WorldWideScience

Sample records for bacterial outer membrane proteins

  1. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  2. Conformation of protein secreted across bacterial outer membranes: a study of enterotoxin translocation from Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The secretion of enterotoxin by Vibrio cholerae is punctuated by the transient entry of the toxin subunits into the periplasm. In this paper, the authors show that the subunits oligomerize into an assembled holotoxin within the periplasm prior to their secretion across the outer membrane. The rate of toxin assembly was studied by pulse-labeling cells with [35S]-methionine and then monitoring the turnover of radiolabeled subunits as they assembled within the periplasm. The subunits entered the periplasm as monomers and assembled into oligomers with a half-time of ≅ 1 min. Since assembly was a rapid event compared to the rate of toxin efflux from the periplasm, which had a half-time of ≅ 13 min, they conclude that all of the subunits that pass through the periplasm assemble before they traverse the outer membrane. The average concentration of subunit monomers and assembled holotoxin within the periplasm was calculated to be ≅ 20 and ≅ 260 μg/ml, respectively. This indicates that the periplasm is a suitably concentrated milieu where spontaneous toxin assembly can occur. These findings suggest that protein movement across bacterial outer membranes, in apparent contrast to export across other biological membranes, involves translocation of polypeptides that have already folded into tertiary and even quaternary conformations

  3. Reconstitution of nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 9.5 million people die each year due to infectious diseases caused by pathogens. Many species of pathogenic bacteria require nanomachines acting like a molecular pump that shuttle key disease-causing molecules (proteins) from inside bacteria cells to the outside surface, priming the bacteria for infections. How such proteins are assembled remains an important question in biology. If we can inhibit the nanomachines function in transporting specific violence factors, it would disable the disease process. Therefore it is crucial to understand how the proteins are transported through the nanomachines from the periplasm to the extracellular space. Measuring the activity of the component parts of membrane-embedded nanomachines in solution is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). We show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  4. A Molecularly Complete Planar Bacterial Outer Membrane Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Chih-Yun; Chen, Linxiao; Singh, Rohit R; DeLisa, Matthew P; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane (OM) is a barrier containing membrane proteins and liposaccharides that fulfill crucial functions for Gram-negative bacteria. With the advent of drug-resistant bacteria, it is necessary to understand the functional role of this membrane and its constituents to enable novel drug designs. Here we report a simple method to form an OM-like supported bilayer (OM-SB), which incorporates native lipids and membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria from outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). We characterize the formation of OM-SBs using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy. We show that the orientation of proteins in the OM-SB matches the native bacterial membrane, preserving the characteristic asymmetry of these membranes. As a demonstration of the utility of the OM-SB platform, we quantitatively measure antibiotic interactions between OM-SBs and polymyxin B, a cationic peptide used to treat Gram-negative infections. This data enriches understanding of the antibacterial mechanism of polymyxin B, including disruption kinetics and changes in membrane mechanical properties. Combining OM-SBs with microfluidics will enable higher throughput screening of antibiotics. With a broader view, we envision that a molecularly complete membrane-scaffold could be useful for cell-free applications employing engineered membrane proteins in bacterial membranes for myriad technological purposes. PMID:27600663

  5. Immunological study of the outer membrane proteins of Vibrio harveyi: insights that link immunoprotectivity to interference with bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan-ping; Hu, Yong-hua; Sun, Bo-guang; Sun, Li

    2013-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bacterial pathogen that affects marine vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we identified 13 outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from a pathogenic V. harveyi strain and analyzed their immunological properties. In vivo immunogenicity analysis showed that antibodies specific to recombinant proteins of the 13 OMPs were detected in the antiserum of V. harveyi-infected rat. When used as subunit vaccines to immunize Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), all OMPs were able to elicit specific serum antibody production in the vaccinated fish; however, only two OMPs (OMP173 and OMP214) induced high levels (>70%) of relative percent survival. Pre-incubation of V. harveyi with the antisera of protective OMPs significantly impaired bacterial infectivity against peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), whereas the antisera of non-protective OMPs had no apparent effect on infection. OMP173 antibodies could bind whole V. harveyi cells and exhibit bactericidal effect in a complement-dependent manner. Passive immunization showed that fish received OMP173 antiserum before being infected with V. harveyi exhibited significantly reduced mortality rate and lower bacterial loads in liver, spleen, and kidney. Finally, treatment of FG cells with OMP173 prior to V. harveyi infection protected the cells from bacterial invasion to a significant extent. Take together, these results indicate that two of the examined OMPs induce protective immunity through production of specific antibodies that block bacterial invasion, and that one OMP is likely to be involved in host cell interaction during the infection process. Thus, the immunoprotectivity of the OMPs is probably associated with functional participations of the OMPs in bacterial infection. PMID:23932987

  6. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Valerie A. Ferro; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A...

  7. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Reinaldo eAcevedo; Sonsire eFernandez; Caridad eZayas; Armando eAcosta; Maria Elena Sarmiento; Valerie A. Ferro; Einar eRosenqvist; Concepcion eCampa; Daniel eCardoso; Luis eGarcia; Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cu...

  8. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  9. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo eAcevedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA, serogroup W (dOMVW and serogroup X (dOMVX were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC, Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP, Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM and BCG (dOMVBCG. The immunogenicity of the OMV have been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice have shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-self neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  10. Identification of polyvalent protective immunogens from outer membrane proteins in Vibrio parahaemolyticus to protect fish against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Ye, Jin-Zhou; Han, Yi; Zeng, Li; Zhang, Jian-Ying; Li, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and economic way to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture. The development of effective vaccines, however, is still limited, especially for polyvalent vaccines, which are against multiple species. With this regard, identification of polyvalent protective immunogens, serving as polyvalent vaccines, became a key step in vaccine development. In the current study, 17 outer membrane proteins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus were identified as immunogens. Further, four of the 17 proteins including VP2309, VP0887, VPA0548 and VP1019 were characterized as efficiently protective immunogens against V. parahaemolyticus' infection through passive and active immunizations in zebrafish. Importantly, these four proteins showed cross-protective capability against infections by Aeromonas hydrophila or/and Pseudomonas fluorescens, which shared similar epitopes with V. parahaemolyticus in homology of these proteins. Further investigation showed that the expression level of the four protective immunogens elevated in response to fish plasma in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that the four protective immunogens are polyvalent vaccine candidates in aquaculture. PMID:27071519

  11. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane. PMID:20419407

  12. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  13. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  14. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  15. Energy-coupled outer membrane transport proteins and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Volkmar; Endriss, Franziska

    2007-06-01

    FhuA and FecA are two examples of energy-coupled outer membrane import proteins of gram-negative bacteria. FhuA transports iron complexed by the siderophore ferrichrome and serves as a receptor for phages, a toxic bacterial peptide, and a toxic protein. FecA transports diferric dicitrate and regulates transcription of an operon encoding five ferric citrate (Fec) transport genes. Properties of FhuA mutants selected according to the FhuA crystal structure are described. FhuA mutants in the TonB box, the hatch, and the beta-barrel are rather robust. TonB box mutants in FhuA FecA, FepA, Cir, and BtuB are compared; some mutations are suppressed by mutations in TonB. Mutant studies have not revealed a ferrichrome diffusion pathway, and tolerance to mutations in the region linking the TonB box to the hatch does not disclose a mechanism for how energy transfer from the cytoplasmic membrane to FhuA changes the conformation of FhuA such that bound substrates are released, the pore is opened, and substrates enter the periplasm, or how surface loops change their conformation such that TonB-dependent phages bind irreversibly and release their DNA into the cells. The FhuA and FecA crystal structures do not disclose the mechanism of these proteins, but they provide important information for specific functional studies. FecA is also a regulatory protein that transduces a signal from the cell surface into the cytoplasm. The interacting subdomains of the proteins in the FecA --> FecR --> FecI --> RNA polymerase signal transduction pathway resulting in fecABCDE transcription have been determined. Energy-coupled transporters transport not only iron and vitamin B12, but also other substrates of very low abundance such as sugars across the outer membrane; transcription regulation of the transport genes may occur similarly to that of the Fec transport genes. PMID:17370038

  16. Roles of the Protruding Loop of Factor B Essential for the Localization of Lipoproteins (LolB) in the Anchoring of Bacterial Triacylated Proteins to the Outer Membrane*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  17. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  18. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Bartonella bacilliformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Minnick, M F

    1994-01-01

    Purification of the outer membrane of Bartonella bacilliformis by sucrose step gradient centrifugation and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) suggest that 14 proteins, ranging from 11.2 to 75.3 kDa, are located in the outer membrane of the pathogen. On the basis of M(r)s, eleven of these proteins have counterparts which are labeled by extrinsic radioiodination of intact bartonellae, and two of the proteins are visibly sensitive to extrinsic protei...

  19. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé;

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is posttranslationally modified at a conserved lysyl residue by the coordinated action of two enzymes, PoxA and YjeK. We have previously established the importance of this modification in Salmonella stress resistance. Here we report that, like poxA and yjeK mutants......, Salmonella strains lacking EF-P display increased susceptibility to hypoosmotic conditions, antibiotics, and detergents and enhanced resistance to the compound S-nitrosoglutathione. The susceptibility phenotypes are largely explained by the enhanced membrane permeability of the efp mutant, which exhibits...... increased uptake of the hydrophobic dye 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Analysis of the membrane proteomes of wild-type and efp mutant Salmonella strains reveals few changes, including the prominent overexpression of a single porin, KdgM, in the efp mutant outer membrane. Removal of KdgM in the efp mutant...

  20. The Motion of a Single Molecule, the Lambda-Receptor, in the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia;

    2002-01-01

    constant of (1.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(-9) cm(2)/s and sits in a harmonic potential as if it were tethered by an elastic spring of spring constant of ~1.0 x 10(-2) pN/nm to the bacterial membrane. The purpose of the protein motion might be to facilitate transport of maltodextrins through the outer bacterial......Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo. The...... that allows extraction of the motion of the protein from measurements of the mobility of the bead-molecule complex; these results are equally applicable to analyze bead-protein complexes in other membrane systems. Within a domain of radius approximately 25 nm, the receptor diffuses with a diffusion...

  1. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Houhui; Sandie, Reatha; Wang, Ying; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The cell wall of mycobacteria includes an unusual outer membrane of extremely low permeability. While Escherichia coli uses more than 60 proteins to functionalize its outer membrane, only two mycobacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are known. The porin MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis provided the proof of principle that integral mycobacterial OMPs share the beta-barrel structure, the absence of hydrophobic alpha-helices and the presence of a signal peptide with OMPs of gram-negative bacteria. These properties were exploited in a multi-step bioinformatic approach to predict OMPs of M. tuberculosis. A secondary structure analysis was performed for 587 proteins of M. tuberculosis predicted to be exported. Scores were calculated for the beta-strand content and the amphiphilicity of the beta-strands. Reference OMPs of gram-negative bacteria defined threshold values for these parameters that were met by 144 proteins of unknown function of M. tuberculosis. Two of them were verified as OMPs by a novel two-step experimental approach. Rv1698 and Rv1973 were detected only in the total membrane fraction of M. bovis BCG in Western blot experiments, while proteinase K digestion of whole cells showed the surface accessibility of these proteins. These findings established that Rv1698 and Rv1973 are indeed localized in the outer membrane and tripled the number of known OMPs of M. tuberculosis. Significantly, these results provide evidence for the usefulness of the bioinformatic approach to predict mycobacterial OMPs and indicate that M. tuberculosis likely has many OMPs with beta-barrel structure. Our findings pave the way to identify the set of proteins which functionalize the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. PMID:18439872

  2. Immunochemical Properties of the Major Outer Membrane Protein of Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, Shahjahan

    1983-01-01

    Antisera to the major outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae (molecular weight, 48,000) raised in rabbits (i) agglutinated several strains of V. cholerae and (ii) immunoprecipitated outer membrane proteins prepared from both the biotypes and serotypes of V. cholerae. Antibodies of all isotypes to the major outer membrane protein were detected in immune human sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These results suggest that the major outer membrane protein was the common outer membrane ...

  3. Structural Basis for Translocation of a Biofilm-supporting Exopolysaccharide across the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Andole Pannuri, Archana; Ni, Dongchun; Zhou, Haizhen; Cao, Xiou; Lu, Xiaomei; Romeo, Tony; Huang, Yihua

    2016-05-01

    The partially de-N-acetylated poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (dPNAG) polymer serves as an intercellular biofilm adhesin that plays an essential role for the development and maintenance of integrity of biofilms of diverse bacterial species. Translocation of dPNAG across the bacterial outer membrane is mediated by a tetratricopeptide repeat-containing outer membrane protein, PgaA. To understand the molecular basis of dPNAG translocation, we determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of PgaA (residues 513-807). The structure reveals that PgaA forms a 16-strand transmembrane β-barrel, closed by four loops on the extracellular surface. Half of the interior surface of the barrel that lies parallel to the translocation pathway is electronegative, suggesting that the corresponding negatively charged residues may assist the secretion of the positively charged dPNAG polymer. In vivo complementation assays in a pgaA deletion bacterial strain showed that a cluster of negatively charged residues proximal to the periplasm is necessary for biofilm formation. Biochemical analyses further revealed that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain of PgaA binds directly to the N-deacetylase PgaB and is critical for biofilm formation. Our studies support a model in which the positively charged PgaB-bound dPNAG polymer is delivered to PgaA through the PgaA-PgaB interaction and is further targeted to the β-barrel lumen of PgaA potentially via a charge complementarity mechanism, thus priming the translocation of dPNAG across the bacterial outer membrane. PMID:26957546

  4. Clinico-pathological Responses of Calves Associated with Infection of Pasteurella multocida Type B and the Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and Outer Membrane Protein Immunogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faez Firdaus Jesse Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to investigate the Clinico-pathological responses of calves associated with the infections of Pasteurella multocida type B and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein immunogens. Alterations in the behavior of animals and pathological lesions observed following innate or experimental infections usually divulge extensive and detrimental changes in the clinical signs, organs and tissues of the animals afflicted with the disease. These alterations are imperative for Veterinary evaluation of herd health. Eight clinically healthy, non-pregnant and non-lactating Brangus cross heifers weighing 150±50 kg were used in the study. The heifers (n = 8 were divided into 4 groups of 2 calves per group. The control calves in group 1 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of sterile Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS. Calves in group 2 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of 1012 colony forming unit (cfu of wild-type P. multocida and calves in group 3 were inoculated intravenously with 10 mL of LPS broth extract. Calves in group 4 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of OMP broth extract. All animals were observed for 48 h for clinical signs, changes in behavior and mortality pattern, including the time of death. The results divulged significant differences in the Clinico-pathological alterations. Calves inoculated with whole cell P. multocida type B: 2 showed a significant (p<0.05 increased in rectal temperature. The affected calves showed significant severe dullness (p<0.000 and significant rumen hypomotility (p<0.000 was also exhibited. The calves showed signs of hypersalivation at 14 h. There is no significant difference (p = 0.240 in pulmonary oedema in the Calves of group 2 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 4 also showed no significant difference in pulmonary oedema (p = 0.612 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 3 showed significantly moderate pulmonary oedema (p<0.000. All the

  5. Expression, refolding, and initial structural characterization of the Y. pestis Ail outer membrane protein in lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Plesniak, Leigh A.; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Rypien, Candace; Yang, Yuan; Racic, Jasmina; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Ail is an outer membrane protein and virulence factor of Yersinia pestis, an extremely pathogenic, category A biothreat agent, responsible for precipitating massive human plague pandemics throughout history. Due to its key role in bacterial adhesion to host cells and bacterial resistance to host defense, Ail is a key target for anti-plague therapy. However, little information is available about the molecular aspects of its function and interactions with the human host, and the structure of Ai...

  6. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Watson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC–ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith–Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  7. Insertion of an outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli requires a chaperone-like protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Hardie, K R; Lory, S; Pugsley, A P

    1996-01-01

    Only one of the characterized components of the main terminal branch of the general secretory pathway (GSP) in Gram-negative bacteria, GspD, is an integral outer membrane protein that could conceivably form a channel to permit protein transport across this membrane. PulD, a member of the GspD protein family required for pullulanase secretion by Klebsiella oxytoca, is shown here to form outer membrane-associated complexes which are not readily dissociated by SDS treatment. The outer membrane a...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Vikas Kumar; Kapil, Arti

    2001-01-01

    Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses ...

  9. Relationship between the iron regulated outer membrane proteins and the outer membrane proteins of in vivo grown Pasteurella multocida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SDS-PAGE patterns of the outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts of Pasteurella multocida strain P1059, grown under iron-restricted, iron-replete and in vivo conditions, were examined. The results showed that the iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMPs) with molecular masses of 76 kDa, 84 kDa, and 94 kDa were expressed by bacteria grown in iron-restricted media. They were also expressed by in vivo grown P. multocida. Convalescent-phase sera, obtained from turkeys which had survived pasteurellosis, contained antibodies that reacted intensly with th three IROMPs. This indicated that these proteins were expressed in vivo. Bacteria expressing the IROMPs showed greater binding to Congo Red when compared to cells not expressing IROMPs. Cells expressing the IROMPs or its OMP extracts grown in iron-restricted media also showed greater binding to 59Fe-pasteurella siderophore (multocidin) when compared to bacteria or its extracts not expressing IROMPs. Convalescent-phase sera, which contained antibodies against the IROMPs, blocked this specific 59Fe-multocidin binding to IROMPs. Autoradiography was used to determine which of these IROMPs functioned as a receptor for the iron-multocidin complex. The results suggested that these three IROMPs have specific epitopes for binding to the iron multocidin complex

  10. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer membrane protein OmpL32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immu...

  11. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Priya Valeru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment.

  12. Leptospirosis serodiagnosis by ELISA based on recombinant outer membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayon, Piyanart; Chanket, Phanita; Boonchawalit, Toungporn; Chattanadee, Siriporn; Srimanote, Potjanee; Kalambaheti, Thareerat

    2011-05-01

    The outer membrane protein LipL21, LipL32, LipL41 and Loa22 of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni were previously revealed by immunoproteomic analysis, using sera from acute phase infection in a guinea pig. The full-length DNA of each protein was then cloned from the same serovar and expressed in pRSET vector. The obtained molecular weight (MW) of recombinant proteins rLipL21, rLipL32 and rLoa22 were slightly higher than the MW predicted from nucleotide sequences of each inserted gene, while only the N-terminal half of rLipL41 was obtained. Mice antiserum raised against each purified recombinant protein could react with the whole cell lysate of leptospiral serovars, implying that leptospiral native proteins shared a common epitope with recombinant protein. Serodiagnosis using recombinant protein antigen based on indirect ELISA procedure was developed in this study. The optimization of the ELISA components lead to determination of optical density (OD) from a single serum-dilution of 1:1000 in the leptospirosis patients group and normal healthy control group. The cut off OD values for both IgG and IgM class were investigated, and based on this fixed dilution only the IgG class could be used for differential diagnosis of patients and normal individuals. Compared with the MAT assay, ELISA assay utilizing both rLipL32 and rLoa22 as antigen, gave high accuracy and could thus be useful as a confirmative serology test. PMID:21353274

  13. Cross-reactivity of major outer membrane proteins of Enterobacteriaceae, studied by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstra, H.; Van Tol, J D; Dankert, J

    1980-01-01

    Outer membrane fractions were prepared from 11 bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae: Escherichia coli serotypes O1K-, O4K2, O26K60, O75K-, and O111K58, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumonia, Serratia marcescens, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, and Providencia stuartii. All strains studied were found to contain one non-peptidoglycan-bound, heat-modifiable outer membrane protein, and one or two peptidoglycan-associated major outer membrane proteins in the 27,...

  14. Adaptation of Salmonella enterica Hadar under static magnetic field: effects on outer membrane protein pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoussi Sarra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Hadar (S. Hadar is a highly prevalent foodborne pathogen and therefore a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Outer membrane proteins whose production is often regulated by environmental conditions also play important roles in the adaptability of bacterial pathogens to various environments. Results The present study investigated the adaptation of S. Hadar under the effect of acute static magnetic field exposure (200 mT, 9 h and the impact on the outer membrane protein pattern. Via two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and LC-MS/MS spectrometry, we compared the proteome of enriched-outer membrane fraction before and after exposure to a magnetic field. A total of 11 proteins, displaying more than a two-fold change, were differentially expressed in exposed cells, among which 7 were up-regulated and 4 down-regulated. These proteins were involved in the integrity of cell envelope (TolB, Pal, in the response to oxidative stress (OmpW, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, UspF, in the oxidative stress status (bacterioferritin, in virulence (OmpX, Yfgl or in motility (FlgE and UspF. Complementary experiments associated the down-regulation of FlgE and UspF with an alteration of swarming, a flagella-driven motility, under SMF. Furthermore, the antibiotic disc diffusion method confirmed a decrease of gentamicin susceptibility in exposed cells. This decrease could be partly associated with the up-regulation of TolC, outer membrane component of an efflux pump. OmpA, a multifunctional protein, was up-regulated. Conclusions SMF (200 mT seems to maintain the cell envelope integrity and to submit the exposed cells to an oxidative stress. Some alterations suggest an increase of the ability of exposed cells to form biofilms.

  15. Protecting enzymatic function through directed packaging into bacterial outer membrane vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Nathan J.; Turner, Kendrick B.; Medintz, Igor L.; Walper, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess innate machinery to transport extracellular cargo between cells as well as package virulence factors to infect host cells by secreting outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain small molecules, proteins, and genetic material. These robust proteoliposomes have evolved naturally to be resistant to degradation and provide a supportive environment to extend the activity of encapsulated cargo. In this study, we sought to exploit bacterial OMV formation to package and maintain the activity of an enzyme, phosphotriesterase (PTE), under challenging storage conditions encountered for real world applications. Here we show that OMV packaged PTE maintains activity over free PTE when subjected to elevated temperatures (>100-fold more activity after 14 days at 37 °C), iterative freeze-thaw cycles (3.4-fold post four-cycles), and lyophilization (43-fold). We also demonstrate how lyophilized OMV packaged PTE can be utilized as a cell free reagent for long term environmental remediation of pesticide/chemical warfare contaminated areas. PMID:27117743

  16. Topological Analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 Outer Membrane Protein 2

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Per; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1998-01-01

    Using monospecific polyclonal antisera to different parts of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2), we show that the protein is localized at the inner surface of the outer membrane. Omp2 becomes immunoaccessible when Chlamydia elementary bodies are treated with dithiothreitol, and protease digestions indicate that Omp2 has a possible two-domain structure.

  17. Topological analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane protein 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, P; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1998-01-01

    Using monospecific polyclonal antisera to different parts of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2), we show that the protein is localized at the inner surface of the outer membrane. Omp2 becomes immunoaccessible when Chlamydia elementary bodies are treated with dithiothreitol...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vikas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses four new outer membrane proteins,with molecular weight ranging from 77 kDa to 88 kDa, that are called Iron Regulated Outer Membrane Proteins (IROMPs. We studied the functional and immunological properties of IROMPs expressed by A.baumanii ATCC 19606.The bands corresponding to IROMPs were eluted from SDS-PAGE and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas secreting specific antibodies against these IROMPs were selected after screening by ELISA and their reactivity was confirmed by Western Blot. The antibodies then generated belonged to IgM isotype and showed bactericidical and opsonising activities against A.baumanii in vitro.These antibodies also blocked siderophore mediated iron uptake via IROMPs in bacteria. Conclusion This proves that iron uptake via IROMPs,which is mediated through siderophores,may have an important role in the survival of A.baumanii inside the host,and helps establishing the infection.

  19. Cloning of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane protein W in Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Alizadeh; Reza Ranjbar; Mehdi Kamali; Nima Farhadi; Amin Davari; Nourkhoda Sadeghifard

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective The outer membrane protein W (ompW) of Vibrio cholerae is involved in stimulating the immune response via induction of protective immunity. It also plays an important role in bacterial pathogenesis by increasing the adaptability of pathogenic strains. In this study we aimed to clone V. cholerae ompW gene in the strain X-33 of Pichia pastoris. Materials and Methods A gene encoding ompW was cloned into the Ppicza vector downstream of alcohol oxidase promoter. Then recom...

  20. Membrane proteins PmpG and PmpH are major constituents of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Per H; Christiansen, Gunna; Roepstorff, P;

    2000-01-01

    The outer membrane complex of Chlamydia is involved in the initial adherence and ingestion of Chlamydia by the host cell. In order to identify novel proteins in the outer membrane of Chlamydia trachomatis L2, proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. By...

  1. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32

    OpenAIRE

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.; Zuerner, Richard L; Frank, Ami; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, wh...

  2. Outer Membrane Protein Complex of Meningococcus Enhances the Antipolysaccharide Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharide–CRM197 Conjugate Vaccine ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial polysaccharides (PS) are T cell-independent antigens that do not induce immunologic memory and are poor immunogens in infants. Conjugate vaccines in which the PS is covalently linked to a carrier protein have enhanced immunogenicity that resembles that of T cell-dependent antigens. The Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine, which uses the outer membrane protein complex (OMPC) from meningococcus as a carrier protein, elicits protective levels of anti-capsular PS antib...

  3. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  4. Expression, refolding, and initial structural characterization of the Y. pestis Ail outer membrane protein in lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Leigh A; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Rypien, Candace; Yang, Yuan; Racic, Jasmina; Marassi, Francesca M

    2011-01-01

    Ail is an outer membrane protein and virulence factor of Yersinia pestis, an extremely pathogenic, category A biothreat agent, responsible for precipitating massive human plague pandemics throughout history. Due to its key role in bacterial adhesion to host cells and bacterial resistance to host defense, Ail is a key target for anti-plague therapy. However, little information is available about the molecular aspects of its function and interactions with the human host, and the structure of Ail is not known. Here we describe the recombinant expression, purification, refolding, and sample preparation of Ail for solution and solid-state NMR structural studies in lipid micelles and lipid bilayers. The initial NMR and CD spectra show that Ail adopts a well-defined transmembrane β-sheet conformation in lipids. PMID:20883662

  5. Solid-state NMR Study of the YadA Membrane-Anchor Domain in the Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shakeel A; Nagaraj, Madhu; Chauhan, Nandini; Franks, Trent W; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Habeck, Michael; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Linke, Dirk; van Rossum, Barth-J

    2015-10-19

    MAS-NMR was used to study the structure and dynamics at ambient temperatures of the membrane-anchor domain of YadA (YadA-M) in a pellet of the outer membrane of E. coli in which it was expressed. YadA is an adhesin from the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica that is involved in interactions with the host cell, and it is a model protein for studying the autotransport process. Existing assignments were sucessfully transferred to a large part of the YadA-M protein in the E. coli lipid environment by using (13) C-(13) C DARR and PDSD spectra at different mixing times. The chemical shifts in most regions of YadA-M are unchanged relative to those in microcrystalline YadA-M preparations from which a structure has previously been solved, including the ASSA region that is proposed to be involved in transition-state hairpin formation for transport of the soluble domain. Comparisons of the dynamics between the microcrystalline and membrane-embedded samples indicate greater flexibility of the ASSA region in the outer-membrane preparation at physiological temperatures. This study will pave the way towards MAS-NMR structure determination of membrane proteins, and a better understanding of functionally important dynamic residues in native membrane environments. PMID:26332158

  6. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer. PMID:24914988

  7. Vibrio cholerae expresses iron-regulated outer membrane proteins in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Sciortino, C V; Finkelstein, R A

    1983-01-01

    A comparison was made, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, of the outer membrane proteins of four strains of Vibrio cholerae grown in vivo in infant rabbits and in vitro in low-iron and iron-supplemented defined media. In vivo-grown V. cholerae expressed novel outer membrane-associated proteins which, in part, were similar to those observed on V. cholerae grown in vitro under conditions of iron deprivation.

  8. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  9. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Ye; WANG Xiuli; GUO Sheping; QIU xuemei

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals.The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host.Thus,the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines.We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V.parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802.We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells.The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa.We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting,respectively.Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V.parahaemolyticus.In addition,the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  10. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  11. Immunoproteomic Analysis ofBordetella bronchisepticaOuter Membrane Proteins and Identiifcation of New Immunogenic Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Quan-an

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative pathogen that causes acute and chronic respiratory infection in a variety of animals. To identify useful antigen candidates for diagnosis and subunit vaccine ofB. bronchiseptica, immunoproteomic analysis was adopted to analyse outer membrane proteins of it. The outer membrane proteins extracted fromB. bronchiseptica were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by Western blotting for their reactivity with the convalescent serum against two strains. Immunogenic proteins were identiifed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of lfight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), a total of 14 proteins are common immunoreactive proteins, of which 1 was known antigen and 13 were novel immunogenic proteins forB. bronchiseptica. Putative lipoprotein gene was cloned and recombinantly expressed. The recombinant protein induced high titer antibody, but showed low protective indices against challenges with HB (B. bronchiseptica strain isolated from a infected rabbit). The mortality of mice was 80% compared to 100% of positive controls. The identiifcation of these novel antigenic proteins is an important resource for further development of a new diagnostic test and vaccine for B. bronchiseptica.

  12. Chemical Analysis of Major Outer Membrane Proteins of Neisseria meningitidis: Comparison of Serotypes 2 and 11

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Chao-Ming; Frasch, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the 15 protein serotypes found in group B Neisseria meningitidis have distinct major outer membrane protein patterns when examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) by the Weber-Osborn system. Both serotypes 2 and 11 contain major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 41,000 and 28,000 (41K and 28K). The 41K and 28K proteins were purified from the prototype strains of these two serotypes (M986 type 2 and M136 type 11) by prepa...

  13. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a's targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  14. Rv1698 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis represents a new class of channel-forming outer membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroy, Axel; Mailaender, Claudia; Harder, Daniel; Koerber, Stephanie; Wolschendorf, Frank; Danilchanka, Olga; Wang, Ying; Heinz, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-06-27

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane composed of mycolic acids and a large variety of other lipids. Its protective function is an essential virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only OmpA, which has numerous homologs in Gram-negative bacteria, is known to form channels in the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis so far. Rv1698 was predicted to be an outer membrane protein of unknown function. Expression of rv1698 restored the sensitivity to ampicillin and chloramphenicol of a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant lacking the main porin MspA. Uptake experiments showed that Rv1698 partially complemented the permeability defect of the M. smegmatis porin mutant for glucose. These results indicated that Rv1698 provides an unspecific pore that can partially substitute for MspA. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that purified Rv1698 is an integral membrane protein that indeed produces channels. The main single channel conductance is 4.5 +/- 0.3 nanosiemens in 1 M KCl. Zero current potential measurements revealed a weak preference for cations. Whole cell digestion of recombinant M. smegmatis with proteinase K showed that Rv1698 is surface-accessible. Taken together, these experiments demonstrated that Rv1698 is a channel protein that is likely involved in transport processes across the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. Rv1698 has single homologs of unknown functions in Corynebacterineae and thus represents the first member of a new class of channel proteins specific for mycolic acid-containing outer membranes. PMID:18434314

  15. Heat Modifiability of Outer Membrane Proteins from Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary β-barrel membrane proteins are somewhat unique in that their folding states can be monitored using semi-native SDS-PAGE methods to determine if they are folded properly or not. This property, which is commonly referred to as heat modifiability, has been used for many years on both purified protein and on whole cells to monitor folded states of proteins of interest. Additionally, heat modifiability assays have proven indispensable in studying the BAM complex and its role in folding and inserting β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane. Here, we describe the protocol our lab uses for performing the heat modifiability assay in our studies on outer membrane proteins. PMID:26427675

  16. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa. PMID:25426629

  17. TonB-Dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the ...

  18. Analysis of proteins in Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane complex, COMC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Shaw, Allan C; Christiansen, Gunna

    2009-01-01

    The protein composition and N-terminal sequences of proteins in the outer membrane of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 were analysed following isolation of N-terminal peptides using combined fractional diagonal chromatography and identification by liquid chromatography tandem MS. Acetylation of primary a...

  19. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  20. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  1. Purification and partial characterization of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes C, E, and L2 were extrinsically radioiodinated, and whole-cell lysates of these serotypes were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Autoradiography of the polypeptide profiles identified a major surface protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 39,500 that was common to each C. trachomatis serotype. The abilities of nonionic (Triton X-100), dipolar ionic (Zwittergent TM-314), mild (sodium deoxycholate and sodium N-lauroyl sarcosine), and strongly anionic (SDS) detergents to extract this protein from intact EB of the L2 serotype were investigated by SDS-PAGE analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions obtained after each detergent treatment. Only SDS readily extracted this protein from intact EB. Sarkosyl treatment selectively solubilized the majority of other EB proteins, leaving the 39,500-dalton protein associated with the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction. Ultrastructural studies of the Sarkosyl-insoluble EB pellet showed it to consist of empty EB particles possessing an apparently intact outer membrane. No structural evidence for a peptidoglycan-like cell wall was found. Morphologically these chlamydial outer membrane complexes (COMC) resembled intact chlamydial EB outer membranes. The 39,500-dalton outer membrane protein was quantitatively extracted from COMC by treating them with 2% SDS at 60 degrees C. This protein accounted for 61% of the total COMC-associated protein, and its extraction resulted in a concomitant loss of the COMC membrane structure and morphology. The 39,500-dalton major outer membrane protein is a serogroup antigen of C. trachomatis organisms

  2. Protein secretion by hybrid bacterial ABC-transporters: specific functions of the membrane ATPase and the membrane fusion protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Binet, R; Wandersman, C

    1995-01-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi metalloprotease C and the Serratia marcescens haem acquisition protein HasA are both secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a C-terminal secretion signal and a specific ABC-transporter made up of three proteins: a membrane ATPase (the ABC-protein), a second inner membrane component belonging to the membrane fusion protein family and an outer membrane polypeptide. HasA and protease C transporters are homologous altho...

  3. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang

    2014-09-24

    The multiheme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC), and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC), respectively. Here we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate, but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  4. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-01-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. PMID:25139405

  5. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  6. Outer Membrane Proteins of Brucella abortus Vaccinal and Field Strains and their Immune Response in Buffaloes

    OpenAIRE

    Rukhshanda Munir*, M. Afzal1, M. Hussain2, S. M. S. Naqvi3 and A. Khanum3

    2010-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of three strains of B. abortus i.e. S19, RB51 and a local field isolate of biotype 1 were isolated through disrupting cells to generate membranes by centrifugation and sodium lauryl sarcosinate solubilisation of inner membrane proteins. Distinct OMP profiles of each strain were seen on SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE analysis of S19 and field isolate revealed eight protein bands in each strain. The OMPs of S19 had molecular masses 89.0, 73.0, 53.7, 49.0, 38.0, 27.0, 22.3, a...

  7. Intermediate location in the assembly of the matrix protein or porin into the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, A; Holland, I B

    1980-01-01

    Evidence from pulse-chase experiments indicates that the outer membrane matrix protein or porin of Escherichia coli B/r passes through a Sarkosyl-soluble membrane pool on the way to its eventual Sarkosyl-insoluble state in the outer membrane.

  8. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  9. Pathogenicity of Vibrio anguillarum serogroup O1 strains compared to plasmids, outer membrane protein profiles and siderophore production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K.; Gram, Lone; Austin, D.A.;

    1997-01-01

    The virulence of 18 strains of Vibrio anguillarum serogroup 01 was compared to plasmid content, expression of siderophores and outer membrane proteins. All strains, irrespective of plasmid content, produced siderophores and inducible outer membrane proteins under iron-limited conditions. Only str...

  10. Functional properties of the major outer membrane protein in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Yuan; Wu, Han-Chiang; Lin, Juey-Wen; Weng, Shu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic pathogen that is closely associated with high morbidity and mortality in debilitated and immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, to investigate the pathogenesis mechanism is urgently required. However, there are very few studies to evaluate the functional properties of outer membrane protein, which may contribute to the pathogenesis in S. maltophilia. In this study, three abundant proteins in the outer membrane fraction of S. maltophilia were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as OmpW1, MopB, and a hypothetical protein. MopB, a member of the OmpA family, was firstly chosen for functional investigation in this study because many OmpA-family proteins are known to be involved in pathogenesis and offer potential as vaccines. Membrane fractionation analyses demonstrated that MopB was indeed the most abundant outer membrane protein (OMP) in S. maltophilia. For functional studies, the mopB mutant of S. maltophilia (SmMopB) was constructed by insertional mutation. MopB deficiency resulted in a change in the protein composition of OMPs and altered the architecture of the outer membrane. The SmMopB strain exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward L929 fibroblasts and was more sensitive to numerous stresses, including human serum, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and hydrogen peroxide compared with wildtype S. maltophilia. These results suggest that MopB may be a good candidate for the design of vaccines or anti-MopB drugs for controlling serious nosocomial infections of multidrug-resistant S. maltophilia, especially in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:26224456

  11. Evidence that the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is glycosylated.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, A F; Kuo, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis was determined to be a glycoprotein on the basis of susceptibility to glycosidase digestion and the presence of carbohydrate by staining and radiolabeling. The MOMP of the serovar L2 organisms was isolated by electroelution from the protein band excised from the gel after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The incubation of MOMP with N-glycosidase F, an endoglycosidase that cleaves the N-glycan...

  12. Outer membrane protein binding sites of complement component 3 during opsonization of Haemophilus influenzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Hetherington, S V; Patrick, C C; Hansen, E J

    1993-01-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) binding to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is an important step in host defense against invasive disease, but the details of this process remain poorly understood. We have shown that the P1 and P2 outer membrane proteins (OMPs) serve as binding sites for C3 on serum-opsonized Hib. Whole-cell lysates of opsonized Hib were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the resolved proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose. Immunobl...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    OpenAIRE

    Goel Vikas; Kapil Arti

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, e...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  15. Cloning of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane protein W in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Alizadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The outer membrane protein W (ompW of Vibrio cholerae is involved in stimulating the immune response via induction of protective immunity. It also plays an important role in bacterial pathogenesis by increasing the adaptability of pathogenic strains. In this study we aimed to clone V. cholerae ompW gene in the strain X-33 of Pichia pastoris.A gene encoding ompW was cloned into the Ppicza vector downstream of alcohol oxidase promoter. Then recombinant vector was transformed into the genome of the strain X-33 of P. pastoris. After growth of zeocin-resistant transformants, clones were selected and subsequently confirmed for cloning by PCR enzymatic digestion and sequencing.PCR, enzymatic digestion and sequencing showed that the ompW gene was correctly cloned into P. pastoris genome.Results of our study showed that the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris can be considered as an appropriate host instead of mammalian and prokaryotic systems for cloning of ompW. As far as data show, this is the first time that ompW of V. cholera is cloned into the methylotrophic P. pastoris.

  16. Characterization of new outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a combinatorial peptide ligand library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Khemiri, Arbia; Seyer, Damien; Hardouin, Julie; Chan Tchi Song, Philippe; Dé, Emmanuelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Most often, the use of ProteoMiner beads has been restricted to human serum proteins for the normalization of major proteins, such as albumin. However, there are other situations of interest in which the presence of major proteins would quench the signals of low abundance polypeptides. We propose the use of these beads for investigating the envelope of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially, we performed comparative 2D electrophoresis to qualitatively evaluate the incidence of the normalization stage. This demonstrated a significant reduction of the major membrane proteins. Thereafter, using shotgun analysis, the same protein extract was targeted by using combinatorial peptide ligand library capture. This treatment yielded 154 additional outer membrane proteins (OMPs) uncovered by the study of the crude sample. PMID:25471289

  17. Lipopolysaccharide density and structure govern the extent and distance of nanoparticle interaction with actual and model bacterial outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials

  19. Accelerated microevolution in an outer membrane protein (OMP of the intracellular bacteria Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Jacob A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane proteins (OMPs of Gram-negative bacteria are key players in the biology of bacterial-host interactions. However, while considerable attention has been given to OMPs of vertebrate pathogens, relatively little is known about the role of these proteins in bacteria that primarily infect invertebrates. One such OMP is found in the intracellular bacteria Wolbachia, which are widespread symbionts of arthropods and filarial nematodes. Recent experimental studies have shown that the Wolbachia surface protein (WSP can trigger host immune responses and control cell death programming in humans, suggesting a key role of WSP for establishment and persistence of the symbiosis in arthropods. Results Here we performed an analysis of 515 unique alleles found in 831 Wolbachia isolates, to investigate WSP structure, microevolution and population genetics. WSP shows an eight-strand transmembrane β-barrel structure with four extracellular loops containing hypervariable regions (HVRs. A clustering approach based upon patterns of HVR haplotype diversity was used to group similar WSP sequences and to estimate the relative contribution of mutation and recombination during early stages of protein divergence. Results indicate that although point mutations generate most of the new protein haplotypes, recombination is a predominant force triggering diversity since the very first steps of protein evolution, causing at least 50% of the total amino acid variation observed in recently diverged proteins. Analysis of synonymous variants indicates that individual WSP protein types are subject to a very rapid turnover and that HVRs can accommodate a virtually unlimited repertoire of peptides. Overall distribution of WSP across hosts supports a non-random association of WSP with the host genus, although extensive horizontal transfer has occurred also in recent times. Conclusions In OMPs of vertebrate pathogens, large recombination impact, positive

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against the Outer Membrane Protein of Bordetella avium

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guanhua; Liang, Manfei; Zuo, Xuemei; Zhao, Xue; Guo, Fanxia; Yang, Shifa; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the etiologic agent of coryza and rhinotracheitis in poultry. This respiratory disease is responsible for substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. avium isolated from diseased chickens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the extracted B. avium OMPs. Then the splenocytes from immunized mice and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused using PEG 4000. Three stable hybridoma clones (des...

  1. Protection against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa induced by immunization with outer membrane proteins of Shigella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Adamus, G.; Mulczyk, M; Witkowska, D; Romanowska, E

    1980-01-01

    Active immunization of guinea pigs and rabbits with outer membrane proteins (OMP) isolated from Shigella flexneri 3a and Shigella sonnei phase I protected the animals against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa induced with the homologous or heterologous strain. Protection was also achieved in rabbits after passive immunization with anti-OMP immune serum. Active immunization with lipopolysaccharide of S. flexneri 3a did not protect rabbits against keratoconjunctivitis shigellosa.

  2. Heat modifiability and detergent solubility of outer membrane proteins of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, N E; Wisnieski, B J

    1983-01-01

    The outer membrane fraction from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides was isolated by isopycnic density centrifugation. The purity of this fraction was assayed by several methods. When the outer membrane fraction obtained after French press lysis of cells was compared with the outer membrane fragments released during spheroplast formation, the polypeptide profiles were identical. Detergent solubilization of membrane fractions showed that Triton X-100 nonselectively solubilizes both the cytoplasmic me...

  3. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins in Adherence and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Ménard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most successful human pathogens, which colonizes the mucus layer of the gastric epithelium of more than 50% of the world’s population. This curved, microaerophilic, Gram-negative bacterium induces a chronic active gastritis, often asymptomatic, in all infected individuals. In some cases, this gastritis evolves to more severe diseases such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori has developed a unique set of factors, actively supporting its successful survival and persistence in its natural hostile ecological niche, the human stomach, throughout the individual’s life, unless treated. In the human stomach, the vast majority of H. pylori cells are motile in the mucus layer lining, but a small percentage adheres to the epithelial cell surfaces. Adherence to the gastric epithelium is important for the ability of H. pylori to cause disease because this intimate attachment facilitates: (1 colonization and persistence, by preventing the bacteria from being eliminated from the stomach, by mucus turnover and gastric peristalsis; (2 evasion from the human immune system and (3 efficient delivery of proteins into the gastric cell, such as the CagA oncoprotein. Therefore, bacteria with better adherence properties colonize the host at higher densities. H. pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial species known and is equipped with an extraordinarily large set of outer membrane proteins, whose role in the infection and persistence process will be discussed in this review, as well as the different receptor structures that have been so far described for mucosal adherence.

  4. Brucella ovis PA mutants for outer membrane proteins Omp10, Omp19, SP41, and BepC are not altered in their virulence and outer membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Sancho, Pilar; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2016-04-15

    Mutants in several genes have been obtained on the genetic background of virulent rough (lacking O-polysaccharide) Brucella ovis PA. The target genes encode outer membrane proteins previously associated with the virulence of smooth (bearing O-polysaccharide chains in the lipopolysaccharide) Brucella strains. Multiple attempts to delete omp16, coding for a homologue to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins, were unsuccessful, which suggests that Omp16 is probably essential for in vitro survival of B. ovis PA. Single deletion of omp10 or omp19 - that encode two other outer membrane lipoproteins - was achieved, but the simultaneous removal of both genes failed, suggesting an essential complementary function between both proteins. Two other deletion mutants, defective in the Tol-C-homologue BepC or in the SP41 adhesin, were also obtained. Surprisingly when compared to previous results obtained with smooth Brucella, none of the B. ovis mutants showed attenuation in the virulence, either in the mouse model or in cellular models of professional and non-professional phagocytes. Additionally, and in contrast to the observations reported with smooth Brucella strains, several properties related to the outer membrane remained almost unaltered. These results evidence new distinctive traits between naturally rough B. ovis and smooth brucellae. PMID:27016758

  5. Proteolytic cleavage of the Chlamydia pneumoniae major outer membrane protein in the absence of Pmp10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Stefan; Timmerman, E; Gevaert, K;

    2007-01-01

    compared the proteome of the CWL029 isolate with the proteome of the subcloned strain and identified a specific cleavage of the C-terminal part of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP), which occurred only in the absence of Pmp10. In contrast, when Pmp10 was expressed we predominantly observed full......-length MOMP. No other proteins appeared to be regulated according to the presence or absence of Pmp10. These results suggest a close association between MOMP and Pmp10, where Pmp10 may protect the C-terminal part of MOMP from proteolytic cleavage....

  6. Outer membrane protein shifts in biocide-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, C L; Al-Adham, I S; Abdel Malek, S M; Buultjens, T E; Horrocks, A J; Collier, P J

    2000-08-01

    Benzisothiazolone (BIT), N-methylisothiazolone (MIT) and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT) are highly effective biocidal agents and are used as preservatives in a variety of cosmetic preparations. The isothiazolones have proven efficacy against many fungal and bacterial species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, some species are beginning to exhibit resistance towards this group of compounds after extended exposure. This experiment induced resistance in cultures of Ps. aeruginosa exposed to incrementally increasing sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the isothiazolones in their pure chemical forms. The induced resistance was observed as a gradual increase in MIC with each new passage. The MICs for all three test isothiazolones and a thiol-interactive control compound (thiomersal) increased by approximately twofold during the course of the experiment. The onset of resistance was also observed by reference to the altered presence of an outer membrane protein, designated the T-OMP, in SDS-PAGE preparations. T-OMP was observed to disappear from the biocide-exposed preparations and reappear when the resistance-induced cultures were passaged in the absence of biocide. This reappearance of T-OMP was not accompanied by a complete reversal of induced resistance, but by a small decrease in MIC. The induction of resistance towards one biocide resulted in the development of cross-resistance towards other members of the group and the control, thiomersal. It has been suggested that the disappearance of T-OMP from these preparations is associated with the onset of resistance to the isothiazolones in their Kathon form (CMIT and MIT). PMID:10971761

  7. Identification of immunogenic outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the infant rat model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.J.; Frisch, C.F.; McDade, R.L. Jr.; Johnston, K.H.

    1981-06-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b which are immunogenic in infant rats were identified by a radioimmunoprecipitation method. Intact cells of H. influenzae type b were radioiodinated by a lactoperoxidase-catalyzed procedure, and an outer membrane-containing fraction was prepared from these cells. These radioiodinated outer membranes were mixed with sera obtained from rats convalescing from systemic H. influenzae type b disease induced at 6 days of age, and the resultant (antibody-outer membrane protein antigen) complexes were extracted from these membranes by treatment with nonionic detergent and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. These soluble antibody-antigen complexes were isolated by means of adsorption to protein A-bearing staphylococci, and the radioiodinated protein antigens were identified by gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. Infant rats were shown to mount a readily detectable antibody response to several different proteins present in the outer membrane of H. influenzae type b. Individual infant rats were found to vary both qualitatively and quantitatively in their immune response to these immunogenic outer membrane proteins.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the C-terminal domain of outer membrane protein A from enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) plays multiple roles in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, such as mediation of bacterial conjunction, maintenance of cell shape, induction of adhesion of EHEC to host cells etc. Better understanding of the functions of OmpA will help in the control of EHEC infections. OmpA is composed of two domains: the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is a β-barrel structure and embeds in the outer membrane of the bacterium. The structure and function of the C-terminal domain of OmpA (OmpAC) remain elusive. In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group I4132, with unit-cell parameter a = 158.99 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.55 Å3 Da−1 and 51.77%, respectively, for two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  9. Purification of integral outer-membrane protein OmpC, a surface antigen from Salmonella typhi for structure-function studies: a method applicable to enterobacterial major outer-membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiasamy, A; Krishnaswamy, S

    2000-07-15

    Extraction of the outer-membrane porin, OmpC, from Salmonella typhi Ty21a was done by using a modified salt-extraction procedure. It was possible to extract only the major outer-membrane protein (OMP) from the crude membrane using this method. Aberrant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) production in the galE mutant Ty21a has resulted in more isoforms of OmpC and subsequently led to anomalous mobility in SDS-PAGE. The purity of the preparation was confirmed by denaturing urea SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. The major OMP extracts had LPS of both bound and free forms. The free form of LPS could be removed by gel filtration and the bound form, largely, was removed using ion-exchange chromatography and by passing through ultrafiltration devices. This method has been used to extract the native trimer of OmpC, the major OMP, in a large scale, for structure-function studies. S. typhi Ty21a OmpC preparation yielded reproducible diffraction-quality crystals. Extracts of porin from wild-type Escherichia coli HB101, grown under high osmolarity conditions, showed a single species of OMP on SDS-PAGE. This suggests the possible application of the method to other gram-negative bacterial porins. PMID:10929809

  10. Electrophoretic analysis of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia psittaci reveals multimers which are recognized by protective monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, M C; Herring, A J; Andersen, A A; Jones, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Purified major outer membrane protein, detergent solubilized and reduced with dithiothreitol but not heated, gave an apparent molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels almost three times that observed for the heat-denatured SDS-treated peptide. This is similar to the behavior of porin trimers from gram-negative bacteria. Two protective monoclonal antibodies showed strong binding to the proposed trimer but not to denatured, monomeric major outer membrane protein.

  11. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ is essential for electron transport to Fe (III and Mn (IV oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffer Marianne

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J, was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III and insoluble Mn (IV oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal

  12. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  13. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  14. Leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL32 induces inflammation and kidney injury in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Yang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Ma, Tsu-Lin; Chou, Li-Fang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Pan, Rong-Long; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an often overlooked cause of acute kidney injury that can lead to multiple organ failure and even death. The principle protein that conserved in many pathogenic leptospires is the outer membrane protein LipL32. However, the role of LipL32 in the pathogenesis of renal injury in leptospirosis is not entirely clear. Here we studied the effects of LipL32 on the developing kidney in zebrafish larvae. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with Leptospira santarosai serovar Shermani induced acute tubular injury predominantly in the proximal pronephric ducts. Furthermore, microinjection of lipl32 mRNA or recombinant LipL32 protein into zebrafish larvae increased macrophage accumulation and disrupted the basolateral location of NA-K-ATPase in pronephric ducts. These changes led to substantial impairment of the pronephric kidney structure. We further demonstrated that morpholino knockdown of tlr2, but not tlr4, reduced the LipL32-induced leukocyte infiltration and kidney injury. These data demonstrate that LipL32 contributes to the renal pathology in leptospirosis and gives some clues to the potential virulence of LipL32. Our results support the use of zebrafish as a model organism for studying the disease mechanism of leptospiral infection. This model might permit the future exploration of the virulence and molecular pathways of different leptospiral outer membrane proteins. PMID:27278903

  15. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  16. The protein moiety of Brucella abortus outer membrane protein 16 is a new bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern that activates dendritic cells in vivo, induces a Th1 immune response, and is a promising self-adjuvanting vaccine against systemic and oral acquired brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, Karina A; García Samartino, Clara; Coria, Lorena M; Estein, Silvia M; Zwerdling, Astrid; Ibañez, Andrés E; Barrionuevo, Paula; Oliveira, Fernanda Souza de; Carvalho, Natalia Barbosa; Borkowski, Julia; Oliveira, Sergio Costa; Warzecha, Heribert; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2010-05-01

    Knowing the inherent stimulatory properties of the lipid moiety of bacterial lipoproteins, we first hypothesized that Brucella abortus outer membrane protein (Omp)16 lipoprotein would be able to elicit a protective immune response without the need of external adjuvants. In this study, we demonstrate that Omp16 administered by the i.p. route confers significant protection against B. abortus infection and that the protective response evoked is independent of the protein lipidation. To date, Omp16 is the first Brucella protein that without the requirement of external adjuvants is able to induce similar protection levels to the control live vaccine S19. Moreover, the protein portion of Omp16 (unlipidated Omp16 [U-Omp16]) elicits a protective response when administered by the oral route. Either systemic or oral immunization with U-Omp16 elicits a Th1-specific response. These abilities of U-Omp16 indicate that it is endowed with self-adjuvanting properties. The adjuvanticity of U-Omp16 could be explained, at least in part, by its capacity to activate dendritic cells in vivo. U-Omp16 is also able to stimulate dendritic cells and macrophages in vitro. The latter property and its ability to induce a protective Th1 immune response against B. abortus infection have been found to be TLR4 dependent. The facts that U-Omp16 is an oral protective Ag and possesses a mucosal self-adjuvanting property led us to develop a plant-made vaccine expressing U-Omp16. Our results indicate that plant-expressed recombinant U-Omp16 is able to confer protective immunity, when given orally, indicating that a plant-based oral vaccine expressing U-Omp16 could be a valuable approach to controlling this disease. PMID:20351187

  17. Outer membrane protein and biotype analysis of non-serotypable strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Coverdale, C H; Temple, G S

    1989-01-01

    Strains of Haemophilus influenzae (n = 161) were isolated from inpatients with symptoms of pulmonary infection. Conventional tests showed that 144 strains were non-serotypable and all belonged to one of eight biotypes. The common biotypes were 2 (41%), 3 (27.1%), 1 (13.2%) and 5 (10.4%). The outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles of 59 non-serotypable strains were examined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). A comparison of OMP profiles suggested a possibl...

  18. Isolation and Identification of Outer Membrane Proteins of Helicobacter Pylori of Iranian Patient by SDS-PAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Doosty

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The function of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori is confirmed as one of the factors which motivates gastric and duodenal ulcer and gastritis. Various methods are used to diagnose the infection. Serological tests are the easiest and most harmless for the patients. Probably, H.pylori strains in Iran are different from the strains in other countries. Hence, it seems neccessary to design a specific serological test to recognize and identify different strains of bacterial antigenic proteins of Iranian patients."nSince the most manifest and specific to these bacterial antigens are the "Outer Membrane Protein" (OMP, therefore, the first necessary step is to separate and purify H.pylori OMP and then to identify antigenic proteins."nIn this study, we received bacteria colony that belonged to 15 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer, which had been growed in blood agar or brucella broth. After processing such as washing, freezing and defreezing, sonicating, centrifugation with high speed (10,000 g and treatment with sarcosyl, the sarcosyl insoluble fraction was extracted. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - Poly Acrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was preformed. From all 15 OMP specimens, we isolated protein bands."nThe first two bands with higher MW, were major bands and the two lighter bands were the minor bands. Approximate MW of these 4 proteins are equal to 67000, 61000, 30000 and 17000 dalton

  19. BB0172, a Borrelia burgdorferi outer membrane protein that binds integrin α3β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Elaine; Tamborero, Silvia; Mingarro, Ismael; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2013-08-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Upon infection, some B. burgdorferi genes are upregulated, including members of the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) protein family, which facilitate B. burgdorferi adherence to extracellular matrix components of the host. Comparative genome analysis has revealed a new family of B. burgdorferi proteins containing the von Willebrand factor A (vWFA) domain. In the present study, we characterized the expression and membrane association of the vWFA domain-containing protein BB0172 by using in vitro transcription/translation systems in the presence of microsomal membranes and with detergent phase separation assays. Our results showed evidence of BB0172 localization in the outer membrane, the orientation of the vWFA domain to the extracellular environment, and its function as a metal ion-dependent integrin-binding protein. This is the first report of a borrelial adhesin with a metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif that is similar to those observed in eukaryotic integrins and has a similar function. PMID:23687274

  20. Outer Membrane Targeting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteins Shows Variable Dependence on the Components of Bam and Lol Machineries

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Hanh H.; Nickerson, Nicholas N.; Lee, Vincent T.; Kazimirova, Anastasia; Chami, Mohamed; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Lory, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Gram-negative bacteria, the Lol and Bam machineries direct the targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins, respectively, to the outer membrane (OM). Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with depleted levels of specific Bam and Lol proteins, we demonstrated a variable dependence of different OM proteins on these targeting pathways. Reduction in the level of BamA significantly affected the ability of the β-barrel membrane protein OprF to localize to the OM, while the targeting...

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of the structural gene for protein I, the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Carbonetti, N H; Sparling, P F

    1987-01-01

    Protein I (P.I) is the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and serves as a porin. By using oligonucleotide probes derived from the known amino-terminal sequence of the mature protein, we have cloned the gene encoding the P.I of gonococcal strain FA19 in three overlapping fragments and determined the DNA sequence. The gene sequence predicts a protein with characteristics typical of the porins of other Gram-negative bacteria. A clone expressing P.I in Escherichia coli was obta...

  2. Prokaryotic Expression and Identification of Outer Membrane Protein 2 of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈超群; 吴移谋; 李忠玉; 朱翠明; 尹卫国

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant plasmid containing the outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2) gene of Chlamydia trachomatis and express Omp2 in E.coli. Methods: The omp2 gene of C. trachomatis serovar D was cloned into pQE30 vector following PCR amplification from genomic DNA. E. coli M15 transformants were induced to express the fusion protein by IPTG and the product was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Results: Confirmed by enzyme cleavage analysis and DNA sequencing, a correct recombinant plasmid pQE30/omp2 was constructed. The fusion protein from the transformants was approximately 60 kDa in size in SDS-PAGE analysis, which could specially react with anti-6 × His mouse monoclonal IgG antibodies. Conclusion: We successfully expressed Omp2 in E. coil M15, providing an efficient and simple system for assaying the immunological properties of Omp2.

  3. Distribution of a protein antigenically related to the major anaerobically induced gonococcal outer membrane protein among other Neisseria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1990-12-01

    The Pan 1 protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a novel 54-kDa outer membrane protein expressed only when gonococci are grown in the absence of oxygen. It is a major antigen recognized by sera from patients with gonococcal infection. We raised mouse monospecific polyclonal antiserum to gel-purified Pan 1 from gonococcal strain F62. The antiserum was broadly cross-reactive among gonococcal strains; all strains tested reacted in immunoblot analysis proportionate to the amount of Pan 1 visible in silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. In immunoblot experiments, N. lactamica and N. cinerea reacted very strongly to the anti-Pan 1 antiserum, whereas N. sicca, N. flava, and N. mucosa did not react at all. The other commensals tested, N. subflava and N. perflava, exhibited only a minor reaction. These results correlated with the apparent amount of Pan 1 seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes. SDS-polyacrylamide gel analysis of six meningococcal strains revealed no visible anaerobically induced outer membrane proteins, and the subsequent immunoblots showed only slight or no reaction to the anti-Pan 1 antibody. In the four meningococcal strains that did react slightly with the antiserum, a Pan 1-like protein was seen only in anaerobically grown cells. Thus, meningococci did not express Pan 1 at levels comparable to that found in gonococci; however, when Pan 1 was expressed in meningococcal strains, it was oxygen regulated. This is the first example of a protein found in the gonococcal outer membrane that, under identical growth conditions, is not expressed at similar levels in the meningococcus. PMID:2123827

  4. Differential expression of in vivo and in vitro protein profile of outer membrane of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Outer membrane (OM proteins play a significant role in bacterial pathogenesis. In this work, we examined and compared the expression of the OM proteins of the rice pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1, a Gram-negative bacterium, both in an in vitro culture medium and in vivo rice plants. Global proteomic profiling of A. avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1 comparing in vivo and in vitro conditions revealed the differential expression of proteins affecting the survival and pathogenicity of the rice pathogen in host plants. The shotgun proteomics analysis of OM proteins resulted in the identification of 97 proteins in vitro and 62 proteins in vivo by mass spectrometry. Among these OM proteins, there is a high number of porins, TonB-dependent receptors, lipoproteins of the NodT family, ABC transporters, flagellins, and proteins of unknown function expressed under both conditions. However, the major proteins such as phospholipase and OmpA domain containing proteins were expressed in vitro, while the proteins such as the surface anchored protein F, ATP-dependent Clp protease, OmpA and MotB domain containing proteins were expressed in vivo. This may indicate that these in vivo OM proteins have roles in the pathogenicity of A. avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1. In addition, the LC-MS/MS identification of OmpA and MotB validated the in silico prediction of the existance of Type VI secretion system core components. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the in vitro and in vivo protein profiles, in combination with LC-MS/MS mass spectra, in silico OM proteome and in silico genome wide analysis, of pathogenicity or plant host required proteins of a plant pathogenic bacterium.

  5. A conserved small RNA promotes silencing of the outer membrane protein YbfM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Johansen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jesper S; Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Graakjær, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    important physiological role of regulatory RNA molecules in Gram-negative bacteria is to modulate the cell surface and/or to prevent accumulation of OMPs in the envelope. Here, we extend the OMP-sRNA network by showing that the expression of the outer membrane protein YbfM is silenced by a conserved sRNA......In the past few years an increasing number of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in enterobacteria have been found to negatively regulate the expression of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) at the post-transcriptional level. These RNAs act under various growth and stress conditions, suggesting that one......, designated MicM (also known as RybC/SroB). The regulation is strictly dependent on the RNA chaperone Hfq, and mutational analysis indicates that MicM sequesters the ribosome binding site of ybfM mRNA by an antisense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hfq strongly enhances the on-rate of duplex...

  6. Physiological Characterization of SusG, an Outer Membrane Protein Essential for Starch Utilization by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Cho, Kyu Hong; Siegel, Hilary A.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    1999-01-01

    Results from previous studies had suggested that Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron utilizes starch by binding the polysaccharide to the bacterial surface and subsequently degrading the polymer by using cell-associated enzymes. Most of the starch-degrading activity was localized to the periplasm, but a portion appeared to be membrane associated. This raised the possibility that some breakdown might occur in the outer membrane prior to exposure of the polysaccharide to the periplasmic polysaccharide...

  7. Genome-Wide Study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Protein Immunogenicity Using Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Montor, Wagner R.; Huang, Jin; Hu, Yanhui; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Lynch, Susan; Kronish, Jeannine-Weiner; Ordonez, Claudia L.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Lory, Stephen; LaBaer, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for potentially life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised defense mechanisms and those with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa infection is notable for the appearance of a humoral response to some known antigens, such as flagellin C, elastase, alkaline protease, and others. Although a number of immunogenic proteins are known, no effective vaccine has been approved yet. Here, we report a comprehensive study of all 262 outer membrane and expor...

  8. Analysis of outer membrane vesicle associated proteins isolated from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehaus Karsten

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are released from the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria. These extracellular compartments are known to transport compounds involved in cell-cell signalling as well as virulence associated proteins, e.g. the cytolysine from enterotoxic E. coli. Results We have demonstrated that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc releases OMVs into the culture supernatant during growth. A proteome study identified 31 different proteins that associate with the OMV fraction of which half are virulence-associated. A comparison with the most abundant outer membrane (OM proteins revealed that some proteins are enriched in the OMV fraction. This may be connected to differences in the LPS composition between the OMVs and the OM. Furthermore, a comparison of the OMV proteomes from two different culture media indicated that the culture conditions have an impact on the protein composition. Interestingly, the proteins that are common to both culture conditions are mainly involved in virulence. Conclusion Outer membrane vesicles released from the OM of Xcc contain membrane- and virulence-associated proteins. Future experiments will prove whether these structures can serve as "vehicles" for the transport of virulence factors into the host membrane.

  9. Molecular biology of Neisseria meningitidis class 5 and H.8 outer membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the surface structures responsible for inter- and intrastrain antigenic variability in meningococci is the heat-modifiable class 5 (C.5) protein. Neisseria meningitidis strain FAM18 (a meningococcal disease isolate) expressed two different C.5 proteins (C.5a and C.5b) identifiable by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We generated two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), each specific for one of the identified C.5 proteins. The MAbs, which were bactericidal for variants expressing the appropriate C.5 protein, were used to study C.5 expression changes in FAM18. The H.8 protein is an antigenically conserved outer membrane protein expressed almost exclusively by the pathogenic Neisseria. We have cloned and sequenced an H.8 gene from N. meningitidis FAM18. The predicted H.8 amino acid sequence indicated that the most probable signal peptide processing site matched the consensus prokaryotic lipoprotein processing/modification sequence. We then showed that the H.8 protein could be labeled with 14C-palmitic acid, confirming that H.8 was a lipoprotein. Processing of the H.8 protein was inhibited by globomycin in E. coli indicating that H.8 was modified by the described lipoprotein processing/modifying pathway described in both gram negative and gram positive genera

  10. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Are Required for Maximal Type I Secretion of the Caulobacter crescentus S-Layer Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Toporowski, Michael C.; Nomellini, John F.; Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    2004-01-01

    Transport of RsaA, the crystalline S-layer subunit protein of Caulobacter crescentus, is mediated by a type I secretion mechanism. Two proteins have been identified that play the role of the outer membrane protein (OMP) component in the RsaA secretion machinery. The genes rsaFa and rsaFb were identified by similarity to the Escherichia coli hemolysin secretion OMP TolC by using the C. crescentus genome sequence. The rsaFa gene is located several kilobases downstream of the other transporter g...

  11. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-04-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detail. However, it remained unclear how Lol factors interact with each other to conduct very efficient lipoprotein transfer in the periplasm where ATP is not available. To address this issue, a photo-reactive phenylalanine analogue, p-benzoyl-phenylalanine, was introduced at various positions of LolA and LolB, of which the overall structures are very similar and comprise an incomplete beta-barrel with a hydrophobic cavity inside. Cells expressing LolA or LolB derivatives containing the above analogue were irradiated with UV for in vivo photo-cross-linking. These analyses revealed a hot area in the same region of LolA and LolB, through which LolA and LolB interact with each other. This area is located at the entrance of the hydrophobic cavity. Moreover, this area in LolA is involved in the interaction with a membrane subunit, LolC, whereas no cross-linking occurs between LolA and the other membrane subunit, LolE, or ATP-binding subunit LolD, despite the structural similarity between LolC and LolE. The hydrophobic cavities of LolA and LolB were both found to bind lipoproteins inside. These results indicate that the transfer of lipoproteins through Lol proteins occurs in a mouth-to-mouth manner. PMID:19307584

  12. Immunogenicity of a Haemophilus influenzae polysaccharide-Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein complex conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, J J; Deck, R R; Liu, M A

    1990-11-01

    Polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines made with different carriers vary in their ability to elicit antipolysaccharide IgG antibody responses in young infants and an adult mouse model, suggesting that the carrier proteins used in the conjugate vaccines differ in their ability to act as carriers, or that additional mechanisms of immunogenicity play a role. A conjugate vaccine of Haemophilus influenzae PRP coupled to the outer membrane protein complex (OMPC) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is immunogenic in children as young as 2 mo of age and is immunogenic in infant rhesus monkeys, an animal model for infant humans. In the present study, PRP-OMPC was found to induce efficient IgM to IgG switching of anti-PRP serum antibody in adult mice, whereas PRP conjugated to two other protein carriers did not. Thus the PRP-OMPC conjugate was examined in order to determine why PRP coupled to OMPC was so immunogenic, even more immunogenic than conjugates made with other carrier proteins. The OMPC carrier differs from the other protein carriers in that the proteins are present in a liposomal form containing lipids (including LPS) derived from the outer membrane of N. meningitidis. We studied the OMPC to see whether the different components or the nature of the OMPC carrier could contribute to its enhanced immunogenicity. Specifically we evaluated the OMPC for both classic Th cell carrier activity and adjuvanticity, and the LPS component of OMPC for systemic polyclonal B cell activation. Carrier recognition of the OMPC moiety of PRP-OMPC was demonstrated. In addition the PRP-OMPC conjugate vaccine was observed to have adjuvant properties for both T cell-dependent and T cell-independent Ag in the absence of LPS-induced systemic polyclonal B cell activation. These observations suggest that in addition to functioning as a classic protein carrier whereby the proteins in OMPC provide Th cell epitopes, the OMPC also has adjuvant activity that distinguishes it from other protein

  13. Specialized transducing bacteriophage lambda carrying the structural gene for a major outer membrane matrix protein of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutoh, N; Nagasawa, T; Mizushima, S

    1981-01-01

    A specialized transducing phage lambda carrying the structural gene for the OmpF protein, an outer membrane matrix protein, was isolated. The phage carries the 20.5--21-min region of the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome and carries asnS, ompF, and aspC genes.

  14. Outer Membrane Proteins of Brucella abortus Vaccinal and Field Strains and their Immune Response in Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukhshanda Munir*, M. Afzal1, M. Hussain2, S. M. S. Naqvi3 and A. Khanum3

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs of three strains of B. abortus i.e. S19, RB51 and a local field isolate of biotype 1 were isolated through disrupting cells to generate membranes by centrifugation and sodium lauryl sarcosinate solubilisation of inner membrane proteins. Distinct OMP profiles of each strain were seen on SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE analysis of S19 and field isolate revealed eight protein bands in each strain. The OMPs of S19 had molecular masses 89.0, 73.0, 53.7, 49.0, 38.0, 27.0, 22.3, and 17.7 kDa, while field isolate had OMPs of 151.3, 89.0, 75.8, 67.6, 37.0, 27.0, 24.0 and 19.0 kDa. B. abortus RB51 yielded 11 OMP bands ranging from 12.5 to 107.1 kDa, with 34.2, 15.8 and 12.5 kDa as additional OMPs. Western immunoblot analysis using antisera raised against all three strains in buffaloes indicated an almost similar pattern of immuno-reactive OMPs in S19 and field strain. Two OMPs of molecular weight 37-38 and 19 kDa were immuno-reactive in all strains in buffaloes. There is possibility of use of these OMPs in a recombinant vaccine for B. abortus. A distinct protein of molecular weight of 151.3 kDa was identified in field strain but not in both vaccine strains of B. abortus. Use of this OMP in a diagnostic assay may differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals.

  15. Verification of a topology model of PorT as an integral outer membrane protein in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Żylicz, Jasiek; Szczesny, Pawel; Sroka, Aneta; Hunter, Neil; Potempa, Jan

    2009-01-01

    PorT is a membrane-associated protein shown to be essential for the maturation and secretion of a class of cysteine proteinases, the gingipains, from the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. It was previously reported that PorT is located on the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane to function as a chaperone for the maturing proteinases. Our modeling suggested it to be an integral outer membrane protein with eight anti-parallel, membrane-traversing β-strands. In this report, th...

  16. Nitazoxanide Inhibits Pilus Biogenesis by Interfering with Folding of the Usher Protein in the Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahales, Peter; Hoffman, Paul S; Thanassi, David G

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial pathogens assemble surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae that facilitate attachment to host cells and colonization of host tissues. The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is a conserved secretion system that is responsible for the assembly of virulence-associated pili by many different Gram-negative bacteria. Pilus biogenesis by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and an integral outer membrane (OM) assembly and secretion platform termed the usher. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic drug, was previously shown to inhibit the function of aggregative adherence fimbriae and type 1 pili assembled by the CU pathway in enteroaggregativeEscherichia coli, an important causative agent of diarrhea. We show here that NTZ also inhibits the function of type 1 and P pili from uropathogenicE. coli(UPEC). UPEC is the primary causative agent of urinary tract infections, and type 1 and P pili mediate colonization of the bladder and kidneys, respectively. By analysis of the different stages of the CU pilus biogenesis pathway, we show that treatment of bacteria with NTZ causes a reduction in the number of usher molecules in the OM, resulting in a loss of pilus assembly on the bacterial surface. In addition, we determine that NTZ specifically prevents proper folding of the usher β-barrel domain in the OM. Our findings demonstrate that NTZ is a pilicide with a novel mechanism of action and activity against diverse CU pathways. This suggests that further development of the NTZ scaffold may lead to new antivirulence agents that target the usher to prevent pilus assembly. PMID:26824945

  17. In silico local structure approach: a case study on outer membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Juliette; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The detection of Outer Membrane Proteins (OMP) in whole genomes is an actual question, their sequence characteristics have thus been intensively studied. This class of protein displays a common beta-barrel architecture, formed by adjacent antiparallel strands. However, due to the lack of available structures, few structural studies have been made on this class of proteins. Here we propose a novel OMP local structure investigation, based on a structural alphabet approach, i.e., the decomposition of 3D structures using a library of four-residue protein fragments. The optimal decomposition of structures using hidden Markov model results in a specific structural alphabet of 20 fragments, six of them dedicated to the decomposition of beta-strands. This optimal alphabet, called SA20-OMP, is analyzed in details, in terms of local structures and transitions between fragments. It highlights a particular and strong organization of beta-strands as series of regular canonical structural fragments. The comparison with alphabets learned on globular structures indicates that the internal organization of OMP structures is more constrained than in globular structures. The analysis of OMP structures using SA20-OMP reveals some recurrent structural patterns. The preferred location of fragments in the distinct regions of the membrane is investigated. The study of pairwise specificity of fragments reveals that some contacts between structural fragments in beta-sheets are clearly favored whereas others are avoided. This contact specificity is stronger in OMP than in globular structures. Moreover, SA20-OMP also captured sequential information. This can be integrated in a scoring function for structural model ranking with very promising results. PMID:17932925

  18. Outer membrane protein (OMP) based vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Subramonia; Howell, Alan; Alexander, Kristin; Bentley, B Erin; Jiang, Han-Qian; Ambrose, Karita; Zhu, Duzhang; Zlotnick, Gary

    2005-03-18

    A family of outer membrane lipoproteins of Neisseria meningitidis, LP2086, has been shown to induce serum bactericidal activity against a broad variety of meningococcal strains. Two sub-families of serologically distinct LP2086 proteins (A and B) have been identified. In the present study, we have shown that polyclonal anti-serum against rLP2086 is protective in vivo in an infant rat passive-protection model. Additionally, the LP2086 protein is displayed on the surface of 91% meningococcal strains as measured in a whole cell ELISA using polyclonal anti-sera raised against these proteins. We also demonstrate based on the reactivity of anti-rLP2086 antibody with recombinantly expressed C- and N-terminal fragments of rLP2086 in a Western blot assay that the C-terminal fragment of LP2086 dictates sub-family specificity and the N-terminal fragment determines the family specificity. A formulation containing family A and B of LP2086 potentially would provide broad protection against a majority of Neisseria meningitidis strains. PMID:15755596

  19. Expression and Purification of the Major Outer Membrane Protein of Chlamydia Trachomatis in Prokaryotic Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠玉; 吴移谋; 陈超群; 万艳平; 朱翠明

    2004-01-01

    To clone and construct the recombinant plasmid containing the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene of Chlamydia trachomatis ( C.trachomatis ) and to express the fusion protein in E. coli BL21, the MOMP gene was amphfied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genome of C. trachomatis serovar D. The fragment was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-22b( + ) after digestion with BamH Ⅰ and Not Ⅰ and transformed into E. coli XL1-Blue. Recombinants were selected by enzyme digestion and sequencing and the recombinant plasmid with MOMP gene was then transformed into E. coli BL21 with IPTG to express the target gene. The expression recombinant proteins were purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. It was found that a 1.2 kb MOMP gene was isolated. The DNA sequence of MOMP was found to be just the same as the sequence published by GenBank. A recombinant plasmid containing MOMP gene was constructed to express the fusion proteins in E.coli. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the relative molecular weight of the recombinant protein was about 47 kDa that was consistent with the theoretical predicted value, and the specificity of the expressed protein was conformed by Western blot. It concluded that the MOMP gene could be expressed in the prokaryotic system, by which it provided the foundation for the future studies on the biological activities of C. trachomatis and for the development of vaccine against this pathogen.

  20. Immunological characteristics of outer membrane protein omp31 of goat Brucella and its monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W Y; Wang, Y; Zhang, Z C; Yan, F

    2015-01-01

    We examined the immunological characteristics of outer membrane protein omp31 of goat Brucella and its monoclonal antibody. Genomic DNA from the M5 strain of goat Brucella was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1. The expression and immunological characteristics of the fusion protein GST-omp31 were subjected to preliminary western blot detection with goat Brucella rabbit immune serum. The Brucella immunized BALB/c mouse serum was detected using purified protein. The high-potency mouse splenocytes and myeloma Sp2/0 cells were fused. Positive clones were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to establish a hybridoma cell line. Mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with hybridoma cells to prepare ascites. The mAb was purified using the n-caprylic acid-ammonium sulfate method. The characteristics of mAb were examined using western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A 680-base pair band was observed after polymerase chain reaction. Enzyme digestion identification and sequencing showed that the pGEX-4T-1-omp31 prokaryotic expression vector was successfully established; a target band of approximately 57 kDa with an apparent molecular weight consistent with the size of the target fusion protein. At 25°C, the expression of soluble expression increased significantly; the fusion protein GST-omp31 was detected by western blotting. Anti-omp31 protein mAb was obtained from 2 strains of Brucella. The antibody showed strong specificity and sensitivity and did not cross-react with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Bacillus pyocyaneus. The pGEX-4T-1-omp31 prokaryotic expression vector was successfully established and showed good immunogenicity. The antibody also showed strong specificity and good sensitivity. PMID:26505344

  1. Recombinant Expression Screening of P. aeruginosa Bacterial Inner Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Constance J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane proteins (TM proteins make up 25% of all proteins and play key roles in many diseases and normal physiological processes. However, much less is known about their structures and molecular mechanisms than for soluble proteins. Problems in expression, solubilization, purification, and crystallization cause bottlenecks in the characterization of TM proteins. This project addressed the need for improved methods for obtaining sufficient amounts of TM proteins for determining their structures and molecular mechanisms. Results Plasmid clones were obtained that encode eighty-seven transmembrane proteins with varying physical characteristics, for example, the number of predicted transmembrane helices, molecular weight, and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY. All the target proteins were from P. aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterial opportunistic pathogen that causes serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis. The relative expression levels of the transmembrane proteins were measured under several culture growth conditions. The use of E. coli strains, a T7 promoter, and a 6-histidine C-terminal affinity tag resulted in the expression of 61 out of 87 test proteins (70%. In this study, proteins with a higher grand average hydrophobicity and more transmembrane helices were expressed less well than less hydrophobic proteins with fewer transmembrane helices. Conclusions In this study, factors related to overall hydrophobicity and the number of predicted transmembrane helices correlated with the relative expression levels of the target proteins. Identifying physical characteristics that correlate with protein expression might aid in selecting the "low hanging fruit", or proteins that can be expressed to sufficient levels using an E. coli expression system. The use of other expression strategies or host species might be needed for sufficient levels of expression of transmembrane proteins with other physical

  2. Heterogeneity of outer membrane proteins in Borrelia burgdorferi: comparison of osp operons of three isolates of different geographic origins.

    OpenAIRE

    JONSSON, M; Noppa, L; Barbour, A G; Bergström, S

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical and immunochemical studies of the outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi have shown that the OspA and OspB proteins from strains of different geographic origins may differ considerably in their reactivities with monoclonal antibodies and in their apparent molecular weights. To further characterize this variation in Osp proteins between strains, the osp operons and deduced translation products from two strains, one from Sweden (ACAI) and one from eastern Russia (Ip90), wer...

  3. Targeting of a Tail-anchored Protein to Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane by Independent but Competing Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Borgese, Nica; Gazzoni, Ilaria; Barberi, Massimo; Colombo, Sara; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2001-01-01

    Many mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins have a transmembrane domain near the C terminus and an N-terminal cytosolic moiety. It is not clear how these tail-anchored (TA) proteins posttranslationally select their target, but C-terminal charged residues play an important role. To investigate how discrimination between MOM and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs, we used mammalian cytochrome b5, a TA protein existing in two, MOM or ER localized, versions. Substi...

  4. Variation in the TonB-dependent Outer-Membrane Proteins in Plant-Associated Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient acquisition is key to the ecological fitness of environmental bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens and TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins are important components of the cellular machinery for the uptake of substrates from the environment. Genomic sequences of ten strains of plant-a...

  5. Diversity of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins in plant-associated strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic sequences of ten strains of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp. were surveyed for the presence of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins (TBDPs), which function in the uptake of substrates from the environment by many Gram-negative bacteria. The ten strains, representing P. fluorescens, P. ch...

  6. Protection of immunocompromised mice against lethal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by active or passive immunization with recombinant P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein F and outer membrane protein I fusion proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    von Specht, B U; Knapp, B.; Muth, G; Bröker, M.; Hungerer, K D; Diehl, K D; Massarrat, K; Seemann, A; Domdey, H

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant outer membrane proteins (Oprs) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST)-linked fusion proteins. GST-linked Oprs F and I (GST-OprF190-350 [GST linked to OprF spanning amino acids 190 to 350] and GST-OprI21-83, respectively) and recombinant hybrid Oprs (GST-OprF190-342-OprI21-83 and GST-OprI21-83-OprF190-350) were isolated and tested for their efficacy as vaccines in immunodeficient mice. GST-OprF-OprI protected the mice against...

  7. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  8. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...... are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane....

  9. Molecular Evolution of the Yersinia Major Outer Membrane Protein C (OmpC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkova, Anna M; Bystritskaya, Evgeniya P; Guzev, Konstantin V; Rakin, Alexander V; Isaeva, Marina P

    2016-01-01

    The genus Yersinia includes species with a wide range of eukaryotic hosts (from fish, insects, and plants to mammals and humans). One of the major outer membrane proteins, the porin OmpC, is preferentially expressed in the host gut, where osmotic pressure, temperature, and the concentrations of nutrients and toxic products are relatively high. We consider here the molecular evolution and phylogeny of Yersinia ompC. The maximum likelihood gene tree reflects the macroevolution processes occurring within the genus Yersinia. Positive selection and horizontal gene transfer are the key factors of ompC diversification, and intraspecies recombination was revealed in two Yersinia species. The impact of recombination on ompC evolution was different from that of another major porin gene, ompF, possibly due to the emergence of additional functions and conservation of the basic transport function. The predicted antigenic determinants of OmpC were located in rapidly evolving regions, which may indicate the evolutionary mechanisms of Yersinia adaptation to the host immune system. PMID:27578962

  10. Role of protein D2 and lipopolysaccharide in diffusion of quinolones through the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Michéa-Hamzehpour, M; Furet, Y X; Pechère, J C

    1991-01-01

    Routes of quinolone permeation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated by using sparfloxacin as a prototype compound. [14C]sparfloxacin cell labeling was 13 to 28% lower in three protein D2-deficient mutants resistant to imipenem than in their imipenem-susceptible counterparts. In four impermeability-type quinolone-resistant strains isolated from pefloxacin-treated animals, we observed two- to fourfold-greater resistance to imipenem, reduced protein D2 expression in the outer membrane acc...

  11. Differentiation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism of outer membrane protein IB genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Q C; Chow, V T; Poh, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To employ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis for the rapid differentiation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae protein IB (PIB) isolates and to compare its usefulness with the widely accepted auxotype/serovar classification scheme. METHODS--The outer membrane protein IB genes of 47 gonococcal isolates belonging to 10 different serovars were amplified by PCR. The approximately 1 kb DNA products were then digested separately with restri...

  12. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  13. Overexpression, refolding, and purification of the histidine-tagged outer membrane efflux protein OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, F; Köhler, T; Pechère, J C; Ducruix, A

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes the overproduction and purification of the C-terminus polyhistidine-tagged outer membrane protein OprM, which is a part of the MexA-MexB-OprM active efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Renaturation of the protein from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli was achieved using guanidine-HCl as denaturing agent and n-octylpolyoxyethylene (C8POE) and n-octyltetraoxyethylene (C8E4) as nonionic detergents. The refolded protein was purified by ion-exchange and nickel-affinity chromatography. The final yield was 6 mg of pure histidine-tagged OprM per liter of E. coli culture. Renaturation was monitored by the effects of heating prior to SDS-PAGE, using a typical and exclusive property of outer membrane proteins. Immunoblotting revealed that the recombinant protein is addressed to the outer membrane of E. coli, after maturation by excision of its N-terminal signal sequence. Complementation of an oprM deletion mutant with the plasmid encoded histidine-tagged OprM protein restored antibiotic susceptibilities to wild-type levels, demonstrating functionality of recombinant OprM. PMID:11570853

  14. Membrane protein structure determination: back to the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong; Ding, Yi; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables the structures of membrane proteins to be determined in the native-like environment of the phospholipid bilayer membrane. This chapter outlines the methods for membrane protein structural studies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy with samples of membrane proteins incorporated in proteoliposomes or planar lipid bilayers. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from OmpX and Ail, two bacterial outer membrane proteins that function in bacterial virulence. PMID:23975776

  15. Major heat-modifiable outer membrane protein in gram-negative bacteria: comparison with the ompA protein of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Beher, M G; Schnaitman, C A; Pugsley, A P

    1980-01-01

    The outer membranes of several strains of Escherichia coli, other enteric bacteria, and a variety of nonenteric gram-negative bacteria all contain a major heat-modifiable protein similar to the OmpA protein of E. coli K-12. The heat-modifiable proteins from these bacteria resemble the K-12 protein in molecular weight, in preferential release from the outer membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of Mg2+, and in characteristic cleavage by proteases to yield a smaller fragment which ...

  16. Mcp3 is a novel mitochondrial outer membrane protein that follows a unique IMP-dependent biogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinzel, Monika; Tan, Tao; Wendling, Philipp; Kalbacher, Hubert; Özbalci, Cagakan; Chelius, Xenia; Westermann, Benedikt; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are separated from the remainder of the eukaryotic cell by the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). The MOM plays an important role in different transport processes like lipid trafficking and protein import. In yeast, the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) has a central, but poorly defined role in both activities. To understand the functions of the ERMES, we searched for suppressors of the deficiency of one of its components, Mdm10, and identified a novel mitochondrial protein that we named Mdm10 complementing protein 3 (Mcp3). Mcp3 partially rescues a variety of ERMES-related phenotypes. We further demonstrate that Mcp3 is an integral protein of the MOM that follows a unique import pathway. It is recognized initially by the import receptor Tom70 and then crosses the MOM via the translocase of the outer membrane. Mcp3 is next relayed to the TIM23 translocase at the inner membrane, gets processed by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) and finally integrates into the MOM. Hence, Mcp3 follows a novel biogenesis route where a MOM protein is processed by a peptidase of the inner membrane. PMID:27226123

  17. Outer membrane protein OmpQ of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for mature biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattelan, Natalia; Villalba, María Inés; Parisi, Gustavo; Arnal, Laura; Serra, Diego Omar; Aguilar, Mario; Yantorno, Osvaldo

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing the respiratory tract of diverse animals and chronically persists inside the hosts by forming biofilm. Most known virulence factors in Bordetella species are regulated by the BvgAS two-component transduction system. The Bvg-activated proteins play a critical role during host infection. OmpQ is an outer membrane porin protein which is expressed under BvgAS control. Here, we studied the contribution of OmpQ to the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica. We found that the lack of expression of OmpQ did not affect the growth kinetics and final biomass of B. bronchiseptica under planktonic growth conditions. The ΔompQ mutant strain displayed no differences in attachment level and in early steps of biofilm formation. However, deletion of the ompQ gene attenuated the ability of B. bronchiseptica to form a mature biofilm. Analysis of ompQ gene expression during the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica showed a dynamic expression pattern, with an increase of biofilm culture at 48 h. Moreover, we demonstrated that the addition of serum anti-OmpQ had the potential to reduce the biofilm biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, evidence of the contribution of OmpQ to a process of importance for B. bronchiseptica pathobiology. Our results indicate that OmpQ plays a role during the biofilm development process, particularly at later stages of development, and that this porin could be a potential target for strategies of biofilm formation inhibition. PMID:26673448

  18. Aminoglycoside Efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of Novel Outer Membrane Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, James T. H.; Brinkman, Fiona S.L.; Hancock, Robert E W

    2003-01-01

    The expression of tripartite multidrug efflux pumps such as MexA-MexB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to intrinsic resistance to a wide variety of antimicrobials, including β-lactams, chloramphenicol, macrolides, quinolones, and tetracycline. The MexX-MexY linker-pump combination has been shown to be involved in intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides, but the identity of the cognate outer membrane channel component remains under debate. Fourteen uncharacterized OprM homologs ident...

  19. Targeting and Assembly of Components of the TOC Protein Import Complex at the Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn G.L. Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β–barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  20. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl β-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure [35S]pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components

  1. Outer Membrane Proteins of Fibrobacter succinogenes with Potential Roles in Adhesion to Cellulose and in Cellulose Digestion▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hyun-Sik; Qi, Meng; Gong, Joshua; Egbosimba, Emmanuel E.; Forsberg, Cecil W.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analysis of binding of intact glucose-grown Fibrobacter succinogenes strain S85 cells and adhesion-defective mutants AD1 and AD4 to crystalline and acid-swollen (amorphous) cellulose showed that strain S85 bound efficiently to both forms of cellulose while mutant Ad1 bound to acid-swollen cellulose, but not to crystalline cellulose, and mutant Ad4 did not bind to either. One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of outer membrane cellulose binding proteins and of outer membr...

  2. Identification and validation of T-cell epitopes in outer membrane protein (OMP) of Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanu, Arifur Rahman; Ashraf, Mohammad Arif; Hossain, Md Faruk; Ismail, Md; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to design epitope-based peptides for the utility of vaccine development by targeting outer membrane protein F (Omp F), because two available licensed vaccines, live oral Ty21a and injectable polysaccharide, are 50% to 80% protective with a higher rate of side effects. Conventional vaccines take longer time for development and have less differentiation power between vaccinated and infected cells. On the other hand, Peptide-based vaccines present few advantages over other vaccines, such as stability of peptide, ease to manufacture, better storage, avoidance of infectious agents during manufacture, and different molecules can be linked with peptides to enhance their immunogenicity. Omp F is highly conserved and facilitates attachment and fusion of Salmonella typhi with host cells. Using various databases and tools, immune parameters of conserved sequences from Omp F of different isolates of Salmonella typhi were tested to predict probable epitopes. Binding analysis of the peptides with MHC molecules, epitopes conservancy, population coverage, and linear B cell epitope prediction were analyzed. Among all those predicted peptides, ESYTDMAPY epitope interacted with six MHC alleles and it shows highest amount of interaction compared to others. The cumulative population coverage for these epitopes as vaccine candidates was approximately 70%. Structural analysis suggested that epitope ESYTDMAPY fitted well into the epitope-binding groove of HLA-C*12:03, as this HLA molecule was common which interact with each and every predicted epitopes. So, this potential epitope may be linked with other molecules to enhance its immunogenicity and used for vaccine development. PMID:25258481

  3. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors

  4. Evasion of IFN-γ Signaling by Francisella novicida Is Dependent upon Francisella Outer Membrane Protein C

    OpenAIRE

    Nallaparaju, Kalyan C.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Rodriguez, Stephen A.; Zogaj, Xhavit; Manam, Srikanth; Guentzel, M. Neal; Seshu, Janakiram; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Chambers, James P.; Klose, Karl E.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. An outer membrane protein (FTT0918) of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis has been identified as a virulence factor. We generated a F. novicida (F. tularensis subsp. novicida) FTN_0444 (homolog of FTT0918) fopC mutant to study the virulence-associated mechanism(s) of FTT0918. Methods and Findings The ΔfopC strain phenotype was characterized using immun...

  5. Characterization of Four Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Binding Starch to the Cell Surface of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph A.; Berleman, James E.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, utilizes polysaccharides by binding them to its cell surface and allowing cell-associated enzymes to hydrolyze them into digestible fragments. We use the starch utilization system as a model to analyze the initial steps involved in polysaccharide binding and breakdown. In a recent paper, we reported that one of the outer membrane proteins involved, SusG, had starch-degrading activity but was not sufficient for growth on starch. ...

  6. Outer membrane protein profiles and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis for differentiation of clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Kappos, T; John, M A; Hussain, Z; Valvano, M A

    1992-01-01

    Outer membrane protein (MP) profiles and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) analysis were used as tools for differentiating clinical isolates of Proteus spp. Fourteen distinct MP profiles were established by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 54 clinical isolates of Proteus spp. (44 strains identified as P. mirabilis and 10 strains identified as P. vulgaris). Forty-one isolates of P. mirabilis and eight isolates of P. vulgaris were grouped within six and th...

  7. Immunization with a 22-kDa outer membrane protein elicits protective immunity to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Huang; Yufeng Yao; Shijie Wang; Ye Xia; Xu Yang; Qiong Long; Wenjia Sun; Cunbao Liu; Yang Li; Xiaojie Chu; Hongmei Bai; Yueting Yao; Yanbing Ma

    2016-01-01

    A. baumannii infections are becoming more and more serious health issues with rapid emerging of multidrug and extremely drug resistant strains, and therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of nonantibiotic-based intervention strategies. This study aimed at identifying whether an outer membrane protein with molecular weight of about 22 kDa (Omp22) holds the potentials to be an efficient vaccine candidate and combat A. baumannii infection. Omp22 which has a molecule length of 217 ...

  8. Structure, Function and Regulation of Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Drug Transport in Enterobactericeae: the OmpF/C - TolC Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic translocation across membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is a key step for the activity on their specific intracellular targets. Resistant bacteria control their membrane permeability as a first line of defense to protect themselves against external toxic compounds such as antibiotics and biocides. On one hand, resistance to small hydrophilic antibiotics such as ß-lactams and fluoroquinolones frequently results from the « closing » of their way in: the general outer membrane porins. On the other hand, an effective way out for a wide range of antibiotics is provided by TolC-like proteins, which are outer membrane components of multidrug efflux pumps. Accordingly, altered membrane permeability, including porin modifications and/or efflux pumps' overexpression, is always associated to multidrug resistance (MDR) in a number of clinical isolates. Several recent studies have highlighted our current understanding of porins/TolC structures and functions in Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we review the transport of antibiotics through the OmpF/C general porins and the TolC-like channels with regards to recent data on their structure, function, assembly, regulation and contribution to bacterial resistance. Because MDR strains have evolved global strategies to identify and fight our antibiotic arsenal, it is important to constantly update our global knowledge on antibiotic transport. PMID:23569467

  9. A Novel Treponema pallidum Antigen, TP0136, Is an Outer Membrane Protein That Binds Human Fibronectin▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Mary Beth; McGill, Melanie A.; Pettersson, Jonas; Rogers, Arthur; Matějková, Petra; Šmajs, David; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The antigenicity, structural location, and function of the predicted lipoprotein TP0136 of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were investigated based on previous screening studies indicating that anti-TP0136 antibodies are present in the sera of syphilis patients and experimentally infected rabbits. Recombinant TP0136 (rTP0136) protein was purified and shown to be strongly antigenic during human and experimental rabbit infection. The TP0136 protein was exposed on the surface of the bacterial ...

  10. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  11. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  12. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales

  13. Action of Polymyxin B on Bacterial Membranes: Morphological Changes in the Cytoplasm and in the Outer Membrane of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Peter R. G.; Teuber, Michael

    1975-01-01

    Though the primary action of the cationic antibiotic polymyxin B is against the membrane of susceptible bacteria, severe morphological changes are detected in the cytoplasm. Using fluorescence microscopy and a mono-N-dansyl-polymyxin B derivative, we could demonstrate aggregations of the antibiotic with cellular material, possibly nucleic acids and/or ribosomes. These aggregations were only produced by minimum inhibitory or higher concentrations of the antibiotic as shown with Salmonella and Escherichia strains differing in their polymyxin susceptibility. The outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium revealed characteristic blebs when treated with polymyxin B. This was investigated by the gentle methods of spray-freezing and freeze-etching. The obtained electron micrographs suggest that the polymyxin-induced blebs are projections of the outer monolayer of the outer membrane. A possible mechanism of penetration of polymyxin B through the cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria is presented. Images PMID:169730

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against LipL32, the major outer membrane protein of pathogenic Leptospira: production, characterization, and testing in diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia P H; Seixas, Fabiana K; Coutinho, Mariana L; Vasconcellos, Flávia A; Seyffert, Núbia; Croda, Julio; McBride, Alan J; Ko, Albert I; Dellagostin, Odir A; Aleixo, José A G

    2007-02-01

    Pathogenic serovars of Leptospira have a wide antigenic diversity attributed mainly to the lipopolysaccharide present in the outer membrane. In contrast, antigens conserved among pathogenic serovars are mainly represented by outer membrane proteins. Surface exposure of a major and highly conserved outer membrane lipoprotein (LipL32) was recently demonstrated on pathogenic Leptospira. LipL32 in its recombinant form (rLipL32) was used to immunize BALB/c mice to develop murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Three MAbs against rLipL32 were produced, isotyped, and evaluated for further use in diagnostic tests of leptospirosis using different approaches. MAbs were conjugated to peroxidase and evaluated in a native protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with intact and heat-treated leptospiral cells, conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for indirect immunofluorescence with intact and methanol fixed cells and were used for LipL32 immunoprecipitation from leptospiral cells. rLipL32 MAbs conjugated to peroxidase or used as primary antibody bound to intact and heat-treated cells in ELISA, proving that they could be used in enzyme immunoassays for detection of the native protein. In immunofluorescence assay, MAbs labeled bacterial cells either intact or methanol fixed. Two MAbs were able to immunoprecipitate the native protein from live and motile leptospiral cells and, adsorbed onto magnetic beads, captured intact bacteria from artificially contaminated human sera for detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Results of this study suggest that the MAbs produced can be useful for the development of diagnostic tests based on detection of LipL32 leptospiral antigen in biological fluids. PMID:17316084

  15. Identification of a surface-exposed immunodominant epitope on outer membrane protein P1 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    OpenAIRE

    Proulx, C; Munson, R S; Grass, S; Hamel, J; Martin, D.; Brodeur, B R

    1991-01-01

    Eight murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against outer membrane protein P1 of Haemophilus influenzae type b were generated and characterized. Seven of the eight MAbs reacted with recombinant P1 and purified P1 protein from H. influenzae type b strains MinnA and 1613; MAb P1.8 was specific for the latter strain. A panel of 32 nontypeable and 140 encapsulated Haemophilus strains recovered worldwide representing the major clonal families of serotypes a, b, and d was used to evaluate th...

  16. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4–5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  17. Specific association of lectin LecB with the surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: role of outer membrane protein OprF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Funken

    Full Text Available The fucose binding lectin LecB affects biofilm formation and is involved in pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. LecB resides in the outer membrane and can be released specifically by treatment of an outer membrane fraction with fucose suggesting that it binds to specific ligands. Here, we report that LecB binds to the outer membrane protein OprF. In an OprF-deficient P. aeruginosa mutant, LecB is no longer detectable in the membrane but instead in the culture supernatant indicating a specific interaction between LecB and OprF.

  18. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and 131I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 420C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12. (author)

  19. Evaluation of methods for predicting the topology of β-barrel outer membrane proteins and a consensus prediction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamodrakas Stavros J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of the transmembrane strands and topology of β-barrel outer membrane proteins is of interest in current bioinformatics research. Several methods have been applied so far for this task, utilizing different algorithmic techniques and a number of freely available predictors exist. The methods can be grossly divided to those based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs, on Neural Networks (NNs and on Support Vector Machines (SVMs. In this work, we compare the different available methods for topology prediction of β-barrel outer membrane proteins. We evaluate their performance on a non-redundant dataset of 20 β-barrel outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria, with structures known at atomic resolution. Also, we describe, for the first time, an effective way to combine the individual predictors, at will, to a single consensus prediction method. Results We assess the statistical significance of the performance of each prediction scheme and conclude that Hidden Markov Model based methods, HMM-B2TMR, ProfTMB and PRED-TMBB, are currently the best predictors, according to either the per-residue accuracy, the segments overlap measure (SOV or the total number of proteins with correctly predicted topologies in the test set. Furthermore, we show that the available predictors perform better when only transmembrane β-barrel domains are used for prediction, rather than the precursor full-length sequences, even though the HMM-based predictors are not influenced significantly. The consensus prediction method performs significantly better than each individual available predictor, since it increases the accuracy up to 4% regarding SOV and up to 15% in correctly predicted topologies. Conclusions The consensus prediction method described in this work, optimizes the predicted topology with a dynamic programming algorithm and is implemented in a web-based application freely available to non-commercial users at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/ConBBPRED.

  20. Undressing of Waddlia chondrophila to enrich its outer membrane proteins to develop a new species-specific ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lienard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium of the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an agent of bovine abortion and a likely cause of miscarriage in humans. Its role in respiratory diseases was questioned after the detection of its DNA in clinical samples taken from patients suffering from pneumonia or bronchiolitis. To better define the role of Waddlia in both miscarriage and pneumonia, a tool allowing large-scale serological investigations of Waddlia seropositivity is needed. Therefore, enriched outer membrane proteins of W. chondrophila were used as antigens to develop a specific ELISA. After thorough analytical optimization, the ELISA was validated by comparison with micro-immunofluorescence and it showed a sensitivity above 85% with 100% specificity. The ELISA was subsequently applied to human sera to specify the role of W. chondrophila in pneumonia. Overall, 3.6% of children showed antibody reactivity against W. chondrophila but no significant difference was observed between children with and without pneumonia. Proteomic analyses were then performed using mass spectrometry, highlighting members of the outer membrane protein family as the dominant proteins. The major Waddlia putative immunogenic proteins were identified by immunoblot using positive and negative human sera. The new ELISA represents an efficient tool with high throughput applications. Although no association with pneumonia and Waddlia seropositivity was observed, this ELISA could be used to specify the role of W. chondrophila in miscarriage and in other diseases.

  1. Surface Immunolabeling and Consensus Computational Framework To Identify Candidate Rare Outer Membrane Proteins of Treponema pallidum▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David L.; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    Treponema pallidum reacts poorly with the antibodies present in rabbit and human syphilitic sera, a property attributed to the paucity of proteins in its outer membrane. To better understand the basis for the syphilis spirochete's “stealth pathogenicity,” we used a dual-label, 3-step amplified assay in which treponemes encapsulated in gel microdroplets were probed with syphilitic sera in parallel with anti-FlaA antibodies. A small (approximately 5 to 10%) but reproducible fraction of intact treponemes bound IgG and/or IgM antibodies. Three lines of evidence supported the notion that the surface antigens were likely β-barrel-forming outer membrane proteins (OMPs): (i) surface labeling with anti-lipoidal (VDRL) antibodies was not observed, (ii) immunoblot analysis confirmed prior results showing that T. pallidum glycolipids are not immunoreactive, and (iii) labeling of intact organisms was not appreciably affected by proteinase K (PK) treatment. With this method, we also demonstrate that TprK (TP0897), an extensively studied candidate OMP, and TP0136, a lipoprotein recently reported to be surface exposed, are both periplasmic. Consistent with the immunolabeling studies, TprK was also found to lack amphiphilicity, a characteristic property of β-barrel-forming proteins. Using a consensus computational framework that combined subcellular localization and β-barrel structural prediction tools, we generated ranked groups of candidate rare OMPs, the predicted T. pallidum outer membrane proteome (OMPeome), which we postulate includes the surface-exposed molecules detected by our enhanced gel microdroplet assay. In addition to underscoring the syphilis spirochete's remarkably poor surface antigenicity, our findings help to explain the complex and shifting balance between pathogen and host defenses that characterizes syphilitic infection. PMID:20876295

  2. Isolation and characterization of channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli and Borrelia species

    OpenAIRE

    Denker, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    In this study pore forming proteins of the gram-negative bacteria B. burgdorferi, B. duttonii and E.coli were investigated. Therefore the study is subdivided into three parts. In the first part outer membrane preparation of three relapsing fever Borrelia were investigated. In the second part the putative TolC homologue BB0124 of B. burgdorferi, the Lyme borreliosis agent, was studied. In the last part the influence of point mutants within the greasy slide of the maltose specific porin (LamB) ...

  3. The Xanthomonas Ax21 protein is processed by the general secretory system and is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofir Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs play an important role in detecting invading pathogens and mounting a robust defense response to restrict infection. In rice, one of the best characterized PRRs is XA21, a leucine rich repeat receptor-like kinase that confers broad-spectrum resistance to multiple strains of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo. In 2009 we reported that an Xoo protein, called Ax21, is secreted by a type I-secretion system and that it serves to activate XA21-mediated immunity. This report has recently been retracted. Here we present data that corrects our previous model. We first show that Ax21 secretion does not depend on the predicted type I secretion system and that it is processed by the general secretion (Sec system. We further show that Ax21 is an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. Finally, we provide data showing that ax21 knockout strains do not overcome XA21-mediated immunity.

  4. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic domain of outer membrane protein A from Acinetobacter baumannii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of the OmpA periplasmic domain from A. baumannii is described. Outer membrane protein A from Acinetobacter baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major outer membrane protein and a key player in the bacterial pathogenesis that induces host cell death. AbOmpA is presumed to consist of an N-terminal β-barrel transmembrane domain and a C-terminal periplasmic OmpA-like domain. In this study, the recombinant C-terminal periplasmic domain of AbOmpA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A native diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The space group of the crystal was P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.24, b = 98.59, c = 97.96 Å, β = 105.92°. The native crystal contained seven or eight molecules per asymmetric unit and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.93 or 2.56 Å3 Da−1

  5. A component of the Xanthomonadaceae type IV secretion system combines a VirB7 motif with a N0 domain found in outer membrane transport proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diorge P Souza

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Type IV secretion systems (T4SS are used by Gram-negative bacteria to translocate protein and DNA substrates across the cell envelope and into target cells. Translocation across the outer membrane is achieved via a ringed tetradecameric outer membrane complex made up of a small VirB7 lipoprotein (normally 30 to 45 residues in the mature form and the C-terminal domains of the VirB9 and VirB10 subunits. Several species from the genera of Xanthomonas phytopathogens possess an uncharacterized type IV secretion system with some distinguishing features, one of which is an unusually large VirB7 subunit (118 residues in the mature form. Here, we report the NMR and 1.0 Å X-ray structures of the VirB7 subunit from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (VirB7(XAC2622 and its interaction with VirB9. NMR solution studies show that residues 27-41 of the disordered flexible N-terminal region of VirB7(XAC2622 interact specifically with the VirB9 C-terminal domain, resulting in a significant reduction in the conformational freedom of both regions. VirB7(XAC2622 has a unique C-terminal domain whose topology is strikingly similar to that of N0 domains found in proteins from different systems involved in transport across the bacterial outer membrane. We show that VirB7(XAC2622 oligomerizes through interactions involving conserved residues in the N0 domain and residues 42-49 within the flexible N-terminal region and that these homotropic interactions can persist in the presence of heterotropic interactions with VirB9. Finally, we propose that VirB7(XAC2622 oligomerization is compatible with the core complex structure in a manner such that the N0 domains form an extra layer on the perimeter of the tetradecameric ring.

  6. Biogenesis of outer membranes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-03-23

    The outer membrane, an essential organelle of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of four major components: lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, beta-barrel proteins, and lipoproteins. The mechanisms underlying the transport of these components to outer membranes are currently under extensive examination. Among them, the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been clarified in detail. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes outer membrane sorting of lipoproteins. Various Lpt proteins have recently been identified as factors involved in the transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane, although the mechanism remains largely unknown. Proteins with alpha-helical membrane spanning segments are found in the inner membrane, whereas amphipathic beta-barrel proteins span the outer membrane. These beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the outer membranes through a central core protein BamA (YaeT) with the help of four outer membrane lipoproteins. In contrast, little is known about how phospholipids are transported to the outer membrane. PMID:19270402

  7. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  8. Development of new cloning vectors for the production of immunogenic outer membrane fusion proteins in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, P.; Sierra, J.C.; Lim, A. Jr.; Malur, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Paardenstraat (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein gene (oprI) was modified by cloning an in-frame polylinker in both orientations at the end of oprI. The resulting plasmids pVUBI and pVUB2 allow high lipoprotein production in E. coli after IPTG induction. The modified lipoproteins are present in the outer membrane and surface-exposed. Outer membrane-bound fusion proteins of different sizes were produced and used to generate antibodies without use of adjuvant. An 87 bp DNA fragment from the vp72 capsid protein gene of African Swine Fever virus (ASFV) and the entire Leishmania major glycoprotein gp63 gene were expressed in this system. Finally, a fusion lipoprotein containing a 16 amino acid epitope from the preS2b region of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was presented by an antigen-presenting cell line to a T-cell hybridoma while the corresponding cross-linked S2b peptide was not. The results suggest that OprI-based fusion proteins can be used to generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Engineering of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein FhuA to overcome the Hydrophobic Mismatch in Thick Polymeric Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioroni Marco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel proteins like the engineered FhuA Δ1-159 often cannot insert into thick polymeric membranes due to a mismatch between the hydrophobic surface of the protein and the hydrophobic surface of the polymer membrane. To address this problem usually specific block copolymers are synthesized to facilitate protein insertion. Within this study in a reverse approach we match the protein to the polymer instead of matching the polymer to the protein. Results To increase the FhuA Δ1-159 hydrophobic surface by 1 nm, the last 5 amino acids of each of the 22 β-sheets, prior to the more regular periplasmatic β-turns, were doubled leading to an extended FhuA Δ1-159 (FhuA Δ1-159 Ext. The secondary structure prediction and CD spectroscopy indicate the β-barrel folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Ext. The FhuA Δ1-159 Ext insertion and functionality within a nanocontainer polymeric membrane based on the triblock copolymer PIB1000-PEG6000-PIB1000 (PIB = polyisobutylene, PEG = polyethyleneglycol has been proven by kinetic analysis using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine. Identical experiments with the unmodified FhuA Δ1-159 report no kinetics and presumably no insertion into the PIB1000-PEG6000-PIB1000 membrane. Furthermore labeling of the Lys-NH2 groups present in the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext channel, leads to controllability of in/out flux of substrates and products from the nanocontainer. Conclusion Using a simple "semi rational" approach the protein's hydrophobic transmembrane region was increased by 1 nm, leading to a predicted lower hydrophobic mismatch between the protein and polymer membrane, minimizing the insertion energy penalty. The strategy of adding amino acids to the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext hydrophobic part can be further expanded to increase the protein's hydrophobicity, promoting the efficient embedding into thicker/more hydrophobic block copolymer membranes.

  10. Cloning and sequence analysis of hsf, an outer membrane protein gene of Pasteurella multocida serotype B:2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Priyadarshini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to clone, sequence and analyze the hsf, an outer membrane protein gene of Pasteurella multocida serotype B:2 Materials and Methods: hsf gene was amplified from genomic DNA of P. multocida. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR product was cloned in pET-32a vector and was characterized. hsf gene was sequenced, analyzed and phylogenetic tree was constructed taking sequences of other strains. Results: Amplicon size was found to be 785 bp. Recombinant got characterized through colony PCR and restriction enzyme analysis. Conclusion: hsf gene of P. multocida serotype B is similar to serotype A, but different from serotype D. Further work is needed to evaluate role of Hsf protein in protection studies and to study the antigenic properties of this recombinant protein as a candidate for vaccine.

  11. The role of heparan sulfate on adhesion of 47 and 51 kDa outer membrane proteins of Helicobacter pylori to gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bolaños, Claudia C; Guzmán-Murillo, Maria A; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo; Ascencio, Felipe

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common gastrointestinal pathogenic bacterium in humans and the usual preference for the stomach's outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are antigens involved in the adhesion process. Through SDS-PAGE and blotting analyses, using horseradish peroxidase-labeled heparan sulfate (HRP-HS) as a probe, we identified H. pylori OMPs with affinity for heparan sulfate (OMP-HS). Biotin-streptavidin bacterial-adhesion assay was used to evaluate participation of OMP-HS in the adhesion of H. pylori to semi-confluent HeLa S3 and Kato III cell monolayers. The results provide evidence that induction of antibodies against 2 OMP-HSs (HSBP-47 and HSBP-51) could reduce binding of H. pylori to both cell lines and induce detachment of cell-bound bacteria from infected cultured cells. PMID:19396245

  12. Fate of the major outer membrane protein P.IA in early and late events of gonococcal infection of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, J F; van Putten, J P

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the fate of the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, P.IA, during gonococcal infection of Chang conjunctiva epithelial cells by using immunoelectron microscopy. Probing of P.IA epitopes with mono- and polyclonal antibodies revealed variable, fixation-dependent P.IA epitope exposure in the gonococci used as an inoculum in the infection experiments. Detection of invariable exposed P.IA epitopes in cryosections of infected epithelial cells with a polyclonal antiserum revealed unaltered P.IA exposure on the bacterial membranes during early attachment of the bacteria to the eukaryotic cells. Upon entry of the bacteria into the host cells, however, labelling was extended to membraneous structures that intercalated between the bacteria and the host cell surface, and, occasionally, to the host cell plasma membrane. The latter observation is consistent with the suggested active role of P.I. in the uptake process (as shown in 1985 by E.C. Gotschlich). Once inside the epithelial cells, both morphologically intact and disintegrating bacteria could be distinguished. The disintegration of the bacteria was accompanied by a loss of P.IA immunoreactivity. PMID:1725221

  13. Disease association with two Helicobacter pylori duplicate outer membrane protein genes, homB and homA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleastro Monica

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background homB encodes a Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein. This gene was previously associated with peptic ulcer disease (PUD and was shown to induce activation of interleukin-8 secretion in vitro, as well as contributing to bacterial adherence. Its 90%-similar gene, homA, was previously correlated with gastritis. The present study aimed to evaluate the gastric disease association with homB and homA, as well as with the H. pylori virulence factors cagA, babA and vacA, in 415 H. pylori strains isolated from patients from East Asian and Western countries. The correlation among these genotypes was also evaluated. Results Both homB and homA genes were heterogeneously distributed worldwide, with a marked difference between East Asian and Western strains. In Western strains (n = 234, 124 PUD and 110 non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, homB, cagA and vacA s1 were all significantly associated with PUD (p = 0.025, p = 0.014, p = 0.039, respectively, and homA was closely correlated with NUD (p = 0.072. In East Asian strains (n = 138, 73 PUD and 65 NUD, homB was found more frequently than homA, and none of these genes was associated with the clinical outcome. Overall, homB was associated with the presence of cagA (p = 0.043 and vacA s1 (p homA was found more frequently in cagA-negative (p = 0.062 and vacA s2 (p Polymorphisms in homB and homA copy number were observed, with a clear geographical specificity, suggesting an involvement of these genes in host adaptation. A correlation between the homB two-copy genotype and PUD was also observed, emphasizing the role of homB in the virulence of the strain. Conclusion The global results suggest that homB and homA contribute to the determination of clinical outcome.

  14. Protective immunity induced by 67 K outer membrane protein of phase I Coxiella burnetii in mice and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67 K outer membrane protein (OMP) isolated from phase I Coxiella burnetii QiYi strain was purified with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Chemical analyses of the 67 K protein showed that it contained seventeen kids of amino acids and no lipopolysaccharides. The immunogenicity and protectivity of the 67 K protein against C. burnetii was evaluated in mice and guinea pigs bi in vitro lymphocyte proliferation assay, delayed-type skin test, antibody conversion rate, and immunization and challenge tests. Intraperitoneal injection of the 67 K protein resulted in antibody production against phase I and II whole cell antigens. The anti-67 K antibody conversion rate was found to be 100% in mice and guinea pigs as well. Lymphocytes were responses in vitro to specific antigen. In addition, delayed-type hypersensitivity appeared two weeks after immunization with the 67 K protein. Moreover, 199% of mice and guinea pigs inoculated with the 67 K protein were protected against a challenge with 103 ID50 virulent C. burnetii. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the 67 K OMP elicits in vivo and in vitro both B cell-mediated and T cell-mediated immunity in mice and guinea pigs. Thus the 67 K protein is a candidate for an effective subunit vaccine against Q fever. (author)

  15. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six α-helices (α1-α6) out of which α2-α5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the α1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that α1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the α5 helix and the linker between α3 and α4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by α1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment

  16. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora N Pollak

    Full Text Available Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa and monocytes (THP-1, and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8 to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively. Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.

  17. Gene synthesis, bacterial expression, and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies of the rat outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, M; Barillas-Mury, C; Christensen, K A; Little, J W; Wells, M A; Walker, F A

    1992-12-01

    The gene coding for the water-soluble domain of the outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5 (OM cytochrome b5) from rat liver has been synthetized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence was obtained by back-translating the known amino acid sequence [Lederer, F., Ghrir, R., Guiard, B., Cortial, S., & Ito, A. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 95-102]. The recombinant OM cytochrome b5 was characterized by UV-visible, EPR, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The UV-visible and EPR spectra of the OM cytochrome b5 are almost identical to the ones obtained from the overexpressed rat microsomal cytochrome b5 [Bodman, S. B. V., Schyler, M. A., Jollie, D. R., & Sligar, S. G. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 9443-9447]. The one-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the OM cytochrome b5 indicates that the rhombic perturbation of the ferric center is essentially identical to that in the microsomal beef, rabbit, chicken, and rat cytochromes b5. Two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy (NOESY) and one-dimensional NOE difference spectroscopy were used to assign the contact-shifted resonances that correspond to each of the two isomers that result from the rotation of the heme around its alpha-gamma-meso axis. The assignment of the resonances allowed the determination of the heme orientation ratio in the OM cytochrome b5, which was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.1. It is noteworthy that the two cytochromes b5 that have similar populations of the two heme isomers (large heme disorder) originate from the rat liver. PMID:1333795

  18. Identification of two novel genes encoding 97- to 99-kilodalton outer membrane proteins of Chlamydia pneumoniae.Infect Immun. 1999 Jan;67(1):375-83

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, K; Madsen, AS; Mygind, P;

    1999-01-01

    of putative outer membrane proteins encoded by the Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis gene families. By use of a monospecific polyclonal antibody against purified recombinant Omp4, it was shown that without heating, the protein migrated at 65 to 75 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  19. Role of Tim50 in the transfer of precursor proteins from the outer to the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokranjac, Dejana; Sichting, Martin; Popov-Celeketić, Dusan; Mapa, Koyeli; Gevorkyan-Airapetov, Lada; Zohary, Keren; Hell, Kai; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter

    2009-03-01

    Transport of essentially all matrix and a number of inner membrane proteins is governed, entirely or in part, by N-terminal presequences and requires a coordinated action of the translocases of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes (TOM and TIM23 complexes). Here, we have analyzed Tim50, a subunit of the TIM23 complex that is implicated in transfer of precursors from TOM to TIM23. Tim50 is recruited to the TIM23 complex via Tim23 in an interaction that is essentially independent of the rest of the translocase. We find Tim50 in close proximity to the intermembrane space side of the TOM complex where it recognizes both types of TIM23 substrates, those that are to be transported into the matrix and those destined to the inner membrane, suggesting that Tim50 recognizes presequences. This function of Tim50 depends on its association with TIM23. We conclude that the efficient transfer of precursors between TOM and TIM23 complexes requires the concerted action of Tim50 with Tim23. PMID:19144822

  20. Evidence for proteolytic cleavage of the 120-kilodalton outer membrane protein of rickettsiae: identification of an avirulent mutant deficient in processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Hackstadt, T; Messer, R; Cieplak, W; Peacock, M G

    1992-01-01

    The 120-kDa rickettsial outer membrane protein (rOmpB) is encoded by a gene with the capacity to encode a protein of approximately 168 kDa. The carboxy-terminal end of the molecule is apparently cleaved to yield 120- and 32-kDa products. Both polypeptides are surface exposed and remain associated with the outer membrane of intact rickettsiae. All species of rickettsiae examined display similar cleavage of rOmpB. Comparison of diverse species of rickettsiae demonstrate a conserved N terminus o...

  1. Variable opacity (Opa) outer membrane proteins account for the cell tropisms displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae for human leukocytes and epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kupsch, E M; Knepper, B; Kuroki, T; Heuer, I; Meyer, T F

    1993-01-01

    Opacity proteins (Opa) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a family of variant outer membrane proteins implicated in pathogenesis, are subject to phase variation. In strain MS11, 11 different opa gene alleles have been identified, the expression of which can be turned on and off independently. Using a reverse genetic approach, we demonstrate that a single Opa protein variant of strain MS11, Opa50, enables gonococci to invade epithelial cells. The remaining variant Opa proteins show no, or very little, ...

  2. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-Barrel Assembly Machinery A (BamA) Ortholog and Rare Outer Membrane Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A. D.; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum (Tp) rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in Tp with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modeling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat-modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in Tp considerably larger than that of E. coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. Tp-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  3. Autotransported serine protease A of Neisseria meningitidis: an immunogenic, surface-exposed outer membrane, and secreted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P J; Wooldridge, Karl G; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A A

    2002-08-01

    Several autotransporter proteins have previously been identified in Neisseria meningitidis. Using molecular features common to most members of the autotransporter family of proteins, we have identified an additional novel ca. 112-kDa autotransporter protein in the meningococcal genomic sequence data. This protein, designated autotransported serine protease A (AspA), has significant N-terminal homology to the secreted serine proteases (subtilases) from several organisms and contains a serine protease catalytic triad. The amino acid sequence of AspA is well-conserved in serogroup A, B, and C meningococci. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the AspA homologue appears to be a pseudogene. The gene encoding AspA was cloned and expressed from meningococcal strain MC58 (B15:P1.16b). Anti-AspA antibodies were detected in patients' convalescent-phase sera, suggesting that AspA is expressed in vivo during infection and is immunogenic and cross-reactive. Rabbit polyclonal monospecific anti-AspA serum was used to probe whole-cell proteins from a panel of wild-type meningococcal strains and two AspA mutant strains. Expression of the ca. 112-kDa precursor polypeptide was detected in 12 of 20 wild-type meningococcal strains examined, suggesting that AspA expression is phase variable. Immunogold electron microscopy and cellular fractionation studies showed that the AspA precursor is transported to the outer membrane and remains surface exposed. Western blot experiments confirmed that smaller, ca. 68- or 70-kDa components of AspA (AspA68 and AspA70, respectively) are then secreted into the meningococcal culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis of S426 abolished secretion of both rAspA68 and rAspA70 in Escherichia coli, confirming that AspA is an autocleaved autotransporter protein. In conclusion, we characterized a novel, surface-exposed and secreted, immunogenic, meningococcal autotransporter protein. PMID:12117956

  4. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. PMID:21338419

  5. Evasion of IFN-γ signaling by Francisella novicida is dependent upon Francisella outer membrane protein C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan C Nallaparaju

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. An outer membrane protein (FTT0918 of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis has been identified as a virulence factor. We generated a F. novicida (F. tularensis subsp. novicida FTN_0444 (homolog of FTT0918 fopC mutant to study the virulence-associated mechanism(s of FTT0918.The ΔfopC strain phenotype was characterized using immunological and biochemical assays. Attenuated virulence via the pulmonary route in wildtype C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, as well as in knockout (KO mice, including MHC I, MHC II, and µmT (B cell deficient, but not in IFN-γ or IFN-γR KO mice was observed. Primary bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM prepared from C57BL/6 mice treated with rIFN-γ exhibited greater inhibition of intracellular ΔfopC than wildtype U112 strain replication; whereas, IFN-γR KO macrophages showed no IFN-γ-dependent inhibition of ΔfopC replication. Moreover, phosphorylation of STAT1 was downregulated by the wildtype strain, but not the fopC mutant, in rIFN-γ treated macrophages. Addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NOS inhibitor, led to an increase of ΔfopC replication to that seen in the BMDM unstimulated with rIFN-γ. Enzymatic screening of ΔfopC revealed aberrant acid phosphatase activity and localization. Furthermore, a greater abundance of different proteins in the culture supernatants of ΔfopC than that in the wildtype U112 strain was observed.F. novicida FopC protein facilitates evasion of IFN-γ-mediated immune defense(s by down-regulation of STAT1 phosphorylation and nitric oxide production, thereby promoting virulence. Additionally, the FopC protein also may play a role in maintaining outer membrane stability (integrity facilitating the activity and localization of acid phosphatases and other F. novicida cell components.

  6. Immunogenicity and protective role of antigenic regions from five outer membrane proteins of Flavobacterium columnare in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Zhixin; Fu, Jianping; Zhang, Qiusheng; Huang, Bei; Nie, Pin

    2016-02-01

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in freshwater fish. In the present study, the antigenic regions of five outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including zinc metalloprotease, prolyl oligopeptidase, thermolysin, collagenase and chondroitin AC lyase, were bioinformatically analyzed, fused together, and then expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein of 95.6 kDa, as estimated by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was consistent with the molecular weight deduced from the amino acid sequence. The purified recombinant protein was used to vaccinate the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. Following vaccination of the fish their IgM antibody levels were examined, as was the expression of IgM, IgD and IgZ immunoglobulin genes and other genes such as MHC Iα and MHC IIβ, which are also involved in adaptive immunity. Interleukin genes (IL), including IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10, and type I and type II interferon (IFN) genes were also examined. At 3 and 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv), significant increases in IgM antibody levels were observed in the fish vaccinated with the recombinant fusion protein, and an increase in the expression levels of IgM, IgD and IgZ genes was also detected following the vaccinations, thus indicating that an adaptive immune response was induced by the vaccinations. Early increases in the expression levels of IL and IFN genes were also observed in the vaccinated fish. At four wpv, the fish were challenged with F. columnare, and the vaccinated fish showed a good level of protection against this pathogen, with 39% relative percent survival (RPS) compared with the control group. It can be concluded, therefore, that the five OMPs, in the form of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine, induced an immune response in fish and protection against F. columnare.

  7. Identification of an iron-regulated outer membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis involved in the utilization of hemoglobin complexed to haptoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, L. A.; Dyer, D W

    1995-01-01

    Hemoglobin complexed to the plasma protein haptoglobin can be used by Neisseria meningitidis as a source of iron to support growth in vitro. An N meningitidis mutant, DNM2E4, was generated by insertion of the mini-Tn3erm transposon into the gene coding for an 85-kDa iron-regulated outer membrane protein. Membrane proteins prepared from DNM2E4 were identical to those of the wild-type strain except that the 85-kDa protein was not produced. This mutant was unable to use hemoglobin-haptoglobin co...

  8. IMMUNE RESPONSE INDUCED BY N-LAUROYLSARCOSINE EXTRACTED OUTER-MEMBRANE PROTEINS OF AN ISOLATE OF EDWARDSIELLA ICTALURI IN CHANNEL CATFISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    A virulent isolate of Edwardsiella ictaluri (AL-93-75), the causative agent of enteric septicaemia of catfish (ESC), was used to derive a lipopolysaccharide-reduced N-lauroylsarcosine outer- membrane protein (OMP) fraction vaccine. The OMP fraction was analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryl...

  9. An Outer Membrane Protein Involved in the Uptake of Glucose Is Essential for Cytophaga hutchinsonii Cellulose Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Xia; Yang, Tengteng; Zhang, Weixin; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2016-03-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii specializes in cellulose digestion by employing a collection of novel cell-associated proteins. Here, we identified a novel gene locus, CHU_1276, that is essential for C. hutchinsonii cellulose utilization. Disruption of CHU_1276 in C. hutchinsonii resulted in complete deficiency in cellulose degradation, as well as compromised assimilation of cellobiose or glucose at a low concentration. Further analysis showed that CHU_1276 was an outer membrane protein that could be induced by cellulose and low concentrations of glucose. Transcriptional profiling revealed that CHU_1276 exerted a profound effect on the genome-wide response to both glucose and Avicel and that the mutant lacking CHU_1276 displayed expression profiles very different from those of the wild-type strain under different culture conditions. Specifically, comparison of their transcriptional responses to cellulose led to the identification of a gene set potentially regulated by CHU_1276. These results suggest that CHU_1276 plays an essential role in cellulose utilization, probably by coordinating the extracellular hydrolysis of cellulose substrate with the intracellular uptake of the hydrolysis product in C. hutchinsonii. PMID:26773084

  10. Outer membrane biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori: A deviation from the paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Liechti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS and numerous outer membrane proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its outer membrane profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines that use any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε- proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε-proteobacteria, while the inner and outer membrane associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OM protein transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to

  11. Effects of Outer Membrane Proteins (OMPs) on the Transport of Escherichia coli within Saturated Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Bardy, S.; Feriancikova, L.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the transport behavior of bacteria within the groundwater system is critical to the protection of groundwater resources from microbial contamination and the reduction of associated public health risks. In this study, we used TolC and Ag43 positive and negative E. coli mutants to evaluate the effects of OMP TolC and Ag43 on the transport behavior of E. coli under a wide range of water chemistry conditions. The surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, contact angles of three probing liquid) of TolC and Ag43 positive and negative E. coli cells were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory, which considers Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) interaction, the electrostatic double layer (EDL) interaction as well as the Lewis acid-base (AB) (i.e., hydrophobic) interaction between E. coli cells and the surface of quartz sands, were used to explain the observed trend in E. coli mobility. In general, good agreements between the experimental observations and XDLVO calculations were observed. Findings from this research suggested that OMPs could significantly impact bacterial mobility in sandy aquifers.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-12-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  13. Shigella Outer Membrane Protein PSSP-1 Is Broadly Protective against Shigella Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Ouk; Rho, Semi; Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Heejoo; Song, Hyo Jin; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Ryang Yeo; Kim, Eun Hye; Sinha, Anuradha; Dey, Ayan; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, Shigella is a primary cause of diarrhea in infants and young children. Although antibiotic therapy is an effective treatment for shigellosis, therapeutic options are narrowing due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, preventive vaccination could become the most efficacious approach for controlling shigellosis. We have identified several conserved protein antigens that are shared by multiple Shigella serotypes and species. Among these, one antigen induced c...

  14. Engineering of an E. coli outer membrane protein FhuA with increased channel diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dworeck Tamara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel proteins like FhuA can be an alternative to artificial chemically synthesized nanopores. To reach such goals, channel proteins must be flexible enough to be modified in their geometry, i.e. length and diameter. As continuation of a previous study in which we addressed the lengthening of the channel, here we report the increasing of the channel diameter by genetic engineering. Results The FhuA Δ1-159 diameter increase has been obtained by doubling the amino acid sequence of the first two N-terminal β-strands, resulting in variant FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. The total number of β-strands increased from 22 to 24 and the channel surface area is expected to increase by ~16%. The secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows a high β-sheet content, suggesting the correct folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. To further prove the FhuA Δ1-159 Exp channel functionality, kinetic measurement using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were conducted. The results indicated a 17% faster diffusion kinetic for FhuA Δ1-159 Exp as compared to FhuA Δ1-159, well correlated to the expected channel surface area increase of ~16%. Conclusion In this study using a simple "semi rational" approach the FhuA Δ1-159 diameter was enlarged. By combining the actual results with the previous ones on the FhuA Δ1-159 lengthening a new set of synthetic nanochannels with desired lengths and diameters can be produced, broadening the FhuA Δ1-159 applications. As large scale protein production is possible our approach can give a contribution to nanochannel industrial applications.

  15. Study on Outer Membrane Protein (OMP Profile of Aeromonas Strains using SDS- PAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sachan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesophilic aeromonads are being increasingly reported pathogen of humans and lower vertebrates. Water and foods are considered to be the chief source of Aeromonas spp. At present there are several techniques available for the detection of Aeromonas spp. from water and foods. However, there is still need to develop immunodiagnostics for rapid detection of Aeromonas spp. irrespective of their species or serotype. To meet out this requirement present study was undertaken to identify the common protein moiety in their OMPs by SDS-PAGE so, that immunoassays can be developed for efficient and rapid detection of Aeromonas spp. from foods. [Vet. World 2012; 5(3.000: 173-177

  16. Cloning and sequence analysis of gene oipA encoding an outer membrane protein of human Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Rong Chen; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang; Zheng Jiang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant E. coli strain that would highly express the proinflammatory outer membrane protein of human Helicobacter pylori(Hpylori).METHODS: The oipA DNA was amplified by PCR, inserted into pET-32a, and transformed into Top10 E. coli strain.This recombinant plasmid of Top10 was sent out for nucleotide sequence analysis. Finally this sequence AF479754 was compared with HP0638 and JHP0581.RESULTS: The sequence of the aim gene was obtained. It had 924 base pairs. The identity was 95.32% against HP0638, 95.02% against JHP0581, which was higher than the identity between HP0638 and JHP0581.CONCLUSION: Although the aim gene was obtained, but it was different from the published sequence of GenBank. It is not clear what makes this difference. Maybe it is because different strain was used or because there were some variations. So more researches are required to prove it.

  17. Treponema pallidum in Gel Microdroplets: A Method for Topological Analysis of BamA (TP0326) and Localization of Rare Outer Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    The noncultivable spirochete Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) is the etiological agent of venereal syphilis. In contrast to the outer membranes (OMs) of gram-negative bacteria, the OM of T. pallidum lacks lipopolysaccharide, contains a paucity of integral membrane proteins, and is extremely labile. The lability of the T. pallidum OM greatly hinders efforts to localize the bacterium's rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs). To circumvent this problem, we developed the gel microdroplet method in which treponemes are encapsulated in porous agarose beads and then probed with specific antibodies in the absence or presence of low concentrations of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. To demonstrate the general utility of this method for surface localization of any T. pallidum antigen, herein we describe a protocol for immunolabeling of encapsulated treponemes using antibodies directed against the β-barrel and POTRA domains of TP0326, the spirochete's BamA ortholog. PMID:26427677

  18. Molecular Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of omp-40, the Gene Coding for the Major Outer Membrane Protein from the Acidophilic Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans†

    OpenAIRE

    Guiliani, Nicolas; Jerez, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is one of the chemolithoautotrophic bacteria important in industrial biomining operations. Some of the surface components of this microorganism are probably involved in adaptation to their acidic environment and in bacterium-mineral interactions. We have isolated and characterized omp40, the gene coding for the major outer membrane protein from T. ferrooxidans. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Omp40 protein has 382 amino acids and a calculated molecular weight ...

  19. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  20. THE OUTER MEMBRANE OF PATHOGENIC REPRESENTATIVES OF THE LEPTOSPIRA GENIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Vaganova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pathogenic leptospires can infect wide spectrum of hosts and they can survive in the environment long time. The outer membrane is the cellular component participated in interaction of microorganisms and environment. In present time several proteins located in the outer membrane of leptospires which are responsible for colonization of host organism, protection from influence of immune system of host, transport of substances in to the cell and other processes have been described. The outer membrane contains proteins and lipopolysaccharide molecules which have citotoxic effect. It was shown that regulation of protein composition of membranes depends on several factors of environment such as temperature, osmolarity, presence of certain substances in environment. Lipopolysaccharide and protein molecules of outer membranes have antigenic properties. These molecules can be used in practice as the components of vaccine against leptospiroses and diagnostic tools. Current review summarize information concerning structural organization of the outer membrane of leptospires, diversities of incoming parts of molecules and regulation of their synthesis. Moreover, perspectives of practical using of the outer membrane components in diagnostics and prevention of leptospiroses are presented.

  1. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP) and fimbriae crude extract (FE). The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9) CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were perfor...

  2. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Expressing the Outer Membrane Protein 26-Kilodalton Antigen Confers Prophylactic Protection against Helicobacter pylori Infection ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lü, Lin; Zeng, Han-qing; Wang, Pi-Long; Shen, Wei; Xiang, Ting-xiu; Mei, Zhe-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent worldwide and results in chronic gastritis, which may lead to gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. We have previously reported that oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing the H. pylori outer membrane protein 26-kilodalton (Omp26) antigen affords therapeutic protection against H. pylori infection in mice. In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of this vaccine cand...

  3. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori by Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serological response of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobocter pylori(Hpylori)infection to two H pylori outer membrane proteins (OMPs)(Mr18 000 and Mr26 000) acquired by gene recombinanttechnique, and to determine the diagnostic significance of serological tests derived from these OMPs.METHODS: Recombinant vectors encoding the two H pylori OMPs were used to transform and express in BL21 (DE3)E. coli. After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin, colloid gold kits were prepared with purified recombinant proteins to detect H pylori infection and H pylori-associated diseases by the immunity-marker technology. We selected 150 patients with H pyloriinfection and digestive symptoms without previous treatment, induding chronic gastritis (n = 60), duodenal ulcer (n = 30), gastric ulcer (n = 30), and gastric cancer (n = 30).As controls, 33 H pylori-negative healthy volunteers were also recruited. Serum samples were collected from all subjects, and the antibodies to specific proteins of H pylori were tested with the colloid gold test kits. The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the colloid gold tests were evaluated, by using the combination of standard diagnostic methods (13C urea breath test and bacteria culture) and classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as reference.RESULTS: After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin,the purity of recombinant fusion proteins was about 95%.The recombinant fusion proteins were recognized by the specific monoclonal antibodies against the two H pylori OMPs,as demonstrated by the ELISA. Of the 150 serum samples from patients infected with H pylori 141 (94.0%) responded positively to the recombinant protein with Mr26 000, while the seropositive rates were 95.0%, 96.7%, 96.7% and 90.0%for patients with H pylori-associated chronic gastritis,duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer respectively.The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the colloid gold kit with Mr26 000

  4. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  5. Protein complexes in bacterial and yeast mitochondrial membranes differ in their sensitivity towards dissociation by SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2008-12-01

    Previously, a 2D gel electrophoresis approach was developed for the Escherichia coli inner membrane, which detects membrane protein complexes that are stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at room temperature, and dissociate under the influence of trifluoroethanol [R. E. Spelbrink et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005), 28742-8]. Here, the method was applied to the evolutionarily related mitochondrial inner membrane that was isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, only very few proteins were found to be dissociated by trifluoroethanol of which Lpd1p, a component of multiple protein complexes localized in the mitochondrial matrix, is the most prominent. Usage of either milder or more stringent conditions did not yield any additional proteins that were released by fluorinated alcohols. This strongly suggests that membrane protein complexes in yeast are less stable in SDS solution than their E. coli counterparts, which might be due to the overall reduced hydrophobicity of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins. PMID:18817900

  6. The role of lipids in membrane insertion and translocation of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Annemieke; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-11

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of membranes and maintain the membrane permeability barrier of cells and organelles. They provide not only the bilayer matrix in which the functional membrane proteins reside, but they also can play direct roles in many essential cellular processes. In this review, we give an overview of the lipid involvement in protein translocation across and insertion into the Escherichia coli inner membrane. We describe the key and general roles that lipids play in these processes in conjunction with the protein components involved. We focus on the Sec-mediated insertion of leader peptidase. We describe as well the more direct roles that lipids play in insertion of the small coat proteins Pf3 and M13. Finally, we focus on the role of lipids in membrane assembly of oligomeric membrane proteins, using the potassium channel KcsA as model protein. In all cases, the anionic lipids and lipids with small headgroups play important roles in either determining the efficiency of the insertion and assembly process or contributing to the directionality of the insertion process. PMID:15546660

  7. The Lethal Cargo of Myxococcus xanthus Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JamesEBerleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including MXAN_3564 (mepA, an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is the long-predicted (yet to date unknown primary extracellular protease in M. xanthus.

  8. A Western-blot assay for the detection of antibodies against pathogenic Leptospira serogroups with recombinant outer membrane protein LipL32

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-yuan DUAN; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Shao-fu QIU; He, Bin; Zhao, Hai; Song, Li-Hua; Zhu, Hong; Duan, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective To provide a possible antigen for rapid serodiagnosis of leptospirosis,the present study focused on the activity of immune-reaction and cross-reaction between outer membrane protein LipL32 and multi-serogroup anti-pathogenic Leptospira antibodies.Methods Based on the given sequence of LipL32 gene of Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae strain 56601,the primer pair was designed and the DNA fragment was amplified by PCR.The amplified product was inserted into vector pET-28a-(c) to construct...

  9. Distribution of Salmonella paratyphi A outer membrane protein X gene and immune-protective effect related to its recombinant expressed products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明雷

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution and sequence conservation of outer membrane protein X(ompX)gene in Salmonella paratyphi A isolates as well as the immunogenicity and immono-protection of ompX gene products.Methods OmpX gene in Salmonella paratyphi A isolates was detected by PCR and the amplification products were sequenced after the T-A cloning process.OmpX gene product was expressed with E.coli expression system and the expressed rOmpX was extracted by Ni-NTA affinity

  10. Interdependence of calcium and cobalamin binding by wild-type and mutant BtuB protein in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbeer, C; Gudmundsdottir, A

    1990-01-01

    The binding of calcium and cobalamin to outer membranes from cells of Escherichia coli that contained amplified levels of wild-type or mutant btuB was studied. The mutant (BBam50) had an aspartyl-prolyl dipeptide inserted after the original 50th amino acid residue of the mature BtuB protein, which is within a region that shows extensive homology with the ferric siderophore receptors. This insertion resulted in cleavage of the BtuB in two places. The larger form retained the insertion but had ...

  11. Immunogenicity of a chimeric peptide corresponding to T helper and B cell epitopes of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The immunogenicity of a chimeric T/B cell peptide corresponding to antigenically characterized epitopes of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP) was studied in mice to further define its potential use in the development of a subunit vaccine in preventing blinding trachoma in humans. The chimeric peptide, designated A8-VDI, corresponds to a conserved MOMP T helper (Th) cell epitope(s) (A8, residues 106-130) and serovar A VDI (residues 66-80), which contains the serovar-...

  12. Evidence for proteolytic cleavage of the 120-kilodalton outer membrane protein of rickettsiae: identification of an avirulent mutant deficient in processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackstadt, T; Messer, R; Cieplak, W; Peacock, M G

    1992-01-01

    The 120-kDa rickettsial outer membrane protein (rOmpB) is encoded by a gene with the capacity to encode a protein of approximately 168 kDa. The carboxy-terminal end of the molecule is apparently cleaved to yield 120- and 32-kDa products. Both polypeptides are surface exposed and remain associated with the outer membrane of intact rickettsiae. All species of rickettsiae examined display similar cleavage of rOmpB. Comparison of diverse species of rickettsiae demonstrate a conserved N terminus of the 32-kDa fragment, with a predicted procaryotic secretory signal peptide immediately upstream of the proposed cleavage site. Coprecipitation of the 120-kDa rOmpB protein and the 32-kDa peptide by monoclonal antibodies specific for the 120-kDa portion of the molecule suggests that the two fragments remain noncovalently associated on the surface of rickettsiae. Analysis of an avirulent mutant of Rickettsia rickettsii revealed reduced amounts of the 120- and 32-kDa fragments, but with a correspondingly larger rOmpB protein that displayed properties expected of the putative precursor. This avirulent mutant grows intracellularly but fails to cause the lysis of infected cells that is typical of R. rickettsii. DNA sequence analysis of the region of the gene encoding the cleavage site of the avirulent strain revealed no difference from the sequence obtained from virulent R. rickettsii. The 168-kDa putative precursor of the avirulent strain of R. rickettsii was not extracted from the surface by dilute buffers, as is the 120-kDa protein of virulent R. rickettsii or R. prowazekii. These latter results suggest that the 32-kDa C-terminal region of the molecule may serve as a membrane anchor domain. Images PMID:1729180

  13. Regulatory protein OmpR influences the serum resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 by modifying the structure of the outer membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Skorek

    Full Text Available The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system constitutes a regulatory pathway involved in bacterial adaptive responses to environmental cues. Our previous findings indicated that the OmpR regulator in Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 positively regulates the expression of FlhDC, the master flagellar activator, which influences adhesion/invasion properties and biofilm formation. Here we show that a strain lacking OmpR grown at 37°C exhibits extremely high resistance to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum (NHS compared with the wild-type strain. Analysis of OMP expression in the ompR mutant revealed that OmpR reciprocally regulates Ail and OmpX, two homologous OMPs of Y. enterocolitica, without causing significant changes in the level of YadA, the major serum resistance factor. Analysis of mutants in individual genes belonging to the OmpR regulon (ail, ompX, ompC and flhDC and strains lacking plasmid pYV, expressing YadA, demonstrated the contribution of the respective proteins to serum resistance. We show that Ail and OmpC act in an opposite way to the OmpX protein to confer serum resistance to the wild-type strain, but are not responsible for the high resistance of the ompR mutant. The serum resistance phenotype of ompR seems to be multifactorial and mainly attributable to alterations that potentiate the function of YadA. Our results indicate that a decreased level of FlhDC in the ompR mutant cells is partly responsible for the serum resistance and this effect can be suppressed by overexpression of flhDC in trans. The observation that the loss of FlhDC enhances the survival of wild-type cells in NHS supports the involvement of FlhDC regulator in this phenotype. In addition, the ompR mutant exhibited a lower level of LPS, but this was not correlated with changes in the level of FlhDC. We propose that OmpR might alter the susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to complement-mediated killing through remodeling of the outer membrane.

  14. Recognition of saccharides by the OpcA, OpaD, and OpaB outer membrane proteins from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeremy; Bailey, Simon E S; Benmechernene, Zineb; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Griffiths, Natalie J E; Virji, Mumtaz; Derrick, Jeremy P

    2005-09-01

    The adhesion of the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis to host cell surface proteoglycan, mediated by the integral outer membrane proteins OpcA and Opa, plays an important part in the processes of colonization and invasion by the bacterium. The precise specificities of the OpcA and Opa proteins are, however, unknown. Here we use a fluorescence-based binding assay to show that both proteins bind to mono- and disaccharides with high affinity. Binding of saccharides caused a quench in the intrinsic fluorescence emission of both proteins, and mutation of selected Tyr residues within the external loop regions caused a substantial decrease in fluorescence. We suggest that the intrinsic fluorescence arises from resonance energy transfer from Tyr to Trp residues in the beta-barrel portion of the structure. OpcA bound sialic acid with a Kd of 0.31 microM and was shown to be specific for pyranose saccharides. The binding specificities of two different Opa proteins were compared; unlike OpcA, neither protein bound to monosaccharides, but both bound to maltose, lactose, and sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides, with Kd values in the micromolar range. OpaB had a 10-fold higher affinity for sialic acid-containing ligands than OpaD as a result of the mutation Y165V, which was shown to restore this specificity to OpaD. Finally, the OpcA- and Opa-dependent adhesion of meningococci to epithelial cells was shown to be partially inhibited by exogenously added sialic acid and maltose. The results show that OpcA and the Opa proteins can be thought of as outer membrane lectins and that simple saccharides can modulate their recognition of complex proteoglycan receptors. PMID:16006553

  15. Substrate specificity within a family of outer membrane carboxylate channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Eren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  16. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A2 in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure

  17. Role of disulfide bonding in outer membrane structure and permeability in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bavoil, P; Ohlin, A.; Schachter, J

    1984-01-01

    The outer membrane of Chlamydia trachomatis can be efficiently solubilized by a variety of mild detergents in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. This allows purification of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein at high yield in very gentle conditions by using its differential solubility in Sarkosyl and octylglucoside in the presence of dithiothreitol. The major outer membrane protein of the L2 serovar is an acidic protein with a pI of ca. 5. It contains three cysteine re...

  18. Lipid-modified azurin of Neisseria meningitidis is a copper protein localized on the outer membrane surface and not regulated by FNR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeudom, Manu; Huston, Wilhemina; Moir, James W B

    2015-04-01

    The laz gene of Neisseria meningitidis is predicted to encode a lipid-modified azurin (Laz). Laz is very similar to azurin, a periplasmic protein, which belongs to the copper-containing proteins in the cupredoxin superfamily. In other bacteria, azurin is an electron donor to nitrite reductase, an important enzyme in the denitrifying process. It is not known whether Laz could function as an electron transfer protein in this important pathogen. Laz protein was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Electrospray mass spectrometry indicated that the Laz protein contains one copper ion. Laz was shown to be redox-active in the presence of its redox center copper ion. When oxidized, Laz exhibits an intense blue colour and absorbs visible light around 626 nm. The absorption is lost when exposed to diethyldithiocarbamate, a copper chelating agent. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against purified Laz for detecting expression of Laz under different growth conditions and to determine the orientation of Laz on the outer membrane. The expression of Laz under microaerobic and microaerobic denitrifying conditions was slightly higher than that under aerobic conditions. However, the expression of Laz was similar between the wild type strain and an fnr mutant, suggesting that Fumarate/Nitrate reduction regulator (FNR) does not regulate the expression of Laz despite the presence of a partial FNR box upstream of the laz gene. We propose that some Laz protein is exposed on the outer membrane surface of N. meningitidis as the αLaz antibodies can increase killing by complement in a capsule deficient N. meningitidis strain, in a dose-dependent fashion. PMID:25666376

  19. Structural Modelling of the Chlamydia Trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein Provides Insights into Immunogenic Properties of its External loops in Serotypes E and K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Lytovchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted pathogens, causing serious health risks worldwide. Based on serological properties of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein, up to 19 serovars of C.trachomatis can be distinguished, having different antigenic properties and clinical manifestations. In this study, the antibody response to the variable domains of the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis serotypes E and K was analyzed in connection with the structural models of its extracellular loops. We propose that the reduction of antibody formation to the antigens of some variable domains may be caused by their shielding by other external loops. It has been shown that the entire structure of the second and fifth loops of genotype E are more compact and have minimal chain exposure due shielding with the more unfolded third and seventh loops. This corresponds to the absence of significant antibody response to their variable domains VDI and VDII. In genotype K entire structure of the second and the fifth loops is more unfolded, their shielding with the third and seventh loops is not so complete. As a consequence their variable domains induce antibody production in infected organism

  20. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  1. Isolation, functional characterization and crystallization of Aq_1259, an outer membrane protein with porin features, from Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Langer, Julian D; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2012-12-01

    The "hypothetical protein" Aq_1259 was identified by mass spectrometry and purified from native membranes of Aquifex aeolicus. It is a 49.4kDa protein, highly homologous (>52% identity) to several conserved hypothetical proteins from other bacteria. However, none of these proteins has been characterized using biochemical or electrophysiological techniques. Based on the sequence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, the structure of Aq_1259 is predicted to be a β-barrel with 16 β-strands. The strands with loops and turns are distributed evenly through the entire sequence. The function of Aq_1259 was analyzed after incorporation into a lipid bilayer. Electrophysiological measurements revealed a pore that has a basic stationary conductance of 0.48 ± 0.038nS in a buffer with 0.5M NaH₂PO₄ at pH 6.5 and 0.2 ± 0.015nS in a buffer with 0.5M NaCl at pH 6.5. Superimposed on this is a fluctuating conductance of similar amplitude. Aq_1259 could be crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 3.4Å and belong to space group I222 with cell dimensions of a=138.3Å, b=144.6Å, c=151.8Å. PMID:22842195

  2. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression of omp-40, the gene coding for the major outer membrane protein from the acidophilic bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiliani, N; Jerez, C A

    2000-06-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is one of the chemolithoautotrophic bacteria important in industrial biomining operations. Some of the surface components of this microorganism are probably involved in adaptation to their acidic environment and in bacterium-mineral interactions. We have isolated and characterized omp40, the gene coding for the major outer membrane protein from T. ferrooxidans. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Omp40 protein has 382 amino acids and a calculated molecular weight of 40,095.7. Omp40 forms an oligomeric structure of about 120 kDa that dissociates into the monomer (40 kDa) by heating in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The degree of identity of Omp40 amino acid sequence to porins from enterobacteria was only 22%. Nevertheless, multiple alignments of this sequence with those from several OmpC porins showed several important features conserved in the T. ferrooxidans surface protein, such as the approximate locations of 16 transmembrane beta strands, eight loops, including a large external L3 loop, and eight turns which allowed us to propose a putative 16-stranded beta-barrel porin structure for the protein. These results together with the previously known capacity of Omp40 to form ion channels in planar lipid bilayers strongly support its role as a porin in this chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic microorganism. Some characteristics of the Omp40 protein, such as the presence of a putative L3 loop with an estimated isoelectric point of 7.21 allow us to speculate that this can be the result of an adaptation of the acidophilic T. ferrooxidans to prevent free movement of protons across its outer membrane. PMID:10831405

  3. Immunization with synthetic peptides containing epitopes of the class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis: production of bactericidal antibodies on immunization with a cyclic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, M; McGuinness, B T; Heckels, J E

    1993-08-01

    The class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis is the target for subtype-specific, bactericidal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The epitopes recognized by these antibodies have been mapped previously to linear peptides corresponding to the sequences thought to be exposed at the apices of surface-exposed loops of the protein. In this work several synthetic peptides containing the subtype Pl.16b epitope have been synthetized with the aim of inducing a polyclonal immune response resembling the reactivity of the mAbs. Initially, peptides of 9 and 15 amino acid residues were synthesized and used for immunization after coupling to a carrier protein. The reactivity of the resulting antisera, with synthetic linear decapeptides, resembled that seen in previous epitope mapping experiments with the protective mAbs. However, despite the induction of antibodies having the desired specificity, the antisera reacted poorly with the native protein in outer membranes, and were non-bactericidal. A 36mer peptide, consisting of the entire surface-exposed loop 4 of the class 1 protein was then synthesized and used for immunization as (i) free peptide, (ii) peptide coupled to carrier and (iii) peptide subjected to cyclization, in an attempt to restrict it to conformations that might more closely resemble the native loop structure. In contrast to antisera raised against linear peptides, antibodies raised by immunization with the 36mer cyclic peptide, did not react with linear peptides recognized by the mAbs, but instead appeared to recognize conformational determinants. This antiserum promoted complement-mediated bactericidal killing of the homologous meningococcal strain, demonstrating the potential of synthetic peptide immunogens for inducing a protective immune response against group B meningococci. PMID:7691983

  4. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer-membrane

  5. Two distinct outer membrane serotype subcomplexes of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A.

    OpenAIRE

    Bläsius, R; Strittmatter, W; Crowe, B.; Achtman, M.

    1990-01-01

    A 350-kilodalton serotype outer membrane complex containing the class 1, 3, and 4 outer membrane proteins was isolated from serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. Partial denaturation yielded two serotype subcomplexes containing the class 3 and 1 proteins (85 kilodaltons) and the class 3 and 4 proteins (94 kilodaltons), respectively.

  6. Overexpression of human SOD1 in VDAC1-less yeast restores mitochondrial functionality modulating beta-barrel outer membrane protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrì, Andrea; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Guarino, Francesca; Reina, Simona; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1), the most important antioxidant defense against ROS in eukaryotic cells, localizes in cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria (IMS). Several evidences show a SOD1 intersection with both fermentative and respiratory metabolism. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is the main pore-forming protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), and is considered the gatekeeper of mitochondrial metabolism. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking VDAC1 (Δpor1) is a very convenient model system, since it shows an impaired growth rate on non-fermentable carbon source. Transformation of Δpor1 yeast with human SOD1 completely restores the cell growth deficit in non-fermentative conditions and re-establishes the physiological levels of ROS, as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential. No similar result was found upon yeast SOD1 overexpression. A previous report highlighted the action of SOD1 as a transcription factor. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that β-barrel outer-membrane encoding-genes por2, tom40, sam50 are induced by hSOD1, but the same effect was not obtained in Δpor1Δpor2 yeast, indicating a crucial function for yVDAC2. Since the lack of VDAC1 in yeast can be considered a stress factor for the cell, hSOD1 could relieve it stimulating the expression of genes bringing to the recovery of the MOM function. Our results suggest a direct influence of SOD1 on VDAC. PMID:26947057

  7. The host outer membrane proteins OmpA and OmpC are associated with the Shigella phage Sf6 virion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assembly of dsDNA bacteriophage is a precisely programmed process. Potential roles of host cell components in phage assembly haven't been well understood. It was previously reported that two unidentified proteins were present in bacteriophage Sf6 virion (Casjens et al, 2004, J.Mol.Biol. 339, 379-394, Fig. 2A). Using tandem mass spectrometry, we have identified the two proteins as outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OmpA and OmpC from its host Shigella flexneri. The transmission electron cryo-microscopy structure of Sf6 shows significant density at specific sites at the phage capsid inner surface. This density fit well with the characteristic beta-barrel domains of OMPs, thus may be due to the two host proteins. Locations of this density suggest a role in Sf6 morphogenesis reminiscent of phage-encoded cementing proteins. These data indicate a new, OMP-related phage:host linkage, adding to previous knowledge that some lambdoid bacteriophage genomes contain OmpC-like genes that express phage-encoded porins in the lysogenic state.

  8. Gonococcal transferrin-binding protein 1 is required for transferrin utilization and is homologous to TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, C N; Biswas, G D; Tsai, J; Paruchuri, D K; Thompson, S A; Sparling, P F

    1992-09-01

    The pathogenic Neisseria species are capable of utilizing transferrin as their sole source of iron. A neisserial transferrin receptor has been identified and its characteristics defined; however, the biochemical identities of proteins which are required for transferrin receptor function have not yet been determined. We identified two iron-repressible transferrin-binding proteins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, TBP1 and TBP2. Two approaches were taken to clone genes required for gonococcal transferrin receptor function. First, polyclonal antiserum raised against TBP1 was used to identify clones expressing TBP1 epitopes. Second, a wild-type gene copy was cloned that repaired the defect in a transferrin receptor function (trf) mutant. The clones obtained by these two approaches were shown to overlap by DNA sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis of both clones and recombination of mutagenized fragments into the gonococcal chromosome generated mutants that showed reduced binding of transferrin to whole cells and that were incapable of growth on transferrin. No TBP1 was produced in these mutants, but TBP2 expression was normal. The DNA sequence of the gene encoding gonococcal TBP1 (tbpA) predicted a protein sequence homologous to the Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Thus, both the function and the predicted protein sequence of TBP1 were consistent with this protein serving as a transferrin receptor. PMID:1325963

  9. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. Menão

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP and fimbriae crude extract (FE. The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9 CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were performed for the recovery of shedding SE, and SE was recovered from the liver and spleen. Additionally, antibody titers were measured in the serum by micro-agglutination test. The results indicated that the vaccine produced with bacterin yielded better results and resulted in reduction of fecal shedding and organ invasion by SE after oral challenge, although no vaccine was 100% effective for the control of SE experimental infection.

  10. Novel utilization of the outer membrane proteins for the identification and differentiation of pathogenic versus nonpathogenic microbial strains using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Rabih E.; Wade, Mary; Deshpande, Samir V.; McCubbin, Patrick; Snyder, A. Peter; Bevilacqua, Vicky

    2012-06-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomic approaches are showing promising capabilities in addressing various biological and biochemical issues. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are often associated with virulence in gram-negative pathogens and could prove to be excellent model biomarkers for strain level differentiation among bacteria. Whole cells and OMP extracts were isolated from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Francisella tularensis, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei. OMP extracts were compared for their ability to differentiate and delineate the correct database organism to an experimental sample and for the degree of dissimilarity to the nearest-neighbor database strains. This study addresses the comparative experimental proteome analyses of OMPs vs. whole cell lysates on the strain-level discrimination among gram negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.

  11. Separate fusion of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Malka, Florence; Guillery, Olwenn; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Belenguer, Pascale; Lombès, Anne; Rojo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are enveloped by two closely apposed boundary membranes with different properties and functions. It is known that they undergo fusion and fission, but it has remained unclear whether outer and inner membranes fuse simultaneously, coordinately or separately. We set up assays for the study of inner and outer membrane fusion in living human cells. Inner membrane fusion was more sensitive than outer membrane fusion to inhibition of glycolysis. Fusion of the inner membrane, but not of...

  12. Determination of the genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins from the strains of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa with different virulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗依惠; 严杰; 毛亚飞; 李淑萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the existence of genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of leptospira with different virulence. Methods: Microscope agglutination test (MAT) was applied to detect the agglutination between commercial rabbit antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen and 17 strains of Leptospira interrongans belonging to 15 serogroups and 2 strains of Leptospira biflexa belonging to 2 serogroups. The outer envelopes (OEs) of L.interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar lai strain lai (56601) with strong virulence and serogroup Pomona serovar pomona strain Luo (56608) with low virulence, and L.biflexa serogroup Semaranga serovar patoc strain Patoc I without virulence were prepared by using the method reported in Auran et al.(1972). OMPs in the OEs were obtained by treatment with sodium deoxycholate. SDS-PAGE and western blot were used for analyzing the features of the OMPs on electrophoretic pattern and the immunoreactivity to the antiserum against TR/Patoc I antigen, respectively. Results: All the tested strains belonging to different leptospiral serogroups agglutinated to the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen with agglutination titers ranging from 1:256-1:512. A similar SDS-PAGE pattern of the OMPs from the three strains of leptospira with different virulence was shown and the molecular weight of a major protein fragment in the OMPs was found to be approximately 60 KDa. A positive protein fragment with approximately 32 KDa confirmed by Western blot, was able to react with the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen, and was found in each the OMPs of the three stains of leptospira. Conclusion: There are genus-specific antigens on the surface of L.interrogans and L.biflexa. The OMP with molecular weight of 32 KDa may be one of the genus-specific protein antigens of leptospira.

  13. Determination of the genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins from the strains of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa with different virulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗依惠; 严杰; 毛亚飞; 李淑萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To determine the existence of genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of leptospira with different virulence. Methods: Microscope agglutination test (MAT) was applied to detect the agglutination between commercial rabbit antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen and 17 strains of Leptospira interrongans belonging to 15 serogroups and 2 strains of Leptospira biflexa belonging to 2 serogroups.The outer envelopes (OEs) of L.interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar lai strain lai (56601) with strong virulence and serogroup Pomona serovar pomona strain Luo (56608) with low virulence,and L.biflexa serogroup Semaranga serovar patoc strain Patoc I without virulence were prepared by using the method reported in Auran et al.(1972).OMPs in the OEs were obtained by treatment with sodium deoxycholate. SDS-PAGE and western blot were used for analyzing the features of the OMPs on electrophoretic pattern and the immunoreactivity to the antiserum against TR/Patoc I antigen, respectively. Results:All the tested strains belonging to different leptospiral serogroups agglutinated to the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen with agglutination titers ranging from 1:256-1:512. A similar SDS-PAGE pattern of the OMPs from the three strains of leptospira with different virulence was shown and the molecular weight of a major protein fragment in the OMPs was found to be approximately 60 KDa.A positive protein fragment with approximately 32 KDa confirmed by Western blot,was able to react with the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen, and was found in each the OMPs of the three stains of leptospira.Conclusion: There are genus-specific antigens on the surface of L.interrogans and L.biflexa. The OMP with molecular weight of 32 KDa may be one of the genus-specific protein antigens of leptospira.

  14. Structure, Function and Regulation of Outer Membrane Proteins Involved in Drug Transport in Enterobactericeae: the OmpF/C – TolC Case

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic translocation across membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is a key step for the activity on their specific intracellular targets. Resistant bacteria control their membrane permeability as a first line of defense to protect themselves against external toxic compounds such as antibiotics and biocides. On one hand, resistance to small hydrophilic antibiotics such as ß-lactams and fluoroquinolones frequently results from the « closing » of their way in: the general outer membrane porins...

  15. An ABC transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabona, Maria G; Silverman, Julie M; Sall, Khady M; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Threonine kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein, Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and, apparatus assembly and effector export. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signalling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. PMID:22765374

  16. Outer membrane proteomics of kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli identified MipA as a novel antibiotic resistance-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Dan-feng; Lin, Xiang-min; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a great threat to human health and food safety and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance for combating these bacteria. In the current study, comparative proteomic methodologies were applied to identify Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane (OM) proteins related to kanamycin resistance. Mass spectrometry and western blotting results revealed that OM proteins TolC, Tsx and OstA were up-regulated, whereas MipA, OmpA, FadL and OmpW were down-regulated in kanamycin-resistant E. coli K-12 strain. Genetic deletion of tolC (ΔtolC-Km) led to a 2-fold decrease in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of kanamycin and deletion of mipA (ΔmipA-Km) resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of kanamycin. Changes in the MICs for genetically modified strains could be completely recovered by gene complementation. Compared with the wild-type strain, the survival capability of ΔompA-Km was significantly increased and that of Δtsx-Km was significantly decreased. We further evaluated the role and expression of MipA in response to four other antibiotics including nalidixic acid, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, which suggested that MipA was a novel OM protein related to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25940639

  17. DipA, a pore-forming protein in the outer membrane of Lyme disease spirochetes exhibits specificity for the permeation of dicarboxylates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Thein

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borreliae are highly dependent on the uptake of nutrients provided by their hosts. Our study describes the identification of a 36 kDa protein that functions as putative dicarboxylate-specific porin in the outer membrane of Lyme disease Borrelia. The protein was purified by hydroxyapatite chromatography from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 and designated as DipA, for dicarboxylate-specific porin A. DipA was partially sequenced, and corresponding genes were identified in the genomes of B. burgdorferi B31, Borrelia garinii PBi and Borrelia afzelii PKo. DipA exhibits high homology to the Oms38 porins of relapsing fever Borreliae. B. burgdorferi DipA was characterized using the black lipid bilayer assay. The protein has a single-channel conductance of 50 pS in 1 M KCl, is slightly selective for anions with a permeability ratio for cations over anions of 0.57 in KCl and is not voltage-dependent. The channel could be partly blocked by different di- and tricarboxylic anions. Particular high stability constants up to about 28,000 l/mol (in 0.1 M KCl were obtained among the 11 tested anions for oxaloacetate, 2-oxoglutarate and citrate. The results imply that DipA forms a porin specific for dicarboxylates which may play an important role for the uptake of specific nutrients in different Borrelia species.

  18. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA of Shigella flexneri 2a induces TLR2-mediated activation of B cells: involvement of protein tyrosine kinase, ERK and NF-κB.

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    Rajsekhar Bhowmick

    Full Text Available B cells are critically important in combating bacterial infections and their differentiation into plasma cells and memory cells aids bacterial clearance and long-lasting immunity conferred by essentially all vaccines. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA of Shigella flexneri 2a has been demonstrated to induce the production of IgG and IgA in vivo following immunization of mice through intranasal route, but the direct involvement of B cells in OmpA-mediated immune regulation was not determined. Consequently, we investigated whether OmpA can modulate B cell functions and identified the molecular events involved in OmpA-induced B cell immune response in vitro. We show that OmpA of S. flexneri 2a activates B cells to produce protective cytokines, IL-6 and IL-10 as well as facilitates their differentiation into antibody secreting cells (ASCs. The immunostimulatory properties of OmpA are attributed to the increased surface expression of MHCII and CD86 on B cells. We also report here that B cell activation by OmpA is mediated strictly through recognition by TLR2, resulting in initiation of cascades of signal transduction events, involving increased phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs, ERK and IκBα, leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Importantly, a TLR2 antibody diminishes OmpA-induced upregulation of MHCII and CD86 on B cell surface as well as significantly inhibits B cell differentiation and cytokine secretion. Furthermore, we illustrate that B cell differentiation into ASCs and induction of cytokine secretion by OmpA are dependent on PTKs activity. Moreover, we identify that OmpA-induced B cell differentiation is entirely dependent on ERK pathway, whereas both NF-κB and ERK are essential for cytokine secretion by B cells. Overall, our data demonstrate that OmpA of S. flexneri 2a amplifies TLR signaling in B cells and triggers B cell immune response, which is critical for the development of an effective adaptive immunity to an

  19. Tension Sensitivity of Prestin: Comparison with the Membrane Motor in Outer Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, X.-X.; Iwasa, K H

    2004-01-01

    The membrane motor in outer hair cells undergoes conformational transitions involving charge displacement of ∼0.8 e across the membrane and changes of ∼4 nm2 in its membrane area. Previous reports have established that the charge transfer in the membrane motor and that in prestin, a membrane protein in the plasma membrane of outer hair cells, are approximately equal. Here, we determine the membrane area changes based on its sensitivity to membrane tension. We found that prestin does undergo a...

  20. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  1. Membrane protein structure determination in membrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-09-17

    The two principal components of biological membranes, the lipid bilayer and the proteins integrated within it, have coevolved for specific functions that mediate the interactions of cells with their environment. Molecular structures can provide very significant insights about protein function. In the case of membrane proteins, the physical and chemical properties of lipids and proteins are highly interdependent; therefore structure determination should include the membrane environment. Considering the membrane alongside the protein eliminates the possibility that crystal contacts or detergent molecules could distort protein structure, dynamics, and function and enables ligand binding studies to be performed in a natural setting. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is compatible with three-dimensional structure determination of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayer membranes under physiological conditions and has played an important role in elucidating the physical and chemical properties of biological membranes, providing key information about the structure and dynamics of the phospholipid components. Recently, developments in the recombinant expression of membrane proteins, sample preparation, pulse sequences for high-resolution spectroscopy, radio frequency probes, high-field magnets, and computational methods have enabled a number of membrane protein structures to be determined in lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we illustrate solid-state NMR methods with examples from two bacterial outer membrane proteins (OmpX and Ail) that form integral membrane β-barrels. The ability to measure orientation-dependent frequencies in the solid-state NMR spectra of membrane-embedded proteins provides the foundation for a powerful approach to structure determination based primarily on orientation restraints. Orientation restraints are particularly useful for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins because they provide information about both three-dimensional structure

  2. Evaluation of recombinant outer membrane protein C based indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay for the detection of Salmonella antibodies in poultry

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    Jinu Manoj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of recombinant outer membrane proteinC (rOmpC based enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA for the diagnosis of salmonellosis in poultry. Materials and Methods: Three antigens were prepared, and the indirect ELISA was standardized using the antigens and the antiserum raised in chicken against Omp and rOmpC. Sera were collected from a total of 255 apparently healthy field chickens and screened for the presence of Salmonella antibodies by this ELISA. Results: The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of Omp revealed major polypeptides at 36, 42 and 52 kDa, and the rOmpC was evident by a single protein band of 43 kDa. The Omp and rOmpC antigen revealed an optimum concentration of 78 and 156 ng, respectively, in the assay, while the whole cell antigen gave an optimum reaction at a concentration of 106 organisms/ml. The test was found to be specific as it did not react with any of the antisera of seven other organisms. The developed ELISA detected Salmonella antibodies from 22 (8.62% samples with rOmpC antigen, while 24 (9.41% samples gave a positive reaction with both Omp and whole cell antigens. Conclusion: We suggest rOmpC based indirect ELISA as a suitable screening tool for serological monitoring of poultry flocks.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicle Proteins Induce Human Eosinophil Degranulation via a β2 Integrin CD11/CD18- and ICAM-1-Dependent Mechanism

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    Su Hyuk Ko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, a cytotoxic protein contained in eosinophils granules, can contribute to various inflammatory responses. Although Helicobacter pylori infection increases infiltration of eosinophils, the mechanisms of eosinophil degranulation by H. pylori infection are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of H. pylori outer membrane vesicles (OMVs in modulating eosinophil degranulation. We found that eosinophils treated with H. pylori OMVs released significantly more ECP compared with untreated controls. In addition, eosinophils cocultured with OMV-preexposed primary gastric epithelial cells exhibited significantly increased ECP release. Similarly, eosinophils cocultured with culture supernatant (CM from primary gastric epithelial cells exposed to OMVs (OMV-CM released significantly higher amounts of ECP compared with eosinophils cocultured with CM from unexposed control cells. Furthermore, OMVs and OMV-CM both induced the upregulation of ICAM-1 on gastric epithelial cells and β2 integrin CD11b on eosinophils. In addition, both transduction of ICAM-1 shRNA into gastric epithelial cells and treatment with neutralizing mAbs to CD18 significantly decreased OMV-mediated or OMV-CM-mediated release of ECP. These results suggest that the eosinophil degranulation response to H. pylori OMVs occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on both β2 integrin CD11/CD18 and ICAM-1.

  4. Expression and Comparative Analysis of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Proteins LipL21, LipL32 and OmpL1 in Epidemic Leptospires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Yan ZHANG; Xiao-Kui GUO; Yang YU; Ping HE; Yi-Xuan ZHANG; Bao-Yu HU; Yang YANG; Yi-Xin NIE; Xiu-Gao JIANG; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Leptospiral outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are highly conserved in different species, and play an essential role in the development of new immunoprotection and serodiagnosis strategies. The genes encoding LipL21, LipL32 and OmpL1 were cloned from the complete genome sequence of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai strain Lai and expressed in vitro. Sequence comparison analysis revealed that the three genes were highly conserved among distinct epidemic leptospires, including three major epidemic species Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira borgpetersenii and Leptospira weilii, in China. Immunoblot analysis was further performed to scrutinize 15 epidemic Leptospira reference strains using the antisera of the recombinant OMPs. Both immunoblot assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that these three OMPs were conservatively expressed in pathogenic L. interrogans strains and other pathogenic leptospires.Additionally, the use of these recombinant OMPs as antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)for serodiagnosis of leptospirosis was evaluated. The recombinant LipL32 and OmpL1 proteins showed a high degree of ELISA reactivity with sera from patients infected with L. interrogans strain Lai and other pathogenic leptospires. These results may contribute to the identification of candidates for broad-range vaccines and immunodiagnostic antigens in further research.

  5. Enzymatic methylation of 23-29-kDa bovine retinal rod outer segment membrane proteins. Evidence for methyl ester formation at carboxyl-terminal cysteinyl residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of 23-29-kDa polypeptides in the membranes of bovine rod outer segments are substrates for S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation reactions. The bulk of the methyl group incorporation is in base-labile ester-like linkages, and does not appear to be due to the widespread D-aspartyl/L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase. To determine the site(s) of methylation, 3H-methylated proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate were eluted and digested with papain, leucine aminopeptidase-M, and prolidase. After performic acid oxidation of the digest, a base-labile radioactive material was recovered that coeluted with a synthetic standard of cysteic acid methyl ester upon cation exchange and G-15 gel filtration chromatography, as well as in two thin-layer electrophoresis and two thin-layer chromatography systems. These results provide direct evidence for the methylation of the alpha-carboxyl group of a carboxyl-terminal cysteinyl residue, a modification that has been proposed for the 21-kDa Ha-ras product and other cellular proteins

  6. Outer membrane alterations in multiresistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa selected by ciprofloxacin.

    OpenAIRE

    Legakis, N. J.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.; Makris, A; Kotsifaki, H

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa selected by ciprofloxacin were studied for outer membrane alterations. Acquisition of ciprofloxacin resistance was at least partially related to defects in lipopolysaccharide synthesis. When ciprofloxacin resistance was combined with resistance to beta-lactams and aminoglycosides, several alterations in outer membrane proteins were noted.

  7. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  8. Outer membrane vesicle-mediated release of cytolethal distending toxin (CDT from Campylobacter jejuni

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    Uhlin Bernt

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Background: Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT is one of the well-characterized virulence factors of Campylobacter jejuni, but it is unknown how CDT becomes surface-exposed or is released from the bacterium to the surrounding environment. Results Our data suggest that CDT is secreted to the bacterial culture supernatant via outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released from the bacteria. All three subunits (the CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC proteins were detected by immunogold labeling and electron microscopy of OMVs. Subcellular fractionation of the bacteria indicated that, apart from the majority of CDT detected in the cytoplasmic compartment, appreciable amounts (20-50% of the cellular pool of CDT proteins were present in the periplasmic compartment. In the bacterial culture supernatant, we found that a majority of the extracellular CDT was tightly associated with the OMVs. Isolated OMVs could exert the cell distending effects typical of CDT on a human intestinal cell line, indicating that CDT is present there in a biologically active form. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the release of outer membrane vesicles is functioning as a route of C. jejuni to deliver all the subunits of CDT toxin (CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC to the surrounding environment, including infected host tissue.

  9. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

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    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe

  10. Assessment of antibodies against surface and outer membrane proteins of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krbková, L; Homola, L; Hlaváčová, A; Mikolášek, P; Bednářová, J; Čermáková, Z

    2016-09-01

    To examine evidence of positive antibodies against immunogenic proteins of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in patients with other tick-borne infections and to diagnose possible co-infections, 412 serum specimens were tested by immunoblotting using three specific Anaplasma antigens: surface proteins p44 and Asp62 and outer membrane protein A (OmpA). In total, 284 serum samples from children with Lyme borreliosis and 12 serum samples from children with tick-borne encephalitis were tested. Sera from patients with viral aseptic meningitis (n = 47) and from blood donors (n = 69) were used as controls. Among all serum specimens from patients with tick-borne infections submitted for this study, six samples (2·0%) showed positive IgM reactions and seven samples (2·4%) were IgG positive for A. phagocytophilum by immunoblot. Borderline reactivity was found in 30 samples (10·14%) for IgM and 36 samples (12·2%) for IgG. The difference between patients and blood donors was statistically significant for IgM (P = 0·006) and for IgG (P = 0·0007) antibodies. A statistically significant result was obtained for IgG (P = 0·02) but not for IgM between patients and children with aseptic meningitis. Immunoblot using three specific antigens provides novel information about the positivity of antibodies to A. phagocytophilum in children with other tick-borne infections. Taking into account clinical and laboratory findings of children despite antibody positivity, no case of human granulocytic anaplasmosis was demonstrated. PMID:27180603

  11. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-11-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. PMID:1383156

  12. Enhanced antibody responses to a detoxified lipopolysaccharide-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine are due to synergistic engagement of Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wilbur H; Basu, Subhendu; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Cross, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    When given passively or elicited actively, antibodies induced by a detoxified Escherichia coli Rc chemotype (J5) mutant lipopolysaccharide (J5dLPS)-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP) complex vaccine protected animals from lethal sepsis. The protection from sepsis is believed to be dependent on high levels of antibodies against the core glycolipid (CGL), a region of LPS that is rather conserved among Enterobacteriaceae. The addition of unmethylated deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosine dinucleotide (CpG)-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) was used as an immuno-adjuvant to improve antibody responses. In preparation for a Phase I human trial, we elucidated potential contributions by which the sepsis vaccine (J5dLPS-OMP) and CpG ODN might enhance the antibody response and provide evidence that the generation of immune responses is Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent. Toll-like receptor 2, TLR4, and TLR9 were each essential for generating robust cytokine and antibody responses. The signature cytokine of dendritic cells, interleukin-12, was one of the cytokines that demonstrated synergy with the optimal TLR ligand/ engagement combination. We conclude that the involvement of multiple TLRs upon immunization was critical for the generation of optimal antibody responses. These observations provide further evidence for the inclusion of innate immune-based adjuvants during the development of next-generation vaccines. PMID:19822632

  13. Evaluation of PCR assay for common endogenous plasmid and major outer membrane protein gene of C. trachomatis in diagnosis of follicular conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satpathy Gita

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate polymerase chain reaction (PCR in diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis. Methods: In this study PCR assay was used to amplify the 517bp region of common endogenous plasmid in conjunctival specimens from 178 patients with follicular conjuntivitis, and to amplify the 1000bp region of major outer membrane protein (MOMP gene of C.trachomatis from 71 of these 178 patients. The PCR-amplified products were visualised by agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining and Southern hybridisation with radio-labelled internal probes. The test was compared with a direct immunofluorescence assay using monoclonal antibody for Chlamydia antigen detection. Results: The plasmid PCR assay was positive in 95 (53.37% of the 178 specimens processed whereas the Chlamydia antigen was detected in 69 (38.76% of the 178 specimens by direct immunofluorescence assay (p= 0.005. In the 71 specimens processed for both the PCR assays, plasmid PCR was positive in 52 (73.23% and MOMP PCR was positive in 43 (60.56% of the specimens (p=0.10. Thirty seven of these 71 specimens which were positive in both PCR assays were also positive in direct immunofluorescence assay. Conclusion: The PCR assays could detect Chlamydia in a significantly larger number of specimens than conventional antigen detection assay, and being marginally more sensitive, the plasmid PCR assay has the potential for wider use in the diagnosis of trachoma.

  14. Energy-requiring translocation of the OmpA protein and alkaline phosphatase of Escherichia coli into inner membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoads, D B; Tai, P C; Davis, B D

    1984-01-01

    In developing a reliable in vitro system for translocating bacterial proteins, we found that the least dense subfraction of the membrane of Escherichia coli was superior to the total inner membrane, both for a secreted protein (alkaline phosphatase) and for an outer membrane protein (OmpA). Compounds that eliminated the proton motive force inhibited translocation, as already observed in cells; since protein synthesis continued, the energy for translocation appears to be derived from the energ...

  15. Identification of porins in outer membrane of Proteus, Morganella, and Providencia spp. and their role in outer membrane permeation of beta-lactams.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuyama, J; Hiruma, R; Yamaguchi, A.; Sawai, T

    1987-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia rettgeri, and Providencia alcalifaciens, which were once classified into the same genus, Proteus, were studied. Cefoxitin-resistant mutants from these species were isolated, and it was confirmed that the resistance was attributed to the lack of an outer membrane protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the penetration of hydrophilic cephalosporins through the outer membrane. Comparison of the mutant strains with thei...

  16. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, James P; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S; Lagny, Thibaut J; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-09-22

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  17. Measuring the Energetics of Membrane Protein Dimerization in Mammalian Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lirong; Novicky, Lawrence; Merzlyakov, Mikhail; Hristov, Tihomir; Hristova, Kalina

    2010-01-01

    Thus far, methods that give quantitative information about lateral interactions in membranes have been restricted peptides or simplified protein constructs studied in detergents, lipid vesicles or bacterial membranes. None of the available methods have been extended to complex or full length membrane proteins. Here we show how free energies of membrane protein dimerization can be measured in mammalian plasma membrane-derived vesicles. The measurements, performed in single vesicles, utilize th...

  18. Why do the outer membrane proteins OmpF from E. coli and OprP from P. aeruginosa prefer trimers? Simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niramitranon, Jitti; Sansom, Mark Sp; Pongprayoon, Prapasiri

    2016-04-01

    Porins are water-filled protein channels across the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. They facilitate the uptake of nutrients and essential ions. Solutes are filtered by a constriction loop L3 at the mid of a pore. Porins are heat-stable and resistant to toxic agents and detergents. Most porins are trimer, but no clear explanation why trimeric form is preferable. In this work, we thus studied effects of oligomerization on porin structure and function in microscopic detail. A well-studied OmpF (general porin from Escherichia coli) and well-characterised OprP (phosphate-specific pore from Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are used as samples from 2 types of porins found in gram-negative bacteria. MD simulations of trimeric and monomeric pores in pure water and 1M NaCl solution were performed. With a salt solution, the external electric field was applied to mimic a transmembrane potential. Expectedly, OprP is more stable than OmpF. Interestingly, being a monomer turns OmpF into an anion-selective pore. The dislocation of D113's side chain on L3 in OmpF causes the disruption of cation pathway resulting in the reduction of cation influx. In contrast, OprP's structure and function are less dependent on oligomeric states. Both monomeric and trimeric OprP can maintain their anion selectivity. Our findings suggest that trimerization is crucial for both structure and function of general porin OmpF, whereas being trimer in substrate-specific channel OprP supports a pore function. PMID:26895142

  19. A novel recombinant bivalent outer membrane protein of Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas hydrophila as a vaccine antigen of American eel (Anguilla rostrata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    SongLin, Guo; PanPan, Lu; JianJun, Feng; JinPing, Zhao; Peng, Lin; LiHua, Duan

    2015-04-01

    The immogenicity of a novel vaccine antigen was evaluated after immunized American eels (Anguilla rostrata) with a recombinant bivalent expressed outer membrane protein (OMP) of Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas hydrophila. Three groups of eels were intraperitoneal (i.p) injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS group), formaline-killed-whole-cell (FKC) of A. hydrophila and V. vulnificus (FKC group) or the bivalent OMP (OMP group). On 14, 21, 28 and 42 days post-vaccination respectively, proliferation of the whole blood cells, titers of specific antibody and lysozyme activities of experimental eels were detected. On 28 day post-vaccination, eels from three groups were challenged by i.p injection of live A. hydrophila or V. vulnificus. The results showed that, compared with the PBS group, proliferation of whole blood cells in OMP group was significant enhanced on 28 days, and the serum titers of anti-A.hydrophila and anti-V. vulnificus antibody in eels of FKC and OMP group were significant increased on 14, 21 and 28d. Lysozyme Activities in serum, skin mucus, liver and kidney were significant changed between the three groups. Relative Percent Survival (RPS) after challenged A. hydrophila in KFC vs. PBS group and OMP vs. PBS group were 62.5% and 50% respectively, and the RPS challenged V. vulnificus in FKC and OMP vs. PBS group were 37.5% and 50% respectively. These results suggest that American eels immunized with the bivalent OMP would positively affect specific as well as non-specific immune parameters and protect against infection by the two pathogens in fresh water farming. PMID:25655329

  20. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a Trimeric, Pore-Forming Rare Outer Membrane Protein of Treponema pallidum, Has a Bipartite Domain Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J.; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178–5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprCFl) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprCFl increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprCN), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprCC). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprCC, while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host. PMID:22389487

  1. Architecture of beta-barrel membrane proteins: analysis of trimeric porins.

    OpenAIRE

    Seshadri, K.; Garemyr, R.; Wallin, E.; von Heijne, G; Elofsson, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the known three-dimensional structures of trimeric porins from bacterial outer membranes. The distribution of surface-exposed residues in a direction perpendicular to the membrane is similar to that in helical membrane proteins, with aliphatic residues concentrated in the central 20 A of the bilayer. Outside these residues is a layer of aromatic residues, followed by polar and charged residues. Residues in the trimer interface are more conserved than residues not in the inter...

  2. Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. Results The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 μm, AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05–0.2 μm were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. Conclusion Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  3. Serum Concentrations of Antibodies against Outer Membrane Protein P6, Protein D, and T- and B-Cell Combined Antigenic Epitopes of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Children and Adults of Different Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chun-Zhen; Hu, Wei-Lin; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Li, Jian-Ping; Hong, Li-Quan; Yan, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is one of the most common etiologies of acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, and pneumonia. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are the main focus in new vaccine development against NTHi, as the H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine does not cover noncapsulated NTHi. The OMPs P6 and protein D are the most promising candidate antigens for an NTHi vaccine, and low antibody levels against them in serum may be correlated with infection caused by NTHi. In the current study, we measured the antibody titers against P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined peptide epitopes in healthy individuals of different ages. We found that children B-cell combined antigenic epitopes. Antibody titers increased at ages 1 to 6 months, peaked at 7 months to 3 years, and remained high at 4 to 6 years. The antibody titers started to decrease after 6 years and were the lowest in the 21- to 30-year group. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes in P6 and protein D were positively correlated with those of the protein antigens. Among 12 peptides tested, P6-61, P6-123, and protein D-167 epitopes were better recognized than others in human serum. These findings might contribute to the development of an effective serotype-independent vaccine for H. influenzae. PMID:26677200

  4. Mutant Brucella abortus Membrane Fusogenic Protein Induces Protection against Challenge Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V.; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-01-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In t...

  5. NikR Mediates Nickel-Responsive Transcriptional Repression of the Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins FecA3 (HP1400) and FrpB4 (HP1512)▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Florian D.; Stoof, Jeroen; Horrevoets, Wannie M.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Kusters, Johannes G.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2006-01-01

    The transition metal nickel plays an important role in gastric colonization and persistence of the important human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, as it is the cofactor of the abundantly produced acid resistance factor urease. Nickel uptake through the inner membrane is mediated by the NixA protein, and the expression of NixA is controlled by the NikR regulatory protein. Here we report that NikR also controls the nickel-responsive expression of the FecA3 (HP1400) and FrpB4 (HP1512) outer membra...

  6. Immunization with Recombinant Brucella Species Outer Membrane Protein Omp16 or Omp19 in Adjuvant Induces Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells as Well as Systemic and Oral Protection against Brucella abortus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquevich, Karina A.; Estein, Silvia M.; Samartino, Clara García; Zwerdling, Astrid; Coria, Lorena M.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Available vaccines against Brucella spp. are live attenuated Brucella strains. In order to engineer a better vaccine to be used in animals and humans, our laboratory aims to develop an innocuous subunit vaccine. Particularly, we are interested in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. abortus: Omp16 and Omp19. In this study, we assessed the use of these proteins as vaccines against Brucella in BALB/c mice. Immunization with lipidated Omp16 (L-Omp16) or L-Omp19 in incomplete Freund's adjuvan...

  7. Chemical Composition of Salmon Ovary Outer Membrane and Its Protein Increases Fecal Mucins Content in C57BL/6J and Type 2 Diabetic/Obese KK-Ay Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hayato Maeda; Ryota Hosomi; Utako Chiba; Kenji Fukunaga

    2013-01-01

    Salmon ovary outer membrane (SOM) is a byproduct of the salmon industry; however, the effective utilization of SOM for food materials and supplements is anticipated as the demand for fish and seafood increases worldwide. The purposes of the present study were to assess the chemical composition of SOM, the characteristics of SOM protein (SOMP), and its effects on serum and fecal biochemical parameters in mice. SOM contained high levels of crude protein (61.9 g/100 g) and crude lipid (18.9 g/10...

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong, E-mail: weicando@ipbcams.ac.cn; Jin, Qi, E-mail: zdsys@vip.sina.com

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Outer membrane vesicles – offensive weapons or good Samaritans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs from Gram-negative bacteria were first considered as artifacts and were followed with disbelief and bad reputation. Later, their existence was accepted and they became characterized as bacterial bombs, virulence bullets, and even decoys. Today, we know that OMVs also can be involved in cell–cell signaling/communication and be mediators of immune regulation and cause disease protection. Furthermore, OMVs represent a distinct bacterial secretion pathway selecting and protecting their cargo, and they can even be good Samaritans providing nutrients to the gut microbiota maintaining commensal homeostasis beneficial to the host. The versatility in functions of these nanostructures is remarkable and includes both defense and offense. The broad spectrum of usability does not stop with that, as it now seems that OMVs can be used as vaccines and adjuvants or vehicles engineered for drug treatment of emerging and new diseases not only caused by bacteria but also by virus. They may even represent new ways of selective drug treatment.

  11. Solute Transport Proteins and the Outer Membrane Protein NmpC Contribute to Heat Resistance of Escherichia coli AW1.7▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Lifang; Pleitner, Aaron; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli by comparing the composition of membrane lipids, as well as gene expression, in heat-resistant E. coli AW1.7 and heat-sensitive E. coli GGG10 with or without heat shock. The survival of E. coli AW1.7 at late exponential phase was 100-fold higher than that of E. coli GGG10 after incubation at 60°C for 15 min. The cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of saturated and cyclopropane fat...

  12. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, LolB (HemM), involved in the LolA (p20)-dependent localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuyama, S i; Yokota, N.; Tokuda, H

    1997-01-01

    The Escherichia coli major outer membrane lipoprotein (Lpp) is released from the inner membrane into the periplasm as a complex with a carrier protein, LolA (p20), and is then specifically incorporated into the outer membrane. An outer membrane protein playing a critical role in Lpp incorporation was identified, and partial amino acid sequences of the protein, named LolB, were identical to those of HemM, which has been suggested to play a role in 5-aminolevulinic acid synthesis in the cytosol...

  13. Outer membrane ultrastructure explains the limited antigenicity of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V; Schulz, W W

    1989-03-01

    Freeze fracture and deep etching were used to investigate the ultrastructural basis for the observation that anti-treponemal antibodies bind poorly to the surface of virulent Treponema pallidum. Fractures of T. pallidum outer membranes contained scarce, uniformly sized intramembranous particles (IMPs). IMPs on the convex faces often appeared to form linear arrays that wound in spirals about the organism. In contrast to the outer membrane, IMPs of the cytoplasmic membrane were randomly distributed, numerous, and heterogeneous in size. In Escherichia coli and T. pallidum cofractures, IMPs of the E. coli outer membranes were densely packed within the concave fracture faces, while the T. pallidum fractures were identical to the experiments lacking the E. coli internal controls. Outer membranes of two representative nonpathogenic treponemes, Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter and Treponema denticola, contained numerous IMPs, which segregated preferentially with the concave halves. Examination of apposed replicas and deep-etched specimens indicated that at least some of the IMPs extend through the T. pallidum outer membrane and are exposed on the surface of the organism. The outer membrane of intact T. pallidum appears to contain a paucity of integral membrane proteins that can serve as targets for specific antibodies. These findings appear to represent an unusual parasitic strategy for evasion of host humoral defenses. PMID:2648388

  14. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  15. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome. PMID:24078306

  16. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  17. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  18. The Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane: The Edge of Light and Excitement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The chloroplast is surrounded by a double-membrane envelope at which proteins, ions, and numerous metabolites Including nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates are exchanged between the two aqueous phases, the cytoplasm and the chloroplast stroma. The chloroplast envelope is also the location where the biosynthesis and accumulation of various lipids take place. By contrast to the inner membrane, which contains a number of specific transporters and acts as the permeability barrier, the chloroplast outer membrane has often been considered a passive compartment derived from the phagosomal membrane. However, the presence of galactoglycerolipids and β-barrel membrane proteins support the common origin of the outer membranes of the chloroplast envelope and extant cyanobacteria. Furthermore, recent progress in the field underlines that the chloroplast outer envelope plays important roles not only for translocation of various molecules, but also for regulation of metabolic activities and signaling processes. The chloroplast outer envelope membrane offers various interesting and challenging questions that are relevant to the understanding of organelle biogenesis, plant growth and development, and also membrane biology in general.

  19. TraK and TraB are conserved outer membrane proteins of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV secretion system and are expressed at low levels in wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Bender, Tobias; Kotha, Chaitra; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2014-08-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the medium, and this DNA is effective in transforming other gonococci via natural transformation. In addition, the T4SS is important in the initial stages of biofilm development and mediates intracellular iron uptake in the absence of TonB. To better understand the mechanism of type IV secretion in N. gonorrhoeae, we examined the expression levels and localization of two predicted T4SS outer membrane proteins, TraK and TraB, in the wild-type strain as well as in overexpression strains and in a strain lacking all of the T4SS proteins. Despite very low sequence similarity to known homologues, TraB (VirB10 homolog) and TraK (VirB9 homolog) localized similarly to related proteins in other systems. Additionally, we found that TraV (a VirB7 homolog) interacts with TraK, as in other T4SSs. However, unlike in other systems, neither TraK nor TraB required the presence of other T4SS components for proper localization. Unlike other gonococcal T4SS proteins we have investigated, protein levels of the outer membrane proteins TraK and TraB were extremely low in wild-type cells and were undetectable by Western blotting unless overexpressed or tagged with a FLAG3 triple-epitope tag. Localization of TraK-FLAG3 in otherwise wild-type cells using immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections revealed a single gold particle on some cells. These results suggest that the gonococcal T4SS may be present in single copy per cell and that small amounts of T4SS proteins TraK and TraB are sufficient for DNA secretion. PMID:24914183

  20. The Bilayer Enhances Rhodopsin Kinetic Stability in Bovine Rod Outer Segment Disk Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Corley, Scott C.; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As deter...

  1. Use of the pre-pro part of Staphylococcus hyicus lipase as a carrier for secretion of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A (OmpA) prevents proteolytic degradation of OmpA by cell-associated protease(s) in two different gram-positive bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Meens, J.; Herbort, M. (Mirco); Klein, M.; Freudl, R

    1997-01-01

    Heterologous protein secretion was studied in the gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus carnosus by using the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein OmpA as a model protein. The OmpA protein was found to be translocated across the plasma membrane of both microorganisms. However, the majority of the translocated OmpA was similarly degraded in B. subtilis and S. carnosus despite the fact that the latter organism does not secrete soluble exoproteases into the culture mediu...

  2. Surface display of proteins by Gram-negative bacterial autotransporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourez Michael

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expressing proteins of interest as fusions to proteins of the bacterial envelope is a powerful technique with many biotechnological and medical applications. Autotransporters have recently emerged as a good tool for bacterial surface display. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a passenger domain and a translocator domain that mediates the outer membrane translocation of the passenger. The natural passenger domain of autotransporters can be replaced by heterologous proteins that become displayed at the bacterial surface by the translocator domain. The simplicity and versatility of this system has made it very attractive and it has been used to display functional enzymes, vaccine antigens as well as polypeptides libraries. The recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters have raised several controversial issues with implications for their use as display systems. These issues include the requirement for the displayed polypeptides to remain in a translocation-competent state in the periplasm, the requirement for specific signal sequences and "autochaperone" domains, and the influence of the genetic background of the expression host strain. It is therefore important to better understand the mechanism of translocation of autotransporters in order to employ them to their full potential. This review will focus on the recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters and describe practical considerations regarding their use for bacterial surface display.

  3. Proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Laura; Toloza, Lorena; Giménez, Rosa; Odena, Antonia; Oliveira, Eliandre; Aguilar, Juan; Badia, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a probiotic used for the treatment of intestinal disorders. EcN improves gastrointestinal homeostasis and microbiota balance; however, little is known about how this probiotic delivers effector molecules to the host. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria and have a relevant role in bacteria-host interactions. Using 1D SDS-PAGE and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS analysis we identified in this study 192 EcN vesicular proteins with high confidence in three independent biological replicates. Of these proteins, 18 were encoded by strain-linked genes and 57 were common to pathogen-derived OMVs. These proteins may contribute to the ability of this probiotic to colonize the human gut as they fulfil functions related to adhesion, immune modulation or bacterial survival in host niches. This study describes the first global OMV proteome of a probiotic strain and provides evidence that probiotic-derived OMVs contain proteins that can target these vesicles to the host and mediate their beneficial effects on intestinal function. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000367 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000367). PMID:24307187

  4. An Inner Membrane Protein (Imp) of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola Functions in Carbon Acquisition, EPS Production, Bacterial Motility and Virulence in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gong-you

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes bacterial leaf streak, a devastating disease in rice-growing regions worldwide. A Tn5-insertion mutant in Xoc_3248, encoding an inner membrane protein (Imp), showed reduced virulence in rice. To explore the potential function of this gene in virulence, a deletion mutant R∆imp was constructed in the wild-type RS105. The R∆imp mutant was signiifcantly impaired for bacterial virulence and growth in planta. The mutation in imp made the pathogen insufifciently utilize glucose, fructose, mannose or pyruvate as a sole carbon source, leading to less extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and reduced motility. The deifciencies noted for the mutant were restored to wild-type levels when imp was introduced in trans. Transcription of imp was signiifcantly declined when hrpG and hrpX was mutated and the expression of hrpG and hrpX was also signiifcantly declined when imp was deleted. Cell sublocalization in planta showed Imp membrane-binding feature. These results suggest that Imp is a virulence factor with roles in the catabolism of sugars, EPS production, and bacterial motility.

  5. The molecular mechanism of Zinc acquisition by the neisserial outer-membrane transporter ZnuD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Ing, Christopher; Buckwalter, Carolyn M.; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chieh-Lin Lai, Christine; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Gray-Owen, Scott D.; Pomès, Régis; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2015-08-01

    Invading bacteria from the Neisseriaceae, Acinetobacteriaceae, Bordetellaceae and Moraxellaceae families express the conserved outer-membrane zinc transporter zinc-uptake component D (ZnuD) to overcome nutritional restriction imposed by the host organism during infection. Here we demonstrate that ZnuD is required for efficient systemic infections by the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, Neisseria meningitidis, in a mouse model. We also combine X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechanism of zinc recognition and transport across the bacterial outer-membrane by ZnuD. Because ZnuD is also considered a promising vaccine candidate against N. meningitidis, we use several ZnuD structural intermediates to map potential antigenic epitopes, and propose a mechanism by which ZnuD can maintain high sequence conservation yet avoid immune recognition by altering the conformation of surface-exposed loops.

  6. Filtration properties of bacterial cellulose membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Janika

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has the same molecular formula as cellulose from plant origin, but it is characterized by several unique properties including high purity, crystallinity and mechanical strength. These properties are dependent on parameters such as the bacterial strain used, the cultivation conditions and post-growth processing. The possibility to achieve bacterial cellulose membranes with different properties by varying these parameters could make bacterial cellulose an interesting materi...

  7. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  8. A membrane bending model of outer hair cell electromotility.

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael, R. M.; Popel, A S; Brownell, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for outer hair cell electromotility based on electrically induced localized changes in the curvature of the plasma membrane (flexoelectricity). Electromechanical coupling in the cell's lateral wall is modeled in terms of linear constitutive equations for a flexoelectric membrane and then extended to nonlinear coupling based on the Langevin function. The Langevin function, which describes the fraction of dipoles aligned with an applied electric field, is shown to be ...

  9. Chemical Composition of Salmon Ovary Outer Membrane and Its Protein Increases Fecal Mucins Content in C57BL/6J and Type 2 Diabetic/Obese KK-Ay Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Maeda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmon ovary outer membrane (SOM is a byproduct of the salmon industry; however, the effective utilization of SOM for food materials and supplements is anticipated as the demand for fish and seafood increases worldwide. The purposes of the present study were to assess the chemical composition of SOM, the characteristics of SOM protein (SOMP, and its effects on serum and fecal biochemical parameters in mice. SOM contained high levels of crude protein (61.9 g/100 g and crude lipid (18.9 g/100 g. The protein pattern of SOMP was different from those of fish muscle protein and roe; it was abundant in collagen, as calculated from the hydroxyproline content. In addition, SOMP exhibited lower protein digestibility during in vitro digestion analyses compared with casein. Male C57BL/6J and KK-Ay mice were fed a casein-based semi-purified diet or a diet with replacement of part of the dietary protein (50% by SOMP for four weeks. Mice fed the diet containing SOMP showed elevated fecal nitrogen and mucins contents and reduced levels of serum liver injury markers and fecal ammonia. These results show for the first time that chemical composition of SOM, and SOMP, contain a resistant protein fraction and a large amount of collagen. Therefore, SOM is a potential source of marine collagen and functional food material for promoting the health of the liver and colon.

  10. Secretion of Bacterial Lipoproteins: Through the Cytoplasmic Membrane, the Periplasm and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Zückert, Wolfram R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., grampositive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep pro...

  11. Biological and Immunological Evaluation of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup A Outer Membrane Vesicle as Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Delbaz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup A, is a major cause of bacterial meningitidis outbreaks in Africa and the Middle East. While polysaccharide vaccines have been available for many years, these vaccines have many disadvantages including the induction of T-cell independent responses which do not induce memory responses.Objectives: Thus to overcome this problem, in this research outer membrane vesicle (OMV containing PorA was extracted and evaluated by biological and immunological methods.Materials and Methods: OMVs were extracted with deoxycholate and EDTA, and purification was performed by sequential ultracentrifugation. Physicochemical properties of extracted OMVs were analyzed by electron microscopy and SDS-PAGE. The toxicity of LPS content in its was assayed by LAL test. The Presence of PorA as a major component of OMV was confirmed by western blot. To study antibodies synthesis after immunization with OMV, ELISA method was used. Also serum bactericidal assay (SBA was performed to determine the serum bactericidal activity against N.meningitidis serogroup A.Results: The results revealed that the content of protein extracted was 0.1mg/ml. The electron microscopy showed that intactness of the vesicle in these preparation ranged more than 70%. The SDS-PAGE showed that PorA as a major immunological part of outer membrane vesicle was located in 35-40kDa. LAL test showed that the endotoxin activity was around 126EU/ml which is safe for using. The ELISA test revealed that the IgG total titer was elevated after the first injection. SBA indicates that bactericidal antibodies rise after the second dose of booster.Conclusions: The results showed that the extracted OMVs were conformationally stable, and there were no pyrogenic determinants in OMV. Also the results showed that the OMV elicited high level of specific antibodies against N. meningitidis serogroup A. These results indicate that the OMV obtained here, can be used as a meningococcal

  12. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu, a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway.

  13. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1-Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1-Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  14. Topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, F; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1997-01-01

    The topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria was studied using several approaches. 1. The accessibility of the active site and malonyl-CoA-binding site of the enzyme from the cytosolic aspect of the membrane was investigated using preparations of octanoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA immobilized on to agarose beads to render them impermeant through the outer membrane. Both immobilized ligands were fully able to interact effectively with CPT I. 2. The effects of proteinase K and trypsin on the activity and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I were studied using preparations of mitochondria that were either intact or had their outer membranes ruptured by hypo-osmotic swelling (OMRM). Proteinase K had a marked but similar effect on CPT I activity irrespective of whether only the cytosolic or both sides of the membrane were exposed to it. However, it affected sensitivity more rapidly in OMRM. By contrast, trypsin only reduced CPT I activity when incubated with OMRM. The sensitivity of the residual CPT I activity was unaffected by trypsin. 3. The proteolytic fragments generated by these treatments were studied by Western blotting using three anti-peptide antibodies raised against linear epitopes of CPT I. These showed that a proteinase K-sensitive site close to the N-terminus was accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane. No trypsin-sensitive sites were accessible in intact mitochondria. In OMRM, both proteinase K and trypsin acted from the inter-membrane space side of the membrane. 4. The ability of intact mitochondria and OMRM to bind to each of the three anti-peptide antibodies was used to study the accessibility of the respective epitopes on the cytosolic and inter-membrane space sides of the membrane. 5. The results of all these approaches indicate that CPT I adopts a bitopic topology within the mitochondrial outer membrane; it has two transmembrane domains, and both the N- and C-termini are exposed on the

  15. Packing of transmembrane domain 2 of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A affects oligomerization and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the mitochondrial outer membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenei, Zsuzsanna A; Warren, Gemma Z L; Hasan, Muhammad; Zammit, Victor A; Dixon, Ann M

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sequence-dependence of oligomerization of transmembrane domain 2 (TM2) of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (rCPT1A), to elucidate the role of this domain in the function of the full-length enzyme. Oligomerization of TM2 was studied qualitatively using complementary genetic assays that facilitate measurement of helix-helix interactions in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, and multiple quantitative biophysical methods. The effects of TM2-mutations on oligomerization and malonyl-CoA inhibition of the full-length enzyme (expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris) were quantified. Changes designed to disrupt close-packing of the GXXXG(A) motifs reduced the oligomeric state of the corresponding TM2 peptides from hexamer to trimer (or lower), a reduction also observed on mutation of the TM2 sequence in the full-length enzyme. Disruption of these GXXXG(A) motifs had a parallel effect on the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of rCPT1A, reducing the IC(50) from 30.3 ± 5.0 to 3.0 ± 0.6 μM. For all measurements, wild-type rCPT1A was used as a control alongside various appropriate (e.g., molecular mass) standards. Our results suggest that sequence-determined, TM2-mediated oligomerization is likely to be involved in the modulation of malonyl-CoA inhibition of CPT1A in response to short- and long-term changes in protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions that occur in vivo. PMID:21917985

  16. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The β-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  17. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses. PMID:26948242

  18. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Barker, Clive S; Kostyukova, Alla S; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  19. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Meshcheryakov

    Full Text Available The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants.

  20. Mechanism of bacterial membrane poration by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Mishra, Abhijit

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is a major health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), an important component of mammalian immune system, are thought to utilize non-specific interactions to target common features on the outer membranes of pathogens; hence development of resistance to such AMPs may be less pronounced. Most AMPs are amphiphilic and cationic in nature. Most AMPs form pores in the bacterial membranes causing them to lyse, however, the exact mechanism is unknown. Here, we study the AMP CHRG01 (KSSTRGRKSSRRKK), derived from human β defensin 3 (hBD3) with all Cysteine residues substituted with Serine. Circular Dichorism studies indicate that CHRG01 shows helicity and there is change in helicity as it interacts with the lipid membrane. The AMP was effective against different species of bacteria. Leakage of cellular components from bacterial cells observed by SEM and AFM indicates AMP action by pore formation. Confocal microscopy studies on giant vesicles incubated with AMP confirm poration. The effect of this AMP on model bacterial membranes is characterized using Small Angle X-ray scattering and Fluorescence spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism behind antimicrobial activity.

  1. From Evolution to Pathogenesis: The Link Between β-Barrel Assembly Machineries in the Outer Membrane of Mitochondria and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhih-Hang Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available β-barrel proteins are the highly abundant in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and the mitochondria in eukaryotes. The assembly of β-barrels is mediated by two evolutionary conserved machineries; the β-barrel Assembly Machinery (BAM in Gram-negative bacteria; and the Sorting and Assembly Machinery (SAM in mitochondria. Although the BAM and SAM have functionally conserved roles in the membrane integration and folding of β-barrel proteins, apart from the central BamA and Sam50 proteins, the remaining components of each of the complexes have diverged remarkably. For example all of the accessory components of the BAM complex characterized to date are located in the bacterial periplasm, on the same side as the N-terminal domain of BamA. This is the same side of the membrane as the substrates that are delivered to the BAM. On the other hand, all of the accessory components of the SAM complex are located on the cytosolic side of the membrane, the opposite side of the membrane to the N-terminus of Sam50 and the substrate receiving side of the membrane. Despite the accessory subunits being located on opposite sides of the membrane in each system, it is clear that each system is functionally equivalent with bacterial proteins having the ability to use the eukaryotic SAM and vice versa. In this review, we summarize the similarities and differences between the BAM and SAM complexes, highlighting the possible selecting pressures on bacteria and eukaryotes during evolution. It is also now emerging that bacterial pathogens utilize the SAM to target toxins and effector proteins to host mitochondria and this will also be discussed from an evolutionary perspective.

  2. Complement component C3 fixes selectively to the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Legionella pneumophila and mediates phagocytosis of liposome-MOMP complexes by human monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that parasitizes human monocytes and alveolar macrophages. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that monocyte complement receptors CR1 and CR3 and complement component C3 in serum mediate L. pneumophila phagocytosis. In this study, we have explored C3 fixation to L. pneumophila. We developed a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure C3 fixation to the bacterial surface. By this assay, ...

  3. Protein-Induced Modulation of Chloroplast Membrane Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Machettira, Anu B.; Groß, Lucia E.; Tillmann, Bodo; Weis, Benjamin L.; Englich, Gisela; Sommer, Maik S.; Königer, Martina; Schleiff, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Organelles are surrounded by membranes with a distinct lipid and protein composition. While it is well established that lipids affect protein functioning and vice versa, it has been only recently suggested that elevated membrane protein concentrations may affect the shape and organization of membranes. We therefore analyzed the effects of high chloroplast envelope protein concentrations on membrane structures using an in vivo approach with protoplasts. Transient expression of outer envelope p...

  4. Mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization and remodelling in apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdain, Alexis; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Many human pathologies are associated with defects in mitochondria such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cancer. This tiny organelle is involved in a plethora of processes in mammalian cells, including energy production, lipid metabolism and cell death. In the so-called intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the outer mitochondrial membrane (MOM) is premeabilized by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 members Bax and Bak, allowing the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c from the inter-mem...

  5. The role of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria in antibiotic resistance: Ajax' shield or Achilles' heel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Malcolm G P

    2012-01-01

    There has been an enormous increase in our knowledge of the fundamental steps in the biosynthesis and assembly of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Lipopolysaccharide is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria as is peptidoglycan. Porins, efflux pumps and other transport proteins of the outer membrane are also present. It is clear that there are numerous essential proteins that have the potential to be targets for novel antimicrobial agents. Progress, however, has been slow. Much of the emphasis has been on cytoplasmic processes that were better understood earlier on, but have the drawback that two penetration barriers, with different permeability properties, have to be crossed. With the increased understanding of the late-stage events occurring in the periplasm, it may be possible to shift focus to these more accessible targets. Nevertheless, getting drugs across the outer membrane will remain a challenge to the ingenuity of the medicinal chemist. PMID:23090596

  6. Essential Role of the ESX-5 Secretion System in Outer Membrane Permeability of Pathogenic Mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis S Ates

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show that esx-5 is essential for growth of both Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis. Remarkably, this essentiality can be rescued by increasing the permeability of the outer membrane, either by altering its lipid composition or by the introduction of the heterologous porin MspA. Mutagenesis of the first nucleotide-binding domain of the membrane ATPase EccC5 prevented both ESX-5-dependent secretion and bacterial growth, but did not affect ESX-5 complex assembly. This suggests that the rescuing effect is not due to pores formed by the ESX-5 membrane complex, but caused by ESX-5 activity. Subsequent proteomic analysis to identify crucial ESX-5 substrates confirmed that all detectable PE and PPE proteins in the cell surface and cell envelope fractions were routed through ESX-5. Additionally, saturated transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS was applied to both wild-type M. marinum cells and cells expressing mspA to identify genes that are not essential anymore in the presence of MspA. This analysis confirmed the importance of esx-5, but we could not identify essential ESX-5 substrates, indicating that multiple of these substrates are together responsible for the essentiality. Finally, examination of phenotypes on defined carbon sources revealed that an esx-5 mutant is strongly impaired in the uptake and utilization of hydrophobic carbon sources. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the ESX-5 system is responsible for the transport of cell envelope proteins that are required for nutrient uptake. These proteins might in this way compensate for the lack of Msp

  7. Essential Role of the ESX-5 Secretion System in Outer Membrane Permeability of Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ates, Louis S.

    2015-05-04

    Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S) systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show that esx-5 is essential for growth of both Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis. Remarkably, this essentiality can be rescued by increasing the permeability of the outer membrane, either by altering its lipid composition or by the introduction of the heterologous porin MspA. Mutagenesis of the first nucleotide-binding domain of the membrane ATPase EccC5 prevented both ESX-5-dependent secretion and bacterial growth, but did not affect ESX-5 complex assembly. This suggests that the rescuing effect is not due to pores formed by the ESX-5 membrane complex, but caused by ESX-5 activity. Subsequent proteomic analysis to identify crucial ESX-5 substrates confirmed that all detectable PE and PPE proteins in the cell surface and cell envelope fractions were routed through ESX-5. Additionally, saturated transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) was applied to both wild-type M. marinum cells and cells expressing mspA to identify genes that are not essential anymore in the presence of MspA. This analysis confirmed the importance of esx-5, but we could not identify essential ESX-5 substrates, indicating that multiple of these substrates are together responsible for the essentiality. Finally, examination of phenotypes on defined carbon sources revealed that an esx-5 mutant is strongly impaired in the uptake and utilization of hydrophobic carbon sources. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the ESX-5 system is responsible for the transport of cell envelope proteins that are required for nutrient uptake. These proteins might in this way compensate for the lack of MspA-like porins in slow

  8. Essential Role of the ESX-5 Secretion System in Outer Membrane Permeability of Pathogenic Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Louis S; Ummels, Roy; Commandeur, Susanna; van de Weerd, Robert; van der Weerd, Robert; Sparrius, Marion; Weerdenburg, Eveline; Alber, Marina; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Piersma, Sander R; Abdallah, Abdallah M; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M; Pain, Arnab; Jiménez, Connie R; Bitter, Wilbert; Houben, Edith N G

    2015-05-01

    Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S) systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show that esx-5 is essential for growth of both Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis. Remarkably, this essentiality can be rescued by increasing the permeability of the outer membrane, either by altering its lipid composition or by the introduction of the heterologous porin MspA. Mutagenesis of the first nucleotide-binding domain of the membrane ATPase EccC5 prevented both ESX-5-dependent secretion and bacterial growth, but did not affect ESX-5 complex assembly. This suggests that the rescuing effect is not due to pores formed by the ESX-5 membrane complex, but caused by ESX-5 activity. Subsequent proteomic analysis to identify crucial ESX-5 substrates confirmed that all detectable PE and PPE proteins in the cell surface and cell envelope fractions were routed through ESX-5. Additionally, saturated transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) was applied to both wild-type M. marinum cells and cells expressing mspA to identify genes that are not essential anymore in the presence of MspA. This analysis confirmed the importance of esx-5, but we could not identify essential ESX-5 substrates, indicating that multiple of these substrates are together responsible for the essentiality. Finally, examination of phenotypes on defined carbon sources revealed that an esx-5 mutant is strongly impaired in the uptake and utilization of hydrophobic carbon sources. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the ESX-5 system is responsible for the transport of cell envelope proteins that are required for nutrient uptake. These proteins might in this way compensate for the lack of MspA-like porins in slow

  9. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thöle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL led to reduced binding to 3ʹ-sialyl lactose, sialylated Lea and Lex. A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  10. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  11. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by...

  12. Erythrocyte membrane proteins and membrane skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yiqin; LIU Junfan

    2007-01-01

    Considerable advances in the research field of erythrocyte membrane were achieved in the recent two decades.New findings in the structure-function correlation and interactions of erythrocyte membrane proteins have attracted extensive attention.Interesting progress was also made in the molecular pathogenesis of erythrocyte membrane disorders.Advances in the composition,function and interaction of erythrocyte membrane proteins,erythrocyte membrane skeleton,and relevant diseases are briefly described and summarized here on the basis of domestic and world literatures.

  13. Outer-membrane PapC molecular usher discriminately recognizes periplasmic chaperone-pilus subunit complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dodson, K W; Jacob-Dubuisson, F; Striker, R T; Hultgren, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    P pili are highly ordered composite structures consisting of thin fibrillar tips joined end-to-end to rigid helical rods. The production of these virulence-associated structures requires a periplasmic chaperone (PapD) and an outer membrane protein (PapC) that is the prototype member of a newly recognized class of proteins that we have named "molecular ushers." Two in vitro assays showed that the preassembly complexes that PapD forms with the three most distal tip fibrillar proteins (PapG, Pap...

  14. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  15. The proton motive force drives the outer membrane transport of cobalamin in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbeer, C

    1993-01-01

    Cells of Escherichia coli pump cobalamin (vitamin B12) across their outer membranes into the periplasmic space, and it was concluded previously that this process is potentiated by the proton motive force of the inner membrane. The novelty of such an energy coupling mechanism and its relevance to other outer membrane transport processes have required confirmation of this conclusion by studies with cells in which cobalamin transport is limited to the outer membrane. Accordingly, I have examined...

  16. HmbR outer membrane receptors of pathogenic Neisseria spp.: iron-regulated, hemoglobin-binding proteins with a high level of primary structure conservation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljkovic, I; Larson, J.; Hwa, V; Anic, S; So, M

    1996-01-01

    We have recently cloned and characterized the hemoglobin receptor gene from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. N. meningitidis cells expressing HmbR protein were able to bind biotinylated hemoglobin, and the binding was specifically inhibited by unlabeled hemoglobin and not heme. The HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activity of N. meningitidis cells was shown to be iron regulated. The presence of hemoglobin but not heme in the growth medium stimulated HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activit...

  17. Immunogenicity of Outer Membrane Proteins VirB9-1 and VirB9-2, a Novel Nanovaccine against Anaplasma marginale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Antonino S.; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Jun; Deringer, James R.; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Brown, Wendy C.; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the most prevalent tick-borne livestock pathogen and poses a significant threat to cattle industry. In contrast to currently available live blood-derived vaccines against A. marginale, alternative safer and better-defined subunit vaccines will be of great significance. Two proteins (VirB9-1 and VirB9-2) from the Type IV secretion system of A. marginale have been shown to induce humoral and cellular immunity. In this study, Escherichia coli were used to express VirB9-1 and VirB9-2 proteins. Silica vesicles having a thin wall of 6 nm and pore size of 5.8 nm were used as the carrier and adjuvant to deliver these two antigens both as individual or mixed nano-formulations. High loading capacity was achieved for both proteins, and the mouse immunisation trial with individual as well as mixed nano-formulations showed high levels of antibody titres over 107 and strong T-cell responses. The mixed nano-formulation also stimulated high-level recall responses in bovine T-cell proliferation assays. These results open a promising path towards the development of efficient A. marginale vaccines and provide better understanding on the role of silica vesicles to deliver multivalent vaccines as mixed nano-formulations able to activate both B-cell and T-cell immunity, for improved animal health. PMID:27115492

  18. Efficient activation of T cells by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (HMDCs pulsed with Coxiella burnetii outer membrane protein Com1 but not by HspB-pulsed HMDCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xile

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of Q fever; both coxiella outer membrane protein 1 (Com1 and heat shock protein B (HspB are its major immunodominant antigens. It is not clear whether Com1 and HspB have the ability to mount immune responses against C. burnetii infection. Results The recombinant proteins Com1 and HspB were applied to pulse human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (HMDCs, and the pulsed HMDCs were used to stimulate isogenic T cells. Com1-pulsed HMDCs expressed substantially higher levels of surface molecules (CD83, CD40, CD80, CD86, CD54, and CD58 and a higher level of interleukin-12 than HspB-pulsed HMDCs. Moreover, Com1-pulsed HMDCs induced high-level proliferation and activation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, which expressed high levels of T-cell activation marker CD69 and inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α. In contrast, HspB-pulsed HMDCs were unable to induce efficient T-cell proliferation and activation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Com1-pulsed HMDCs are able to induce efficient T-cell proliferation and drive T cells toward Th1 and Tc1 polarization; however, HspB-pulsed HMDCs are unable to do so. Unlike HspB, Com1 is a protective antigen, which was demonstrated by the adoptive transfer of Com1-pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells into naive BALB/c mice.

  19. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  20. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    OpenAIRE

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr pr...

  1. Structural genomics of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Walian, Peter; Cross, Timothy A.; Jap, Bing K.

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in the fields of membrane-protein molecular biology and biochemistry, technical advances in structural data collection and processing, and the availability of numerous sequenced genomes have paved the way for membrane-protein structural genomics efforts. There has been significant recent progress, but various issues essential for high-throughput membrane-protein structure determination remain to be resolved.

  2. Immunization with recombinant Brucella species outer membrane protein Omp16 or Omp19 in adjuvant induces specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as systemic and oral protection against Brucella abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, Karina A; Estein, Silvia M; García Samartino, Clara; Samartino, Clara García; Zwerdling, Astrid; Coria, Lorena M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Available vaccines against Brucella spp. are live attenuated Brucella strains. In order to engineer a better vaccine to be used in animals and humans, our laboratory aims to develop an innocuous subunit vaccine. Particularly, we are interested in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. abortus: Omp16 and Omp19. In this study, we assessed the use of these proteins as vaccines against Brucella in BALB/c mice. Immunization with lipidated Omp16 (L-Omp16) or L-Omp19 in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) conferred significant protection against B. abortus infection. Vaccination with unlipidated Omp16 (U-Omp16) or U-Omp19 in IFA induced a higher degree of protection than the respective lipidated versions. Moreover, the level of protection induced after U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 immunization in IFA was similar to that elicited by live B. abortus S19 immunization. Flow cytometric analysis showed that immunization with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 induced antigen-specific CD4(+) as well as CD8(+) T cells producing gamma interferon. In vivo depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in mice immunized with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 plus IFA resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that both cell types are mediating immune protection. U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 vaccination induced a T helper 1 response, systemic protection in aluminum hydroxide formulation, and oral protection with cholera toxin adjuvant against B. abortus infection. Both immunization routes exhibited a similar degree of protection to attenuated Brucella vaccines (S19 and RB51, respectively). Overall these results indicate that U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 would be a useful candidate for a subunit vaccine against human and animal brucellosis. PMID:18981242

  3. Role of membrane contact sites in protein import into mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Susanne E.; Rampelt, Heike; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria import more than 1,000 different proteins from the cytosol. The proteins are synthesized as precursors on cytosolic ribosomes and are translocated by protein transport machineries of the mitochondrial membranes. Five main pathways for protein import into mitochondria have been identified. Most pathways use the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) as the entry gate into mitochondria. Depending on specific signals contained in the precursors, the proteins are subse...

  4. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal g...

  5. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Breukink, Eefjan

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated) proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues. PMID:27571111

  6. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Kozjak-Pavlovic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m. Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m. The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection.

  7. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues.

  8. Disrupted yeast mitochondria can import precursor proteins directly through their inner membrane

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Import of precursor proteins into the yeast mitochondrial matrix can occur directly across the inner membrane. First, disruption of the outer membrane restores protein import to mitochondria whose normal import sites have been blocked by an antibody against the outer membrane or by a chimeric, incompletely translocated precursor protein. Second, a potential- and ATP-dependent import of authentic or artificial precursor proteins is observed with purified inner membrane vesicles virtually free ...

  9. Characterising antimicrobial protein-membrane complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are host defence molecules that protect organisms from microbial infection. A number of hypotheses for AMP activity have been proposed which involve protein membrane interactions. However, there is a paucity of information describing AMP-membrane complexes in detail. The aim of this project is to characterise the interactions of amoebapore-A (APA-1) with membrane models using primarily solution-state NMR spectroscopy. APA-1 is an AMP which is regulated by a pH-dependent dimerisation event. Based on the atomic resolution solution structure of monomeric APA-1, it is proposed that this dimerisation is a prerequisite for ring-like hexameric pore formation. Due to the cytotoxicity of APA-1, we have developed a cell-free system to produce this protein. To facilitate our studies, we have adapted the cell-free system to isotope label APA-1. 13C/15N-enriched APA-1 sample was achieved and we have begun characterising APA-1 dimerisation and membrane interactions using NMR spectroscopy and other biochemical/biophysical methods. Neutron reflectometry is a surface-sensitive technique and therefore represents an ideal technique to probe how APA-1 interacts with membranes at the molecular level under different physiological conditions. Using Platypus, the pH-induced APA-1-membrane interactions should be detectable as an increase of the amount of protein adsorbed at the membrane surface and changes in the membrane properties. Specifically, detailed information of the structure and dimensions of the protein-membrane complex, the position and amount of the protein in the membrane, and the perturbation of the membrane phospholipids on protein incorporation can be extracted from the neutron reflectometry measurement. Such information will enable critical assessment of current proposed mechanisms of AMP activity in bacterial membranes and complement our NMR studies

  10. Identification of Major Outer Surface Proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Martin J. G.; Moore, Joanne C.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Wilson, Rebecca; Pribul, Philippa K.; Younes, Zabin N.; Dobson, Richard J; Everest, Paul; Reason, Andrew J.; Redfern, Joanne M.; Greer, Fiona M.; Paxton, Thanai; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Feldman, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify the major outer surface proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), a proteomic analysis was undertaken. An extract of the outer surface proteins was separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The visualized spots were identified through a combination of peptide sequencing and reverse genetic methodologies. Of the 30 major spots identified as S. agalactiae specific, 27 have been identified. Six of these proteins, previously unidentified in S. agalactiae, were ...

  11. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  12. Identification of the interactome between fish plasma proteins and Edwardsiella tarda reveals tissue-specific strategies against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Zaohai; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Peng, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the complex pathogen-host interaction is essential for a comprehensive understanding of how these remarkable agents invade their hosts and how the hosts defend against these invaders. During the infection, pathogens interact intensively with host to enable their survival, which can be revealed through their interactome. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing huge economic loss in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. E. tarda is an ideal model for host-pathogen investigation as it infects fish in three distinct steps: entering the host, circulating through the blood and establishing infection. We adopted a previous established proteomic approach that inactivated E. tarda cells and covalent crosslink fish plasma proteins were used to capture plasma proteins and bacterial outer membrane proteins, respectively. By the combinatorial use of proteomic and biochemical approaches, six plasma proteins and seven outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were identified. Interactions among these proteins were validated with protein-array, far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. At last, seventeen plasma protein-bacteria protein-protein interaction were confirmed to be involved in the interaction network, forming a complex interactome. Compared to our previous results, different host proteins were detected, whereas some of the bacterial proteins were similar, which indicates that hosts adopt tissue-specific strategies to cope with the same pathogen during infection. Thus, our results provide a robust demonstration of both bacterial initiators and host receptors or interacting proteins to further explore infection and anti-infective mechanisms between hosts and microbes. PMID:27458055

  13. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  14. The free energy landscape of dimerization of a membrane protein, NanC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Dunton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are frequently present in crowded environments, which favour lateral association and, on occasions, two-dimensional crystallization. To better understand the non-specific lateral association of a membrane protein we have characterized the free energy landscape for the dimerization of a bacterial outer membrane protein, NanC, in a phospholipid bilayer membrane. NanC is a member of the KdgM-family of bacterial outer membrane proteins and is responsible for sialic acid transport in E. coli. Umbrella sampling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics were employed to calculate the potentials of mean force (PMF for a variety of restrained relative orientations of two NanC proteins as the separation of their centres of mass was varied. We found the free energy of dimerization for NanC to be in the range of -66 kJ mol(-1 to -45 kJ mol(-1. Differences in the depths of the PMFs for the various orientations are related to the shape of the proteins. This was quantified by calculating the lipid-inaccessible buried surface area of the proteins in the region around the minimum of each PMF. The depth of the potential well of the PMF was shown to depend approximately linearly on the buried surface area. We were able to resolve local minima in the restrained PMFs that would not be revealed using conventional umbrella sampling. In particular, these features reflected the local organization of the intervening lipids between the two interacting proteins. Through a comparison with the distribution of lipids around a single freely-diffusing NanC, we were able to predict the location of these restrained local minima for the orientational configuration in which they were most pronounced. Our ability to make this prediction highlights the important role that lipid organization plays in the association of two NanCs in a bilayer.

  15. Mitochondrial Swelling and Incipient Outer Membrane Rupture in Preapoptotic and Apoptotic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sesso, A.; Belizário, JE; Marques, MM; Higuchi, ML; Schumacher, RI; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E.; Kawakami, J.

    2012-01-01

    Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) rupture was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it ruptures. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM ru...

  16. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens Eficácia de bactéria inativada (bacterina), proteína da membrana externa e extrato de fimbrias no controle de infecção experimental por Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) em galinhas

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia C. Menão; Claudete S. Astolfi-Ferreira; Terezinha Knöbl; Antonio J. Piantino Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP) and fimbriae crude extract (FE). The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9) CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were perfor...

  17. Release of outer membrane fragments from wild-type Escherichia coli and from several E. coli lipopolysaccharide mutants by EDTA and heat shock treatments.

    OpenAIRE

    Marvin, H J; ter Beest, M B; Witholt, B

    1989-01-01

    EDTA-induced outer membrane losses from whole cells of wild-type Escherichia coli (O111:B4) and several lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants derived from E. coli K-12 D21 were analyzed. EDTA treatment induced losses of LPS (up to 40%), outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpF/C, and lipoprotein, periplasmic proteins, and phosphatidylethanolamine. The extent of these releases was strain specific. Successively more EDTA was necessary to induce these losses from strains containing LPS with increasing poly...

  18. Fusion of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane in Rats Brown Adipose Tissue: Activation of Thermogenesis by Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca2+ effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca2+ increased the rate of respiration and heat production ...

  19. Construction and Characterization of DNA Vaccine for Major Outer Membrane Protein Gene of Aeromonas hydrophila%嗜水气单胞菌外膜蛋白基因 DNA 疫苗载体的构建及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李盼; 李素一; 吴唯维; 林天龙; 林晨韬; 陈叙

    2013-01-01

    为构建嗜水气单胞菌的 DNA 疫苗载体,根据已发表的该菌外膜蛋白基因 momp 的核苷酸序列设计一对特异性引物,应用 PCR 技术,扩增到嗜水气单胞菌 L316的主要外膜蛋白基因,并插入到真核表达载体 pcDNA3上,构建成 DNA 疫苗,命名为 pcDNA3-POMP 。以纯化的原核表达蛋白 GST-POMP 免疫 SD 大鼠制备抗血清,用 ELISA 测定抗体效价达到1∶100000以上;用 pcDNA3-POM P 质粒转染293细胞,转染48 h 后收集细胞,提取细胞的 RNA 进行 RT-PCR ,检测到外源基因的表达。至此,初步完成嗜水气单胞菌 DNA 疫苗表达载体的构建,为进一步疫苗免疫和效价的检测奠定基础。%For constructing the DNA vaccine , a pair of specific PCR primers were designed according to the nucleotide sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila major outer membrane protein gene published by our lab previously . The PCR products were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA 3 to construct a DNA vaccine named pcDNA3-POMP . SD rats were immunized with purified prokaryotic-expressed protein GST-POMP to make antiserum ,whose antibody titer ,measured by ELISA ,was over 1 ∶ 100 000 .293 cells were transfected with pcDNA3-POMP ,48 hours after transfection ,the cells were collected for total RNA extraction and RT-PCR ,and the expression of exogenous momp were detected .Therefore ,we have constructed a plasmid of DNA vaccine for Aeromonas hydrophila ,vaccination and evaluation of this DNA vaccine will be studied in the future .

  20. Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium outer membrane protein A is recognized by synovial fluid CD8 cells and stimulates synovial fluid mononuclear cells to produce interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 in patients with reactive arthritis and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S; Shasany, A K; Aggarwal, A; Misra, R

    2016-08-01

    In developing countries, one-third of patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (uSpA) are triggered by Salmonella typhimurium. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) of patients with ReA and uSpA proliferate to low molecular weight fractions (lmwf) of outer membrane proteins (Omp) of S. typhimurium. To characterize further the immunity of Omp of Salmonella, cellular immune response to two recombinant proteins of lmwf, OmpA and OmpD of S. typhimurium (rOmpA/D-sal) was assessed in 30 patients with ReA/uSpA. Using flow cytometry, 17 of 30 patients' SF CD8(+) T cells showed significant intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ to Omp crude lysate of S. typhimurium. Of these 17, 11 showed significantly more CD8(+) CD69(+) IFN-γ T cells to rOmpA-sal, whereas only four showed reactivity to rOmpD-sal. The mean stimulation index was significantly greater in rOmpA-sal than rOmpD-sal [3·0 (1·5-6·5) versus 1·5 (1·0-2·75), P interleukin (IL)-17 [28·60 (6·15-510·86) versus 11·84 (6·83-252·62) pg/ml, P 15-241·52) pg/ml, P < 0·05] and IL-6 [59·78 (2·03-273·36) versus 10·17 (0·004-190·19) ng/ml, P < 0·05]. The rOmpA-sal-specific CD8(+) T cell response correlated with duration of current synovitis (r = 0·53, P < 0·05). Thus, OmpA of S. typhimurium is a target of SF CD8(+) T cells and drives SFMC to produce increased cytokines of the IL-17/IL-23 axis which contribute to the pathogenesis of Salmonella-triggered ReA. PMID:27060348

  1. In vivo evidence of TonB shuttling between the cytoplasmic and outer membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ray A; Letain, Tracy E; Postle, Kathleen

    2003-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are able to convert potential energy inherent in the proton gradient of the cytoplasmic membrane into active nutrient transport across the outer membrane. The transduction of energy is mediated by TonB protein. Previous studies suggest a model in which TonB makes sequential and cyclic contact with proteins in each membrane, a process called shuttling. A key feature of shuttling is that the amino-terminal signal anchor must quit its association with the cytoplasmic membrane, and TonB becomes associated solely with the outer membrane. However, the initial studies did not exclude the possibility that TonB was artifactually pulled from the cytoplasmic membrane by the fractionation process. To resolve this ambiguity, we devised a method to test whether the extreme TonB amino-terminus, located in the cytoplasm, ever became accessible to the cys-specific, cytoplasmic membrane-impermeant molecule, Oregon Green(R) 488 maleimide (OGM) in vivo. A full-length TonB and a truncated TonB were modified to carry a sole cysteine at position 3. Both full-length TonB and truncated TonB (consisting of the amino-terminal two-thirds) achieved identical conformations in the cytoplasmic membrane, as determined by their abilities to cross-link to the cytoplasmic membrane protein ExbB and their abilities to respond conformationally to the presence or absence of proton motive force. Full-length TonB could be amino-terminally labelled in vivo, suggesting that it was periplasmically exposed. In contrast, truncated TonB, which did not associate with the outer membrane, was not specifically labelled in vivo. The truncated TonB also acted as a control for leakage of OGM across the cytoplasmic membrane. Further, the extent of labelling for full-length TonB correlated roughly with the proportion of TonB found at the outer membrane. These findings suggest that TonB does indeed disengage from the cytoplasmic membrane during energy transduction and shuttle to the outer membrane

  2. Hydrophobic organization of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, D C; DeAntonio, L.; Eisenberg, D.

    1989-01-01

    Membrane-exposed residues are more hydrophobic than buried interior residues in the transmembrane regions of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This hydrophobic organization is opposite to that of water-soluble proteins. The relative polarities of interior and surface residues of membrane and water soluble proteins are not simply reversed, however. The hydrophobicities of interior residues of both membrane and water-soluble proteins are comparable, whereas the bi...

  3. Bacterial S-layer protein coupling to lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, M.; Wetzer, B.; Pum, D.; Sleytr, U.B.; Cuvillier, N.; Kjær, K.; Howes, P.B.; Lösche, M.

    1999-01-01

    The coupling of bacterial surface (S)-layer proteins to lipid membranes is studied in molecular detail for proteins from Bacillus sphaericus CCM2177 and B. coagulans E38-66 recrystallized at dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayers on aqueous buffer. A comparison of the monolayer str...

  4. Effect of stress on the membrane capacitance of the auditory outer hair cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, K H

    1993-01-01

    The membrane capacitance of the outer hair cell, which has unique membrane potential-dependent motility, was monitored during application of membrane tension. It was found that the membrane capacitance of the cell decreased when stress was applied to the membrane. This result is the opposite of stretching the lipid bilayer in the plasma membrane. It thus indicates the importance of some other capacitance component that decreases on stretching. It has been known that charge movement across the...

  5. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  6. On the mechanism of transport of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laba, Justyna Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The nucleus is usually the biggest, round-shaped organelle in the cell, which contains numerous proteins and nucleic acids and protects the DNA. Nuclear components are contained within the boarders of Nuclear Envelope (NE), a double membrane system, formed by the fusion of Outer Nuclear Membrane (OM

  7. Components of SurA required for outer membrane biogenesis in uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Watts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SurA is a periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase and chaperone of Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to other PPIases, SurA appears to have a distinct role in chaperoning newly synthesized porins destined for insertion into the outer membrane. Previous studies have indicated that the chaperone activity of SurA rests in its "core module" (the N- plus C-terminal domains, based on in vivo envelope phenotypes and in vitro binding and protection of non-native substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we determined the components of SurA required for chaperone activity using in vivo phenotypes relevant to disease causation by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, namely membrane resistance to permeation by antimicrobials and maturation of the type 1 pilus usher FimD. FimD is a SurA-dependent, integral outer membrane protein through which heteropolymeric type 1 pili, which confer bladder epithelial binding and invasion capacity upon uropathogenic E. coli, are assembled and extruded. Consistent with prior results, the in vivo chaperone activity of SurA in UPEC rested primarily in the core module. However, the PPIase domains I and II were not expendable for wild-type resistance to novobiocin in broth culture. Steady-state levels of FimD were substantially restored in the UPEC surA mutant complemented with the SurA N- plus C-terminal domains. The addition of PPIase domain I augmented FimD maturation into the outer membrane, consistent with a model in which domain I enhances stability of and/or substrate binding by the core module. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results confirm the core module of E. coli SurA as a potential target for novel anti-infective development.

  8. Mitochondrial outer membrane forms bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane organelles that move around and change their shapes dynamically. In plants, the dynamics of the outer membrane is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that mitochondria had tubular protrusions of the outer membrane with little or no matrix, called MOPs (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs). Here we show that a MOP can form a bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bridge does not appear to involve the inner membranes. Live imaging revealed stretching of the MOP bridge, demonstrating the flexibility of the outer membrane. Mitochondria frequently undergo fission and fusion. These observations raise the possibility that MOPs bridges have a role in these processes. PMID:27031262

  9. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  10. Immunization with the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis major outer membrane protein by use of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as an adjuvant induces a protective immune response against an intranasal chlamydial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sukumar; Davis, Heather L; Peterson, Ellena M; de la Maza, Luis M

    2002-09-01

    Recently, we have shown that a vaccine consisting of a purified preparation of the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and Freund's adjuvant can protect mice against a genital challenge. Here, we wanted to determine if CpG motifs could be used as an immune modulator to the MOMP to induce protection in mice against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge. One-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly and subcutaneously either once or three times at 2-week intervals with MOMP and CpG suspended in aluminum hydroxide (alum). Negative controls received ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Positive controls were immunized i.n. with C. trachomatis MoPn elementary bodies (EB). Six weeks after the last immunization, mice were challenged i.n. with 10(4) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of the C. trachomatis MoPn serovar. Mice that received MOMP, CpG, and alum had a strong immune response, as shown by a high titer of serum antibodies to Chlamydia and significant lymphoproliferation of T-cells following stimulation with C. trachomatis EB. After the i.n. challenge mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum showed significantly less body weight loss than the corresponding control mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Ten days after the challenge the animals were euthanized, their lungs were weighed, and the numbers of IFU in the lungs were determined. The average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Also, the average number of IFU recovered per mouse immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than the average number of IFU per mouse detected in the mice inoculated with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. In conclusion, our data show that CpG sequences can be used as an effective adjuvant with the C. trachomatis MoPn MOMP to elicit a protective immune response in mice against a chlamydial respiratory

  11. Outer membrane ultrastructure explains the limited antigenicity of virulent Treponema pallidum.

    OpenAIRE

    Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V; Schulz, W W

    1989-01-01

    Freeze fracture and deep etching were used to investigate the ultrastructural basis for the observation that anti-treponemal antibodies bind poorly to the surface of virulent Treponema pallidum. Fractures of T. pallidum outer membranes contained scarce, uniformly sized intramembranous particles (IMPs). IMPs on the convex faces often appeared to form linear arrays that wound in spirals about the organism. In contrast to the outer membrane, IMPs of the cytoplasmic membrane were randomly distrib...

  12. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  13. Phylogenomic analysis supports the ancestral presence of LPS-outer membranes in the Firmicutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Luisa CS; Poppleton, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Criscuolo, Alexis; Dupuy, Bruno; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Beloin, Christophe; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    One of the major unanswered questions in evolutionary biology is when and how the transition between diderm (two membranes) and monoderm (one membrane) cell envelopes occurred in Bacteria. The Negativicutes and the Halanaerobiales belong to the classically monoderm Firmicutes, but possess outer membranes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-OM). Here, we show that they form two phylogenetically distinct lineages, each close to different monoderm relatives. In contrast, their core LPS biosynthesis enzymes were inherited vertically, as in the majority of bacterial phyla. Finally, annotation of key OM systems in the Halanaerobiales and the Negativicutes shows a puzzling combination of monoderm and diderm features. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the LPS-OMs of Negativicutes and Halanaerobiales are remnants of an ancient diderm cell envelope that was present in the ancestor of the Firmicutes, and that the monoderm phenotype in this phylum is a derived character that arose multiple times independently through OM loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14589.001 PMID:27580370

  14. A saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A G; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-04-01

    A limiting factor in membrane protein research is the ability to solubilize and stabilize such proteins. Detergents are used most often for solubilizing membrane proteins, but they are associated with protein instability and poor compatibility with structural and biophysical studies. Here we present a saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system, Salipro, which allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of saposin proteins. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as by the direct solubilization and nanoparticle incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. Our approach facilitated high-resolution structural studies of the bacterial peptide transporter PeptTSo2 by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and allowed us to stabilize the HIV envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  15. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  16. Getting to the Outer Leaflet: Physiology of Phosphatidylserine Exposure at the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Edouard M; Williamson, Patrick L

    2016-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a major component of membrane bilayers whose change in distribution between inner and outer leaflets is an important physiological signal. Normally, members of the type IV P-type ATPases spend metabolic energy to create an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids between the two leaflets, with PS confined to the cytoplasmic membrane leaflet. On occasion, membrane enzymes, known as scramblases, are activated to facilitate transbilayer migration of lipids, including PS. Recently, two proteins required for such randomization have been identified: TMEM16F, a scramblase regulated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+), and XKR8, a caspase-sensitive protein required for PS exposure in apoptotic cells. Once exposed at the cell surface, PS regulates biochemical reactions involved in blood coagulation, and bone mineralization, and also regulates a variety of cell-cell interactions. Exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, PS controls their recognition and engulfment by other cells. This process is exploited by parasites to invade their host, and in specialized form is used to maintain photoreceptors in the eye and modify synaptic connections in the brain. This review discusses what is known about the mechanism of PS exposure at the surface of the plasma membrane of cells, how actors in the extracellular milieu sense surface exposed PS, and how this recognition is translated to downstream consequences of PS exposure. PMID:26936867

  17. Clonging and Expression of Leptospiral Outer Membrane Protein LipL32 Gene and Application of Recombinant Antigen in Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assays%钩端螺旋体外膜脂蛋白LipL32基因的克隆和表达及其在ELISA检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范薇; 于长明; 杨敬; 隋丽华; 战大伟; 贺争鸣; 孙岩松

    2003-01-01

    Objective To construct L32-pQE32 recombinant expression vectors, and to induce the expression of recombinant Leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL32. Establish method of recombinant Leptospiral outer membrane proteinbased ELISA. Method Gene coding of Leptospiral LipL32 protein was amplified by PCR, then recombinant cloning vectors pGEM-T/L32 and expression vectors L32-pQE32 were constructed. Recombinant expression vector was transformed into the competent host E. coli. DH-5α and E. coli. M15. Recombinant Leptospiral LipL32 protein was expressed by IPTG induced method. Immulon microtiter plates were coated at 37℃ overnight with 100 ng of purified recombinant protein per well, 3 positive and 4 negative sera were used in indirect ELISA. Results Mature Leptospiral LipL32 gene fragment about 750 bp was amplified by PCR. LipL32 gene was inserted into expression vectors pQE32, the molecular weight of fusion protein was corresponding to the estimated molecular size of mature Leptospiral LipL32 protein. Results of Western-blot and ELISA demonstrated intense LipL32 reactivity with anti-Leptospira sera. Conclusion findings indicate that recombinant Leptospiral LipL32 may be an important, useful antigen for the serodiagnosis of Leptospira.

  18. Covalently linked hopanoid-lipid A improves outer-membrane resistance of a Bradyrhizobium symbiont of legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silipo, Alba; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Gully, Djamel; Sturiale, Luisa; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joel; Gargani, Daniel; Lee, Hae-In; Kulkarni, Gargi; Busset, Nicolas; Marchetti, Roberta; Palmigiano, Angelo; Moll, Herman; Engel, Regina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Paduano, Luigi; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Chang, Woo-Suk; Holst, Otto; Newman, Dianne K; Garozzo, Domenico; D'Errico, Gerardino; Giraud, Eric; Molinaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are major components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are essential for their growth and survival. They act as a structural barrier and play an important role in the interaction with eukaryotic hosts. Here we demonstrate that a photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium strain, symbiont of Aeschynomene legumes, synthesizes a unique LPS bearing a hopanoid covalently attached to lipid A. Biophysical analyses of reconstituted liposomes indicate that this hopanoid-lipid A structure reinforces the stability and rigidity of the outer membrane. In addition, the bacterium produces other hopanoid molecules not linked to LPS. A hopanoid-deficient strain, lacking a squalene hopene cyclase, displays increased sensitivity to stressful conditions and reduced ability to survive intracellularly in the host plant. This unusual combination of hopanoid and LPS molecules may represent an adaptation to optimize bacterial survival in both free-living and symbiotic states. PMID:25355435

  19. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  20. Bacterial Ortholog of Mammalian Translocator Protein (TSPO) with Virulence Regulating Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapalain, Annelise; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Murillo, Laurence; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10−5 M) adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies. PMID:19564920

  1. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO with virulence regulating activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Chapalain

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5 M adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies.

  2. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO) with virulence regulating activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapalain, Annelise; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Murillo, Laurence; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2009-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5) M) adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies. PMID:19564920

  3. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-06-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to its role in regulating APP transport and processing. LR11 is a type I transmembrane protein and belongs to a novel family of Vps10p receptors. Using a new expression vector, pMTTH (MBP-MCS1 (multiple cloning site)-Thrombin protease cleavage site-MCS2-TEV protease cleavage site-MCS3-His(6)), we successfully expressed, purified and reconstituted the LR11 transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic (CT) domains into bicelles and detergent micelles for NMR structural studies. This new construct allowed us to overcome several obstacles during sample preparation. MBP fused LR11TM and LR11TMCT proteins are preferably expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli membrane, making a refolding of the protein unnecessary. The C-terminal His-tag allows for easy separation of the target protein from the truncated products from the C-terminus, and provides a convenient route for screening detergents to produce high quality 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra. Thrombin protease cleavage is compatible with most of the commonly used detergents, including a direct cleavage at the E. coli membrane surface. This new MBP construct may provide an effective route for the preparation of small proteins with TM domains. PMID:21320603

  4. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  5. HMPAS: Human Membrane Protein Analysis System

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Sung; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins perform essential roles in diverse cellular functions and are regarded as major pharmaceutical targets. The significance of membrane proteins has led to the developing dozens of resources related with membrane proteins. However, most of these resources are built for specific well-known membrane protein groups, making it difficult to find common and specific features of various membrane protein groups. Methods We collected human membrane proteins from the dispersed...

  6. Extra amino group-containing gramicidin S analogs possessing outer membrane-permeabilizing activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Masao; Tanaka, Ryoji; Yamamura, Hatsuo; Yasuda, Keiko; Narita, Shizuto; Umemoto, Hiroshi; Ando, Setsuko; Katsu, Takashi; ヤマムラ, ハツオ; 山村, 初雄

    2003-01-01

    Novel (2S,4R)- and (2S,4S)-4-aminoproline residue-containing analogs of the cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S were synthesized, which exhibited marked permeabilizing activity on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Distinct pathways mediate the sorting of tail-anchored proteins to the plastid outer envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetinder K Dhanoa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tail-anchored (TA proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34 and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie

  8. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD); Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  9. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  10. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides

  11. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baul, Upayan, E-mail: upayanb@imsc.res.in; Vemparala, Satyavani, E-mail: vani@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Kuroda, Kenichi, E-mail: kkuroda@umich.edu [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  12. Phase variation of Opa proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and the effects of bacterial transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Sadarangani; J Claire Hoe; Katherine Makepeace; Peter Van Der Ley; Andrew J Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Opa proteins are major proteins involved in meningococcal colonization of the nasopharynx and immune interactions. Opa proteins undergo phase variation (PV) due to the presence of the 5′-CTCTT-3′ coding repeat (CR) sequence. The dynamics of PV of meningococcal Opa proteins is unknown. Opa PV, including the effect of transformation on PV, was assessed using a panel of Opa-deficient strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Analysis of Opa expression from UK disease-causing isolates was undertaken. Different opagenes demonstrated variable rates of PV, between 6.4 ×10–4 and 6.9 ×10–3 per cell per generation. opa genes with a longer CR tract had a higher rate of PV (r2=0.77, p=0.1212). Bacterial transformation resulted in a 180-fold increase in PV rate. The majority of opagenes in UK disease isolates (315/463, 68.0%) were in the ‘on’ phase, suggesting the importance of Opa proteins during invasive disease. These data provide valuable information for the first time regarding meningococcal Opa PV. The presence of Opa PV in meningococcal populations and high expression of Opa among invasive strains likely indicates the importance of this protein in bacterial colonization in the human nasopharynx. These findings have potential implications for development of vaccines derived from meningococcal outer membranes.

  13. Genetic variation analysis of an outer membrane protein gene of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus%柑橘黄龙病菌亚洲种外膜蛋白基因的遗传变异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿连明; 杜丹超; 程保平; 胡秀荣; 张利平; 陈国庆

    2014-01-01

    ,causing different characteristic symptoms including asymmetric blotchy mottle,vein yellowing or nutrition deficiency on leaves,and red nose”,greening” or deformed shape on fruits.While the infected Murraya exotica usually show no symptoms.Based on the above mentioned facts,it is referred that genetic diversity might exist in populations of Ca. L.asiaticus.The gene sequences of 1 6S rDNA,1 6S-23S rDNA ITS and 23S rDNA of Ca.L.asiaticus have been confirmed to have a high degree of conservation and are not suitable for genetic diversity analysis.The omp gene,an outer membrane protein gene of Gram-negative bacterium,has been demonstrated as a potential candidate gene used for research on the genetic diversity. In this study,genetic variations of omp genes of 18 Ca.L.asiaticus isolates from China and other countries were analyzed aiming to understand the genetic diversity in populations of Ca. L.asiaticus and the effect of geographical source and host species. First,omp genes of Ca.L.asiaticus isolates from seven different geographical regions and 11 different host species in Taizhou of Zhejiang were amplified with special primers OMP5 (5'-GATGATAGGTGCATAAAAGTACAGAAG-3') and OMP3 (5'-AATACCCTTATGGGATACAAAAA-3'). Then, the PCR products were subjected to digestion with restriction enzymes Alu Ⅰ,Apo Ⅰ,Hinf Ⅰ,Rsa Ⅰ,Ssp Ⅰ and Taq Ⅰ respectively,and were separated using agarose gel electrophoresis.To further characterize the omp gene of Ca.L.asiaticus,the PCR products were cloned and sequenced.The sequences of omp genes were submitted to GenBank (JQ928882-JQ928889),and were aligned with software DNAMAN and NCBI Blast.Finally,the phylogenetic tree of Ca.L. asiaticus was constructed by neighbor-joining method using MEGA 5.05. The results showed that the omp genes of Ca.L.asiaticus isolates from different geographical regions yielded different DNA fingerprints,but those from different host species in Taizhou area didnt.Digestion with Rsa Ⅰyielded two distinct RFLP

  14. Calorimetric Studies of Bovine Rod Outer Segment Disk Membranes Support a Monomeric Unit for Both Rhodopsin and Opsin

    OpenAIRE

    Edrington, Thomas C.; Bennett, Michael; Albert, Arlene D.

    2008-01-01

    The photoreceptor rhodopsin is a G-protein coupled receptor that has recently been proposed to exist as a dimer or higher order oligomer, in contrast to the previously described monomer, in retinal rod outer segment disk membranes. Rhodopsin exhibits considerably greater thermal stability than opsin (the bleached form of the receptor), which is reflected in an ∼15°C difference in the thermal denaturation temperatures (Tm) of rhodopsin and opsin as measured by differential scanning calorimetry...

  15. Electrophoretic analysis, labeling and isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellum membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksander F. Sikorski

    2015-01-01

    SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoretic patterns of Chlamydomonas flagellum membrane proteins displayad 6 fractions, 3 PAS-positive among them. The surface radiolabeling of the flagellum membrane suggested an outer surface exposure of fraction '5', and internal localization of fractions '4' and '6'. Application of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and radiolabeled membranes allowed to isolate individual membrane polypeptides.

  16. Electrophoretic analysis, labeling and isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellum membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander F. Sikorski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoretic patterns of Chlamydomonas flagellum membrane proteins displayad 6 fractions, 3 PAS-positive among them. The surface radiolabeling of the flagellum membrane suggested an outer surface exposure of fraction '5', and internal localization of fractions '4' and '6'. Application of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and radiolabeled membranes allowed to isolate individual membrane polypeptides.

  17. Identification of Outer Membrane and Exoproteins of Carbapenem-Resistant Multilocus Sequence Type 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Brinkworth

    Full Text Available Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains have emerged as a cause of life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals (e.g., transplant recipients and critically ill patients. Strains classified as multilocus sequence type (ST 258 are among the most prominent causes of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae infections worldwide, but the basis for the success of this lineage remains incompletely determined. To gain a more comprehensive view of the molecules potentially involved in the success of ST258, we used a proteomics approach to identify surface-associated and culture supernatant proteins produced by ST258. Protein samples were prepared from varied culture conditions in vitro, and were analyzed by a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 193 proteins in outer membrane preparations from bacteria cultured in Luria-Bertani broth (LB or RPMI 1640 tissue culture media (RPMI. Compared with LB, several iron-acquisition proteins, including IutA, HmuR, HmuS, CirA, FepA, FitA, FoxA, FhuD, and YfeX, were more highly expressed in RPMI. Of the 177 proteins identified in spent media, only the fimbrial subunit, MrkA, was predicted to be extracellular, a finding that suggests few proteins (or a limited quantity are freely secreted by ST258. Notably, we discovered 203 proteins not reported in previous K. pneumoniae proteome studies. In silico modeling of proteins with unknown function revealed several proteins with beta-barrel transmembrane structures typical of porins, as well as possible host-interacting proteins. Taken together, these findings contribute several new targets for the mechanistic study of drug-resistance and pathogenesis by ST258 K. pneumoniae isolates.

  18. Recent advances in bacterial heme protein biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Jeffery A.; Dehner, Carolyn A.; Dubois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in genetics, fed by the burst in genome sequence data, has led to the identification of a host of novel bacterial heme proteins that are now being characterized in structural and mechanistic terms. The following short review highlights very recent work with bacterial heme proteins involved in the uptake, biosynthesis, degradation, and use of heme in respiration and sensing.

  19. Bacterial membrane activity of a-peptide/b-peptoid chimeras: Influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the activity against different bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M; Franzyk, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells and...... permeabilization of the bacterial cell envelope, and the outer membrane may act as a barrier in Gram-negative bacteria. The tolerance of S. marcescens to chimeras may be due to differences in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide layer also responsible for its resistance to polymyxin B....... subsequent killing is usually not tested. In this report, six α-peptide/β-peptoid chimeras were examined for the effect of amino acid/peptoid substitutions and chain length on the membrane perturbation and subsequent killing of food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. RESULTS: All six AMP analogues...

  20. 兔多杀性巴氏杆菌外膜蛋白A(OmpA)重组蛋白单克隆抗体的制备及潜在应用%Preparation and Potential Application of Monoclonal Antibody against Pasteurella multocida Outer Membrane Protein A (OmpA) Recombinant Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕; 庞安娜; 韦强; 肖琛闻; 鲍国连; 季权安; 钱微

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare monoclonal antibody (McAb)against Pasteurella multocida. The DNA fragment encoding the mature domain of P. multocida outer membrane protein A (OmpA) was amplified from the genomic DNA and sub-cloned into pET28a (+) expression vector, 37.6 kD rOmpA fusion protein was expressed mainly as an insoluble protein, optimal sohibilization of the recombinant protein was obtained using 8 mol/L urea in lysis buffer. BALB/c mice (Mus musculus) were subcutaneously injected with 100 μg of P. multocida OmpA emulsified by equivolumminal freund's complete adjuvant at the age of 6-8 weeks. Thereafter they were boosted two times with 200 μg of P. multocida OmpA emulsified by Freund's incomplete adjuvant at intervals of three weeks. The spleen cells of BALB/ c mice immunized with recombinant Pm OmpA were collected and infused with SP2/ 0 cell. Sebsequently four hybridoma cell strains were obtained by indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA titers of antibodies in culture supernatant were 1:128,1:128,1:256 and 1:128, respectively, and ascites titers were 1:6 400,1:6 400,1: 12 800 and 1:6 400, respectively. The McAbs did not cross-react with other gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial pathogens, including E. coli, Bordetella bmnchiseptka, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and slaphylococcus. High titer McAbs were secreted from the hybridoma cells after repeat freezing. The result of Western blotting assay showed that the four Mabs could react with Pm OmpA protein specifically. ELISA test revealed that the 2A2 McAb belonged to the subtype of IgG2b, with a concentration was 130 u-g/mL after protein A affinity purification. The purified 2A2 McAb was selected by Western blot and IFA assays. The result indicated that the McAb could react with the Pm isolate strain. The success of this study has built up a solid base for developing a novel diagnostic methodology to the Pasteurella multocida infection in rabbits.%制

  1. Co-evolution of primordial membranes and membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the past several decades have provided major insights into the structural organization of biological membranes and mechanisms of many membrane molecular machines. However, the origin(s) of the membrane(s) and membrane proteins remain enigmatic. We discuss different concepts of the origin and early evolution of membranes, with a focus on the evolution of the (im)permeability to charged molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, and small ions. Reconstruction of the evolution of ...

  2. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  3. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  4. Membrane Protein Structure Determination: Back to the Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yong; Ding, Yi; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables the structures of membrane proteins to be determined in the native-like environment of the phospholipid bilayer membrane. This chapter outlines the methods for membrane protein structural studies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy with samples of membrane proteins incorporated in proteoliposomes or planar lipid bilayers. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from OmpX an...

  5. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  6. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivero Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops. Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  7. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  8. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor Lithgow; Lisa Martin; Hsin-Hui Shen

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of mem...

  9. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  10. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatini Rakshit

    Full Text Available Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organization of rhodopsin from mammalian species. Rod outer segment disc membranes prepared from the cold-blooded frog Xenopus laevis were investigated by atomic force microscopy to visualize the organization of rhodopsin in the absence of lipid phase separation effects. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin nanodomains form similarly as that observed previously in mammalian membranes. Formation of nanodomains in ROS disc membranes is independent of lipid phase separation and conserved among vertebrates.

  11. Membrane tether formation from voltage-clamped outer hair cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Murdock, David R.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Outer hair cells contribute an active mechanical feedback to the vibrations of the cochlear structures resulting in the high sensitivity and frequency selectivity of normal hearing. We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup that combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement during tether elongation is monitored by a quadrant photodetector to obtain time-resolved measurements of the tethering force. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  12. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  13. Unlipidated outer membrane protein Omp16 (U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. as nasal adjuvant induces a Th1 immune response and modulates the Th2 allergic response to cow's milk proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés E Ibañez

    Full Text Available The discovery of novel mucosal adjuvants will help to develop new formulations to control infectious and allergic diseases. In this work we demonstrate that U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. delivered by the nasal route (i.n. induced an inflammatory immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and lung tissues. Nasal co-administration of U-Omp16 with the model antigen (Ag ovalbumin (OVA increased the amount of Ag in lung tissues and induced OVA-specific systemic IgG and T helper (Th 1 immune responses. The usefulness of U-Omp16 was also assessed in a mouse model of food allergy. U-Omp16 i.n. administration during sensitization ameliorated the hypersensitivity responses of sensitized mice upon oral exposure to Cow's Milk Protein (CMP, decreased clinical signs, reduced anti-CMP IgE serum antibodies and modulated the Th2 response in favor of Th1 immunity. Thus, U-Omp16 could be used as a broad Th1 mucosal adjuvant for different Ag formulations.

  14. In-vitro Degradation Behaviour of Irradiated Bacterial Cellulose Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Darwis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose membrane synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in coconut water medium has potential application for Guided bone Regeneration. However, this membrane may not meet some application requirements due to its low biodegradation properties. In this paper, incorporation of gamma irradiation into the membrane is a developed strategy to increase its biodegradability properties. The in–vitro degradation study in synthetic body fluid (SBF of the irradiated membrane has been analyzed during periods of 6 months by means of weight loss, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy observation compared to that the un-irradiated one. The result showed that weight loss of irradiated membrane with 25 kGy and 50 kGy and immersed in SBF solution for 6 months reached 18% and 25% respectively. While un-irradiated membrane did not give significant weight loss. Tensile strength of membranes decreases with increasing of irradiation dose and further decreases in tensile strength is observed when irradiated membrane was followed by immersion in SBF solution. Microscope electron image of cellulose membranes shows that un-irradiated bacterial cellulose membrane consists of dense ultrafine fibril network structures, while irradiation result in cleavage of fibrils network of cellulose. The fibrils network become loosely after irradiated membrane immersed in SBF solution due to released of small molecular weight carbohydrates formed during by irradiation from the structure

  15. In-vitro Degradation Behaviour of Irradiated Bacterial Cellulose Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cellulose membrane synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in coconut water medium has potential application for Guided bone Regeneration. However, this membrane may not meet some application requirements due to its low biodegradation properties. In this paper, incorporation of gamma irradiation into the membrane is a developed strategy to increase its biodegradability properties. The in-vitro degradation study in synthetic body fluid (SBF) of the irradiated membrane has been analyzed during periods of 6 months by means of weight loss, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy observation compared to that the un-irradiated one. The result showed that weight loss of irradiated membrane with 25 kGy and 50 kGy and immersed in SBF solution for 6 months reached 18% and 25% respectively. While un-irradiated membrane did not give significant weight loss. Tensile strength of membranes decreases with increasing of irradiation dose and further decreases in tensile strength is observed when irradiated membrane was followed by immersion in SBF solution. Microscope electron image of cellulose membranes shows that un-irradiated bacterial cellulose membrane consists of dense ultrafine fibril network structures, while irradiation result in cleavage of fibrils network of cellulose. The fibrils network become loosely after irradiated membrane immersed in SBF solution due to released of small molecular weight carbohydrates formed during by irradiation from the structure (author)

  16. Green Modification of Outer Selective P84 Nanofiltration (NF) Hollow Fiber Membranes for Cadmium Removal

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Jie

    2015-10-26

    Outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes are normally made from interfacial polymerization of m-phenylenediamine (MPD) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC). However, the removal of excess MPD solution and the large consumption of alkane solvents are their technical bottlenecks. In this study, green methods to prepare the outer selective TFC hollow fiber membranes were explored by firstly modifying the membrane substrate with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and then by water soluble small molecules such as glutaraldehyde (GA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH). Using P84 polyimide as the substrate, not only do these modifications decrease substrate\\'s pore size, but also vary surface charge by making the membranes less positively charged. As a result, the resultant membranes have higher rejections against salts such as Na2SO4, NaCl and MgSO4. The PEI and then GA modified membrane has the best separation performance with a NaCl rejection over 90% and a pure water permeability (PWP) of 1.74±0.01 Lm−2bar−1h−1. It also shows an impressive rejection to CdCl2 (94%) during long-term stability tests. The CdCl2 rejection remains higher than 90% at operating temperatures from 5 to 60 °C. This study may provide useful insights for green manufacturing of outer-selective nanofiltration (NF) hollow fiber membranes.

  17. Dynamic Structure Formation of Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Morozova, Diana; Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Eukaryotic cells are subdivided into a variety of compartments by membranes, i.e. by lipid bilayers into which a multitude of proteins are embedded. About 30% of all protein species in a cell are associated with membranes to perform vital functions, e.g. in signaling and transport pathways. A plethora of membrane-associated proteins, so-called peripheral membrane proteins, penetrate only one monolayer whereas transmembrane proteins span the entire thickness of a lipid bilayer. ...

  18. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  19. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs, while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles. Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN. The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  20. Identification and characterization of a novel porin family highlights a major difference in the outer membrane of chlamydial symbionts and pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Aistleitner

    Full Text Available The Chlamydiae constitute an evolutionary well separated group of intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of humans as well as symbionts of protozoa. The amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila lacks a homologue of the most abundant outer membrane protein of the Chlamydiaceae, the major outer membrane protein MOMP, highlighting a major difference between environmental chlamydiae and their pathogenic counterparts. We recently identified a novel family of putative porins encoded in the genome of P. amoebophila by in silico analysis. Two of these Protochlamydiaouter membrane proteins, PomS (pc1489 and PomT (pc1077, are highly abundant in outer membrane preparations of this organism. Here we show that all four members of this putative porin family are toxic when expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Immunofluorescence analysis using antibodies against heterologously expressed PomT and PomS purified directly from elementary bodies, respectively, demonstrated the location of both proteins in the outer membrane of P. amoebophila. The location of the most abundant protein PomS was further confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy. We could show that pomS is transcribed, and the corresponding protein is present in the outer membrane throughout the complete developmental cycle, suggesting an essential role for P. amoebophila. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that PomS functions as a porin with anion-selectivity and a pore size similar to the Chlamydiaceae MOMP. Taken together, our results suggest that PomS, possibly in concert with PomT and other members of this porin family, is the functional equivalent of MOMP in P. amoebophila. This work contributes to our understanding of the adaptations of symbiotic and pathogenic chlamydiae to their different eukaryotic hosts.

  1. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A; Enghild, Jan J; Thøgersen, Ida B; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway. PMID:27005013

  2. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis

    OpenAIRE

    Tatini Rakshit; Subhadip Senapati; Satyabrata Sinha; Whited, A. M.; Paul S-H Park

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains) in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organizat...

  3. Actuation of flexoelectric membranes in viscoelastic fluids with applications to outer hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera-Valencia, E. E.; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid crystal flexoelectric actuation uses an imposed electric field to create membrane bending, and it is used by the outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the inner ear, whose role is to amplify sound through generation of mechanical power. Oscillations in the OHC membranes create periodic viscoelastic flows in the contacting fluid media. A key objective of this work on flexoelectric actuation relevant to OHCs is to find the relations and impact of the electromechanical properties of the memb...

  4. Multiscale Simulation of Protein Mediated Membrane Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins interacting with membranes can result in substantial membrane deformations and curvatures. This effect is known in its broadest terms as membrane remodeling. This review article will survey current multiscale simulation methodologies that have been employed to examine protein-mediated membrane remodeling.

  5. Novel Tripod Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Kruse, Andrew C; Gotfryd, Kamil; Rana, Rohini R; Cho, Kyung Ho; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Chandra, Richa; Gether, Ulrik; Guan, Lan; Kobilka, Brian K; Loland, Claus J; Byrne, Bernadette; Gellman, Samuel H

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins play central roles in controlling the flow of information and molecules across membranes. Our understanding of membrane protein structures and functions, however, is seriously limited, mainly due to difficulties in handling and analysing these proteins in aqueous solution....... The use of a detergent or other amphipathic agents is required to overcome the intrinsic incompatibility between the large lipophilic surfaces displayed by the membrane proteins in their native forms and the polar solvent molecules. Here, we introduce new tripod amphiphiles displaying favourable...... behaviours toward several membrane protein systems, leading to an enhanced protein solubilisation and stabilisation compared to both conventional detergents and previously described tripod amphiphiles....

  6. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...... interactions between proteins and lipids. First, interactions of soluble proteins with membranes and specific lipids were studied, using two proteins: Annexin V and Tma1. The protein was first subjected to a lipid/protein overlay assay to identify candidate interaction partners in a fast and efficient way....... Discovered interactions were then probed on the level of the membrane using liposome-based assays. In the second part, a transmembrane protein was investigated. Assays to probe activity of the plasma membrane ATPase (Arabidopsis thaliana H+ -ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2)) in single liposomes using both giant...

  7. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell......Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms to...

  8. Production of Membrane Proteins for NMR Studies Using the Condensed Single Protein Production (cSPP) System

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lili; Tang, Yuefeng; Vaiphei, S. Thangminlal; Shimazu, Tsutomu; Kim, Sung-Gun; Mani, Rajeswari; Fakhoury, Elias; White, Eileen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2009-01-01

    In the Single Protein Production (SPP) method, all E. coli cellular mRNAs are eliminated by the induction of MazF, an ACA-specific mRNA interferase. When an mRNA for a membrane protein, engineered to have no ACA sequences without altering its amino acid sequence, is induced in the MazF-induced cells, E. coli is converted into a bioreactor producing only the targeted membrane protein. Here we demonstrate that three prokaryotic inner membrane proteins, two prokaryotic outer membrane proteins, a...

  9. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents. PMID:25197068

  10. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  11. Optically transparent membrane based on bacterial cellulose/polycaprolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Barud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optically transparent membranes from bacterial cellulose (BC/polycaprolactone (PCL have been prepared by impregnation of PCL acetone solution into dried BC membranes. UV-Vis measurements showed an increase on transparency in BC/PCL membrane when compared with pristine BC. The good transparency of the BC/PCL can be related to the presence of BC nanofibers associated with deposit of PCL nano-sized spherulites which are smaller than the wavelength of visible light and practically free of light scattering. XRD results show that cellulose type I structure is preserved inside the BC/PCL membrane, while the mechanical properties suggested indicated that PCL acts as a plasticizer for the BC membrane. The novel BC/PCL membrane could be used for preparation of fully biocompatible flexible display and biodegradable food packaging.

  12. Impact of bacterial endotoxin on the structure of DMPC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Michael; Brauckmann, Stephan; Moegle-Hofacker, Franzeska; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; Hartmann, Matthias; de Groot, Herbert; Mayer, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are believed to have a toxic effect on human cell membranes. In this study, the influence of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli on the structure, the dynamics and the mechanical strength of phospholipid membranes are monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Model membranes are formed from 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and are either prepared as multilamellar bulk samples or multilamellar vesicles. Field gradient NMR data directly prove the rapid integration of LPS into DMPC membranes. Solid state NMR experiments primarily detect decreasing molecular order parameters with increasing LPS content. This is accompanied by a mechanical softening of the membrane bilayers as is shown by AFM indentation measurements. Altogether, the data prove that lipopolysaccharide molecules quickly insert into phospholipid bilayers, increase membrane fluctuation amplitudes and significantly weaken their mechanical stiffness. PMID:26071197

  13. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles

  14. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barud, Hernane S.; Barrios, Celina; Regiani, Thais; Marques, Rodrigo F.C. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Verelst, Marc; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES, UPR No. 8011 - Universite Toulouse III, B.P. 94347, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Messaddeq, Younes [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil)], E-mail: sidney@iq.unesp.br

    2008-05-01

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles.

  15. A knowledge-based potential highlights unique features of membrane α-helical and β-barrel protein insertion and folding

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Daniel; Davis, Alexander; Nanda, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Outer membrane β-barrel proteins differ from α-helical inner membrane proteins in lipid environment, secondary structure, and the proposed processes of folding and insertion. It is reasonable to expect that outer membrane proteins may contain primary sequence information specific for their folding and insertion behavior. In previous work, a depth-dependent insertion potential, Ez, was derived for α-helical inner membrane proteins. We have generated an equivalent potential for TM β-barrel prot...

  16. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition. PMID:23808339

  17. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  18. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  19. Deletion of lolB, Encoding an Outer Membrane Lipoprotein, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Causes Accumulation of Lipoprotein Localization Intermediates in the Periplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane lipoproteins of Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane upon the formation of a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA, followed by localization to the outer membrane. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that the localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane generally requires an outer membrane lipoprotein, LolB, and occurs via transient formation of a LolB-lipoprotein complex. On the other hand, a mutant carrying the chromosomal lolB gene under the co...

  20. A conformational landscape for alginate secretion across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jingquan [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Rouse, Sarah L. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Li, Dianfan; Pye, Valerie E.; Vogeley, Lutz; Brinth, Alette R.; El Arnaout, Toufic [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Whitney, John C.; Howell, P. Lynne [The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sansom, Mark S. P. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: martin.caffrey@tcd.ie [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-08-01

    Crystal structures of the β-barrel porin AlgE reveal a mechanism whereby alginate is exported from P. aeruginosa for biofilm formation. The exopolysaccharide alginate is an important component of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major pathogen that contributes to the demise of cystic fibrosis patients. Alginate exits the cell via the outer membrane porin AlgE. X-ray structures of several AlgE crystal forms are reported here. Whilst all share a common β-barrel constitution, they differ in the degree to which loops L2 and T8 are ordered. L2 and T8 have been identified as an extracellular gate (E-gate) and a periplasmic gate (P-gate), respectively, that reside on either side of an alginate-selectivity pore located midway through AlgE. Passage of alginate across the membrane is proposed to be regulated by the sequential opening and closing of the two gates. In one crystal form, the selectivity pore contains a bound citrate. Because citrate mimics the uronate monomers of alginate, its location is taken to highlight a route through AlgE taken by alginate as it crosses the pore. Docking and molecular-dynamics simulations support and extend the proposed transport mechanism. Specifically, the P-gate and E-gate are flexible and move between open and closed states. Citrate can leave the selectivity pore bidirectionally. Alginate docks stably in a linear conformation through the open pore. To translate across the pore, a force is required that presumably is provided by the alginate-synthesis machinery. Accessing the open pore is facilitated by complex formation between AlgE and the periplasmic protein AlgK. Alginate can thread through a continuous pore in the complex, suggesting that AlgK pre-orients newly synthesized exopolysaccharide for delivery to AlgE.

  1. A conformational landscape for alginate secretion across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of the β-barrel porin AlgE reveal a mechanism whereby alginate is exported from P. aeruginosa for biofilm formation. The exopolysaccharide alginate is an important component of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major pathogen that contributes to the demise of cystic fibrosis patients. Alginate exits the cell via the outer membrane porin AlgE. X-ray structures of several AlgE crystal forms are reported here. Whilst all share a common β-barrel constitution, they differ in the degree to which loops L2 and T8 are ordered. L2 and T8 have been identified as an extracellular gate (E-gate) and a periplasmic gate (P-gate), respectively, that reside on either side of an alginate-selectivity pore located midway through AlgE. Passage of alginate across the membrane is proposed to be regulated by the sequential opening and closing of the two gates. In one crystal form, the selectivity pore contains a bound citrate. Because citrate mimics the uronate monomers of alginate, its location is taken to highlight a route through AlgE taken by alginate as it crosses the pore. Docking and molecular-dynamics simulations support and extend the proposed transport mechanism. Specifically, the P-gate and E-gate are flexible and move between open and closed states. Citrate can leave the selectivity pore bidirectionally. Alginate docks stably in a linear conformation through the open pore. To translate across the pore, a force is required that presumably is provided by the alginate-synthesis machinery. Accessing the open pore is facilitated by complex formation between AlgE and the periplasmic protein AlgK. Alginate can thread through a continuous pore in the complex, suggesting that AlgK pre-orients newly synthesized exopolysaccharide for delivery to AlgE

  2. Vaccination with attenuated Salmonella enterica Dublin expressing E coli O157:H7 outer membrane protein Intimin induces transient reduction of fecal shedding of E coli O157:H7 in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ferric C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli serogroup O157:H7 has emerged as an important zoonotic bacterial pathogen, causing a range of symptoms from self-limiting bloody diarrhea to severe hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans. Beef and dairy cattle are considered the most important animal reservoirs for this pathogen. One of the important virulence characteristics of E. coli O157:H7 is the eaeA gene encoding the 97 kDa surface protein intimin. Intimin is required for attachment and effacement during the interaction of enterohemorrhagic E. coli with human and bovine neonatal enterocytes. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that an adaptive mucosal immune response directed against intimin will reduce or prevent enteric colonization and fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. Results Cattle were orally inoculated with either milk (control, milk with live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (vector, or milk with live attenuated recombinant S. Dublin expressing intimin (vaccinated on days 0, 14 and 28. On day 98, all calves were challenged orally with E. coli O157:H7 to evaluate whether vaccination with the recombinant S. Dublin expressing intimin would reduce the level of E. coli O157:H7 fecal shedding. During the first 28 days, vaccinated calves shed both the vector strain and the intimin-expressing S. Dublin strain at a similar level. The vector strain was shed for a significantly longer period as compared to the level of recombinant vaccine strain. Calves that received the intimin-expressed vaccine ceased shedding S. Dublin from day 28 to day 63. All calves were challenged with E. coli O157:H7 on day 98 to determine the effect on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7. The amount of E. coli O157:H7 in feces was measured for 30 days post-challenge. We observed a transient clearance of E. coli O157:H7 from the feces in the vaccinated calves. The magnitude of fecal E. coli O157:H7 shedding did not

  3. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Sijbrandi, R.; Kol, M.A.; Swiezewska, E.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced b

  4. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  5. The effect of bacterial cellulose membrane compared with collagen membrane on guided bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung In; An, Sung-Jun; Kang, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effects of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as a barrier membrane on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in comparison with those of the resorbable collagen membranes. MATERIALS AND METHODS BC membranes were fabricated using biomimetic technology. Surface properties were analyzed, Mechanical properties were measured, in vitro cell proliferation test were performed with NIH3T3 cells and in vivo study were performed with rat calvarial defect and histomorphometric analysis was done. The Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used (α<.05). RESULTS BC membrane showed significantly higher mechanical properties such as wet tensile strength than collagen membrane and represented a three-dimensional multilayered structure cross-linked by nano-fibers with 60 % porosity. In vitro study, cell adhesion and proliferation were observed on BC membrane. However, morphology of the cells was found to be less differentiated, and the cell proliferation rate was lower than those of the cells on collagen membrane. In vivo study, the grafted BC membrane did not induce inflammatory response, and maintained adequate space for bone regeneration. An amount of new bone formation in defect region loaded with BC membrane was significantly similar to that of collagen membrane application. CONCLUSION BC membrane has potential to be used as a barrier membrane, and efficacy of the membrane on GBR is comparable to that of collagen membrane. PMID:26816579

  6. DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CRYSTALLIZATION OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G. Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallography is more like an art than science. Crystallizing membrane proteins are a big challenge; membrane proteins are present in the cell membrane and serve as cell support. The most important feature of membrane protein is that it contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions on its surface. They are generally much more difficult to study than soluble proteins. The problem becomes more difficult when trying to obtain crystals to determine the high resolution structures of membrane proteins. We want to utilize this opportunity to briefly examine various approaches for crystallization of membrane proteins. The important factors for determining the success of crystallization experiments for membrane proteins lies in the purification, preparation of membrane samples, the environment in which the crystals are grown and the technique used to grow the crystals. All the X-ray structures of membrane protein are grown from preparations of detergents by different methods developed to crystallize. In this review different techniques for the crystallization of membrane proteins are being described. The cubic phase method also known as in meso method is discussed along with other methods to understand about the crystallization of membrane proteins, its general applicability, salt, detergent and screening effects on crystallization. Low volumes as nano-liter of samples can be used for crystallization. The effects of different detergents on the crystallization of membrane protein, as well as the use of surfactants like polyoxyethylene. Approach based on the detergent complexation to prove the ability of cyclodextrins to remove detergent from ternary mixtures in order to get 2D crystals. Crystallization of membrane proteins using non-ionic surfactants as well as Lipidic sponge phase and with swollen lipidic mesophases is discussed to better understand the crystallization of membrane proteins.

  7. A Flip Turn for Membrane Protein Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane domains in a membrane protein must be recognized and correctly oriented before their insertion into the lipid bilayer. Devaraneni et al. (2011) generate snapshots at different stages of membrane protein biogenesis, revealing a dynamic set of steps that imply an unexpectedly flexible membrane insertion machinery.

  8. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    other kind of nonbiological amphiphilic molecules. An interesting possibility could be the use of self-assembled proteins in a lipid-free membrane mimicking the capside of some viruses. The membrane proteins that have been more actively used in combination with block copolymer membranes are gramicidin A...

  9. Effect of membrane curvature on lateral distribution of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    membrane tubes out of Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). The tube diameter can be tuned by aspirating the GUV into a micropipette for controlling the membrane tension. By using fluorescently labled proteins we have shown that sorting of proteins like e.g. FBAR onto tubes is significantly increased...

  10. A secretory system for bacterial production of high-profile protein targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Vernet, Erik; Hammarström, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli represents a robust, inexpensive expression host for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one major limitation is that certain protein classes do not express well in a biologically relevant form using standard expression approaches in the cytoplasm of E. coli. To...... improve the usefulness of the E. coli expression platform we have investigated combinations of promoters and selected N-terminal fusion tags for the extracellular expression of human target proteins. A comparative study was conducted on 24 target proteins fused to outer membrane protein A (OmpA), outer...... membrane protein F (OmpF) and osmotically inducible protein Y (OsmY). Based on the results of this initial study, we carried out an extended expression screen employing the OsmY fusion and multiple constructs of a more diverse set of human proteins. Using this high-throughput compatible system, we clearly...

  11. Protection against Chlamydia trachomatis infection and upper genital tract pathological changes by vaccine-promoted neutralizing antibodies directed to the VD4 of the major outer membrane protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anja W.; Follmann, Frank; Erneholm, Karin Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    bacterial numbers in vagina and prevention of pathological changes in the upper genital tract. Adoptive transfer of serumand T-cell depletion experiments demonstrated a dominant role for antibodies and CD4+ T cells in the protective immune response. Integrating a multivalent VD4 construct into the sequence...

  12. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J;

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains...... unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root...... and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date....

  13. 钩端螺旋体Loa22外膜蛋白对钩体黏附Raw264.7细胞的阻断作用研究%Interruption of Leptospiral Outer Membrane Protein Loa22 on Leptospira Adherence to Raw264.7 Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连英; 杨正久; 丁朋晓; 曾庆华; 谭立志; 陈琳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the interruption of leptospiral outer membrane protein Loa22 on Leptospira adherence to Raw 264.7 call.Methods Guinea pigs were immunized with leptospiral Loa22 protein or PBS(severing as the control),and then the sera were collected.Fontana silver staining method was used to test the blocking effect of the sera on Leptospira adherence to Raw 264.7 cell.The adherence rate were determined.Results Leptospira adherence to Raw264.7 cell could be markedly inhibited as the sera from the Loa22 protein immunized guinea pigs was diluted by 1 ∶ 200-1∶ 1,600.The adherence rate was ≤0.01%.The adherence was not affected by the sera from the controls.Conclusions Leptospiral outer membrane protein Loa22 can block Leptospira adherence to Raw264.7 cell as well as protect the cell.%目的 研究钩端螺旋体Loa22蛋白血清阻断钩体黏附Raw264.7细胞的情况. 方法 钩体外膜蛋白Loa22、PBS免疫豚鼠后取血清,PBS为对照,使用镀银染色法检测各免疫血清阻止钩体黏附Raw264.7细胞且测定黏附率. 结果 稀释度为1∶200~1∶1 600的Loa22蛋白血清均显著抑制钩体黏附,粘附率≤0.01%.而相应稀释度的对照组血清不影响钩体黏附. 结论 Loa22蛋白可以阻断钩体黏附细胞,对细胞起到保护作用.

  14. Membrane recycling at the infranuclear pole of the outer hair cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasztosi, Csaba; Harasztosi, Emese; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid endocytic activity of outer hair cells (OHCs) in the guinea-pig cochlea has been already studied using the fluorescent membrane marker FM1-43. It was demonstrated that vesicles were endocytosed at the apical pole of OHCs and transcytosed to the basolateral membrane and through a central strand towards the nucleus. The significance of endocytic activity in the infranuclear region is still not clear. Therefore, in this study endocytic activity at the synaptic pole of OHCs was investigated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize dye uptake of OHCs isolated from the guinea-pig cochlea. Signal intensity changes were quantified in the apical and basal poles relative to the signal at the membrane. Data showed no significant difference in fluorescent signal intensity changes between the opposite poles of the OHC. These results suggest that endocytic activities in both the basal and the apical poles contribute equally to the membrane recycling of OHCs.

  15. Bacterial Ortholog of Mammalian Translocator Protein (TSPO) with Virulence Regulating Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chapalain, Annelise; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Murillo, Laurence; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2009-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initial...

  16. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...

  17. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2015-07-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO2 nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  18. Role of outer membrane barrier in efflux-mediated tetracycline resistance of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Thanassi, D. G.; Suh, G S; Nikaido, H

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of tetracycline in Escherichia coli was studied to determine its permeation pathway and to provide a basis for understanding efflux-mediated resistance. Passage of tetracycline across the outer membrane appeared to occur preferentially via the porin OmpF, with tetracycline in its magnesium-bound form. Rapid efflux of magnesium-chelated tetracycline from the periplasm was observed. In E. coli cells that do not contain exogenous tetracycline resistance genes, the steady-state level...

  19. Impact of reducing complement inhibitor binding on the immunogenicity of native neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels-Treffandier, H; Nie, K.; Marsay, L.; Dold, C.; Sadarangani, M.; Reyes-Sandoval, A.; Langford, PR; Wyllie, D; Hill, F; Pollard, AJ; Rollier, CS

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis recruits host human complement inhibitors to its surface to down-regulate complement activation and enhance survival in blood. We have investigated whether such complement inhibitor binding occurs after vaccination with native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs), and limits immunogenicity of such vaccines. To this end, nOMVs reactogenic lipopolysaccharide was detoxified by deletion of the lpxl1 gene (nOMVlpxl1). nOMVs unable to bind human complement factor H (hfH) were gene...

  20. Ultrastructural characteristics of ostrich eggshell: outer shell membrane and the calcified layers

    OpenAIRE

    P.D.G. Richards; P.A. Richards; Lee, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the eggshell of the domestic hen has been well researched and structural studies of other avian species, such as the ostrich, often base their interpretation of egg shell structure on that of the chicken. In the ostrich, lowered hatchability and hatching trauma may be due to shell ultrastructural abnormalities. In the present study the ultrastructure of the calcified portion, and the outer shell membrane (OSM), of domesticated ostrich eggshells was investigated using sta...

  1. Biosynthetic capacity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for outer membrane receptor FpvA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palyzová, Andrea; Valešová, Renata; Marešová, Helena; Kyslík, Pavel

    Zagreb: Croatioan Microbiological Society, Pressum d.o.o, 2009. s. 63-63. [Central European Symposium on Antimicrobial Resistance CESAR 2009. 23.09.2009-26.09.2009, Zadar] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500200703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : P.aeruginosa * outer membrane receptor * FpvA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  2. Intra- and Interspecies Effects of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia on β-Lactam Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Simon; Stremersch, Stephan; Raemdonck, Koen; Braeckmans, Kevin; Devreese, Bart

    2016-04-01

    The treatment ofStenotrophomonas maltophiliainfection with β-lactam antibiotics leads to increased release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are packed with two chromosomally encoded β-lactamases. Here, we show that these β-lactamase-packed OMVs are capable of establishing extracellular β-lactam degradation. We also show that they dramatically increase the apparent MICs of imipenem and ticarcillin for the cohabituating speciesPseudomonas aeruginosaandBurkholderia cenocepacia. PMID:26787686

  3. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-01-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to ...

  4. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Membrane Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A. Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein folding has been one of the great challenges in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. Over the past 50 years, many thermodynamic and kinetic studies have been performed addressing the stability of globular proteins. In comparison, advances in the membrane protein folding field lag far behind. Although membrane proteins constitute about a third of the proteins encoded in known genomes, stability studies on membrane proteins have been impaired due to experimental limitations. Furthermore, no systematic experimental strategies are available for folding these biomolecules in vitro. Common denaturing agents such as chaotropes usually do not work on helical membrane proteins, and ionic detergents have been successful denaturants only in few cases. Refolding a membrane protein seems to be a craftsman work, which is relatively straightforward for transmembrane β-barrel proteins but challenging for α-helical membrane proteins. Additional complexities emerge in multidomain membrane proteins, data interpretation being one of the most critical. In this review, we will describe some recent efforts in understanding the folding mechanism of membrane proteins that have been reversibly refolded allowing both thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. This information will be discussed in the context of current paradigms in the protein folding field.

  5. Detection of apoptosis through the lipid order of the outer plasma membrane leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Zeinab; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Kucherak, Oleksandr A; Richert, Ludovic; Mély, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Cell plasma membranes of living cells maintain their asymmetry, so that the outer leaflet presents a large quantity of sphingomyelin, which is critical for formation of ordered lipid domains. Here, a recently developed probe based on Nile Red (NR12S) was applied to monitor changes in the lipid order specifically at the outer leaflet of cell membranes. Important key features of NR12S are its ratiometric response exclusively to lipid order (liquid ordered vs. liquid disordered phase) and not to surface charge, the possibility of using it at very low concentrations (10-20nM) and the very simple staining protocol. Cholesterol extraction, oxidation and sphingomyelin hydrolysis were found to red shift the emission spectrum of NR12S, indicating a decrease in the lipid order at the outer plasma membrane leaflet. Remarkably, apoptosis induced by three different agents (actinomycin D, camptothecin, staurosporine) produced very similar spectroscopic effects, suggesting that apoptosis also significantly decreases the lipid order at this leaflet. The applicability of NR12S to detect apoptosis was further validated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, using the ratio between the blue and red parts of its emission band. Thus, for the first time, an environment-sensitive probe, sensitive to lipid order, is shown to detect apoptosis, suggesting a new concept in apoptosis sensing. PMID:22846507

  6. Engineered fluorescent proteins illuminate the bacterial periplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorben Dammeyer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial periplasm is of special interest whenever cell factories are designed and engineered. Recombinantely produced proteins are targeted to the periplasmic space of Gram negative bacteria to take advantage of the authentic N-termini, disulfide bridge formation and easy accessibility for purification with less contaminating cellular proteins. The oxidizing environment of the periplasm promotes disulfide bridge formation - a prerequisite for proper folding of many proteins into their active conformation. In contrast, the most popular reporter protein in all of cell biology, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP, remains inactive if translocated to the periplasmic space prior to folding. Here, the self-catalyzed chromophore maturation is blocked by formation of covalent oligomers via interchain disulfide bonds in the oxidizing environment. However, different protein engineering approaches addressing folding and stability of GFP resulted in improved proteins with enhanced folding properties. Recent studies describe GFP variants that are not only active if translocated in their folded form via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat pathway, but actively fold in the periplasm following general secretory pathway (Sec and signal recognition particle (SRP mediated secretion. This mini-review highlights the progress that enables new insights into bacterial export and periplasmic protein organization, as well as new biotechnological applications combining the advantages of the periplasmic production and the Aequorea-based fluorescent reporter proteins.

  7. Ice nucleation protein as a bacterial surface display protein

    OpenAIRE

    Sarhan Mohammed A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Surface display technology can be defined as that phenotype (protein or peptide) which is linked to a genotype (DNA or RNA) through an appropriate anchoring motif. A bacterial surface display system is based on expressing recombinant proteins fused to sorting signals (anchoring motifs) that direct their incorporation on the cell surface.

  8. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP

  9. Mechanistic insight into the TH1-biased immune response to recombinant subunit vaccines delivered by probiotic bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Joseph A; Huang, Chung-Jr; Doody, Anne M; Leung, Tiffany; Mineta, Kaho; Feng, Danielle D; Wayne, Elizabeth C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Leifer, Cynthia; DeLisa, Matthew P; Mendez, Susana; Putnam, David

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccine engineering increasingly focuses on the development of more effective delivery platforms. However, current recombinant vaccines fail to sufficiently stimulate protective adaptive immunity against a wide range of pathogens while remaining a cost effective solution to global health challenges. Taking an unorthodox approach to this fundamental immunological challenge, we isolated the TLR-targeting capability of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria (EcN) by engineering bionanoparticlate antigen carriers derived from EcN outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Exogenous model antigens expressed by these modified bacteria as protein fusions with the bacterial enterotoxin ClyA resulted in their display on the surface of the carrier OMVs. Vaccination with the engineered EcN OMVs in a BALB/c mouse model, and subsequent mechanism of action analysis, established the EcN OMV's ability to induce self-adjuvanted robust and protective humoral and T(H)1-biased cellular immunity to model antigens. This finding appears to be strain-dependent, as OMV antigen carriers similarly engineered from a standard K12 E. coli strain derivative failed to generate a comparably robust antigen-specific TH1 bias. The results demonstrate that unlike traditional subunit vaccines, these biomolecularly engineered "pathogen-like particles" derived from traditionally overlooked, naturally potent immunomodulators have the potential to effectively couple recombinant antigens with meaningful immunity in a broadly applicable fashion. PMID:25426709

  10. Mechanistic insight into the TH1-biased immune response to recombinant subunit vaccines delivered by probiotic bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Rosenthal

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccine engineering increasingly focuses on the development of more effective delivery platforms. However, current recombinant vaccines fail to sufficiently stimulate protective adaptive immunity against a wide range of pathogens while remaining a cost effective solution to global health challenges. Taking an unorthodox approach to this fundamental immunological challenge, we isolated the TLR-targeting capability of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria (EcN by engineering bionanoparticlate antigen carriers derived from EcN outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. Exogenous model antigens expressed by these modified bacteria as protein fusions with the bacterial enterotoxin ClyA resulted in their display on the surface of the carrier OMVs. Vaccination with the engineered EcN OMVs in a BALB/c mouse model, and subsequent mechanism of action analysis, established the EcN OMV's ability to induce self-adjuvanted robust and protective humoral and T(H1-biased cellular immunity to model antigens. This finding appears to be strain-dependent, as OMV antigen carriers similarly engineered from a standard K12 E. coli strain derivative failed to generate a comparably robust antigen-specific TH1 bias. The results demonstrate that unlike traditional subunit vaccines, these biomolecularly engineered "pathogen-like particles" derived from traditionally overlooked, naturally potent immunomodulators have the potential to effectively couple recombinant antigens with meaningful immunity in a broadly applicable fashion.

  11. Sorting pathways of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlke, Kerstin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Martin, Jörg; Horwich, Arthur; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Two distinct pathways of sorting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane proteins are described. In the first pathway, precursor proteins that carry amino-terminal targeting signals are initially translocated via contact sites between both mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. They become proteolytically processed, interact with the 60-kDa heat-shock protein hsp60 in the matrix and are retranslocated to the inner membrane. The sorting of subunit 9 of Neur...

  12. Revolutionizing membrane protein overexpression in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Susan; Klepsch, Mirjam; Gialama, Dimitra; Wickström, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; De Gier, Jan‐Willem

    2010-01-01

    Summary The bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used expression host for overexpression trials of membrane proteins. Usually, different strains, culture conditions and expression regimes are screened for to identify the optimal overexpression strategy. However, yields are often not satisfactory, especially for eukaryotic membrane proteins. This has initiated a revolution of membrane protein overexpression in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that it is feasible to (i) engineer or ...

  13. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 cattle immunoproteome includes outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a modulator of adherence to bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on previous studies, we defined the repertoire of proteins comprising the antigenome of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) supplemented with norepinephrine (NE; O157 protein-antigenome), a beta-adrenergic hormone that regulates E. coli O157 ...

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the TonB-dependent haem outer membrane transporter ShuA from Shigella dysenteriae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ShuA from S. dysenteriae was crystallized in several crystallization conditions containing detergents. Adding heavy atoms during crystallization strongly improved the crystal quality and the resolution limits. Diffraction data were collected at an energy remote from the Pb M absorption edges. As part of efforts towards understanding the crystallization of membrane proteins and membrane transport across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, the TonB-dependent haem outer membrane transporter ShuA of Shigella dysenteriae bound to heavy atoms was crystallized in several crystallization conditions using detergents. The insertion of a His6 tag into an extracellular loop of ShuA, instead of downstream of the Escherichia coli peptide signal, allowed efficient targeting to the outer membrane and the rapid preparation of crystallizable protein. Crystals diffracting X-rays beyond 3.5 Å resolution were obtained by co-crystallizing ShuA with useful heavy atoms for phasing (Eu, Tb, Pb) by the MAD method at the synchrotron, and the SAD or SIRAS method at the Cu wavelength. The authors collected X-ray diffraction data at 2.3 Å resolution using one crystal of ShuA-Pb, and at 3.2 Å resolution at an energy remote from the Pb M absorption edges for phasing on PROXIMA-1 at SOLEIL

  15. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong‑Woon Yu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  16. Antimicrobial Bacterial Cellulose-Silver Nanoparticles Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernane S. Barud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial bacterial cellulose-silver nanoparticles composite membranes have been obtained by “in situ” preparation of Ag nanoparticles from hydrolytic decomposition of silver nitrate solution using triethanolamine as reducing and complexing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by the X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and absorption in the UV-Visible (350 nm to 600 nm. Thermal and mechanical properties together with swelling behavior for water were considered. TEA concentration was observed to be important in order to obtain only Ag particles and not a mixture of silver oxides. It was also observed to control particle size and amount of silver contents in bacterial cellulose. The composite membranes exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  17. Electrically conductive bacterial cellulose composite membranes produced by the incorporation of graphite nanoplatelets in pristine bacterial cellulose membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs were utilized to improve the electrical conductivity of pristine bacterial cellulose (BC membranes. By physical and chemical methods, flake-shaped GNPs, weaving through the surface layer of web-like cellulose nanofibrils, were indeed fixed or trapped by the adjacent nanofibrils in the BC surface network, for comparison, rod-shaped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were homogeneously inserted into BC membrane through the pore structures and tunnels within the BC membrane. Strong physical and chemical interaction exists between the BC nanofibrils and the particles of GNP or MWCNT even after 15 h sonication. BC membrane with 8.7 wt% incorporated GNPs reached the maximum electrical conductivity of 4.5 S/cm, while 13.9 wt% MWCNT/BC composite membrane achieved the maximum electrical conductivity of 1.2 S/cm. Compared with one dimensional (1-D MWCNTs, as long as GNPs inserted into BC membranes, the 2-D reinforcement of GNPs was proven to be more effective in improving the electrical conductivity of BC membranes thus not only break the bottleneck of further improvement of the electrical conductivity of BC-based composite membranes but also broaden the applications of BC and GNPs.

  18. Development of a cost-effective vaccine candidate with outer membrane vesicles of a tolA-disrupted Shigella boydii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soma; Sinha, Ritam; Mitobe, Jiro; Koley, Hemanta

    2016-04-01

    Our previous studies on outer membrane vesicles based vaccine development against shigellosis, revealed the inability of Shigella to release significant amount of vesicles naturally, during growth. Disruption of tolA, one of the genes of the Tol-Pal system of Gram negative bacterial membrane, has increased the vesicle release rate of a Shigella boydii type 4 strain to approximately 60% higher. We also noticed the vesicles, released from tolA-disrupted strain captured more OmpA protein and lipopolysaccharide, compared to the vesicles released from its wild type prototype. Six to seven weeks old BALB/c mice, immunized with 25μg of three oral doses of the vesicles, released by tolA mutant, conferred 100% protection against lethal homologous challenge through nasal route, compared to only 60% protection after the same dose of wild type immunogen. Mice, immunized with the vesicles from tolA-mutant, manifested significant secretion of mucosal IgG and IgA. A sharp and significant response of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ) were also observed in the lung lavage of these groups of mice, within 6h post challenge; but at 24h, these inflammatory cytokines showed the sign of subsidence and the system was taken over by the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Studies with naïve peritoneal macrophages, proved further, the potency of these vesicles to stimulate nitric oxide and TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-6 and IL-10 productions in-vitro. The ability of these vesicles to trigger polarization of CD4(+) T cells toward Th1 adaptive immune response, had also been observed along with the presence of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the system. Our study demonstrated, the vesicles from tolA-disrupted Shigella were able to suppress Shigella-mediated inflammation in the host and could balance between inflammation and anti-inflammation, promoting better survival and health of the infected mice. Outer membrane vesicles from tolA-mutant, could be a potential

  19. Membrane fatty acids as markers of bacterial antibiotic-producers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elhottová, Dana; Petrásek, Jiří; Krištůfek, Václav; Jágr, Michal; Chroňáková, Alica; Petříček, Miroslav

    Cairns : International Society for Microbial Ecology, 2008. [International Symposium on Microbial Ecology ISME 12. Microbial Diversity - Sustaining the Blue Planet /12./. 17.08.2008-22.08.2008, Cairns] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600660607; GA MŠk 2B06154 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : membrane fatty acids * bacterial antibiotic -producers * microorganisms Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  20. Antimicrobial Bacterial Cellulose-Silver Nanoparticles Composite Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Barud, Hernane S.; Thaís Regiani; Rodrigo F. C. Marques; Wilton R. Lustri; Younes Messaddeq; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial bacterial cellulose-silver nanoparticles composite membranes have been obtained by “in situ” preparation of Ag nanoparticles from hydrolytic decomposition of silver nitrate solution using triethanolamine as reducing and complexing agent. The formation of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by the X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and absorption in the UV-Visible (350 nm to 600 nm). Thermal and mechanical properties toge...

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-soluble mutant of the outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two crystal forms obtained under two different conditions were collected to 2.8 and 3.0 Å resolution and processed in space groups P43212 and C2, respectively. The outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE functions in stress response by activating the Cpx signal transduction pathway. The nonlipidated Cys1Ala mutant of NlpE with a C-terminal His tag from Escherichia coli was constructed, overexpressed and purified. Crystals of NlpE were grown in two distinct forms by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 298 K. The tetragonal crystals diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belong to space group P43212. The monoclinic crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and belong to space group C2. Initial phases were obtained from a tetragonal crystal of selenomethionylated protein by the MAD method

  2. Actuation of flexoelectric membranes in viscoelastic fluids with applications to outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Valencia, E E; Rey, Alejandro D

    2014-11-28

    Liquid crystal flexoelectric actuation uses an imposed electric field to create membrane bending, and it is used by the outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the inner ear, whose role is to amplify sound through generation of mechanical power. Oscillations in the OHC membranes create periodic viscoelastic flows in the contacting fluid media. A key objective of this work on flexoelectric actuation relevant to OHCs is to find the relations and impact of the electromechanical properties of the membrane, the rheological properties of the viscoelastic media, and the frequency response of the generated mechanical power output. The model developed and used in this work is based on the integration of: (i) the flexoelectric membrane shape equation applied to a circular membrane attached to the inner surface of a circular capillary and (ii) the coupled capillary flow of contacting viscoelastic phases, such that the membrane flexoelectric oscillations drive periodic viscoelastic capillary flows, as in OHCs. By applying the Fourier transform formalism to the governing equation, analytical expressions for the transfer function associated with the curvature and electrical field and for the power dissipation of elastic storage energy were found. PMID:25332388

  3. Guillain-Barré综合征患者空肠弯曲菌的主要外膜蛋白基因的分子分型%Molecular typing of the major outer membrane protein gene ofCampylobacterjejuni isolates from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建军; 徐军; 西村公孝; 齐田孝彦

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study thd momecular typing of the major outer membrane protein gene(momp) of Campylobacter jejuni(C.jejuni). Methods: The C. jejuni major outer membrane protein gene was arnplified by PCR from a total of 163 strains. AfterHind Ⅲ , HaeⅢ, Mbo Ⅱ and HhaI restriction enzyme digestions, the digest was analyzed by electrophoresis, and then comparedwith heat-stable(HS) serotype and PCR-based restriction fragnent length polymorphism(RFLP) typing of flagellin A gene (flaA). Results: Eight distinct momp RFLP genotypes were observed. Among all of them, one major type (momp-3) accounted for61% of all isolates. All 34 HS-19:Cj(fla)-1 strains,including isolates from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome(GBS) and en-teritis,belonged to a single genotype(momp-1). Conclusion: The HS-19:Cj(fla)-1 :momp-1 strain is distinctive among C.jejunistains,and HS-19 related GBS may be an excellent model to elucidate the pathogenesis of GBS.%目的:研究空肠弯曲菌(Cj)的主要外膜蛋白(momp)基因的分子分型。方法:采用PCR方法对163株空肠弯曲菌的主要外膜蛋白基因进行扩增,用HindⅢ,HaeⅢ,MboⅡ和HhaI四种内切酶消化后进行电泳分析,并与热稳定性血清型(HS)和鞭毛蛋白A基因(flagellin A gene,fal A)分型方法相比较。结果:共观察到8种不同的主要外膜蛋白的限制性片段长度多态性的基因型,其中主要外膜蛋白基因-3(momp-3)占61%。Guillain-Barré综合征(GBS)和腹泻患者所有34株HS-19:Cj(fla)-1菌株均属同一个单一基因型,即主要外膜蛋白基因-1(momp-1)。结论:HS-19:Cj(fla)-1:momp-1菌株是空肠弯曲菌的一个特殊类型,与HS-19相关的GBS可能是阐明GBS发病机制最好的模型。

  4. Transcriptional regulation of the outer membrane porin gene ompW reveals its physiological role during the transition from the aerobic to the anaerobic lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfeng eXiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in E. coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  5. Bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin membranes for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuyu; Qiu, Liying; Cui, Jing; Wei, Qufu

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin (BC-Vac) membranes were successfully produced in large scale. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinum. BC-Vac membranes were prepared by immersing BC in vaccarin solution. The surface morphologies of BC and BC-Vac membranes were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscopy (AFM). The images showed that BC-Vac exhibited the characteristic 3D nanofibrillar network of BC matrix but there was adhesion between fibers. The mechanical properties of BC and BC-Vac membranes were evaluated and the results indicated that the adding of drug vaccarin into the BC membranes increased the malleability indicated by the increment in elongation at break compared with BC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was conducted to confirm the incorporation of vaccarin in BC-Vac and investigate the hydroxyl interactions between BC and drug vaccarin. Cell viability and cell attachment studies demonstrated that BC and BC-Vac membranes had no cytotoxicity and could be a good carrier for cell growth. The wound healing performance was examined in vivo by rat skin models. Histological observations revealed that wounds treated with BC-Vac epithelialized and regenerated faster than treated with BC. Therefore, BC-Vac was considered as a potential candidate for wound dressing materials. PMID:26652377

  6. Resistance of a vaccinia virus A34R deletion mutant to spontaneous rupture of the outer membrane of progeny virions on the surface of infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extracellular form of vaccinia virus is referred to as an enveloped virion (EV) because it contains an additional lipoprotein membrane surrounding the infectious mature virion (MV) that must be discarded prior to cell fusion and entry. Most EVs adhere to the surface of the parent cell and mediate spread of the infection to adjacent cells. Here we show that some attached EVs have ruptured envelopes. Rupture was detected by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed and unpermeabilized cells using antibodies to the F13 and L1 proteins, which line the inner side of the EV membrane and the outer side of the MV membrane, respectively. The presence of ruptured EV membranes was confirmed by immunogold transmission electron microscopy. EVs with broken membranes were present on several cell lines examined including one deficient in glycosaminoglycans, which are thought to play a role in breakage of the EV membrane prior to fusion of the MV. No correlation was found between EVs with ruptured membranes and actin tail formation. Studies with several mutant viruses indicated that EV membranes lacking the A34 protein were unbroken. This result was consistent with other properties of A34R deletion mutants including resistance of the EV membrane to polyanions, small plaque formation and low infectivity that can be increased by disruption of the EV membrane by freezing and thawing

  7. Cleavage of colicin Ia by the Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane is not mediated by the colicin Ia receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, L K; Konisky, J

    1981-01-01

    Colicin Ia can be cleaved by isolated outer membranes prepared from sensitive and resistant (lacking the colicin Ia receptor) strains of Escherichia coli. Both active and heat-denatured colicin Ia are extensively fragmented. Such proteolysis does not occur when colicin Ia is added to whole sensitive or resistant cells. These results demonstrate that cleavage of colicin Ia is not mediated by its outer membrane receptor.

  8. Effects of protein crowding on membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Cellular membranes are typically decorated with a plethora of embedded and adsorbed macromolecules, e.g. proteins, that participate in numerous vital processes. With typical surface densities of 30,000 proteins per μm(2) cellular membranes are indeed crowded places that leave only few nanometers of private space for individual proteins. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of protein crowding in membrane systems. We first give a brief overview on state-of-the-art approaches in experiment and simulation that are frequently used to study crowded membranes. After that, we review how crowding can affect diffusive transport of proteins and lipids in membrane systems. Next, we discuss lipid and protein sorting in crowded membrane systems, including effects like protein cluster formation, phase segregation, and lipid droplet formation. Subsequently, we highlight recent progress in uncovering crowding-induced conformational changes of membranes, e.g. membrane budding and vesicle formation. Finally, we give a short outlook on potential future developments in the field of crowded membrane systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26724385

  9. Tandem Facial Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Gotfryd, Kamil; Pacyna, Jennifer; Miercke, Larry J W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Robbins, Rebecca A; Rana, Rohini R; Løland, Claus Juul; Kobilka, Brian; Stroud, Robert; Byrne, Bernadette; Gether, Ulrik; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new type of synthetic amphiphile that is intended to support biochemical characterization of intrinsic membrane proteins. Members of this new family displayed favorable behavior with four of five membrane proteins tested, and these amphiphiles formed relatively small micelles....

  10. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the m

  11. Multi-drug carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection carrying the OXA-48 gene and showing variations in outer membrane protein 36 causing an outbreak in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher uz Zaman

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This is probably the first reported outbreak of multidrug/carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella infection involving the OXA-48 gene from Saudi Arabia. Although the presence of ESBLs such as OXA, CTX-M, TEM, and SHV are predictable reasons for resistance, variations in the Omp-36 gene might also have precipitated this phenomenon. Disruption of the Omp-36 sequence by large insertional elements, the insertion of two amino acids in a very crucial part of this protein, and the presence of a premature stop codon in one isolate might have rendered this protein incomplete and non-functional. The study also demonstrated that more than one type of clone was responsible for this reported apparent outbreak and that ST29, a clone not reported from this region before, was the major clone responsible.

  12. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  13. Protein Solvation in Membranes and at Water-Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Wilson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Different salvation properties of water and membranes mediate a host of biologically important processes, such as folding, insertion into a lipid bilayer, associations and functions of membrane proteins. These processes will be discussed in several examples involving synthetic and natural peptides. In particular, a mechanism by which a helical peptide becomes inserted into a model membrane will be described. Further, the molecular mechanism of recognition and association of protein helical segments in membranes will be discussed. These processes are crucial for proper functioning of a cell. A membrane-spanning domain of glycophorin A, which exists as a helical dimer, serves as the model system. For this system, the free energy of dissociation of the helices is being determined for both the wild type and a mutant, in which dimerization is disrupted.

  14. Dissociation of outer membrane for Escherichia coli cell caused by cerium nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱美; 施庆珊; 冯劲; 欧阳友生; 陈仪本; 谭绍早

    2010-01-01

    The biological effect of cerium nitrate on the outer membrane(OM) of Escherichia coli(E.coli) cell was studied,and the antim-icrobial mechanism of rare earth elements was explored.The antimicrobial effect of cerium nitrate on E.coli cell was valued by plate count method,and the morphology change of E.coli cell was observed with scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and transmission electron microscopy(TEM).The results showed that the E.coli cell suspension was flocculated when the concentration of Ce(NO3)3?6H2O...

  15. Detection of nearest neighbors to specific fluorescently tagged ligands in rod outer segment and lymphocyte plasma membranes by photosensitization of 5-iodonaphthyl 1-azide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima bean agglutinin-fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate conjugate (FluNCS-lima bean lectin) interacts with specific receptor molecules on membranes both from the rod outer segment (ROS) of the frog retina and from S49 mouse lymphoma cells. When [125I]-5-iodonaphthyl 1-azide (125I-INA), which freely and randomly partitions into the lipid bilayer, is added to membranes and the suspension is irradiated at 480 nm, the FluNCS-conjugated lectin photosensitizes the [125I]INA but only at discrete sites. This results in the selective labeling of specific proteins: an 88-kDa protein on ROS membranes and a 56-kDa protein on S49 plasma membranes. Labeling is dependent upon the interaction of the FluNCS-lectin with glycosylated receptor sites, since N-acetylgalactosamine, but not methyl alpha-mannoside, blocked labeling of the 56-kDa protein on S49 membranes. In contrast, a random labeling pattern of membrane proteins was observed upon irradiation at 480 nm using other fluorescein conjugates, such as FluNCS-bovine serum albumin (FluNCS-BSA) or FluNCS-soybean trypsin inhibitor (FluNCS-STI), which interact with cell membranes in a nonselective manner, or with N-(fluorescein-5-thiocarbamoyl)-n-undecyclamine (FluNCS-NHC11), which is freely miscible in the membrane lipid. Random labeling was also obtained by direct photoexcitation of [125I]INA at 314 nm, with no distinct labeling of the 88- and 56-kDa proteins in the respective membranes. These results suggest that protein ligands can be used to guide sensitizers to discrete receptor sites and lead to their selective labeling by photosensitized activation of [125I]INA

  16. Detection of nearest neighbors to specific fluorescently tagged ligands in rod outer segment and lymphocyte plasma membranes by photosensitization of 5-iodonaphthyl 1-azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raviv, Y.; Bercovici, T.; Gitler, C.; Salomon, Y. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1989-02-07

    Lima bean agglutinin-fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate conjugate (FluNCS-lima bean lectin) interacts with specific receptor molecules on membranes both from the rod outer segment (ROS) of the frog retina and from S49 mouse lymphoma cells. When (125I)-5-iodonaphthyl 1-azide (125I-INA), which freely and randomly partitions into the lipid bilayer, is added to membranes and the suspension is irradiated at 480 nm, the FluNCS-conjugated lectin photosensitizes the (125I)INA but only at discrete sites. This results in the selective labeling of specific proteins: an 88-kDa protein on ROS membranes and a 56-kDa protein on S49 plasma membranes. Labeling is dependent upon the interaction of the FluNCS-lectin with glycosylated receptor sites, since N-acetylgalactosamine, but not methyl alpha-mannoside, blocked labeling of the 56-kDa protein on S49 membranes. In contrast, a random labeling pattern of membrane proteins was observed upon irradiation at 480 nm using other fluorescein conjugates, such as FluNCS-bovine serum albumin (FluNCS-BSA) or FluNCS-soybean trypsin inhibitor (FluNCS-STI), which interact with cell membranes in a nonselective manner, or with N-(fluorescein-5-thiocarbamoyl)-n-undecyclamine (FluNCS-NHC11), which is freely miscible in the membrane lipid. Random labeling was also obtained by direct photoexcitation of (125I)INA at 314 nm, with no distinct labeling of the 88- and 56-kDa proteins in the respective membranes. These results suggest that protein ligands can be used to guide sensitizers to discrete receptor sites and lead to their selective labeling by photosensitized activation of (125I)INA.

  17. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  18. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  19. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  20. Improved diagnostic PCR assay for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae based on the nucleotide sequence of an outer membrane lipoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Trine; Ahrens, Peter

    1998-01-01

    species related to A. pleuropneumoniae or isolated from pigs were assayed. They were all found negative in the PCR, as were tonsil cultures from 50 pigs of an A. pleuropneumoniae-negative herd. The sensitivity assessed by agarose gel analysis of the PCR product was 10(2) CFU/PCR test tube. The specificity......The gene (omlA) coding for an outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 5 has been described earlier and has formed the basis for development of a specific PCR assay, The corresponding regions of all 12 A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains of biovar 1 were sequenced...... and sensitivity of this PCR compared to those of culture suggest the use of this PCR for routine identification of A. pleuropneumoniae....

  1. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  2. Structural investigations of calcium binding and its role in activity and activation of outer membrane phospholipase A from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, H.J.; Kingma, R.L.; Kalk, K.H.; Egmond, M.R.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Enzymatic activity is regulated by reversible dimerisation and calcium-binding. We have investigated the role of calcium by X-ray crystallography. In monomeric OMPLA, one calcium ion

  3. Identification of a TcpC-TcpQ Outer Membrane Complex Involved in the Biogenesis of the Toxin-Coregulated Pilus of Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Niranjan; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae and the soluble TcpF protein that is secreted via the TCP biogenesis apparatus are essential for intestinal colonization. The TCP biogenesis apparatus is composed of at least nine proteins but is largely uncharacterized. TcpC is an outer membrane lipoprotein required for TCP biogenesis that is a member of the secretin protein superfamily. In the present study, analysis of TcpC in a series of strains deficient in each of the TCP biogenesis p...

  4. Predominant membrane localization is an essential feature of the bacterial signal recognition particle receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graumann Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signal recognition particle (SRP receptor plays a vital role in co-translational protein targeting, because it connects the soluble SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complex (SRP-RNCs to the membrane bound Sec translocon. The eukaryotic SRP receptor (SR is a heterodimeric protein complex, consisting of two unrelated GTPases. The SRβ subunit is an integral membrane protein, which tethers the SRP-interacting SRα subunit permanently to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The prokaryotic SR lacks the SRβ subunit and consists of only the SRα homologue FtsY. Strikingly, although FtsY requires membrane contact for functionality, cell fractionation studies have localized FtsY predominantly to the cytosolic fraction of Escherichia coli. So far, the exact function of the soluble SR in E. coli is unknown, but it has been suggested that, in contrast to eukaryotes, the prokaryotic SR might bind SRP-RNCs already in the cytosol and only then initiates membrane targeting. Results In the current study we have determined the contribution of soluble FtsY to co-translational targeting in vitro and have re-analysed the localization of FtsY in vivo by fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that FtsY can bind to SRP-ribosome nascent chains (RNCs in the absence of membranes. However, these soluble FtsY-SRP-RNC complexes are not efficiently targeted to the membrane. In contrast, we observed effective targeting of SRP-RNCs to membrane-bond FtsY. These data show that soluble FtsY does not contribute significantly to cotranslational targeting in E. coli. In agreement with this observation, our in vivo analyses of FtsY localization in bacterial cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed that the vast majority of FtsY was localized to the inner membrane and that soluble FtsY constituted only a negligible species in vivo. Conclusion The exact function of the SRP receptor (SR in bacteria has so far been enigmatic. Our data show that the bacterial SR is

  5. BACTERIAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT PROTEINS IN THEIR LIPID ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TVELD, GI; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN; Veld, Gerda in 't

    1993-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria is a selective barrier that restricts entry and exit of solutes. Transport of solutes across this membrane is catalyzed by specific membrane proteins. Integral membrane proteins usually require specific lipids for optimal activity and are inhibited by other lipid

  6. Dual Protein Localization to the Envelope and Thylakoid Membranes Within the Chloroplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasek, Laura; Inoue, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast houses various metabolic processes essential for plant viability. This organelle originated from an ancestral cyanobacterium via endosymbiosis and maintains the three membranes of its progenitor. Among them, the outer envelope membrane functions mainly in communication with cytoplasmic components while the inner envelope membrane houses selective transport of various metabolites and the biosynthesis of several compounds, including membrane lipids. These two envelope membranes also play essential roles in import of nuclear-encoded proteins and in organelle division. The third membrane, the internal membrane system known as the thylakoid, houses photosynthetic electron transport and chemiosmotic phosphorylation. The inner envelope and thylakoid membranes share similar lipid composition. Specific targeting pathways determine their defined proteomes and, thus, their distinct functions. Nonetheless, several proteins have been shown to exist in both the envelope and thylakoid membranes. These proteins include those that play roles in protein transport, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, membrane dynamics, or transport of nucleotides or inorganic phosphate. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about proteins localized to both the envelope and thylakoid membranes in the chloroplast, discussing their roles in each membrane and potential mechanisms of their dual localization. Addressing the unanswered questions about these dual-localized proteins should help advance our understanding of chloroplast development, protein transport, and metabolic regulation. PMID:26944623

  7. Outer Membrane Vesicle Biosynthesis in Salmonella: Is There More to Gram-Negative Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the biological role of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are derived from the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their potential exploitation as therapeutics. OMVs have been characterized in many ways and functions. Until recently, research focused on hypothetical and empirical models that addressed the molecular mechanisms of OMV biogenesis, such as vesicles bulging from the OM in various ways. The recently reported study by Elhenawy et al. (mBio 7:e00940-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00940-16) provided further insights into OMV biogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. That study showed that deacylation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) influences the level of OMV production and, furthermore, determines a sorting of high versus low acylated LPS in OMs and OMVs, respectively. Interestingly, deacylation may inversely correlate with other LPS modifications, suggesting some synergy toward optimized host resistance via best OM compositions for S Typhimurium. PMID:27531914

  8. Identification and extraction of Pasteurella haemolytica membrane proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Squire, P G; Smiley, D W; Croskell, R B

    1984-01-01

    The inner and outer membranes of Pasteurella haemolytica were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation after plasmolysis of the cells in 20% sucrose and fragmentation in a French pressure cell. Assays of the two membrane fractions for 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, succinate dehydrogenase, and NADH dehydrogenase and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that each of the two membrane fractions was purified fivefold relative to the other. The outer membrane...

  9. 副猪嗜血杆菌OMP5的克隆表达及其对豚鼠免疫保护作用%Expression of outer membrane protein P5 of Haemophilus parasuis and evaluation of its protective immunity in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海峰; 王萍; 黄建珍; 黄冬艳

    2012-01-01

    A pair of primers was designed according to Haemophilus parasuis outer membrane protein P5 ( OMP5 ) gene sequences pub-lished in the GenBank, and the gene of 0MP5 was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of H. parasuis strain NC0807. The recombinant plasmid pET-28a-OMP5 was constructed by inserting this fragment into plasnud pET-28a (+). After identification, the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses revealed that the transformed BL21 (DE3) bacteria could express 0MP5 with molecular weight of 43 ku after induced by IPTG. Sera were examined for the 0MP5 specific antibody titers and all animals were challenged with lethal doses of the highly virulent H. parasuis strain NC0807 after the guinea pigs were immunized with the purified recombinaut protein. The results demonstrated that the recombinant protein could induce the production of a high level of 0MP5 specific antibody and provided the guinea pigs with significant protection from H. parasitis infection. It suggested that 0MP5 is a protective antigen of H. parasuis.%根据GenBank中登录的副猪嗜血杆菌外膜蛋白P5(outer membrane protein P5,OMP5)基因序列设计1对特异性引物,以江西分离株NC0807基因组DNA为模板,扩增出OMP5基因.将其克隆到pEf-28a(+)中,构建重组表达质粒pET-28a-OMP5,质粒转化大肠杆菌BL21( DE3),通过SDS-PAGE和Western blotting分析重组蛋白的表达情况和反应原性.重组蛋白经镍柱亲和层析纯化后免疫豚鼠,测定其免疫原性和保护效率.结果表明,重组蛋白在大肠杆菌中获得了高效表达.表达的蛋白分子质量约为43 ku,能被副猪嗜血杆菌阳性血清识别.动物试验结果表明,重组蛋白免疫后能诱导产生高水平的OMP5特异性抗体,并可显著保护豚鼠抵抗副猪嗜血杆菌强毒菌株的攻击,提示OMP5是副猪嗜血杆菌的保护性抗原.

  10. Molecular target of synthetic antimicrobial oligomer in bacterial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita; Som, Abhigyan; Cronan, John; Tew, Gregory; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprises a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic analogs have demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity via permeating bacterial membranes selectively. Synthetic antimicrobials with tunable structure and toxicological profiles are ideal for investigations of selectivity mechanisms. We investigate interactions and self-assembly using a prototypical family of antimicrobials based on phenylene ethynylene. Results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results and in vitro microbicidal assays on genetically modified `knock-out' bacteria will be presented.

  11. Glasslike Membrane Protein Diffusion in a Crowded Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguira, Ignacio; Casuso, Ignacio; Takahashi, Hirohide; Rico, Felix; Miyagi, Atsushi; Chami, Mohamed; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-02-23

    Many functions of the plasma membrane depend critically on its structure and dynamics. Observation of anomalous diffusion in vivo and in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and single particle tracking has advanced our concept of the membrane from a homogeneous fluid bilayer with freely diffusing proteins to a highly organized crowded and clustered mosaic of lipids and proteins. Unfortunately, anomalous diffusion could not be related to local molecular details given the lack of direct and unlabeled molecular observation capabilities. Here, we use high-speed atomic force microscopy and a novel analysis methodology to analyze the pore forming protein lysenin in a highly crowded environment and document coexistence of several diffusion regimes within one membrane. We show the formation of local glassy phases, where proteins are trapped in neighbor-formed cages for time scales up to 10 s, which had not been previously experimentally reported for biological membranes. Furthermore, around solid-like patches and immobile molecules a slower glass phase is detected leading to protein trapping and creating a perimeter of decreased membrane diffusion. PMID:26859708

  12. Statistical thermodynamics of membrane bending mediated protein-protein attraction

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Tom; Kim, Ken S.; Oster, George

    1999-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins deform the surrounding bilayer creating long-ranged forces that influence distant proteins. These forces can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the proteins' shape, height, contact angle with the bilayer, as well as the local membrane curvature. Although interaction energies are not pairwise additive, for sufficiently low protein density, thermodynamic properties depend only upon pair interactions. Here, we compute pair interaction potentials and entropic cont...

  13. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-07-10

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains. PMID:22733749

  14. Membrane structure and radiation and hyperthermic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general structure of the biological membrane and its involvement in cell damage from radiation and hyperthermic insults are discussed using bacterial cells as an example. Bacterial cells are useful models for these types of studies because they possess a simple membrane system whose composition can be readily altered. Also, various strains exist having different sensitivities to radiation and heat. For example, the response of Escherichia coli cells to ionizing radiation is found to be related to the degree of association between its DNA and membrane. The cell membrane, particularly the lipid component, is an important target in hyperthermic cell killing. The composition and organization of the membrane lipids can influence a cell's response to heat. Heat-induced changes in membrane lipids lead to altered distribution of E. coli proteins, particularly their translocation to the outer membrane. These and other aspects are discussed in this review. (author)

  15. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:25644010

  16. Mutant Brucella abortus Membrane Fusogenic Protein Induces Protection against Challenge Infection in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V.; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:25644010

  17. Mitochondrial Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) Is Part of an Outer Membrane Fatty Acid Transfer Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  18. Mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) is part of an outer membrane fatty acid transfer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L

    2011-07-22

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  19. Microbead-based immunoassay using the outer membrane layer of Escherichia coli combined with autodisplayed Z-domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Bong, Ji-Hong; Yoo, Gu; Chang, Seo-Yoon; Park, Min; Chang, Young Wook; Kang, Min-Jung; Jose, Joachim; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The Z-domain has the potential to control the orientation of immobilized antibodies because of its binding affinity to the Fc regions of antibodies (IgGs). In this work, Z-domains were autodisplayed on the outer membrane (OM) of Escherichia coli. OM particles were isolated and coated onto microbeads with positive, neutral, or negative surface charges. Other conditions such as incubation time and initial OM concentration were also optimized for the OM coating to obtain maximum antibody-binding. Using three kinds of model proteins with different isoelectric points (pI), streptavidin (pI = 5, negative charge at pH 7), horseradish peroxidase (pI = 7, neutral charge at pH 7), and avidin (pI = 10, positive charge at pH 7), protein immobilization onto the microbeads was carried out through physical adsorption and electrostatic interactions. Using fluorescently labeled antibodies and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, it was determined that the neutral and the positively charged microbeads effectively bound antibodies while minimizing non-specific protein binding. The OM-coated microbeads with autodisplayed Z-domains were applied to C-reactive protein immunoassay. This immunoassay achieved 5-fold improved sensitivity compared to conventional immunoassay based on physical adsorption of antibodies at the cutoff concentration of medical diagnosis of inflammatory diseases (1000 ng/ml) and cardiovascular diseases (200 ng/ml).

  20. A Systematic Assessment of Mature MBP in Membrane Protein Production: Overexpression, Membrane targeting and Purification

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jian; Qin, Huajun; Gao, Fei Philip; Cross, Timothy A

    2011-01-01

    Obtaining enough membrane protein in native or native-like status is still a challenge in membrane protein structure biology. Maltose binding protein (MBP) has been widely used as a fusion partner in improving membrane protein production. In the present work, a systematic assessment on the application of mature MBP (mMBP) for membrane protein overexpression and purification was performed on 42 membrane proteins, most of which showed no or poor expression level in membrane fraction fused with ...