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Sample records for bacterial pleckstrin homology

  1. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  2. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  3. Evectins: Vesicular proteins that carry a pleckstrin homology domain and localize to post-Golgi membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Krappa, Ralf; Nguyen, Andrew Van; Burrola, Patrick; Deretic, Dusanka; Lemke, Greg

    1999-01-01

    We have identified two vesicular proteins, designated evectin (evt)-1 and -2. These proteins are ≈25 kDa in molecular mass, lack a cleaved N-terminal signal sequence, and appear to be inserted into membranes through a C-terminal hydrophobic anchor. They also carry a pleckstrin homology domain at their N termini, which potentially couples them to signal transduction pathways that result in the production of lipid second messengers. evt-1 is specific to the nervous system, where it is expressed...

  4. Hadp1, a newly identified pleckstrin homology domain protein, is required for cardiac contractility in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Wythe

    2011-09-01

    The vertebrate heart is one of the first organs to form, and its early function and morphogenesis are crucial for continued embryonic development. Here we analyze the effects of loss of Heart adaptor protein 1 (Hadp1, which we show is required for normal function and morphogenesis of the embryonic zebrafish heart. Hadp1 is a pleckstrin homology (PH-domain-containing protein whose expression is enriched in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Knockdown of hadp1 in zebrafish embryos reduced cardiac contractility and altered late myocyte differentiation. By using optical mapping and submaximal levels of hadp1 knockdown, we observed profound effects on Ca2+ handling and on action potential duration in the absence of morphological defects, suggesting that Hadp1 plays a major role in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ handling in the heart. Hadp1 interacts with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI4P; also known as PtdIns(4P] derivatives via its PH domain, and its subcellular localization is dependent upon this motif. Pharmacological blockade of the synthesis of PI4P derivatives in vivo phenocopied the loss of hadp1 in zebrafish. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hadp1 is required for normal cardiac function and morphogenesis during embryogenesis, and suggest that hadp1 modulates Ca2+ handling in the heart through its interaction with phosphatidylinositols.

  5. Structural and Functional Studies of the Ras-Associating and Pleckstrin Homology Domains of Grb10 and Grb14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depetris, R.; Wu, J; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-binding proteins Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 are adaptor proteins containing a Ras-associating (RA) domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2) region and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 domain. Previous structural studies showed that the Grb14 BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor to suppress insulin signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the RA and PH domains of Grb10 at 2.6-A resolution. The structure reveals that these two domains, along with the intervening linker, form an integrated, dimeric structural unit. Biochemical studies demonstrated that Grb14 binds to activated Ras, which may serve as a timing mechanism for downregulation of insulin signaling. Our results illuminate the membrane-recruitment mechanisms not only of Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 but also of MIG-10, Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule, lamellipodin and Pico, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement that share a structurally related RA-PH tandem unit.

  6. Cancer associated E17K mutation causes rapid conformational drift in AKT1 pleckstrin homology (PH domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambuj Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 kinase is one of the most frequently activated proliferated and survival pathway of cancer. Recently it has been shown that E17K mutation in the Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain of AKT1 protein leads to cancer by amplifying the phosphorylation and membrane localization of protein. The mutant has shown resistance to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. In this study we have demonstrated the detailed structural and molecular consequences associated with the activity regulation of mutant protein. METHODS: The docking score exhibited significant loss in the interaction affinity to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulation studies presented an evidence of rapid conformational drift observed in mutant structure. RESULTS: There was no stability loss in mutant as compared to native structure and the major cation-π interactions were also shown to be retained. Moreover, the active residues involved in membrane localization of protein exhibited significant rise in NHbonds formation in mutant. The rise in NHbond formation in active residues accounts for the 4-fold increase in the membrane localization potential of protein. CONCLUSION: The overall result suggested that, although the mutation did not induce any stability loss in structure, the associated pathological consequences might have occurred due to the rapid conformational drifts observed in the mutant AKT1 PH domain. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The methodology implemented and the results obtained in this work will facilitate in determining the core molecular mechanisms of cancer-associated mutations and in designing their potential drug inhibitors.

  7. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, J.; Heroux, A.; Scott, J. L.; Roy, S.; Lenoir, M.; Overduin, M.; Stahelin, R. V.; Kutateladze, T. G.

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded {beta}-barrel capped by an {alpha}-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the {beta}4 and {beta}7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the {beta}-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the {beta}-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  8. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  9. Increased abundance of the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes: evidence for altered adiponectin signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.M.; Yi, Z; De Filippis, E.; Berria, R.; S. Shahani; P. Sathyanarayana; Sherman, V.; K. Fujiwara; Meyer, C.; Christ-Roberts, C.; Hwang, H; Finlayson, J.; Dong, L. Q.; Mandarino, L. J.; Bajaj, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The adiponectin signalling pathway is largely unknown, but recently the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1), has been shown to interact directly with adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR)1. APPL1 is present in C2C12 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle, but its presence in human skeletal muscle has not been investigated. Methods Samples from type 2 diabetic, and lean and non-diabetic obese participants w...

  10. The interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of ceramide kinase and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate regulates the plasma membrane targeting and ceramide 1-phosphate levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramide kinase (CERK) converts ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), which has recently emerged as a new bioactive molecule capable of regulating diverse cellular functions. The N-terminus of the CERK protein encompasses a sequence motif known as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Although the PH domain was previously demonstrated to be an important domain for the subcellular localization of CERK, the precise properties of this domain remained unclear. In this study, we reveal that the PH domain of CERK exhibits high affinity for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), among other lipids. Furthermore, in COS7 cells, GFP-fused CERK translocated rapidly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in response to hyper-osmotic stress, which is known to increase the intracellular PI(4,5)P2 levels, whereas a PH domain deletion mutant did not. Additionally, in [32P]orthophosphate-labeled COS7 cells, the translocation of CERK to the plasma membrane induced a 2.8-fold increase in C1P levels. The study presented here provides insight into the crucial role of the CERK-PH domain in plasma membrane targeting, through its binding to PI(4,5)P2, and subsequent induction of C1P production in the vicinity of the membrane

  11. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 in Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758): A new candidate gene for hypoxia tolerance in fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vindhya Mohindra; Ratnesh K Tripathi; Prabhaker Yadav; Rajeev K Singh; Kuldeep K Lal

    2014-06-01

    Several physiologically important genes were found to be regulated by hypoxia at the transcriptional level. The Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) gene was previously identified as an imprinted gene. The present study was aimed to determine the structure of complete cDNA and the deduced protein of PHLDA2 along with analysing the changes in its mRNA expression in Clarias batrachus tissues under hypoxic conditions. The complete cDNA of CbPHLDA2 gene consisted of 1009 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 417 nucleotides. The deduced CbPHLDA2 protein of 139 amino acids shared high homology with PHLD2A of other fishes as well as that of vertebrates. Importantly, a single amino acid (asparagine/lysine) insertion was identified in the PH domain of CbPHLDA2 and other fishes, which was absent in other vertebrates studied. Furthermore, under normoxic conditions, CbPHLDA2 was constitutively expressed with varying levels in analysed tissues. Short- and long-term hypoxia exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of CbPHLDA2 in liver, spleen, head kidney, brain and muscle in a time-dependent manner. The results suggested that CbPHLDA2 might play an important role for adaptive significance under hypoxia.

  12. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Guanglin Kuang; Vincent Bulone; Yaoquan Tu

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely fou...

  13. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site.

  14. BLANNOTATOR: enhanced homology-based function prediction of bacterial proteins

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    Kankainen Matti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated function prediction has played a central role in determining the biological functions of bacterial proteins. Typically, protein function annotation relies on homology, and function is inferred from other proteins with similar sequences. This approach has become popular in bacterial genomics because it is one of the few methods that is practical for large datasets and because it does not require additional functional genomics experiments. However, the existing solutions produce erroneous predictions in many cases, especially when query sequences have low levels of identity with the annotated source protein. This problem has created a pressing need for improvements in homology-based annotation. Results We present an automated method for the functional annotation of bacterial protein sequences. Based on sequence similarity searches, BLANNOTATOR accurately annotates query sequences with one-line summary descriptions of protein function. It groups sequences identified by BLAST into subsets according to their annotation and bases its prediction on a set of sequences with consistent functional information. We show the results of BLANNOTATOR's performance in sets of bacterial proteins with known functions. We simulated the annotation process for 3090 SWISS-PROT proteins using a database in its state preceding the functional characterisation of the query protein. For this dataset, our method outperformed the five others that we tested, and the improved performance was maintained even in the absence of highly related sequence hits. We further demonstrate the value of our tool by analysing the putative proteome of Lactobacillus crispatus strain ST1. Conclusions BLANNOTATOR is an accurate method for bacterial protein function prediction. It is practical for genome-scale data and does not require pre-existing sequence clustering; thus, this method suits the needs of bacterial genome and metagenome researchers. The method and a

  15. The σ enigma: Bacterial σ factors, archaeal TFB and eukaryotic TFIIB are homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Samuel P; Burton, Zachary F.

    2014-01-01

    Structural comparisons of initiating RNA polymerase complexes and structure-based amino acid sequence alignments of general transcription initiation factors (eukaryotic TFIIB, archaeal TFB and bacterial σ factors) show that these proteins are homologs. TFIIB and TFB each have two-five-helix cyclin-like repeats (CLRs) that include a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif (CLR/HTH domains). Four homologous HTH motifs are present in bacterial σ factors that are relics of CLR/HTH domains. Sequen...

  16. The σ enigma: bacterial σ factors, archaeal TFB and eukaryotic TFIIB are homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Samuel P; Burton, Zachary F

    2014-01-01

    Structural comparisons of initiating RNA polymerase complexes and structure-based amino acid sequence alignments of general transcription initiation factors (eukaryotic TFIIB, archaeal TFB and bacterial σ factors) show that these proteins are homologs. TFIIB and TFB each have two-five-helix cyclin-like repeats (CLRs) that include a C-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif (CLR/HTH domains). Four homologous HTH motifs are present in bacterial σ factors that are relics of CLR/HTH domains. Sequence similarities clarify models for σ factor and TFB/TFIIB evolution and function and suggest models for promoter evolution. Commitment to alternate modes for transcription initiation appears to be a major driver of the divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:25483602

  17. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  18. Thermodynamic properties distinguish human mitochondrial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from bacterial homolog with same 3D architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Neuenfeldt, Anne; Lorber, Bernard; Ennifar, Eric; Gaudry, Agnès; Sauter, Claude; Sissler, Marie; Florentz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian mitochondrial translation apparatus, the proteins and their partner RNAs are coded by two genomes. The proteins are nuclear-encoded and resemble their homologs, whereas the RNAs coming from the rapidly evolving mitochondrial genome have lost critical structural information. This raises the question of molecular adaptation of these proteins to their peculiar partner RNAs. The crystal structure of the homodimeric bacterial-type human mitochondrial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (DRS)...

  19. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, Mats A.; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC...

  20. SimBac: simulation of whole bacterial genomes with homologous recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Didelot, X.; De Maio, N.; Brown, T.; Wilson, DJ

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can exchange genetic material, or acquire genes found in theenvironment. This process, generally known as bacterial recombination, can have a strong impact on the evolution and phenotype of bacteria, for example causing the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, but can also disrupt phylogenetic and transmission inferences. With the increasing affordability of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for an efficient simulator of bacterial evolution to test a...

  1. Rapid accumulation of an interleukin 17 homolog transcript in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes following bacterial exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, S; Gueguen, Yannick; De Lorgeril, Julien; Goetz, F

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) gene models have been found in the sequenced genomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, there have been no published reports on the empirical cloning and characterization of any interleukin cDNAs in invertebrates. From a Pacific oyster (Crossostrea gigas) hemocyte cDNA library, two clones were obtained that encoded a protein similar to vertebrate IL-17s. The putative oyster IL-17 homolog (CgIL-17) was 27% identical to rainbow trout IL-...

  2. Multidrug resistance mediated by a bacterial homolog of the human multidrug transporter MDR1.

    OpenAIRE

    van Veen, Hendrik W.; Venema, Koen; Bolhuis, Henk; Oussenko, Irina; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Resistance of Lactococcus lactis to cytotoxic compounds shares features with the multidrug resistance phenotype of mammalian tumor cells. Here, we report the gene cloning and functional characterization in Escherichia coli of LmrA, a lactococcal structural and functional homolog of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1. LmrA is a 590-aa polypeptide that has a putative topology of six alpha-helical transmembrane segments in the N-terminal hydrophobic domain, followed by a hydrophi...

  3. Insight into the assembly properties and functional organisation of the magnetotactic bacterial actin-like homolog, MamK.

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    Sanjiv Sonkaria

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB synthesize magnetosomes, which are intracellular vesicles comprising a magnetic particle. A series of magnetosomes arrange themselves in chains to form a magnetic dipole that enables the cell to orient itself along the Earth's magnetic field. MamK, an actin-like homolog of MreB has been identified as a central component in this organisation. Gene deletion, fluorescence microscopy and in vitro studies have yielded mechanistic differences in the filament assembly of MamK with other bacterial cytoskeletal proteins within the cell. With little or no information on the structural and behavioural characteristics of MamK outside the cell, the mamK gene from Magnetospirillium gryphiswaldense was cloned and expressed to better understand the differences in the cytoskeletal properties with its bacterial homologues MreB and acitin. Despite the low sequence identity shared between MamK and MreB (22% and actin (18%, the behaviour of MamK monitored by light scattering broadly mirrored that of its bacterial cousin MreB primarily in terms of its pH, salt, divalent metal-ion and temperature dependency. The broad size variability of MamK filaments revealed by light scattering studies was supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM imaging. Filament morphology however, indicated that MamK conformed to linearly orientated filaments that appeared to be distinctly dissimilar compared to MreB suggesting functional differences between these homologues. The presence of a nucleotide binding domain common to actin-like proteins was demonstrated by its ability to function both as an ATPase and GTPase. Circular dichroism and structural homology modelling showed that MamK adopts a protein fold that is consistent with the 'classical' actin family architecture but with notable structural differences within the smaller domains, the active site region and the overall surface electrostatic potential.

  4. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Marie Legler; Susanne eBoisvert; Compton, Jaimee R.; Millard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucl...

  5. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    OpenAIRE

    Legler, Patricia M.; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Millard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleo...

  6. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Mats A; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC) into the new pET-based bacterial expression vector pSUMO-YHRC. The vector supports cloning for untagged expression as well as fusions to His6-SUMO or His6 tags. We demonstrate that YHRC from single PCR products of 6 independent genes into the vector results in virtually no background. Importantly, in a quantitative assay for functional expression we find that single-step YHRC of 7 DNA fragments can be performed with very high cloning efficiencies. The method and reagents described in this paper significantly simplifies the construction of expression plasmids from multiple DNA fragments, including complex gene fusions, chimeric genes and polycistronic constructs. PMID:24631626

  7. Silkworm ferritin 1 heavy chain homolog is involved in defense against bacterial infection through regulation of haemolymph iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otho, Sohail Ahmed; Chen, Kangkang; Zhang, Yongdong; Wang, Peng; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    Iron functions as a nutrient and a potential toxin in all organisms. It plays a key role in the interaction between microbes and their hosts as well. Microbial infection disrupts iron homeostasis in the host; meanwhile the host endeavors to keep the homeostasis through iron transport and storage. Transferrins and ferritins are the major iron-binding proteins that affect iron distribution in insects. In this study, we investigated a possible involvement of Bombyx mori ferritin 1 (BmFer1) heavy chain homolog in the defense against bacterial infection in the silkworm larvae. The BmFer1 mRNA abundance was up-regulated in hemocytes, but not in fat body, after Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus infection. The infection resulted in elevated iron levels in the hemolymph. Injection of recombinant BmFer1 protein into hemocoel reduced the plasma iron level after infection, limited the bacterial growth in the hemolymph, and resulted in a lower mortality caused by infection. Our study indicated that B. mori ferritin-1 may restrict iron access of the invading bacteria to block their growth as a defense strategy. PMID:26522340

  8. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Patricia; Boisvert, Susanne; Compton, Jaimee; Millard, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O?. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  9. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marie Legler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400 within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  10. A gene from Renibacterium salmoninarum encoding a product which shows homology to bacterial zinc-metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, T H; Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Martin, K L; Munn, C B

    1995-06-01

    A genomic library constructed from Renibacterium salmoninarum isolate MT444 DNA in the plasmid vector pBR328 was screened using Escherichia coli host strain DH1 for the expression of genes encoding putative virulence factors. A single haemolytic clone was isolated at 22 degrees C and found to contain a 3.1 kb HindIII fragment of inserted DNA. This fragment was present in seven isolates of R. salmoninarum which were examined. Western blots of extracts from clones exhibiting haemolytic activity were performed with antisera raised against either cellular or extracellular components of R. salmoninarum and failed to identify any additional proteins compared to control E. coli containing pBR328. However, minicell analysis revealed that a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 65 kDa was associated with a haemolytic activity distinct from that previously described for R. salmoninarum. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding this product was determined and the amino acid sequence deduced. The product was 548 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 66757 Da and a pl of 5.57. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene possessed strong similarities to those of a range of secreted bacterial zinc-metalloproteases and was tentatively designed hly. Neither protease nor lecithinase activities were detectable in E. coli recombinants expressing gene hly. Haemolytic activity was observed from 6 degrees C to 37 degrees C for erythrocytes from a number of mammalian species and also from fish. Gene hly was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein consisting of maltose-binding protein at the N-terminus linked to all but the first 24 amino acids, largely constituting the putative signal peptide, of the N-terminus of Hly. The soluble fusion protein was produced and purified by affinity chromatography. Antiserum raised against the purified fusion protein was used to probe Western blots of cell lysates and extracellular products from seven isolates of R. salmoninarum

  11. Autoexcision of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Facilitated by Terminal Repeat-Mediated Homologous Recombination: a Novel Approach for Generating Traceless Genetic Mutants of Herpesviruses ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Fuchun; Li, Qiuhua; Wong, Scott W.; Gao, Shou-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of herpesviruses are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. However, the presence of BAC vector sequence in the viral genomes often causes genetic and phenotypic alterations. While the excision of the BAC vector cassette can be achieved by homologous recombination between extra duplicate viral sequences or loxP site-mediated recombination, these methods either are inefficient or leave a loxP site mark in the viral genome. Here we describe t...

  12. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments drive many dynamic cellular processes, such as the regulation of shape by actin networks in eukaryotes and by the actin homolog MreB in rod-shaped bacteria. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate close parallels between the conformational dynamics of actin and MreB, in which polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits that restructures the ATP binding pocket to promote hydrolysis. We also find that ATP-bound MreB filaments are substan...

  13. RapA, a bacterial homolog of SWI2/SNF2, stimulates RNA polymerase recycling in transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhodolets, Maxim V.; Cabrera, Julio E.; Zhi, Huijun; Jin, Ding Jun

    2001-01-01

    We report that RapA, an Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP)-associated homolog of SWI2/SNF2, is capable of dramatic activation of RNA synthesis. The RapA-mediated transcriptional activation in vitro depends on supercoiled DNA and high salt concentrations, a condition that is likely to render the DNA superhelix tightly compacted. Moreover, RapA activates transcription by stimulating RNAP recycling. Mutational analyses indicate that the ATPase activity of RapA is essential for its function a...

  14. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Karl A.; Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide ch...

  15. A Bacterial Homolog of a Eukaryotic Inositol Phosphate Signaling Enzyme Mediates Cross-kingdom Dialog in the Mammalian Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis Stentz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dietary InsP6 can modulate eukaryotic cell proliferation and has complex nutritive consequences, but its metabolism in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract is poorly understood. Therefore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in order to search for candidate InsP6 phosphatases. We determined that prominent gut bacteria express homologs of the mammalian InsP6 phosphatase (MINPP and characterized the enzyme from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtMinpp. We show that BtMinpp has exceptionally high catalytic activity, which we rationalize on the basis of mutagenesis studies and by determining its crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. We demonstrate that BtMinpp is packaged inside outer membrane vesicles (OMVs protecting the enzyme from degradation by gastrointestinal proteases. Moreover, we uncover an example of cross-kingdom cell-to-cell signaling, showing that the BtMinpp-OMVs interact with intestinal epithelial cells to promote intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Our characterization of BtMinpp offers several directions for understanding how the microbiome serves human gastrointestinal physiology.

  16. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. PMID:23178502

  17. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  18. Intramolecular cross-linking in a bacterial homolog of mammalian SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters suggests an evolutionary conserved role of transmembrane segments 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kniazeff, Julie; Loland, Claus Juul; Goldberg, Naomi;

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA and glycine is tightly controlled by plasma membrane transporters belonging to the SLC6 gene family. A very large number of putative transport proteins with a remarkable homology to the SLC6...

  19. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  20. An alpha-helical extension of the ELMO1 pleckstrin homology domain mediates direct interaction to DOCK180 and is critical in Rac signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komander, David; Patel, Manishha; Laurin, Mélanie; Fradet, Nadine; Pelletier, Ariane; Barford, David; Côté, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    The mammalian DOCK180 protein belongs to an evolutionarily conserved protein family, which together with ELMO proteins, is essential for activation of Rac GTPase-dependent biological processes. Here, we have analyzed the DOCK180-ELMO1 interaction, and map direct interaction interfaces to the N-terminal 200 amino acids of DOCK180, and to the C-terminal 200 amino acids of ELMO1, comprising the ELMO1 PH domain. Structural and biochemical analysis of this PH domain reveals that it is incapable of phospholipid binding, but instead structurally resembles FERM domains. Moreover, the structure revealed an N-terminal amphiphatic alpha-helix, and point mutants of invariant hydrophobic residues in this helix disrupt ELMO1-DOCK180 complex formation. A secondary interaction between ELMO1 and DOCK180 is conferred by the DOCK180 SH3 domain and proline-rich motifs at the ELMO1 C-terminus. Mutation of both DOCK180-interaction sites on ELMO1 is required to disrupt the DOCK180-ELMO1 complex. Significantly, although this does not affect DOCK180 GEF activity toward Rac in vivo, Rac signaling is impaired, implying additional roles for ELMO in mediating intracellular Rac signaling. PMID:18768751

  1. An α-Helical Extension of the ELMO1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain Mediates Direct Interaction to DOCK180 and Is Critical in Rac Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Komander, David; Patel, Manishha; Laurin, Mélanie; Fradet, Nadine; Pelletier, Ariane; Barford, David; Côté, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian DOCK180 protein belongs to an evolutionarily conserved protein family, which together with ELMO proteins, is essential for activation of Rac GTPase-dependent biological processes. Here, we have analyzed the DOCK180-ELMO1 interaction, and map direct interaction interfaces to the N-terminal 200 amino acids of DOCK180, and to the C-terminal 200 amino acids of ELMO1, comprising the ELMO1 PH domain. Structural and biochemical analysis of this PH domain reveals that it is incapable of...

  2. Intersection homology Betti numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Durfee, A H

    1993-01-01

    A generalization of the formula of Fine and Rao for the ranks of the intersection homology groups of a complex algebraic variety is given. The proof uses geometric properties of intersection homology and mixed Hodge theory.

  3. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  4. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  5. Homological stabilizer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev’s toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev’s toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: ► We show that Kitaev’s toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. ► We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. ► We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. ► We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  6. Sutures and contact homology I

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Vincent; Ghiggini, Paolo; Honda, Ko; Hutchings, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We define a relative version of contact homology for contact manifolds with convex boundary, and prove basic properties of this relative contact homology. Similar considerations also hold for embedded contact homology.

  7. Braid Floer homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  8. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...... dimensions over special commutative noetherian rings; very often local Cohen–Macaulay rings with a dualizing module. These results are done by Avramov, Christensen, Enochs, Foxby, Jenda, Martsinkovsky and Xu among others. The aim of this paper is to generalize these results, and to give homological...

  9. Introduction to sutured Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Altman, Irida

    2013-01-01

    This article is a standalone introduction to sutured Floer homology for graduate students in geometry and topology. It is divided into three parts. The first part is an introductory level exposition of Lagrangian Floer homology. The second part is a construction of Heegaard Floer homology as a special, and slightly modified, case of Lagrangian Floer homology. The third part covers the background on sutured manifolds, the definition of sutured Floer homology, as well as a discussion of its mos...

  10. Pseudocycles and Integral Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Zinger, Aleksey

    2006-01-01

    We describe a natural isomorphism between the set of equivalence classes of pseudocycles and the integral homology groups of a smooth manifold. Our arguments generalize to settings well-suited for applications in enumerative algebraic geometry and for construction of the virtual fundamental class in the Gromov-Witten theory.

  11. Homology cylinders and sutured manifolds for homologically fibered knots

    OpenAIRE

    Goda, Hiroshi; Sakasai, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    Sutured manifolds defined by Gabai are useful in the geometrical study of knots and 3-dimensional manifolds. On the other hand, homology cylinders are in an important position in the recent theory of homology cobordisms of surfaces and finite-type invariants. We study a relationship between them by focusing on sutured manifolds associated with a special class of knots which we call {\\it homologically fibered knots}. Then we use invariants of homology cylinders to give applications to...

  12. Persistent Homology of Filtered Covers

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Maia

    2012-01-01

    We prove an extension to the simplicial Nerve Lemma which establishes isomorphism of persistent homology groups, in the case where the covering spaces are filtered. While persistent homology is now widely used in topological data analysis, the usual Nerve Lemma does not provide isomorphism of persistent homology groups. Our argument involves some homological algebra: the key point being that although the maps produced in the standard proof of the Nerve Lemma do not commute as maps of chain complexes, the maps they induce on homology do.

  13. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  14. Equivariant elliptic homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous paper we studied the modular properties of indices of elliptic operators on twisted loop spaces of manifolds with finite group actions. This motivates the introduction of the universal twisted elliptic genus. This genus can be interpreted as a ring homomorphism from the equivariant bordism ring MU*G to a ring Ell*G. It is shown that the functor X→Ell*G=MU*G(X)xMU*GEll*G defines an equivariant homology theory, and that the associated cohomology theory satisfies a conjecture of Atiyah and Segal about generalized Lefchetz formulas. (author). 24 refs

  15. Intersection homology Kunneth theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Cohen, Goresky and Ji showed that there is a Kunneth theorem relating the intersection homology groups $I^{\\bar p}H_*(X\\times Y)$ to $I^{\\bar p}H_*(X)$ and $I^{\\bar p}H_*(Y)$, provided that the perversity $\\bar p$ satisfies rather strict conditions. We consider biperversities and prove that there is a K\\"unneth theorem relating $I^{\\bar p,\\bar q}H_*(X\\times Y)$ to $I^{\\bar p}H_*(X)$ and $I^{\\bar q}H_*(Y)$ for all choices of $\\bar p$ and $\\bar q$. Furthermore, we prove that the Kunneth theorem...

  16. 2-categories and cyclic homology

    OpenAIRE

    Slevin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the application of distributive laws between comonads to the theory of cyclic homology. Explicitly, our main aims are: 1) To study how the cyclic homology of associative algebras and of Hopf algebras in the original sense of Connes and Moscovici arises from a distributive law, and to clarify the role of different notions of bimonad in this generalisation. 2) To extend the procedure of twisting the cyclic homology of a unital associative algebra to any duplicial obj...

  17. Matrix Factorizations and Kauffman Homology

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, S; Gukov, Sergei; Walcher, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    The topological string interpretation of homological knot invariants has led to several insights into the structure of the theory in the case of sl(N). We study possible extensions of the matrix factorization approach to knot homology for other Lie groups and representations. In particular, we introduce a new triply graded theory categorifying the Kauffman polynomial, test it, and predict the Kauffman homology for several simple knots.

  18. The Geometry of Homological Triangles

    CERN Document Server

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2012-01-01

    This book is addressed to students, professors and researchers of geometry, who will find herein many interesting and original results. The originality of the book The Geometry of Homological Triangles consists in using the homology of triangles as a "filter" through which remarkable notions and theorems from the geometry of the triangle are unitarily passed. Our research is structured in seven chapters, the first four are dedicated to the homology of the triangles, while the last ones to their applications.

  19. Homology of L_{\\infty}-Algebras and Cyclic Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Khalkhali, Masoud

    1998-01-01

    A classical result of Loday-Quillen and Tsygan states that the Lie algebra homology of the algebra of stable matrices over an associative algebra is isomorphic, as a Hopf algebra, to the exterior algebra of the cyclic homology of the algebra. In this paper we develop the necessary tools needed to extend extend this result to the category of L_{\\infty} algebras.

  20. K-Kolmogorov homology groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we use the idea of the K-groups to define the K-Kolmogorov homology groups, and their induced homomorphisms and boundary operators for the case of a pair of discrete coefficient groups, where K denotes a locally-finite simplicial complex. Moreover, we prove that our homology construction is exact. (author)

  1. Relative Homological Algebra Volume 1

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This is the second revised edition of an introduction to contemporary relative homological algebra. It supplies important material essential to understand topics in algebra, algebraic geometry and algebraic topology. Each section comes with exercises providing practice problems for students as well as additional important results for specialists. The book is also suitable for an introductory course in commutative and ordinary homological algebra.

  2. Structural Basis for Phosphotyrosine Recognition by the Src Homology-2 Domains of the Adapter Proteins SH2-B and APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu,J.; Hubbard, S.

    2006-01-01

    SH2-B, APS, and Lnk constitute a family of adapter proteins that modulate signaling by protein tyrosine kinases. These adapters contain an N-terminal dimerization region, a pleckstrin homology domain, and a C-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domain. SH2-B is recruited via its SH2 domain to various protein tyrosine kinases, including Janus kinase-2 (Jak2) and the insulin receptor. Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.35 Angstroms resolution of the SH2 domain of SH2-B in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the SH2-B recruitment site in Jak2 (pTyr813). The structure reveals a canonical SH2 domain-phosphopeptide binding mode, but with specific recognition of a glutamate at the +1 position relative to phosphotyrosine, in addition to recognition of a hydrophobic residue at the +3 position. Biochemical studies of SH2-B and APS demonstrate that, although the SH2 domains of these two adapter proteins share 79% sequence identity, the SH2-B SH2 domain binds preferentially to Jak2, whereas the APS SH2 domain has higher affinity for the insulin receptor. This differential specificity is attributable to the difference in the oligomeric states of the two SH2 domains: monomeric for SH2-B and dimeric for APS.

  3. Mod two homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cohomology and homology modulo 2 helps the reader grasp more readily the basics of a major tool in algebraic topology. Compared to a more general approach to (co)homology this refreshing approach has many pedagogical advantages: It leads more quickly to the essentials of the subject, An absence of signs and orientation considerations simplifies the theory, Computations and advanced applications can be presented at an earlier stage, Simple geometrical interpretations of (co)chains. Mod 2 (co)homology was developed in the first quarter of the twentieth century as an alternative to integral homology, before both became particular cases of (co)homology with arbitrary coefficients. The first chapters of this book may serve as a basis for a graduate-level introductory course to (co)homology. Simplicial and singular mod 2 (co)homology are introduced, with their products and Steenrod squares, as well as equivariant cohomology. Classical applications include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Poincaré duality, Borsuk-Ula...

  4. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, Sergei; Vafa, Cumrun

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[M_3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  5. Object-oriented persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  6. Localization theorems in topological Hochschild homology and topological cyclic homology

    CERN Document Server

    Blumberg, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    We construct localization cofiber sequences for the topological Hochschild homology (THH) and topological cyclic homology (TC) of spectral categories. Using a ``global'' construction of the THH and TC of a scheme in terms of the perfect complexes in a spectrally enriched version of the category of unbounded complexes, the sequences specialize to localization cofiber sequences associated to the inclusion of an open subscheme. These are the targets of the cyclotomic trace from the localization sequence of Thomason-Trobaugh in K-theory. We also deduce a version of Thomason's blow-up formula for THH and TC.

  7. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte; Kruse, Torben; Nordström, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  8. ClEST cluster :Cl_singleton1038 [ClEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cl_singleton1038 pleckstrin homology domain- family ... a (phosphoinositide binding specific) member ... : similar to pleckstrin homology domain-containing family ... A (phosphoinositide binding specific) member 3 [Tr ...

  9. Grid diagrams and Khovanov homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droz, Jean-Marie; Wagner, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We explain how to compute the Jones polynomial of a link from one of its grid diagrams and we observe a connection between Bigelow’s homological definition of the Jones polynomial and Kauffman’s definition of the Jones polynomial. Consequently, we prove that the Maslov grading on the Seidel...

  10. Local contact homology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hryniewicz, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a local version of contact homology for an isolated periodic orbit $\\gamma$ of the Reeb flow and prove that its rank is uniformly bounded for isolated iterations. Several applications are obtained, including a generalization of Gromoll-Meyer's theorem on the existence of infinitely many simple periodic orbits, resonance relations and conditions for the existence of non-hyperbolic periodic orbits.

  11. Persistent Homology of Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carstens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, network science has introduced several statistical measures to determine the topological structure of large networks. Initially, the focus was on binary networks, where edges are either present or not. Thus, many of the earlier measures can only be applied to binary networks and not to weighted networks. More recently, it has been shown that weighted networks have a rich structure, and several generalized measures have been introduced. We use persistent homology, a recent technique from computational topology, to analyse four weighted collaboration networks. We include the first and second Betti numbers for the first time for this type of analysis. We show that persistent homology corresponds to tangible features of the networks. Furthermore, we use it to distinguish the collaboration networks from similar random networks.

  12. New perspectives on bacterial ferredoxin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Yeh, L.-S. L.; Barker, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    Ferredoxins are low-molecular-weight, nonheme, iron proteins which function as electron carriers in a wide variety of electron transport chains. Howard et al. (1983) have suggested that the amino end of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin shows a greater similarity to the carboxyl end of ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum and that their half-chain sequences are homologous when the half-chains of either species are considered in inverse order. Examination of this proposition has made it necessary to reevaluate previous conclusions concerning the evolution of bacterial ferredoxin. Attention is given to the properties of the bacterial ferredoxin sequences, and the evolution of the bacterial ferredoxins.

  13. The Homological Nature of Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baudot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose that entropy is a universal co-homological class in a theory associated to a family of observable quantities and a family of probability distributions. Three cases are presented: (1 classical probabilities and random variables; (2 quantum probabilities and observable operators; (3 dynamic probabilities and observation trees. This gives rise to a new kind of topology for information processes, that accounts for the main information functions: entropy, mutual-informations at all orders, and Kullback–Leibler divergence and generalizes them in several ways. The article is divided into two parts, that can be read independently. In the first part, the introduction, we provide an overview of the results, some open questions, future results and lines of research, and discuss briefly the application to complex data. In the second part we give the complete definitions and proofs of the theorems A, C and E in the introduction, which show why entropy is the first homological invariant of a structure of information in four contexts: static classical or quantum probability, dynamics of classical or quantum strategies of observation of a finite system.

  14. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis. PMID:24462869

  15. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 586. Related Content STDs during Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STD Prevention Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ... STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive ...

  16. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  17. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  18. Bacterial Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhle, Ülkü; Kükner, Şahap

    2003-01-01

    Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva, generally characterized by irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, tearing and discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis may be distinguished from other types of conjunctivitis by the presence of yellow–white mucopurulent discharge. It is the most common form of ocular infection all around the world. Staphylococcus species are the most common bacterial pathogenes, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus i...

  19. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Pellikka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  20. Link homology and equivariant gauge theory

    OpenAIRE

    Poudel, Prayat; Saveliev, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The singular instanton Floer homology was defined by Kronheimer and Mrowka in connection with their proof that the Khovanov homology is an unknot detector. We study this theory for knots and two-component links using equivariant gauge theory on their double branched covers. We show that the special generator in the singular instanton Floer homology of a knot is graded by the knot signature mod 4, thereby providing a purely topological way of fixing the absolute grading in the theory. Our appr...

  1. Including Biological Literature Improves Homology Search

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jeffrey T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Altman, Russ B

    2001-01-01

    Annotating the tremendous amount of sequence information being generated requires accurate automated methods for recognizing homology. Although sequence similarity is only one of many indicators of evolutionary homology, it is often the only one used. Here we find that supplementing sequence similarity with information from biomedical literature is successful in increasing the accuracy of homology search results. We modified the PSI-BLAST algorithm to use literature similarity in each iterati...

  2. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Homology Among Lactic Streptococci

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Audrey W.; Jarvis, Brion D. W.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison was made by deoxyribonucleic acid homology of 45 strains of lactic streptococci, using two strains of Streptococcus cremoris and three strains of Streptococcus lactis as reference strains. All S. cremoris strains were grouped together by deoxyribonucleic acid homology. S. lactis strains formed a second group, except that three strains of S. lactis showed a high degree of homology with S. cremoris strains. The three Streptococcus diacetylactis strains could not be differentiated f...

  3. Homologous Recombination in Negative Sense RNA Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Worobey; Guan-Zhu Han

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an important process that influences biological evolution at many different levels. More and more homologous recombination events have been reported among negative sense RNA viruses recently. While sporadic authentic examples indicate that homologous recombination does occur, recombination seems to be generally rare or even absent in most negative sense RNA viruses, and most of the homologous recombination events reported in the literature were likely generated artificially d...

  4. A Pyrococcus homolog of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein, LrpA, inhibits transcription by abrogating RNA polymerase recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlke, Isabell; Thomm, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The genomes of Archaea harbor homologs of the global bacterial regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp). Archaeal Lrp homologs are helix–turn–helix DNA-binding proteins that specifically repress the transcription of their own genes in vitro. Here, we analyze the interaction of Pyrococcus LrpA with components of the archaeal transcriptional machinery at the lrpA promoter. DNA–protein complexes can be isolated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays that contain both LrpA and the ...

  5. A Serine Protease Homolog Negatively Regulates TEP1 Consumption in Systemic Infections of the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Yassine, Hassan; Kamareddine, Layla; Chamat, Soulaima; Christophides, George K.; Osta, Mike A.

    2014-01-01

    Clip domain serine protease homologs are widely distributed in insect genomes and play important roles in regulating insect immune responses, yet their exact functions remain poorly understood. Here, we show that CLIPA2, a clip domain serine protease homolog of Anopheles gambiae, regulates the consumption of the mosquito complement-like protein TEP1 during systemic bacterial infections. We provide evidence that CLIPA2 localizes to microbial surfaces in a TEP1-dependent manner whereby it negat...

  6. Bacterial carbonatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of experiments in the laboratory as well as in natural conditions teach that the production of carbonate particles by heterotrophic bacteria follows different ways. The 'passive' carbonatogenesis is generated by modifications of the medium that lead to the accumulation of carbonate and bicarbonate ions and to the precipitation of solid particles. The 'active' carbonatogenesis is independent of the metabolic pathways. The carbonate particles are produced by ionic exchanges through the cell membrane following still poorly known mechanisms. Carbonatogenesis appears to be the response of heterotrophic bacterial communities to an enrichment of the milieu in organic matter. The active carbonatogenesis seems to start first. It is followed by the passive one which induces the growth of initially produced particles. The yield of heterotrophic bacterial carbonatogenesis and the amounts of solid carbonates production by bacteria are potentially very high as compared to autotrophic or chemical sedimentation from marine, paralic or continental waters. Furthermore, the bacterial processes are environmentally very ubiquitous; they just require organic matter enrichment. Thus, apart from purely evaporite and autotrophic ones, all Ca and/or Mg carbonates must be considered as from heterotrophic bacterial origin. By the way, the carbon of carbonates comes from primary organic matter. Such considerations ask questions about some interpretations from isotopic data on carbonates. Finally, bacterial heterotrophic carbonatogenesis appears as a fundamental phase in the relationships between atmosphere and lithosphere and in the geo-biological evolution of Earth. (author)

  7. The molecular evolution of PL10 homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ti-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PL10 homologs exist in a wide range of eukaryotes from yeast, plants to animals. They share a DEAD motif and belong to the DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3 subfamily with a major role in RNA metabolism. The lineage-specific expression patterns and various genomic structures and locations of PL10 homologs indicate these homologs have an interesting evolutionary history. Results Phylogenetic analyses revealed that, in addition to the sex chromosome-linked PL10 homologs, DDX3X and DDX3Y, a single autosomal PL10 putative homologous sequence is present in each genome of the studied non-rodent eutheria. These autosomal homologous sequences originated from the retroposition of DDX3X but were pseudogenized during the evolution. In rodents, besides Ddx3x and Ddx3y, we found not only Pl10 but another autosomal homologous region, both of which also originated from the Ddx3x retroposition. These retropositions occurred after the divergence of eutheria and opossum. In contrast, an additional X putative homologous sequence was detected in primates and originated from the transposition of DDX3Y. The evolution of PL10 homologs was under positive selection and the elevated Ka/Ks ratios were observed in the eutherian lineages for DDX3Y but not PL10 and DDX3X, suggesting relaxed selective constraints on DDX3Y. Contrary to the highly conserved domains, several sites with relaxed selective constraints flanking the domains in the mammalian PL10 homologs may play roles in enhancing the gene function in a lineage-specific manner. Conclusion The eutherian DDX3X/DDX3Y in the X/Y-added region originated from the translocation of the ancient PL10 ortholog on the ancestral autosome, whereas the eutherian PL10 was retroposed from DDX3X. In addition to the functional PL10/DDX3X/DDX3Y, conserved homologous regions on the autosomes and X chromosome are present. The autosomal homologs were also derived from DDX3X, whereas the additional X-homologs were derived

  8. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  9. Invariants and structures of the homology cobordism group of homology cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Minkyoung

    2015-01-01

    The homology cobordism group of homology cylinders is a generalization of the mapping class group and the string link concordance group. We study this group and its filtrations by subgroups by developing new homomorphisms. First, we define extended Milnor invariants by combining the ideas of Milnor's link invariants and Johnson homomorphisms. They give rise to a descending filtration of the homology cobordism group of homology cylinders. We show that each successive quotient of the filtration...

  10. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  11. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bryan M

    2015-01-01

    I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding gases as a model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes under a homologous flow, a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)^(|N0| ti)$, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(pi |N0| ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular...

  12. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  13. Products and relations in symplectic Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Betz, Marty; Rade, Johan

    1995-01-01

    We give a construction of a version of the Gromov-Witten classes, Q: H_*(J) -> HF_*(M) otimes ... otimes HF^*(M), within the context of symplectic Floer (co)homology. In particular, this gives a functorial approach to products and relations in symplectic Floer (co)homology.

  14. On the computation of torus link homology

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Ben; Hogancamp, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method for computing triply graded link homology, which is particularly well-adapted to torus links. Our main application is to the (n,n)-torus links, for which we give an exact answer for all n. In several cases, our computations verify conjectures of Gorsky et al relating homology of torus links with Hilbert schemes.

  15. MIF proteins are not glutathione transferase homologs.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, W R

    1994-01-01

    Although macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) proteins conjugate glutathione, sequence analysis does not support their homology to other glutathione transferases. Glutathione transferases are not detected with MIF proteins in searches of protein sequence databases, and MIF proteins do not share significant sequence similarity with glutathione transferases. Homology cannot be demonstrated by multiple sequence alignment or evolutionary tree construction; such methods assume that the pro...

  16. Matroid Filtrations and Computational Persistent Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Henselman, Gregory; Ghrist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This technical report introduces a novel approach to efficient computation in homological algebra over fields, with particular emphasis on computing the persistent homology of a filtered topological cell complex. The algorithms here presented rely on a novel relationship between discrete Morse theory, matroid theory, and classical matrix factorizations. We provide background, detail the algorithms, and benchmark the software implementation in the Eirene package.

  17. Equivariant symplectic homology of Anosov contact structures

    CERN Document Server

    Macarini, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    We show that the differential in positive equivariant symplectic homology or linearized contact homology vanishes for non-degenerate Reeb flows with a continuous invariant Lagrangian subbundle (e.g. Anosov Reeb flows). Several applications are given, including obstructions to the existence of these flows and abundance of periodic orbits for contact forms representing an Anosov contact structure.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    parameters, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion is...... the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental...

  19. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, mea

  20. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  1. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  2. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. - ;Threading Homology through Algebra takes homological themes (Koszul complexes and their variations, resolutions in general) and shows how these affect the perception of certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. The text deals with regular local ri

  3. Convergent evolution among immunoglobulin G-binding bacterial proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, I M; Wikström, M.; Forsén, S.; Drakenberg, T; Gomi, H.; Sjöbring, U; Björck, L

    1992-01-01

    Protein G, a bacterial cell-wall protein with high affinity for the constant region of IgG (IgGFc) antibodies, contains homologous repeats responsible for the interaction with IgGFc. A synthetic peptide corresponding to an 11-amino acid-long sequence in the COOH-terminal region of the repeats was found to bind to IgGFc and block the interaction with protein G. Moreover, two other IgGFc-binding bacterial proteins (proteins A and H), which do not contain any sequences homologous to the peptide,...

  4. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  5. Superconformal field theories and cyclic homology

    CERN Document Server

    Eager, Richard

    2015-01-01

    One of the predictions of the AdS/CFT correspondence is the matching of protected operators between a superconformal field theory and its holographic dual. We review the spectrum of protected operators in quiver gauge theories that flow to superconformal field theories at low energies. The spectrum is determined by the cyclic homology of an algebra associated to the quiver gauge theory. Identifying the spectrum of operators with cyclic homology allows us to apply the Hochschild-Kostant-Rosenberg theorem to relate the cyclic homology groups to deRham cohomology groups. The map from cyclic homology to deRham cohomology can be viewed as a mathematical avatar of the passage from open to closed strings under the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  6. Exceptional cosmetic surgeries on homology spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelomanana, Huygens C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmetic surgery conjecture for hyperbolic knots in integer homology spheres, focusing on exceptional surgeries. We give some restrictions on the slopes of exceptional truly cosmetic surgeries according to the type of surgery.

  7. Rescue of end fragments of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanson, G G; Hoekstra, M F; McElligott, D. L.; Evans, G A

    1991-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) provide a powerful tool for the isolation and mapping of large regions of mammalian chromosomes. We developed a rapid and efficient method for the isolation of DNA fragments representing the extreme ends of YAC clones by the insertion of a rescue plasmid into the YAC vector by homologous recombination. Two rescue vectors were constructed containing a yeast LYS2 selectable gene, a bacterial origin of replication, an antibiotic resistance gene, a polylinker c...

  8. Impact of recombination on bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Didelot, Xavier; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic exchange plays a defining role in the evolution of many bacteria. The recent accumulation of nucleotide sequence data from multiple members of diverse bacterial genera has facilitated comparative studies that have revealed many features of this process. Here we focus on genetic exchange that has involved homologous recombination and illustrate how nucleotide sequence data have furthered our understanding of: (i) the frequency of recombination; (ii) the impact of recombination in diffe...

  9. Cylindrical contact homology and topological entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Marcelo R. R.

    2014-01-01

    We establish a relation between the growth of the cylindrical contact homology of a contact manifold and the topological entropy of Reeb flows on this manifold. We show that if a contact manifold $(M,\\xi)$ admits a hypertight contact form $\\lambda_0$ for which the cylindrical contact homology has exponential homotopical growth rate, then the Reeb flow of every contact form on $(M,\\xi)$ has positive topological entropy. Using this result, we provide numerous new examples of contact 3-manifolds...

  10. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  11. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  12. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  13. Glutamate receptor homologs in plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Beth Price

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The plant glutamate receptors (GLRs are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs, which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions.In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenteic analysis using glutamate receptors from metazoans, plants and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial glutamate receptors, indicating the separation of plant, eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed.

  14. An efficient method of constructing homologous recom binant baculovirus with PCR-amplified fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; Songwang; (侯松旺); CHEN; Xinwen; (陈新文); WANG; Hanzhong; (王汉中); HU; Zhihong; (胡志红)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid method of constructing homologous recombinant baculovirus in E. coli with PCR-amplified fragments. By using this method, the traditional steps of constructing transfer vector are omitted. The method is based on phage λ red system which can promote the recombination between the homologous fragments with the length above 36 bp. Taking HaSNPV as an example, this paper describes the rapid recombination process by using chloramphenicol resistance gene (CmR) to replace orf135 in HaSNPV genome. A pair of primers with length of 60 bp was synthesized, in which 40 bp was homologous to the each end sequence of orf135, and the rest 20 bp was homologous to the each end sequence of CmR. By using these primers, a linear fragment containing the complete CmR gene between 40 bp of homologous arms of orf135 was generated by PCR with the plasmid pKD3 which contains CmR as the template. By transforming the linear fragment into the E. coli containing the bacterial artificial chromosome of HaSNPV and with the help of a plasmid expressing λ recombinase, the recombinants on which the homologue replacement had taken place were selected by chloramphenicol resistance. This method greatly shortens the process of constructing recombinant baculovirus since the process was performed in E. coli and does not need to construct transfer vectors. It can be further used for gene replacement and gene deletion of other large viral genomes.

  15. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  16. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena eFaunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Owen’s pre-evolutionary definition of a homologue as the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function and its redefinition after Darwin as the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish sameness. Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  17. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  18. A pumilio homolog in Polycelis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Yanqing; Dong, Zimei; Si, Xiaohui; Chen, Guangwen

    2014-02-01

    Pumilio proteins (PUMs), members of the pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) family, are eukaryote-specific RNA-binding proteins. We isolated a 2,048-basepair cDNA fragment of a pumilio homolog from the planarian flatworm Polycelis sp. This pumilio protein (PyPUM) contains a conserved pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) consisting of eight repeats and two flanking half repeats. PyPUM shows high similarity to Dugesia japonica pumilio (DjPUM) from another planarian D. japonica, and their PUM-HD also shows high similarity to each other. Furthermore, our data showed that there is a flatworm-specific spacer between repeats 7 and 8. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PyPUM has a closer relationship to other PUM homologs from flatworms. These results provide a foundation for future functional studies of pumilio gene in Polycelis sp. PMID:24292205

  19. Homological stability for oriented configuration spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We prove homological stability for sequences of "oriented configuration spaces" as the number of points in the configuration goes to infinity. These are spaces of configurations of n points in a connected manifold M of dimension at least 2 which 'admits a boundary', with labels in a path-connected space X, and with an orientation: an ordering of the points up to even permutations. They are double covers of the corresponding unordered configuration spaces, where the points do not have this orientation. To prove our result we adapt methods from a paper of Randal-Williams, which proves homological stability in the unordered case. Interestingly the oriented configuration spaces stabilise more slowly than the unordered ones: the stability slope we obtain is one-third, compared to one-half in the unordered case (these are the best possible slopes in their respective cases). This result can also be interpreted as homological stability for unordered configuration spaces with certain twisted coefficients.

  20. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed

  1. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  2. Homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Aaron; Dani, Pallavi; Young, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different ways of measuring the difficulty of filling a closed curve inside a group or a space. The homological Dehn function measures fillings of cycles by chains, while the homotopical Dehn function measures fillings of curves by disks. Since the two definitions involve different sorts of boundaries and fillings, there is no a priori relationship between the two functions, but prior to this work there were no known examples of finitely-presented groups for which the two functions differ. This paper gives the first such examples, constructed by amalgamating a free-by-cyclic group with several Bestvina-Brady groups.

  3. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...... substantial information also in the operator theoretic setting from which the BDF theory was developed and we conclude the paper by extracting some of this information on approximation of normal operators....

  4. Sutured Floer homology distinguishes between Seifert surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Irida

    2010-01-01

    In this note we exhibit the first example of a knot in the three-sphere with a pair of minimal genus Seifert surfaces that can be distinguished using the sutured Floer homology of their complementary manifolds together with the Spin^c-grading. This answers a question of Juh\\'asz. More precisely, we show that the Euler characteristic of the sutured Floer homology of the complementary manifolds distinguishes between the two surfaces, and we exhibit an infinite family of knots with pairs of Seifert surfaces that can be distinguished in such a way.

  5. Sheaves on Graphs and Their Homological Invariants

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a notion of a sheaf of vector spaces on a graph, and develop the foundations of homology theories for such sheaves. One sheaf invariant, its "maximum excess," has a number of remarkable properties. It has a simple definition, with no reference to homology theory, that resembles graph expansion. Yet it is a "limit" of Betti numbers, and hence has a short/long exact sequence theory and resembles the $L^2$ Betti numbers of Atiyah. Also, the maximum excess is defined via a supermodul...

  6. New mesogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Vora; A K Prajapati

    2001-04-01

    Compounds of a new smectogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates were prepared by condensing different 4--alkoxybenzoyl chloride with methoxyethyl trans-4-hydroxy- -methylcinnamate. In this series, the first six members are non-mesogenic. -Heptyloxy derivative exhibits monotropic smectic A phase whereas rest of the members exhibit enantiotropic smectic A mesophase. The compounds are characterized by combination of elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques. Enthalpies of few homologues are measured by DSC techniques. Fluorescent properties are also observed. The thermal stabilities of the present series are compared with those of other structurally related mesogenic homologous series.

  7. Relative Derived Equivalences and Relative Homological Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Yong PAN

    2016-01-01

    Let A be a small abelian category. For a closed subbifunctor F of Ext1A (−,−), Buan has generalized the construction of Verdier’s quotient category to get a relative derived category, where he localized with respect to F-acyclic complexes. In this paper, the homological properties of relative derived categories are discussed, and the relation with derived categories is given. For Artin algebras, using relative derived categories, we give a relative version on derived equivalences induced by F-tilting complexes. We discuss the relationships between relative homological dimensions and relative derived equivalences.

  8. Homology and cohomology of Rees semigroup algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Niels; Gourdeau, Frédéric; White, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra.......Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra....

  9. Contact homology of good toric contact manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show that any good toric contact manifold has well defined cylindrical contact homology and describe how it can be combinatorially computed from the associated moment cone. As an application we compute the cylindrical contact homology of a particularly nice family of examples that appear in the work of Gauntlett-Martelli-Sparks-Waldram on Sasaki-Einstein metrics. We show in particular that these give rise to a new infinite family of non-equivalent contact structures on $S^2 \\times S^{3}$ in the unique homotopy class of almost contact structures with vanishing first Chern class.

  10. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2015-03-15

    Background: Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Results: Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Conclusion: Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification. © Huang et al.

  11. Betti numbers and stability for configuration spaces via factorization homology

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Using factorization homology, we realize the rational homology of the unordered configuration spaces of an arbitrary manifold $M$, possibly with boundary, as the homology of a Lie algebra constructed from the compactly supported cohomology of $M$. By locating the homology of each configuration space within the Chevalley-Eilenberg complex of this Lie algebra, we extend theorems of B\\"{o}digheimer-Cohen-Taylor and F\\'{e}lix-Thomas and give a new, combinatorial proof of the homological stability...

  12. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Toro

    Full Text Available Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs, Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L, and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  13. Homological Perturbation Theory and Mirror Symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    We explain how deformation theories of geometric objects such as complex structures,Poisson structures and holomorphic bundle structures lead to differential Gerstenhaber or Poisson al-gebras. We use homological perturbation theory to construct A∞ algebra structures on the cohomology,and their canonically defined deformations. Such constructions are used to formulate a version of A∞algebraic mirror symmetry.

  14. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  15. Planar open books and Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Ozsvath, Peter; Stipsicz, Andras I.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2005-01-01

    Giroux has described a correspondence between open book decompositions on a 3--manifold and contact structures. In this paper we use Heegaard Floer homology to give restrictions on contact structures which correspond to open book decompositions with planar pages, generalizing a recent result of Etnyre.

  16. Homological aperiodic tilings of 3-dimensional geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Piotr W

    2012-01-01

    We construct the first aperiodic tiles for two amenable 3-dimensional Lie groups: Sol and the Heisenberg group. Our construction relies on the use of higher-dimensional uniformly finite homology. In particular, we settle completely the existence of aperiodic tiles for all of the non-compact geometries of 3-manifolds appearing in the geometrization conjecture.

  17. (Co)homology of Spectral Categories

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we develop the cotangent complex and (co)homology theories for spectral categories. Along the way, we reproduce standard model structures on spectral categories. As applications, we show that the invariants to descend to stable $\\infty$-categories and we prove a stabilization result for spectral categories.

  18. Einstein Metrics on Rational Homology Spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Charles P.; Galicki, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    We prove the existence of Sasakian-Einstein metrics on infinitely many rational homology spheres in all odd dimensions greater than 3. In dimension 5 we obain somewhat sharper results. There are examples where the number of effective parameters in the Einstein metric grows exponentially with dimension.

  19. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range of 2* \\leq n. Along the way we give a new proof of the high connectivity of the complex of injective words. If the manifold has dimension at least three, we show that in rational homology the stability range may be improved to * \\leq n. In the second part we study to what extent the homology of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q. It is known to be false in the remaining cases.

  20. Homological stability for configuration spaces of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Church, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Let C_n(M) be the configuration space of n distinct ordered points in M. We prove that if M is any connected orientable manifold (closed or open), the homology groups H_i(C_n(M); Q) are representation stable in the sense of [Church-Farb]. Applying this to the trivial representation, we obtain as a corollary that the unordered configuration space B_n(M) satisfies classical homological stability: for each i, H_i(B_n(M); Q) is isomorphic to H_i(B_{n+1}(M); Q) for n > i. This improves on results of McDuff, Segal, and others for open manifolds. Applied to closed manifolds, this provides natural examples where rational homological stability holds even though integral homological stability fails. To prove the main theorem, we introduce the notion of monotonicity for a sequence of S_n--representations, which is of independent interest. Sequences that are both monotone and uniformly representation stable form an abelian category. Monotonicity provides a new mechanism for proving representation stability using spectral...

  1. Khovanov-Rozansky homology and Directed Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We determine the cycle packing number of a directed graph using elementary projective algebraic geometry. Our idea is rooted in the Khovanov-Rozansky theory. In fact, using the Khovanov-Rozansky homology of a graph, we also obtain algebraic methods of detecting directed and undirected cycles containing a particular vertex or edge.

  2. The homology systole of hyperbolic Riemann surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Parlier, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this note is to show that the study of closed hyperbolic surfaces with maximum length systole is in fact the study of surfaces with maximum length homological systole. The same result is shown to be true for once-punctured surfaces, and is shown to fail for surfaces with a large number of cusps.

  3. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de, E-mail: velosom@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  4. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  5. Homological algebra in strongly non-Abelian settings

    CERN Document Server

    Grandis, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We propose here a study of 'semiexact' and 'homological' categories as a basis for a generalised homological algebra. Our aim is to extend the homological notions to deeply non-abelian situations, where satellites and spectral sequences can still be studied.This is a sequel of a book on 'Homological Algebra, The interplay of homology with distributive lattices and orthodox semigroups', published by the same Editor, but can be read independently of the latter.The previous book develops homological algebra in p-exact categories, i.e. exact categories in the sense of Puppe and Mitchell - a modera

  6. Homological Pisot Substitutions and Exact Regularity

    CERN Document Server

    Barge, Marcy; Jones, Leslie; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional substitution tiling spaces where the dilatation (stretching factor) is a degree d Pisot number, and where the first rational Cech cohomology is d-dimensional. We construct examples of such "homological Pisot" substitutions that do not have pure discrete spectra. These examples are not unimodular, and we conjecture that the coincidence rank must always divide a power of the norm of the dilatation. To support this conjecture, we show that homological Pisot substitutions exhibit an Exact Regularity Property (ERP), in which the number of occurrences of a patch for a return length is governed strictly by the length. The ERP puts strong constraints on the measure of any cylinder set in the corresponding tiling space.

  7. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  8. Homologous Pairing between Long DNA Double Helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition between two double stranded (ds) DNA with homologous sequences may not seem compatible with the B-DNA structure because the sequence information is hidden when it is used for joining the two strands. Nevertheless, it has to be invoked to account for various biological data. Using quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and hints from recent genetics experiments, I show here that direct recognition between homologous dsDNA is possible through the formation of short quadruplexes due to direct complementary hydrogen bonding of major-groove surfaces in parallel alignment. The constraints imposed by the predicted structures of the recognition units determine the mechanism of complexation between long dsDNA. This mechanism and concomitant predictions agree with the available experimental data and shed light upon the sequence effects and the possible involvement of topoisomerase II in the recognition.

  9. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...... of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q...

  10. Hochschild homology, lax codescent, and duplicial structure

    OpenAIRE

    Garner, Richard; Lack, Stephen; Slevin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study the duplicial objects of Dwyer and Kan, which generalize the cyclic objects of Connes. We describe duplicial objects in terms of the decalage comonads, and we give a conceptual account of the construction of duplicial objects due to Bohm and Stefan. This is done in terms of a 2-categorical generalization of Hochschild homology. We also study duplicial structure on nerves of categories, bicategories, and monoidal categories.

  11. Nash equilibria via duality and homological selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Basu; Samik Basu; Mahan MJ

    2014-11-01

    Given a multifunction from to the -fold symmetric product Sym$_{k}(X)$, we use the Dold–Thom theorem to establish a homological selection theorem. This is used to establish existence of Nash equilibria. Cost functions in problems concerning the existence of Nash equilibria are traditionally multilinear in the mixed strategies. The main aim of this paper is to relax the hypothesis of multilinearity. We use basic intersection theory, Poincaré duality in addition to the Dold–Thom theorem.

  12. Recombineering Homologous Recombination Constructs in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A.; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineeri...

  13. On the definition of homological critical value

    OpenAIRE

    Govc, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    We point out that there is a problem with the definition of homological critical value (as defined in the widely cited paper \\cite{stability} by Cohen-Steiner, Edelsbrunner and Harer). Under that definition, the critical value lemma of \\cite{stability} in fact fails. We provide several counterexamples and a definition (due to Bubenik and Scott \\cite{categorification}) we feel should be preferred and under which the critical value lemma does indeed hold. One of the counterexamples we have foun...

  14. Persistent Homology and Partial Similarity of Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Di Fabio, Barbara; Landi, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform shape retrieval based not only on full similarity, but also partial similarity is a key property for any content-based search engine. We prove that persistence diagrams can reveal a partial similarity between two shapes by showing a common subset of points. This can be explained using the Mayer-Vietoris formulas that we develop for ordinary, relative and extended persistent homology. An experiment outlines the potential of persistence diagrams as shape descriptors in re...

  15. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  16. Note on homological modeling of the electric circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a simple example, it is explained how the homological analysis may be used for modeling of the electric circuits. The homological branch, mesh and nodal analyses are presented. Geometrical interpretations are given.

  17. Computing Small 1-Homological Models for Commutative Differential Graded Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Victor; Armario, Jose Andres; Frau, Maria Dolores; Gonzalez-Diaz, Rocio; Jimenez, Maria Jose; Real, Pedro; Silva, Beatriz

    2001-01-01

    We use homological perturbation machinery specific for the algebra category [P. Real. Homological Perturbation Theory and Associativity. Homology, Homotopy and Applications vol. 2, n. 5 (2000) 51-88] to give an algorithm for computing the differential structure of a small 1--homological model for commutative differential graded algebras (briefly, CDGAs). The complexity of the procedure is studied and a computer package in Mathematica is described for determining such models.

  18. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silic...

  19. Equivariant geometric K-homology for compact Lie group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Paul; Schick, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a compact Lie-group, X a compact G-CW-complex. We define equivariant geometric K-homology groups K^G_*(X), using an obvious equivariant version of the (M,E,f)-picture of Baum-Douglas for K-homology. We define explicit natural transformations to and from equivariant K-homology defined via KK-theory (the "official" equivariant K-homology groups) and show that these are isomorphism.

  20. Duality and products in algebraic (co)homology theories

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalzig, N.; Kraehmer, U.

    2008-01-01

    The origin and interplay of products and dualities in algebraic (co)homology theories is ascribed to a ×A-Hopf algebra structure on the relevant universal enveloping algebra. This provides a unified treatment for example of results by Van den Bergh about Hochschild (co)homology and by Huebschmann about Lie–Rinehart (co)homology.

  1. Homology Modelling of the GABA Transporter and Analysis of Tiagabine Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovstrup, S.; Taboureau, Olivier; Bräuner-Osborne, H.;

    2010-01-01

    A homology model of the human GABA transporter (GAT-1) based on the recently reported crystal structures of the bacterial leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT) was developed. The stability of the resulting model embedded in a membrane environment was analyzed by extensive molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. Based on docking studies and subsequent MD simulations of three compounds, the endogenous ligand GABA and two potent inhibitors, (R)-nipecotic acid and the anti-epilepsy drug tiagabine, various binding modes were identified and are discussed. Whereas GABA and (R)-nipecotic acid...

  2. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of two Campylobacter jejuni homologs of the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, DsbA

    OpenAIRE

    Anna D Grabowska; Wywiał, Ewa; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Łasica, Anna M.; Wosten, M.M.S.M; Nagy-Staroń, Anna; Godlewska, Renata; Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna; Pieńkowska, Katarzyna; Łaniewski, Paweł; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Jos P M van Putten; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, E. Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bacterial Dsb enzymes are involved in the oxidative folding of many proteins, through the formation of disulfide bonds between their cysteine residues. The Dsb protein network has been well characterized in cells of the model microorganism Escherichia coli. To gain insight into the functioning of the Dsb system in epsilon-Proteobacteria, where it plays an important role in the colonization process, we studied two homologs of the main Escherichia coli Dsb oxidase (EcDsbA) that are ...

  3. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  4. Exponential growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homology

    CERN Document Server

    Wedrich, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We define reduced colored sl(N) link homologies and use deformation spectral sequences to characterize their dependence on color and rank. We then define reduced colored HOMFLY-PT homologies and prove that they arise as large N limits of sl(N) homologies. Together, these results allow proofs of many aspects of the physically conjectured structure of the family of type A link homologies. In particular, we verify a conjecture of Gorsky, Gukov and Sto\\v{s}i\\'c about the growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homologies.

  5. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  6. Hochschild homology and microlocal Euler classes

    CERN Document Server

    Kashiwara, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    We define the notion of a Hochschild kernel on a manifold M. Roughly speaking, it is a sheaf on M x M for which the formalism of Hochschild homology applies. We associate a microlocal Euler class to such a kernel, a cohomology class with values in the relative dualizing complex of the cotangent bundle over M and we prove that this class is functorial with respect to the composition of kernels. This generalizes, unifies and simplifies various results of (relative) index theorems for constructible sheaves, D-modules and elliptic pairs.

  7. Periodic cyclic homology of affine Hecke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Solleveld, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    This is the author's PhD-thesis, which was written in 2006. The version posted here is identical to the printed one. Instead of an abstract, the short list of contents: Preface 5 1 Introduction 9 2 K-theory and cyclic type homology theories 13 3 Affine Hecke algebras 61 4 Reductive p-adic groups 103 5 Parameter deformations in affine Hecke algebras 129 6 Examples and calculations 169 A Crossed products 223 Bibliography 227 Index 237 Samenvatting 245 Curriculum vitae 253

  8. L^2-homology for compact quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kyed, David

    2006-01-01

    A notion of L^2-homology for compact quantum groups is introduced, generalizing the classical notion for countable, discrete groups. If the compact quantum group in question has tracial Haar state, it is possible to define its L^2-Betti numbers and Novikov-Shubin invariants/capacities. It is proved that these L^2-Betti numbers vanish for the Gelfand dual of a compact Lie group and that the zeroth Novikov-Shubin invariant equals the dimension of the underlying Lie group. Finally, we relate our...

  9. Homology of lipoprotein lipase to pancreatic lipase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Avram, C M; Ben-Zeev, O; Lee, T.D. (Taunia D.); Haaga, K; Shively, J. E.; Goers, J; Pedersen, M.E; Reeve, J R; Schotz, M C

    1986-01-01

    Bovine milk lipoprotein lipase was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. The first 19 amino-terminal residues were Asp-Arg-Ile-Thr-Gly-Gly-Lys-Asp-Phe-Arg-Asp-Ile-Glu-Ser-Lys-Phe-Ala-Leu- Arg. In addition, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of a tryptic digest of reduced and alkylated lipase resolved a number of peptides, five of which contained cysteine. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides revealed in most instances a close homology to porcine pancreatic lipase....

  10. Hochschild Homology and Cohomology of Klein Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Butin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of deformation quantization, a first step towards the study of star-products is the calculation of Hochschild cohomology. The aim of this article is precisely to determine the Hochschild homology and cohomology in two cases of algebraic varieties. On the one hand, we consider singular curves of the plane; here we recover, in a different way, a result proved by Fronsdal and make it more precise. On the other hand, we are interested in Klein surfaces. The use of a complex suggested by Kontsevich and the help of Groebner bases allow us to solve the problem.

  11. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of nail infection is often caused by a bacterial infection but may also be caused by herpes, a ... to a type of yeast called Candida , or bacterial infection, and this may lead to abnormal nail growth. ...

  12. Detailed assessment of homology detection using different substitution matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Homology detection plays a key role in bioinformatics, whereas substitution matrix is one of the most important components in homology detection. Thus, besides the improvement of alignment algorithms, another effective way to enhance the accuracy of homology detection is to use proper substitution matrices or even construct new matrices.A study on the features of various matrices and on the comparison of the performances between different matrices in homology detection enable us to choose the most proper or optimal matrix for some specific applications. In this paper, by taking BLOSUM matrices as an example, some detailed features of matrices in homology detection are studied by calculating the distributions of numbers of recognized proteins over different sequence identities and sequence lengths. Our results clearly showed that different matrices have different preferences and abilities to the recognition of remote homologous proteins. Furthermore, detailed features of the various matrices can be used to improve the accuracy of homology detection.

  13. The Homology Groups of a Partial Trace Monoid Action

    CERN Document Server

    Husainov, Ahmet A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the homology groups of mathematical models of concurrency. We study the Baues-Wirsching homology groups of a small category associated with a partial monoid action on a set. We prove that these groups can be reduced to the Leech homology groups of the monoid. For a trace monoid with an action on a set, we will build a cubical complex of free Abelian groups with homology groups isomorphic to the integral homology groups of the action category. It allows us to solve the problem posed by the author in 2004 of the constructing an algorithm for computing homology groups of the CE nets. We describe the algorithm and give examples of calculating the homology groups.

  14. Transfers for ramified covering maps in homology and cohomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A. Aguilar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Making use of a modified version, due to McCord, of the Dold-Thom construction of ordinary homology, we give a simple topological definition of a transfer for ramified covering maps in homology with arbitrary coefficients. The transfer is induced by a suitable map between topological groups. We also define a new cohomology transfer which is dual to the homology transfer. This duality allows us to show that our homology transfer coincides with the one given by L. Smith. With our definition of the homology transfer we can give simpler proofs of the properties of the known transfer and of some new ones. Our transfers can also be defined in Karoubi's approach to homology and cohomology. Furthermore, we show that one can define mixed transfers from other homology or cohomology theories to the ordinary ones.

  15. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will...

  16. A homological study of Green polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Syu

    2011-01-01

    We interpret the orthogonality relation of Kostka polynomials arising from complex reflection groups (c.f. [Shoji, Invent. Math. 74 (1983), J. Algebra 245 (2001)] and [Lusztig, Adv. Math. 61 (1986)]) in terms of homological algebra. This leads us to the notion of Kostka system, which can be seen as a categorical counter-part of Kostka polynomials. Then, we show that every generalized Springer correspondence (in good characteristic) (c.f. [Lusztig, Invent. Math. 75 (1984)]) gives rise to a Kostka system. This enables us to see the top-term generation property of the homology of generalized Springer fibers, and the transition formula of Kostka polynomials between two generalized Springer correspondences of type $\\mathsf{BC}$. The latter enhances one of the main results from [Ciubotaru-Kato-K, Invent. Math., to appear] to its graded version. In the appendix, we present a purely algebraic proof that a Kostka system exists for type $\\mathsf{A}$, and therefore one can skip geometric sections \\S 3--5 to see the key ...

  17. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-07-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. PMID:25855811

  18. Sheaves on Graphs and Their Homological Invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a notion of a sheaf of vector spaces on a graph, and develop the foundations of homology theories for such sheaves. One sheaf invariant, its "maximum excess," has a number of remarkable properties. It has a simple definition, with no reference to homology theory, that resembles graph expansion. Yet it is a "limit" of Betti numbers, and hence has a short/long exact sequence theory and resembles the $L^2$ Betti numbers of Atiyah. Also, the maximum excess is defined via a supermodular function, which gives the maximum excess much stronger properties than one has of a typical Betti number. The maximum excess gives a simple interpretation of an important graph invariant, which will be used to study the Hanna Neumann Conjecture in a future paper. Our sheaf theory can be viewed as a vast generalization of algebraic graph theory: each sheaf has invariants associated to it---such as Betti numbers and Laplacian matrices---that generalize those in classical graph theory.

  19. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  20. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  1. Towards Stratification Learning through Homology Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Bendich, Paul; Wang, Bei

    2010-01-01

    A topological approach to stratification learning is developed for point cloud data drawn from a stratified space. Given such data, our objective is to infer which points belong to the same strata. First we define a multi-scale notion of a stratified space, giving a stratification for each radius level. We then use methods derived from kernel and cokernel persistent homology to cluster the data points into different strata, and we prove a result which guarantees the correctness of our clustering, given certain topological conditions; some geometric intuition for these topological conditions is also provided. Our correctness result is then given a probabilistic flavor: we give bounds on the minimum number of sample points required to infer, with probability, which points belong to the same strata. Finally, we give an explicit algorithm for the clustering, prove its correctness, and apply it to some simulated data.

  2. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence Hα blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  3. A roadmap for the computation of persistent homology

    CERN Document Server

    Otter, Nina; Tillmann, Ulrike; Grindrod, Peter; Harrington, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology is a method used in topological data analysis to study qualitative features of data, which is robust to perturbations, dimension independent and provides statistical summaries of the outputs. Despite recent progress, the computation of persistent homology for large data sets remains an open problem. We investigate the challenges of computing persistent homology and navigate through the different algorithms and data structures. Specifically, we evaluate the (currently available) open source implementations of persistent homology computations on a wide range of synthetic and real-world data sets, and indicate which algorithms and implementations are best suited to these data. We provide guidelines for the computation of persistent homology, make our own implementations used in this study available, and put forward measures to quantify the challenges of the computation of persistent homology.

  4. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didelot Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. Results We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E. From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E, which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Conclusions Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and

  5. Variants of equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Marcolli, M.; Wang, B-L

    2005-01-01

    For a rational homology 3-sphere Y with a Spin c structure s, we show that simple algebraic manipulations of our construction of equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer homology in lead to a collection of variants, which are all topological invariants. We establish a long exact sequence relating them and we show that they satisfy a duality under orientation reversal. We explain their relation to the equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer (co)homologies introduced in [loc. cit.]. We conjecture the equivale...

  6. A local homology theory for linearly compact modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a local homology theory for linearly modules which is in some sense dual to the local cohomology theory of A. Grothendieck. Some basic properties of local homology modules are shown such as: the vanishing and non-vanishing, the noetherianness of local homology modules. By using duality, we extend some well-known results in theory of local cohomology of A. Grothendieck. (author)

  7. Euler Integration of Gaussian Random Fields and Persistent Homology

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrowski, Omer

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we extend the notion of the Euler characteristic to persistent homology and give the relationship between the Euler integral of a function and the Euler characteristic of the function's persistent homology. We then proceed to compute the expected Euler integral of a Gaussian random field using the Gaussian kinematic formula and obtain a simple closed form expression. This results in the first computation of a quantitative descriptor for the persistent homology of a Gaussian random field.

  8. Homologous recombination: from model organisms to human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Modesti (Mauro); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRecent experiments show that properly controlled recombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the maintenance of genome stability and for the prevention of tumorigenesis.

  9. On the geography and botany of knot Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Hedden, Matthew; Watson, Liam

    2014-01-01

    This note explores two questions: (1) Which bigraded groups arise as the knot Floer homology of a knot in the three-sphere? (2) Given a knot, how many distinct knots share its Floer homology? Regarding the first, we show there exist bigraded groups satisfying all previously known constraints of knot Floer homology which do not arise as the invariant of a knot. This leads to a new constraint for knots admitting lens space surgeries, as well as a proof that the rank of knot Floer homology detec...

  10. Gene prediction by pattern recognition and homology search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for combining pattern recognition-based exon prediction and database homology search in gene model construction. The goal is to use homologous genes or partial genes existing in the database as reference models while constructing (multiple) gene models from exon candidates predicted by pattern recognition methods. A unified framework for gene modeling is used for genes ranging from situations with strong homology to no homology in the database. To maximally use the homology information available, the algorithm applies homology on three levels: (1) exon candidate evaluation, (2) gene-segment construction with a reference model, and (3) (complete) gene modeling. Preliminary testing has been done on the algorithm. Test results show that (a) perfect gene modeling can be expected when the initial exon predictions are reasonably good and a strong homology exists in the database; (b) homology (not necessarily strong) in general helps improve the accuracy of gene modeling; (c) multiple gene modeling becomes feasible when homology exists in the database for the involved genes.

  11. Homology cylinders and the acyclic closure of a free group

    OpenAIRE

    Sakasai, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    We give a Dehn-Nielsen type theorem for the homology cobordism group of homology cylinders by considering its action on the acyclic closure, which was defined by Levine, of a free group. Then we construct an additive invariant of those homology cylinders which act on the acyclic closure trivially. We also describe some tools to study the automorphism group of the acyclic closure of a free group generalizing those for the automorphism group of a free group or the homology cobordism group of ho...

  12. Identification and Partial Characterization of Potential FtsL and FtsQ Homologs of Chlamydia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot P Ouellette

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia is amongst the rare bacteria that lack the critical cell division protein FtsZ. By annotation, Chlamydia also lacks several other essential cell division proteins including the FtsLBQ complex that links the early (e.g. FtsZ and late (e.g. FtsI/Pbp3 components of the division machinery. Here, we report chlamydial FtsL and FtsQ homologs. Ct271 aligned well with E. coli FtsL and shared sequence homology with it, including a predicted leucine-zipper like motif. Based on in silico modeling, we show that Ct764 has structural homology to FtsQ in spite of little sequence similarity. Importantly, ct271/ftsL and ct764/ftsQ are present within all sequenced chlamydial genomes and are expressed during the replicative phase of the chlamydial developmental cycle, two key characteristics for a chlamydial cell division gene. GFP-Ct764 localized to the division septum of dividing transformed chlamydiae, and, importantly, over-expression inhibited chlamydial development. Using a bacterial two-hybrid approach, we show that Ct764 interacted with other components of the chlamydial division apparatus. However, Ct764 was not capable of complementing an E. coli FtsQ depletion strain in spite of its ability to interact with many of the same division proteins as E. coli FtsQ, suggesting that chlamydial FtsQ may function differently. We previously proposed that Chlamydia uses MreB and other rod-shape determining proteins as an alternative system for organizing the division site and its apparatus. Chlamydial FtsL and FtsQ homologs expand the number of identified chlamydial cell division proteins and suggest that Chlamydia has likely kept the late components of the division machinery while substituting the Mre system for the early components.

  13. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    -vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial......Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...

  14. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  15. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  16. Circular Ribbon Flares and Homologous Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Haimin

    2012-01-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), and this has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a closed circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan--spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence \\ha blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite magnetic polarity, forming a circular PIL that is also traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons bright...

  17. An adelic resolution for homology sheaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorchinskii, S O [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-12-31

    We propose a generalization of the ordinary idele group by constructing certain adelic complexes for sheaves of K-groups on schemes. Such complexes are defined for any abelian sheaf on a scheme. We focus on the case when the sheaf is associated with the presheaf of a homology theory with certain natural axioms satisfied, in particular, by K-theory. In this case it is proved that the adelic complex provides a flabby resolution for this sheaf on smooth varieties over an infinite perfect field and that the natural morphism to the Gersten complex is a quasi-isomorphism. The main advantage of the new adelic resolution is that it is contravariant and multiplicative. In particular, this enables us to reprove that the intersection in Chow groups coincides (up to a sign) with the natural product in the corresponding K-cohomology groups. Also, we show that the Weil pairing can be expressed as a Massey triple product in K-cohomology groups with certain indices.

  18. Cylindrical contact homology of subcritical Stein-fillable contact manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Mei-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We use contact handle decompositions and a stabilization process to compute the cylindrical contact homology of a subcritical Stein-fillable contact manifold with vanishing first Chern class, and show that it is completely determined by the homology of a subcritical Stein-filling of the contact manifold.

  19. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  20. A configuration space for equivariant connective K-homology

    CERN Document Server

    Velasquez, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Following ideas of Graeme Segal we construct a configuration space that represents equivariant connective K-homology for group actions of finite groups and furthermore we describe explicitly the complex homology of this configuration space as a Hopf algebra. As a consequence of this work we obtain models of representing spaces for equivariant K-theory.

  1. The weight filtration for real algebraic varieties II: Classical homology

    OpenAIRE

    Mccrory, Clint; Parusinski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We associate to each real algebraic variety a filtered chain complex, the weight complex, which is well-defined up to filtered quasi-isomorphism, and which induces on classical (compactly supported) homology with Z/2 coefficients an analog of the weight filtration for complex algebraic varieties. This complements our previous definition of the weight filtration of Borel-Moore homology.

  2. A spectrum-level Hodge filtration on topological Hochschild homology

    OpenAIRE

    Glasman, Saul

    2014-01-01

    We define a functorial spectrum-level filtration on the topological Hochschild homology of any commutative ring spectrum $R$, and more generally the factorization homology $R \\otimes X$ for any space $X$, echoing algebraic constructions of Loday and Pirashvili. We investigate the properties of this filtration and show that it breaks THH up into common eigenspectra of the Adams operations.

  3. The tedious task of finding homologous noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Karl Peter; Gorodkin, Jan; Stadler, Peter F

    2009-01-01

    : BLAST still works better or equally good as other methods unless extensive expert knowledge on the RNA family is included. However, when good curated data are available the recent development yields further improvements in finding remote homologs. Homology search beyond the reach of BLAST hence is not...

  4. Cycles in the chamber homology of GL(3)

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Anne-Marie; Hasan, Samir; Plymen, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Let F be a nonarchimedean local field and let GL(N) = GL(N,F). We prove the existence of parahoric types for GL(N). We construct representative cycles in all the homology classes of the chamber homology of GL(3).

  5. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Rozenlaan, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Neefe, Paulien (Zoetermeer, NL)

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  6. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  7. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  8. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  9. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach that ...... become valuable weapons for preventing pathogen contamination and fighting infectious diseases in the future....

  10. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim N. Mak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs. IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection.

  11. Homologous series of induced early mutants in indican rice. Pt.1. The production of homologous series of early mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of homologous series of early mutants induced from the same Indican rice variety were almost the same (1.37%∼1.64%) in 1983∼1993, but the ones from the different eco-typical varieties were different. The early variety was 0.73%, the mid variety was 1.51%, and the late variety was 1.97%. The percentage of homologous series of early mutants from the varieties with the same pedigree and relationship were similar, but the one from the cog nation were lower than those from distant varieties. There are basic laws and characters in the homologous series of early mutants: 1. The inhibited phenotype is the basic of the homologous series of early mutants; 2. The production of the homologous series of early mutants is closely related with the growing period of the parent; 3. The parallel mutation of the stem and leaves are simultaneously happened with the variation of early or late maturing; 4. The occurrence of the homologous series of early mutants is in a state of imbalance. According to the law of parallel variability, the production of homologous series of early mutants can be predicted as long as the parents' classification of plant, pedigree and ecological type are identified. Therefore, the early breeding can be guided by the law of homologous series of early mutants

  12. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  13. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels K H Scheel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination is an important mechanism for increasing diversity of RNA viruses, and constitutes a viral escape mechanism to host immune responses and to treatment with antiviral compounds. Although rare, epidemiologically important hepatitis C virus (HCV recombinants have been reported. In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a, which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6 sequence from the 5' end to the NS2-NS3 region followed by JFH1 sequence from Core to the 3' end. These recombinants carried duplicated sequence of up to 2400 nucleotides. HCV replication was not required for recombination, as recombinants were observed in most experiments even when two replication incompetent genomes were co-transfected. Reverse genetic studies verified the viability of representative recombinants. After serial passage, subsequent recombination events reducing or eliminating the duplicated region were observed for some but not all recombinants. Furthermore, we found that inter-genotypic recombination could occur, but at a lower frequency than intra-genotypic recombination. Productive recombination of attenuated HCV genomes depended on expression of all HCV proteins and tolerated duplicated sequence. In general, no strong site specificity was observed. Non-homologous recombination was observed in most cases, while few homologous events were identified. A better understanding of HCV recombination could help identification of natural

  14. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  15. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P...

  16. The genome BLASTatlas - a GeneWiz extension for visualization of whole-genome homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David

    2008-01-01

    the Clostridium tetani plasmid p88, where homologues for toxin genes can be easily visualized in other sequenced Clostridium genomes, and for a Clostridium botulinum genome, compared to 14 other Clostridium genomes. DNA structural information is also included in the atlas to visualize the DNA chromosomal context...... enabling automation of repeated tasks. This tool can be relevant in many pangenomic as well as in metagenomic studies, by giving a quick overview of clusters of insertion sites, genomic islands and overall homology between a reference sequence and a data set.......The development of fast and inexpensive methods for sequencing bacterial genomes has led to a wealth of data, often with many genomes being sequenced of the same species or closely related organisms. Thus, there is a need for visualization methods that will allow easy comparison of many sequenced...

  17. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Phosphoproteins involved in bacterial signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells adjust their behavior continuously in response to changing environmental conditions. A number of specific stimulus-response systems have been investigated in bacteria. These include the chemotaxis system (Che), the nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr), the phosphorus system (Pho), the system that controls expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) in response to changes in osmotic pressure, the sporulation system (SpoO), and the virulence system (Vir) that mediates bacterial infectivity of damaged plant tissues. Surprisingly, all of these systems show a common set of components. In each case, the signal transduction proteins include members of two homologous families, which appear to comprise a cascade: Sensory information feeds into the first component, which activates the second component that, in turn, modulates a target activity within the cell. In this paper, the authors present evidence that the communication between the two components involves a phospho-transfer mechanism that is common to all of these regulatory systems

  19. Prokaryotic Caspase Homologs: Phylogenetic Patterns and Functional Characteristics Reveal Considerable Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes; Bergman, Birgitta; Larsson, John

    2012-01-01

    Caspases accomplish initiation and execution of apoptosis, a programmed cell death process specific to metazoans. The existence of prokaryotic caspase homologs, termed metacaspases, has been known for slightly more than a decade. Despite their potential connection to the evolution of programmed cell death in eukaryotes, the phylogenetic distribution and functions of these prokaryotic metacaspase sequences are largely uncharted, while a few experiments imply involvement in programmed cell death. Aiming at providing a more detailed picture of prokaryotic caspase homologs, we applied a computational approach based on Hidden Markov Model search profiles to identify and functionally characterize putative metacaspases in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Out of the total of 1463 analyzed genomes, merely 267 (18%) were identified to contain putative metacaspases, but their taxonomic distribution included most prokaryotic phyla and a few archaea (Euryarchaeota). Metacaspases were particularly abundant in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, which harbor many morphologically and developmentally complex organisms, and a distinct correlation was found between abundance and phenotypic complexity in Cyanobacteria. Notably, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, known to undergo genetically regulated autolysis, lacked metacaspases. Pfam domain architecture analysis combined with operon identification revealed rich and varied configurations among the metacaspase sequences. These imply roles in programmed cell death, but also e.g. in signaling, various enzymatic activities and protein modification. Together our data show a wide and scattered distribution of caspase homologs in prokaryotes with structurally and functionally diverse sub-groups, and with a potentially intriguing evolutionary role. These features will help delineate future characterizations of death pathways in prokaryotes. PMID:23185476

  20. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of alpha and beta subunits (alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60) and one composed of all beta subunits (beta(14) ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 microM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of beta(14) ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that beta(14) is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  1. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  2. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  3. Multiple regulation of Rad51-mediated homologous recombination by fission yeast Fbh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Kurokawa, Yumiko; Ito, Kentaro; Siddique, Md Shahjahan P; Kawano, Yumiko; Yamao, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Fbh1, an F-box helicase related to bacterial UvrD, has been proposed to modulate homologous recombination in fission yeast. We provide several lines of evidence for such modulation. Fbh1, but not the related helicases Srs2 and Rqh1, suppressed the formation of crossover recombinants from single HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Purified Fbh1 in complex with Skp1 (Fbh1-Skp1 complex) inhibited Rad51-driven DNA strand exchange by disrupting Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments in an ATP-dependent manner; this disruption was alleviated by the Swi5-Sfr1 complex, an auxiliary activator of Rad51. In addition, the reconstituted SCFFbh1 complex, composed of purified Fbh1-Skp1 and Pcu1-Rbx1, displayed ubiquitin-ligase E3 activity toward Rad51. Furthermore, Fbh1 reduced the protein level of Rad51 in stationary phase in an F-box-dependent, but not in a helicase domain-independent manner. These results suggest that Fbh1 negatively regulates Rad51-mediated homologous recombination via its two putative, unrelated activities, namely DNA unwinding/translocation and ubiquitin ligation. In addition to its anti-recombinase activity, we tentatively suggest that Fbh1 might also have a pro-recombination role in vivo, because the Fbh1-Skp1 complex stimulated Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro after strand exchange had been initiated. PMID:25165823

  4. Multiple regulation of Rad51-mediated homologous recombination by fission yeast Fbh1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tsutsui

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fbh1, an F-box helicase related to bacterial UvrD, has been proposed to modulate homologous recombination in fission yeast. We provide several lines of evidence for such modulation. Fbh1, but not the related helicases Srs2 and Rqh1, suppressed the formation of crossover recombinants from single HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Purified Fbh1 in complex with Skp1 (Fbh1-Skp1 complex inhibited Rad51-driven DNA strand exchange by disrupting Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments in an ATP-dependent manner; this disruption was alleviated by the Swi5-Sfr1 complex, an auxiliary activator of Rad51. In addition, the reconstituted SCFFbh1 complex, composed of purified Fbh1-Skp1 and Pcu1-Rbx1, displayed ubiquitin-ligase E3 activity toward Rad51. Furthermore, Fbh1 reduced the protein level of Rad51 in stationary phase in an F-box-dependent, but not in a helicase domain-independent manner. These results suggest that Fbh1 negatively regulates Rad51-mediated homologous recombination via its two putative, unrelated activities, namely DNA unwinding/translocation and ubiquitin ligation. In addition to its anti-recombinase activity, we tentatively suggest that Fbh1 might also have a pro-recombination role in vivo, because the Fbh1-Skp1 complex stimulated Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro after strand exchange had been initiated.

  5. Applications of homological mirror symmetry to hypergeometric systems: duality conjectures

    OpenAIRE

    Borisov, Lev A.; Horja, R. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Homological mirror symmetry for crepant resolutions of Gorenstein toric singularities leads to a pair of conjectures on certain hypergeometric systems of PDEs. We explain these conjectures and verify them in some cases.

  6. Homologous prominence non-radial eruptions: A case study

    CERN Document Server

    Duchlev, P; Madjarska, M S; Dechev, M

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides important details on homologous eruptions of a solar prominence that occurred in active region NOAA 10904 on 2006 August 22. We report on the preeruptive phase of the homologous feature as well as the kinematics and the morphology of a forth from a series of prominence eruptions that is critical in defining the nature of the previous consecutive eruptions. The evolution of the overlying coronal field during homologous eruptions is discussed and a new observational criterion for homologous eruptions is provided. We find a distinctive sequence of three activation periods each of them containing preeruptive precursors such as a brightening and enlarging of the prominence body followed by small surge- like ejections from its southern end observed in the radio 17 GHz. We analyse a fourth eruption that clearly indicates a full reformation of the prominence after the third eruption. The fourth eruption although occurring 11 hrs later has an identical morphology, the same angle of propagati...

  7. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms that...

  8. Generalized local homology and cohomology for linearly compact modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study generalized local homology for linearly compact modules. By duality, we get some properties of generalized local cohomology modules and extend well-known properties of local cohomology of A. Grothendieck. (author)

  9. Calibrating bacterial evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ochman, Howard; Elwyn, Susannah; Moran, Nancy A

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to calibrate bacterial evolution have relied on the assumption that rates of molecular sequence divergence in bacteria are similar to those of higher eukaryotes, or to those of the few bacterial taxa for which ancestors can be reliably dated from ecological or geological evidence. Despite similarities in the substitution rates estimated for some lineages, comparisons of the relative rates of evolution at different classes of nucleotide sites indicate no basis for their universal appl...

  10. A definition of graph homology and graph K-theory of algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Movshev, M. V.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and study elementary properties of graph homology of algebras. This new homology theory shares many features of cyclic and Hochschild homology. We also define a graph K-theory together with an analog of Chern character.

  11. Sketches of a platypus: persistent homology and its algebraic foundations

    OpenAIRE

    Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The subject of persistent homology has vitalized applications of algebraic topology to point cloud data and to application fields far outside the realm of pure mathematics. The area has seen several fundamentally important results that are rooted in choosing a particular algebraic foundational theory to describe persistent homology, and applying results from that theory to prove useful and important results. In this survey paper, we shall examine the various choices in use, and what they allo...

  12. The rational Khovanov homology of 3-strand pretzel links

    OpenAIRE

    Manion, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The 3-strand pretzel knots and links are a well-studied source of examples in knot theory. However, while there have been computations of the Khovanov homology of some sub-families of 3-strand pretzel knots, no general formula has been given for all of them. We give a general formula for the unreduced Khovanov homology of all 3-strand pretzel links, over the rational numbers.

  13. Characterization of nonconservative homologous junctions in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Desautels, L; Brouillette, S; Wallenburg, J; Belmaaza, A; Gusew, N; Trudel, P; Chartrand, P

    1990-01-01

    Homologous recombination in mammalian cells between extrachromosomal molecules, as well as between episomes and chromosomes, can be mediated by a nonconservative mechanism. It has been proposed that the key steps in this process are the generation (by double-strand cleavage) of overlapping homologous ends, the creation of complementary single-strand ends (either by strand-specific exonuclease degradation or by unwinding of the DNA helix), and finally the creation of heteroduplex DNA by the an...

  14. Cloning of a peroxidase gene from cassava with potential as a molecular marker for resistance to bacterial blight

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Filipe Pereira; Goodwin, Paul H.; Larry Erickson

    2003-01-01

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is considered one of the most important bacterial diseases of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). In order to characterize the cassava genes involved in resistance to this disease, a genomic clone of a cationic peroxidase gene, MEPX1, was isolated by PCR from cassava cultivar MCOL 22. The DNA sequence of MEPX1 showed high homology with other plant peroxidase genes and contained a large intron typical of peroxidase...

  15. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  16. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  17. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University/Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  18. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  19. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  20. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair. PMID:26520106

  1. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  2. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". PMID:20635424

  3. Calcium-Enhanced Twitching Motility in Xylella fastidiosa Is Linked to a Single PilY1 Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F; Parker, Jennifer K; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is restricted to the xylem vessel environment, where mineral nutrients are transported through the plant host; therefore, changes in the concentrations of these elements likely impact the growth and virulence of this bacterium. Twitching motility, dependent on type IV pili (TFP), is required for movement against the transpiration stream that results in basipetal colonization. We previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca) increases the motility of X. fastidiosa, although the mechanism was unknown. PilY1 is a TFP structural protein recently shown to bind Ca and to regulate twitching and adhesion in bacterial pathogens of humans. Sequence analysis identified three pilY1 homologs in X. fastidiosa (PD0023, PD0502, and PD1611), one of which (PD1611) contains a Ca-binding motif. Separate deletions of PD0023 and PD1611 resulted in mutants that still showed twitching motility and were not impaired in attachment or biofilm formation. However, the response of increased twitching at higher Ca concentrations was lost in the pilY1-1611 mutant. Ca does not modulate the expression of any of the X. fastidiosa PilY1 homologs, although it increases the expression of the retraction ATPase pilT during active movement. The evidence presented here suggests functional differences between the PilY1 homologs, which may provide X. fastidiosa with an adaptive advantage in environments with high Ca concentrations, such as xylem sap. PMID:25217013

  4. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria.......Biofilm resilience poses major challenges to the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Biofilm bacteria can be considered small groups of “Special Forces” capable of infiltrating the host and destroying important components of the cellular defense system with the aim of crippling the host...

  5. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial

  6. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27294123

  7. Using Persistent Homology to Describe Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tithof, Jeffrey; Suri, Balachandra; Xu, Mu; Kramar, Miroslav; Levanger, Rachel; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Paul, Mark; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Complex spatial patterns that exhibit aperiodic dynamics commonly arise in a wide variety of systems in nature and technology. Describing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of such patterns is an open problem. We explore the use of persistent homology (a branch of algebraic topology) to characterize spatiotemporal dynamics in a canonical fluid mechanics problem, Rayleigh Bénard convection. Persistent homology provides a powerful mathematical formalism in which the topological characteristics of a pattern (e.g. the midplane temperature field) are encoded in a so-called persistence diagram. By applying a metric to measure the pairwise distances across multiple persistence diagrams, we can quantify the similarities between different states in a time series. Our results show that persistent homology yields new physical insights into the complex dynamics of large spatially extended systems that are driven far-from-equilibrium. This work is supported under NSF grant DMS-1125302.

  8. Induction of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of different factors on frequencies of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco plants was analyzed using a disrupted β-glucuronidase marker gene. Recombination frequencies were enhanced several fold by DNA damaging agents like UV-light or MMS (methyl methanesulfonate). Applying 3-methoxybenzamide (3-MB), an inhibitor of poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP), an enzyme that is postulated to be involved in DNA repair, enhanced homologous recombination frequencies strongly. These findings indicate that homologous recombination is involved in DNA repair and can (at least partially) compensate for other DNA repair pathways. Indications that recombination in plants can be induced by environmental stress factors that are not likely to be involved in DNA metabolism were also found; Arabidopsis plants growing in a medium containing 0.1 M NaCl exhibited elevated recombination frequencies. The possible general effects of ‘environmental’ challenges on genome flexibility are discussed. (author)

  9. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372

  10. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Sars, Matthias [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Suijlekom, Walter D. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  11. Homological ring epimorphisms and recollements from exact pairs. I

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hongxing

    2012-01-01

    Homological ring epimorphisms are often used in modern representation theory and algebraic $K$-theory. In this paper, we give some new characterizations of when a universal localization related to an `exact' pair of ring homomorphisms is homological. These characterizations are flexible and applicable to many cases, thus give rise to a wide variety of new recollements (of derived module categories) which have become of interest in and attracted increasing attentions towards to understanding invariants in algebra and geometry. As a consequence, we show that if $\\lambda: R\\ra S$ is an injective homological ring epimorphism between commutative rings $R$ and $S$, then the derived module category of the endomorphism ring of the $R$-module $S\\oplus S / R$ always admits a recollement of the derived module categories of $R$ and the tensor product $S\\otimes_R End_R(S/R)$. In particular, this result is applicable to localizations of integral domains by multiplicative sets in commutative rings.

  12. Data bank homology search algorithm with linear computation complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelets, V B; Ptitsyn, A A; Milanesi, L; Lim, H A

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm for data bank homology search is proposed. The principal advantages of the new algorithm are: (i) linear computation complexity; (ii) low memory requirements; and (iii) high sensitivity to the presence of local region homology. The algorithm first calculates indicative matrices of k-tuple 'realization' in the query sequence and then searches for an appropriate number of matching k-tuples within a narrow range in database sequences. It does not require k-tuple coordinates tabulation and in-memory placement for database sequences. The algorithm is implemented in a program for execution on PC-compatible computers and tested on PIR and GenBank databases with good results. A few modifications designed to improve the selectivity are also discussed. As an application example, the search for homology of the mouse homeotic protein HOX 3.1 is given. PMID:7922689

  13. Identification of Diverse Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants Carried on Bacterial, Plasmid, or Viral Metagenomes from an Activated Sludge Microbial Assemblage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Parsley, Larissa C.; Consuegra, Erin J.; Kakirde, Kavita S.; Land, Andrew M.; Harper, Willie F.; Liles, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Using both sequence- and function-based metagenomic approaches, multiple antibiotic resistance determinants were identified within metagenomic libraries constructed from DNA extracted from bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, or viruses within an activated sludge microbial assemblage. Metagenomic clones and a plasmid that in Escherichia coli expressed resistance to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, or kanamycin were isolated, with many cloned DNA sequences lacking any significant homology to known ant...

  14. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  15. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scraped, the injury should be washed with soap and water and covered with a sterile bandage. Petrolatum may be applied to open areas to keep the tissue moist and to try to prevent bacterial invasion. Doctors recommend that people do not use ...

  16. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  17. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Nakashima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption, knock-in (insertion, and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering.

  18. Two Lectures on Gauge Theory and Khovanov Homology

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In the first of these two lectures, I use a comparison to symplectic Khovanov homology to motivate the idea that the Jones polynomial and Khovanov homology of knots can be defined by counting the solutions of certain elliptic partial differential equations in 4 or 5 dimensions. The second lecture is devoted to a description of the rather unusual boundary conditions by which these equations should be supplemented. An appendix describes some physical background. (Versions of these lectures have been presented at various institutions including the Simons Center at Stonybrook, the TSIMF conference center in Sanya, and also Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.)

  19. Khovanov-Rozansky Graph Homology and Composition Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology.......In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology....

  20. K-homology and Fredholm operators I: Dirac Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Paul; van Erp, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This is an expository paper which gives a proof of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem for Dirac operators, presenting the theorem as a computation of the K-homology of a point. This paper and its follow up ("K-homology and index theory II: Elliptic Operators") was written to clear up basic points about index theory that are generally accepted as valid, but for which no proof has been published. Some of these points are needed for the solution of the Heisenberg-elliptic index problem in our paper...

  1. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sole, Francesca; Vadnagara, Komal; MOE, ORSON W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, a...

  2. RNA Structural Homology Search with a Succinct Stochastic Grammar Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Lei Song; Ji-Zhen Zhao; Chun-Mei Liu; Kan Liu; Russell Malmberg; Li-Ming Cai

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of structural homology search tools, mostly based on profile stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been recently developed for the non-coding RNA gene identification. SCFGs can include statistical biases that often occur in RNA sequences, necessary to profile specific RNA structures for structural homology search. In this paper, a succinct stochastic grammar model is introduced for RNA that has competitive search effectiveness. More importantly, the profiling model can be easily extended to include pseudoknots, structures that are beyond the capability of profile SCFGs. In addition, the model allows heuristics to be exploited, resulting in a significant speed-up for the CYK algorithm-based search.

  3. Computability of Homology for Compact Absolute Neighbourhood Retracts

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pieter; Contributed Papers

    2009-01-01

    In this note we discuss the information needed to compute the homology groups of a topological space. We argue that the natural class of spaces to consider are the compact absolute neighbourhood retracts, since for these spaces the homology groups are finite. We show that we need to specify both a function which defines a retraction from a neighbourhood of the space in the Hilbert cube to the space itself, and a sufficiently fine over-approximation of the set. However, neither the retraction ...

  4. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  5. Bioaugmentation with Endophytic Bacterium E6S Homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii Enhances Metal Rhizoaccumulation in Host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Oliveira, Rui S.; Freitas, Helena; Luo, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Application of hyperaccumulator-endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil, and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb). Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn > Cd >Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn, and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants. PMID:26870079

  6. Bioaugmentation with Endophytic Bacterium E6S Homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii Enhances Metal Rhizoaccumulation in Host Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Oliveira, Rui S; Freitas, Helena; Luo, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Application of hyperaccumulator-endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil, and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb). Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn > Cd >Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn, and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants. PMID:26870079

  7. Bioaugmentation with endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii enhances metal rhizoaccumulation in host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of hyperaccumulator–endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn and Pb. Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn ˃ Cd ˃ Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants.

  8. Evolutionary transitions in bacterial symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Joel L.; Skophammer, Ryan G.; Regus, John U.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse bacterial lineages form beneficial infections with eukaryotic hosts. The origins, evolution, and breakdown of these mutualisms represent important evolutionary transitions. To examine these key events, we synthesize data from diverse interactions between bacteria and eukaryote hosts. Five evolutionary transitions are investigated, including the origins of bacterial associations with eukaryotes, the origins and subsequent stable maintenance of bacterial mutualism with hosts, the captur...

  9. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine;

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin...

  10. Vanishing of the contact homology of overtwisted contact 3--manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Mei-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We give a proof of, for the case of contact structures defined by global contact 1-forms, a Theorem stated by Eliashberg that for any overtwisted contact structure on a closed 3-manifold, its contact homology is 0. A different proof is also outlined in the appendix by Yakov Eliashberg.

  11. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  12. K-homology and index theory on contact manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Paul F

    2011-01-01

    Let X be a closed connected contact manifold. On X there is a naturally arising class of hypoelliptic (but not elliptic) operators which are Fredholm. In this paper we solve the index problem for this class of operators. The solution is achieved by combining Van Erp's earlier partial result with the Baum-Douglas isomorphism of analytic and geometric K-homology.

  13. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs

  14. On the skein exact squence for knot Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Ozsvath, Peter; Szabo, Zoltan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the skein exact sequence for knot Floer homology. We prove precise graded version of this sequence, and also one using $\\HFm$. Moreover, a complete argument is also given purely within the realm of grid diagrams.

  15. Real bundle gerbes, orientifolds and twisted KR-homology

    CERN Document Server

    Hekmati, Pedram; Szabo, Richard J; Vozzo, Raymond F

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a notion of Real bundle gerbes on manifolds equipped with an involution. We elucidate their relation to Jandl gerbes and prove that they are classified by their Real Dixmier-Douady class in Grothendieck's equivariant sheaf cohomology. We show that the Grothendieck group of Real bundle gerbe modules is isomorphic to twisted KR-theory for a torsion Real Dixmier-Douady class. Building on the Baum-Douglas model for K-homology and the orientifold construction in string theory, we introduce geometric cycles for twisted KR-homology groups using Real bundle gerbe modules. We prove that this defines a real-oriented generalised homology theory dual to twisted KR-theory for Real closed manifolds, and more generally for Real finite CW-complexes, for any Real Dixmier-Douady class. This is achieved by defining an explicit natural transformation to analytic twisted KR-homology and proving that it is an isomorphism. Our constructions give a new framework for the classification of orientifolds in string theory, p...

  16. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10-5 recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  17. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  18. Topological Hochschild homology and the Bass trace conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berrick, A. J.; Hesselholt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We use the methods of topological Hochschild homology to shed new light on groups satisfying the Bass trace conjecture. Factorization of the Hattori–Stallings rank map through the Bökstedt–Hsiang–Madsen cyclotomic trace map leads to Linnell's restriction on such groups. As a new consequence of this...

  19. On the Homology of Congruence Subgroups and K3(Z)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ronnie; Szczarba, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Let Γ(n;p) be the congruence subgroup of SL(n;Z) of level p. We study the homology and cohomology of Γ(n;p) as modules over SL(n;Fp) and apply our results to obtain an upper bound for the order of K3(Z). PMID:16592224

  20. On rationality of logarithmic Q-homology planes - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal surfaces over the complex plane are considered that are logarithmic (i.e., all its singularities are of the quotient type) and of which all reduced homology groups with rational coefficients vanish. It is proved that all such planes are rational. 16 refs

  1. Annotating Simplices with a Homology Basis and Its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Busaryev, Oleksiy; Chen, Chao; Dey, Tamal K; Wang, Yusu

    2011-01-01

    Let $K$ be a simplicial complex and $g$ the rank of its $p$-th homology group $H_p(K)$ defined with $Z_2$ coefficients. We show that we can compute a basis $H$ of $H_p(K)$ and annotate each $p$-simplex of $K$ with a binary vector of length $g$ with the following property: the annotations, summed over all $p$-simplices in any $p$-cycle $z$, provide the coordinate vector of the homology class $[z]$ in the basis $H$. The basis and the annotations for all simplices can be computed in $O(n^{\\omega})$ time, where $n$ is the size of $K$ and $\\omega<2.376$ is a quantity so that two $n\\times n$ matrices can be multiplied in $O(n^{\\omega})$ time. The pre-computation of annotations permits answering queries about the independence or the triviality of $p$-cycles efficiently. Using annotations of edges in 2-complexes, we derive better algorithms for computing optimal basis and optimal homologous cycles in 1-dimensional homology. Specifically, for computing an optimal basis of $H_1(K)$, we improve the time complexity kn...

  2. On the zeroth L^2-homology of a quantum group

    OpenAIRE

    Kyed, David

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the zeroth L^2-Betti number of a compact quantum group vanishes unless the underlying C*-algebra is finite dimensional and that the zeroth L^2-homology itself is non-trivial exactly when the quantum group is coamenable.

  3. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  4. Actions of SL(n,Z) on homology spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Parwani, Kamlesh

    2005-01-01

    Any continuous action of SL(n,Z), where n > 2, on a r-dimensional mod 2 homology sphere factors through a finite group action if r < n - 1. In particular, any continuous action of SL(n+2,Z) on the n-dimensional sphere factors through a finite group action.

  5. Using intron position conservation for homology-based gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilwagen, Jens; Wenk, Michael; Erickson, Jessica L; Schattat, Martin H; Grau, Jan; Hartung, Frank

    2016-05-19

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is very important in bioinformatics and biology and has a decisive influence on many downstream analyses. Homology-based gene prediction programs allow for transferring knowledge about protein-coding genes from an annotated organism to an organism of interest.Here, we present a homology-based gene prediction program called GeMoMa. GeMoMa utilizes the conservation of intron positions within genes to predict related genes in other organisms. We assess the performance of GeMoMa and compare it with state-of-the-art competitors on plant and animal genomes using an extended best reciprocal hit approach. We find that GeMoMa often makes more precise predictions than its competitors yielding a substantially increased number of correct transcripts. Subsequently, we exemplarily validate GeMoMa predictions using Sanger sequencing. Finally, we use RNA-seq data to compare the predictions of homology-based gene prediction programs, and find again that GeMoMa performs well.Hence, we conclude that exploiting intron position conservation improves homology-based gene prediction, and we make GeMoMa freely available as command-line tool and Galaxy integration. PMID:26893356

  6. Gene network homology in prokaryotes using a similarity search approach: queries of quorum sensing signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Quan

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication is mediated by small signaling molecules known as autoinducers. Importantly, autoinducer-2 (AI-2 is synthesized via the enzyme LuxS in over 80 species, some of which mediate their pathogenicity by recognizing and transducing this signal in a cell density dependent manner. AI-2 mediated phenotypes are not well understood however, as the means for signal transduction appears varied among species, while AI-2 synthesis processes appear conserved. Approaches to reveal the recognition pathways of AI-2 will shed light on pathogenicity as we believe recognition of the signal is likely as important, if not more, than the signal synthesis. LMNAST (Local Modular Network Alignment Similarity Tool uses a local similarity search heuristic to study gene order, generating homology hits for the genomic arrangement of a query gene sequence. We develop and apply this tool for the E. coli lac and LuxS regulated (Lsr systems. Lsr is of great interest as it mediates AI-2 uptake and processing. Both test searches generated results that were subsequently analyzed through a number of different lenses, each with its own level of granularity, from a binary phylogenetic representation down to trackback plots that preserve genomic organizational information. Through a survey of these results, we demonstrate the identification of orthologs, paralogs, hitchhiking genes, gene loss, gene rearrangement within an operon context, and also horizontal gene transfer (HGT. We found a variety of operon structures that are consistent with our hypothesis that the signal can be perceived and transduced by homologous protein complexes, while their regulation may be key to defining subsequent phenotypic behavior.

  7. Homology modeling, molecular docking and electrostatic potential analysis of MurF ligase from Klebsiella pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatabalasubramanian; Thiyagarajan, Chinnaiyan; Kalaivanan, Sivakumaran; Selvakumar, Raj; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of availability of moderately protective vaccine and antibiotics, new antibacterial agents are urgently needed to decrease the global incidence of Klebsiella pneumonia infections. MurF ligase, a key enzyme, which participates in the bacterial cell wall assembly, is indispensable to existence of K. pneumonia. MurF ligase lack mammalian vis-à-vis and have high specificity, uniqueness, and occurrence only in eubacteria, epitomizing them as promising therapeutic targets for intervention. In this study, we present a unified approach involving homology modeling and molecular docking studies on MurF ligase enzyme. As part of this study, a homology model of K. pneumonia (MurF ligase) enzyme was predicted for the first time in order to carry out structurebased drug design. The accuracy of the model was further validated using different computational approaches. The comparative molecular docking study on this enzyme was undertaken using different phyto-ligands from Desmodium sp. and a known antibiotic Ciprofloxacin. The docking analysis indicated the importance of hotspots (HIS 281 and ASN 282) within the MurF binding pocket. The Lipinski's rule of five was analyzed for all ligands considered for this study by calculating the ADME/Tox, drug likeliness using Qikprop simulation. Only ten ligands were found to comply with the Lipinski rule of five. Based on the molecular docking results and Lipinki values 6-Methyltetrapterol A was confirmed as a promising lead compound. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design and development of 6-Methyltetrapterol A as a bactericidal agent. PMID:22715301

  8. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  9. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  10. Single-stranded heteroduplex intermediates in λ Red homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red proteins of lambda phage mediate probably the simplest and most efficient homologous recombination reactions yet described. However the mechanism of dsDNA recombination remains undefined. Results Here we show that the Red proteins can act via full length single stranded intermediates to establish single stranded heteroduplexes at the replication fork. We created asymmetrically digestible dsDNA substrates by exploiting the fact that Redα exonuclease activity requires a 5' phosphorylated end, or is blocked by phosphothioates. Using these substrates, we found that the most efficient configuration for dsDNA recombination occurred when the strand that can prime Okazaki-like synthesis contained both homology regions on the same ssDNA molecule. Furthermore, we show that Red recombination requires replication of the target molecule. Conclusions Hence we propose a new model for dsDNA recombination, termed 'beta' recombination, based on the formation of ssDNA heteroduplexes at the replication fork. Implications of the model were tested using (i an in situ assay for recombination, which showed that recombination generated mixed wild type and recombinant colonies; and (ii the predicted asymmetries of the homology arms, which showed that recombination is more sensitive to non-homologies attached to 5' than 3' ends. Whereas beta recombination can generate deletions in target BACs of at least 50 kb at about the same efficiency as small deletions, the converse event of insertion is very sensitive to increasing size. Insertions up to 3 kb are most efficiently achieved using beta recombination, however at greater sizes, an alternative Red-mediated mechanism(s appears to be equally efficient. These findings define a new intermediate in homologous recombination, which also has practical implications for recombineering with the Red proteins.

  11. Supramolecular bacterial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan

    2015-01-01

    For nearly over a decade, a wide variety of dynamic and responsive supramolecular architectures have been investigated and developed to address biological systems. Since the non-covalent interactions between individual molecular components in such architectures are similar to the interactions found in living systems, it was possible to integrate chemically-synthesized and naturally-occurring components to create platforms with interesting bioactive properties. Bacterial cells and recombinant ...

  12. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references

  13. Presence of calcium-binding motifs in PilY1 homologs correlates with Ca-mediated twitching motility and evolutionary history across diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Cruz, Luisa F; Evans, Michael R; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Twitching motility, involving type IV pili, is essential for host colonization and virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. Studies of PilY1, a tip-associated type IV pili protein, indicate that PilY1 functions as a switch between pilus extension and retraction, resulting in twitching motility. Recent work detected a calcium-binding motif in PilY1 of some animal bacterial pathogens and demonstrated that binding of calcium to PilY1 with this motif regulates twitching. Though studies of PilY1 in non-animal pathogens are limited, our group demonstrated that twitching motility in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, which contains three PilY1 homologs, is increased by calcium supplementation. A study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between multiple PilY1 homologs, the presence of calcium-binding motifs therein, and calcium-mediated twitching motility across diverse bacteria. Strains analyzed contained one to three PilY1 homologs, but phylogenetic analyses indicated that PilY1 homologs containing the calcium-binding motif Dx[DN]xDGxxD are phylogenetically divergent from other PilY1 homologs. Plant-associated bacteria included in these analyses were then examined for a calcium-mediated twitching response. Results indicate that bacteria must have at least one PilY1 homolog containing the Dx[DN]xDGxxD motif to display a calcium-mediated increase in twitching motility, which likely reflects an adaption to environmental calcium concentrations. PMID:25688068

  14. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  15. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta De Santi

    Full Text Available The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15 form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs.MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes.

  16. An Improved Method for oriT-Directed Cloning and Functionalization of Large Bacterial Genomic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Kvitko, Brian H.; McMillan, Ian A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2013-01-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient...

  17. An improved technique for the rapid chemical characterisation of bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A K; Rabe, Patrick; Klapschinski, Tim A

    2014-04-14

    A derivative of the pET28c(+) expression vector was constructed. It contains a yeast replication system (2μ origin of replication) and a yeast selectable marker (URA3), and can be used for gene cloning in yeast by efficient homologous recombination, and for heterologous expression in E. coli. The vector was used for the expression and chemical characterisation of three bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:24573945

  18. Involvement of a Bacterial Microcompartment in the Metabolism of Fucose and Rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans

    OpenAIRE

    Elsa Petit; W Greg LaTouf; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Warnick, Thomas A.; Devin Currie; Igor Romashko; Supriya Deshpande; Kelly Haas; Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Colin Wardman; Schnell, Danny J.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC), organelles composed entirely of proteins. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans....

  19. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Javier García-Nafría; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA ( In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in

  20. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  1. Involvement of a Bacterial Microcompartment in the Metabolism of Fucose and Rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Elsa; LaTouf, W. Greg; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Warnick, Thomas A; Currie, Devin; Romashko, Igor; Deshpande, Supriya; Haas, Kelly; Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G; Wardman, Colin; Schnell, Danny J.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic soil bacterium, can directly convert plant biomass into biofuels. The genome of C. phytofermentans contains three loci with genes encoding shell proteins of bacterial microcompartments (BMC), organelles composed entirely of proteins. Methodology and Principal Findings One of the BMC loci has homology to a BMC-encoding locus implicated in the conversion of fucose to propanol and propionate in a human gut commensal, Roseburia inulinivorans. W...

  2. Bacterial Growth Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Mette

    the induction of amino acid starvation. Indeed, the RNA chaperone Hfq is known to facilitate a pairing of small RNA (sRNA) with their target mRNA, affecting gene expression. Thus, our attention was drawn towards sRNA and other regulatory RNAs. The tRNA-linked-repeats (TLR) acting as regulatory RNA...... (regRNA) in collaboration with Hfq seemed to be good candidates for starvation-induced down regulation of tRNA. This is because TLRs are small intergenic repeats located in operons of tRNA and rRNA that share 18-19 nt of homology with the RNA they are located next to with yet an unknown function. It...... turned out that the TLRs were not involved in starvation-induced down regulation of tRNA. As such, my project was subdivided into the following segments:...

  3. The endless tale of non-homologous end-joining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Weterings; David J Chen

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in cells by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species. In addi-tion, they are commonly generated during V(D)J recombination, an essential aspect of the developing immune system. Failure to effectively repair these DSBs can result in chromosome breakage, cell death, onset of cancer, and defects in the immune system of higher vertebrates. Fortunately, all mammalian cells possess two enzymatic pathways that mediate the repair of DSBs: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The NHEJ process utilizes enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA molecule, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and finally repair the DNA break. In this review, all the known enzymes that play a role in the NHEJ process are discussed and a working model for the co-operation of these enzymes during DSB repair is presented.

  4. Community-local homology of force chains in granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Chad; Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen; Bassett, Danielle

    2015-03-01

    The development of robust quantitative measurements of the structure of force chains in granular materials remains an open problem. Recent work of Bassett, et. al. applies community detection algorithms to extract subnetworks of strongly interacting particles, and then computes geometric measures of these networks to characterize local branching. Separately, Kramar, et. al. apply persistent homology to extract robust global signatures of chains in terms of their Betti numbers. Here, we investigate a hybrid of these two approaches, computing low-dimensional persistent homology of the clique complexes of communities in force-chain graphs. Such invariants measure the tendency of core chain sections to branch while remaining insensitive to the presence of tightly-packed collections of particles, thus making them natural candidates for both local and global stability analysis.

  5. Phylogeny and Homologous Recombination in Japanese Encephalitis Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiao-xue; Cong Ying-ying; Wang Xin; Ren Yu-dong; Ren Xiao-feng; Lu Ai-guo; Li Guang-xing

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a significant causative agent of arthropod-borne encephalitis and what is less clear that the factors cause the virus wide spread. The objective was to confirm whether the homologous recombination imposed on JEV. The phylogenetic and homologous recombination analyses were performed based on 163 complete JEV genomes which were recently isolated. They were still separated into five genotypes (GI-GV) and the most of recently isolated JEVs were GI rather than GIII in Asian areas including mainland China. Two recombinant events were identified in JEV and the evidence of the recombination was observed between China and Japan isolates that partitioned into two distinct subclades, but still the same genotype (GIII). Our data further suggested that most of the nucleotides in JEV genome were under negative selection; however, changes within codon 2 316 (amino acid NS4b-44) showed an evidence of the positive selection.

  6. Optimization criteria and biological process enrichment in homologous multiprotein modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Luqman; Karp, Richard M

    2013-06-25

    Biological process enrichment is a widely used metric for evaluating the quality of multiprotein modules. In this study, we examine possible optimization criteria for detecting homologous multiprotein modules and quantify their effects on biological process enrichment. We find that modularity, linear density, and module size are the most important criteria considered, complementary to each other, and that graph theoretical attributes account for 36% of the variance in biological process enrichment. Variations in protein interaction similarity within module pairs have only minor effects on biological process enrichment. As random modules increase in size, both biological process enrichment and modularity tend to improve, although modularity does not show this upward trend in modules with size at most 50 proteins. To adjust for these trends, we recommend a size correction based on random sampling of modules when using biological process enrichment or other attributes to evaluate module boundaries. Characteristics of homologous multiprotein modules optimized for each of the optimization criteria are examined. PMID:23757502

  7. Homology and isomorphism: Bourdieu in conversation with New Institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingyao

    2016-06-01

    Bourdieusian Field Theory (BFT) provided decisive inspiration for the early conceptual formulation of New Institutionalism (NI). This paper attempts to reinvigorate the stalled intellectual dialogue between NI and BFT by comparing NI's concept of isomorphism with BFT's notion of homology. I argue that Bourdieu's understanding of domination-oriented social action, transposable habitus, and a non-linear causality, embodied in his neglected concept of homology, provides an alternative theorization of field-level convergence to New Institutionalism's central idea of institutional isomorphism. To showcase how BFT can be useful for organizational research, I postulate a habitus-informed and field-conditioned theory of transference to enrich NI's spin-off thesis of 'diffusion'. I propose that while NI can benefit from BFT's potential of bringing social structure back into organizational research, BFT can enrich its social analysis by borrowing from NI's elaboration of the symbolic system of organizations. PMID:27218878

  8. Intermediaries in Bredon (Co)homology and Classifying Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dembegioti, Fotini; Talelli, Olympia

    2011-01-01

    For certain contractible G-CW-complexes and F a family of subgroups of G, we construct a spectral sequence converging to the F-Bredon cohomology of G with E1-terms given by the F-Bredon cohomology of the stabilizer subgroups. As applications, we obtain several corollaries concerning the cohomological and geometric dimensions of the classifying space for the family F. We also introduce a hierarchically defined class of groups which contains all countable elementary amenable groups and countable linear groups of characteristic zero, and show that if a group G is in this class, then G has finite F-Bredon (co)homological dimension if and only if G has jump F-Bredon (co)homology.

  9. Homological algebra of Novikov-Shubin invariants and Morse inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Farber, M

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the topological phenomenon "zero in the continuous spectrum", discovered by S.P.Novikov and M.A.Shubin, can be explained in terms of a homology theory on the category of finite polyhedra with values in certain abelian category. This approach implies homotopy invariance of the Novikov-Shubin invariants. Its main advantage is that it allows to use the standard homological techniques, such as spectral sequences, derived functors, universal coefficients etc., while studying the Novikov-Shubin invariants. It also leads to some new quantitative invariants, measuring the Novikov-Shubin phenomenon in a different way, which are used in order to strengthen the Morse type inequalities of Novikov and Shubin.

  10. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  11. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  12. Construction of a novel kind of expression plasmid by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiangling

    2005-01-01

    (2): 91―96.[13]Hong, M., Sam, K., Peter, J. S. et al., Plasmid construction by homologous recombination in yeast, Gene, 1987, 58: 201―216.[14]Prado, F., Aguilera, A., New in-vivo cloning methods, methods by homologous recombination in yeast, Curr. Genet., 1994, 20: 180―183.[15]Jacques, D., DNA insertion system for complex yeast shuttle vectors, Curr. Genet., 1995, 27: 309―311.[16]Erik, D., Bruno, D., Mireille, D. et al., In vivo cloning by homologous recombination in yeast using a two-plasmid-based system, Yeast, 1995, 11: 629―640.[17]Kevin, R. O., Kham, T. V., Susan, M., Chris, P., Recombination-mediated PCR-directed plasmid construction in vivo in yeast, Nucleic Acids Res., 1997, 25(2): 451―452.[18]Falco, S. C., Li, Y. Y., James, R. B., David, B., Genetic properties of chromosomally integrated 2μ plasmid DNA in yeast, Cell, 1982, 29: 573―584.[19]Francesca, S. L., Kevtn, L., Michael, A. R., In vivo site-directed mutagenesis using oligonucleotides, Nature Biotechnology, 2001, 19: 773―776.[20]Chulman, J., Hyuck, K., Sangmee, A. J., In vivo site-directed mutagenesis of yeast plasmids using a three-fragment homologous recombination system, Biotechniques, 2002, 33(2): 288―294.[21]Wach, A., Brachat, A., Pohlmann, R., Philippsen, P., New heterologus modules for classical or PCR-based gene disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiea, Yeast, 1994, 10: 1793―1808.[22]Lorenz, M. C., Muir, R. S., Lim, E. et al., Gene disruption with PCR products in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Gene, 1995, 158: 113―117.[23]Bhargava, J., Direct cloning of genomic DNA by recombinogenic targeting method using a yeast-bacterial shuttle vector, pClasper, Genomics, 1999, 62: 285―288.[24]Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E. F., Maniatis, T., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989.[25]Gietz, R. D., Schiestl, R. H., Williems, A. R. et al., Studies on the transformation of intact yeast cells by the LiAc/SS-DNA/PEG procedure, Yeast, 1995, 11(4): 355

  13. Cosmetic Surgery in Integral Homology $L$-Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhongtao

    2009-01-01

    Let $K$ be a non-trivial knot in $S^3$, and let $r$ and $r'$ be two distinct rational numbers of same sign, allowing $r$ to be infinite; we prove that there is no orientation-preserving homeomorphism between the manifolds $S^3_r(K)$ and $S^3_{r'}(K)$. We further generalize this uniqueness result to knots in arbitrary integral homology L-spaces.

  14. Quantifying Homologous Replacement of Loci between Haloarchaeal Species

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of...

  15. Characterization of a canine homolog of hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Gerold, Gisa; Qaisar, Natasha; Jain, Komal; Henriquez, Jose A.; Firth, Cadhla; Hirschberg, David L.; Rice, Charles M.; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 3% of the world's population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although HCV was discovered more than 20 y ago, its origin remains obscure largely because no closely related animal virus homolog has been identified; furthermore, efforts to understand HCV pathogenesis have been hampered by the absence of animal models other than chimpanzees for human disease. Here we report the identification in domestic dogs of a nonprimate hepacivirus. Comparative phylogenetic...

  16. Amifostine Metabolite WR-1065 Disrupts Homologous Recombination in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Goetz, Wilfried; Murley, Jeffrey S.; David J Grdina; Morgan, William F.; Janet E. Baulch

    2010-01-01

    Repair of DNA damage through homologous recombination (HR) pathways plays a crucial role in maintaining genome stability. However, overstimulation of HR pathways in response to genotoxic stress may abnormally elevate recombination frequencies, leading to increased mutation rates and delayed genomic instability. Radiation-induced genomic instability has been detected after exposure to both low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, but the mechanisms responsible for initiating or p...

  17. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  18. The many facets of homologous recombination at telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Clémence Claussin; Michael Chang

    2015-01-01

    The ends of linear chromosomes are capped by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. A dysfunctional telomere may resemble a DNA double-strand break (DSB), which is a severe form of DNA damage. The presence of one DSB is sufficient to drive cell cycle arrest and cell death. Therefore cells have evolved mechanisms to repair DSBs such as homologous recombination (HR). HR-mediated repair of telomeres can lead to genome instability, a hallmark of cancer cells, wh...

  19. Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking for the Science Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Owen M. McDougal; Comia, Nic; Sambasivarao, S.V.; Remm, Andrew; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom; Maupin, C. Mark; Andersen, Tim

    2013-01-01

    DockoMatic 2.0 is a powerful open source software program (downloadable from sourceforge.net) that simplifies the exploration of computational biochemistry. This manuscript describes a practical tutorial for use in the undergraduate curriculum that introduces students to macromolecular structure creation, ligand binding calculations, and visualization of docking results. A student procedure is provided that illustrates use of DockoMatic to create a homology model for the amino propeptide regi...

  20. GHOSTM: a GPU-accelerated homology search tool for metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of sensitive homology searches are required for mapping DNA sequence fragments to known protein sequences in public and private databases during metagenomic analysis. BLAST is currently used for this purpose, but its calculation speed is insufficient, especially for analyzing the large quantities of sequence data obtained from a next-generation sequencer. However, faster search tools, such as BLAT, do not have sufficient search sensitivity for metagenomic analysis. Thus, a sensitive and efficient homology search tool is in high demand for this type of analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new, highly efficient homology search algorithm suitable for graphics processing unit (GPU calculations that was implemented as a GPU system that we called GHOSTM. The system first searches for candidate alignment positions for a sequence from the database using pre-calculated indexes and then calculates local alignments around the candidate positions before calculating alignment scores. We implemented both of these processes on GPUs. The system achieved calculation speeds that were 130 and 407 times faster than BLAST with 1 GPU and 4 GPUs, respectively. The system also showed higher search sensitivity and had a calculation speed that was 4 and 15 times faster than BLAT with 1 GPU and 4 GPUs. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a GPU-optimized algorithm to perform sensitive sequence homology searches and implemented the system as GHOSTM. Currently, sequencing technology continues to improve, and sequencers are increasingly producing larger and larger quantities of data. This explosion of sequence data makes computational analysis with contemporary tools more difficult. We developed GHOSTM, which is a cost-efficient tool, and offer this tool as a potential solution to this problem.

  1. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miné-Hattab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  2. A Smale Type Result and Applications to Contact Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Martino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this note we will show that the injection of a suitable subspace of the space of Legendrian loops into the full loop space is an S1-equivariant homotopy equivalence. Moreover, since the smaller space is the space of variations of a given action functional, we will compute the relative Contact Homology of a family of tight contact forms on the three-dimensional torus.

  3. Topological Hochschild homology and the Bass trace conjecture

    OpenAIRE

    Berrick, A. J.; Hesselholt, Lars

    2013-01-01

    We use the methods of topological Hochschild homology to shed new light on the groups satisfying the Bass trace conjecture. We show that the factorization of the Hattori-Stallings rank map through the Bokstedt-Hsiang-Madsen cyclotomic trace map leads to Linnell's restriction on such groups. As a new consequence of this restriction, we show that the conjecture holds for any group G with the property that every subgroup that is isomorphic to the additive group of rational numbers has nontrivial...

  4. FastBLAST: homology relationships for millions of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-versus-all BLAST, which searches for homologous pairs of sequences in a database of proteins, is used to identify potential orthologs, to find new protein families, and to provide rapid access to these homology relationships. As DNA sequencing accelerates and data sets grow, all-versus-all BLAST has become computationally demanding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present FastBLAST, a heuristic replacement for all-versus-all BLAST that relies on alignments of proteins to known families, obtained from tools such as PSI-BLAST and HMMer. FastBLAST avoids most of the work of all-versus-all BLAST by taking advantage of these alignments and by clustering similar sequences. FastBLAST runs in two stages: the first stage identifies additional families and aligns them, and the second stage quickly identifies the homologs of a query sequence, based on the alignments of the families, before generating pairwise alignments. On 6.53 million proteins from the non-redundant Genbank database ("NR", FastBLAST identifies new families 25 times faster than all-versus-all BLAST. Once the first stage is completed, FastBLAST identifies homologs for the average query in less than 5 seconds (8.6 times faster than BLAST and gives nearly identical results. For hits above 70 bits, FastBLAST identifies 98% of the top 3,250 hits per query. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: FastBLAST enables research groups that do not have supercomputers to analyze large protein sequence data sets. FastBLAST is open source software and is available at http://microbesonline.org/fastblast.

  5. The homological content of the Jones representations at $q = -1$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Jens Kristian; Fuglede Jørgensen, Søren

    We generalize a discovery of Kasahara and show that the Jones representations of braid groups, when evaluated at $q = -1$, are related to the action on homology of a branched double cover of the underlying punctured disk. As an application, we prove for a large family of pseudo-Anosov mapping cla...... classes a conjecture put forward by Andersen, Masbaum, and Ueno by extending their original argument for the sphere with four marked points to our more general case....

  6. Identification of New Herpesvirus Gene Homologs in the Human Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Holzerlandt, Ria; Orengo, Christine; Kellam, Paul; Albà, M. Mar

    2002-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites that use many cellular pathways during their replication. Large DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses, have captured a repertoire of cellular genes to block or mimic host immune responses, apoptosis regulation, and cell-cycle control mechanisms. We have conducted a systematic search for all homologs of herpesvirus proteins in the human genome using position-specific scoring matrices representing herpesvirus protein sequence domains, and pair-wise sequence comp...

  7. Persistent Homology Transform for Modeling Shapes and Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Katharine; Mukherjee, Sayan; Doug M Boyer

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a statistic, the persistent homology transform (PHT), to model surfaces in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ and shapes in $\\mathbb{R}^2$. This statistic is a collection of persistence diagrams - multiscale topological summaries used extensively in topological data analysis. We use the PHT to represent shapes and execute operations such as computing distances between shapes or classifying shapes. We prove the map from the space of simplicial complexes in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ into the space ...

  8. TALEN-mediated homologous recombination in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) offer versatile tools to engineer endogenous genomic loci in various organisms. We established a homologous recombination (HR)-based knock-in using TALEN in the crustacean Daphnia magna, a model for ecological and toxicological genomics. We constructed TALENs and designed the 67 bp donor insert targeting a point deletion in the eyeless mutant that shows eye deformities. Co-injection of the TALEN mRNA with donor DNA into eggs led to the precise integration of the donor insert in the germ line, which recovered eye deformities in offspring. The frequency of HR events in the germ line was 2% by using both plasmid and single strand oligo DNA with 1.5 kb and 80 nt homology to the target. Deficiency of ligase 4 involved in non-homologous end joining repair did not increase the HR efficiency. Our data represent efficient HR-based knock-in by TALENs in D. magna, which is a promising tool to understand Daphnia gene functions. PMID:26674741

  9. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  10. Quantifying homologous replacement of loci between haloarchaeal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J Peter; Papke, R Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of 21 genomes representing all major groups. Using a novel algorithm and a concatenated ribosomal protein phylogeny as a reference, we created a directed horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) network of contemporary and ancestral genomes. Gene order analysis revealed that 90% of testable HGTs were by direct homologous replacement, rather than nonhomologous integration followed by a loss. Network analysis revealed an inverse log-linear relationship between HGT frequency and ribosomal protein evolutionary distance that is maintained across the deepest divergences in Halobacteria. We use this mathematical relationship to estimate the total transfers and amino acid substitutions delivered by HGTs in each genome, providing a measure of chimerism. For the relaxed core genes of each genome, we conservatively estimate that 11-20% of their evolution occurred in other haloarchaea. Our findings are unexpected, because the transfer and homologous recombination of relaxed core genes between members of the class Halobacteria disrupts the coevolution of genes; however, the generation of new combinations of divergent but functionally related genes may lead to adaptive phenotypes not available through cumulative mutations and recombination within a single population. PMID:23160063

  11. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gene targeting by 'ends-out' homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR. PMID:24154526

  12. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  13. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  14. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulent-like motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedge-like "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that a maximal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp regi...

  15. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E. (Toledo)

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  16. Analysis of plasmid genes by phylogenetic profiling and visualization of homology relationships using Blast2Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzicalupo Marco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic methods are well-established bioinformatic tools for sequence analysis, allowing to describe the non-independencies of sequences because of their common ancestor. However, the evolutionary profiles of bacterial genes are often complicated by hidden paralogy and extensive and/or (multiple horizontal gene transfer (HGT events which make bifurcating trees often inappropriate. In this context, plasmid sequences are paradigms of network-like relationships characterizing the evolution of prokaryotes. Actually, they can be transferred among different organisms allowing the dissemination of novel functions, thus playing a pivotal role in prokaryotic evolution. However, the study of their evolutionary dynamics is complicated by the absence of universally shared genes, a prerequisite for phylogenetic analyses. Results To overcome such limitations we developed a bioinformatic package, named Blast2Network (B2N, allowing the automatic phylogenetic profiling and the visualization of homology relationships in a large number of plasmid sequences. The software was applied to the study of 47 completely sequenced plasmids coming from Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella spps. Conclusion The tools implemented by B2N allow to describe and visualize in a new way some of the evolutionary features of plasmid molecules of Enterobacteriaceae; in particular it helped to shed some light on the complex history of Escherichia, Salmonella and Shigella plasmids and to focus on possible roles of unannotated proteins. The proposed methodology is general enough to be used for comparative genomic analyses of bacteria.

  17. Structural characterization of inhibitors with selectivity against members of a homologous enzyme family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-01-01

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors. PMID:22039970

  18. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Shivaram Bhat; Athar A Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Since its initial description in 1964, research has transformed spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from a feared disease (with reported mortality of 90%) to a treatable complication of decompensated cirrhosis,albeit with steady prevalence and a high recurrence rate. Bacterial translocation, the key mechanism in the pathogenesis of SBP, is only possible because of the concurrent failure of defensive mechanisms in cirrhosis.Variants of SBP should be treated. Leucocyte esterase reagent strips have managed to shorten the 'tap-toshot' time, while future studies should look into their combined use with ascitic fluid pH. Third generation cephalosporins are the antibiotic of choice because they have a number of advantages. Renal dysfunction has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with SBP. Albumin is felt to reduce the risk of renal impairment by improving effective intravascular volume, and by helping to bind proinflammatory molecules. Following a single episode of SBP, patients should have long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and be considered for liver transplantation.

  19. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M;

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p <0.001). Ceftriaxone plus penicillin as empirical treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... was 75% for penicillin-susceptible episodes, and 24% for penicillin-non-susceptible episodes (p <0.001). Cases involving staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae were under-reported. Among 51 ABM cases with no identified risk factors, nine of 11 cases with penicillin...

  20. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  1. Identification of viruses and viroids by next-generation sequencing and homology-dependent and homology-independent algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingfa; Ding, Shou-Wei; Zhang, Yongjiang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    A fast, accurate, and full indexing of viruses and viroids in a sample for the inspection and quarantine services and disease management is desirable but was unrealistic until recently. This article reviews the rapid and exciting recent progress in the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for the identification of viruses and viroids in plants. A total of four viroids/viroid-like RNAs and 49 new plant RNA and DNA viruses from 18 known or unassigned virus families have been identified from plants since 2009. A comparison of enrichment strategies reveals that full indexing of RNA and DNA viruses as well as viroids in a plant sample at single-nucleotide resolution is made possible by one NGS run of total small RNAs, followed by data mining with homology-dependent and homology-independent computational algorithms. Major challenges in the application of NGS technologies to pathogen discovery are discussed. PMID:26047558

  2. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  3. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Villarreal Manzanilla; Gustavo Silva de Miranda; Alessandro Ponce de Leão Giupponi

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous fe...

  4. Homology for higher-rank graphs and twisted C*-algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Kumjian, Alex; Pask, David; Sims, Aidan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a homology theory for k-graphs and explore its fundamental properties. We establish connections with algebraic topology by showing that the homology of a k-graph coincides with the homology of its topological realisation as described by Kaliszewski et al. We exhibit combinatorial versions of a number of standard topological constructions, and show that they are compatible, from a homological point of view, with their topological counterparts. We show how to twist the C*-algebra o...

  5. Identification of a human src homology 2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatase: a putative homolog of Drosophila corkscrew.

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, R. M.; Plutzky, J; Neel, B G

    1992-01-01

    src homology 2 (SH2) domains direct binding to specific phosphotyrosyl proteins. Recently, SH2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPs) were identified. Using degenerate oligonucleotides and the PCR, we have cloned a cDNA for an additional PTP, SH-PTP2, which contains two SH2 domains and is expressed ubiquitously. When expressed in Escherichia coli, SH-PTP2 displays tyrosine-specific phosphatase activity. Strong sequence similarity between SH-PTP2 and the Drosophila gene corkscrew (csw...

  6. Genetic selection and DNA sequences of 4.5S RNA homologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Thon, G; Tolentino, E

    1989-01-01

    A general strategy for cloning the functional homologs of an Escherichia coli gene was used to clone homologs of 4.5S RNA from other bacteria. The genes encoding these homologs were selected by their ability to complement a deletion of the gene for 4.5S RNA. DNA sequences of the regions encoding...

  7. Equidistribution of geodesics on homology classes and analogues for free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petridis, Y.N.; Risager, Morten

    2005-01-01

    We investigate how often geodesics have homology in a fixed set of the homology lattice of a compact Riemann surface. We prove that closed geodesics are equidistributed on a random set of homology classes and certain arithmetic sets. We explain the analogues for free groups, conjugacy classes and...... discrete logarithms, in particular, we investigate the density of conjugacy classes with relatively prime discrete logarithms....

  8. On mathematical arbitrariness of some papers on the potential homologous linear rule investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The history of homologous linear rule investigation is reviewed simply. The author puts forward a problem worth paying attention to in the recent potential homologous linear rule investigation, especially some mistakes made in these investigations on mathematical foundations. The author also exposes the mathematical arbitrariness of some papers on their potential homologous linear rule investigation.

  9. NMR Structure of Lipoprotein YxeF from Bacillus subtilis Reveals a Calycin Fold and Distant Homology with the Lipocalin Blc from Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Yibing Wu; Marco Punta; Rong Xiao; Acton, Thomas B.; Bharathwaj Sathyamoorthy; Fabian Dey; Markus Fischer; Arne Skerra; Burkhard Rost; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Thomas Szyperski

    2012-01-01

    The soluble monomeric domain of lipoprotein YxeF from the Gram positive bacterium B. subtilis was selected by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) as a target of a biomedical theme project focusing on the structure determination of the soluble domains of bacterial lipoproteins. The solution NMR structure of YxeF reveals a calycin fold and distant homology with the lipocalin Blc from the Gram-negative bacterium E.coli. In particular, the characteristic β-barrel, which is open to...

  10. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  11. Enzymatic properties, evidence for in vivo expression, and intracellular localization of shewasin D, the pepsin homolog from Shewanella denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Ana Rita; Cruz, Rui; Bur, Daniel; Huesgen, Pitter F; Faro, Rosário; Manadas, Bruno; Wlodawer, Alexander; Faro, Carlos; Simões, Isaura

    2016-01-01

    The widespread presence of pepsin-like enzymes in eukaryotes together with their relevance in the control of multiple biological processes is reflected in the large number of studies published so far for this family of enzymes. By contrast, pepsin homologs from bacteria have only recently started to be characterized. The work with recombinant shewasin A from Shewanella amazonensis provided the first documentation of this activity in prokaryotes. Here we extend our studies to shewasin D, the pepsin homolog from Shewanella denitrificans, to gain further insight into this group of bacterial peptidases that likely represent ancestral versions of modern eukaryotic pepsin-like enzymes. We demonstrate that the enzymatic properties of recombinant shewasin D are strongly reminiscent of eukaryotic pepsin homologues. We determined the specificity preferences of both shewasin D and shewasin A using proteome-derived peptide libraries and observed remarkable similarities between both shewasins and eukaryotic pepsins, in particular with BACE-1, thereby confirming their phylogenetic proximity. Moreover, we provide first evidence of expression of active shewasin D in S. denitrificans cells, confirming its activity at acidic pH and inhibition by pepstatin. Finally, our results revealed an unprecedented localization for a family A1 member by demonstrating that native shewasin D accumulates preferentially in the cytoplasm. PMID:27029611

  12. Transposition and homologous recombination drive evolution of pUO-StVR2, a multidrug resistance derivative of pSLT, the virulence plasmid specific of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Rodicio, Rosaura; Montero, Ignacio; García, Patricia; Rodicio, M Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Five variants of a resistant derivative of pSLT (termed pUO-StVR2) were detected in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium recovered in Spain. The structure of these variants revealed the involvement of IS1, IS26 and Tn21-like transposition, as well as homologous recombinati...... understand the co-selection mechanisms that are helping to maintain multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens, despite the structural instability of the responsible DNA....

  13. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  14. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the...... benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial...

  15. The suboptimal structures find the optimal RNAs: homology search for bacterial non-coding RNAsusing suboptimal RNA structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Josef; Krásný, Libor; Bobek, Jan; Ježková, E.; Korelusová, Jana; Vohradský, Jiří

    -, - (2010), s. 1-9. ISSN 1362-4962 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06065; GA ČR GA303/09/0475; GA ČR GA310/07/1009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ncRNAs * RNA structures Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  16. Structural Stability and Unfolding Properties of Thermostable bacterial alpha-amylases: A Comparative Study on Homologous Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Fitter, J.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.

    2004-01-01

    In a comparative investigation on two thermostable alpha-amylases [Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA), T(m) = 86 degrees C and Bacillus licheniformis (BLA), T(m) = 101 degrees C], we studied thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GndHCl)-induced unfolding using fluorescence and CD spectroscopy, as well as dynamic light scattering. Depletion of calcium from specific ion-binding sites in the protein structures reduces the melting temperature tremendously for both alpha-amylases. The reduction is ne...

  17. Building multiclass classifiers for remote homology detection and fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karypis George

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in computational biology. Supervised learning algorithms based on support vector machines are currently one of the most effective methods for solving these problems. These methods are primarily used to solve binary classification problems and they have not been extensively used to solve the more general multiclass remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems. Results We present a comprehensive evaluation of a number of methods for building SVM-based multiclass classification schemes in the context of the SCOP protein classification. These methods include schemes that directly build an SVM-based multiclass model, schemes that employ a second-level learning approach to combine the predictions generated by a set of binary SVM-based classifiers, and schemes that build and combine binary classifiers for various levels of the SCOP hierarchy beyond those defining the target classes. Conclusion Analyzing the performance achieved by the different approaches on four different datasets we show that most of the proposed multiclass SVM-based classification approaches are quite effective in solving the remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems and that the schemes that use predictions from binary models constructed for ancestral categories within the SCOP hierarchy tend to not only lead to lower error rates but also reduce the number of errors in which a superfamily is assigned to an entirely different fold and a fold is predicted as being from a different SCOP class. Our results also show that the limited size of the training data makes it hard to learn complex second-level models, and that models of moderate complexity lead to consistently better results.

  18. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  19. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  20. K-homology and Fredholm Operators II: Elliptic Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Paul; van Erp, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This is an expository paper which gives a proof of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem for elliptic operators. Specifcally, we compute the geometric K-cycle that corresponds to the analytic K-cycle determined by the operator. This paper and its companion ("K-homology and index theory II: Dirac Operators") was written to clear up basic points about index theory that are generally accepted as valid, but for which no proof has been published. Some of these points are needed for the solution of the H...

  1. Immunological response to the Brucella abortus GroEL homolog.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J.; Adams, L G; Ficht, T A

    1996-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of sera from cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 exhibit an elevated serologic response to Hsp62, the GroEL homolog (BaGroEL). Serologic screening of individual cows vaccinated with B. abortus S19 revealed no correlation between the immune response to BaGroEL and protection against a challenge with virulent organisms. The humoral immune response to BaGroEL was restricted to a region of the mature protein which mapped to amino acids 317 to 355 and may...

  2. Homological projective duality for linear systems with base locus

    OpenAIRE

    Carocci, Francesca; Turcinovic, Zak

    2015-01-01

    We show how blowing up varieties in base loci of linear systems gives a procedure for creating new homological projective duals from old. Starting with a HP dual pair $X,Y$ and smooth orthogonal linear sections $X_L,Y_L$, we prove that the blowup of $X$ in $X_L$ is naturally HP dual to $Y_L$. The result does not need $Y$ to exist as a variety, i.e. it may be "noncommutative". We extend the result to the case where the base locus $X_L$ is a multiple of a smooth variety and the universal hyperp...

  3. Length Formulas for the Homology of Generalized Koszul Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Ichim, Bogdan; Vetter, Udo

    2005-01-01

    Let $M$ be a finite module over a noetherian ring $R$ with a free resolution of length 1. We consider the generalized Koszul complexes $\\mathcal{C}_{\\bar\\lambda}(t)$ associated with a map $\\bar\\lambda:M\\to\\mathcal{H}$ into a finite free $R$-module $\\mathcal{H}$ (see [IV], section 3), and investigate the homology of $\\mathcal{C}_{\\bar\\lambda}(t)$ in the special setup when $\\grade I_M=\\rank M=\\dim R$. ($I_M$ is the first non-vanishing Fitting ideal of $M$.) In this case the (interesting) homolo...

  4. Reducible Galois representations and the homology of GL(3,Z)

    CERN Document Server

    Ash, Avner

    2012-01-01

    We prove the following theorem: Let $\\bar\\F_p$ be an algebraic closure of a finite field of characteristic $p$. Let $\\rho$ be a continuous homomorphism from the absolute Galois group of $\\Q$ to $\\GL(3,\\bar\\F_p)$ which is isomorphic to a direct sum of a character and a two-dimensional odd irreducible representation. Under the condition that the conductor of $\\rho$ is squarefree, we prove that $\\rho$ is attached to a Hecke eigenclass in the homology of an arithmetic subgroup $\\Gamma$ of $\\GL(3,\\Z)$. In addition, we prove that the coefficient module needed is, in fact, predicted by a conjecture of Ash, Doud, Pollack, and Sinnott.

  5. Homology of the open moduli space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ib Henning

    2012-01-01

    This is a survey on the proof of a generalized version of the Mumford conjecture obtained in joint work with M. Weiss stating that a certain map between some classifying spaces which a priori have different natures induces an isomorphism at the level of integral homology. We also discuss our proo...... of the original Mumford conjecture stating that the stable rational cohomology of the moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a certain polynomial algebra generated by the Mumford–Morita–Miller cohomology classes of even degrees....

  6. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Ryan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  7. A Markovian analysis of bacterial genome sequence constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Skewes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of nucleotides within a bacterial chromosome is influenced by numerous factors. The degeneracy of the third codon within each reading frame allows some flexibility of nucleotide selection; however, the third nucleotide in the triplet of each codon is at least partly determined by the preceding two. This is most evident in organisms with a strong G + C bias, as the degenerate codon must contribute disproportionately to maintaining that bias. Therefore, a correlation exists between the first two nucleotides and the third in all open reading frames. If the arrangement of nucleotides in a bacterial chromosome is represented as a Markov process, we would expect that the correlation would be completely captured by a second-order Markov model and an increase in the order of the model (e.g., third-, fourth-…order would not capture any additional uncertainty in the process. In this manuscript, we present the results of a comprehensive study of the Markov property that exists in the DNA sequences of 906 bacterial chromosomes. All of the 906 bacterial chromosomes studied exhibit a statistically significant Markov property that extends beyond second-order, and therefore cannot be fully explained by codon usage. An unrooted tree containing all 906 bacterial chromosomes based on their transition probability matrices of third-order shares ∼25% similarity to a tree based on sequence homologies of 16S rRNA sequences. This congruence to the 16S rRNA tree is greater than for trees based on lower-order models (e.g., second-order, and higher-order models result in diminishing improvements in congruence. A nucleotide correlation most likely exists within every bacterial chromosome that extends past three nucleotides. This correlation places significant limits on the number of nucleotide sequences that can represent probable bacterial chromosomes. Transition matrix usage is largely conserved by taxa, indicating that this property is likely

  8. Discovery of a Homolog of Siderophilin in a Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Biao FEI; Peng-Xiu CAO; Su-Qin GAO; Ling-Bo WEI; Bin WANG

    2005-01-01

    Members belonging to the siderophilin family are iron-binding and iron-transporting proteins,which includes transferrin and lactoferrin. They have only been found in animals previously. If siderophilin could be found in and isolated from a plant, its production and subsequent extensive application could be increased. The present study is the first to report the discovery of a homolog of siderophilin in a plant. In order to purify antifreeze proteins from Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.) Cheng f., the authors processed the proteins from the leaves using techniques such as column chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose-52, gel filtration via Sephacryl S-100 HR medium, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectroscopy was performed on the three proteins purified and the sequence of one of the proteins (containing 32 amino acids) was found to have 97%homology with the corresponding part of one type of human lactoferrin. Moreover, one of the two peptides belongs to an iron-binding domain. So, it is possible that siderophilin also exists in plants and plays a role as an antibacterial and antifungal, among other actions.

  9. Using persistent homology and dynamical distances to analyze protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacev-Nikolic, Violeta; Bubenik, Peter; Nikolić, Dragan; Heo, Giseon

    2016-03-01

    Persistent homology captures the evolution of topological features of a model as a parameter changes. The most commonly used summary statistics of persistent homology are the barcode and the persistence diagram. Another summary statistic, the persistence landscape, was recently introduced by Bubenik. It is a functional summary, so it is easy to calculate sample means and variances, and it is straightforward to construct various test statistics. Implementing a permutation test we detect conformational changes between closed and open forms of the maltose-binding protein, a large biomolecule consisting of 370 amino acid residues. Furthermore, persistence landscapes can be applied to machine learning methods. A hyperplane from a support vector machine shows the clear separation between the closed and open proteins conformations. Moreover, because our approach captures dynamical properties of the protein our results may help in identifying residues susceptible to ligand binding; we show that the majority of active site residues and allosteric pathway residues are located in the vicinity of the most persistent loop in the corresponding filtered Vietoris-Rips complex. This finding was not observed in the classical anisotropic network model. PMID:26812805

  10. Characterization of a canine homolog of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Gerold, Gisa; Qaisar, Natasha; Jain, Komal; Henriquez, Jose A; Firth, Cadhla; Hirschberg, David L; Rice, Charles M; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-07-12

    An estimated 3% of the world's population is chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although HCV was discovered more than 20 y ago, its origin remains obscure largely because no closely related animal virus homolog has been identified; furthermore, efforts to understand HCV pathogenesis have been hampered by the absence of animal models other than chimpanzees for human disease. Here we report the identification in domestic dogs of a nonprimate hepacivirus. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the canine hepacivirus (CHV) confirmed it to be the most genetically similar animal virus homolog of HCV. Bayesian Markov chains Monte Carlo and associated time to most recent common ancestor analyses suggest a mean recent divergence time of CHV and HCV clades within the past 500-1,000 y, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CHV may provide new insights into the origin and evolution of HCV and a tractable model system with which to probe the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of diseases caused by hepacivirus infection. PMID:21610165

  11. Gimeracil sensitizes cells to radiation via inhibition of homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: 5-Chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine (Gimeracil) is a component of an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1. Gimeracil is originally added to S-1 to yield prolonged 5-FU concentrations in tumor tissues by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, which degrades 5-FU. We found that Gimeracil by itself had the radiosensitizing effect. Methods and materials: We used various cell lines deficient in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) as well as DLD-1 and HeLa in clonogenic assay. γ-H2AX focus formation and SCneo assay was performed to examine the effects of Gimeracil on DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms. Results: Results of γ-H2AX focus assay indicated that Gimeracil inhibited DNA DSB repair. It did not sensitize cells deficient in HR but sensitized those deficient in NHEJ. In SCneo assay, Gimeracil reduced the frequency of neo-positive clones. Additionally, it sensitized the cells in S-phase more than in G0/G1. Conclusions: Gimeracil inhibits HR. Because HR plays key roles in the repair of DSBH caused by radiotherapy, Gimeracil may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy through the suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair pathways.

  12. Open-closed field theories, string topology, and Hochschild homology

    CERN Document Server

    Blumberg, Andrew J; Teleman, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    In this expository paper we discuss a project regarding the string topology of a manifold, that was inspired by recent work of Moore-Segal, Costello, and Hopkins and Lurie, on "open-closed topological conformal field theories". Given a closed, oriented manifold M, we describe the "string topology category" S_M, which is enriched over chain complexes over a fixed field k. The objects of S_M are connected, closed, oriented submanifolds N of M, and the complex of morphisms between N_1 and N_2 is a chain complex homotopy equivalent to the singular chains C_*(P_{N_1, N_2}), where C_*(P_{N_1, N_2}) is the space of paths in M that start in N_1 and end in N_2. The composition pairing in this category is a chain model for the open string topology operations of Sullivan and expanded upon by Harrelson, and Ramirez. We will describe a calculation yielding that the Hochschild homology of the category S_M is the homology of the free loop space, LM. Another part of the project is to calculate the Hochschild cohomology of th...

  13. Non-homologous end joining: advances and frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Rong; Xu, Dongyi

    2016-07-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious form of DNA damage. In human cells, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of DSBs. Different types of DSBs result in different subsets of NHEJ repair strategies. These variations in NHEJ repair strategies depend on numerous elements, such as the flexible recruitment of NHEJ-related proteins, the complexity of the DSB ends, and the spatial- and temporal-ordered formation of the multi-protein complex. On the one hand, current studies of DNA DSBs repair focus on the repair pathway choices between homologous recombination and classic or alternative NHEJ. On the other hand, increasing researches have also deepened the significance and dug into the cross-links between the NHEJ pathway and the area of genome organization and aging. Although remarkable progress has been made in elucidating the underlying principles during the past decades, the detailed mechanism of action in response to different types of DSBs remains largely unknown and needs further evaluation in the future study. PMID:27217473

  14. Physiological homology between Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cardiovascular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Choma

    2011-05-01

    The physiology of the Drosophila melanogaster cardiovascular system remains poorly characterized compared with its vertebrate counterparts. Basic measures of physiological performance remain unknown. It also is unclear whether subtle physiological defects observed in the human cardiovascular system can be reproduced in D. melanogaster. Here we characterize the cardiovascular physiology of D. melanogaster in its pre-pupal stage by using high-speed dye angiography and optical coherence tomography. The heart has vigorous pulsatile contractions that drive intracardiac, aortic and extracellular-extravascular hemolymph flow. Several physiological measures, including weight-adjusted cardiac output, body-length-adjusted aortic velocities and intracardiac shear forces, are similar to those in the closed vertebrate cardiovascular systems, including that of humans. Extracellular-extravascular flow in the pre-pupal D. melanogaster circulation drives convection-limited fluid transport. To demonstrate homology in heart dysfunction, we showed that, at the pre-pupal stage, a troponin I mutant, held-up2 (hdp2, has impaired systolic and diastolic heart wall velocities. Impaired heart wall velocities occur in the context of a non-dilated phenotype with a mildly depressed fractional shortening. We additionally derive receiver operating characteristic curves showing that heart wall velocity is a potentially powerful discriminator of systolic heart dysfunction. Our results demonstrate physiological homology and support the use of D. melanogaster as an animal model of complex cardiovascular disease.

  15. On discrete symmetries and torsion homology in F-theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Christoph; Palti, Eran; Till, Oskar; Weigand, Timo

    2015-06-01

    We study the relation between discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory compactifications and torsion homology on the associated Calabi-Yau manifold. Focusing on the simplest example of a symmetry, we show that there are two physically distinct ways that such a discrete gauge symmetry can arise. First, compactifications of M-Theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds which support a genus-one fibration with a bi-section are known to be dual to six-dimensional F-theory vacua with a gauge symmetry. We show that the resulting five-dimensional theories do not have a symmetry but that the latter emerges only in the F-theory decompactification limit. Accordingly the genus-one fibred Calabi-Yau manifolds do not exhibit torsion in homology. Associated to the bi-section fibration is a Jacobian fibration which does support a section. Compactifying on these related but distinct varieties does lead to a symmetry in five dimensions and, accordingly, we find explicitly an associated torsion cycle. We identify the expected particle and membrane system of the discrete symmetry in terms of wrapped M2 and M5 branes and present a field-theory description of the physics for both cases in terms of circle reductions of six-dimensional theories. Our results and methods generalise straightforwardly to larger discrete symmetries and to four-dimensional compactifications.

  16. Tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Sun, Eileen S; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2004-11-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi, the etiologic agent of rabbit venereal syphilis, is morphologically indistinguishable from Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the human syphilis treponeme, and induces similar immune responses and histopathologic changes in the infected host. Because of their high degree of relatedness, comparative studies are likely to identify genetic determinants that contribute to pathogenesis or virulence in human syphilis. The tpr (Treponema pallidum repeat) genes are believed to code for potential virulence factors. In this study, we identified 10 tpr homologs in Treponema paraluiscuniculi Cuniculi A strain and determined their sequence architecture. Half of this group of paralogous genes were predicted to be nonfunctional due to the presence of frameshifts and premature stop codons. Furthermore, the immune response against the T. paraluiscuniculi Tpr homologs in long-term-infected rabbits was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lymphocyte proliferation assay, showing that TprK is the only target of the antibody and T-cell responses during experimental infection and emphasizing the importance of this putative virulence factor in venereal treponematosis. PMID:15501788

  17. Bacterial ghosts provided with antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts Cornelis, Johannes; Ramasamy, Ranjan; Steen, Anton; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    Methods for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium are disclosed. The proteinaceous substance includes an AcmA cell-wall binding domain, homolog or functional derivative thereof. The method includes treating the cell-wall material with a sol

  18. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  19. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  20. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  1. Transport Powered by Bacterial Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations.

  2. Transport powered by bacterial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peshkov, Anton; Sokolov, Andrey; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-04-18

    We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. In our experiments and simulations, a microwedgelike "bulldozer" draws energy from a bacterial bath of varied density. We obtain that an optimal transport speed is achieved in the turbulent state of the bacterial suspension. This apparent rectification of random motion of bacteria is caused by polar ordered bacteria inside the cusp region of the carrier, which is shielded from the outside turbulent fluctuations. PMID:24785075

  3. Identification and characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamic peptidases, from the MEROPS family G1, are a distinct group of peptidases characterized by a catalytic dyad consisting of a glutamate and a glutamine residue, optimal activity at acidic pH and insensitivity towards the microbial derived protease inhibitor, pepstatin. Previously, only glutamic peptidases derived from filamentous fungi have been characterized. Results We report the first characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase (pepG1, derived from the thermoacidophilic bacteria Alicyclobacillus sp. DSM 15716. The amino acid sequence identity between pepG1 and known fungal glutamic peptidases is only 24-30% but homology modeling, the presence of the glutamate/glutamine catalytic dyad and a number of highly conserved motifs strongly support the inclusion of pepG1 as a glutamic peptidase. Phylogenetic analysis places pepG1 and other putative bacterial and archaeal glutamic peptidases in a cluster separate from the fungal glutamic peptidases, indicating a divergent and independent evolution of bacterial and fungal glutamic peptidases. Purification of pepG1, heterologously expressed in Bacillus subtilis, was performed using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified peptidase was characterized with respect to its physical properties. Temperature and pH optimums were found to be 60°C and pH 3-4, in agreement with the values observed for the fungal members of family G1. In addition, pepG1 was found to be pepstatin-insensitive, a characteristic signature of glutamic peptidases. Conclusions Based on the obtained results, we suggest that pepG1 can be added to the MEROPS family G1 as the first characterized bacterial member.

  4. Molecular cloning of cellulase genes from indigenous bacterial isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigenous cellulolytic bacterial isolates having high activities in degrading carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were isolated from local environments. Identification of these isolates were performed by molecular techniques. By using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, PCR products encoding cellulase gene were amplified from the total genomic DNAs. Purified PCR product was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli host system. The complete nucleotide sequences of the cellulase genes determined. The analysis of amino acid sequences deduced from the genes indicated that the cloned DNA fragments show high homology to those of endoglucanase genes of family GH5. All cloned genes consist of an N-terminal signal peptide, a catalytic domain of family 5 glycosyl hydrolase and a cellulose-binding domain of family III. (Author)

  5. Disease: H00436 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dification and increases TRACP secretion in osteoclasts. J Bone Miner Res 23:380-91... of the osteopetrosis gene, pleckstrin homolog domain containing family M (with run domain) member 1 (PLEKHM1), impairs vesicular aci

  6. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  7. Cloning of a peroxidase gene from cassava with potential as a molecular marker for resistance to bacterial blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Luiz Filipe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is considered one of the most important bacterial diseases of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz. In order to characterize the cassava genes involved in resistance to this disease, a genomic clone of a cationic peroxidase gene, MEPX1, was isolated by PCR from cassava cultivar MCOL 22. The DNA sequence of MEPX1 showed high homology with other plant peroxidase genes and contained a large intron typical of peroxidase genes. The predicted translation product showed a heme-ligand motif, also a characteristic of peroxidases, as well as phosphorylation, myristoylation and glycosylation sites. The amino acid sequence had 75 % homology with two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases. A Southern blot of 17 cassava cultivars, probed with MEPX1, showed multiple hybridization bands. Polymorphisms between cultivars generally reflected geographic origin, but there was also an association with resistance to CBB, indicating that MEPX1 could be a potentially useful marker for this trait.

  8. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  9. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  10. Bacterial flora of sturgeon fingerling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on microbial populations is a suitable tool to understand and apply control methods to improve the sanitary level of production in fish breeding and rearing centers, ensure health of sturgeon fingerlings at the time of their release into the rivers and also in the conversation and restoration of these valuable stocks in the Caspian Sea, Iran. A laboratory research based on Austin methods (Austin, B., Austin, D.A. 1993) was conducted for bacterial study on 3 sturgeon species naming A. persicus, A. stellatus and A. nudiventris during different growth stages. Bacterial flora of Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Edwardsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas were determined. The factors which may induce changes in bacterial populations during different stages of fife are the followings: quality of water in rearing ponds, different conditions for growth stages, suitable time for colonization of bacterial flora in rearing pond, water temperature increase in fingerlings size and feeding condition. (author)

  11. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  12. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate on whether or not muscle is actually sterile. The numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations often reflect those of the surrounding water. The role of the bacteria includes the ability to degrade complex m...

  13. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. UNESP. Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Caiut, Jose Mauricio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo. Departamento de Quimica - FFCLRP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  14. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    AH Movahedian; R Moniri; Z Mosayebi

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI) broth accordi...

  15. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  16. Mast cells in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in immunity towards bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which mast cells contribute to the host response are only partially understood. Previous studies have examined how mast cells react to purified bacterial cell wall components, such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate how mast cells react to live bacteria we co-cultured mast cells and the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus equi (S. equi) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)...

  17. Studies of Experimental Bacterial Translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Stenbäck, Anders

    2005-01-01

    One of the main obstacles to maintaining patients with short bowel syndrome on parenteral nutrition, or successfully transplanting these patients with a small bowel graft, is the many severe infections that occur. Evidence is accumulating that translocating bacteria from the patient’s bowel causes a significant part of these infections. In this thesis bacterial translocation is studied in a Thiry-Vella loop of defunctionalised small bowel in the rat. Bacterial translocation to the mesenteric ...

  18. Bacterial translocation: impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable amount of data in humans showing that patients who cannot take in nutrients enterally have more organ failure in the intensive care unit, a less favourable prognosis, and a higher frequency of septicaemia, in particular involving bacterial species from the intestinal tract. However, there is little evidence that this is connected with translocation of bacterial species in humans. Animal data more uniformly imply the existence of such a connection. The main focus of thi...

  19. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial gro...

  20. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ingar; Tribble, Gena D; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it a...

  1. Bacterial contamination of radiopharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examinations of the microflora of the air, personnel hands' skin, and surface of the equipment were performed in the Centre for Nuclear research, Libya. It is stated that bacterial contamination was maximal in winter and minimal in summer. The authors believe that human factor is the crucial in bacterial contamination. The microflora detected at the surfaces of equipment contains increased levels of radioresistent forms of bacteria. 8 refs.; 3 tabs

  2. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara

    2006-03-01

    causales son virales lo cual conlleva a las diferentes sub-clasificaciones. También en ciertos casos puede ser ocasionada por hongos, bacterias atípicas, micobacterias y parásitos.In Costa Rica the bacterial meningitis had turn into a high-priority subject in which to monitoring epidemiologist. It had been talked about in the last months, to dice an increase in the attention is published of this subject, due to this phenomenon it becomes necessary to make a revision of topic. Meningitis is an inflammation of leptomeninges and colonization of the subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (LCR due to different agents, which produces meningeal symptoms (ex. migraine, neck rigidity, and photophobia and pleocytosis in LCR. De pending on the variables to take into account is possible to group it in different classifications, taking into account the time of evolution are possible to be divided in acute or chronic, to first with few hours or days of beginning of the symptoms, whereas the chronicle also presents a silence course but of the disease of approximately 4 weeks of instauration. There is a difference according to its etiologic agent; they can be infectious and non-infectious. Examples of common non-infectious causes include medications (ex, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antibiotics and carcinomatosis. A classification exists as well according to the causal agent. The acute bacterial meningitis remarks a bacterial origin of the syndrome, which characterizes by the by an acute onset of meningeal symptoms and neutrophilic pleocytosis. Each one of the bacteriological agents, parasitic or fungus finishes by characterizing the different presentations of the clinical features (ex, meningocóccica meningitis, Cryptococcus meningitis. Finally, there is also the aseptic meningitis, denominated in this form because it’s nonpyogenic cellular response caused by many types of agents. The patients show an acute beginning of symptoms, fever and lymphocytic pleocytosis. After

  4. Highly Efficient Modification of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) Using Novel Shuttle Vectors Containing the R6Kγ Origin of Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Shiaoching; Yang, Xiangdong William; Li, Chenjian; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mediated transgenesis has proven to be a highly reliable way to obtain accurate transgene expression for in vivo studies of gene expression and function. A rate-limiting step in use of this technology to characterize large numbers of genes has been the process with which BACs can be modified by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. We report here a highly efficient method for modifying BACs by using a novel set of shuttle vectors that contain the ...

  5. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss

    OpenAIRE

    den Bakker, Henk C.; Cummings, Craig A.; Ferreira, Vania; Vatta, Paolo; Orsi, Renato H.; Degoricija, Lovorka; Barker, Melissa; Petrauskene, Olga; Furtado, Manohar R; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with rega...

  6. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana Dulal; Benjamin Silver; Hua Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination syste...

  7. The graded Jacobi algebras and (co)homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi algebroids (i.e. 'Jacobi versions' of Lie algebroids) are studied in the context of graded Jacobi brackets on graded commutative algebras. This unifies various concepts of graded Lie structures in geometry and physics. A method of describing such structures by classical Lie algebroids via certain gauging (in the spirit of E Witten's gauging of the exterior derivative) is developed. One constructs a corresponding Cartan differential calculus (graded commutative one) in a natural manner. This, in turn, gives canonical generating operators for triangular Jacobi algebroids. One gets, in particular, the Lichnerowicz-Jacobi homology operators associated with classical Jacobi structures. Courant-Jacobi brackets are obtained in a similar way and used to define an abstract notion of a Courant-Jacobi algebroid and Dirac-Jacobi structure

  8. Homology Models of Melatonin Receptors: Challenges and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rivara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin exerts many of its actions through the activation of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, named MT1 and MT2. So far, a number of different MT1 and MT2 receptor homology models, built either from the prototypic structure of rhodopsin or from recently solved X-ray structures of druggable GPCRs, have been proposed. These receptor models differ in the binding modes hypothesized for melatonin and melatonergic ligands, with distinct patterns of ligand-receptor interactions and putative bioactive conformations of ligands. The receptor models will be described, and they will be discussed in light of the available information from mutagenesis experiments and ligand-based pharmacophore models. The ability of these ligand-receptor complexes to rationalize structure-activity relationships of known series of melatonergic compounds will be commented upon.

  9. Quota Complexes, Persistant Homology and the Goldbach Conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Pakianathan, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of a quota complex and study how the topology of these quota complexes changes as the quota is changed. This problem is a simple "linear" version of the general question in Morse Theory of how the topology of a space varies with a parameter. We give examples of natural and basic quota complexes where this problem codifies questions about the distribution of primes, squares and divisors in number theory and as an example provide natural topological formulations of the prime number theorem, the twin prime conjecture, Goldbach's conjecture, Lehmer's conjecture, the Riemann Hypothesis and the existance of odd perfect numbers among other things. We also consider random quota complexes associated to sequences of independent random variables and show that various formulas for expected topological quantities give L-series and Euler product analogs of interest. Keywords: Quota system, persistant homology, Goldbach conjecture, Riemann Hypothesis, random complexes.

  10. Homological interpretation of extensions and biextensions of 1-motives

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolin, Cristiana

    2008-01-01

    Let k be a separably closed field. Let K_i=[A_i \\to B_i] (for i=1,2,3) be three 1-motives defined over k. We define the geometrical notions of extension of K_1 by K_3 and of biextension of (K_1,K_2) by K_3. We then compute the homological interpretation of these new geometrical notions: namely, the group Biext^0(K_1,K_2;K_3) of automorphisms of any biextension of (K_1,K_2) by K_3 is canonically isomorphic to the cohomology group Ext^0(K_1 \\otimes K_2,K_3), and the group Biext^1(K_1,K_2;K_3) o...

  11. Future trypanosomatid phylogenies: refined homologies, supertrees and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stothard JR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been good progress in inferring the evolutionary relationships within trypanosomes from DNA data as until relatively recently, many relationships have remained rather speculative. Ongoing molecular studies have provided data that have adequately shown Trypanosoma to be monophyletic and, rather surprisingly, that there are sharply contrasting levels of genetic variation within and between the major trypanosomatid groups. There are still, however, areas of research that could benefit from further development and resolution that broadly fall upon three questions. Are the current statements of evolutionary homology within ribosomal small sub-unit genes in need of refinement? Can the published phylograms be expanded upon to form `supertrees' depicting further relationships? Does a bifurcating tree structure impose an untenable dogma upon trypanosomatid phylogeny where hybridisation or reticulate evolutionary steps have played a part? This article briefly addresses these three questions and, in so doing, hopes to stimulate further interest in the molecular evolution of the group.

  12. Optimised fine and coarse parallelism for sequence homology search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiandong; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2006-01-01

    New biological experimental techniques are continuing to generate large amounts of data using DNA, RNA, human genome and protein sequences. The quantity and quality of data from these experiments makes analyses of their results very time-consuming, expensive and impractical. Searching on DNA and protein databases using sequence comparison algorithms has become one of the most powerful techniques to better understand the functionality of particular DNA, RNA, genome, or protein sequence. This paper presents a technique to effectively combine fine and coarse grain parallelism using general-purpose processors for sequence homology database searches. The results show that the classic Smith-Waterman sequence alignment algorithm achieves super linear performance with proper scheduling and multi-level parallel computing at no additional cost. PMID:18048183

  13. Homological finiteness properties of monoids, their ideals and maximal subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We consider the general question of how the homological finiteness property left-FPn holding in a monoid influences, and conversely depends on, the property holding in the substructures of that monoid. In particular we show that left-FPn is inherited by the maximal subgroups in a completely simple minimal ideal, in the case that the minimal ideal has finitely many left ideals. For completely simple semigroups we prove the converse, and as a corollary show that a completely simple semigroup is of type left- and right-FPn if and only if it has finitely many left and right ideals and all of its maximal subgroups are of type FPn. Also, given an ideal of a monoid, we show that if the ideal has a two-sided identity element then the containing monoid is of type left-FPn if and only if the ideal is of type left-FPn.

  14. Representation theory a homological algebra point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

      Introducing the representation theory of groups and finite dimensional algebras, this book first studies basic non-commutative ring theory, covering the necessary background of elementary homological algebra and representations of groups to block theory. It further discusses vertices, defect groups, Green and Brauer correspondences and Clifford theory. Whenever possible the statements are presented in a general setting for more general algebras, such as symmetric finite dimensional algebras over a field. Then, abelian and derived categories are introduced in detail and are used to explain stable module categories, as well as derived categories and their main invariants and links between them. Group theoretical applications of these theories are given – such as the structure of blocks of cyclic defect groups – whenever appropriate. Overall, many methods from the representation theory of algebras are introduced. Representation Theory assumes only the most basic knowledge of linear algebra, groups, rings ...

  15. Development and characterization of a homologous radioimmunoassay for equine prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific and sensitive homologous radioimmunoassay has been developed for equine prolactin, suitable for measuring prolactin concentrations in serum of horses. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from 0.4 to 0.6 ng/ml and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation averaged 6.9 and 15.4%, respectively, for five doses of hormone. Cross-reactivity with other mammalian and nonmammalian prolactins and growth hormones was less than 20 and 0.3%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with equine growth hormone was less than 0.07%. Equine serum and pituitary extracts showed parallel dilution-response curves with equine prolactin. The percentage recovery of exogenous equine prolactin in serum was 89%. Preliminary analysis of several physiological samples (stallions, pregnant, and nonpregnant mares) yielded values from 0.6 to 12.0 ng/ml

  16. Studies of Flerovium and Element 115 Homologs with Macrocyclic Extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z >= 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z >= 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high-purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies; crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions. Finally. a potential chemical system for Fl was established based on the Eichrom Pb resin, and insight to an improved system based on thiacrown ethers is presented.

  17. Internal and External Reconnection Series Homologous Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on SOHO and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, we examine a series of morphologically homologous solar flares occurring in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active region 8210 over May 1-2, 1998. An emerging flux region (EFR) impacted against a sunspot to the west and next to a coronal hole to the east is the source of the repeated flaring. An SXT sigmoid parallels the EFR's neutral line at the site of the initial flaring in soft X rays. In EIT each flaring episode begins with the formation of a crinkle pattern external to the EFR. These EIT crinkles move out from, and then in toward, the EFR with velocities approx. 20 km/ s. A shrinking and expansion of the width of the coronal hole coincides with the crinkle activity, and generation and evolution of a postflare loop system begins near the time of crinkle formation. Using a schematic based on magnetograms of the region, we suggest that these observations are consistent with the standard reconnection-based model for solar eruptions but are modified by the presence of the additional magnetic fields of the sunspot and coronal hole. In the schematic, internal reconnection begins inside of the EFR-associated fields, unleashing a flare, postflare loops, and a coronal mass ejection (CME). External reconnection, first occurring between the escaping CME and the coronal hole field and second occurring between fields formed as a result of the first external reconnection, results in the EIT crinkles and changes in the coronal hole boundary. By the end of the second external reconnection, the initial setup is reinstated; thus the sequence can repeat, resulting in morphologically homologous eruptions. Our inferred magnetic topology is similar to that suggested in the "breakout model" of eruptions although we cannot determine if our eruptions are released primarily by the breakout mechanism (external reconnection) or, alternatively

  18. A rat homolog of the mouse deafness mutant jerker (je).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truett, G E; Walker, J A; Brock, J W

    1996-05-01

    An autosomal recessive deafness mutant was discovered in our colony of Zucker (ZUC) rats. These mutants behave like shaker-waltzer deafness mutants, and their inner ear pathology classifies them among neuroepithelial degeneration type of deafness mutants. To determine whether this rat deafness mutation (-) defines a unique locus or one that has been previously described, we mapped its chromosomal location. F2 progeny of (Pbrc:ZUC x BN/Crl) A/a B/b H/h +/- F1 rats were scored for coat color and behavioral phenotypes. Segregation analysis indicated that the deafness locus might be loosely linked with B on rat Chromosome (Chr) 5 (RNO5). Therefore, 40 -/- rats were scored for BN and ZUC alleles at four additional loci, D5Mit11, D5Mit13, Oprd1, and Gnb1, known to map to RNO5 or its homolog, mouse Chr 4 (MMU4). Linkage analysis established the gene order (cM distance) as D5Mit11-(19.3)-B-(17.9)-D5Mit13-(19. 2)-Oprd1-(21.5) - (1.2) Gnb1, placing the deafness locus on distal RNO5. The position of the deafness locus on RNO5 is similar to that ofjerker (je) on MMU4; the phenotypes and patterns of inheritance of the deafness mutation and je are also similar. It seems likely that the mutation affects the rat homolog of je. The rat deafness locus should, therefore, be named jerker and assigned the gene symbol Je. PMID:8661723

  19. Dynamic evolution of rht-1 homologous regions in grass genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available Hexaploid bread wheat contains A, B, and D three subgenomes with its well-characterized ancestral genomes existed at diploid and tetraploid levels, making the wheat act as a good model species for studying evolutionary genomic dynamics. Here, we performed intra- and inter-species comparative analyses of wheat and related grass genomes to examine the dynamics of homologous regions surrounding Rht-1, a well-known "green revolution" gene. Our results showed that the divergence of the two A genomes in the Rht-1 region from the diploid and tetraploid species is greater than that from the tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The divergence of D genome between diploid and hexaploid is lower than those of A genome, suggesting that D genome diverged latter than others. The divergence among the A, B and D subgenomes was larger than that among different ploidy levels for each subgenome which mainly resulted from genomic structural variation of insertions and, perhaps deletions, of the repetitive sequences. Meanwhile, the repetitive sequences caused genome expansion further after the divergence of the three subgenomes. However, several conserved non-coding sequences were identified to be shared among the three subgenomes of wheat, suggesting that they may have played an important role to maintain the homolog of three subgenomes. This is a pilot study on evolutionary dynamics across the wheat ploids, subgenomes and differently related grasses. Our results gained new insights into evolutionary dynamics of Rht-1 region at sequence level as well as the evolution of wheat during the plolyploidization process.

  20. A quality metric for homology modeling: the H-factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    di Luccio Eric

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of protein structures provides fundamental insight into most biochemical functions and consequently into the cause and possible treatment of diseases. As the structures of most known proteins cannot be solved experimentally for technical or sometimes simply for time constraints, in silico protein structure prediction is expected to step in and generate a more complete picture of the protein structure universe. Molecular modeling of protein structures is a fast growing field and tremendous works have been done since the publication of the very first model. The growth of modeling techniques and more specifically of those that rely on the existing experimental knowledge of protein structures is intimately linked to the developments of high resolution, experimental techniques such as NMR, X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This strong connection between experimental and in silico methods is however not devoid of criticisms and concerns among modelers as well as among experimentalists. Results In this paper, we focus on homology-modeling and more specifically, we review how it is perceived by the structural biology community and what can be done to impress on the experimentalists that it can be a valuable resource to them. We review the common practices and provide a set of guidelines for building better models. For that purpose, we introduce the H-factor, a new indicator for assessing the quality of homology models, mimicking the R-factor in X-ray crystallography. The methods for computing the H-factor is fully described and validated on a series of test cases. Conclusions We have developed a web service for computing the H-factor for models of a protein structure. This service is freely accessible at http://koehllab.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/toolkit/h-factor.

  1. Which way up? Recognition of homologous DNA segments in parallel and antiparallel alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dominic J; Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei A

    2014-01-01

    Homologous gene shuffling between DNA promotes genetic diversity and is an important pathway for DNA repair. For this to occur, homologous genes need to find and recognize each other. However, despite its central role in homologous recombination, the mechanism of homology recognition is still an unsolved puzzle. While specific proteins are known to play a role at later stages of recombination, an initial coarse grained recognition step has been proposed. This relies on the sequence dependence of the DNA structural parameters, such as twist and rise, mediated by intermolecular interactions, in particular electrostatic ones. In this proposed mechanism, sequences having the same base pair text, or are homologous, have lower interaction energy than those sequences with uncorrelated base pair texts; the difference termed the recognition energy. Here, we probe how the recognition energy changes when one DNA fragment slides past another, and consider, for the first time, homologous sequences in antiparallel alignmen...

  2. Cubical homology and the Leech dimension of free partially commutative monoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to problems arising when applying homological algebra to computer science. It is proved that the Leech dimension of a free partially commutative monoid is equal to the least upper bound of the cardinalities of finite subsets of pairwise commuting generators of the monoid. For an arbitrary free partially commutative monoid M(E,I) in which every subset of pairwise commuting generators is finite and for any contravariant natural system F on M(E,I) we construct a semicubical set T(E,I) with a homological system F-bar on this set such that the Leech homology groups Hn(M(E,I),F) are isomorphic to the cubical homology groups H-n(T(E,I),F-bar). Complexes of Abelian groups are also constructed enabling one to obtain (under additional finiteness conditions) algorithms for computing the Leech homology groups and homology groups with coefficients in right M(E,I)-modules. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  3. Cubical homology and the Leech dimension of free partially commutative monoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusainov, Akhmet A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper is devoted to problems arising when applying homological algebra to computer science. It is proved that the Leech dimension of a free partially commutative monoid is equal to the least upper bound of the cardinalities of finite subsets of pairwise commuting generators of the monoid. For an arbitrary free partially commutative monoid M(E,I) in which every subset of pairwise commuting generators is finite and for any contravariant natural system F on M(E,I) we construct a semicubical set T(E,I) with a homological system \\overline F on this set such that the Leech homology groups H_n(M(E,I),F) are isomorphic to the cubical homology groups H_n(T(E,I),\\overline F). Complexes of Abelian groups are also constructed enabling one to obtain (under additional finiteness conditions) algorithms for computing the Leech homology groups and homology groups with coefficients in right M(E,I)-modules. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  4. Possible quantum algorithm for the Lipshitz-Sarkar-Steenrod square for Khovanov homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Recently the celebrated Khovanov Homology was introduced as a target for Topological Quantum Computation given that the Khovanov Homology provides a generalization of the Jones polynomal and then it is possible to think about of a generalization of the Aharonov.-Jones-Landau algorithm. Recently, Lipshitz and Sarkar introduced a space-level refinement of Khovanov homology. which is called Khovanov Homotopy. This refinement induces a Steenrod square operation Sq2 on Khovanov homology which they describe explicitly and then some computations of Sq2 were presented. Particularly, examples of links with identical integral Khovanov homology but with distinct Khovanov homotopy types were showed. In the presente work we will introduce possible quantum algorithms for the Lipshitz- Sarkar-Steenrod square for Khovanov Homolog and their possible simulations using computer algebra.

  5. 7 CFR 58.135 - Bacterial estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bacterial estimate. 58.135 Section 58.135 Agriculture... Milk § 58.135 Bacterial estimate. (a) Methods of Testing. Milk shall be tested for bacterial estimate... of Testing. A laboratory examination to determine the bacterial estimate shall be made on...

  6. Azotobacter vinelandii nifD- and nifE-encoded polypeptides share structural homology

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Dennis R.; Brigle, Kevin E.

    1985-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii nifE gene was isolated and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequences deduced from the A. vinelandii nifE and nifD gene sequences were compared and found to share striking primary sequence homology. This homology implies a functional and possibly an evolutionary relationship between these two gene products. The structural homology is discussed with regard to the potential FeMo cofactor binding properties of these polypeptides and the p...

  7. AvrRxo1 Is a Bifunctional Type III Secreted Effector and Toxin-Antitoxin System Component with Homologs in Diverse Environmental Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Shidore, Teja; Long, John; Miao, Jiamin; Wu, Shuchi; Han, Qian; Zhou, Changhe; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Li, Jianyong; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous bacterial systems that may function in genome maintenance and metabolic stress management, but are also thought to play a role in virulence by helping pathogens survive stress. We previously demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola protein AvrRxo1 is a type III-secreted virulence factor that has structural similarities to the zeta family of TA toxins, and is toxic to plants and bacteria in the absence of its predicted chaperone Arc1. In this work, we confirm that AvrRxo1 and its binding partner Arc1 function as a TA system when expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequences of avrRxo1 homologs were culled from published and newly generated phytopathogen genomes, revealing that avrRxo1:arc1 modules are rare or frequently inactivated in some species and highly conserved in others. Cloning and functional analysis of avrRxo1 from Acidovorax avenae, A. citrulli, Burkholderia andropogonis, Xanthomonas translucens, and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria showed that some AvrRxo1 homologs share the bacteriostatic and Rxo1-mediated cell death triggering activities of AvrRxo1 from X. oryzae. Additional distant putative homologs of avrRxo1 and arc1 were identified in genomic or metagenomic sequence of environmental bacteria with no known pathogenic role. One of these distant homologs was cloned from the filamentous soil bacterium Cystobacter fuscus. avrRxo1 from C. fuscus caused watersoaking and triggered Rxo1-dependent cell collapse in Nicotiana benthamiana, but no growth suppression in E. coli was observed. This work confirms that a type III effector can function as a TA system toxin, and illustrates the potential of microbiome data to reveal new environmental origins or reservoirs of pathogen virulence factors. PMID:27391081

  8. AvrRxo1 Is a Bifunctional Type III Secreted Effector and Toxin-Antitoxin System Component with Homologs in Diverse Environmental Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Shidore, Teja; Long, John; Miao, Jiamin; Wu, Shuchi; Han, Qian; Zhou, Changhe; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Li, Jianyong; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous bacterial systems that may function in genome maintenance and metabolic stress management, but are also thought to play a role in virulence by helping pathogens survive stress. We previously demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola protein AvrRxo1 is a type III-secreted virulence factor that has structural similarities to the zeta family of TA toxins, and is toxic to plants and bacteria in the absence of its predicted chaperone Arc1. In this work, we confirm that AvrRxo1 and its binding partner Arc1 function as a TA system when expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequences of avrRxo1 homologs were culled from published and newly generated phytopathogen genomes, revealing that avrRxo1:arc1 modules are rare or frequently inactivated in some species and highly conserved in others. Cloning and functional analysis of avrRxo1 from Acidovorax avenae, A. citrulli, Burkholderia andropogonis, Xanthomonas translucens, and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria showed that some AvrRxo1 homologs share the bacteriostatic and Rxo1-mediated cell death triggering activities of AvrRxo1 from X. oryzae. Additional distant putative homologs of avrRxo1 and arc1 were identified in genomic or metagenomic sequence of environmental bacteria with no known pathogenic role. One of these distant homologs was cloned from the filamentous soil bacterium Cystobacter fuscus. avrRxo1 from C. fuscus caused watersoaking and triggered Rxo1-dependent cell collapse in Nicotiana benthamiana, but no growth suppression in E. coli was observed. This work confirms that a type III effector can function as a TA system toxin, and illustrates the potential of microbiome data to reveal new environmental origins or reservoirs of pathogen virulence factors. PMID:27391081

  9. Genetic probing of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining during meiotic prophase in irradiated mouse spermatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Emad A. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, 71516 Assiut (Egypt); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Kal, Henk B. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rooij, Dirk G. de, E-mail: d.g.derooij@uu.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boer, Peter de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to obtain a better insight into the relative contribution of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) to the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at first meiotic prophase. Early and late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes that had completed crossing over were sampled. We studied the kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX chromatin foci removal after irradiation of mice deficient for HR and mice deficient for NHEJ. Analyzing {gamma}-H2AX signals in unirradiated RAD54/RAD54B deficient spermatocytes indicated incomplete meiotic recombination repair due to the pronounced increase of {gamma}-H2AX foci in late prophase primary spermatocytes. In these mice, 8 h after irradiation, early pachytene spermatocytes showed a reduction of the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci by 52% compared to 82% in the wild type, the difference being significant. However, after crossing over (in late pachytene and early diplotene), no effect of RAD54/RAD54B deficiency on the reduction of irradiation-induced foci was observed. In NHEJ deficient SCID mice, repair kinetics in early spermatocytes were similar to those in wild type mice. However, 1 h after irradiation in late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes 1.7 times more foci were found than in wild type mice. This difference might be related to the absence of a DNA-PKcs dependent fast repair component in SCID mice. As subsequent repair is normal, HR likely is taking over. Taken together, the results obtained in RAD54/RAD54B deficient mice and in SCID mice indicate that DSB repair in early pachytene spermatocytes is mainly carried out through HR. In late spermatocytes (late pachytenes and early diplotenes) NHEJ is active. However, probably there is an interplay between these repair pathways and when in late spermatocytes the NHEJ pathway is compromised HR may take over.

  10. Microfluidic Approaches to Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Deung Park; Junghyun Kim; Seok Chung

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms—aggregations of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS)—are an important subject of research in the fields of biology and medical science. Under aquatic conditions, bacterial cells form biofilms as a mechanism for improving survival and dispersion. In this review, we discuss bacterial biofilm development as a structurally and dynamically complex biological system and propose microfluidic approaches for the study of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms develop t...

  11. The human vaginal bacterial biota and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV). PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition. PMID:19282975

  12. Homologous series of induced early mutants in Indica rice. Pt.3: The relationship between the induction of homologous series of early mutants and its different pedigree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of homologous series of early mutants (PHSEM) induced by irradiation was closely related to its pedigree. This study showed that PHSEM for varieties with the same pedigree were similar, and there were three different level of dominance (high, low and normal) in the homologous series induced from different pedigree. The PHSEM for varieties derived form distant-relative-parents were higher than that derived from close-relative-parents. There was the dominance pedigree for the induction of homologous series of early mutants. IR8(Peta x DGWG), IR127 (Cpslo x Sigadis) and IR24 (IR8 x IR127) were dominant pedigree, and varieties derived from them could be easily induced the homologous series of early mutants

  13. Gene expression analysis during cassava defense response to bacterial blight disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto-Suárez Mauricio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava bacterial blight (CBB caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam is a destructive disease in the South América and África and yield losses range between 12 and 100%. Cytochemistry and biochemistry of defense response to CBB have been well studied. However, the response of the plant to pathogen attack at the molecular and cellular level remains uncharacterized. Identification of genes associated with defense responses is one of most critical steps leading to the elucidation of disease resistance mechanisms in cassava. In this study, we identified differentially expressed genes during pathogen attack by subtractive hybridization, using the Differential Subtraction Chain method (DSC. A population of cDNA obtained from infected plants was used as ";treatment"; and a population of cDNA obtained from healthy plants was used as ";control";. 1536 clones were isolated from the resistant varieties (MBRA 685 and SG 107-35. Of these, 110 randomly selected clones were sequenced and a homology search was conducted. The sequence analysis showed that 14 cDNA clones shared homology with plant genes involved in defense responses, 70 clones were either homologous to plant genes of unknown function or showed no homology, representing new genes potentially involved in cassava defense responses. A cDNA microarray was constructed by spotting the clones identified from our subtractive libraries. Other clones potentially involved in cassava defense responses were also included. The cassava defense cDNA microarray was used to confirm the differential expression of the clones. Keywords: cassava, bacterial blight, gene expression, subtractive library, microarrays.

  14. New Treatments for Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. M. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the newer treatments for bacterial keratitis. Data Sources. PubMed literature search up to April 2012. Study Selection. Key words used for literature search: “infectious keratitis”, “microbial keratitis”, “infective keratitis”, “new treatments for infectious keratitis”, “fourth generation fluoroquinolones”, “moxifloxacin”, “gatifloxacin”, “collagen cross-linking”, and “photodynamic therapy”. Data Extraction. Over 2400 articles were retrieved. Large scale studies or publications at more recent dates were selected. Data Synthesis. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been the main stay of treatment for bacterial keratitis but with the emergence of bacterial resistance; there is a need for newer antimicrobial agents and treatment methods. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and corneal collagen cross-linking are amongst the new treatments. In vitro studies and prospective clinical trials have shown that fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are better than the older generation fluoroquinolones and are as potent as combined fortified antibiotics against common pathogens that cause bacterial keratitis. Collagen cross-linking was shown to improve healing of infectious corneal ulcer in treatment-resistant cases or as an adjunct to antibiotics treatment. Conclusion. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones are good alternatives to standard treatment of bacterial keratitis using combined fortified topical antibiotics. Collagen cross-linking may be considered in treatment-resistant infectious keratitis or as an adjunct to antibiotics therapy.

  15. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  16. A microbial detection array (MDA for viral and bacterial detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLoughlin Kevin S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying the bacteria and viruses present in a complex sample is useful in disease diagnostics, product safety, environmental characterization, and research. Array-based methods have proven utility to detect in a single assay at a reasonable cost any microbe from the thousands that have been sequenced. Methods We designed a pan-Microbial Detection Array (MDA to detect all known viruses (including phages, bacteria and plasmids and developed a novel statistical analysis method to identify mixtures of organisms from complex samples hybridized to the array. The array has broader coverage of bacterial and viral targets and is based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to have no significant matches to the human genome sequence. Results In blinded testing on spiked samples with single or multiple viruses, the MDA was able to correctly identify species or strains. In clinical fecal, serum, and respiratory samples, the MDA was able to detect and characterize multiple viruses, phage, and bacteria in a sample to the family and species level, as confirmed by PCR. Conclusions The MDA can be used to identify the suite of viruses and bacteria present in complex samples.

  17. Bacterial tactic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many, if not most, bacterial species swim. The synthesis and operation of the flagellum, the most complex organelle of a bacterium, takes a significant percentage of cellular energy, particularly in the nutrient limited environments in which many motile species are found. It is obvious that motility accords cells a survival advantage over non-motile mutants under normal, poorly mixed conditions and is an important determinant in the development of many associations between bacteria and other organisms, whether as pathogens or symbionts and in colonization of niches and the development of biofilms. This survival advantage is the result of sensory control of swimming behaviour. Although too small to sense a gradient along the length of the cell, and unable to swim great distances because of buffetting by Brownian motion and the curvature resulting from a rotating flagellum, bacteria can bias their random swimming direction towards a more favourable environment. The favourable environment will vary from species to species and there is now evidence that in many species this can change depending on the current physiological growth state of the cell. In general, bacteria sense changes in a range of nutrients and toxins, compounds altering electron transport, acceptors or donors into the electron transport chain, pH, temperature and even the magnetic field of the Earth. The sensory signals are balanced, and may be balanced with other sensory pathways such as quorum sensing, to identify the optimum current environment. The central sensory pathway in this process is common to most bacteria and most effectors. The environmental change is sensed by a sensory protein. In most species examined this is a transmembrane protein, sensing the external environment, but there is increasing evidence for additional cytoplasmic receptors in many species. All receptors, whether sensing sugars, amino acids or oxygen, share a cytoplasmic signalling domain that controls the activity of a

  18. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  19. Studies of Flerovium and Element 115 Homologs with Macrocyclic Extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despotopulos, John D. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-12

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z ≥ 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z ≥ 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high-purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies; crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions. Finally. a potential chemical system for Fl was established based on the Eichrom Pb resin, and insight to an improved system based on thiacrown ethers is

  20. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HALOPHILIC BACTERIAL STRAINS FROM SALINE WATERS OF KHEWRA SALT MINES ON THE BASIS OF 16S rRNA GENE SEQUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kaleem Sarwar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Halophiles are salt loving microbes optimally growing at high concentrations of salt. Khewra salt mines of Pakistan provide extreme saline conditions where enormous halophilic microbial biota thrives. The present study aimed at isolation and molecular identification of bacterial strains from saline waters of Khewra salt mines. Using halophilic media, nine halophilic bacterial strains from saline water bodies were cultured and studied under optimized growth conditions (NaCl, pH and temperature. Bacterial growth at different NaCl concentrations was measured at 600nm wavelength, showing optimal growth at 1.5M NaCl. 769bp size 16S rRNA gene was amplified for molecular identification of bacterial strains. The amplified genes of the strains FA2.2 and FA3.3 were sequenced and their homology with other bacterial strains was analyzed. The results showed FA2.2 shared maximum homology with Bacillus anthracis strain while FA3.3 showed close resemblance with Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. bovis. Isolated halophilic bacterial strains possess potential for various biotechnological applications. They could be manipulated for synthesizing transgenic crops tolerating high salinity boosting the agricultural yield. Moreover extremozymes of these bacteria holds great industrial importance.

  1. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by...

  2. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  3. Phylogenetic organization of bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ember M; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; Hayer, Michaela; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Phylogeny is an ecologically meaningful way to classify plants and animals, as closely related taxa frequently have similar ecological characteristics, functional traits and effects on ecosystem processes. For bacteria, however, phylogeny has been argued to be an unreliable indicator of an organism's ecology owing to evolutionary processes more common to microbes such as gene loss and lateral gene transfer, as well as convergent evolution. Here we use advanced stable isotope probing with (13)C and (18)O to show that evolutionary history has ecological significance for in situ bacterial activity. Phylogenetic organization in the activity of bacteria sets the stage for characterizing the functional attributes of bacterial taxonomic groups. Connecting identity with function in this way will allow scientists to begin building a mechanistic understanding of how bacterial community composition regulates critical ecosystem functions. PMID:26943624

  4. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  5. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of two Campylobacter jejuni homologs of the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, DsbA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna D Grabowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial Dsb enzymes are involved in the oxidative folding of many proteins, through the formation of disulfide bonds between their cysteine residues. The Dsb protein network has been well characterized in cells of the model microorganism Escherichia coli. To gain insight into the functioning of the Dsb system in epsilon-Proteobacteria, where it plays an important role in the colonization process, we studied two homologs of the main Escherichia coli Dsb oxidase (EcDsbA that are present in the cells of the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the most frequently reported bacterial cause of human enteritis in the world. METHODS AND RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis suggests the horizontal transfer of the epsilon-Proteobacterial DsbAs from a common ancestor to gamma-Proteobacteria, which then gave rise to the DsbL lineage. Phenotype and enzymatic assays suggest that the two C. jejuni DsbAs play different roles in bacterial cells and have divergent substrate spectra. CjDsbA1 is essential for the motility and autoagglutination phenotypes, while CjDsbA2 has no impact on those processes. CjDsbA1 plays a critical role in the oxidative folding that ensures the activity of alkaline phosphatase CjPhoX, whereas CjDsbA2 is crucial for the activity of arylsulfotransferase CjAstA, encoded within the dsbA2-dsbB-astA operon. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that CjDsbA1 is the primary thiol-oxidoreductase affecting life processes associated with bacterial spread and host colonization, as well as ensuring the oxidative folding of particular protein substrates. In contrast, CjDsbA2 activity does not affect the same processes and so far its oxidative folding activity has been demonstrated for one substrate, arylsulfotransferase CjAstA. The results suggest the cooperation between CjDsbA2 and CjDsbB. In the case of the CjDsbA1, this cooperation is not exclusive and there is probably another protein to be identified in C. jejuni cells that acts to re

  6. Bacterial contamination of blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, J

    2001-10-01

    Despite considerable advances in the safety of blood components, transfusion associated bacterial infection (TABI) remains an unresolved problem. As yet there are no perfect preventative, screening and/or detection methodologies for eliminating contaminated units. Until a practical, rapid, cost-effective and logistically acceptable test becomes available, we should be satisfied with the choice of various limited solutions that at least partially improve the bacterial safety of blood components. It is also necessary to establish standardised guidelines and agreed upon systematic procedures for the recognition and reporting of the laboratory and clinical evaluation of adverse reactions in recipients of contaminated blood components. PMID:11761277

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Bacterial Persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...

  8. Failure of homologous synapsis and sex-specific reproduction problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eKurahashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The prophase of meiosis I ensures the correct segregation of chromosomes to each daughter cell. This includes the pairing, synapsis and recombination of homologous chromosomes. A subset of chromosomal abnormalities, including translocation and inversion, disturbs these processes, resulting in the failure to complete synapsis. This activates the meiotic pachytene checkpoint, and the gametes are fated to undergo cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Spermatogenic cells appear to be more vulnerable to the pachytene checkpoint, and male carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are more susceptible to infertility. In contrast, oocytes tend to bypass the checkpoint and instead generate other problems, such as chromosome imbalance that often leads to recurrent pregnancy loss in female carriers. Recent advances in genetic manipulation technologies have increased our knowledge about the pachytene checkpoint and surveillance systems that detect chromosomal synapsis. This review focuses on the consequences of synapsis failure in humans and provides an overview of the mechanisms involved. We also discuss the sexual dimorphism of the involved pathways that leads to the differences in reproductive outcomes between males and females.

  9. Homologous radioimmunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a polypeptide hormone originally discovered in the mouse submaxillary gland, stimulates growth in a variety of tissues in several species. This hormone has recently been identified in human urine. A homologous RIA for human EGF (RIA-hEGF) has been developed. In general, levels were similar to those recently reported using a heterologous RIA system. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretion of RIA-hEGF by normal adult males and females was 63.0 +- 3.0 and 52.0 +- 3.5 (mean +- SE) μg/total vol, or 29.7 +- 1.1 and 39.8 +- 1.7 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Excretion by females taking oral contraceptives was significantly greater (60.1 +- 2.7 μg/g creatinine; P 0.05). Several of those with very low values had histories of alcohol abuse. Excretion by patients with Cushing's syndrome was normal. Patients with psoriasis or recovering from major burns excreted both abnormally high and abnormally low levels of RIA-hEGF, with no obvious correlation to their clinical condition. There was no apparent diurnal or postprandial variation in urinary RIA-hEGF excretion by normal subjects. An excellent linear correlation was observed between RIA-hEGF and creatinine concentrations in each urine sample for each subject, suggesting that RIA-hEGF concentration in a random urine sample provides a valid index of 24-h RIA-hEGF excretion

  10. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H Steven

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to the modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in the expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and that are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (such as Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  11. Sunspot Waves and Triggering of Homologous Active Region Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Ramesh; Mulay, Sargam; Tripathi, Durgesh

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss multi-wavelength observations of five homologous recurrent solar jets that occurred in active region NOAA 11133 on 11 December, 2010. These jets were well observed by the Solar Dynamic observatory (SDO) with high spatial and temporal resolution. The speed of the jets ranged between 86 and 267 km/s. A type III radio burst was observed in association with all the five jets. The investigation of the over all evolution of magnetic field in the source regions suggested that the flux was continuously emerging on longer term. However, all the jets but J5 were triggered during a local dip in the magnetic flux, suggesting the launch of the jets during localised submergence of magnetic flux. Additionally, using the PFSS modelling of the photospheric magnetic field, we found that all the jets were ejected in the direction of open field lines. We also traced sunspot oscillations from the sunspot interior to foot-point of jets and found presence of ~ 3 minute oscillations in all the SDO/AIA passband...

  12. Characterization of a Canine Homolog of Human Aichivirus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Dubovi, Edward J.; Qaisar, Natasha; Henriquez, Jose A.; Medina, Jan; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Many of our fatal “civilization” infectious diseases have arisen from domesticated animals. Although picornaviruses infect most mammals, infection of a companion animal is not known. Here we describe the identification and genomic characterization of the first canine picornavirus. Canine kobuvirus (CKoV), identified in stool samples from dogs with diarrhea, has a genomic organization typical of a picornavirus and encodes a 2,469-amino-acid polyprotein flanked by 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Comparative phylogenetic analysis using various structural and nonstructural proteins of CKoV confirmed it as the animal virus homolog most closely related to human Aichivirus (AiV). Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis suggests a mean recent divergence time of CKoV and AiV within the past 20 to 50 years, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CKoV provides new insights into the origin and evolution of AiV and the species specificity and pathogenesis of kobuviruses. PMID:21880761

  13. Characterization of a canine homolog of human Aichivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Dubovi, Edward J; Qaisar, Natasha; Henriquez, Jose A; Medina, Jan; Shields, Shelly; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-11-01

    Many of our fatal "civilization" infectious diseases have arisen from domesticated animals. Although picornaviruses infect most mammals, infection of a companion animal is not known. Here we describe the identification and genomic characterization of the first canine picornavirus. Canine kobuvirus (CKoV), identified in stool samples from dogs with diarrhea, has a genomic organization typical of a picornavirus and encodes a 2,469-amino-acid polyprotein flanked by 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Comparative phylogenetic analysis using various structural and nonstructural proteins of CKoV confirmed it as the animal virus homolog most closely related to human Aichivirus (AiV). Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis suggests a mean recent divergence time of CKoV and AiV within the past 20 to 50 years, well after the domestication of canines. The discovery of CKoV provides new insights into the origin and evolution of AiV and the species specificity and pathogenesis of kobuviruses. PMID:21880761

  14. The many facets of homologous recombination at telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Claussin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ends of linear chromosomes are capped by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. A dysfunctional telomere may resemble a DNA double-strand break (DSB, which is a severe form of DNA damage. The presence of one DSB is sufficient to drive cell cycle arrest and cell death. Therefore cells have evolved mechanisms to repair DSBs such as homologous recombination (HR. HR-mediated repair of telomeres can lead to genome instability, a hallmark of cancer cells, which is why such repair is normally inhibited. However, some HR-mediated processes are required for proper telomere function. The need for some recombination activities at telomeres but not others necessitates careful and complex regulation, defects in which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Furthermore, some cell types can maintain telomeres via telomerase-independent, recombination-mediated mechanisms. In humans, these mechanisms are called alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT and are used in a subset of human cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the different recombination activities occurring at telomeres and discuss how they are regulated. Much of the current knowledge is derived from work using yeast models, which is the focus of this review, but relevant studies in mammals are also included.

  15. Deficiency of the homologous restriction factor in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalman, L S; Wood, L M; Frank, M M; Müller-Eberhard, H J

    1987-02-01

    The affected E of two patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) were enriched by lysing the unaffected, normal E with anti-human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and guinea pig serum. The membranes of the unlysed, DAF-deficient cells (PNH-E) were dissolved and examined by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using an antiserum to homologous restriction factor (HRF). Whereas the 65 kD complement regulatory protein was readily detectable in the normal controls, it was completely lacking in both samples of PNH-E membranes. Functional studies likewise indicated the absence of HRF activity from PNH-E. When radiolabeled, isolated HRF protein was offered to PNH-E, it became firmly attached to the cell. Approximately 1,000 molecules of HRF per cell reduced the characteristic susceptibility of these cells to reactive lysis by C5b-9 to nearly normal levels. The results suggest that HRF, which is known to control the action of C8 and C9 on normal human E membranes, is deficient in PNH, as well as acetylcholinesterase and DAF. PMID:2434597

  16. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates. PMID:27233112

  17. Homology among tet determinants in conjugative elements of streptococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.D.; Hazum, S.; Guild, W.R.

    1981-10-01

    A mutation to tetracycline sensitivity in a resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown by several criteria to be due to a point mutation in the conjugative o(cat-tet) element found in the chromosomes of strains derived from BM6001, a clinical strain resistant to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Strains carrying the mutation were transformed back to tetracycline resistance with the high efficiency of a point marker by donor deoxyribonucleic acids from its ancestral strain and from nine other clinical isolates of pneumococcus and by deoxyribonucleic acids from Group D Streptococcus faecalis and Group B Streptococcus agalactiae strains that also carry conjugative tet elements in their chromosomes. It was not transformed to resistance by tet plasmid deoxyribonucleic acids from either gram-negative or gram-positive species, except for one that carried transposon TN916, the conjugative tet element present in the chromosomes of some S. faecalis strains. The results showed that the tet determinants in conjugative elements of several streptococcal species share a high degree of deoxyribonucleic acid sequence homology and suggested that they differ from other tet genes.

  18. miRviewer: a multispecies microRNA homologous viewer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiezun Adam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression via binding to the 3' ends of mRNAs. MiRNAs have been associated with many cellular events ascertaining their central role in gene regulation. In order to better understand miRNAs of interest it is of utmost importance to learn about the genomic conservation of these genes. Findings The miRviewer web-server, presented here, encompasses all known miRNAs of currently fully annotated animal genomes in a visual 'birds-eye' view representation. miRviewer provides a graphical outlook of the current miRNA world together with sequence alignments and secondary structures of each miRNA. As a test case we experimentally examined the expression of several miRNAs in various animals. Conclusions miRviewer completes the homologous miRNA space with hundreds of unreported miRNAs and is available at: http://people.csail.mit.edu/akiezun/miRviewer

  19. Pharmacokinetics of the dimethylheptyl homolog of cannabidiol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, E; Bialer, M

    1988-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the major nonpsychoactive cannabinoids produced by Cannabis sativa L. Recent studies have shown that a dimethylheptyl homolog (DMH) of CBD is more active as an anticonvulsant than is the naturally occurring CBD. In considering DMH as a potential antiepileptic agent, its pharmacokinetics was studied in dogs (N = 8) after both iv (20 mg) and oral (80 mg) administration. After iv administration, DMH was rapidly distributed. DMH has a mean terminal half-life of 2 hr, its plasma levels decline in a biphasic fashion, and its total body clearance is 8.3 liters/hr. This clearance value, after being normalized to blood clearance by the use of mathematical equations, was less than one half of the value of the hepatic blood flow and its extraction ratio (E) by the liver is 0.39, DMH was observed to have a mean volume of distribution of 10 liters (or 0.5 liters/kg). In four of the eight dogs studied, DMH could not be detected in the plasma after oral administration. In the other four, the oral bioavailability was 3, 21, 39, and 43%, respectively. After oral administration, DMH has a low and variable bioavailability, due to a liver first-pass effect and incomplete absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. In comparison with CBD, DMH has a shorter half-life and lower clearance and volume of distribution values, and its liver extraction ratio is about one half that of CBD. PMID:2907468

  20. Identification, localization, and sequencing of fetal bovine VASA homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Rachel A; Parks, John E

    2007-10-01

    The vasa gene, first described in Drosophila, is purported to be important in germ cell development. Vasa is present across several invertebrate and vertebrate taxa, including frogs, fish, chickens, and humans. Vasa, a DEAD (asparagine-glutamine-alanine-asparagine) box protein shown to function as an RNA helicase in vitro, has not been investigated previously in fetal stage cattle. Total RNA was extracted from bovine fetal gonads obtained at 35-55 days, 55-80 days, and 80-120 days of gestation to amplify a 296 bp reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product using primers for human vasa. The complete coding sequence of bovine vasa was cloned with 5' and 3' random amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) and subsequently identified as bovine vasa homolog (BVH). Northern blot analysis revealed that among the tissues examined (gonad, liver, heart, brain, and femur), the vasa gene was expressed in the gonad. This localization, the conserved pattern of gene expression, and the gene sequence suggests that BVH plays a role in bovine germ cell development as proposed for other mammalian species. PMID:17150314

  1. On Discrete Symmetries and Torsion Homology in F-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mayrhofer, Christoph; Till, Oskar; Weigand, Timo

    2014-01-01

    We study the relation between discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory compactifications and torsion homology on the associated Calabi-Yau manifold. Focusing on the simplest example of a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry, we show that there are two physically distinct ways that such a discrete gauge symmetry can arise. First, compactifications of M-Theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds which support a genus-one fibration with a bi-section are known to be dual to six-dimensional F-theory vacua with a $\\mathbb Z_2$ gauge symmetry. We show that the resulting five-dimensional theories do not have a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry but that the latter emerges only in the F-theory decompactification limit. Accordingly the genus-one fibred Calabi-Yau manifolds do not exhibit discrete torsion. Associated to the bi-section fibration is a Jacobian fibration which does support a section. Compactifying on these related but distinct varieties does lead to a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry in five dimensions and, accordingly, we find explicitly an associated di...

  2. Functions of the MMR system and special roles of mutL in bacterial evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN GONG; RU JING JIA

    2006-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair guards the integrity of the genome of almost all organisms by correcting DNA biosynthetic errors and by ensuring the fidelity of homologous genetic recombination. MutL is one of the important proteins involved in mismatch repair system. It has been suggested to function as a master coordinator or molecular matchmaker because it interacts physically with MutS, the endonuclease MutH, and DNA helicase UvrD. It also binds to DNA and has an ATPase activity. MutL defective bacteria strains have elevated mutation rates and it has been reported recently that MutL defect may have an important impact on bacterial evolution.

  3. Structure of a Filament-Like Actin Trimer Bound to the Bacterial Effector VopL

    OpenAIRE

    Zahm, Jacob A.; Padrick, Shae B.; Chen, Zhucheng; Pak, Chi W.; Yunus, Ali A.; Henry, Lisa; Tomchick, Diana R.; Chen, Zhe; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens use secreted effector proteins to subvert host-cell defenses. VopL is an effector protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus that nucleates actin filaments. VopL consists of a VopL C-terminal Domain (VCD) and a tandem array of three WASP homology 2 (WH2) motifs. Here we report the crystal structure of the VCD dimer bound to actin. The VCD binds three actin monomers in a spatial arrangement close to that in the canonical actin filament. In this configuration each actin can readil...

  4. On the homological dimensions of Leavitt path algebras with coefficients in commutative rings

    OpenAIRE

    Lopatkin, V.; Nam, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we give sharp bounds for the homological dimensions of the Leavitt path algebra $L_R(E)$ of a finite graph $E$ with coefficients in a commutative ring $R$, as well as establish a formula for calculating the homological dimensions of $L_R(E)$ when $R$ is a commutative unital algebra over a field.

  5. Assembly and sorting of homologous BAC contigs in allotetraploid cotton genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a diploidized allopolyploid species containing At and Dt sub-genomes that have partial homology. Assembly and sorting of homologous BAC contigs into their subgenomes and further to individual chromosomes are of both great interest and great challenge for genome-wide i...

  6. Nielsen theory, Floer homology and a generalisation of the Poincare-Birkhoff theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Fel'shtyn, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this mostly expository paper is to discuss a connection between Nielsen fixed point theory and symplectic Floer homology theory for symplectomorphisms of surface and a calculation of Seidel's symplectic Floer homology for different mapping classes. We also describe symplectic zeta functions and asympltotic symplectic invariant. A generalisation of the Poincare- Birkhoff fixed point theorem and Arnold conjecture is proposed.

  7. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  8. Density parameter estimation for finding clusters of homologous proteins-tracing actinobacterial pathogenicity lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röttger, Richard; Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sun, Peng;

    2013-01-01

    Homology detection is a long-standing challenge in computational biology. To tackle this problem, typically all-versus-all BLAST results are coupled with data partitioning approaches resulting in clusters of putative homologous proteins. One of the main problems, however, has been widely neglected...

  9. The good pants homology and a proof of the Ehrenpreis conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    We develop the notion of the good pants homology and show that it agrees with the standard homology on closed surfaces (the good pants are pairs of pants whose cuffs have the length nearly equal to some large number R). Combined with our previous work on the Surface Subgroup Theorem, this yields a proof of the Ehrenpreis conjecture.

  10. Twisted homological stability for extensions and automorphism groups of free nilpotent groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymik, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We prove twisted homological stability with polynomial coefficients for automorphism groups of free nilpotent groups of any given class. These groups interpolate between two extremes for which homological stability was known before, the general linear groups over the integers and the automorphism...

  11. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  12. Proteomics of foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on recent research on foodborne bacterial pathogens that use mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques as well as protein microarrays. Mass spectrometry ionization techniques (e.g. electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization), analyzers (e.g. ion ...

  13. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  14. Regulation of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Michel

    2016-07-01

    How bacterial cells control the activity of peptidoglycan polymerases has remained mysterious. Biochemical characterization of derivatives of penicillin-binding protein PBP1b that are functional in the absence of lipoprotein LpoB provides evidence for allosteric control of PBP1b glycosyltransferase activity via binding of LpoB to the PBP1b UBH1 domain. PMID:27236859

  15. How carotenoids protect bacterial photosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cogdell, R J; Howard, T. D.; Bittl, R.; Schlodder, E; Geisenheimer, I; Lubitz, W.

    2000-01-01

    The essential function of carotenoids in photosynthesis is to act as photoprotective agents, preventing chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls from sensitizing harmful photodestructive reactions in the presence of oxygen. Based upon recent structural studies on reaction centres and antenna complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria, the detailed organization of the carotenoids is described. Then with specific reference to bacterial antenna complexes the details of the photoprotective role, ...

  16. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods. (author)

  17. Biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Menendez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellulases have numerous applications in several industries, including biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, pulp and paper, textile, laundry, and agriculture.Cellulose-degrading bacteria are widely spread in nature, being isolated from quite different environments. Cellulose degradation is the result of a synergic process between an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a,β-glucosidase. Bacterial endoglucanases degrade ß-1,4-glucan linkages of cellulose amorphous zones, meanwhile exoglucanases cleave the remaining oligosaccharide chains, originating cellobiose, which is hydrolyzed by ß-glucanases. Bacterial cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 are comprised in fourteen Glycosil Hydrolase families. Several advantages, such as higher growth rates and genetic versatility, emphasize the suitability and advantages of bacterial cellulases over other sources for this group of enzymes. This review summarizes the main known cellulolytic bacteria and the best strategies to optimize their cellulase production, focusing on endoglucanases, as well as it reviews the main biotechnological applications of bacterial cellulases in several industries, medicine and agriculture.

  18. BACTERIAL INHIBITORS IN LAKE WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The populations of six bacterial genera fell rapidly after their addition to sterile lake water but not after their addition to buffer. The decline in numbers of two species that were studied further, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Micrococcus flavus, occurred even when the buffer was...

  19. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  20. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models. PMID:24671676

  1. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  2. Mammalian X homolog acts as sex chromosome in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, M; Vukić, J; Kratochvíl, L

    2016-07-01

    Among amniotes, squamate reptiles are especially variable in their mechanisms of sex determination; however, based largely on cytogenetic data, some lineages possess highly evolutionary stable sex chromosomes. The still very limited knowledge of the genetic content of squamate sex chromosomes precludes a reliable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of sex determination in this group and consequently in all amniotes. Female heterogamety with a degenerated W chromosome typifies the lizards of the family Lacertidae, the widely distributed Old World clade including several hundreds of species. From the liver transcriptome of the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus female, we selected candidates for Z-specific genes as the loci lacking single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We validated the candidate genes through the comparison of the copy numbers in the female and male genomes of T. sexlineatus and another lacertid species, Lacerta agilis, by quantitative PCR that also proved to be a reliable technique for the molecular sexing of the studied species. We suggest that this novel approach is effective for the detection of Z-specific and X-specific genes in lineages with degenerated W, respectively Y chromosomes. The analyzed gene content of the Z chromosome revealed that lacertid sex chromosomes are not homologous with those of other reptiles including birds, but instead the genes have orthologs in the X-conserved region shared by viviparous mammals. It is possible that this part of the vertebrate genome was independently co-opted for the function of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and lacertids because of its content of genes involved in gonad differentiation. PMID:26980341

  3. Ab initio Study of Naptho-Homologated DNA Bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro [ORNL; Huertas, Oscar [Universitat de Barcelona; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A [ORNL; Orozco, Modesto [Institut de Recerca Biomedica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Luque, Javier [Universitat de Barcelona

    2008-01-01

    Naptho-homologated DNA bases have been recently used to build a new type of size expanded DNA known as yyDNA. We have used theoretical techniques to investigate the structure, tautomeric preferences, base-pairing ability, stacking interactions, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of the naptho-bases. The structure of these bases is found to be similar to that of the benzo-fused predecessors (y-bases) with respect to the planarity of the aromatic rings and amino groups. Tautomeric studies reveal that the canonical-like form of naptho-thymine (yyT) and naptho-adenine (yyA) are the most stable tautomers, leading to hydrogen-bonded dimers with the corresponding natural nucleobases that mimic the Watson-Crick pairing. However, the canonical-like species of naptho-guanine (yyG) and naptho-cytosine (yyC) are not the most stable tautomers, and the most favorable hydrogen-bonded dimers involve wobble-like pairings. The expanded size of the naphto-bases leads to stacking interactions notably larger than those found for the natural bases, and they should presumably play a dominant contribution in modulating the structure of yyDNA duplexes. Finally, the HOMO-LUMO gap of the naptho-bases is smaller than that of their benzo-base counterparts, indicating that size-expansion of DNA bases is an efficient way of reducing their HOMO-LUMO gap. These results are examined in light of the available experimental evidence reported for yyT and yyC.

  4. Genetic Manipulation of Homologous Recombination In Vivo Attenuates Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlhatton, Michael A; Murnan, Kevin; Carson, Daniel; Boivin, Gregory P; Croce, Carlo M; Groden, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Although disruption of DNA repair capacity is unquestionably associated with cancer susceptibility in humans and model organisms, it remains unclear if the inherent tumor phenotypes of DNA repair deficiency syndromes can be regulated by manipulating DNA repair pathways. Loss-of-function mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family, cause Bloom's syndrome (BS), a rare, recessive genetic disorder that predisposes to many types of cancer. BLM functions in many aspects of DNA homeostasis, including the suppression of homologous recombination (HR) in somatic cells. We investigated whether BLM overexpression, in contrast with loss-of-function mutations, attenuated the intestinal tumor phenotypes of Apc(Min/+) and Apc(Min/+);Msh2(-/-) mice, animal models of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (FAP). We constructed a transgenic mouse line expressing human BLM (BLM-Tg) and crossed it onto both backgrounds. BLM-Tg decreased adenoma incidence in a dose-dependent manner in our Apc(Min/) (+) model of FAP, although levels of GIN were unaffected and concomitantly increased animal survival over 50%. It did not reduce intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/) (+);Msh2(-/-) mice. We used the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mouse model to demonstrate that increasing BLM dosage in vivo lowered endogenous levels of HR by 2-fold. Our data suggest that attenuation of the Min phenotype is achieved through a direct effect of BLM-Tg on the HR repair pathway. These findings demonstrate that HR can be manipulated in vivo to modulate tumor formation at the organismal level. Our data suggest that lowering HR frequencies may have positive therapeutic outcomes in the context of specific hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, exemplified by FAP. PMID:25908507

  5. Relative antidipsogenic potencies of six homologous natriuretic peptides in eels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exhibits a potent antidipsogenic effect in seawater (SW) eels to limit excess Na(+) uptake, thereby effectively promoting SW adaptation. Recently, cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNP1, 3 and 4, have been identified in eels. We examined the antidipsogenic effect of all homologous NPs using conscious, cannulated eels in both FW and SW together with parameters that affect drinking. A dose-response study (0.01-1 nmol/kg) in SW eels showed the relative potency of the antidipsogenic effect was in the order ANP ≥ VNP > BNP = CNP3 > CNP1 ≥ CNP4, while the order was ANP = VNP = BNP > CNP3 = CNP1 = CNP4 for the vasodepressor effect. The minimum effective dose of ANP for the antidipsogenic effect is much lower than that in mammals. ANP, BNP and VNP at 0.3 nmol/kg decreased drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and aortic pressure and increased hematocrit in SW eels. The cardiac NPs induced similar changes in drinking, aortic pressure and hematocrit in FW eels, but aside from BNP no change in plasma Na(+) concentration. CNPs had no effect on drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and hematocrit but induced mild hypotension in both FW and SW eels, except for CNP3 that inhibited drinking in SW eels. These results show that ANP, BNP and VNP are potent antidipsogenic hormones in eels in spite of other regulatory factors working to induce drinking, and that CNPs are without effects on drinking except for the ancestor of the cardiac NPs, CNP3. PMID:21967218

  6. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  7. Spatial distribution of marine airborne bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Seifried, Jasmin S; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of bacterial populations in marine bioaerosol samples was investigated during a cruise from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea via Skagerrak and Kattegat. The analysis of the sampled bacterial communities with a pyrosequencing approach revealed that the most abundant phyla were represented by the Proteobacteria (49.3%), Bacteroidetes (22.9%), Actinobacteria (16.3%), and Firmicutes (8.3%). Cyanobacteria were assigned to 1.5% of all bacterial reads. A core of 37 bacterial ...

  8. Bacterial population genetics, evolution and epidemiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Spratt, B. G.; Maiden, M C

    1999-01-01

    Asexual bacterial populations inevitably consist of an assemblage of distinct clonal lineages. However, bacterial populations are not entirely asexual since recombinational exchanges occur, mobilizing small genome segments among lineages and species. The relative contribution of recombination, as opposed to de novo mutation, in the generation of new bacterial genotypes varies among bacterial populations and, as this contribution increases, the clonality of a given population decreases. In con...

  9. Population Genomics and the Bacterial Species Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Margaret A.; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in bacterial evolution has been elevated to such a degree that many bacteriologists now question the very existence of bacterial species. If gene transfer is as rampant as comparative genomic studies have suggested, how could bacterial species survive such genomic fluidity? And yet, most bacteriologists recognize, and name, as species, clusters of bacterial isolates that share complex phenotypic properties. The Core Genome Hypo...

  10. Filtration properties of bacterial cellulose membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Janika

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has the same molecular formula as cellulose from plant origin, but it is characterized by several unique properties including high purity, crystallinity and mechanical strength. These properties are dependent on parameters such as the bacterial strain used, the cultivation conditions and post-growth processing. The possibility to achieve bacterial cellulose membranes with different properties by varying these parameters could make bacterial cellulose an interesting materi...

  11. Bacterial leaching of Pb -metallurgical wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Fečko, Peter; Janáková, Iva; Pertile, Eva; Kulová, Eliška

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is verification of application of bacterial leaching and calcination to recover heavy metals from metallurgical wastes - matte from metallurgical plant Kovohute Pribram. For bacterial leaching a pure bacterial culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was used. For a verification test an original sample of matte and matte from 2004 year were used. This paper further shows changes in the samples after bacterial leaching and after calcination. The paper results...

  12. Bacterial oesophagitis in an immunocompromised patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Radhi, J M; Schweiger, F

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial oesophagitis is an uncommon and poorly described entity affecting particularly the immunosuppressed patient. The diagnosis rests on the demonstration of bacterial invasion of the oesophageal wall in the absence of other pathological processes. The causative organisms usually are Gram-positive cocci and there may be associated bacteraemia. The case report describes a leukaemic patient with bacteraemic bacterial oesophagitis.

  13. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    OpenAIRE

    Demuth Donald R; Bagaitkar Juhi; Scott David A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacteri...

  14. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  15. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  16. Gene Sequence, Soluble Expression and Homologous Comparison of a D-Hydantoinase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ya-wei; ZHAO Li-xia; NIU Li-xi; FENG Xia; YUAN Jing-ming

    2005-01-01

    A 1440bp open-reading frame encoding D-hydantoinase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26 was cloned and sequenced(GenBank AY387829). The DNA fragment was inserted into Nde and BamHI sites of vector pET-3a, yielding a recombinant plasmid, pET-HDT. After being transferred into the host strain, the artificial strain, pET-HDT/E.coli BL21 can express the D-hydantoinase as the soluble form in the Lura-Bertani medium without addition of any inducers. The activity of the enzyme toward substrate DL-hydantoin can reach 3000-4000 IU per cells from one-liter bacterial culture incubated at 30 ℃ for 10-12 h. By the comparison of amino acid sequence homology, hydrophobic residues analysis and secondary structure prediction, it was found that D-hydantoinase reported herein is quite similar to that from Pseudomonas putdia CCRC12857, and alike to that from Pseudomonas putdia DSM84 or other bacteria. A rapid and efficient purification procedure of the enzyme was performed by a three-step procedure: ammonium sulfate fractionation, phenyl Sepharose hydrophobic interaction chromatography and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration. The molecular mass of the monomeric enzyme is 52042 Da as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  17. A Temperature-Independent Cold-Shock Protein Homolog Acts as a Virulence Factor in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, is a fastidious organism that requires very specific conditions for replication and plant colonization. Cold temperatures reduce growth and survival of X. fastidiosa both in vitro and in planta. However, little is known regarding physiological responses of X. fastidiosa to temperature changes. Cold-shock proteins (CSP), a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins, act as chaperones facilitating translation at low temperatures. Bacterial genomes often encode multiple CSP, some of which are strongly induced following exposure to cold. Additionally, CSP contribute to the general stress response through mRNA stabilization and posttranscriptional regulation. A putative CSP homolog (Csp1) with RNA-binding activity was identified in X. fastidiosa Stag's Leap. The csp1 gene lacked the long 5' untranslated region characteristic of cold-inducible genes and was expressed in a temperature-independent manner. As compared with the wild type, a deletion mutant of csp1 (∆csp1) had decreased survival rates following cold exposure and salt stress in vitro. The deletion mutant also was significantly less virulent in grapevine, as compared with the wild type, in the absence of cold stress. These results suggest an important function of X. fastidiosa Csp1 in response to cellular stress and during plant colonization. PMID:26808446

  18. A Geometric Description of Equivariant K-Homology for Proper Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Paul; Schick, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a discrete group and let X be a G-finite, proper G-CW-complex. We prove that Kasparov's equivariant K-homology groups KK^G(C_0(X),\\C) are isomorphic to the geometric equivariant K-homology groups of X that are obtained by making the geometric K-homology theory of Baum and Douglas equivariant in the natural way. This reconciles the original and current formulations of the Baum-Connes conjecture for discrete groups.

  19. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  20. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.