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Sample records for bacterial metagenomic library

  1. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  2. Identification of novel glycosyl hydrolases with cellulolytic activity against crystalline cellulose from metagenomic libraries constructed from bacterial enrichment cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Toshio; Kamei, Ichiro; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    To obtain cellulases that are capable of degrading crystalline cellulose and cedar wood, metagenomic libraries were constructed from raw soil sample which was covered to pile of cedar wood sawdust or from its enrichment cultures. The efficiency of screening of metagenomic library was improved more than 3 times by repeating enrichment cultivation using crystalline cellulose as a carbon source, compared with the library constructed from raw soil. Four cellulase genes were obtained from the meta...

  3. Construction and screening of marine metagenomic libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, Nancy; Löscher, Carolin; Metzger, Rebekka;

    2010-01-01

    microbial consortia on marine tissues of multicellular organisms are rich sources for isolating novel bioactive compounds and genes. Here we describe the sampling, construction of large-insert metagenomic libraries from marine habitats and exemplarily one function based screen of metagenomic clones....

  4. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  5. Soil bacterial metagenomic analysis from uranium ore deposit of Domiasiat in Northeast India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total bacterial community analyses were performed for uranium ore deposit soil samples of Domiasiat utilizing cultivation-independent approach. Screening based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) using MspI and HaeIII was performed to analyse 150 clones which generated 59 distinct ribo-types from the clone library. Representative 96 clone partial 16S rRNA gene were phylogenetically related to 10 different bacterial groups. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were the most abundant bacterial group while 7% of the clones represented novel bacterial lineages. The bacterial diversity obtained by the culture-independent approach presented a larger diversity of bacteria as compared to the conditioned cultivation method. The study also provides baseline me-tagenomic information to assess subsequent impact of environment perturbation consequent to uranium mining at the studied site. (author)

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow

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    Anna eLopatina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity.

  7. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, (China); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro, E-mail: abei@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  8. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  9. [Bacterial genomics and metagenomics: clinical applications and medical relevance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diene, S M; Bertelli, C; Pillonel, T; Schrenzel, J; Greub, G

    2014-11-12

    New sequencing technologies provide in a short time and at low cost high amount of genomic sequences useful for applications such as: a) development of diagnostic PCRs and/or serological tests; b) detection of virulence factors (virulome) or genes/SNPs associated with resistance to antibiotics (resistome) and c) investigation of transmission and dissemination of bacterial pathogens. Thus, bacterial genomics of medical importance is useful to clinical microbiologists, to infectious diseases specialists as well as to epidemiologists. Determining the microbial composition of a sample by metagenomics is another application of new sequencing technologies, useful to understand the impact of bacteria on various non-infectious diseases such as obesity, asthma, or diabetes. Genomics and metagenomics will likely become a specialized diagnostic analysis.

  10. Harvesting of novel polyhydroxyalkanaote (PHA) synthase encoding genes from a soil metagenome library using phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Marcus; Ly, Anh; Wang, Chunxia; Meglei, Gabriela; Voget, Sonja; Streit, Wolfgang R; Driscoll, Brian T; Charles, Trevor C

    2011-08-01

    We previously reported the construction of metagenomic libraries in the IncP cosmid vector pRK7813, enabling heterologous expression of these broad-host-range libraries in multiple bacterial hosts. Expressing these libraries in Sinorhizobium meliloti, we have successfully complemented associated phenotypes of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis mutants. DNA sequence analysis of three clones indicates that the complementing genes are homologous to, but substantially different from, known polyhydroxyalkanaote synthase-encoding genes. Thus we have demonstrated the ability to isolate diverse genes for polyhydroxyalkanaote synthesis by functional complementation of defined mutants. Such genes might be of use in the engineering of more efficient systems for the industrial production of bioplastics. The use of functional complementation will also provide a vehicle to probe the genetics of polyhydroxyalkanaote metabolism and its relation to carbon availability in complex microbial assemblages. PMID:21631577

  11. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Serene; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H.; Butler, Margaret K.; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100–1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics.

  12. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Christian; Low, Serene; Woodcroft, Ben J; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H; Butler, Margaret K; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100-1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics. PMID:27688978

  13. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Serene; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H.; Butler, Margaret K.; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100–1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics. PMID:27688978

  14. Applying Shannon's information theory to bacterial and phage genomes and metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sajia; Bailey, Barbara A; Salamon, Peter; Aziz, Ramy K; Edwards, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    All sequence data contain inherent information that can be measured by Shannon's uncertainty theory. Such measurement is valuable in evaluating large data sets, such as metagenomic libraries, to prioritize their analysis and annotation, thus saving computational resources. Here, Shannon's index of complete phage and bacterial genomes was examined. The information content of a genome was found to be highly dependent on the genome length, GC content, and sequence word size. In metagenomic sequences, the amount of information correlated with the number of matches found by comparison to sequence databases. A sequence with more information (higher uncertainty) has a higher probability of being significantly similar to other sequences in the database. Measuring uncertainty may be used for rapid screening for sequences with matches in available database, prioritizing computational resources, and indicating which sequences with no known similarities are likely to be important for more detailed analysis.

  15. ExoMeg1: a new exonuclease from metagenomic library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Portela, Rita C. B.; Carvalho, Fabíola M.; Pereira, Carolina P. M.; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Modesti, Mauro; Fuchs, Robert P.; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are responsible for maintaining the integrity of DNA and are essential to life. However, our knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms is based on model organisms such as Escherichia coli, and little is known about free living and uncultured microorganisms. In this study, a functional screening was applied in a metagenomic library with the goal of discovering new genes involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity. One clone was identified and the sequence analysis showed an open reading frame homolog to a hypothetical protein annotated as a member of the Exo_Endo_Phos superfamily. This novel enzyme shows 3′-5′ exonuclease activity on single and double strand DNA substrates and it is divalent metal-dependent, EDTA-sensitive and salt resistant. The clone carrying the hypothetical ORF was able to complement strains deficient in recombination or base excision repair, suggesting that the new enzyme may be acting on the repair of single strand breaks with 3′ blockers, which are substrates for these repair pathways. Because this is the first report of an enzyme obtained from a metagenomic approach showing exonuclease activity, it was named ExoMeg1. The metagenomic approach has proved to be a useful tool for identifying new genes of uncultured microorganisms. PMID:26815639

  16. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from a representative metagenomic library of food fermenting microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Zinno, Paola; Stirpe, Mariarita; Barile, Simona; Perozzi, Giuditta

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) represent the predominant microbiota in fermented foods. Foodborne LAB have received increasing attention as potential reservoir of antibiotic resistance (AR) determinants, which may be horizontally transferred to opportunistic pathogens. We have previously reported isolation of AR LAB from the raw ingredients of a fermented cheese, while AR genes could be detected in the final, marketed product only by PCR amplification, thus pointing at the need for more sensitive microbial isolation techniques. We turned therefore to construction of a metagenomic library containing microbial DNA extracted directly from the food matrix. To maximize yield and purity and to ensure that genomic complexity of the library was representative of the original bacterial population, we defined a suitable protocol for total DNA extraction from cheese which can also be applied to other lipid-rich foods. Functional library screening on different antibiotics allowed recovery of ampicillin and kanamycin resistant clones originating from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus genomes. We report molecular characterization of the cloned inserts, which were fully sequenced and shown to confer AR phenotype to recipient bacteria. We also show that metagenomics can be applied to food microbiota to identify underrepresented species carrying specific genes of interest. PMID:25243126

  17. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from a representative metagenomic library of food fermenting microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Zinno, Paola; Stirpe, Mariarita; Barile, Simona; Perozzi, Giuditta

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) represent the predominant microbiota in fermented foods. Foodborne LAB have received increasing attention as potential reservoir of antibiotic resistance (AR) determinants, which may be horizontally transferred to opportunistic pathogens. We have previously reported isolation of AR LAB from the raw ingredients of a fermented cheese, while AR genes could be detected in the final, marketed product only by PCR amplification, thus pointing at the need for more sensitive microbial isolation techniques. We turned therefore to construction of a metagenomic library containing microbial DNA extracted directly from the food matrix. To maximize yield and purity and to ensure that genomic complexity of the library was representative of the original bacterial population, we defined a suitable protocol for total DNA extraction from cheese which can also be applied to other lipid-rich foods. Functional library screening on different antibiotics allowed recovery of ampicillin and kanamycin resistant clones originating from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus genomes. We report molecular characterization of the cloned inserts, which were fully sequenced and shown to confer AR phenotype to recipient bacteria. We also show that metagenomics can be applied to food microbiota to identify underrepresented species carrying specific genes of interest.

  18. Functional Screening of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from a Representative Metagenomic Library of Food Fermenting Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Devirgiliis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB represent the predominant microbiota in fermented foods. Foodborne LAB have received increasing attention as potential reservoir of antibiotic resistance (AR determinants, which may be horizontally transferred to opportunistic pathogens. We have previously reported isolation of AR LAB from the raw ingredients of a fermented cheese, while AR genes could be detected in the final, marketed product only by PCR amplification, thus pointing at the need for more sensitive microbial isolation techniques. We turned therefore to construction of a metagenomic library containing microbial DNA extracted directly from the food matrix. To maximize yield and purity and to ensure that genomic complexity of the library was representative of the original bacterial population, we defined a suitable protocol for total DNA extraction from cheese which can also be applied to other lipid-rich foods. Functional library screening on different antibiotics allowed recovery of ampicillin and kanamycin resistant clones originating from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus genomes. We report molecular characterization of the cloned inserts, which were fully sequenced and shown to confer AR phenotype to recipient bacteria. We also show that metagenomics can be applied to food microbiota to identify underrepresented species carrying specific genes of interest.

  19. Construction of small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carola; Daniel, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of the Earth's biological diversity is hidden in uncultured and yet uncharacterized microbial genomes. The construction of metagenomic libraries is a cultivation-independent molecular approach to assess this unexplored genetic reservoir. In the last few years, a high number of novel biocatalysts have been identified by function-based or sequence-based screening of metagenomic libraries. Here, we describe detailed protocols for the construction of metagenomic small-insert and large-insert libraries in plasmids and fosmids, respectively, from environmental DNA. PMID:20830554

  20. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eNyyssönen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26 % cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts.

  1. Metagenomic reconstructions of bacterial CRISPR loci constrain population histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Thomas, Brian C; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems provide insight into recent population history because they rapidly incorporate, in a unidirectional manner, short fragments (spacers) from coexisting infective virus populations into host chromosomes. Immunity is achieved by sequence identity between transcripts of spacers and their targets. Here, we used metagenomics to study the stability and dynamics of the type I-E CRISPR-Cas locus of Leptospirillum group II bacteria in biofilms sampled over 5 years from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. Despite recovery of 452,686 spacers from CRISPR amplicons and metagenomic data, rarefaction curves of spacers show no saturation. The vast repertoire of spacers is attributed to phage/plasmid population diversity and retention of old spacers, despite rapid evolution of the targeted phage/plasmid genome regions (proto-spacers). The oldest spacers (spacers found at the trailer end) are conserved for at least 5 years, and 12% of these retain perfect or near-perfect matches to proto-spacer targets. The majority of proto-spacer regions contain an AAG proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). Spacers throughout the locus target the same phage population (AMDV1), but there are blocks of consecutive spacers without AMDV1 target sequences. Results suggest long-term coexistence of Leptospirillum with AMDV1 and periods when AMDV1 was less dominant. Metagenomics can be applied to millions of cells in a single sample to provide an extremely large spacer inventory, allow identification of phage/plasmids and enable analysis of previous phage/plasmid exposure. Thus, this approach can provide insights into prior bacterial environment and genetic interplay between hosts and their viruses. PMID:26394009

  2. Dynamics of Sequence -Discrete Bacterial Populations Inferred Using Metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Sarah; Bendall, Matthew; Kang, Dongwan; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Chan, Leong-Keat; Tringe, Susannah; McMahon, Katherine; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    From a multi-year metagenomic time series of two dissimilar Wisconsin lakes we have assembled dozens of genomes using a novel approach that bins contigs into distinct genome based on sequence composition, e.g. kmer frequencies, and contig coverage patterns at various times points. Next, we investigated how these genomes, which represent sequence-discrete bacterial populations, evolved over time and used the time series to discover the population dynamics. For example, we explored changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies as well as patterns of gene gain and loss in multiple populations. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in some populations during the course of this study, suggesting these populations may have experienced genome-wide selective sweeps. This represents the first direct, time-resolved observations of periodic selection in natural populations, a key process predicted by the ecotype model of bacterial diversification.

  3. Metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into bacterial communities in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylward, Frank O.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Suen, Garret; Tringe, Susannah G.; Adams, Sandra M.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2012-09-01

    Herbivores gain access to nutrients stored in plant biomass largely by harnessing the metabolic activities of microbes. Leaf-cutter ants of the genus Atta are a hallmark example; these dominant Neotropical herbivores cultivate symbiotic fungus gardens on massive quantities of fresh plant forage. As the external digestive system of the ants, fungus gardens facilitate the production and sustenance of millions of workers in mature Atta colonies. Here we use metagenomic, and metaproteomic techniques to characterize the bacterial diversity and overall physiological potential of fungus gardens from two species of Atta. Our analysis of over 1.2 Gbp of community metagenomic sequence and three 16S pyrotag libraries reveals that, in addition to harboring the dominant fungal crop, these ecosystems contain abundant populations of Enterobacteriaceae, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Escherichia. We show that these bacterial communities possess genes commonly associated with lignocellulose degradation, and likely participate in the processing of plant biomass. Additionally, we demonstrate that bacteria in these environments encode a diverse suite of biosynthetic pathways, and that they may enrich the nitrogen-poor forage of the ants with B-vitamins, amino acids, and proteins. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that fungus gardens are highly-specialized fungus-bacteria communities that efficiently convert plant material into usable energy for their ant hosts. Together with recent investigations into the microbial symbionts of vertebrates, our work underscores the importance of microbial communities to the ecology and evolution of herbivorous metazoans.

  4. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidi

  5. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  6. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta De Santi

    Full Text Available The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15 form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs.MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes.

  7. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Bhatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  8. Metagenomic analysis as a tool to better characterize the bacterial content of food and food preparations.

    OpenAIRE

    Taminiau, Bernard; Delhalle, Laurent; Nezer, Carine; Adolphe, Ysabelle; Didimo Imazaki, Pedro Henrique; Clinquart, Antoine; Daube, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomic analysis is a new culture-independent approach for assigning a taxonomic, genic or functional identity to bacterial DNA fragments of unknown origin. Its power and utility is increasingly rising thanks to the next generation sequencing techniques. It is now mature and cheap enough to be transposed to more applied fields like the food microbiology. We demonstrated in several studies the extraordinary potential of the targeted metagenomic analysis to different problematics relate...

  9. Est16, a New Esterase Isolated from a Metagenomic Library of a Microbial Consortium Specializing in Diesel Oil Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rangel Pereira

    Full Text Available Lipolytic enzymes have attracted attention from a global market because they show enormous biotechnological potential for applications such as detergent production, leather processing, cosmetics production, and use in perfumes and biodiesel. Due to the intense demand for biocatalysts, a metagenomic approach provides methods of identifying new enzymes. In this study, an esterase designated as Est16 was selected from 4224 clones of a fosmid metagenomic library, revealing an 87% amino acid identity with an esterase/lipase (accession number ADM63076.1 from an uncultured bacterium. Phylogenetic studies showed that the enzyme belongs to family V of bacterial lipolytic enzymes and has sequence and structural similarities with an aryl-esterase from Pseudomonas fluorescens and a patented Anti-Kazlauskas lipase (patent number US20050153404. The protein was expressed and purified as a highly soluble, thermally stable enzyme that showed a preference for basic pH. Est16 exhibited activity toward a wide range of substrates and the highest catalytic efficiency against p-nitrophenyl butyrate and p-nitrophenyl valerate. Est16 also showed tolerance to the presence of organic solvents, detergents and metals. Based on molecular modeling, we showed that the large alpha-beta domain is conserved in the patented enzymes but not the substrate pocket. Here, it was demonstrated that a metagenomic approach is suitable for discovering the lipolytic enzyme diversity and that Est16 has the biotechnological potential for use in industrial processes.

  10. Diagnostic metagenomics: potential applications to bacterial, viral and parasitic infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pallen, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The term ‘shotgun metagenomics’ is applied to the direct sequencing of DNA extracted from a sample without culture or target-specific amplification or capture. In diagnostic metagenomics, this approach is applied to clinical samples in the hope of detecting and characterizing pathogens. Here, I provide a conceptual overview, before reviewing several recent promising proof-of-principle applications of metagenomics in virus discovery, analysis of outbreaks and detection of pathogens in ...

  11. Construction and screening of a functional metagenomic library to identify novel enzymes produced by Antarctic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Ferrés; Vanesa Amarelle; Francisco Noya; Elena Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library of approximately 52 000 clones was constructed to identify functional genes encoding cold-adapted enzymes. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from a sample of glacial meltwater, collected on the Antarctic Peninsula during the ANTARKOS XXIX Expedition during the austral summer of 2012–2013. Each clone contained an insert of about 35–40 kb, so the library represented almost 2 Gb of genetic information from metagenomic DNA. Activity-driven screening was used to detect the cold-adapted functions expressed by the library. Fifty lipase/esterase and two cellulase-producing clones were isolated, and two clones able to grow on Avicel® as the sole carbon source. Interestingly, three clones formed a brown precipitate in the presence of manganese (II). Accumulation of manganese oxides was determined with a leucoberbelin blue assay, indicating that these three clones had manganese-oxidizing activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a manganese oxidase activity detected with a functional metagenomic strategy.

  12. Sequencing platform and library preparation choices impact viral metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Solonenko, Sergei A; Ignacio-Espinoza, J César; Alberti, Adriana; Cruaud, Corinne; Hallam, Steven; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Tyson, Gene; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Microbes drive the biogeochemistry that fuels the planet. Microbial viruses modulate their hosts directly through mortality and horizontal gene transfer, and indirectly by re-programming host metabolisms during infection. However, our ability to study these virus-host interactions is limited by methods that are low-throughput and heavily reliant upon the subset of organisms that are in culture. One way forward are culture-independent metagenomic approaches, but t...

  13. Functional screening of a metagenomic library from algal biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Marjolaine,

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae, and particularly their lignin-free polysaccharides, are increasingly used for their gelling and therapeutic properties and for the production of biofuels and renewable chemical compounds. To extract, hydrolyze and purify this biomass, algae hydrolyzing enzymes are needed. Our work aims to identify and characterize algal biomass hydrolyzing enzymes expressed by microorganisms living on the surface of algae, by functional metagenomics. Therefore, a microbial DNA extraction me...

  14. Functional screening of metagenome and genome libraries for detection of novel flavonoid-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabausch, U; Juergensen, J; Ilmberger, N; Böhnke, S; Fischer, S; Schubach, B; Schulte, M; Streit, W R

    2013-08-01

    The functional detection of novel enzymes other than hydrolases from metagenomes is limited since only a very few reliable screening procedures are available that allow the rapid screening of large clone libraries. For the discovery of flavonoid-modifying enzymes in genome and metagenome clone libraries, we have developed a new screening system based on high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). This metagenome extract thin-layer chromatography analysis (META) allows the rapid detection of glycosyltransferase (GT) and also other flavonoid-modifying activities. The developed screening method is highly sensitive, and an amount of 4 ng of modified flavonoid molecules can be detected. This novel technology was validated against a control library of 1,920 fosmid clones generated from a single Bacillus cereus isolate and then used to analyze more than 38,000 clones derived from two different metagenomic preparations. Thereby we identified two novel UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes. The metagenome-derived gtfC gene encoded a 52-kDa protein, and the deduced amino acid sequence was weakly similar to sequences of putative UGTs from Fibrisoma and Dyadobacter. GtfC mediated the transfer of different hexose moieties and exhibited high activities on flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and stilbenes and also accepted isoflavones and chalcones. From the control library we identified a novel macroside glycosyltransferase (MGT) with a calculated molecular mass of 46 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly similar to sequences of MGTs from Bacillus thuringiensis. Recombinant MgtB transferred the sugar residue from UDP-glucose effectively to flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, and flavanones. Moreover, MgtB exhibited high activity on larger flavonoid molecules such as tiliroside.

  15. Construction of a Metagenomic DNA Library of Sponge Symbionts and Screening of Antibacterial Metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Juan; ZHU Tianjiao; LI Dehai; CUI Chengbin; FANG Yuchun; LIU Hongbing; LIU Peipei; GU Qianqun; ZHU Weiming

    2006-01-01

    To study the bioactive metabolites produced by sponge-derived uncultured symbionts, a metagenomic DNA library of the symbionts of sponge Gelliodes gracilis was constructed. The average size of DNA inserts in the library was 20 kb. This library was screened for antibiotic activity using paper disc assaying. Two clones displayed the antibacterial activity against Micrococcus tetragenus. The metabolites of these two clones were analyzed through HPLC. The result showed that their metabolites were quite different from those of the host E. coli DH5α and the host containing vector pHZ132. This study may present a new approach to exploring bioactive metabolites of sponge symbionts.

  16. Metagenomic evaluation of bacterial and archaeal diversity in the geothermal hot springs of manikaran, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-02-19

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat.

  17. Promiscuous enzymes from functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte; Fischer, Gerhard; Mahomed, Mark; HYVONEN, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P.; Janssen, Dick B.; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under ...

  18. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Razzauti

    Full Text Available Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations.We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq. In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454. In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles.We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each individual reservoir, with subsequent derivation of

  19. Global metagenomic survey reveals a new bacterial candidate phylum in geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Paez-Espino, David; Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter F; Hedlund, Brian P; Dekas, Anne E; Grasby, Stephen E; Brady, Allyson L; Dong, Hailiang; Briggs, Brandon R; Li, Wen-Jun; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Pati, Amrita; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Rubin, Edward M; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N

    2016-01-27

    Analysis of the increasing wealth of metagenomic data collected from diverse environments can lead to the discovery of novel branches on the tree of life. Here we analyse 5.2 Tb of metagenomic data collected globally to discover a novel bacterial phylum ('Candidatus Kryptonia') found exclusively in high-temperature pH-neutral geothermal springs. This lineage had remained hidden as a taxonomic 'blind spot' because of mismatches in the primers commonly used for ribosomal gene surveys. Genome reconstruction from metagenomic data combined with single-cell genomics results in several high-quality genomes representing four genera from the new phylum. Metabolic reconstruction indicates a heterotrophic lifestyle with conspicuous nutritional deficiencies, suggesting the need for metabolic complementarity with other microbes. Co-occurrence patterns identifies a number of putative partners, including an uncultured Armatimonadetes lineage. The discovery of Kryptonia within previously studied geothermal springs underscores the importance of globally sampled metagenomic data in detection of microbial novelty, and highlights the extraordinary diversity of microbial life still awaiting discovery.

  20. SCREENING OF PROTEASE ENZYME BY CONSTRUCTION OF METAGENOMIC LIBRARY FROM MARINE SOIL SEDIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.PRABAVATHI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonetheless, the cultivable microorganisms constituting these resources correspond to only a small fraction of the microbial diversity less than 1% of the microorganisms in various environments are readily cultivable (Amann et al., 1995. This limits the range of a search for new biocatalysts for the bioprocess industry, so the use of complex communities and the effort to overcome the problem of noncultivability attract not only scientific attention but also biotechnological innovation. Methods have been developed and used toovercome the non-cultivability of environmental microorganisms for biotechnology, namely cloning and the expression of metagenomes in suitable expression hosts. Proteases are present in all living forms as they are involved in various metabolic processes. They are mainly involved in hydrolysis of the peptide bonds (Gupta et al., 2002. Proteases find a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical, leather and textile, detergent, diagnostics industries and also in waste management. In order to discover new proteases from metagenomiclibraries, we screened for proteolytic activity from a constructed metagenomic library by direct cloning of environmental DNA of large DNA inserts. A novel gene encoding proteolytic enzyme was picked up,sequenced, expressed in E. coli and characterized. Several microbial proteases from the culturable organisms have been characterized. However, very few proteases have been identified through culture independent metagenomic approach.

  1. Screening a wide host-range, waste-water metagenomic library in tryptophan auxotrophs of Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli reveals different classes of cloned trp genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youguo; Wexler, Margaret; Richardson, David J; Bond, Philip L; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2005-12-01

    A metagenomic cosmid library was constructed, in which the insert DNA was derived from bacteria in a waste-water treatment plant and the vector was the wide host-range cosmid pLAFR3. The library was screened for clones that could correct defined tryptophan auxotrophs of the alpha-proteobacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum and of Escherichia coli. A total of 26 different cosmids that corrected at least one trp mutant in one or both of these species were obtained. Several cosmids corrected the auxotrophy of one or more R. leguminosarum trp mutants, but not the corresponding mutants in E. coli. Conversely, one cosmid corrected trpA, B, C, D and E mutants of E. coli but none of the trp mutants of R. leguminosarum. Two of the Trp+ cosmids were examined in more detail. One contained a trp operon that resembled that of the pathogen Chlamydophila caviae, containing the unusual kynU gene, which specifies kynureninase. The other, whose trp genes functioned in R. leguminosarum but not in E. coli, contained trpDCFBA in an operon that is likely co-transcribed with five other genes, most of which had no known link with tryptophan synthesis. The sequences of these TRP proteins, and the products of nine other genes encoded by this cosmid, failed to affiliate them with any known bacterial lineage. For one metagenomic cosmid, lac reporter fusions confirmed that its cloned trp genes were transcribed in R. leguminosarum, but not in E. coli. Thus, rhizobia, with their many sigma-factors, may be well-suited hosts for metagenomic libraries, cloned in wide host-range vectors. PMID:16309391

  2. Genefish: an alternate metagenomic approach for capturing targeted bacterial diversity in an engineered recipient E. coli strain

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard, Nathalie; Faugier, Aurélie; Lavire, Céline; Jacquiod, Samuel; Philippot, Laurent; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure

    2009-01-01

    The metagenomic approach, defined as the direct recovery and cloning of bacterial DNA from the environment in domesticated bacterial hosts has been widely used to study bacterial populations and their functional genes in numerous environments. The advantage of this approach over conventional culture based techniques is that it encompasses a wider range of bacteria by bypassing the bias of uncultivability of more than 99% of the bacteria in soil. However, in complex and rich environments such ...

  3. Characterization of three new carboxylic ester hydrolases isolated by functional screening of a forest soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Sophie; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2013-02-01

    Three new lipolytic genes were isolated from a forest soil metagenomic library by functional screening on tributyrin agar plates. The genes SBLip1, SBLip2 and SBLip5.1 respectively encode polypeptides of 445, 346 and 316 amino acids. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SBLip2 and SBLip5.1 belong to bacterial esterase/lipase family IV, whereas SBLip1 shows similarity to class C β-lactamases and is thus related to esterase family VIII. The corresponding genes were overexpressed and their products purified by affinity chromatography for characterization. Analyses of substrate specificity with different p-nitrophenyl esters showed that all three enzymes have a preference for short-acyl-chain p-nitrophenyl esters, a feature of carboxylesterases as opposed to lipases. The β-lactamase activity of SBLip1, measured with the chromogenic substrate nitrocefin, was very low. The three esterases have the same optimal pH (pH 10) and remain active across a relatively broad pH range, displaying more than 60 % activity between pH 6 and 10. The temperature optima determined were 35 °C for SBLip1, 45 °C for SBLip2 and 50 °C for SBLip5.1. The three esterases displayed different levels of tolerance to salts, solvents and detergents, SBLip2 being overall more tolerant to high concentrations of solvent and SBLip5.1 less affected by detergents. PMID:23160923

  4. Expression and characterization of a new esterase with GCSAG motif from a permafrost metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, Lada E; Novototskaya-Vlasova, Ksenia A; Spirina, Elena V; Durdenko, Ekaterina V; Lomakina, Galina Yu; Zavialova, Maria G; Nikolaev, Evgeny N; Rivkina, Elizaveta M

    2016-05-01

    As a result of construction and screening of a metagenomic library prepared from a permafrost-derived microcosm, we have isolated a novel gene coding for a putative lipolytic enzyme that belongs to the hormone-sensitive lipase family. It encodes a polypeptide of 343 amino acid residues whose amino acid sequence displays maximum likelihood with uncharacterized proteins from Sphingomonas species. A putative catalytic serine residue of PMGL2 resides in a new variant of a recently discovered GTSAG sequence in which a Thr residue is replaced by a Cys residue (GCSAG). The recombinant PMGL2 was produced in Escherichia coli cells and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The resulting protein preferably utilizes short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (C4 and C8) and therefore is an esterase. It possesses maximum activity at 45°C in slightly alkaline conditions and has limited thermostability at higher temperatures. Activity of PMGL2 is stimulated in the presence of 0.25-1.5 M NaCl indicating the good salt tolerance of the new enzyme. Mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that N-terminal methionine in PMGL2 is processed and cysteine residues do not form a disulfide bond. The results of the study demonstrate the significance of the permafrost environment as a unique genetic reservoir and its potential for metagenomic exploration. PMID:26929439

  5. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  6. Novel, deep-branching heterotrophic bacterial populations recovered from thermal spring metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Colman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spring ecosystems are a valuable resource for the discovery of novel hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea, and harbor deeply-branching lineages that provide insight regarding the nature of early microbial life. We characterized bacterial populations in two circumneutral (pH ~ 8 Yellowstone National Park thermal (T ~ 80 oC spring filamentous ‘streamer’ communities using random metagenomic DNA sequence to investigate the metabolic potential of these novel populations. Four de novo assemblies representing three abundant, deeply-branching bacterial phylotypes were recovered. Analysis of conserved phylogenetic marker genes indicated that two of the phylotypes represent separate groups of an uncharacterized phylum (for which we propose the candidate phylum name ‘Pyropristinus’. The third new phylotype falls within the proposed Calescamantes phylum. Metabolic reconstructions of the 'Pyropristinus' and Calescamantes populations showed that these organisms appear to be chemoorganoheterotrophs, and have the genomic potential for aerobic respiration and oxidative phosphorylation via archaeal-like V-type, and bacterial F-type ATPases, respectively. A survey of similar phylotypes (> 97% nt identity within 16S rRNA gene datasets suggest that the newly described organisms are restricted to terrestrial thermal springs ranging from 70 - 90 oC and pH values of ~ 7 - 9. The characterization of these lineages is important for understanding the diversity of deeply-branching bacterial phyla, and their functional role in high-temperature circumneutral ‘streamer’ communities.

  7. Putative bacterial interactions from metagenomic knowledge with an integrative systems ecology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordron, Philippe; Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, Maria-Paz; González, Mauricio; Thiele, Sven; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro; Eveillard, Damien

    2016-02-01

    Following the trend of studies that investigate microbial ecosystems using different metagenomic techniques, we propose a new integrative systems ecology approach that aims to decipher functional roles within a consortium through the integration of genomic and metabolic knowledge at genome scale. For the sake of application, using public genomes of five bacterial strains involved in copper bioleaching: Acidiphilium cryptum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, we first reconstructed a global metabolic network. Next, using a parsimony assumption, we deciphered sets of genes, called Sets from Genome Segments (SGS), that (1) are close on their respective genomes, (2) take an active part in metabolic pathways and (3) whose associated metabolic reactions are also closely connected within metabolic networks. Overall, this SGS paradigm depicts genomic functional units that emphasize respective roles of bacterial strains to catalyze metabolic pathways and environmental processes. Our analysis suggested that only few functional metabolic genes are horizontally transferred within the consortium and that no single bacterial strain can accomplish by itself the whole copper bioleaching. The use of SGS pinpoints a functional compartmentalization among the investigated species and exhibits putative bacterial interactions necessary for promoting these pathways. PMID:26677108

  8. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications.

  9. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  10. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  11. New Thermophilic and Thermostable Esterase with Sequence Similarity to the Hormone-Sensitive Lipase Family, Cloned from a Metagenomic Library

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-01-01

    A gene coding for a thermostable esterase was isolated by functional screening of Escherichia coli cells that had been transformed with fosmid environmental DNA libraries constructed with metagenomes from thermal environmental samples. The gene conferring esterase activity on E. coli grown on tributyrin agar was composed of 936 bp, corresponding to 311 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 34 kDa. The enzyme showed significant amino acid similarity (64%) to the enzyme from a hypertherm...

  12. A metagenomic β-glucuronidase uncovers a core adaptive function of the human intestinal microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Gloux, Karine; Berteau, Olivier; El oumami, Hanane; Béguet, Fabienne; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël

    2010-01-01

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, bacterial β-D-glucuronidases (BG; E.C. 3.2.1.31) are involved both in xenobiotic metabolism and in some of the beneficial effects of dietary compounds. Despite their biological significance, investigations are hampered by the fact that only a few BGs have so far been studied. A functional metagenomic approach was therefore performed on intestinal metagenomic libraries using chromogenic glucuronides as probes. Using this strategy, 19 positive metagenomic cl...

  13. Metagenomic profile of the bacterial communities associated with Ixodes ricinus ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Carpi

    Full Text Available Assessment of the microbial diversity residing in arthropod vectors of medical importance is crucial for monitoring endemic infections, for surveillance of newly emerging zoonotic pathogens, and for unraveling the associated bacteria within its host. The tick Ixodes ricinus is recognized as the primary European vector of disease-causing bacteria in humans. Despite I. ricinus being of great public health relevance, its microbial communities remain largely unexplored to date. Here we evaluate the pathogen-load and the microbiome in single adult I. ricinus by using 454- and Illumina-based metagenomic approaches. Genomic DNA-derived sequences were taxonomically profiled using a computational approach based on the BWA algorithm, allowing for the identification of known tick-borne pathogens at the strain level and the putative tick core microbiome. Additionally, we assessed and compared the bacterial taxonomic profile in nymphal and adult I. ricinus pools collected from two distinct geographic regions in Northern Italy by means of V6-16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing and community based ecological analysis. A total of 108 genera belonging to representatives of all bacterial phyla were detected and a rapid qualitative assessment for pathogenic bacteria, such as Borrelia, Rickettsia and Candidatus Neoehrlichia, and for other bacteria with mutualistic relationship or undetermined function, such as Wolbachia and Rickettsiella, was possible. Interestingly, the ecological analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure differed between the examined geographic regions and tick life stages. This finding suggests that the environmental context (abiotic and biotic factors and host-selection behaviors affect their microbiome.Our data provide the most complete picture to date of the bacterial communities present within I. ricinus under natural conditions by using high-throughput sequencing technologies. This study further demonstrates a novel detection

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel endoglucanase from a Bursaphelenchus xylophilus metagenomic library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available A novel gene (designated as cen219 encoding endoglucanase was isolated from a Bursaphelenchus xylophilus metagenomic library by functional screening. Sequence analysis revealed that cen219 encoded a protein of 367 amino acids. SDS-PAGE analysis of purified endoglucanase suggested that Cen219 was a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 40 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for endoglucanase activity of Cen219 was separately 50 °C and 6.0. It was stable from 30 to 50 °C, and from pH 4.0 to 7.0. The activity was significantly enhanced by Mn(2+ and dramatically reduced by detergent SDS and metals Fe(3+, Cu(2+ or Hg(2+. The enzyme hydrolyzed a wide range of β-1, 3-, and β-1, 4-linked polysaccharides, with varying activities. Activities towards microcrystalline cellulose and filter paper were relatively high, while the highest activity was towards oat gum. The Km and Vmax of Cen219 towards CMC was 17.37 mg/ml and 333.33 U/mg, respectively. The findings have an insight into understanding the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions in B. xylophilus species. The properties also make Cen219 an interesting enzyme for biotechnological application.

  15. A novel salt-tolerant chitobiosidase discovered by genetic screening of a metagenomic library derived from chitin-amended agricultural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Berini, Francesca; Kielak, Anna Maria; Marinelli, Flavia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on the construction of a metagenomic library from a chitin-amended disease-suppressive agricultural soil and its screening for genes that encode novel chitinolytic enzymes. The library, constructed in fosmids in an Escherichia coli host, comprised 145,000 clones containing inserts of

  16. Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Krohn-Molt, Ines; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Güllert, Simon; Schmeisser, Christel; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Grundhoff, Adam; Daniel, Rolf; Hanelt, Dieter; Wolfgang R Streit

    2013-01-01

    Photobioreactors (PBRs) are very attractive for sunlight-driven production of biofuels and capturing of anthropogenic CO2. One major problem associated with PBRs however, is that the bacteria usually associated with microalgae in nonaxenic cultures can lead to biofouling and thereby affect algal productivity. Here, we report on a phylogenetic, metagenome, and functional analysis of a mixed-species bacterial biofilm associated with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus in ...

  17. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We

  18. Construction and Characterization of Three Wheat Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries of wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Wangshuibai, germplasms T. monococcum TA2026 and TA2033. A total of 1,233,792,170,880 and 263,040 clones were picked and arrayed in 384-well plates. On the basis of genome sizes of 16.8 Gb for hexaploid wheat and 5.6 Gb for diploid wheat, the three libraries represented 9.05-, 2.60-, and 3.71-fold coverage of the haploid genomes, respectively. An improved descending pooling system for BAC libraries screening was established. This improved strategy can save 80% of the time and 68% of polymerase chain reaction (PCR with the same successful rate as the universal 6D pooling strategy.

  19. Application of targeted metagenomics to explore abundance and diversity of CO₂-fixing bacterial community using cbbL gene from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Basit; Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2012-09-10

    Sequestration of CO(2) by autotrophic bacteria is a key process of biogeochemical carbon cycling in soil ecosystem. Rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial activity and diversity, influenced by change in atmospheric CO(2). Structural changes in rhizosphere composition influence microbial communities and the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were established using cbbL and 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomics approach from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea. A total of 108 cbbL clones were obtained from the rhizospheric soil which revealed predominance of cbbL sequences affiliated to Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bradyrhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi and a variety of uncultured cbbL harboring bacteria. The 16S rRNA gene clone library exhibited the dominance of Firmicutes (34.4%), Proteobacteria (18.3%), Actinobacteria (17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (16.1%). About 43% nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene clone library were novel genera which showed <95% homology with published sequences. Gene copy number of cbbL and 16S rRNA genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT PCR), was 9.38 ± 0.75 × 10(7) and 5.43 ± 0.79 × 10(8) (per g dry soil), respectively. The results exhibited bacterial community structure with high bacterial diversity and abundance of CO(2)-fixing bacteria, which can be explored further for their role in carbon cycling, sustainable agriculture and environment management. PMID:22766402

  20. Mining the metagenome of activated biomass of an industrial wastewater treatment plant by a novel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nandita; Tanksale, Himgouri; Kapley, Atya; Purohit, Hemant J

    2012-12-01

    Metagenomic libraries herald the era of magnifying the microbial world, tapping into the vast metabolic potential of uncultivated microbes, and enhancing the rate of discovery of novel genes and pathways. In this paper, we describe a method that facilitates the extraction of metagenomic DNA from activated sludge of an industrial wastewater treatment plant and its use in mining the metagenome via library construction. The efficiency of this method was demonstrated by the large representation of the bacterial genome in the constructed metagenomic libraries and by the functional clones obtained. The BAC library represented 95.6 times the bacterial genome, while, the pUC library represented 41.7 times the bacterial genome. Twelve clones in the BAC library demonstrated lipolytic activity, while four clones demonstrated dioxygenase activity. Four clones in pUC library tested positive for cellulase activity. This method, using FTA cards, not only can be used for library construction, but can also store the metagenome at room temperature. PMID:24293707

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel halotolerant feruloyl esterase identified from a soil metagenomic library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel feruloyl esterase (EstF27) identified from a soil metagenomic library has been crystallized and a complete data set was collected from a single cooled crystal using an in-house X-ray source. Feruloyl esterase cleaves the ester linkage formed between ferulic acid and polysaccharides in plant cell walls and thus has wide potential industrial applications. A novel feruloyl esterase (EstF27) identified from a soil metagenomic library was crystallized and a complete data set was collected from a single cooled crystal using an in-house X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.35, b = 106.19, c = 188.51 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00°. A Matthews coefficient of 2.55 Å3 Da−1, with a corresponding solvent content of 51.84%, suggested the presence of ten protein subunits in the asymmetric unit

  2. Application of 16S rRNA metagenomics to analyze bacterial communities at a respiratory care centre in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan Yi; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Kuo, Han-Yueh; Tan, Te-Sheng; Liao, Ki-Hok; Liu, Chih-Chin; Hon, Wing-Kai; Liou, Ming-Li

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we applied a 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) metagenomics approach to survey inanimate hospital environments (IHEs) in a respiratory care center (RCC). A total of 16 samples, including 9 from medical devices and 7 from workstations, were analyzed. Besides, clinical isolates were retrospectively analyzed during the sampling period in the RCC. A high amount of microbial diversity was detected, with an average of 1,836 phylotypes per sample. In addition to Acinetobacter, more than 60 % of the bacterial communities present among the top 25 abundant genera were dominated by skin-associated bacteria. Differences in bacterial profiles were restricted to individual samples. Furthermore, compliance with hand hygiene guidelines may be unsatisfactory among hospital staff according to a principal coordinate analysis that indicated clustering of bacterial communities between devices and workstations for most of the sampling sites. Compared to the high incidence of clinical isolates in the RCC, only Staphylococcus and Acinetobacter were highly abundant in the IHEs. Despite Acinetobacter was the most abundant genus present in IHEs of the RCC, potential pathogens, e.g., Acinetobacter baumannii, might remain susceptible to carbapenem. This study is the first in Taiwan to demonstrate a high diversity of human-associated bacteria in the RCC via 16S rRNA metagenomics, which allows for new assessment of potential health risks in RCCs, aids in the evaluation of existing sanitation protocols, and furthers our understanding of the development of healthcare-associated infections.

  3. Cloning and functional characterization of endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene from metagenomic library of vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Haji; Azam, Syed Sikander; Telke, Amar; Kim, Seon Won; Chung, Young Ryun

    2013-06-01

    In the vermicomposting of paper mill sludge, the activity of earthworms is very dependent on dietetic polysaccharides including cellulose as energy sources. Most of these polymers are degraded by the host microbiota and considered potentially important source for cellulolytic enzymes. In the present study, a metagenomic library was constructed from vermicompost (VC) prepared with paper mill sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS) and functionally screened for cellulolytic activities. Eighteen cellulase expressing clones were isolated from about 89,000 fosmid clones libraries. A short fragment library was constructed from the most active positive clone (cMGL504) and one open reading frame (ORF) of 1,092 bp encoding an endo-β-1,4-glucanase was indentified which showed 88% similarity with Cellvibrio mixtus cellulase A gene. The endo-β-1,4-glucanase cmgl504 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant cmgl504 cellulase displayed activities at a broad range of temperature (25-55°C) and pH (5.5-8.5). The enzyme degraded carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with 15.4 U, while having low activity against avicel. No detectable activity was found for xylan and laminarin. The enzyme activity was stimulated by potassium chloride. The deduced protein and three-dimensional structure of metagenome-derived cellulase cmgl504 possessed all features, including general architecture, signature motifs, and N-terminal signal peptide, followed by the catalytic domain of cellulase belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5). The cellulases cloned in this work may play important roles in the degradation of celluloses in vermicomposting process and could be exploited for industrial application in future. PMID:23812813

  4. Identification of nitrogen-fixing genes and gene clusters from metagenomic library of acid mine drainage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Dai

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community.

  5. Discovery and characterization of thermophilic limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolases from hot spring metagenomic libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrandi, Erica Elisa; Sayer, Christopher; Isupov, Michail N.;

    2015-01-01

    The epoxide hydrolases (EHs) represent an attractive option for the synthesis of chiral epoxides and 1,2-diols which are valuable building blocks for the synthesis of several pharmaceutical compounds. A metagenomic approach has been used to identify two new members of the atypical EH limonene-1...

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of a spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation metagenome reveals new insights into its bacterial and fungal community diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Illeghems

    Full Text Available This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing. Several sequence-based and composition-based taxonomic profiling tools were used and evaluated to avoid software-dependent results and their outcome was validated by comparison with previously obtained culture-dependent and culture-independent data. Overall, this approach revealed a wider bacterial (mainly γ-Proteobacteria and fungal diversity than previously found. Further, the use of a combination of different classification methods, in a software-independent way, helped to understand the actual composition of the microbial ecosystem under study. In addition, bacteriophage-related sequences were found. The bacterial diversity depended partially on the methods used, as composition-based methods predicted a wider diversity than sequence-based methods, and as classification methods based solely on phylogenetic marker genes predicted a more restricted diversity compared with methods that took all reads into account. The metagenomic sequencing analysis identified Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Acetobacter pasteurianus as the prevailing species. Also, the presence of occasional members of the cocoa bean fermentation process was revealed (such as Erwinia tasmaniensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Oenococcus oeni. Furthermore, the sequence reads associated with viral communities were of a restricted diversity, dominated by Myoviridae and Siphoviridae, and reflecting Lactobacillus as the dominant host. To conclude, an accurate overview of all members of a cocoa bean fermentation process sample was revealed, indicating the superiority of metagenomic sequencing over previously used techniques.

  7. Challenges of studying viral aerosol metagenomics and communities in comparison with bacterial and fungal aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussin, Aaron J; Marr, Linsey C; Bibby, Kyle J

    2014-08-01

    Despite the obvious importance of viral transmission and ecology to medicine, epidemiology, ecology, agriculture, and microbiology, the study of viral bioaerosols and community structure has remained a vastly underexplored area, due to both unresolved technical challenges and unrecognized importance. High-throughput, culture-independent techniques such as viral metagenomics are beginning to revolutionize the study of viral ecology. With recent developments in viral metagenomics, characterization of viral bioaerosol communities provides an opportunity for high-impact future research. However, there remain significant challenges for the study of viral bioaerosols compared with viruses in other matrices, such as water, the human gut, and soil. Collecting enough biomass is essential for successful metagenomic analysis, but this is a challenge with viral bioaerosols. Herein, we provide a perspective on the importance of studying viral bioaerosols, the challenges of studying viral community structure, and the potential opportunities for improvements in methods to study viruses in indoor and outdoor air.

  8. Applying meta-pathway analyses through metagenomics to identify the functional properties of the major bacterial communities of a single spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2015-09-01

    A high-resolution functional metagenomic analysis of a representative single sample of a Brazilian spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process was carried out to gain insight into its bacterial community functioning. By reconstruction of microbial meta-pathways based on metagenomic data, the current knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of bacterial members involved in the cocoa bean fermentation ecosystem was extended. Functional meta-pathway analysis revealed the distribution of the metabolic pathways between the bacterial members involved. The metabolic capabilities of the lactic acid bacteria present were most associated with the heterolactic fermentation and citrate assimilation pathways. The role of Enterobacteriaceae in the conversion of substrates was shown through the use of the mixed-acid fermentation and methylglyoxal detoxification pathways. Furthermore, several other potential functional roles for Enterobacteriaceae were indicated, such as pectinolysis and citrate assimilation. Concerning acetic acid bacteria, metabolic pathways were partially reconstructed, in particular those related to responses toward stress, explaining their metabolic activities during cocoa bean fermentation processes. Further, the in-depth metagenomic analysis unveiled functionalities involved in bacterial competitiveness, such as the occurrence of CRISPRs and potential bacteriocin production. Finally, comparative analysis of the metagenomic data with bacterial genomes of cocoa bean fermentation isolates revealed the applicability of the selected strains as functional starter cultures. PMID:25998815

  9. Applying meta-pathway analyses through metagenomics to identify the functional properties of the major bacterial communities of a single spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeghems, Koen; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2015-09-01

    A high-resolution functional metagenomic analysis of a representative single sample of a Brazilian spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation process was carried out to gain insight into its bacterial community functioning. By reconstruction of microbial meta-pathways based on metagenomic data, the current knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of bacterial members involved in the cocoa bean fermentation ecosystem was extended. Functional meta-pathway analysis revealed the distribution of the metabolic pathways between the bacterial members involved. The metabolic capabilities of the lactic acid bacteria present were most associated with the heterolactic fermentation and citrate assimilation pathways. The role of Enterobacteriaceae in the conversion of substrates was shown through the use of the mixed-acid fermentation and methylglyoxal detoxification pathways. Furthermore, several other potential functional roles for Enterobacteriaceae were indicated, such as pectinolysis and citrate assimilation. Concerning acetic acid bacteria, metabolic pathways were partially reconstructed, in particular those related to responses toward stress, explaining their metabolic activities during cocoa bean fermentation processes. Further, the in-depth metagenomic analysis unveiled functionalities involved in bacterial competitiveness, such as the occurrence of CRISPRs and potential bacteriocin production. Finally, comparative analysis of the metagenomic data with bacterial genomes of cocoa bean fermentation isolates revealed the applicability of the selected strains as functional starter cultures.

  10. Current and future resources for functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Nguyen Lam; Jiujun eCheng; Katja eEngel; Josh David Neufeld; Trevor Carlos Charles

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomics is a powerful experimental approach for studying gene function, starting from the extracted DNA of mixed microbial populations. A functional approach relies on the construction and screening of metagenomic libraries – physical libraries that contain DNA cloned from environmental metagenomes. The information obtained from functional metagenomics can help in future annotations of gene function and serve as a complement to sequence-based metagenomics. In this Perspective,...

  11. A novel esterase gene cloned from a metagenomic library from neritic sediments of the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine microbes are a large and diverse group, which are exposed to a wide variety of pressure, temperature, salinity, nutrient availability and other environmental conditions. They provide a huge potential source of novel enzymes with unique properties that may be useful in industry and biotechnology. To explore the lipolytic genetic resources in the South China Sea, 23 sediment samples were collected in the depth Results A metagenomic library of South China Sea sediments assemblage in plasmid vector containing about 194 Mb of community DNA was prepared. Screening of a part of the unamplified library resulted in isolation of 15 unique lipolytic clones with the ability to hydrolyze tributyrin. A positive recombinant clone (pNLE1, containing a novel esterase (Est_p1, was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified. In a series of assays, Est_p1 displayed maximal activity at pH 8.57, 40°C, with ρ-Nitrophenyl butyrate (C4 as substrate. Compared to other metagenomic esterases, Est_p1 played a notable role in specificity for substrate C4 (kcat/Km value 11,500 S-1m M-1 and showed no inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suggested that the substrate binding pocket was suitable for substrate C4 and the serine active-site residue was buried at the bottom of substrate binding pocket which sheltered by a lid structure. Conclusions Esterase, which specificity towards short chain fatty acids, especially butanoic acid, is commercially available as potent flavoring tools. According the outstanding activity and specificity for substrate C4, Est_p1 has potential application in flavor industries requiring hydrolysis of short chain esters.

  12. Using metagenomics and metatranscriptomics to study specific bacterial species involved in biological phosphorus removal from wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel;

    to enrich for bacteria contributing to phosphorus removal and their normal competitors. To extract complete genomes we generated two metagenomes from each reactor, taken approximately 1 month apart, using the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. Due to low micro-diversity in the reactors (2-15 dominating species...

  13. Functional metagenomics reveals novel pathways of prebiotic breakdown by human gut bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Cecchini, Davide; Laville, Elisabeth; Laguerre, Sandrine; Robe, Patrick; Leclerc, Marion; Dore, Joel; Henrissat, Bernard; Remaud Simeon, Magali; Monsan, Pierre; Veronese, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine hosts a complex bacterial community that plays a major role in nutrition and in maintaining human health. A functional metagenomic approach was used to explore the prebiotic breakdown potential of human gut bacteria, including non-cultivated ones. Two metagenomic libraries, constructed from ileum mucosa and fecal microbiota, were screened for hydrolytic activities on the prebiotic carbohydrates inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharide...

  14. Bacterial Bile Metabolising Gene Abundance in Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis and Type 2 Diabetes Metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G.; Martoni, Christopher J.; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L.

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to determine the importance of bile acid modification genes in the gut microbiome of inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetic patients. We used publicly available metagenomic datasets from the Human Microbiome Project and the MetaHIT consortium, and determined the abundance of bile salt hydrolase gene (bsh), 7 alpha-dehydroxylase gene (adh) and 7-alpha hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene (hsdh) in fecal bacteria in diseased populations of Crohn's disease (CD), Ulc...

  15. Comparative Metagenomic Profiling of Symbiotic Bacterial Communities Associated with Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi and Dermacentor reticulatus Ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kurilshikov

    Full Text Available Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes pavlovskyi, and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks inhabiting Western Siberia are responsible for the transmission of a number of etiological agents that cause human and animal tick-borne diseases. Because these ticks are abundant in the suburbs of large cities, agricultural areas, and popular tourist sites and frequently attack people and livestock, data regarding the microbiomes of these organisms are required. Using metagenomic 16S profiling, we evaluate bacterial communities associated with I. persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi, and D. reticulatus ticks collected from the Novosibirsk region of Russia. A total of 1214 ticks were used for this study. DNA extracted from the ticks was pooled according to tick species and sex. Sequencing of the V3-V5 domains of 16S rRNA genes was performed using the Illumina Miseq platform. The following bacterial genera were prevalent in the examined communities: Acinetobacter (all three tick species, Rickettsia (I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus and Francisella (D. reticulatus. B. burgdorferi sensu lato and B. miyamotoi sequences were detected in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi but not in D. reticulatus ticks. The pooled samples of all tick species studied contained bacteria from the Anaplasmataceae family, although their occurrence was low. DNA from A. phagocytophilum and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis was first observed in I. pavlovskyi ticks. Significant inter-species differences in the number of bacterial taxa as well as intra-species diversity related to tick sex were observed. The bacterial communities associated with the I. pavlovskyi ticks displayed a higher biodiversity compared with those of the I. persulcatus and D. reticulatus ticks. Bacterial community structure was also diverse across the studied tick species, as shown by permutational analysis of variance using the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metric (p = 0.002. Between-sex variation was confirmed by PERMANOVA testing in I

  16. Characterization of a Novel Alkaline Family VIII Esterase with S-Enantiomer Preference from a Compost Metagenomic Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Jung, Won Kyeong; Kim, Yong Ho; Ryu, Bum Han; Kim, T Doohun; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Hoon

    2016-02-01

    A novel esterase gene, est7K, was isolated from a compost metagenomic library. The gene encoded a protein of 411 amino acids and the molecular mass of the Est7K was estimated to be 44,969 Da with no signal peptide. Est7K showed the highest identity of 57% to EstA3, which is an esterase from a drinking water metagenome, when compared with the enzymes with reported properties. Est7K had three motifs, SMTK, YSV, and WGG, which correspond to the typical motifs of family VIII esterases, SxxK, Yxx, and WGG, respectively. Est7K did not have the GxSxG motif in most lipolytic enzymes. Three additional motifs, LxxxPGxxW, PLGMxDTxF, and GGxG, were found to be conserved in family VIII enzymes. The results of the phylogenetic analysis and the alignment study suggest that family VIII enzymes could be classified into two subfamilies, VIII.1 and VIII.2. The purified Est7K was optimally active at 40°C and pH 10.0. It was activated to exhibit a 2.1-fold higher activity by the presence of 30% methanol. It preferred short-length p-nitrophenyl esters, particularly p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and efficiently hydrolyzed glyceryl tributyrate. It did not hydrolyze β-lactamase substrates, tertiary alcohol esters, glyceryl trioleate, fish oil, and olive oil. Est7K preferred an Senantiomer, such as (S)-methyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpropionate, as the substrate. The tolerance to methanol and the substrate specificity may provide potential advantage in the use of the enzyme in pharmaceutical and other biotechnological processes.

  17. Using DNA Microarrays To Identify Library-Independent Markers for Bacterial Source Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Soule, Marilyn; Kuhn, Edward; Loge, Frank; Gay, John; Call, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial source tracking is used to apportion fecal pollution among putative sources. Within this context, library-independent markers are genetic or phenotypic traits that can be used to identify the host origin without a need for library-dependent classification functions. The objective of this project was to use mixed-genome Enterococcus microarrays to identify library-independent markers. Separate shotgun libraries were prepared for five host groups (cow, dog, elk/deer, human, and waterf...

  18. Screening and characterization of a novel ruminal cellulase gene (Umcel-1) from a metagenomic library of gayal (Bos frontalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bi-feng; MAO Hua-ming; YANG Shu-Li; ZHU Ya-xin; GU Zhao-bing; CHEN Yuan; LENG Jing; GOU Xiao; FENG Li; LI Qing; XI Dong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Gayal is a rare semi-wild bovine species found in the Indo-China. They can graze grasses, including bamboo leaves, as wel as reeds and other plant species, and grow to higher mature live weights than Yunnan Yelow cattle maintained in similar harsh environments. The aim of this study was to identify speciifc celulase in the gayal rumen. A metagenomic fosmid library was constructed using genomic DNA isolated from the ruminal contents of four adult gayals. This library contained 38400 clones with an average insert size of 35.5 kb. TheUmcel-1 gene was isolated from this library. Investigation of the celulase activity of 24 random clones led to the identiifcation of theUmcel-1 gene, which exhibited the most potent celulase activity. Sequencing theUmcel-1 gene revealed that it contained an open reading frame of 942 base pairs that encoded a product of 313 amino acids. The putativegene Umcel-1 product belonged to the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and showed the highest homology to the celulase (GenBank accession no. YP_004310852.1) fromClostridium lentocelum DSM 5427, with 44% identity and 62% similarity. TheUmcel-1 gene was heterologously expressed inEscherichia coli BL21, and recombinant Umcel-1 was puriifed. The activity of puriifed recombinant Umcel-1 was assessed, and the results revealed that it hydrolyzed carboxymethyl celulose with optimal activity at pH 5.5 and 45°C. To our knowledge, this study provides the ifrst evidence for a celulase produced by bacteria in gayal rumen.

  19. Cloning and identification of novel hydrolase genes from a dairy cow rumen metagenomic library and characterization of a cellulase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Xia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in cellulose degrading enzymes has increased in recent years due to the expansion of the cellulosic biofuel industry. The rumen is a highly adapted environment for the degradation of cellulose and a promising source of enzymes for industrial use. To identify cellulase enzymes that may be of such use we have undertaken a functional metagenomic screen to identify cellulase enzymes from the bacterial community in the rumen of a grass-hay fed dairy cow. Results Twenty five clones specifying cellulose activity were identified. Subcloning and sequence analysis of a subset of these hydrolase-positive clones identified 10 endoglucanase genes. Preliminary characterization of the encoded cellulases was carried out using crude extracts of each of the subclones. Zymogram analysis using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate showed a single positive band for each subclone, confirming that only one functional cellulase gene was present in each. One cellulase gene, designated Cel14b22, was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli and purified for further characterization. The purified recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 6.0 and 50°C. It was stable over a broad pH range, from pH 4.0 to 10.0. The activity was significantly enhanced by Mn2+ and dramatically reduced by Fe3+ or Cu2+. The enzyme hydrolyzed a wide range of beta-1,3-, and beta-1,4-linked polysaccharides, with varying activities. Activities toward microcrystalline cellulose and filter paper were relatively high, while the highest activity was toward Oat Gum. Conclusion The present study shows that a functional metagenomic approach can be used to isolate previously uncharacterized cellulases from the rumen environment.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of soil microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae, rare resurrection plants growing in the Balkan Peninsula, produce a high amount of phenolic compounds as a response to stress. The composition and size of bacterial communities in two rhizosphere soil samples of these plants were analyzed using a metagenomic approach. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments together with DAPI staining showed that the metabolically active bacteria represent only a small fraction, approximately 5%, of total soil bacteria. Using universal bacteria - specific primers 16S rDNA genes were amplified directly from metagenomic DNAs and two libraries were constructed. The Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RLFP method was used in library screening. Amongst 192 clones, 35 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs were determined from the rhizosphere of R. nathaliae, and 13 OTUs out of 80 clones in total from the library of R. serbica. Representative clones from each OTU were sequenced. The majority of sequences from metagenomes showed very little similarity to any cultured bacteria. In conclusion, the bacterial communities in the studied soil samples showed quite poor diversity. .

  1. Anthropogenic N deposition slows decay by favoring bacterial metabolism: Insights from metagenomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Freedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Litter decomposition is an enzymatically-complex process that is mediated by a diverse assemblage of saprophytic microorganisms. It is a globally important biogeochemical process that can be suppressed by anthropogenic N deposition. In a northern hardwood forest ecosystem located in Michigan, USA, 20 years of experimentally increased atmospheric N deposition has reduced forest floor decay and increased soil C storage. Here, we paired extracellular enzyme assays with shotgun metagenomics to assess if anthropogenic N deposition has altered the functional potential of microbial communities inhabiting decaying forest floor. Experimental N deposition significantly reduced the activity of extracellular enzymes mediating plant cell wall decay, which occurred concurrently with changes in the relative abundance of metagenomic functional gene pathways mediating the metabolism of carbohydrates, aromatic compounds, as well as microbial respiration. Moreover, experimental N deposition increased the relative abundance of 50 of the 60 gene pathways, the majority of which were associated with saprotrophic bacteria. Conversely, the relative abundance and composition of fungal genes mediating the metabolism of plant litter was not affected by experimental N deposition. Future rates of atmospheric N deposition have favored saprotrophic soil bacteria, whereas the metabolic potential of saprotrophic fungi appears resilient to this agent of environmental change. Results presented here provide evidence that changes in the functional capacity of saprotrophic soil microorganisms mediate how anthropogenic N deposition increases C storage in soil.

  2. Increasing Metagenomic Resolution of Microbiome Interactions Through Functional Phylogenomics and Bacterial Sub-Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The genomic composition of the microbiome and its relationship with the environment is an exciting open question in biology. Metagenomics is a useful tool in the discovery of previously unknown taxa, but its use to understand the functional and ecological capacities of the microbiome is limited until taxonomy and function are understood in the context of the community. We suggest that this can be achieved using a combined functional phylogenomics and co-culture-based experimental strategy that can increase our capacity to measure sub-community interactions. Functional phylogenomics can identify and partition the genome such that hidden gene functions and gene clusters with unique evolutionary signals are revealed. We can test these phylogenomic predictions using an experimental model based on sub-community populations that represent a subset of the diversity directly obtained from environmental samples. These populations increase the detection of mechanisms that drive functional forces in the assembly of the microbiome, in particular the role of metabolites from key taxa in community interactions. Our combined approach leverages the potential of metagenomics to address biological questions from ecological systems. PMID:26904093

  3. Natural Product Discovery through Improved Functional Metagenomics in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hala A; Low-Beinart, Lila; Obiajulu, Joseph U; Brady, Sean F

    2016-08-01

    Because the majority of environmental bacteria are not easily culturable, access to many bacterially encoded secondary metabolites will be dependent on the development of improved functional metagenomic screening methods. In this study, we examined a collection of diverse Streptomyces species for the best innate ability to heterologously express biosynthetic gene clusters. We then optimized methods for constructing high quality metagenomic cosmid libraries in the best Streptomyces host. An initial screen of a 1.5 million-membered metagenomic library constructed in Streptomyces albus, the species that exhibited the highest propensity for heterologous expression of gene clusters, led to the identification of the novel natural product metatricycloene (1). Metatricycloene is a tricyclic polyene encoded by a reductive, iterative polyketide-like gene cluster. Related gene clusters found in sequenced genomes appear to encode a largely unexplored collection of structurally diverse, polyene-based metabolites. PMID:27447056

  4. Current and future resources for functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Kathy N.; Cheng, Jiujun; Engel, Katja; Neufeld, Josh D.; Charles, Trevor C.

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomics is a powerful experimental approach for studying gene function, starting from the extracted DNA of mixed microbial populations. A functional approach relies on the construction and screening of metagenomic libraries—physical libraries that contain DNA cloned from environmental metagenomes. The information obtained from functional metagenomics can help in future annotations of gene function and serve as a complement to sequence-based metagenomics. In this Perspective, w...

  5. Bacterial pathogens and community composition in advanced sewage treatment systems revealed by metagenomics analysis based on high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wang, Zhu; Huang, Kailong; Wang, Yuan; Liang, Weigang; Tan, Yunfei; Liu, Bo; Tang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    This study used 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to investigate bacterial pathogens and their potential virulence in a sewage treatment plant (STP) applying both conventional and advanced treatment processes. Pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing consistently demonstrated that Arcobacter genus occupied over 43.42% of total abundance of potential pathogens in the STP. At species level, potential pathogens Arcobacter butzleri, Aeromonas hydrophila and Klebsiella pneumonia dominated in raw sewage, which was also confirmed by quantitative real time PCR. Illumina sequencing also revealed prevalence of various types of pathogenicity islands and virulence proteins in the STP. Most of the potential pathogens and virulence factors were eliminated in the STP, and the removal efficiency mainly depended on oxidation ditch. Compared with sand filtration, magnetic resin seemed to have higher removals in most of the potential pathogens and virulence factors. However, presence of the residual A. butzleri in the final effluent still deserves more concerns. The findings indicate that sewage acts as an important source of environmental pathogens, but STPs can effectively control their spread in the environment. Joint use of the high-throughput sequencing technologies is considered a reliable method for deep and comprehensive overview of environmental bacterial virulence.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 16 β-Agarase from a Mangrove Soil Metagenomic Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhimao; Su, Hongfei; Zhang, Si

    2016-01-01

    A mangrove soil metagenomic library was constructed and a β-agarase gene designated as AgaML was isolated by functional screening. The gene encoded for a 659-amino-acids polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 71.6 kDa. The deduced polypeptide sequences of AgaML showed the highest identity of 73% with the glycoside hydrolase family 16 β-agarase from Microbulbifer agarilyticus in the GenBank database. AgaML was cloned and highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified recombinant protein, AgaML, showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 7.0. The kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax values toward agarose were 4.6 mg·mL(-1) and 967.5 μM·min(-1)·mg(-1), respectively. AgaML hydrolyzed the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages of agar to generate neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) as the main products. These characteristics suggest that AgaML has potential application in cosmetic, pharmaceuticals and food industries. PMID:27548158

  7. Isolation and Characterization of a Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 16 β-Agarase from a Mangrove Soil Metagenomic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhimao; Su, Hongfei; Zhang, Si

    2016-01-01

    A mangrove soil metagenomic library was constructed and a β-agarase gene designated as AgaML was isolated by functional screening. The gene encoded for a 659-amino-acids polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 71.6 kDa. The deduced polypeptide sequences of AgaML showed the highest identity of 73% with the glycoside hydrolase family 16 β-agarase from Microbulbifer agarilyticus in the GenBank database. AgaML was cloned and highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified recombinant protein, AgaML, showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 7.0. The kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax values toward agarose were 4.6 mg·mL−1 and 967.5 μM·min−1·mg−1, respectively. AgaML hydrolyzed the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages of agar to generate neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) as the main products. These characteristics suggest that AgaML has potential application in cosmetic, pharmaceuticals and food industries. PMID:27548158

  8. Screening and characterization of a novel cellulase gene from the gut microflora of Hermetia illucens using metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Muk; Lee, Young-Seok; Seo, So-Hyeon; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Sim, Joon-Soo; Koo, Bon-Sung

    2014-09-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library was constructed using genomic DNA isolated from the gut microflora of Hermetia illucens, a black soldier fly. A cellulase-positive clone, with the CS10 gene, was identified by extensive Congo-red overlay screenings for cellulase activity from the fosmid library of 92,000 clones. The CS10 gene was composed of a 996 bp DNA sequence encoding the mature protein of 331 amino acids. The deduced amino acids of CS10 showed 72% sequence identity with the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 gene of Dysgonomonas mossii, displaying no significant sequence homology to already known cellulases. The purified CS10 protein presented a single band of cellulase activity with a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel and zymogram. The purified CS10 protein exhibited optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and the thermostability and pH stability of CS10 were preserved at the ranges of 20~50°C and pH 4.0~10.0. CS10 exhibited little loss of cellulase activity against various chemical reagents such as 10% polar organic solvents, 1% non-ionic detergents, and 0.5 M denaturing agents. Moreover, the substrate specificity and the product patterns by thinlayer chromatography suggested that CS10 is an endo-β-1,4-glucanase. From these biochemical properties of CS10, it is expected that the enzyme has the potential for application in industrial processes. PMID:25022521

  9. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric R; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed that

  10. Metagenomics reveals pervasive bacterial populations and reduced community diversity across the Alaska tundra ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Robert Johnston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 grams are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth by sequencing, and the recovery of twenty-seven high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity. Collectively

  11. Bacterial bile metabolising gene abundance in Crohn's, ulcerative colitis and type 2 diabetes metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Labbé

    Full Text Available We performed an analysis to determine the importance of bile acid modification genes in the gut microbiome of inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetic patients. We used publicly available metagenomic datasets from the Human Microbiome Project and the MetaHIT consortium, and determined the abundance of bile salt hydrolase gene (bsh, 7 alpha-dehydroxylase gene (adh and 7-alpha hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene (hsdh in fecal bacteria in diseased populations of Crohn's disease (CD, Ulcerative Colitis (UC and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Phylum level abundance analysis showed a significant reduction in Firmicute-derived bsh in UC and T2DM patients but not in CD patients, relative to healthy controls. Reduction of adh and hsdh genes was also seen in UC and T2DM patients, while an increase was observed in the CD population as compared to healthy controls. A further analysis of the bsh genes showed significant differences in the correlations of certain Firmicutes families with disease or healthy populations. From this observation we proceeded to analyse BSH protein sequences and identified BSH proteins clusters representing the most abundant strains in our analysis of Firmicute bsh genes. The abundance of the bsh genes corresponding to one of these protein clusters was significantly reduced in all disease states relative to healthy controls. This cluster includes bsh genes derived from Lachospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Ruminococcaceae families. This metagenomic analysis provides evidence of the importance of bile acid modifying enzymes in health and disease. It further highlights the importance of identifying gene and protein clusters, as the same gene may be associated with health or disease, depending on the strains expressing the enzyme, and differences in the enzymes themselves.

  12. Metagenomics and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, L; Hernandez, A; Sanchez, M B; Martinez, J L

    2012-07-01

    Most of the bacterial species that form part of the biosphere have never been cultivated. In this situation, a comprehensive study of bacterial communities requires the utilization of non-culture-based methods, which have been named metagenomics. In this paper we review the use of different metagenomic techniques for understanding the effect of antibiotics on microbial communities, to synthesize new antimicrobial compounds and to analyse the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems. These techniques include functional metagenomics, which serves to find new antibiotics or new antibiotic resistance genes, and descriptive metagenomics, which serves to analyse changes in the composition of the microbiota and to track the presence and abundance of already known antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems.

  13. Identification and in silico characterization of two novel genes encoding peptidases S8 found by functional screening in a metagenomic library of Yucatán underground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinar-Hernández, Max M; Peña-Ramírez, Yuri J; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Canto-Canché, Blondy B; De Los Santos-Briones, César; O'Connor-Sánchez, Aileen

    2016-11-15

    Metagenomics is a culture-independent technology that allows access to novel and potentially useful genetic resources from a wide range of unknown microorganisms. In this study, a fosmid metagenomic library of tropical underground water was constructed, and clones were functionally screened for extracellular proteolytic activity. One of the positive clones, containing a 41,614-bp insert, had two genes with 60% and 68% identity respectively with a peptidase S8 of Chitinimonas koreensis. When these genes were individually sub-cloned, in both cases their sub-clones showed proteolytic phenotype, confirming that they both encode functional proteases. These genes -named PrAY5 and PrAY6- are next to each other. They are similar in size (1845bp and 1824bp respectively) and share 66.5% identity. An extensive in silico characterization showed that their ORFs encode complex zymogens having a signal peptide at their 5' end, followed by a pro-peptide, a catalytic region, and a PPC domain at their 3' end. Their translated sequences were classified as peptidases S8A by sequence comparisons against the non-redundant database and corroborated by Pfam and MEROPS. Phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic region showed that they encode novel proteases that clustered with the sub-family S8_13, which according to the CDD database at NCBI, is an uncharacterized subfamily. They clustered in a clade different from the other three proteases S8 found so far by functional metagenomics, and also different from proteases S8 found in sequenced environmental samples, thereby expanding the range of potentially useful proteases that have been identified by metagenomics. I-TASSER modeling corroborated that they may be subtilases, thus possibly they participate in the hydrolysis of proteins with broad specificity for peptide bonds, and have a preference for a large uncharged residue in P1.

  14. Identification and in silico characterization of two novel genes encoding peptidases S8 found by functional screening in a metagenomic library of Yucatán underground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinar-Hernández, Max M; Peña-Ramírez, Yuri J; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Canto-Canché, Blondy B; De Los Santos-Briones, César; O'Connor-Sánchez, Aileen

    2016-11-15

    Metagenomics is a culture-independent technology that allows access to novel and potentially useful genetic resources from a wide range of unknown microorganisms. In this study, a fosmid metagenomic library of tropical underground water was constructed, and clones were functionally screened for extracellular proteolytic activity. One of the positive clones, containing a 41,614-bp insert, had two genes with 60% and 68% identity respectively with a peptidase S8 of Chitinimonas koreensis. When these genes were individually sub-cloned, in both cases their sub-clones showed proteolytic phenotype, confirming that they both encode functional proteases. These genes -named PrAY5 and PrAY6- are next to each other. They are similar in size (1845bp and 1824bp respectively) and share 66.5% identity. An extensive in silico characterization showed that their ORFs encode complex zymogens having a signal peptide at their 5' end, followed by a pro-peptide, a catalytic region, and a PPC domain at their 3' end. Their translated sequences were classified as peptidases S8A by sequence comparisons against the non-redundant database and corroborated by Pfam and MEROPS. Phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic region showed that they encode novel proteases that clustered with the sub-family S8_13, which according to the CDD database at NCBI, is an uncharacterized subfamily. They clustered in a clade different from the other three proteases S8 found so far by functional metagenomics, and also different from proteases S8 found in sequenced environmental samples, thereby expanding the range of potentially useful proteases that have been identified by metagenomics. I-TASSER modeling corroborated that they may be subtilases, thus possibly they participate in the hydrolysis of proteins with broad specificity for peptide bonds, and have a preference for a large uncharged residue in P1. PMID:27522038

  15. Construction of Metagenomic Fosmid Library from Activated Sludge%活性污泥宏基因组Fosmid文库的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟敏; 曲媛媛; 周集体; 许炳雯; 曹湘禹

    2012-01-01

    The construction of large-fragment metagenomic library helps to discover large-fragment functional genes and analyze their organization and function. In this paper, first, three methods, namely the CTAB method, the kit and the agarose-embedding method, were used to extract metagenomic DNA from activated sludge, and DNA fragments larger than 23 kbp were extracted by the agarose-embedding method. Then, the metagenomic DNA was liga-ted into pCClFOS vector to construct a Fosmid library consisting of 5280 clones with an average insert fragment size of 35~40kbp, which covered about 200Mbp of metagenomic DNA. Finally, one clone exhibiting amylase activity was rapidly screened from 200 randomly-picked clones via the activity-based screening. It is thus concluded that the Fosmid library constructed from activated sludge is feasible in the screening of novel functional genes by activity-based methods.%大插入片段宏基因组文库的构建是开发大片段目的基因及分析其结构与功能的基础.文中分别采用十六烷基三甲基溴化铵( CTAB)法、试剂盒及琼脂糖包埋法提取活性污泥宏基因组DNA,其中琼脂糖包埋法获得的DNA片段大于23 kbp,利用此DNA成功构建了以pCC1FOS为载体的Fosmid文库,该文库含有5280个克隆,平均插入片段长度为35~40kbp,共包含约200Mbp的宏基因组DNA.从此文库中随机挑选200个克隆,利用活性筛选方法快速筛选到了1个含有淀粉酶的阳性克隆,表明活性污泥Fosmid文库可用于功能基因的活性筛选,具有开发新基因的潜力.

  16. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  17. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for Zhikong Scallop Chlamys farreri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang; ZHANG Xiaojun; Chantel F.SCHEURING; ZHANG Hongbin; LI Fuhua; XIANG Jianhai

    2008-01-01

    Two Large-insert genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri were constructed to promote our genetic and genomic research.High-quality megabase-sized DNA was isolated from the adductor muscle of the scallop and partially digested by BamH I and Mbo I,respectively.The BamH I library consisted of 53760 clones while the Mbo I library consisted of 7680 clones.Approximately 96% of the clones in BamH I library contained nuclear DNA inserts in average size of 100 kb,providing a coverage of 5.3 haploid genome equivalents.Similarly,the Mbo I library with an average insert of 145 kb and no insert-empty clones,thus providing a genome coverage of 1.1 haploid genome equivalents.

  18. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-12-07

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under selection pressure. Spanning three protein superfamilies, these break new ground in sequence space: promiscuity now connects enzymes with only distantly related sequences. Most hits could not have been predicted by sequence analysis, because the desired activities have never been ascribed to similar sequences, showing how this approach complements bioinformatic harvesting of metagenomic sequencing data. Functional screening of a library of unprecedented size with excellent assay sensitivity has been instrumental in identifying rare genes constituting catalytically versatile hubs in sequence space as potential starting points for the acquisition of new functions.

  19. An exceptionally cold-adapted alpha-amylase from a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A cold-active α-amylase, AmyI3C6, identified by a functional metagenomics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sequence analysis showed that the AmyI3C6 amylase was similar to α-amylases from the class Clostridia and revealed classical characteristics of cold-ad...... in two commercial detergents tested, suggesting that the AmyI3C6 α-amylase may be useful as a detergent enzyme in environmentally friendly, low-temperature laundry processes. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.......A cold-active α-amylase, AmyI3C6, identified by a functional metagenomics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sequence analysis showed that the AmyI3C6 amylase was similar to α-amylases from the class Clostridia and revealed classical characteristics of cold-adapted...

  20. Multiplexed metagenome mining using short DNA sequence tags facilitates targeted discovery of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jeremy G; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Smith, Alexandra G; Ternei, Melinda A; Calle, Paula Y; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Montiel, Daniel; Brady, Sean F

    2015-04-01

    In molecular evolutionary analyses, short DNA sequences are used to infer phylogenetic relationships among species. Here we apply this principle to the study of bacterial biosynthesis, enabling the targeted isolation of previously unidentified natural products directly from complex metagenomes. Our approach uses short natural product sequence tags derived from conserved biosynthetic motifs to profile biosynthetic diversity in the environment and then guide the recovery of gene clusters from metagenomic libraries. The methodology is conceptually simple, requires only a small investment in sequencing, and is not computationally demanding. To demonstrate the power of this approach to natural product discovery we conducted a computational search for epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors within 185 globally distributed soil metagenomes. This led to the identification of 99 unique epoxyketone sequence tags, falling into 6 phylogenetically distinct clades. Complete gene clusters associated with nine unique tags were recovered from four saturating soil metagenomic libraries. Using heterologous expression methodologies, seven potent epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors (clarepoxcins A-E and landepoxcins A and B) were produced from these pathways, including compounds with different warhead structures and a naturally occurring halohydrin prodrug. This study provides a template for the targeted expansion of bacterially derived natural products using the global metagenome.

  1. Conservative fragments in bacterial 16S rRNA genes and primer design for 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons in metagenomic studies

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2009-10-09

    Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplicons have been widely used in the classification of uncultured bacteria inhabiting environmental niches. Primers targeting conservative regions of the rDNAs are used to generate amplicons of variant regions that are informative in taxonomic assignment. One problem is that the percentage coverage and application scope of the primers used in previous studies are largely unknown. In this study, conservative fragments of available rDNA sequences were first mined and then used to search for candidate primers within the fragments by measuring the coverage rate defined as the percentage of bacterial sequences containing the target. Thirty predicted primers with a high coverage rate (>90%) were identified, which were basically located in the same conservative regions as known primers in previous reports, whereas 30% of the known primers were associated with a coverage rate of <90%. The application scope of the primers was also examined by calculating the percentages of failed detections in bacterial phyla. Primers A519-539, E969- 983, E1063-1081, U515 and E517, are highly recommended because of their high coverage in almost all phyla. As expected, the three predominant phyla, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Proteobacteria, are best covered by the predicted primers. The primers recommended in this report shall facilitate a comprehensive and reliable survey of bacterial diversity in metagenomic studies. © 2009 Wang, Qian.

  2. Functional Metagenome Mining of Soil for a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyunjoo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics over recent decades has led to bacterial resistance against antibiotics, including gentamicin, one of the most effective aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistance is problematic for hospitals, since gentamicin is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic for the control of bacterial pathogens in the clinic. Previous study to identify gentamicin resistance genes from environmental samples have been conducted using culture-dependent screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we employed a metagenome-based culture-independent protocol to identify gentamicin resistance genes. Through functional screening of metagenome libraries derived from soil samples, a fosmid clone was selected as it conferred strong gentamicin resistance. To identify a specific functioning gene conferring gentamicin resistance from a selected fosmid clone (35-40 kb), a shot-gun library was constructed and four shot-gun clones (2-3 kb) were selected. Further characterization of these clones revealed that they contained sequences similar to that of the RNA ligase, T4 rnlA that is known as a toxin gene. The overexpression of the rnlA-like gene in Escherichia coli increased gentamicin resistance, indicating that this toxin gene modulates this trait. The results of our metagenome library analysis suggest that the rnlA-like gene may represent a new class of gentamicin resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrate that the soil metagenome can provide an important resource for the identification of antibiotic resistance genes, which are valuable molecular targets in efforts to overcome antibiotic resistance. PMID:26699755

  3. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses....... It will illustrate the general workflow of a metagenomic study and introduce the three different metagenomic approaches: (1) the random shotgun approach that focuses on the metagenome as a whole, (2) the targeted approach that focuses on metagenomic amplicon sequences, and (3) the function-driven approach that uses...... heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics....

  4. Complete metagenome sequencing based bacterial diversity and functional insights from basaltic hot spring of Unkeshwar, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan T. Mehetre

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unkeshwar hot springs are located at geographical South East Deccan Continental basalt of India. Here, we report the microbial community analysis of this hot spring using whole metagenome shotgun sequencing approach. The analysis revealed a total of 848,096 reads with 212.87 Mbps with 50.87% G + C content. Metagenomic sequences were deposited in SRA database with accession number (SUB1242219. Community analysis revealed 99.98% sequences belonging to bacteria and 0.01% to archaea and 0.01% to Viruses. The data obtained revealed 41 phyla including bacteria and Archaea and including 719 different species. In taxonomic analysis, the dominant phyla were found as, Actinobacteria (56%, Verrucomicrobia (24%, Bacteriodes (13%, Deinococcus-Thermus (3% and firmicutes (2% and Viruses (2%. Furthermore, functional annotation using pathway information revealed dynamic potential of hot spring community in terms of metabolism, environmental information processing, cellular processes and other important aspects. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis of each contig sequence by assigning KEGG Orthology (KO numbers revealed contig sequences that were assigned to metabolism, organismal system, Environmental Information Processing, cellular processes and human diseases with some unclassified sequences. The Unkeshwar hot springs offer rich phylogenetic diversity and metabolic potential for biotechnological applications.

  5. Feasibility of physical map construction from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome libraries of polyploid plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doležel Jaroslav

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of closely related genomes in polyploid species makes the assembly of total genomic sequence from shotgun sequence reads produced by the current sequencing platforms exceedingly difficult, if not impossible. Genomes of polyploid species could be sequenced following the ordered-clone sequencing approach employing contigs of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones and BAC-based physical maps. Although BAC contigs can currently be constructed for virtually any diploid organism with the SNaPshot high-information-content-fingerprinting (HICF technology, it is currently unknown if this is also true for polyploid species. It is possible that BAC clones from orthologous regions of homoeologous chromosomes would share numerous restriction fragments and be therefore included into common contigs. Because of this and other concerns, physical mapping utilizing the SNaPshot HICF of BAC libraries of polyploid species has not been pursued and the possibility of doing so has not been assessed. The sole exception has been in common wheat, an allohexaploid in which it is possible to construct single-chromosome or single-chromosome-arm BAC libraries from DNA of flow-sorted chromosomes and bypass the obstacles created by polyploidy. Results The potential of the SNaPshot HICF technology for physical mapping of polyploid plants utilizing global BAC libraries was evaluated by assembling contigs of fingerprinted clones in an in silico merged BAC library composed of single-chromosome libraries of two wheat homoeologous chromosome arms, 3AS and 3DS, and complete chromosome 3B. Because the chromosome arm origin of each clone was known, it was possible to estimate the fidelity of contig assembly. On average 97.78% or more clones, depending on the library, were from a single chromosome arm. A large portion of the remaining clones was shown to be library contamination from other chromosomes, a feature that is unavoidable during the

  6. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen M Adema

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available To provide a novel resource for analysis of the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, members of the international Biomphalaria glabrata Genome Initiative (biology.unm.edu/biomphalaria-genome.html, working with the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI and supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI, produced a high quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library. The BB02 strain B. glabrata, a field isolate (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil that is susceptible to several strains of Schistosoma mansoni, was selfed for two generations to reduce haplotype diversity in the offspring. High molecular weight DNA was isolated from ovotestes of 40 snails, partially digested with HindIII, and ligated into pAGIBAC1 vector. The resulting B. glabrata BAC library (BG_BBa consists of 61824 clones (136.3 kb average insert size and provides 9.05 × coverage of the 931 Mb genome. Probing with single/low copy number genes from B. glabrata and fingerprinting of selected BAC clones indicated that the BAC library sufficiently represents the gene complement. BAC end sequence data (514 reads, 299860 nt indicated that the genome of B. glabrata contains ~ 63% AT, and disclosed several novel genes, transposable elements, and groups of high frequency sequence elements. This BG_BBa BAC library, available from AGI at cost to the research community, gains in relevance because BB02 strain B. glabrata is targeted whole genome sequencing by NHGRI.

  7. Novel polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers produced in Pseudomonas putida by metagenomic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterially produced biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with versatile properties can be achieved using different PHA synthases (PhaCs). This work aims to expand the diversity of known PhaCs via functional metagenomics and demonstrates the use of these novel enzymes in PHA production. Complementation of a PHA synthesis-deficient Pseudomonas putida strain with a soil metagenomic cosmid library retrieved 27 clones expressing either class I, class II, or unclassified PHA synthases, and many did not have close sequence matches to known PhaCs. The composition of PHA produced by these clones was dependent on both the supplied growth substrates and the nature of the PHA synthase, with various combinations of short-chain-length (SCL) and medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate diverse genes for PHA synthesis by functional metagenomics and their use for the production of a variety of PHA polymer and copolymer mixtures. PMID:27333909

  8. Screening a novel Na+/H+ antiporter gene from a metagenomic library of halophiles colonizing in the Dagong Ancient Brine Well in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jie; Li, Lin; Liang, Huazhong; Luo, Hai; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Zhirong; Sun, Qun

    2010-05-01

    Metagenomic DNA libraries constructed from the Dagong Ancient Brine Well were screened for genes with Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity on the antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc strain. One clone with a stable Na(+)-resistant phenotype was obtained and its Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene was sequenced and designated as m-nha. The deduced amino acid sequence of M-Nha protein consists of 523 residues with a calculated molecular weight of 58 147 Da and a pI of 5.50, which is homologous with NhaH from Halobacillus dabanensis D-8(T) (92%) and Halobacillus aidingensis AD-6(T) (86%), and with Nhe2 from Bacillus sp. NRRL B-14911 (64%). It had a hydropathy profile with 10 putative transmembrane domains and a long carboxyl terminal hydrophilic tail of 140 amino acid residues, similar to Nhap from Synechocystis sp. and Aphanothece halophytica, as well as NhaG from Bacillus subtilis. The m-nha gene in the antiporter-negative mutant E. coli KNabc conferred resistance to Na(+) and the ability to grow under alkaline conditions. The difference in amino acid sequence and the putative secondary structure suggested that the m-nha isolated from the Dagong Ancient Brine Well in this study was a novel Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene.

  9. Novel xylanase from a holstein cattle rumen metagenomic library and its application in xylooligosaccharide and ferulic Acid production from wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fansheng; Sheng, Jiping; Dong, Rubo; Men, Yejun; Gan, Lin; Shen, Lin

    2012-12-26

    A novel gene fragment containing a xylanase was identified from a Holstein cattle rumen metagenomic library. The novel xylanase (Xyln-SH1) belonged to the glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) and exhibited a maximum of 44% identity to the glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. Xyln-SH1 was heterologously expressed, purified, and characterized. A high level of activity was obtained under the optimum conditions of pH 6.5 and 40 °C. A substrate utilization study indicated that Xyln-SH1 was cellulase-free and strictly specific to xylan from softwood. The synergistic effects of Xyln-SH1 and feruloyl esterase (FAE-SH1) were observed for the release of xylooligosaccharides (XOS) and ferulic acid (FA) from wheat straw. In addition, a high dose of Xyln-SH1 alone was observed to improve the release of FA from wheat straw. These features suggest that this enzyme has substantial potential to improve biomass degradation and industrial applications.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of EstE1, a new and thermostable esterase cloned from a metagenomic library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant EstE1 protein with a histidine tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) and then purified by affinity chromatography. The protein was then crystallized at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. EstE1, a new thermostable esterase, was isolated by functional screening of a metagenomic DNA library from thermal environment samples. This enzyme showed activity towards short-chain acyl derivatives of length C4–C6 at a temperature of 303–363 K and displayed a high thermostability above 353 K. EstE1 has 64 and 57% amino-acid sequence similarity to estpc-encoded carboxylesterase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis and AFEST from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, respectively. The recombinant protein with a histidine tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) and then purified by affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from an EstE1 crystal; the crystal belongs to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.71, c = 234.23 Å. Assuming the presence of four molecules in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient VM is calculated to be 2.2 Å3 Da−1 and the solvent content is 44.1%

  11. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New Cold-active Extradiol Dioxygenase from a Metagenomic Library Derived from Polychlorinated Biphenyl-contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN He-jun; LU Yang; ZHOU Rui; DAI Chun-yan; WANG Yan; ZHANG Lan-ying

    2012-01-01

    To find new extradiol dioxygenases(EDOs,EC 1.13.11.2),a metagenomics library was constructed from polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil and was screened for some dioxygenase with aromatic ring cleavage activity.A novel EDO,designated as BphC_A,was identified and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli.The deduced amino acid sequence of BphC_A exhibited a homology of less than 60% with other known EDOs.Phylogenetic analysis of BphC_A suggests that the protein is a novel member of the EDO family.The enzyme exhibits higher substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency toward 3-methylcatechol than toward 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl or catechol,the preferred substrate of other known EDOs.The optimum activity of purified BphC_A occurred at pH=8.5 and 35 ℃,and BphC_A showed more than 40% of its initial activity at 5 ℃.The activity of purified BphC_A was significantly induced by Mn2+ and slightly reduced bv Al3+,Cu2+ and Zn2+.

  12. A study on the interaction of rhodamine B with methylthioadenosine phosphorylase protein sourced from an Antarctic soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartasun, Paulina; Cieśliński, Hubert; Bujacz, Anna; Wierzbicka-Woś, Anna; Kur, Józef

    2013-01-01

    The presented study examines the phenomenon of the fluorescence under UV light excitation (312 nm) of E. coli cells expressing a novel metagenomic-derived putative methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, called rsfp, grown on LB agar supplemented with a fluorescent dye rhodamine B. For this purpose, an rsfp gene was cloned and expressed in an LMG194 E. coli strain using an arabinose promoter. The resulting RSFP protein was purified and its UV-VIS absorbance spectrum and emission spectrum were assayed. Simultaneously, the same spectroscopic studies were carried out for rhodamine B in the absence or presence of RSFP protein or native E. coli proteins, respectively. The results of the spectroscopic studies suggested that the fluorescence of E. coli cells expressing rsfp gene under UV illumination is due to the interaction of rhodamine B molecules with the RSFP protein. Finally, this interaction was proved by a crystallographic study and then by site-directed mutagenesis of rsfp gene sequence. The crystal structures of RSFP apo form (1.98 Å) and complex RSFP/RB (1.90 Å) show a trimer of RSFP molecules located on the crystallographic six fold screw axis. The RSFP complex with rhodamine B revealed the binding site for RB, in the pocket located on the interface between symmetry related monomers.

  13. A study on the interaction of rhodamine B with methylthioadenosine phosphorylase protein sourced from an Antarctic soil metagenomic library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Bartasun

    Full Text Available The presented study examines the phenomenon of the fluorescence under UV light excitation (312 nm of E. coli cells expressing a novel metagenomic-derived putative methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, called rsfp, grown on LB agar supplemented with a fluorescent dye rhodamine B. For this purpose, an rsfp gene was cloned and expressed in an LMG194 E. coli strain using an arabinose promoter. The resulting RSFP protein was purified and its UV-VIS absorbance spectrum and emission spectrum were assayed. Simultaneously, the same spectroscopic studies were carried out for rhodamine B in the absence or presence of RSFP protein or native E. coli proteins, respectively. The results of the spectroscopic studies suggested that the fluorescence of E. coli cells expressing rsfp gene under UV illumination is due to the interaction of rhodamine B molecules with the RSFP protein. Finally, this interaction was proved by a crystallographic study and then by site-directed mutagenesis of rsfp gene sequence. The crystal structures of RSFP apo form (1.98 Å and complex RSFP/RB (1.90 Å show a trimer of RSFP molecules located on the crystallographic six fold screw axis. The RSFP complex with rhodamine B revealed the binding site for RB, in the pocket located on the interface between symmetry related monomers.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community composition and antibiotic resistance genes in a wastewater treatment plant and its receiving surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Shan, Zhengjun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may pose big risks to the rivers that receive the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigated the changes of bacterial community and ARGs along treatment processes of one WWTP, and examined the effects of the effluent discharge on the bacterial community and ARGs in the receiving river. Pyrosequencing was applied to reveal bacterial community composition including potential bacterial pathogen, and Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used for profiling ARGs. The results showed that the WWTP had good removal efficiency on potential pathogenic bacteria (especially Arcobacter butzleri) and ARGs. Moreover, the bacterial communities of downstream and upstream of the river showed no significant difference. However, the increase in the abundance of potential pathogens and ARGs at effluent outfall was observed, indicating that WWTP effluent might contribute to the dissemination of potential pathogenic bacteria and ARGs in the receiving river.

  15. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-03-11

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  16. Improving microbial fitness in the mammalian gut by in vivo temporal functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Deng, Luxue; Li, Ning; Braff, Jonathan L; Church, George M; Bry, Lynn; Wang, Harris H; Gerber, Georg K

    2015-03-01

    Elucidating functions of commensal microbial genes in the mammalian gut is challenging because many commensals are recalcitrant to laboratory cultivation and genetic manipulation. We present Temporal FUnctional Metagenomics sequencing (TFUMseq), a platform to functionally mine bacterial genomes for genes that contribute to fitness of commensal bacteria in vivo. Our approach uses metagenomic DNA to construct large-scale heterologous expression libraries that are tracked over time in vivo by deep sequencing and computational methods. To demonstrate our approach, we built a TFUMseq plasmid library using the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) and introduced Escherichia coli carrying this library into germfree mice. Population dynamics of library clones revealed Bt genes conferring significant fitness advantages in E. coli over time, including carbohydrate utilization genes, with a Bt galactokinase central to early colonization, and subsequent dominance by a Bt glycoside hydrolase enabling sucrose metabolism coupled with co-evolution of the plasmid library and E. coli genome driving increased galactose utilization. Our findings highlight the utility of functional metagenomics for engineering commensal bacteria with improved properties, including expanded colonization capabilities in vivo.

  17. Construction and Analysis of Siberian Tiger Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library with Approximately 6.5-Fold Genome Equivalent Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are extremely valuable for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. The Siberian tiger, one of the most well-known wild primitive carnivores in China, is an endangered animal. In order to promote research on its genome, a high-redundancy BAC library of the Siberian tiger was constructed and characterized. The library is divided into two sub-libraries prepared from blood cells and two sub-libraries prepared from fibroblasts. This BAC library contains 153,600 individually archived clones; for PCR-based screening of the library, BACs were placed into 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 116.5 kb, representing approximately 6.46 genome equivalents of the haploid genome and affording a 98.86% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence. Screening the library with 19 microsatellite markers and a SRY sequence revealed that each of these markers were present in the library; the average number of positive clones per marker was 6.74 (range 2 to 12, consistent with 6.46 coverage of the tiger genome. Additionally, we identified 72 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. This BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for physical mapping, comparative genomic study and large-scale genome sequencing in the tiger.

  18. Bacterial communities in semen from men of infertile couples: metagenomic sequencing reveals relationships of seminal microbiota to semen quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Long Weng

    Full Text Available Some previous studies have identified bacteria in semen as being a potential factor in male infertility. However, only few types of bacteria were taken into consideration while using PCR-based or culturing methods. Here we present an analysis approach using next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the associations between bacterial communities and semen quality. Ninety-six semen samples collected were examined for bacterial communities, measuring seven clinical criteria for semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, motility, Kruger's strict morphology, antisperm antibody (IgA, Atypical, and leukocytes. Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA was also performed. Results showed that the most abundant genera among all samples were Lactobacillus (19.9%, Pseudomonas (9.85%, Prevotella (8.51% and Gardnerella (4.21%. The proportion of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella was significantly higher in the normal samples, while that of Prevotella was significantly higher in the low quality samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis demonstrated that the seminal bacterial communities were clustered into three main groups: Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Prevotella predominant group. Remarkably, most normal samples (80.6% were clustered in Lactobacillus predominant group. The analysis results showed seminal bacteria community types were highly associated with semen health. Lactobacillus might not only be a potential probiotic for semen quality maintenance, but also might be helpful in countering the negative influence of Prevotella and Pseudomonas. In this study, we investigated whole seminal bacterial communities and provided the most comprehensive analysis of the association between bacterial community and semen quality. The study significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of male fertility.

  19. Construction and Preliminary Characterization Analysis of Wuzhishan Miniature Pig Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library with Approximately 8-Fold Genome Equivalent Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries have been invaluable tools for the genome-wide genetic dissection of complex organisms. Here, we report the construction and characterization of a high-redundancy BAC library from a very valuable pig breed in China, Wuzhishan miniature pig (Sus scrofa, using its blood cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The library contains approximately 153,600 clones ordered in 40 superpools of 10 × 384-deep well microplates. The average insert size of BAC clones was estimated to be 152.3 kb, representing approximately 7.68 genome equivalents of the porcine haploid genome and a 99.93% statistical probability of obtaining at least one clone containing a unique DNA sequence in the library. 19 pairs of microsatellite marker primers covering porcine chromosomes were used for screening the BAC library, which showed that each of these markers was positive in the library; the positive clone number was 2 to 9, and the average number was 7.89, which was consistent with 7.68-fold coverage of the porcine genome. And there were no significant differences of genomic BAC library from blood cells and fibroblast cells. Therefore, we identified 19 microsatellite markers that could potentially be used as genetic markers. As a result, this BAC library will serve as a valuable resource for gene identification, physical mapping, and comparative genomics and large-scale genome sequencing in the porcine.

  20. 牦牛瘤胃元基因组文库中木聚糖酶基因的分析%Analysis of xylanases derived from the metagenomic BAC clone library of yak rumen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 陈富荣; 张山; 朱雅新; 东秀珠; 黄力; 田瑞华; 董志扬; 戴欣

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The diversity of rumen microbial xylanases and their degradation characteristics were studied and the resources of new xylanases genes and enzymes were provided. [ Methods ] According to the result of the high-throughput sequencing of the rumen microbial metagenome bacterial artificial chromosome ( B AC ) clones library, the diversity of xylanase genes was analyzed and screened. Then one xylanase and its downstream xylosidase gene screened was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme characterization of the recombinant xylanase and xylosidase and their synergistic effect were studied. [Results] All 14 xylanases screened from the library belong to GH10 family proteins. These xylanases shared the amino acid sequence similarity between 20. 5% and 91. 3% . Intriguingly, 7 xylanase genes in different contigs were found to be followed by xylosidase gene. The specific enzyme activity of the xylanase (Xyn32) was 1.98 U/mg and no ferulic acid esterase activity was detected. The specific enzyme activity of the coupled xylosidase (Xyl33) was 0.07 IU/mg, and xylosidase ( Xyl33 ) also displayed the activity of arabinofuranosidase. In addition, the in vitro experiment confirmed the synergistic effect between the coupled xylanase and xylosidase.%[目的]了解牦牛瘤胃微生物木聚糖酶多样性及其降解特征,为木聚糖降解提供新的基因资源.[方法]根据对已构建的瘤胃微生物元基因组细菌人工染色体( BAC)克隆文库高通量测序结果的注释,筛选其中编码木聚糖酶的基因并进行多样性分析;对其中一个木聚糖酶基因及其连锁的木糖苷酶基因进行克隆表达和酶学性质表征,分析其协同作用.[结果]共筛选到14个木聚糖酶基因,均编码GH1O家族木聚糖酶,其氨基酸序列之间的相似性为20.5% -91.3%;其中7个木聚糖酶基因所在的不同的DNA片段(contig)上存在木糖苷酶基因,编码的木糖苷酶属于GH43或GH3糖苷水解酶家

  1. Construction and Identification of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library for 0-613-2R in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library containing a large genomic DNA insert is an important tool for genome physical mapping, map-based cloning, and genome sequencing. To isolate genes via a map-based cloning strategy and to perform physical mapping of the cotton genome, a high-quality BAC library containing large cotton DNA inserts is needed. We have developed a BAC library of the restoring line 0-613-2R for isolating the fertility restorer (Rf1) gene and genomic research in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The BAC library contains 97 825 clones stored in 255 pieces of a 384-well microtiter plate. Random samples of BACs digested with the Notl enzyme indicated that the average insert size is approximately 130 kb, with a range of 80-275 kb,and 95.7% of the BAC clones in the library have an average insert size larger than 100 kb. Based on a cotton genome size of 2 250 Mb, library coverage is 5.7 x haploid genome equivalents. Four clones were selected randomly from the library to determine the stability of the BAC clones. There were no different fingerprints for 0 and 100 generations of each clone digested with Notl and Hindlll enzymes. Thus, the stability of a single BAC clone can be sustained at least for 100 generations. Eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers flanking the Rf1 gene were chosen to screen the BAC library by pool using PCR method and 25 positive clones were identified with 3.1 positive clones per SSR marker.

  2. Bioactivity Screening of Fermentation Crude Extracts from Deep Sea Metagenomic Library Clones%深海宏基因组文库克隆子发酵产物的生物活性筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 易志伟; 李宁; 马群; 李慧; 秦丹; 肖湘

    2011-01-01

    目的:对前期构建的深海宏基因组文库克隆子发酵产物进行生物活性筛选.方法:利用CCK8法及琼脂扩散法和双层琼脂法进行了细胞毒活性及抗菌活性筛选,利用荧光定量PCR法进行了抗乙肝病毒活性筛选.结果:筛选发现3个具有细胞毒活性的混合克隆子.HPLC指纹图谱分析表明这3个混合克隆子具有与大肠杆菌宿主对照不同的指纹图谱,其活性与出现的指纹峰成分可能相关.结论:研究结果提示对深海宏基因组文库克隆子发酵产物进行化学筛选为常规的生物活性功能筛选之外的有意义途径.%Objective: Detect bioactivities of fermentation crude extracts originated from previously constructed deep sea metagenomic libraries. Methods : Functional screening of antitumor( cytotoxic ) ,antibacterial and anti HBV activity from fermentation crude extracts was performed by CCK-8 method, agar diffusion method,double agar method and real time PCR method. Results: No antibacterial and anti HBV clones were identified and three mixed clones showed good cytotoxic activity. HPLC analysis of these three mixed clones fingerprints indicated they possess obviously different fingerprints with E. coli host which could be useful to next isolation of cytotoxic compounds from deep sea metagenomic library. Conclusion: These results indicated that chemical screening could be potential way for screening bioactivity substance from deep sea metagenomic libraries besides functional screening and homology screening.

  3. Functional metagenomics: a high throughput screening method to decipher microbiota-driven NF-κB modulation in the human gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Lakhdari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: The human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in modulation of mucosal immune responses. To study interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and commensal bacteria, a functional metagenomic approach was developed. One interest of metagenomics is to provide access to genomes of uncultured microbes. We aimed at identifying bacterial genes involved in regulation of NF-κB signaling in IECs. A high throughput cell-based screening assay allowing rapid detection of NF-κB modulation in IECs was established using the reporter-gene strategy to screen metagenomic libraries issued from the human intestinal microbiota. METHODS: A plasmid containing the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP gene under the control of NF-κB binding elements was stably transfected in HT-29 cells. The reporter clone HT-29/kb-seap-25 was selected and characterized. Then, a first screening of a metagenomic library from Crohn's disease patients was performed to identify NF-κB modulating clones. Furthermore, genes potentially involved in the effect of one stimulatory metagenomic clone were determined by sequence analysis associated to mutagenesis by transposition. RESULTS: The two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, were able to activate the reporter system, translating the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway and NF-κB inhibitors, BAY 11-7082, caffeic acid phenethyl ester and MG132 were efficient. A screening of 2640 metagenomic clones led to the identification of 171 modulating clones. Among them, one stimulatory metagenomic clone, 52B7, was further characterized. Sequence analysis revealed that its metagenomic DNA insert might belong to a new Bacteroides strain and we identified 2 loci encoding an ABC transport system and a putative lipoprotein potentially involved in 52B7 effect on NF-κB. CONCLUSIONS: We have established a robust high throughput screening assay for metagenomic libraries derived from the human intestinal

  4. Use of metagenomic approaches to isolate lipolytic genes from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Ren-Bao; Cheng, Mei-Ping; Wu, Ming-Che; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2010-11-01

    The aims of this study were to access the bacterial diversity and isolate lipolytic genes using the metagenomic approach in activated sludge of a swine wastewater treatment facility. On the basis of BLASTN analysis of 16S rRNA gene clones, most of these communities (90%) were of uncultivated bacteria. The metagenomic library was constructed using a plasmid vector and DNA extracted directly from activated sludge samples. The average insert size was approximately 5.1 kb. A total of 12 unique and lipolytic clones were obtained using the tributyrin plate assay. The rate of discovering a lipolytic clone in this study was as high as 0.31%. Molecular analysis revealed that most of the 16 putative lipolytic enzymes showed 28-55% identity with non-redundant protein sequences in the database. Briefly, this study demonstrates that activated sludge is an ideal bioresource for isolating new lipolytic enzymes. PMID:20639117

  5. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevasti Filippidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr. Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.

  6. Functional metagenomics reveals novel pathways of prebiotic breakdown by human gut bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide A Cecchini

    Full Text Available The human intestine hosts a complex bacterial community that plays a major role in nutrition and in maintaining human health. A functional metagenomic approach was used to explore the prebiotic breakdown potential of human gut bacteria, including non-cultivated ones. Two metagenomic libraries, constructed from ileum mucosa and fecal microbiota, were screened for hydrolytic activities on the prebiotic carbohydrates inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose. The DNA inserts of 17 clones, selected from the 167 hits that were identified, were pyrosequenced in-depth, yielding in total 407, 420 bp of metagenomic DNA. From these sequences, we discovered novel prebiotic degradation pathways containing carbohydrate transporters and hydrolysing enzymes, for which we provided the first experimental proof of function. Twenty of these proteins are encoded by genes that are also present in the gut metagenome of at least 100 subjects, whatever are their ages or their geographical origin. The sequence taxonomic assignment indicated that still unknown bacteria, for which neither culture conditions nor genome sequence are available, possess the enzymatic machinery to hydrolyse the prebiotic carbohydrates tested. The results expand the vision on how prebiotics are metabolized along the intestine, and open new perspectives for the design of functional foods.

  7. Functional metagenomics reveals novel pathways of prebiotic breakdown by human gut bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Davide A; Laville, Elisabeth; Laguerre, Sandrine; Robe, Patrick; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Henrissat, Bernard; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; Monsan, Pierre; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine hosts a complex bacterial community that plays a major role in nutrition and in maintaining human health. A functional metagenomic approach was used to explore the prebiotic breakdown potential of human gut bacteria, including non-cultivated ones. Two metagenomic libraries, constructed from ileum mucosa and fecal microbiota, were screened for hydrolytic activities on the prebiotic carbohydrates inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose. The DNA inserts of 17 clones, selected from the 167 hits that were identified, were pyrosequenced in-depth, yielding in total 407, 420 bp of metagenomic DNA. From these sequences, we discovered novel prebiotic degradation pathways containing carbohydrate transporters and hydrolysing enzymes, for which we provided the first experimental proof of function. Twenty of these proteins are encoded by genes that are also present in the gut metagenome of at least 100 subjects, whatever are their ages or their geographical origin. The sequence taxonomic assignment indicated that still unknown bacteria, for which neither culture conditions nor genome sequence are available, possess the enzymatic machinery to hydrolyse the prebiotic carbohydrates tested. The results expand the vision on how prebiotics are metabolized along the intestine, and open new perspectives for the design of functional foods.

  8. Current and future trends in metagenomics : Development of knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Kurokawa, Ken

    Microbes are essential for every part of life on Earth. Numerous microbes inhabit the biosphere, many of which are uncharacterized or uncultivable. They form a complex microbial community that deeply affects against surrounding environments. Metagenome analysis provides a radically new way of examining such complex microbial community without isolation or cultivation of individual bacterial community members. In this article, we present a brief discussion about a metagenomics and the development of knowledge bases, and also discuss about the future trends in metagenomics.

  9. Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of thermo-sensitive genic male-sterile rice 5460S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱芳; 金德敏; 伏健民; 张超良; 谢纬武; 王斌; 杨仁崔; 张洪斌

    1999-01-01

    In order to develop a detailed physical map of the thermo-sensitive genie male-sterile (TGMS) gene-encompassing region and finally clone the TGMS gene, a high-quality rice bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from TGMS rice 5460S was constructed. The method of constructing BAC library was examined and optimized. The 5460S library consists of 19 584 BAC clones with an average insert size of 110 kb, which represents about 5 times rice haploid genome equivalents. Rice inserts of up to 140 kb and 250 kb were isolated and appeared stable after 100 generations of serial growth. Hybridization of BAC clones with mitochondrial and chloroplastic genes as probes demonstrated that this library has no organellar contamination. The 5460S library was screened with 3 molecular markers linked to tmsl gene as probes and at least 1 BAC clone was identified with each probe. The insert ends of positive clones were successfully isolated using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) technique.

  10. 土壤宏基因组文库的构建及格尔德霉素类PKS基因的初步筛选%Construction of a soil metagenomic library and preliminary screening of geldanamycin-like type-I polyketide synthase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林灵; 陈菲菲; 王以光; 赫卫清; 王相晶

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建土壤宏基因组文库并对格尔德霉素类I型聚酮合系(polyketide synthase,PKS)基因进行初步筛选研究.方法 直接提取土壤样品中宏基因组DNA,以Fosmid为载体,构建宏基因组文库.根据格尔德霉素的I型PKS基因的保守序列设计引物,使用菌落PCR方法直接筛选所获得的宏基因组文库.结果 成功构建了土壤宏基因组文库,获得约6800个克隆子,其平均插入片段在25kb以上,覆盖至少170Mb的基因组信息.通过PKS基因筛选,获得了新的PKS基因片段.结论 本文报道了土壤宏基因组文库的成功构建,并为利用宏基因组技术寻找新的聚酮类次级代谢产物的生物合成基因,以便于其异源表达或组合生物合成新的聚酮类次级代谢产物奠定基础.%Objective Construction of a soil metagenomic library and preliminary screening of geldanamycinlike type-Ⅰ polyketide synthase genes.Methods A metagenomic library was constructed by inserting the metagenomic DNA directly extracted from soil into Fosmid vector, and then transduced into E.coli EPI300.The primers for screening polyketide synthase (PKS) genes were designed according to the conserved region of geldanamycin type Ⅰ PKS genes.Colony-PCR was performed for screening the metagenomic library.Results A soil metagenomic library was constructed successfully, which was consisted of about 6800 clones containing over 25kb inserted exogenous DNA on average, and covered almost 170Mb genomic information.And a new PKS gene fragment was obtained by screening from metagenomic library.Conclusion The strategy for finding novel PKS gene using metagenomic-technology was reported in this study and could facilitate to heterologous expressing or combinatorial biosynthesis of novel polyketide secondary metabolites.

  11. Identification of a new lipase family in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Helisson; Glogauer, Arnaldo; Souza, Emanuel M; Rigo, Liu U; Cruz, Leonardo M; Monteiro, Rose A; Pedrosa, Fábio O

    2011-12-01

    Lipases are the most investigated class of enzymes in metagenomics. Phylogenetic classification of bacterial lipases comprises eight families. Here we describe the construction and screening of three metagenomic libraries from Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil and identification of a new lipase family. The metagenomic libraries, MAF1, MAF2 and MAF3, contained 34 560, 29 280 and 36 288 clones respectively. Lipase screening on triolein-rhodamine B plates resulted in one positive clone, Lip018. The DNA insert of Lip018 was fully sequenced and 20 ORFs were identified by comparison against the GenBank. Transposon mutagenesis revealed that ORF15, similar to serine peptidases, and ORF16, a hypothetical protein, were both required for lipase activity. ORF16 has a typical lipase conserved pentapeptide G-X-S-X-G and the comparison against the Pfam database showed that ORF16 belongs to family 5 of αβ-hydrolase. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that ORF16, together with other related proteins, may be a member of a new lipase family, named LipAP, activated by a putative serine protease. Partial characterization of ORF16 lipase showed that the enzyme has activity against a broad range of p-nitrophenyl esters, but only after activation by the predicted peptidase ORF15. PMID:23761366

  12. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    contigs (184 kb in average) were assembled. Knowing the complete sequences of these candidate genes will enable confirmation of the association with a phenotype and the finding of causative mutations for the targeted phenotypes.Additionally, 1577 BAC clones were end sequenced; 2505 BAC end sequences (80......BACKGROUND: Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. RESULTS: Here, we...... consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library...

  13. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha;

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laborato......We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing...... laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human...

  14. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA main

  15. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Angel, Tatiana; Hernández, Mónica; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clon

  16. 肠道微生物宏基因组文库构建及酯解酶基因筛选%Screening of lipolytic genes from the metagenomic library of human intestine microbes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段嘉; 程功; 胡永飞; 李晶; 律娜; 朱宝利

    2013-01-01

    利用宏基因组学方法,以人肠道微生物样品为原材料,构建了1个约30 000个克隆的fosmid文库.以三丁酸甘油酯为底物,通过功能筛选,获得1个酯解酶阳性克隆.对该阳性克隆构建亚克隆,挑选具有酯解酶活性的阳性亚克隆进行测序分析,最终获得1个肠道微生物来源的酯解酶基因(GenBank登录号:JQ972699).结果表明,文库克隆的平均插入片段约为40 kb,没有重复插入片段克隆.获得的酯解酶基因推演蛋白与Pyramidobacter piscolens W5455的patatin样磷脂酶同源性最高,氨基酸一致性为95%.生物信息学分析结果表明该基因可能通过Vd型分泌方式进行分泌并发挥功能.本研究是通过构建人肠道微生物宏基因组大片段文库并结合重组子功能筛选获得酯解酶的首次报道,可为食品工业提供新的酯解酶来源和筛选方法.%Metagenomic DNA was extracted from a human fecal sample and DNA fragments around 40 kb was isolated and purified. A fosmid library containing approximately 30 000 clones was created. Restriction analysis by EcoR I revealed a high diversity of the cloned DNA fragments and the estimated average insert size of the library was 40 kb. Tributyrin was used as substrate for activity-based screening of the library and one lipolytic enzyme positive fosmid clone was obtained. The lipolytic gene sequence was obtained after subcloning and sequencing, which showed high homology to the patatin-like phospholipase from Pyramidobacter piscolens W5455 with an amino acid identity of 95% . This is the first report of function-based metagenomics on screening of lipolytic genes from human gut microbiota. It also provides food industry with a new source of lipolytic genes and screening method.

  17. Metagenomics of Glassy-winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three new insect-infecting viruses, three endosymbiotic bacteria, a fungus, and a bacterial phage were discovered using a metagenomics approach to identify unknown organisms that live in association with the sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The genetic composition of ...

  18. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of S-type CMS maize mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to isolate mitochondrial genes easily, we have developed a new method to construct S-type CMS maize mitochondrial gene library by means of embedding mitochondria and enzymatic digesting mitochondria in situ, preparing mtDNA by electrophoresis, digesting LMP agarose with β-agarase, using BAC vector and electroporation. About 2 500 white clones of Mo17 CMS-J mitochondrial gene library were obtained with the average size of 18.24 kb, ranging from 5 to 40 kb, 63.6% inserts came from mitochondrial genome and represented 48 ′ mitochondrial genome equivalents. All the probes had detected the positive clones in the gene library. It is helpful to elucidating the maize mitochondrial genome structure and mechanism of S-type CMS, and may give some valuable reference to the construction of other plant mitochondrial genome library.

  19. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  20. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  1. Biosynthetic Functional Gene Analysis of Bis-Indole Metabolites from 25D7, a Clone Derived from a Deep-Sea Sediment Metagenomic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Tang, Xi-Xiang; Qin, Dan; Yi, Zhi-Wei; Fang, Mei-Juan; Wu, Zhen; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the metabolites and their biosynthetic functional hydroxylase genes of the deep-sea sediment metagenomic clone 25D7. 5-Bromoindole was added to the 25D7 clone derived Escherichia coli fermentation broth. The new-generated metabolites and their biosynthetic byproducts were located through LC-MS, in which the isotope peaks of brominated products emerged. Two new brominated bis-indole metabolites, 5-bromometagenediindole B (1), and 5-bromometagenediindole C (2) were separated under the guidance of LC-MS. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectra (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). The biosynthetic functional genes of the two new compounds were revealed through LC-MS and transposon mutagenesis analysis. 5-Bromometagenediindole B (1) also demonstrated moderately cytotoxic activity against MCF7, B16, CNE2, Bel7402, and HT1080 tumor cell lines in vitro. PMID:27258289

  2. Microbial population index and community structure in saline-alkaline soil using gene targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-03-30

    Population indices of bacteria and archaea were investigated from saline-alkaline soil and a possible microbe-environment pattern was established using gene targeted metagenomics. Clone libraries were constructed using 16S rRNA and functional gene(s) involved in carbon fixation (cbbL), nitrogen fixation (nifH), ammonia oxidation (amoA) and sulfur metabolism (apsA). Molecular phylogeny revealed the dominance of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria along with archaeal members of Halobacteraceae. The library consisted of novel bacterial (20%) and archaeal (38%) genera showing ≤95% similarity to previously retrieved sequences. Phylogenetic analysis indicated ability of inhabitant to survive in stress condition. The 16S rRNA gene libraries contained novel gene sequences and were distantly homologous with cultured bacteria. Functional gene libraries were found unique and most of the clones were distantly related to Proteobacteria, while clones of nifH gene library also showed homology with Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes. Quantitative real-time PCR exhibited that bacterial abundance was two orders of magnitude higher than archaeal. The gene(s) quantification indicated the size of the functional guilds harboring relevant key genes. The study provides insights on microbial ecology and different metabolic interactions occurring in saline-alkaline soil, possessing phylogenetically diverse groups of bacteria and archaea, which may be explored further for gene cataloging and metabolic profiling. PMID:23083746

  3. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  4. Library

    OpenAIRE

    Dulaney, Ronald E. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This study began with the desire to design a public town library of the future and became a search for an inkling of what is essential to Architecture. It is murky and full of contradictions. It asks more than it proposes, and the traces of its windings are better ordered through collage than logical synthesis. This study is neither a thesis nor a synthesis. When drawing out the measure of this study it may be beneficial to state what it attempts to place at the ...

  5. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, H.

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  6. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  7. Construction of a full bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Oryza sativa genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOQUANZHOU; HAIYINGZHAO; 等

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a full BAC library for the superior early indica variety of Oryza sativa,Guang Lu Ai 4.The MAX Efficiency DH10B with increased stability of inserts was used as BAC host cells.The potent pBelo BACII with double selection markers was used as cloning vector.The cloning efficiency we have reached was as high as 98%,and the transformation efficiency was raised up to 106 transformants/μg of large fragment DNA.The BAC recombinant transformants were picked at random and analyzed for the size of inserts,which turned out to be of 120 kb in length on average.We have obtained more than 20,000 such BAC clones.According to conventional probability equation,they covered the entire rice genome of 420,000 kb in length.The entire length of inserts of the library obtained has the 5-to 6-fold coverage of the genome.To our knowledge,this is the first reported full BAC library for a complex genome.

  8. Microbial Diversity and Biochemical Potential Encoded by Thermal Spring Metagenomes Derived from the Kamchatka Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic regions contain a variety of environments suitable for extremophiles. This study was focused on assessing and exploiting the prokaryotic diversity of two microbial communities derived from different Kamchatkian thermal springs by metagenomic approaches. Samples were taken from a thermoacidophilic spring near the Mutnovsky Volcano and from a thermophilic spring in the Uzon Caldera. Environmental DNA for metagenomic analysis was isolated from collected sediment samples by direct cell lysis. The prokaryotic community composition was examined by analysis of archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes. A total number of 1235 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and used for taxonomic classification. Most abundant in the samples were members of Thaumarchaeota, Thermotogae, and Proteobacteria. The Mutnovsky hot spring was dominated by the Terrestrial Hot Spring Group, Kosmotoga, and Acidithiobacillus. The Uzon Caldera was dominated by uncultured members of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group and Enterobacteriaceae. The remaining 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the Aquificae, Dictyoglomi, Euryarchaeota, Korarchaeota, Thermodesulfobacteria, Firmicutes, and some potential new phyla. In addition, the recovered DNA was used for generation of metagenomic libraries, which were subsequently mined for genes encoding lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes. Three novel genes conferring lipolytic and one gene conferring proteolytic activity were identified.

  9. Analysis of bacterial communities in soil by use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone libraries, as influenced by different reverse primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, Jolanda; van Elsas, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    To assess soil bacterial diversity, PCR systems consisting of several slightly different reverse primers together with forward primer F968-GC were used along with subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) or clone library analyses. In this study, a set of 13 previously used and novel

  10. Genome sequences of rare, uncultured bacteria obtained by differential coverage binning of multiple metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam;

    2013-01-01

    metagenomes. Multiple metagenomes of the same community, which differ in relative population abundances, were used to assemble 31 bacterial genomes, including rare (.... Four belong to the candidate bacterial phylum TM7 and represent the most complete genomes for this phylum to date (relative abundances, 0.06–1.58%). Reanalysis of published metagenomes reveals that differential coverage binning facilitates recovery of more complete and higher fidelity genome bins than...... other currently used methods, which are primarily based on sequence composition. This approach will be an important addition to the standard metagenome toolbox and greatly improve access to genomes of uncultured microorganisms....

  11. Improved metagenome screening efficiency by random insertion of T7 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Haseong; Kim, Seo Hyeon; Rha, Eugene; Choi, Su-Lim; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-07-20

    Metagenomes constitute a major source for the identification of novel enzymes for industrial applications. However, current functional screening methods are hindered by the limited transcription efficiency of foreign metagenomic genes. To overcome this constraint, we introduced the 'Enforced Transcription' technique, which involves the random insertion of the bi-directional T7 promoter into a metagenomic fosmid library. Then the effect of enforced transcription was quantitatively assessed by screening for metagenomic lipolytic genes encoding enzymes whose catalytic activity forms halos on tributyrin agar plates. The metagenomic library containing the enforced transcription system yielded a significantly increased number of screening hits with lipolytic activity compared to the library without random T7 promoter insertions. Additional sequence analysis revealed that the hits from the enforced transcription library had greater genetic diversity than those from the original metagenome library. Enhancing heterologous expression using the T7 promoter should enable the identification of greater numbers of diverse novel biocatalysts from the metagenome than possible using conventional metagenome screening approaches. PMID:27239964

  12. Metagenomics of an alkaline hot spring in Galicia (Spain: microbial diversity analysis and screening for novel lipolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalla eLópez-López

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A fosmid library was constructed with the metagenomic DNA from the water of the Lobios hot spring (76°C, pH=8.2 located in Ourense (Spain. Metagenomic sequencing of the fosmid library allowed the assembly of 9,722 contigs ranging in size from 500 to 56,677 bp and spanning approximately 18 Mbp. 23,207 ORFs (Open Reading Frames were predicted from the assembly. Biodiversity was explored by taxonomic classification and it revealed that bacteria were predominant, while the archaea were less abundant. The 6 most abundant bacterial phyla were Deinococcus-Thermus, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Aquificae and Chloroflexi. Within the archaeal superkingdom, the phylum Thaumarchaeota was predominant with the dominant species Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum. Functional classification revealed the genes associated to one-carbon metabolism as the most abundant. Both taxonomic and functional classifications showed a mixture of different microbial metabolic patterns: aerobic and anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic and chemolithotrophic, autotrophic and heterotrophic. Remarkably, the presence of genes encoding enzymes with potential biotechnological interest, such as xylanases, galactosidases, proteases and lipases, was also revealed in the metagenomic library.Functional screening of this library was subsequently done looking for genes encoding lipolytic enzymes. Six genes conferring lipolytic activity were identified and one was cloned and characterized. This gene was named LOB4Est and it was expressed in a yeast mesophilic host. LOB4Est codes for a novel esterase of family VIII, with sequence similarity to β-lactamases, but with unusual wide substrate specificity. When the enzyme was purified from the mesophilic host it showed half-life of 1 h and 43 minutes at 50°C, and maximal activity at 40°C and pH 7.5 with p-nitrophenyl-laurate as substrate. Interestingly, the enzyme retained more than 80% of maximal activity in a broad range of pH from 6.5-8.

  13. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... minimal gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  14. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  15. Novel bacterial sulfur oxygenase reductases from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z-W; Liu, Y-Y; Wu, J-F;

    2007-01-01

    The microbial community and sulfur oxygenase reductases of metagenomic DNA from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates were studied by 16S rRNA library, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), conventional cultivation, and molecular cloning. Results indicated that major bacterial......) of bacteria and archaea were 4.59 x 10(9) and 6.68 x 10(5), respectively. Bacterial strains representing Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum, and Sulfobacillus were isolated from the bioreactors. To study sulfur oxidation in the reactors, pairs of new PCR primers were designed for the detection of sulfur...... oxygenase reductase (SOR) genes. Three sor-like genes, namely, sor (Fx), sor (SA), and sor (SB) were identified from metagenomic DNAs of the bioreactors. The sor (Fx) is an inactivated SOR gene and is identical to the pseudo-SOR gene of Ferroplasma acidarmanus. The sor (SA) and sor (SB) showed...

  16. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Mora-Ruiz, Merit R; Lamprecht-Grandío, María; de Figueras, Carolina G; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; González-Pastor, José E

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes from the microbial communities of a moderate-salinity rhizosphere and brine from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain), which could confer increased salt resistance to Escherichia coli. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments and the remarkable presence of three bacterial groups never revealed as major components of salt brines. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain E. coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. Eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well-known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation such as a glycerol transporter and a proton pump, whereas others encoded proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms such as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth) and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also conferred salt resistance to this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species in which these genes can function. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment. PMID:26528268

  17. Characterization of denitrification gene clusters of soil bacteria via a metagenomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Philippot, Laurent; David, Maude M.; Navarro, Elisabeth; Vogel, Timothy,; Simonet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    We characterized operons encoding enzymes involved in denitrification, a nitrogen-cycling process involved in nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emission, using a metagenomic approach which combines molecular screening and pyrosequencing. Screening of 77,000 clones from a soil metagenomic library led to the identification and the subsequent characterization of nine denitrification gene clusters.

  18. Comparative analysis of bacterial community-metagenomics in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms following exposure to Macondo oil (MC252)

    KAUST Repository

    Koo, Hyunmin

    2014-09-10

    The indigenous bacterial communities in sediment microcosms from Dauphin Island (DI), Petit Bois Island (PB) and Perdido Pass (PP) of the coastal Gulf of Mexico were compared following treatment with Macondo oil (MC252) using pyrosequencing and culture-based approaches. After quality-based trimming, 28,991 partial 16S rRNA sequence reads were analyzed by rarefaction, confirming that analyses of bacterial communities were saturated with respect to species diversity. Changes in the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes played an important role in structuring bacterial communities in oil-treated sediments. Proteobacteria were dominant in oil-treated samples, whereas Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were either the second or the third most abundant taxa. Tenericutes, members of which are known for oil biodegradation, were detected shortly after treatment, and continued to increase in DI and PP sediments. Multivariate statistical analyses (ADONIS) revealed significant dissimilarity of bacterial communities between oil-treated and untreated samples and among locations. In addition, a similarity percentage analysis showed the contribution of each species to the contrast between untreated and oil-treated samples. PCR amplification using DNA from pure cultures of Exiguobacterium,  Pseudoalteromonas,  Halomonas and Dyadobacter, isolated from oil-treated microcosm sediments, produced amplicons similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genes. In the context of the 2010 Macondo blowout, the results from our study demonstrated that the indigenous bacterial communities in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms responded to the MC252 oil with altered community structure and species composition. The rapid proliferation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria suggests their involvement in the degradation of the spilt oil in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

  19. Comparative analysis of bacterial community-metagenomics in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms following exposure to Macondo oil (MC252).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyunmin; Mojib, Nazia; Thacker, Robert W; Bej, Asim K

    2014-11-01

    The indigenous bacterial communities in sediment microcosms from Dauphin Island (DI), Petit Bois Island (PB) and Perdido Pass (PP) of the coastal Gulf of Mexico were compared following treatment with Macondo oil (MC252) using pyrosequencing and culture-based approaches. After quality-based trimming, 28,991 partial 16S rRNA sequence reads were analyzed by rarefaction, confirming that analyses of bacterial communities were saturated with respect to species diversity. Changes in the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes played an important role in structuring bacterial communities in oil-treated sediments. Proteobacteria were dominant in oil-treated samples, whereas Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were either the second or the third most abundant taxa. Tenericutes, members of which are known for oil biodegradation, were detected shortly after treatment, and continued to increase in DI and PP sediments. Multivariate statistical analyses (ADONIS) revealed significant dissimilarity of bacterial communities between oil-treated and untreated samples and among locations. In addition, a similarity percentage analysis showed the contribution of each species to the contrast between untreated and oil-treated samples. PCR amplification using DNA from pure cultures of Exiguobacterium,  Pseudoalteromonas,  Halomonas and Dyadobacter, isolated from oil-treated microcosm sediments, produced amplicons similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genes. In the context of the 2010 Macondo blowout, the results from our study demonstrated that the indigenous bacterial communities in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms responded to the MC252 oil with altered community structure and species composition. The rapid proliferation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria suggests their involvement in the degradation of the spilt oil in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

  20. Genome signature-based dissection of human gut metagenomes to extract subliminal viral sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Bowler, Lucas D.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James E.; Jones, Brian V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) have a key role in shaping the development and functional outputs of host microbiomes. Although metagenomic approaches have greatly expanded our understanding of the prokaryotic virosphere, additional tools are required for the phage-oriented dissection of metagenomic data sets, and host-range affiliation of recovered sequences. Here we demonstrate the application of a genome signature-based approach to interrogate conventional whole-community metagenomes an...

  1. Livermore Metagenomics Analysis Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-10-01

    LMAT is designed to take as input a collection of raw metagenomic sequencer reads, and search each read against a reference genome database and assign a taxonomic label and confidence value to each read and report a summary of the predicted taxonomic contents of the metagenomic sample.

  2. METAGENassist: a comprehensive web server for comparative metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, David; Xia, Jianguo; Liu, Yifeng; Zhou, You; Guo, An Chi; Cruz, Joseph A; Sinelnikov, Igor; Budwill, Karen; Nesbø, Camilla L; Wishart, David S

    2012-07-01

    With recent improvements in DNA sequencing and sample extraction techniques, the quantity and quality of metagenomic data are now growing exponentially. This abundance of richly annotated metagenomic data and bacterial census information has spawned a new branch of microbiology called comparative metagenomics. Comparative metagenomics involves the comparison of bacterial populations between different environmental samples, different culture conditions or different microbial hosts. However, in order to do comparative metagenomics, one typically requires a sophisticated knowledge of multivariate statistics and/or advanced software programming skills. To make comparative metagenomics more accessible to microbiologists, we have developed a freely accessible, easy-to-use web server for comparative metagenomic analysis called METAGENassist. Users can upload their bacterial census data from a wide variety of common formats, using either amplified 16S rRNA data or shotgun metagenomic data. Metadata concerning environmental, culture, or host conditions can also be uploaded. During the data upload process, METAGENassist also performs an automated taxonomic-to-phenotypic mapping. Phenotypic information covering nearly 20 functional categories such as GC content, genome size, oxygen requirements, energy sources and preferred temperature range is automatically generated from the taxonomic input data. Using this phenotypically enriched data, users can then perform a variety of multivariate and univariate data analyses including fold change analysis, t-tests, PCA, PLS-DA, clustering and classification. To facilitate data processing, users are guided through a step-by-step analysis workflow using a variety of menus, information hyperlinks and check boxes. METAGENassist also generates colorful, publication quality tables and graphs that can be downloaded and used directly in the preparation of scientific papers. METAGENassist is available at http://www.metagenassist.ca.

  3. Metagenomic scaffolds enable combinatorial lignin transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, Cameron R.; Singh, Rahul; VanInsberghe, David; Ievdokymenko, Kateryna; Budwill, Karen; Mohn, William W.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Steven J Hallam

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass conversion into biofuels and chemicals can reduce human reliance on petroleum and promote sustainable biorefining processes. The structural polymer lignin can comprise up to 40% of plant biomass, but resists decomposition into valuable monoaromatic compounds. In this study, we devised a previously unidentified biosensor responsive to lignin transformation products. We used this biosensor in a functional screen to recover metagenomic scaffolds sourced from coal bed bacterial comm...

  4. Metagenomic analysis of soil microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Đokić Lidija; Savić M.; Narančić Tanja; Vasiljević Branka

    2010-01-01

    Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae, rare resurrection plants growing in the Balkan Peninsula, produce a high amount of phenolic compounds as a response to stress. The composition and size of bacterial communities in two rhizosphere soil samples of these plants were analyzed using a metagenomic approach. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments together with DAPI staining showed that the metabolically active bacteria represent only a small fraction, approximately 5%, of total so...

  5. Identification and characterization of a new true lipase isolated through metagenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Emanuel M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics, the application of molecular genomics to consortia of non-cultivated microbes, has the potential to have a substantial impact on the search for novel industrial enzymes such as esterases (carboxyl ester hydrolases, EC 3.1.1.1 and lipases (triacylglycerol lipases, EC 3.1.1.3. In the current work, a novel lipase gene was identified from a fosmid metagenomic library constructed with the "prokaryotic-enriched" DNA from a fat-contaminated soil collected from a wastewater treatment plant. Results In preliminary screening on agar containing 1% tributyrin, 2661 of the approximately 500,000 clones in the metagenomic library showed activity. Of these, 127 showed activity on agar containing 1% tricaprylin, while 32 were shown to be true lipase producers through screening on agar containing 1% triolein. The clone with the largest halo was further characterized. Its lipase gene showed 72% identity to a putative lipase of Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica Y11. The lipase, named LipC12, belongs to family I.1 of bacterial lipases, has a chaperone-independent folding, does not possess disulfide bridges and is calcium ion dependent. It is stable from pH 6 to 11 and has activity from pH 4.5 to 10, with higher activities at alkaline pH values. LipC12 is stable up to 3.7 M NaCl and from 20 to 50°C, with maximum activity at 30°C over a 1 h incubation. The pure enzyme has specific activities of 1722 U/mg and 1767 U/mg against olive oil and pig fat, respectively. Moreover, it is highly stable in organic solvents at 15% and 30% (v/v. Conclusions The combination of the use of a fat-contaminated soil, enrichment of prokaryotic DNA and a three-step screening strategy led to a high number of lipase-producing clones in the metagenomic library. The most notable properties of the new lipase that was isolated and characterized were a high specific activity against long chain triacylglycerols, activity and stability over a wide range

  6. Summer Workshop in Metagenomics: One Week Plus Eight Students Equals Gigabases of Cloned DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rios-Velazquez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We designed a week-long laboratory workshop in metagenomics for a cohort of undergraduate student researchers. During this course, students learned and utilized molecular biology and microbiology techniques to construct a metagenomic library from Puerto Rican soil. Pre- and postworkshop assessments indicated student learning gains in technical knowledge, skills, and confidence in a research environment. Postworkshop construction of additional libraries demonstrated retention of research techniques by the students.

  7. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  8. The future of skin metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, the direct exploitation of environmental microbial DNA, is complementary to traditional culture-based approaches for deciphering taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in a plethora of ecosystems, including those related to the human body such as the mouth, saliva, teeth, gut or skin. DNA extracted from human skin analyzed by sequencing the PCR-amplified rrs gene has already revealed the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities colonizing the human skin ("skin microbiome"). Each individual possesses his/her own skin microbial community structure, with marked taxonomic differences between different parts of the body and temporal evolution depending on physical and chemical conditions (sweat, washing etc.). However, technical limitations due to the low bacterial density at the surface of the human skin or contamination by human DNA still has inhibited extended use of the metagenomic approach for investigating the skin microbiome at a functional level. These difficulties have been overcome in part by the new generation of sequencing platforms that now provide sequences describing the genes and functions carried out by skin bacteria. These methodological advances should help us understand the mechanisms by which these microorganisms adapt to the specific chemical composition of each skin and thereby lead to a better understanding of bacteria/human host interdependence. This knowledge will pave the way for more systemic and individualized pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications.

  9. Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

    Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

  10. Reference databases for taxonomic assignment in metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Monica; Fosso, Bruno; Consiglio, Arianna; De Caro, Giorgio; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Marzano, Marinella; Alonso-Alemany, Daniel; Valiente, Gabriel; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-11-01

    Metagenomics is providing an unprecedented access to the environmental microbial diversity. The amplicon-based metagenomics approach involves the PCR-targeted sequencing of a genetic locus fitting different features. Namely, it must be ubiquitous in the taxonomic range of interest, variable enough to discriminate between different species but flanked by highly conserved sequences, and of suitable size to be sequenced through next-generation platforms. The internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal DNA operon and one or more hyper-variable regions of 16S ribosomal RNA gene are typically used to identify fungal and bacterial species, respectively. In this context, reliable reference databases and taxonomies are crucial to assign amplicon sequence reads to the correct phylogenetic ranks. Several resources provide consistent phylogenetic classification of publicly available 16S ribosomal DNA sequences, whereas the state of ribosomal internal transcribed spacers reference databases is notably less advanced. In this review, we aim to give an overview of existing reference resources for both types of markers, highlighting strengths and possible shortcomings of their use for metagenomics purposes. Moreover, we present a new database, ITSoneDB, of well annotated and phylogenetically classified ITS1 sequences to be used as a reference collection in metagenomic studies of environmental fungal communities. ITSoneDB is available for download and browsing at http://itsonedb.ba.itb.cnr.it/.

  11. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  12. A primer on metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, John C; Godzik, Adam; Friedberg, Iddo

    2010-02-26

    Metagenomics is a discipline that enables the genomic study of uncultured microorganisms. Faster, cheaper sequencing technologies and the ability to sequence uncultured microbes sampled directly from their habitats are expanding and transforming our view of the microbial world. Distilling meaningful information from the millions of new genomic sequences presents a serious challenge to bioinformaticians. In cultured microbes, the genomic data come from a single clone, making sequence assembly and annotation tractable. In metagenomics, the data come from heterogeneous microbial communities, sometimes containing more than 10,000 species, with the sequence data being noisy and partial. From sampling, to assembly, to gene calling and function prediction, bioinformatics faces new demands in interpreting voluminous, noisy, and often partial sequence data. Although metagenomics is a relative newcomer to science, the past few years have seen an explosion in computational methods applied to metagenomic-based research. It is therefore not within the scope of this article to provide an exhaustive review. Rather, we provide here a concise yet comprehensive introduction to the current computational requirements presented by metagenomics, and review the recent progress made. We also note whether there is software that implements any of the methods presented here, and briefly review its utility. Nevertheless, it would be useful if readers of this article would avail themselves of the comment section provided by this journal, and relate their own experiences. Finally, the last section of this article provides a few representative studies illustrating different facets of recent scientific discoveries made using metagenomics.

  13. 棉花细菌人工染色体文库构建方法探讨%Studies on Construction Method of Cotton Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海燕; 王省芬; 刘方; 彭仁海; 张艳; 马峙英; 王坤波

    2013-01-01

    细菌人工染色体(Bacterial artificial chromosome,BAC)文库是开展基因组测序、基因图位克隆、分子标记、物理作图等研究的重要基因组资源.本文在构建了二倍体野生棉阿非利加棉(Gossypium herbaceum var.africanum)BAC文库的基础上,就棉花细菌人工染色体基因组文库构建过程中高分子量基因组DNA的提取、部分酶切片段选择、DNA的回收、连接转化以及BAC文库的保存等过程中一些细节和注意事项进行了比较详细的分析比较,希望能为棉花BAC文库的构建提供一些可供借鉴的经验.%Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library is an important genome resources to such research as genome sequencing, map-based cloning, molecular markers, and physical mapping. On the base of the construction of BAC library for Gossypi-um herbaceum var. africanum, this paper presents an exhaustive analysis on details and notices of the BAC library construction process. It includes extraction of high molecular weight (HMW) nuclear DNA, determination of the optimized enzyme for partial digestion of HMW DNA, two rounds of size fractionation, recovery of large fragments DNA, ligation and transformation of large fragments of DNA and storage of BAC library. Thus being able to supply an experience for constructing high efficiency cotton BAC library.

  14. The effects of variable sample biomass on comparative metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafee, Meghan; Maignien, Loïs; Simmons, Sheri L

    2015-07-01

    Longitudinal studies that integrate samples with variable biomass are essential to understand microbial community dynamics across space or time. Shotgun metagenomics is widely used to investigate these communities at the functional level, but little is known about the effects of combining low and high biomass samples on downstream analysis. We investigated the interacting effects of DNA input and library amplification by polymerase chain reaction on comparative metagenomic analysis using dilutions of a single complex template from an Arabidopsis thaliana-associated microbial community. We modified the Illumina Nextera kit to generate high-quality large-insert (680 bp) paired-end libraries using a range of 50 pg to 50 ng of input DNA. Using assembly-based metagenomic analysis, we demonstrate that DNA input level has a significant impact on community structure due to overrepresentation of low-GC genomic regions following library amplification. In our system, these differences were largely superseded by variations between biological replicates, but our results advocate verifying the influence of library amplification on a case-by-case basis. Overall, this study provides recommendations for quality filtering and de-replication prior to analysis, as well as a practical framework to address the issue of low biomass or biomass heterogeneity in longitudinal metagenomic surveys.

  15. Characterization of the Gut Microbiome Using 16S or Shotgun Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovel, Juan; Patterson, Jordan; Wang, Weiwei; Hotte, Naomi; O'Keefe, Sandra; Mitchel, Troy; Perry, Troy; Kao, Dina; Mason, Andrew L; Madsen, Karen L; Wong, Gane K-S

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled investigations of the gut microbiome with unprecedented resolution and throughput. This has stimulated the development of sophisticated bioinformatics tools to analyze the massive amounts of data generated. Researchers therefore need a clear understanding of the key concepts required for the design, execution and interpretation of NGS experiments on microbiomes. We conducted a literature review and used our own data to determine which approaches work best. The two main approaches for analyzing the microbiome, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons and shotgun metagenomics, are illustrated with analyses of libraries designed to highlight their strengths and weaknesses. Several methods for taxonomic classification of bacterial sequences are discussed. We present simulations to assess the number of sequences that are required to perform reliable appraisals of bacterial community structure. To the extent that fluctuations in the diversity of gut bacterial populations correlate with health and disease, we emphasize various techniques for the analysis of bacterial communities within samples (α-diversity) and between samples (β-diversity). Finally, we demonstrate techniques to infer the metabolic capabilities of a bacteria community from these 16S and shotgun data. PMID:27148170

  16. [Dominant phylotypes in the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from bacterial mats of the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) hydrothermal springs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, V N; Podosokorskaia, O A; Shliapnikov, M G; Gal'chenko, V F

    2013-01-01

    In situ analysis of the 16S rRNA genes form bacterial mats of five hydrothermal springs (36-58 degrees C) in the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) was carried out using clone libraries. Eight clone libraries contained 18 dominant phylotypes (over 4-5%). In most clone libraries, the phylotype of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum sp. was among the dominant ones. The phylotypes of the green nonsulfur bacteria Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus and of purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodoblastus, Rhodopseudomonas, and Rhodoferax were also among the dominant ones. Cyanobacteria were represented by one dominant phylotype in a single spring. Among nonphototrophic bacteria, the dominant phylotypes belonged to Sulfyrihydrogenibium sp., Geothrixsp., Acidobacterium sp., Meiothermus sp., Thiomonas sp., Thiofaba sp., and Spirochaeta sp. Three phylotypes were not identified at the genus level. Most genera of phototrophic and nonphototrophic organisms corresponding to the phylotypes from Uzon hydrotherms have been previously revealed in the hydrotherms of volcanically active regions of America, Asia, and Europe. These results indicate predominance of bacterial mats carrying out anaerobic photosynthesis in the hydrotherms of the Uzon caldera.

  17. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMirete

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes involved in salt resistance from the microbial communities of brines and the rhizosphere from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain Escherichia coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. As a result, eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation as a glycerol and a proton pump, whereas others encoded for proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also exhibited salt resistance in this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species where these genes can operate. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment.

  18. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-08-01

    As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe step-by-step the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of a bioinformatician. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning with pre-sequencing considerations such as community composition and sequence data type that will greatly influence downstream analyses. We proceed with recommendations for sampling and data generation including sample and metadata collection, community profiling, construction of shotgun libraries and sequencing strategies. We then discuss the application of generic sequence processing steps (read preprocessing, assembly, and gene prediction and annotation) to metagenomic datasets by contrast to genome projects. Different types of data analyses particular to metagenomes are then presented including binning, dominant population analysis and gene-centric analysis. Finally data management systems and issues are presented and discussed. We hope that this review will assist bioinformaticians and biologists in making better-informed decisions on their journey during a metagenomic project.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF ACTIVE BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN A MODEL DRINKING WATER BIOFILM SYSTEM USING 16S RRNA-BASED CLONE LIBRARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent phylogenetic studies have used DNA as the target molecule for the development of environmental 16S rDNA clone libraries. As DNA may persist in the environment, DNA-based libraries cannot be used to identify metabolically active bacteria in water systems. In this study, a...

  20. Novel nickel resistance genes from the rhizosphere metagenome of plants adapted to acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2007-10-01

    Metal resistance determinants have traditionally been found in cultivated bacteria. To search for genes involved in nickel resistance, we analyzed the bacterial community of the rhizosphere of Erica andevalensis, an endemic heather which grows at the banks of the Tinto River, a naturally metal-enriched and extremely acidic environment in southwestern Spain. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of rhizosphere DNA revealed the presence of members of five phylogenetic groups of Bacteria and the two main groups of Archaea mostly associated with sites impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). The diversity observed and the presence of heavy metals in the rhizosphere led us to construct and screen five different metagenomic libraries hosted in Escherichia coli for searching novel nickel resistance determinants. A total of 13 positive clones were detected and analyzed. Insights about their possible mechanisms of resistance were obtained from cellular nickel content and sequence similarities. Two clones encoded putative ABC transporter components, and a novel mechanism of metal efflux is suggested. In addition, a nickel hyperaccumulation mechanism is proposed for a clone encoding a serine O-acetyltransferase. Five clones encoded proteins similar to well-characterized proteins but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance, and the remaining six clones encoded hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions. This is the first report documenting nickel resistance genes recovered from the metagenome of an AMD environment. PMID:17675438

  1. Highly Effective Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by the First Metagenome-Derived AI-2 Quenching Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Kisch, Martin J.; Pinnow, Nicole; Liese, Andreas; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell–cell communication (quorum sensing, QS) represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ) using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2 protein

  2. Highly effective inhibition of biofilm formation by the first metagenome-derived AI-2 quenching enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Weiland-Bräuer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication (quorum sensing, QS represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2. Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2

  3. Highly Effective Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by the First Metagenome-Derived AI-2 Quenching Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Kisch, Martin J.; Pinnow, Nicole; Liese, Andreas; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell–cell communication (quorum sensing, QS) represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ) using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2 protein

  4. A metagenomic study highlights phylogenetic proximity of quorum-quenching and xenobiotic-degrading amidases of the AS-family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannières, Mélanie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mondy, Samuel; Pellissier, Franck; Dessaux, Yves; Faure, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL) class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. Among the 29 760 fosmids of the metagenomic library, a single one was detected that expressed the qsdB gene conferring NAHL-degradation upon E. coli and decreased QS-regulated virulence in Pectobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of the 34 orfs of the fosmid suggested that it would belong to an unknown Proteobacterium - probably a γ-proteobacterium. qPCR quantification of the NAHLase-encoding genes attM, qsdA, and qsdB revealed their higher abundance in the γ-caprolactone-treated rhizosphere as compared to an untreated control. The purified QsdB enzyme exhibited amidase activity. QsdB is the first amidase signature (AS) family member exhibiting NAHLase-activity. Point mutations in the AS-family catalytic triad K-S-S abolished the NAHLase activity of QsdB. This study extends the diversity of NAHLases and highlights a common phylogenic origin of AS-family enzymes involved in the degradation of natural compounds, such as NAHLs, and xenobiotics, such as nylon and linuron. PMID:23762380

  5. Metagenomic mining for microbiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O; Malandain, Cedric; Prestat, Emmanuel; Larose, Catherine; Monier, Jean-Michel; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2011-12-01

    Microbial ecologists can now start digging into the accumulating mountains of metagenomic data to uncover the occurrence of functional genes and their correlations to microbial community members. Limitations and biases in DNA extraction and sequencing technologies impact sequence distributions, and therefore, have to be considered. However, when comparing metagenomes from widely differing environments, these fluctuations have a relatively minor role in microbial community discrimination. As a consequence, any functional gene or species distribution pattern can be compared among metagenomes originating from various environments and projects. In particular, global comparisons would help to define ecosystem specificities, such as involvement and response to climate change (for example, carbon and nitrogen cycle), human health risks (eg, presence of pathogen species, toxin genes and viruses) and biodegradation capacities. Although not all scientists have easy access to high-throughput sequencing technologies, they do have access to the sequences that have been deposited in databases, and therefore, can begin to intensively mine these metagenomic data to generate hypotheses that can be validated experimentally. Information about metabolic functions and microbial species compositions can already be compared among metagenomes from different ecosystems. These comparisons add to our understanding about microbial adaptation and the role of specific microbes in different ecosystems. Concurrent with the rapid growth of sequencing technologies, we have entered a new age of microbial ecology, which will enable researchers to experimentally confirm putative relationships between microbial functions and community structures. PMID:21593798

  6. The Correlation between Bacterial Metagenomic DNA Concentration and the Total Number of Bacteria Colonies in Drinking Water%自来水中细菌宏基因组 DNA的浓度与细菌菌落总数的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳超; 郝文利; 宿庄; 高玉敏

    2015-01-01

    Through analyzing the correlation between the bacterial metagenomic DNA concentration and the total count of bacterial colonies in drinking water, we explore a new method for the detection of total number of bacterial colonies in drinking water.The total number of bacteria colonies in the water from our lab was detected by a tradi-tional technology, and it was about ( 165 ±5 ) CFU/mL, which is higher than 100 CFU/mL that is the security boundary value which was made by Chinese health department in 2006.To limit the total number of bacterial colo-nies within 100 CFU/mL,the volume of the detection sample must below 600 mL.Firstly, the sample with different volumes higher or lower than 600 mL is treated with microfiltration; Secondly, extract the bacterial metagenomic DNA of filter membrane by Bacterial Genome Extraction Kit;Thirdly, analyze the DNA extracted by agarose gel e-lectrophoresis;Fourthly, determine the concentration of DNA extracted.Finally, analyze the correlation between the bacterial metagenomic DNA concentration and the total count of bacterial colonies in drinking water according to the experimental results.The bacterial metagenomic DNA extracted from different volumes of drinking water pro-duce clear bands, and the DNA contents are enough for further analysis;the correlation between the bacterial met-agenomic DNA concentration and the total count of bacterial colonies in drinking water is positive and linear.To es-tablish a new method for detection of total number of bacterial colonies by analyzing the bacterial metagenomic DNA concentration in drinking water, the detection sensitivity can reach 7 CFU/mL, and the method is time-saving and with good repetitiveness.%分析自来水中细菌宏基因组DNA浓度与细菌菌落总数之间的相关性,探索新的自来水细菌菌落总数检测方法。采用国标法检测自来水中的细菌菌落总数约为(165±5) CFU/mL,高于国标限值(100 CFU/mL)

  7. The Correlation between Bacterial Metagenomic DNA Concentration and the Total Number of Bacteria Colonies in Drinking Water%自来水中细菌宏基因组 DNA的浓度与细菌菌落总数的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳超; 郝文利; 宿庄; 高玉敏

    2015-01-01

    分析自来水中细菌宏基因组DNA浓度与细菌菌落总数之间的相关性,探索新的自来水细菌菌落总数检测方法。采用国标法检测自来水中的细菌菌落总数约为(165±5) CFU/mL,高于国标限值(100 CFU/mL)。通过计算得出,检测600 mL本实验水样中的细菌菌落总数相当于检测1000 mL(1 L)100 CFU/mL的自来水。首先将600 mL及低于和高于该体积不同体积梯度的自来水经滤膜过滤收集菌体;然后使用细菌基因组提取试剂盒提取滤膜上的细菌宏基因组DNA,电泳分析提取的宏基因组质量;最后检测各个体积自来水宏基因组DNA浓度,根据检测结果分析自来水中宏基因组DNA含量与细菌菌落总数之间的相关性。提取的自来水宏基因组DNA主条带清晰,可以进行基因组DNA含量测定分析;自来水中细菌宏基因组DNA浓度与细菌菌落总数之间呈正相关的线性关系。建立一种通过检测自来水中细菌宏基因组DNA浓度来反映细菌菌落总数的检测方法,检测灵敏度可达7 CFU/mL,且省时、重复性好。%Through analyzing the correlation between the bacterial metagenomic DNA concentration and the total count of bacterial colonies in drinking water, we explore a new method for the detection of total number of bacterial colonies in drinking water.The total number of bacteria colonies in the water from our lab was detected by a tradi-tional technology, and it was about ( 165 ±5 ) CFU/mL, which is higher than 100 CFU/mL that is the security boundary value which was made by Chinese health department in 2006.To limit the total number of bacterial colo-nies within 100 CFU/mL,the volume of the detection sample must below 600 mL.Firstly, the sample with different volumes higher or lower than 600 mL is treated with microfiltration; Secondly, extract the bacterial metagenomic DNA of filter membrane by Bacterial Genome Extraction Kit;Thirdly, analyze the DNA

  8. A metagenomic snapshot of taxonomic and functional diversity in an alpine glacier cryoconite ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryoconite is a microbe–mineral aggregate which darkens the ice surface of glaciers. Microbial process and marker gene PCR-dependent measurements reveal active and diverse cryoconite microbial communities on polar glaciers. Here, we provide the first report of a cryoconite metagenome and culture-independent study of alpine cryoconite microbial diversity. We assembled 1.2 Gbp of metagenomic DNA sequenced using an Illumina HiScanSQ from cryoconite holes across the ablation zone of Rotmoosferner in the Austrian Alps. The metagenome revealed a bacterially-dominated community, with Proteobacteria (62% of bacterial-assigned contigs) and Bacteroidetes (14%) considerably more abundant than Cyanobacteria (2.5%). Streptophyte DNA dominated the eukaryotic metagenome. Functional genes linked to N, Fe, S and P cycling illustrated an acquisitive trend and a nitrogen cycle based upon efficient ammonia recycling. A comparison of 32 metagenome datasets revealed a similarity in functional profiles between the cryoconite and metagenomes characterized from other cold microbe–mineral aggregates. Overall, the metagenomic snapshot reveals the cryoconite ecosystem of this alpine glacier as dependent on scavenging carbon and nutrients from allochthonous sources, in particular mosses transported by wind from ice-marginal habitats, consistent with net heterotrophy indicated by productivity measurements. A transition from singular snapshots of cryoconite metagenomes to comparative analyses is advocated. (letter)

  9. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles.

  10. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  11. Metagenomic analysis of the microbiomes in ruminants and other herbivores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many conceptual breakthroughs in the life sciences would not have been possible without first developing techniques and instrumentation to investigate biological processes and molecules. In 1995, The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) completely sequenced, assembled and published the fist genome of a free-living organism, that of Haemophilus influenzae Rd. This milestone in scientific achievement has allowed microbiologists to progress from a reductionist approach of studying one gene at a time to the examination of microbial biology from an organismal perspective, using a combination of existing and newly developed (bio)chemical and computational (in silico) approaches. These fields of investigation are often defined with an 'omics' suffix. Hence, genomics refers to the holistic examination of the genetic blueprint that a microbe has acquired, at that point in evolutionary time, to support its lifestyle. Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics refer to a similar level of analysis at the RNA, protein and metabolite levels, respectively. Furthermore, the latest advances in sequencing technologies and cloning vectors better enable a detailed examination of the structure and function of microbial communities, including those organisms that cannot readily be cultured, and we refer to the integrative use of the following methods as the basis of an emerging scientific discipline referred to as metagenomics: 1. Bacterial artificial chromosome and fosmid cloning technologies: Community genomic DNA is cloned in large fragments (>50-150 kilobases [kb]) to create libraries of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), or smaller fragments (∼40 kb) are cloned into fosmid vectors. These libraries can then be screened by DNA- and activity-based screens for genes encoding any number of particular functions including hydrolytic and other enzymes central to schemes of carbon sequestration. 2. High throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatics: Both BAC and fosmid libraries

  12. Recent progresses in metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomics addresses the collective genetic structure and functional composition of a microbial community at its native habitat. This approach has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and function of the microbiota for the past few years and is revolutionizing studies of microbial ec...

  13. A five-fold pig bacterial artificial chromosome library:a resource for positional cloning and physical mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LI Ning; ZHANG Ying; LIU Zhaoliang; GUO Li; WANG Xiaobo; FEI Jing; FENG Jidong; ZHAO Rui; HU Xiaoxiang

    2006-01-01

    A pig BAC library was constructed with genomic DNA from a male Erhualian pig. After partial digestion with Hind Ⅲ or BamH I the fragments obtained were cloned into the pBeloBAC11 vector. The library consists of 184320 clones which stored in 480pieces 384-well plates (20 plates per superpool). A two-step 4-dimension PCR screening system was established to screen the positive clones. An average insert size of 128 kb was estimated from 105 randomly isolated clones, which indicates that the library is more than five times of genomic coverage. For the demonstration of the probability to pick out any unique genes or DNA markers from the library, 10single-copy genes were screened out and the positive clones were yielded between 1 and 8 with an average of 3.6. Positive superpools were obtained for 32 microsatellite markers selected from different regions of pig genome. The number of positive superpools for each marker varies from 1 to 9 with an average of 4.78. This BAC library provides an additional resource for pig physical mapping and gene identification.

  14. Microbial diversity of hypersaline environments: a metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Antonio; de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Papke, R Thane

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies based on metagenomics and other molecular techniques have permitted a detailed knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic activities of microorganisms in hypersaline environments. The current accepted model of community structure in hypersaline environments is that the square archaeon Haloquadratum waslbyi, the bacteroidete Salinibacter ruber and nanohaloarchaea are predominant members at higher salt concentrations, while more diverse archaeal and bacterial taxa are observed in habitats with intermediate salinities. Additionally, metagenomic studies may provide insight into the isolation and characterization of the principal microbes in these habitats, such as the recently described gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. PMID:26056770

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Koumiss in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Koumiss is a low-alcohol product made from fermented mare's milk, which is popular in Kazakhstan, Russia, and other countries of Central Asia, China, and Mongolia. Natural mare's milk is fermented in symbiosis of two types of microorganisms (lactobacteria and yeast. Koumiss’s microbial composition varies depending on the geographical, climatic, and cultural conditions. Based on a phenotypic characteristic from samples, Wu, R. and colleagues identified the following bacteria isolated in inner Mongolia, an autonomous region of China: L.casei, L.helveticus, L.plantarum, L.coryniformis subsp. coryniformis, L.paracasei, L.kefiranofaciens, L.curvatus, L.fermentum, and W.kandleri. Studies of the yeast composition in koumiss also showed significant variations. Thus, there were Saccharomyces unisporus related 48.3% of isolates, to Kluyveromyces marxianus (27.6%, Pichia membranaefaciens (15.0%, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (9.2% from 87 isolated yeast cultures. The purpose of this study was to examine the bacterial composition in koumiss.Methods. To extract DNA, 1.8 ml of fermented milk was centrifuged to generate a pellet, which was suspended in 450 µl of lysis buffer P1 from the Powerfood Microbial DNA Isolation kit (MoBio Laboratories Inc, USA. Amplification of the microflora was used to determine the composition of a fragment of the gene 16S rRNA and ITS1. Plasmid library with target insertion was obtained on the basis of height copy plasmid vectors producing high pGem-T. The definition of direct nucleotide sequencing was performed by the method of Sanger using a set of "BigDye Terminanor v 3.1 Cycle sequencing Kit with automatic genetic analyzer ABI 3730xl  (Applied Biosystems, USA.  Informax Vector NTI Suite 9, Sequence Scanner v 1.0  software package used for the analysis.Results. Our studies showed that in the most samples of koumiss isolated from Akmola region (Central Kazakhstan prevailed the following bacteria species

  16. A retrospective metagenomics approach to studying Blastocystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lee O'Brien; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2015-07-01

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasitic genus, comprising several subtypes. Here, we screened data obtained by metagenomic analysis of faecal DNA for Blastocystis by searching for subtype-specific genes in coabundance gene groups, which are groups of genes that covary across a selection of 316 human faecal samples, hence representing genes originating from a single subtype. The 316 faecal samples were from 236 healthy individuals, 13 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 67 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). The prevalence of Blastocystis was 20.3% in the healthy individuals and 14.9% in patients with UC. Meanwhile, Blastocystis was absent in patients with CD. Individuals with intestinal microbiota dominated by Bacteroides were much less prone to having Blastocystis-positive stool (Matthew's correlation coefficient = -0.25, P metagenomics approach. The study serves as an example of how it is possible to retrospectively investigate microbial eukaryotic communities in the gut using metagenomic datasets targeting the bacterial component of the intestinal microbiome and the interplay between these microbial communities.

  17. Beyond biodiversity: fish metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ardura

    Full Text Available Biodiversity and intra-specific genetic diversity are interrelated and determine the potential of a community to survive and evolve. Both are considered together in Prokaryote communities treated as metagenomes or ensembles of functional variants beyond species limits.Many factors alter biodiversity in higher Eukaryote communities, and human exploitation can be one of the most important for some groups of plants and animals. For example, fisheries can modify both biodiversity and genetic diversity (intra specific. Intra-specific diversity can be drastically altered by overfishing. Intense fishing pressure on one stock may imply extinction of some genetic variants and subsequent loss of intra-specific diversity. The objective of this study was to apply a metagenome approach to fish communities and explore its value for rapid evaluation of biodiversity and genetic diversity at community level. Here we have applied the metagenome approach employing the barcoding target gene coi as a model sequence in catch from four very different fish assemblages exploited by fisheries: freshwater communities from the Amazon River and northern Spanish rivers, and marine communities from the Cantabric and Mediterranean seas.Treating all sequences obtained from each regional catch as a biological unit (exploited community we found that metagenomic diversity indices of the Amazonian catch sample here examined were lower than expected. Reduced diversity could be explained, at least partially, by overexploitation of the fish community that had been independently estimated by other methods.We propose using a metagenome approach for estimating diversity in Eukaryote communities and early evaluating genetic variation losses at multi-species level.

  18. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  19. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  20. Soil-specific limitations for access and analysis of soil microbial communities by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Nathalie; Prestat, Emmanuel; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    Metagenomics approaches represent an important way to acquire information on the microbial communities present in complex environments like soil. However, to what extent do these approaches provide us with a true picture of soil microbial diversity? Soil is a challenging environment to work with. Its physicochemical properties affect microbial distributions inside the soil matrix, metagenome extraction and its subsequent analyses. To better understand the bias inherent to soil metagenome 'processing', we focus on soil physicochemical properties and their effects on the perceived bacterial distribution. In the light of this information, each step of soil metagenome processing is then discussed, with an emphasis on strategies for optimal soil sampling. Then, the interaction of cells and DNA with the soil matrix and the consequences for microbial DNA extraction are examined. Soil DNA extraction methods are compared and the veracity of the microbial profiles obtained is discussed. Finally, soil metagenomic sequence analysis and exploitation methods are reviewed.

  1. Environmental Metagenomics: The Data Assembly and Data Analysis Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Maitra, S. S.; Shukla, Rohit Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gene finding is one of the emerging fields in the environmental research. In the past decades the research was focused mainly on the discovery of microorganisms which were capable of degrading a particular compound. A lot of methods are available in literature about the cultivation and screening of these novel microorganisms. All of these methods are efficient for screening of microbes which can be cultivated in the laboratory. Microorganisms which live in extreme conditions like hot springs, frozen glaciers, acid mine drainage, etc. cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, this is because of incomplete knowledge about their growth requirements like temperature, nutrients and their mutual dependence on each other. The microbes that can be cultivated correspond only to less than 1 % of the total microbes which are present in the earth. Rest of the 99 % of uncultivated majority remains inaccessible. Metagenomics transcends the culture requirements of microbes. In metagenomics DNA is directly extracted from the environmental samples such as soil, seawater, acid mine drainage etc., followed by construction and screening of metagenomic library. With the ongoing research, a huge amount of metagenomic data is accumulating. Understanding this data is an essential step to extract novel genes of industrial importance. Various bioinformatics tools have been designed to analyze and annotate the data produced from the metagenome. The Bio-informatic requirements of metagenomics data analysis are different in theory and practice. This paper reviews the tools that are available for metagenomic data analysis and the capability such tools—what they can do and their web availability.

  2. Exploration of nifH gene through soil metagenomes of the western Indian Himalayas

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Ravindra; Suyal, Deep Chandra; Sai, Santosh; Goel, Reeta

    2016-01-01

    This group has previously highlighted the prevalence of Csp genes from cold Himalayan environments. However, this study has explored the uncultured diazotrophs from metagenomes of western Indian Himalayas. The metagenomic nifH gene clone library was constructed from the Temperate, Subtropical and Tarai soils of Western Himalaya, India followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After preliminary screening, selected clones were sequenced. In silico analysis of the clones was don...

  3. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  4. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  5. The great screen anomaly--a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2012-02-01

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been heralded as a promising mining strategy of resources for the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry. However, in spite of innovative work in the field of functional genomics in recent years, yields from function-based metagenomics studies still fall short of producing significant amounts of new products that are valuable for biotechnological processes. Thus, a new set of strategies is required with respect to fostering gene expression in comparison to the traditional work. These new strategies should address a major issue, that is, how to successfully express a set of unknown genes of unknown origin in a foreign host in high throughput. This article is an opinionating review of functional metagenomic screening of natural microbial communities, with a focus on the optimization of new product discovery. It first summarizes current major bottlenecks in functional metagenomics and then provides an overview of the general metagenomic assessment strategies, with a focus on the challenges that are met in the screening for, and selection of, target genes in metagenomic libraries. To identify possible screening limitations, strategies to achieve optimal gene expression are reviewed, examining the molecular events all the way from the transcription level through to the secretion of the target gene product.

  6. Application of metagenomics in understanding oral health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Gunsolley, John

    2014-04-01

    Oral diseases including periodontal disease and caries are some of the most prevalent infectious diseases in humans. Different microbial species cohabitate and form a polymicrobial biofilm called dental plaque in the oral cavity. Metagenomics using next generation sequencing technologies has produced bacterial profiles and genomic profiles to study the relationships between microbial diversity, genetic variation, and oral diseases. Several oral metagenomic studies have examined the oral microbiome of periodontal disease and caries. Gene annotations in these studies support the association of specific genes or metabolic pathways with oral health and with specific diseases. The roles of pathogenic species and functions of specific genes in oral disease development have been recognized by metagenomic analysis. A model is proposed in which three levels of interactions occur in the oral microbiome that determines oral health or disease.

  7. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Summary: As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for the best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of the bioinformatic analysis step by step. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning ...

  8. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  9. Study of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacterial community in the aged refuse bioreactor with 16S rRNA gene library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xie, Bing; Han, Lu; Xu, Xiaofan

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (Anammox) nitrogen removal pathway of the aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate, a lab-scale bioreactor was established and run for 35 weeks, the performance of the bioreactor and its bacterial community structure of Planctomycetes were analyzed. The results showed that the average TN removal rate of landfill leachate could be reached to 89%. 16S rRNA gene library of Planctomycetes revealed that Anammox sequences accounted for 28.3% of the total Planctomycetes sequences in the bioreactor, and previously recognized Anammox bacterium Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis was the only detected Anammox species in the reactor. It was also found that Anammox bacteria distributed at different sites of the bioreactor while mostly concentrated in the middle and low-middle part. Results above confirmed that Anammox process could happen in aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate and provided an alternative nitrogen removal pathway in practical landfills.

  10. The YNP metagenome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.;

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment......, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3...

  11. A primer on metagenomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Wooley, John C.; Adam Godzik; Iddo Friedberg

    2010-01-01

    Metagenomics is a discipline that enables the genomic study of uncultured microorganisms. Faster, cheaper sequencing technologies and the ability to sequence uncultured microbes sampled directly from their habitats are expanding and transforming our view of the microbial world. Distilling meaningful information from the millions of new genomic sequences presents a serious challenge to bioinformaticians. In cultured microbes, the genomic data come from a single clone, making sequence assembly ...

  12. Methods for comparative metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Auch Alexander F; Mitra Suparna; Richter Daniel C; Huson Daniel H; Schuster Stephan C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Metagenomics is a rapidly growing field of research that aims at studying uncultured organisms to understand the true diversity of microbes, their functions, cooperation and evolution, in environments such as soil, water, ancient remains of animals, or the digestive system of animals and humans. The recent development of ultra-high throughput sequencing technologies, which do not require cloning or PCR amplification, and can produce huge numbers of DNA reads at an affordab...

  13. A high-throughput strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries and anchoring of clones on a genetic map constructed with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deal Karin R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current techniques of screening bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries for molecular markers during the construction of physical maps are slow, laborious and often assign multiple BAC contigs to a single locus on a genetic map. These limitations are the principal impediment in the construction of physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes. It is hypothesized that this impediment can be overcome by screening multidimensional pools of BAC clones using the highly parallel Illumina GoldenGate™ assay. Results To test the efficacy of the Golden Gate assay in BAC library screening, multidimensional pools involving 302976 Aegilops tauschii BAC clones were genotyped for the presence/absence of specific gene sequences with multiplexed Illumina GoldenGate oligonucleotide assays previously used to place single nucleotide polymorphisms on an Ae. tauschii genetic map. Of 1384 allele-informative oligonucleotide assays, 87.6% successfully clustered BAC pools into those positive for a BAC clone harboring a specific gene locus and those negative for it. The location of the positive BAC clones within contigs assembled from 199190 fingerprinted Ae. tauschii BAC clones was used to evaluate the precision of anchoring of BAC clones and contigs on the Ae. tauschii genetic map. For 41 (95% assays, positive BAC clones were neighbors in single contigs. Those contigs could be unequivocally assigned to loci on the genetic map. For two (5% assays, positive clones were in two different contigs and the relationships of these contigs to loci on the Ae. tauschii genetic map were equivocal. Screening of BAC libraries with a simple five-dimensional BAC pooling strategy was evaluated and shown to allow direct detection of positive BAC clones without the need for manual deconvolution of BAC clone pools. Conclusion The highly parallel Illumina oligonucleotide assay is shown here to be an efficient tool for screening BAC libraries and a strategy for high

  14. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  15. Databases of the marine metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  16. Screening and identification of a novel target specific for hepatoma cell line HepG2 from the FliTrx bacterial peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhan Li; Ping Lei; Bing Yu; Sha Wu; Jilin Peng; Xiaoping Zhao; Huffen Zhu; Michael Kirschfink; Guanxin Shen

    2008-01-01

    To explore new targets for hepatoma research, we used a surface display library to screen novel tumor cell-specific peptides. The bacterial FliTrx system was screened with living normal liver cell line L02 and hepatoma cell line HepG2 successively to search for hepatoma-specific peptides. Three clones (Hep1, Hep2, and Hep3) were identified to be specific to HepG2 compared with L02 and other cancer cell lines.Three-dimensional structural prediction proved that peptides inserted into the active site of Escherichia coli thioredoxin (TrxA) formed certain loop structures protruding out of the surface. Western blot analysis showed that FliC/TrxA-pepfide fusion proteins could be directly used to detect HepG2 cells.Three different FliC/TrxA-peptide fusion proteins targeted the same molecule, at approximately 140 kDa, on HepG2 cells.This work presented for the first time the application of the FliTrx library in screening living cells. Three peptides were obtained that could be potential candidates for targeted liver cancer therapy.

  17. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies. PMID:19132072

  18. Repetitive genome elements in a European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, bacterial artificial chromosome library were indicated by bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing and development of sequence tag site markers: implications for lepidopteran genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Sumerford, Douglas V; Hellmich, Richard L; Lewis, Leslie C

    2009-01-01

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, is a serious pest of food, fiber, and biofuel crops in Europe, North America, and Asia and a model system for insect olfaction and speciation. A bacterial artificial chromosome library constructed for O. nubilalis contains 36 864 clones with an estimated average insert size of >or=120 kb and genome coverage of 8.8-fold. Screening OnB1 clones comprising approximately 2.76 genome equivalents determined the physical position of 24 sequence tag site markers, including markers linked to ecologically important and Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance traits. OnB1 bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence reads (GenBank dbGSS accessions ET217010 to ET217273) showed homology to annotated genes or expressed sequence tags and identified repetitive genome elements, O. nubilalis miniature subterminal inverted repeat transposable elements (OnMITE01 and OnMITE02), and ezi-like long interspersed nuclear elements. Mobility of OnMITE01 was demonstrated by the presence or absence in O. nubilalis of introns at two different loci. A (GTCT)n tetranucleotide repeat at the 5' ends of OnMITE01 and OnMITE02 are evidence for transposon-mediated movement of lepidopteran microsatellite loci. The number of repetitive elements in lepidopteran genomes will affect genome assembly and marker development. Single-locus sequence tag site markers described here have downstream application for integration within linkage maps and comparative genomic studies.

  19. The metagenome-derived enzymes LipS and LipT increase the diversity of known lipases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chow

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol lipases (EC 3.1.1.3 catalyze both hydrolysis and synthesis reactions with a broad spectrum of substrates rendering them especially suitable for many biotechnological applications. Most lipases used today originate from mesophilic organisms and are susceptible to thermal denaturation whereas only few possess high thermotolerance. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of two novel thermostable bacterial lipases identified by functional metagenomic screenings. Metagenomic libraries were constructed from enrichment cultures maintained at 65 to 75 °C and screened resulting in the identification of initially 10 clones with lipolytic activities. Subsequently, two ORFs were identified encoding lipases, LipS and LipT. Comparative sequence analyses suggested that both enzymes are members of novel lipase families. LipS is a 30.2 kDa protein and revealed a half-life of 48 h at 70 °C. The lipT gene encoded for a multimeric enzyme with a half-life of 3 h at 70 °C. LipS had an optimum temperature at 70 °C and LipT at 75 °C. Both enzymes catalyzed hydrolysis of long-chain (C(12 and C(14 fatty acid esters and additionally hydrolyzed a number of industry-relevant substrates. LipS was highly specific for (R-ibuprofen-phenyl ester with an enantiomeric excess (ee of 99%. Furthermore, LipS was able to synthesize 1-propyl laurate and 1-tetradecyl myristate at 70 °C with rates similar to those of the lipase CalB from Candida antarctica. LipS represents the first example of a thermostable metagenome-derived lipase with significant synthesis activities. Its X-ray structure was solved with a resolution of 1.99 Å revealing an unusually compact lid structure.

  20. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on 'sequence capture' reveals functional diversity in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-12-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances.

  1. Microbial metagenomics: beyond the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Dupont, Christopher L

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means "beyond the genome." Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise approximately 400 billion base pairs of DNA, only approximately 3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  2. Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Dupont, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means “beyond the genome.” Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise ˜400 billion base pairs of DNA, only ˜3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  3. Identification of the Bacterial Cellular Lipid Fraction by Using Fast GC × GC-MS and Innovative MS Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondello, Luigi; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Fanali, Chiara; Dugo, Paola; La Camera, Erminia; Bisignano, Carlo

    The bacteria fatty acid (FA) profile has been extensively studied for taxonomic classification purposes, since bacteria, in general, contain particular and rare fatty acids, compared to animal and plant tissues. In the last few years, the concern about pathogenic microorganisms used as bioterrorist agents has increased; therefore, rapid methods for the characterization of bacteria are necessary. In the present research, a half-an-hour procedure, to analyze bacteria, was developed: a 2-min one-step sample preparation step, was followed by a relatively fast comprehensive 2D GC-MS separation (25 min). Furthermore, dedicated mass spectrometry libraries were constructed for bacteria and FA identification. Finally, data-processing was carried out with the support of novel comprehensive 2D GC software.

  4. A retrospective metagenomics approach to studying Blastocystis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lee O'Brien; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2015-01-01

    a selection of 316 human faecal samples, hence representing genes originating from a single subtype. The 316 faecal samples were from 236 healthy individuals, 13 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 67 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). The prevalence of Blastocystis was 20.3% in the healthy individuals...... metagenomic datasets targeting the bacterial component of the intestinal microbiome and the interplay between these microbial communities....

  5. Crass: identification and reconstruction of CRISPR from unassembled metagenomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Skennerton, Connor T.; Imelfort, Michael; Tyson, Gene W

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) constitute a bacterial and archaeal adaptive immune system that protect against bacteriophage (phage). Analysis of CRISPR loci reveals the history of phage infections and provides a direct link between phage and their hosts. All current tools for CRISPR identification have been developed to analyse completed genomes and are not well suited to the analysis of metagenomic data sets, where CRISPR loci are difficult to assemble ow...

  6. A new approach of food microbiology with the metagenomic tools: an application on fish

    OpenAIRE

    Delhalle, Laurent; Taminiau, Bernard; Nezer, Carine; Darcis, Amélie; Daube, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics has appeared as a powerful tool to study bacterial composition of various environmental samples. Its interest has started to appear in food microbiology but only on the study of very particular bacterial populations of fermented food. This work describes the application of this technique to study the bacterial population of two fresh fish filets. The two fish species are from freshwater (pangasius) and seawater (haddock), respectively. Samples where directly analyzed the day of r...

  7. 白眉长臂猿基因组BAC文库的构建%Construction of Genome Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of Hylobates Hoolock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王起明; 孙烨超; 厉申捷; 叶建平

    2015-01-01

    High quality genomic DNA of Hylobates hoolock was obtained by gentle physical homogenization. The DNA was partially digested with EcoRⅠand EcoRⅠmethylase, and cloned to pCC1BAC vector. The positive clones were stored in 384-well plates. The constructed BAC library consists of 85800 clones. DNA from randomly selected 250 BAC clones was restricted with Not I restriction enzyme and fragments were separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The result shows that the average insert size is estimated as approximately 110 kb, and the ratio of non-recombinant clones is 10. 0%. If the genome size of Hylobates hoolock is 3 ×106 kilo-base, the library could cover 3 times the number of genome.%通过温和的物理方法获得白眉长臂猿高质量的基因组DNA,EcoRⅠ和EcoRⅠ甲基化酶部分酶切后经回收、连接、转化、阳性克隆的保存,构建了含有85800个克隆的全基因组BAC( Bacterial artificial chromosome)文库.随机选取250个BAC克隆进行Not I酶切及脉冲场电泳分析,结果表明该文库的平均插入片段大小为110 kb,非重组克隆(无插入片段)的比率为10.0%.假定白眉长臂猿的基因组大小为3×106 kb,根据文库的平均插入片段大小,则该文库具有3倍的基因组覆盖率.

  8. Bacterial communities of traditional salted and fermented seafoods from Jeju Island of Korea using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Eun-Jin

    2014-05-01

    Jeotgal, which is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in Korea, is traditional type of preserved seafood that is prepared by salting and fermenting. Here, we report on the bacterial community structure and diversity of jeotgal obtained from the Korean island of Jeju, which has a subtropical climate. Two samples of Jeotgal were collected from Jeju, made from either damselfish (Chromis notata; jari-dom-jeot, J1 and J2) or silver-stripe round herring (Spratelloides gracilis; ggot-myulchi-jeot, K1 and K2). The physical characteristics (pH and salinity) were assessed and the bacterial communities characterized using 16S rRNA gene-clone library analysis and cultural isolation. No difference was found in the community composition between the J and K fermented seafoods. Both fermented seafoods had relatively high salinity (26% to 33%) and high pH values (pH 6.08 to 6.72). Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences, the halophilic lactic-acid bacteria Tetragenococcus halophilus and T. muriaticus were observed to be dominant in the J and K fermented seafoods, accompanied by halophilic bacteria including Halanaerobium spp., Halomonas spp., and Chromohalobacter spp. When compared with 7 other types of fermented seafood from a previous study, the communities of the J and K fermented seafoods were separated by the most influential group, the genus Tetragenococcus. The results suggest that these 2 types of traditional salted fermented seafood from Jeju have distinct communities dominated by Tetragenococcus spp., which are derived from the raw ingredients and are dependent on the physical conditions. This may explain how the seafoods that are made in Jeju may differ from other jeotgals. PMID:24689962

  9. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Hernández, Mónica; Angel, Tatiana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-02-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones (in the plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+) with an average insert size of 4 Kb, covering 80 Mb of the total metagenomic DNA. Metagenomic sequences near the plasmid cloning site were sequenced and them trimmed and assembled, obtaining 299 reads and 31 contigs (0.3 Mb). Taxonomic assignment of total sequences was performed by BLASTX, resulting in 68.8, 44.8 and 24.5% classification into taxonomic groups using the metagenomic RAST server v2.0, WebCARMA v1.0 online system and MetaGenome Analyzer v3.8 software, respectively. Most clone sequences were classified as Bacteria belonging to phlya Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Among the most represented orders were Actinomycetales (34% average), Rhizobiales, Burkholderiales and Myxococcales and with a greater number of sequences in the genus Mycobacterium (7% average), Frankia, Streptomyces and Bradyrhizobium. The vast majority of sequences were associated with the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and catalytic functions, such as phosphatases, glycosyltransferases, dehydrogenases, methyltransferases, dehydratases and epoxide hydrolases. In this study we compared different methods of taxonomic and functional assignment of metagenomic clone sequences to evaluate microbial diversity in an unexplored soil ecosystem, searching for putative enzymes of biotechnological interest and generating important information for further functional screening of clone libraries. PMID:21792685

  10. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  11. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka;

    2014-01-01

    Most current approaches for analyzing metagenomic data rely on comparisons to reference genomes, but the microbial diversity of many environments extends far beyond what is covered by reference databases. De novo segregation of complex metagenomic data into specific biological entities......, such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly...... of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify...

  12. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  13. A metagenomic study highlights phylogenetic proximity of quorum-quenching and xenobiotic-degrading amidases of the AS-family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Tannières

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing (QS signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. Among the 29 760 fosmids of the metagenomic library, a single one was detected that expressed the qsdB gene conferring NAHL-degradation upon E. coli and decreased QS-regulated virulence in Pectobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of the 34 orfs of the fosmid suggested that it would belong to an unknown Proteobacterium - probably a γ-proteobacterium. qPCR quantification of the NAHLase-encoding genes attM, qsdA, and qsdB revealed their higher abundance in the γ-caprolactone-treated rhizosphere as compared to an untreated control. The purified QsdB enzyme exhibited amidase activity. QsdB is the first amidase signature (AS family member exhibiting NAHLase-activity. Point mutations in the AS-family catalytic triad K-S-S abolished the NAHLase activity of QsdB. This study extends the diversity of NAHLases and highlights a common phylogenic origin of AS-family enzymes involved in the degradation of natural compounds, such as NAHLs, and xenobiotics, such as nylon and linuron.

  14. Analysis of bacterial community structure in Saba-Narezushi (Narezushi of Mackerel) by 16S rRNA gene clone library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Tsuchiya, Rie; Isobe, Yuka; Narita, Miyo

    2013-08-01

    Narezushi, a derivation of sushi, is a traditional Japanese food made by fermenting salted fish meat and cooked rice together. In this study, the microbial diversity of saba-narezushi (narezushi of mackerel, Scomber japonicus) was analyzed by the 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone library method. Chemical composition was also analyzed to compare with different kinds of narezushi. The chemical composition of the narezushi was similar to those obtained from samma-narezushi. Ninety-four clones were randomly selected and DNA sequences of cloned fragments (approx. 890 bp) were analyzed. The DNA sequences obtained were phylogenetically analyzed. The expected operational taxonomy units (OTUs) by Chao1 estimates and Shannon-Wiener index (H') at 97% identity threshold were 48 and 1.822, respectively. The sequence similarity of the cloned fragment was equal to or higher than 98% of the sequence of cultivated bacterial species in the public database. Most of the clones (85%) belonged to lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus curvatus was the most abundant species followed by Lactococcus piscium and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, suggesting that these bacteria play important roles in the fermentation of saba-narezushi. PMID:24425983

  15. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    OpenAIRE

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  16. Metagenomics: An Application Based Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Yasir Bashir; Salam Pradeep Singh; Bolin Kumar Konwar

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics deals with the isolation of genetic material directly recovered from environmental samples. Metagenomics as an approach has emerged over the past two decades to elucidate a host of microbial communities inhabiting a specific niche with the goal of understanding their genetic diversity, population structure, and ecological role played by them. A number of new and novel molecules with significant functionalities and applications have been identified through this approach. In fact, ...

  17. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    -encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest...

  18. Metagenome Analyses of Corroded Concrete Wastewater Pipe Biofilms Reveals a Complex Microbial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries was used to determine microbial composition and functional genes associated with biomass harvested from crown (top) and invert (bottom) sections of a corroded wastewater pipe. Taxonomic and functio...

  19. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  20. Molecular cloning of a novel bioH gene from an environmental metagenome encoding a carboxylesterase with exceptional tolerance to organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yuping

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BioH is one of the key enzymes to produce the precursor pimeloyl-ACP to initiate biotin biosynthesis de novo in bacteria. To date, very few bioH genes have been characterized. In this study, we cloned and identified a novel bioH gene, bioHx, from an environmental metagenome by a functional metagenomic approach. The bioHx gene, encoding an enzyme that is capable of hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 using the pET expression system. The biochemical property of the purified BioHx protein was also investigated. Results Screening of an unamplified metagenomic library with a tributyrin-containing medium led to the isolation of a clone exhibiting lipolytic activity. This clone carried a 4,570-bp DNA fragment encoding for six genes, designated bioF, bioHx, fabG, bioC, orf5 and sdh, four of which were implicated in the de novo biotin biosynthesis. The bioHx gene encodes a protein of 259 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 28.60 kDa, displaying 24-39% amino acid sequence identity to a few characterized bacterial BioH enzymes. It contains a pentapeptide motif (Gly76-Trp77-Ser78-Met79-Gly80 and a catalytic triad (Ser78-His230-Asp202, both of which are characteristic for lipolytic enzymes. BioHx was expressed as a recombinant protein and characterized. The purified BioHx protein displayed carboxylesterase activity, and it was most active on p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids substrate with a short acyl chain (C4. Comparing BioHx with other known BioH proteins revealed interesting diversity in their sensitivity to ionic and nonionic detergents and organic solvents, and BioHx exhibited exceptional resistance to organic solvents, being the most tolerant one amongst all known BioH enzymes. This ascribed BioHx as a novel carboxylesterase with a strong potential in industrial applications. Conclusions This study constituted the first investigation of a novel bioHx gene in a biotin

  1. 红树林土壤微生物宏基因组文库的构建及两种新颖的β-葡萄糖苷酶基因的鉴定%Construction of a Mangrove Soil Metagenome Library and Identification of Two Novelβ-Glucosidase Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦志茂; 苏宏飞; 李丽珍; 张偲

    2014-01-01

    宏基因组技术是挖掘微生物新酶的重要途径。通过构建红树林土壤微生物Fosmid文库,共获得了约100000个阳性克隆,该文库外源插入片段平均长度约为30 kb,文库容量达3 Gb。通过对文库中10000个克隆进行功能筛选,获得了17个具有β-葡萄糖苷酶活性的克隆。对其中2个表达β-葡萄糖苷酶的克隆进行亚克隆,获得2个新颖的β-葡萄糖苷酶的基因,分别命名MhGH3和bgl66。生物信息学分析表明,MhGH3基因由1992个碱基对组成,bgl66基因由2025个碱基对组成。在氨基酸水平上, MhGH3和bgl66编码的蛋白质与GenBank数据库中已知β-葡萄糖苷酶的一致性分别为64%和55%。%Metagenomics provides a means of exploring new enzymes in microorganisms. A mangrove soil metagenome library with 100 000 clones was constructed. The average length of inserted DNA fragment is about 30 kb, and the total capacity of inserted DNA reached about 3 Gb. Seventeen clones withβ-glucosidase activity were detected by screening 10 000 fosmid clones. The subcloning and sequencing revealed two novelβ-glucosidase genes(MhGH3 and bgl66). Bioinformatics analysis indicated that MhGH3 and bgl66 composed of 1 992 bp and 2 025 bp in length, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence of MhGH3 and bgl66 showed the highest sequence identity of 64%and 55%with the knownβ-glucosidase in GenBank datebase, respectively.

  2. Screening and Cloning of IMP Cyclohydrolase from a Metagenomic Cosmid Library of a Deep-sea Sediment Sample%深海沉积物微生物宏基因组文库中IMP环水解酶的筛选及基因克隆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴麟; 赵晶; 徐宪忠; 曾润颖

    2011-01-01

    为了解嘌呤合成途径的关键酶——IMP环水解酶的多样性,从深海沉积物样品中提取总DNA构建Cosmid宏基因组文库,从中筛选出一个具有IMP环水解酶活性的克隆(CAIMP1).通过基因步移的方法从CAIMP1的约35 kb的插入片段中扩增出长度为l 599 bp的完整的IMP环水解酶基因,该基因包含MGS和AICARFT_IMPCHas两个保守结构域.活性检测结果表明CAIMP1克隆的发酵液上清具有较强的IMP环水解酶活性.该酶与数据库中收录的IMP环水解酶的氨基酸序列同源性较低,系统发育分析也表明该酶与其它参照序列亲缘关系较远,表明该序列可能为一个新的IMP环水解酶基因.%IMP cyclohydrolase is a key enzyme in the purine synthesis pathway. A clone (CAIMP1) producing IMP cyclohydrolase activity was isolated from a metagenomic library which was constructed from metagenomic DNA of a deep-sea sediment sample. The gene coding for the IMP cyclohydrolase with the size of 1 599 bp was subcloned from the 35 kb inserted fragment of CAIMP1 by gene walking. Two conserved domains, MGS and AICARFT_IMPCHas, was found in the gene. The CAIMP1 exhibited high activity towards 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR). The alignment and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequence of the CAIMP1 IMP cyclohydrolase showed that it had low homology with other referenced sequences in GenBank, indicating that it might be a new sequence. Fig 5, Tab 3, Ref 17

  3. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules. PMID:26586404

  4. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules.

  5. Survey of Endosymbionts in the Diaphorina citri Metagenome and Assembly of a Wolbachia wDi Draft Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Saha; Hunter, Wayne B.; Justin Reese; J Kent Morgan; Mizuri Marutani-Hert; Hong Huang; Magdalen Lindeberg

    2012-01-01

    Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citrus psyllid, is the insect vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of citrus greening disease. Sequencing of the D. citri metagenome has been initiated to gain better understanding of the biology of this organism and the potential roles of its bacterial endosymbionts. To corroborate candidate endosymbionts previously identified by rDNA amplification, raw reads from the D. citri metagenome sequence were mapped to reference ge...

  6. Machine learning for metagenomics: methods and tools

    OpenAIRE

    Soueidan, Hayssam; Nikolski, Macha

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the complexity and variability of metagenomic studies, modern machine learning approaches have seen increased usage to answer a variety of question encompassing the full range of metagenomic NGS data analysis. We review here the contribution of machine learning techniques for the field of metagenomics, by presenting known successful approaches in a unified framework. This review focuses on five important metagenomic problems: OTU-clustering, binning, taxonomic profling and assignment...

  7. Metagenome Skimming of Insect Specimen Pools: Potential for Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Gillett, Conrad P D T; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomic analyses are challenging in metazoans, but high-copy number and repeat regions can be assembled from low-coverage sequencing by "genome skimming," which is applied here as a new way of characterizing metagenomes obtained in an ecological or taxonomic context. Illumina shotgun sequencing on two pools of Coleoptera (beetles) of approximately 200 species each were assembled into tens of thousands of scaffolds. Repeated low-coverage sequencing recovered similar scaffold sets consistently, although approximately 70% of scaffolds could not be identified against existing genome databases. Identifiable scaffolds included mitochondrial DNA, conserved sequences with hits to expressed sequence tag and protein databases, and known repeat elements of high and low complexity, including numerous copies of rRNA and histone genes. Assemblies of histones captured a diversity of gene order and primary sequence in Coleoptera. Scaffolds with similarity to multiple sites in available coleopteran genome sequences for Dendroctonus and Tribolium revealed high specificity of scaffolds to either of these genomes, in particular for high-copy number repeats. Numerous "clusters" of scaffolds mapped to the same genomic site revealed intra- and/or intergenomic variation within a metagenome pool. In addition to effect of taxonomic composition of the metagenomes, the number of mapped scaffolds also revealed structural differences between the two reference genomes, although the significance of this striking finding remains unclear. Finally, apparently exogenous sequences were recovered, including potential food plants, fungal pathogens, and bacterial symbionts. The "metagenome skimming" approach is useful for capturing the genomic diversity of poorly studied, species-rich lineages and opens new prospects in environmental genomics. PMID:25979752

  8. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk. PMID:25417646

  9. Metagenome Skimming of Insect Specimen Pools: Potential for Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Gillett, Conrad P D T; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-05-14

    Metagenomic analyses are challenging in metazoans, but high-copy number and repeat regions can be assembled from low-coverage sequencing by "genome skimming," which is applied here as a new way of characterizing metagenomes obtained in an ecological or taxonomic context. Illumina shotgun sequencing on two pools of Coleoptera (beetles) of approximately 200 species each were assembled into tens of thousands of scaffolds. Repeated low-coverage sequencing recovered similar scaffold sets consistently, although approximately 70% of scaffolds could not be identified against existing genome databases. Identifiable scaffolds included mitochondrial DNA, conserved sequences with hits to expressed sequence tag and protein databases, and known repeat elements of high and low complexity, including numerous copies of rRNA and histone genes. Assemblies of histones captured a diversity of gene order and primary sequence in Coleoptera. Scaffolds with similarity to multiple sites in available coleopteran genome sequences for Dendroctonus and Tribolium revealed high specificity of scaffolds to either of these genomes, in particular for high-copy number repeats. Numerous "clusters" of scaffolds mapped to the same genomic site revealed intra- and/or intergenomic variation within a metagenome pool. In addition to effect of taxonomic composition of the metagenomes, the number of mapped scaffolds also revealed structural differences between the two reference genomes, although the significance of this striking finding remains unclear. Finally, apparently exogenous sequences were recovered, including potential food plants, fungal pathogens, and bacterial symbionts. The "metagenome skimming" approach is useful for capturing the genomic diversity of poorly studied, species-rich lineages and opens new prospects in environmental genomics.

  10. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk.

  11. Microbial community profiling of human saliva using shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur A Hasan

    Full Text Available Human saliva is clinically informative of both oral and general health. Since next generation shotgun sequencing (NGS is now widely used to identify and quantify bacteria, we investigated the bacterial flora of saliva microbiomes of two healthy volunteers and five datasets from the Human Microbiome Project, along with a control dataset containing short NGS reads from bacterial species representative of the bacterial flora of human saliva. GENIUS, a system designed to identify and quantify bacterial species using unassembled short NGS reads was used to identify the bacterial species comprising the microbiomes of the saliva samples and datasets. Results, achieved within minutes and at greater than 90% accuracy, showed more than 175 bacterial species comprised the bacterial flora of human saliva, including bacteria known to be commensal human flora but also Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Gamma proteobacteria. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTn analysis in parallel, reported ca. five times more species than those actually comprising the in silico sample. Both GENIUS and BLAST analyses of saliva samples identified major genera comprising the bacterial flora of saliva, but GENIUS provided a more precise description of species composition, identifying to strain in most cases and delivered results at least 10,000 times faster. Therefore, GENIUS offers a facile and accurate system for identification and quantification of bacterial species and/or strains in metagenomic samples.

  12. Reconciling Phylogeny and Function During Plant Litter Decomposition by High-Throughput Functional Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssonen, M.; Weihe, C.; Goulden, M.; Treseder, K. K.; Martiny, J.; Martiny, A.; Allison, S. D.; Brodie, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating information on microbial diversity and functionality with ecosystem processes may be critical to predicting how ecosystems respond to environmental change. While theoretical models can be used to link microbial processes to environmental responses and rates, accurate predictions of ecosystem functioning would benefit from detailed information on microbial community composition and function. In this study, our aim was to identify functional traits involved in plant litter decomposition, a model process for carbon cycling, from decomposing plant litter. The overall goal is then to link these traits with individual microbial taxa and use this information to build predictive trait-based models of ecosystem responses to global change. In order to identify activities involved in plant litter decomposition we used automated high-throughput assays for functional screening of metagenomic fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing plant litter. Litter was collected over 15 month period from a global change field experiment undergoing rainfall and nitrogen manipulations. We identified over 600 cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin and starch hydrolyzing clones following screening of over 300,000 clones. The frequency of positive clones was ten times lower during dry season but no significant differences in hit rates were observed between different treatments. The positive clones were shotgun sequenced on the Illumina sequencing platform and the identified hydrolytic genes were shown to represent variety bacterial taxonomic groups including Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes.

  13. Web Resources for Metagenomics Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pravin Dudhagara; Sunil Bhavsar; Chintan Bhagat; Anjana Ghelani; Shreyas Bhatt; Rajesh Patel

    2015-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms spawned an enormous volume of data. This explosion in data has unearthed new scalability challenges for existing bioinformatics tools. The analysis of metagenomic sequences using bioinformatics pipelines is complicated by the substantial complexity of these data. In this article, we review several commonly-used online tools for metagenomics data analysis with respect to their quality and detail of analysis using simulated metagenomics data. There are at least a dozen such software tools presently available in the public domain. Among them, MGRAST, IMG/M, and METAVIR are the most well-known tools according to the number of citations by peer-reviewed scientific media up to mid-2015. Here, we describe 12 online tools with respect to their web link, annotation pipelines, clustering methods, online user support, and availability of data storage. We have also done the rating for each tool to screen more potential and preferential tools and evaluated five best tools using synthetic metagenome. The article comprehensively deals with the contemporary problems and the prospects of metagenomics from a bioinformatics viewpoint.

  14. Metagenomics: An Application Based Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics deals with the isolation of genetic material directly recovered from environmental samples. Metagenomics as an approach has emerged over the past two decades to elucidate a host of microbial communities inhabiting a specific niche with the goal of understanding their genetic diversity, population structure, and ecological role played by them. A number of new and novel molecules with significant functionalities and applications have been identified through this approach. In fact, many investigators are engaged in this field to unlock the untapped genetic resources with funding from governments sector. The sustainable economic future of modern industrialized societies requires the development of novel molecules, enzymes, processes, products, and applications. Metagenomics can also be applied to solve practical challenges in the field of medicine, agriculture, sustainability, and ecology. Metagenomics promises to provide new molecules and novel enzymes with diverse functions and enhanced features compared to the enzymes from the culturable microorganisms. Besides the application of metagenomics for unlocking novel biocatalysts from nature, it also has found applications in fields as diverse as bioremediation, personalized medicine, xenobiotic metabolism, and so forth.

  15. Web Resources for Metagenomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Bhavsar, Sunil; Bhagat, Chintan; Ghelani, Anjana; Bhatt, Shreyas; Patel, Rajesh

    2015-10-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms spawned an enormous volume of data. This explosion in data has unearthed new scalability challenges for existing bioinformatics tools. The analysis of metagenomic sequences using bioinformatics pipelines is complicated by the substantial complexity of these data. In this article, we review several commonly-used online tools for metagenomics data analysis with respect to their quality and detail of analysis using simulated metagenomics data. There are at least a dozen such software tools presently available in the public domain. Among them, MGRAST, IMG/M, and METAVIR are the most well-known tools according to the number of citations by peer-reviewed scientific media up to mid-2015. Here, we describe 12 online tools with respect to their web link, annotation pipelines, clustering methods, online user support, and availability of data storage. We have also done the rating for each tool to screen more potential and preferential tools and evaluated five best tools using synthetic metagenome. The article comprehensively deals with the contemporary problems and the prospects of metagenomics from a bioinformatics viewpoint.

  16. Characterization of a new Acidobacteria-derived moderately thermostable lipase from a Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Helisson; Glogauer, Arnaldo; Couto, Gustavo Henrique; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Rigo, Liu Un; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira

    2012-08-01

    A clone (LP001) expressing a new lipase gene was isolated from a metagenomic library of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil. The DNA insert of LP001 was fully sequenced, and 38 ORFs were identified. Comparison of ORFs, %G + C content and gene organization with sequenced bacterial genomes suggested that the fosmid DNA insert belongs to an organism of the Acidobacteria phylum. Protein domain analysis and inactivation by transposon insertion showed that the protein encoded by ORF29 was responsible for the lipase activity and was named LipAAc. The purified LipAAc lipase was capable of hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, showing the highest activity against p-nitrophenol (pNP) decanoate. The lipase was active over a pH range of 5.0-10.0 and was insensitive to divalent cations. LipAAc is moderately thermostable with optimum temperature between 50 and 60 °C and was thermally activated (80% activity increase) after 1 h incubation at 50 °C. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the LipAAc is a member of family I of bacterial lipases and clusters with other moderately thermostable lipases of this group. Comparisons of the DNA insert of fosmid LP001 with other acidobacterial genomes and sequence database suggest that lipAAc gene has a fungal origin and was acquired by horizontal transfer. PMID:22428990

  17. An integrated metagenome and -proteome analysis of the microbial community residing in a biogas production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortseifen, Vera; Stolze, Yvonne; Maus, Irena; Sczyrba, Alexander; Bremges, Andreas; Albaum, Stefan P; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Fracowiak, Jochen; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    To study the metaproteome of a biogas-producing microbial community, fermentation samples were taken from an agricultural biogas plant for microbial cell and protein extraction and corresponding metagenome analyses. Based on metagenome sequence data, taxonomic community profiling was performed to elucidate the composition of bacterial and archaeal sub-communities. The community's cytosolic metaproteome was represented in a 2D-PAGE approach. Metaproteome databases for protein identification were compiled based on the assembled metagenome sequence dataset for the biogas plant analyzed and non-corresponding biogas metagenomes. Protein identification results revealed that the corresponding biogas protein database facilitated the highest identification rate followed by other biogas-specific databases, whereas common public databases yielded insufficient identification rates. Proteins of the biogas microbiome identified as highly abundant were assigned to the pathways involved in methanogenesis, transport and carbon metabolism. Moreover, the integrated metagenome/-proteome approach enabled the examination of genetic-context information for genes encoding identified proteins by studying neighboring genes on the corresponding contig. Exemplarily, this approach led to the identification of a Methanoculleus sp. contig encoding 16 methanogenesis-related gene products, three of which were also detected as abundant proteins within the community's metaproteome. Thus, metagenome contigs provide additional information on the genetic environment of identified abundant proteins. PMID:27312700

  18. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing based microbial diversity assessment of Lasundra hot spring, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit V. Mangrola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report on the metagenomic approach for unveiling the microbial diversity of Lasundra hot spring, Gujarat State, India. High-throughput sequencing of community DNA was performed on an Ion Torrent PGM platform. Metagenome consisted of 606,867 sequences represent 98,567,305 bps size with an average length of 162 bps and 46% G + C content. Metagenome sequence information is available at EBI under EBI Metagenomic database with accession no. ERP009313. MG-RAST assisted community analysis revealed that 99.21% sequences were bacterial origin, 0.43% was fit to eukaryotes and 0.11% belongs to archaea. A total of 29 bacterial, 20 eukaryotic and 4 archaeal phyla were detected. Abundant genera were Bacillus (86.7%, Geobacillus (2.4%, Paenibacillus (1.0%, Clostridium (0.7% and Listeria (0.5%, that represent 91.52% in metagenome. In functional analysis, Cluster of Orthologous Group (COG based annotation revealed that 45.4% was metabolism connected and 19.6% falls in poorly characterized group. Subsystem based annotation approach suggests that the 14.0% was carbohydrates, 7.0% was protein metabolism and 3.0% genes for various stress responses together with the versatile presence of commercially useful traits.

  19. The Characterization of Novel Tissue Microbiota Using an Optimized 16S Metagenomic Sequencing Pipeline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lluch

    Full Text Available Substantial progress in high-throughput metagenomic sequencing methodologies has enabled the characterisation of bacteria from various origins (for example gut and skin. However, the recently-discovered bacterial microbiota present within animal internal tissues has remained unexplored due to technical difficulties associated with these challenging samples.We have optimized a specific 16S rDNA-targeted metagenomics sequencing (16S metabarcoding pipeline based on the Illumina MiSeq technology for the analysis of bacterial DNA in human and animal tissues. This was successfully achieved in various mouse tissues despite the high abundance of eukaryotic DNA and PCR inhibitors in these samples. We extensively tested this pipeline on mock communities, negative controls, positive controls and tissues and demonstrated the presence of novel tissue specific bacterial DNA profiles in a variety of organs (including brain, muscle, adipose tissue, liver and heart.The high throughput and excellent reproducibility of the method ensured exhaustive and precise coverage of the 16S rDNA bacterial variants present in mouse tissues. This optimized 16S metagenomic sequencing pipeline will allow the scientific community to catalogue the bacterial DNA profiles of different tissues and will provide a database to analyse host/bacterial interactions in relation to homeostasis and disease.

  20. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  1. PhylOTU: a high-throughput procedure quantifies microbial community diversity and resolves novel taxa from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Sharpton

    Full Text Available Microbial diversity is typically characterized by clustering ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Targeted sequencing of environmental SSU-rRNA markers via PCR may fail to detect OTUs due to biases in priming and amplification. Analysis of shotgun sequenced environmental DNA, known as metagenomics, avoids amplification bias but generates fragmentary, non-overlapping sequence reads that cannot be clustered by existing OTU-finding methods. To circumvent these limitations, we developed PhylOTU, a computational workflow that identifies OTUs from metagenomic SSU-rRNA sequence data through the use of phylogenetic principles and probabilistic sequence profiles. Using simulated metagenomic data, we quantified the accuracy with which PhylOTU clusters reads into OTUs. Comparisons of PCR and shotgun sequenced SSU-rRNA markers derived from the global open ocean revealed that while PCR libraries identify more OTUs per sequenced residue, metagenomic libraries recover a greater taxonomic diversity of OTUs. In addition, we discover novel species, genera and families in the metagenomic libraries, including OTUs from phyla missed by analysis of PCR sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that PhylOTU enables characterization of part of the biosphere currently hidden from PCR-based surveys of diversity?

  2. Multivariate analysis of functional metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Dinsdale

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics is a primary tool for the description of microbial and viral communities. The sheer magnitude of the data generated in each metagenome makes identifying key differences in the function and taxonomy between communities difficult to elucidate. Here we discuss the application of seven different data mining and statistical analyses by comparing and contrasting the metabolic functions of 212 microbial metagenomes within and between 10 environments. Not all approaches are appropriate for all questions, and researchers should decide which approach addresses their questions. This work demonstrated the use of each approach: for example, random forests provided a robust and enlightening description of both the clustering of metagenomes and the metabolic processes that were important in separating microbial communities from different environments. All analyses identified that the presence of phage genes within the microbial community was a predictor of whether the microbial community was host associated or free living. Several analyses identified the subtle differences that occur with environments, such as those seen in different regions of the marine environment.

  3. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  4. Functional Intestinal Metagenomics (Chapter 18)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Leimena, M.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    The premiere two-volume reference on revelations from studying complex microbial communities in many distinct habitats Metagenomics is an emerging field that has changed the way microbiologists study microorganisms. It involves the genomic analysis of microorganisms by extraction and cloning of DNA

  5. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  6. Metagenomic abundance estimation and diagnostic testing on species level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Martin S.; Renard, Bernhard Y.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of sequencing-based metagenomic community analysis is the quantitative taxonomic assessment of microbial community compositions. In particular, relative quantification of taxons is of high relevance for metagenomic diagnostics or microbial community comparison. However, the majority of existing approaches quantify at low resolution (e.g. at phylum level), rely on the existence of special genes (e.g. 16S), or have severe problems discerning species with highly similar genome sequences. Yet, problems as metagenomic diagnostics require accurate quantification on species level. We developed Genome Abundance Similarity Correction (GASiC), a method to estimate true genome abundances via read alignment by considering reference genome similarities in a non-negative LASSO approach. We demonstrate GASiC’s superior performance over existing methods on simulated benchmark data as well as on real data. In addition, we present applications to datasets of both bacterial DNA and viral RNA source. We further discuss our approach as an alternative to PCR-based DNA quantification. PMID:22941661

  7. Challenges of the Unknown: Clinical Application of Microbial Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast, high throughput and low cost whole genome sequencing holds great promise within public health microbiology, with applications ranging from outbreak detection and tracking transmission events to understanding the role played by microbial communities in health and disease. Within clinical metagenomics, identifying microorganisms from a complex and host enriched background remains a central computational challenge. As proof of principle, we sequenced two metagenomic samples, a known viral mixture of 25 human pathogens and an unknown complex biological model using benchtop technology. The datasets were then analysed using a bioinformatic pipeline developed around recent fast classification methods. A targeted approach was able to detect 20 of the viruses against a background of host contamination from multiple sources and bacterial contamination. An alternative untargeted identification method was highly correlated with these classifications, and over 1,600 species were identified when applied to the complex biological model, including several species captured at over 50% genome coverage. In summary, this study demonstrates the great potential of applying metagenomics within the clinical laboratory setting and that this can be achieved using infrastructure available to nondedicated sequencing centres.

  8. [Mini review] metagenomic studies of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Hayedeh

    2015-10-23

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied amongst marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmolyte C1 oxidation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1–3 °C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the

  9. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  10. Subtractive assembly for comparative metagenomics, and its application to type 2 diabetes metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Comparative metagenomics remains challenging due to the size and complexity of metagenomic datasets. Here we introduce subtractive assembly, a de novo assembly approach for comparative metagenomics that directly assembles only the differential reads that distinguish between two groups of metagenomes. Using simulated datasets, we show it improves both the efficiency of the assembly and the assembly quality of the differential genomes and genes. Further, its application to type 2 diabetes (T2D)...

  11. Growth dynamics of gut microbiota in health and disease inferred from single metagenomic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnit-Sagi, Tali; Pompan-Lotan, Maya; Matot, Elad; Jona, Ghil; Harmelin, Alon; Cohen, Nadav; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Thaiss, Christoph A.; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Sorek, Rotem; Xavier, Ramnik; Elinav, Eran; Segal, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomic sequencing increased our understanding of the role of the microbiome in health and disease, yet it only provides a snapshot of a highly dynamic ecosystem. Here, we show that the pattern of metagenomic sequencing read coverage for different microbial genomes contains a single trough and a single peak, the latter coinciding with the bacterial origin of replication. Furthermore, the ratio of sequencing coverage between the peak and trough provides a quantitative measure of a species' growth rate. We demonstrate this in vitro and in vivo, under different growth conditions, and in complex bacterial communities. For several bacterial species, peak to trough coverage ratios, but not relative abundances, correlated with the manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease and type II diabetes. PMID:26229116

  12. An application of statistics to comparative metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohwer Forest

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics, sequence analyses of genomic DNA isolated directly from the environments, can be used to identify organisms and model community dynamics of a particular ecosystem. Metagenomics also has the potential to identify significantly different metabolic potential in different environments. Results Here we use a statistical method to compare curated subsystems, to predict the physiology, metabolism, and ecology from metagenomes. This approach can be used to identify those subsystems that are significantly different between metagenome sequences. Subsystems that were overrepresented in the Sargasso Sea and Acid Mine Drainage metagenome when compared to non-redundant databases were identified. Conclusion The methodology described herein applies statistics to the comparisons of metabolic potential in metagenomes. This analysis reveals those subsystems that are more, or less, represented in the different environments that are compared. These differences in metabolic potential lead to several testable hypotheses about physiology and metabolism of microbes from these ecosystems.

  13. Metagenomic analysis targeted on the 16S ribosomal DNA to study the quality of meat : a example with raw minced beef meat

    OpenAIRE

    Delhalle, Laurent; Taminiau, Bernard; Nezer, Carine; Daube, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Steak tartare is a popular meat dish in Belgium and some other European countries. This meat preparations due to their raw nature, is highly sensitive to bacterial spoilage. A better understanding of the bacterial content of this product will thus be insightful to control the risk of spoilage. Metagenomics targeted on the 16S ribosomal DNA has appeared as a powerful tool to study bacterial composition of food samples. The aim of this study is to identify the bacterial populatio...

  14. An application of statistics to comparative metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rohwer Forest; Rodriguez-Brito Beltran; Edwards Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Metagenomics, sequence analyses of genomic DNA isolated directly from the environments, can be used to identify organisms and model community dynamics of a particular ecosystem. Metagenomics also has the potential to identify significantly different metabolic potential in different environments. Results Here we use a statistical method to compare curated subsystems, to predict the physiology, metabolism, and ecology from metagenomes. This approach can be used to identify t...

  15. Filtration and Normalization of Sequencing Read Data in Whole-Metagenome Shotgun Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvarine, Philippe; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Moran Losada, Patricia; DeLuca, David S.; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Ever-increasing affordability of next-generation sequencing makes whole-metagenome sequencing an attractive alternative to traditional 16S rDNA, RFLP, or culturing approaches for the analysis of microbiome samples. The advantage of whole-metagenome sequencing is that it allows direct inference of the metabolic capacity and physiological features of the studied metagenome without reliance on the knowledge of genotypes and phenotypes of the members of the bacterial community. It also makes it possible to overcome problems of 16S rDNA sequencing, such as unknown copy number of the 16S gene and lack of sufficient sequence similarity of the “universal” 16S primers to some of the target 16S genes. On the other hand, next-generation sequencing suffers from biases resulting in non-uniform coverage of the sequenced genomes. To overcome this difficulty, we present a model of GC-bias in sequencing metagenomic samples as well as filtration and normalization techniques necessary for accurate quantification of microbial organisms. While there has been substantial research in normalization and filtration of read-count data in such techniques as RNA-seq or Chip-seq, to our knowledge, this has not been the case for the field of whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing. The presented methods assume that complete genome references are available for most microorganisms of interest present in metagenomic samples. This is often a valid assumption in such fields as medical diagnostics of patient microbiota. Testing the model on two validation datasets showed four-fold reduction in root-mean-square error compared to non-normalized data in both cases. The presented methods can be applied to any pipeline for whole metagenome sequencing analysis relying on complete microbial genome references. We demonstrate that such pre-processing reduces the number of false positive hits and increases accuracy of abundance estimates. PMID:27760173

  16. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-08-12

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals.

  17. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Gojobori, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals. PMID:26204808

  18. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Tobar-Tosse

    Full Text Available Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C content, Codon Usage (Cd, Trinucleotide Usage (Tn, and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  19. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Gojobori, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals.

  20. Metagenomic Assembly: Overview, Challenges and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghurye, Jay S.; Cepeda-Espinoza, Victoria; Pop, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have led to the increased use of high throughput sequencing in characterizing the microbial communities associated with our bodies and our environment. Critical to the analysis of the resulting data are sequence assembly algorithms able to reconstruct genes and organisms from complex mixtures. Metagenomic assembly involves new computational challenges due to the specific characteristics of the metagenomic data. In this survey, we focus on major algorithmic approaches for genome and metagenome assembly, and discuss the new challenges and opportunities afforded by this new field. We also review several applications of metagenome assembly in addressing interesting biological problems. PMID:27698619

  1. Featured Library: Parrish Library

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkwood, Hal P, Jr

    2015-01-01

    The Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics is located within the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University. Between 2005 - 2007 work was completed on a white paper that focused on a student-centered vision for the Management & Economics Library. The next step was a massive collection reduction and a re-envisioning of both the services and space of the library. Thus began a 3 phase renovation from a 2 floor standard, collection-focused library into a single floor, 18,000s...

  2. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest.

  3. Subtractive assembly for comparative metagenomics, and its application to type 2 diabetes metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-11-02

    Comparative metagenomics remains challenging due to the size and complexity of metagenomic datasets. Here we introduce subtractive assembly, a de novo assembly approach for comparative metagenomics that directly assembles only the differential reads that distinguish between two groups of metagenomes. Using simulated datasets, we show it improves both the efficiency of the assembly and the assembly quality of the differential genomes and genes. Further, its application to type 2 diabetes (T2D) metagenomic datasets reveals clear signatures of the T2D gut microbiome, revealing new phylogenetic and functional features of the gut microbial communities associated with T2D.

  4. Cypriot libraries

    OpenAIRE

    John F. Harvey

    1982-01-01

    Describes the current state of librarianship and bibliography in Cyprus, with separate sections for the Greek and Turkish sectors. Although there is no national library in the Greek sector there are 5 types of public library: Nicosia public library; Limassol, Larnaca and Paphos public libraries; community libraries; mobile libraries; and foreign cultural centre libraries. Schools and colleges in the Greek centre are well provided with libraries and most government departments sponsor special ...

  5. 瘤胃微生物基因组文库中BAC末端序列分析%Analysis of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences from microbial metagenomic library of rumen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵圣国; 王加启; 李发弟; 刘开朗; 卜登攀; 李旦; 于萍

    2010-01-01

    基于前期从瘤胃微生物基因组文库中筛选的功能酶克隆菌,利用T7和pIBRP引物,测定功能酶克隆菌的BAC末端序列,并利用NCBI Blast系统对BAC末端序列进行分析.结果表明:共得到26条BAC末端序列,经Blast比对分析,与已知编码基因的匹配度低,而大部分BAC末端序列与阪崎肠杆菌和环境中的微生物匹配度高,说明瘤胃中的微生物与其它环境中的微生物具有一定的相似性,进一步丰富了对瘤胃微生物的认识.

  6. Exploring neighborhoods in the metagenome universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßhauer, Kathrin P; Klingenberg, Heiner; Lingner, Thomas; Meinicke, Peter

    2014-07-14

    The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis.

  7. Bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of pioneer plants (Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis) growing on heavy metals-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Jan-Roblero, Janet; González-Chávez, Maria del Carmen; Hernández-Gama, Regina; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the bacterial communities associated with the rhizospheres of pioneer plants Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis were explored. These plants grow on silver mine tailings with high concentration of heavy metals in Zacatecas, Mexico. Metagenomic DNAs from rhizosphere and bulk soil were extracted to perform a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis (DGGE) and to construct 16S rRNA gene libraries. A moderate bacterial diversity and twelve major phylogenetic groups including Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae and Actinobacteria phyla, and divisions TM7, OP10 and OD1 were recognized in the rhizospheres. Only 25.5% from the phylotypes were common in the rhizosphere libraries and the most abundant groups were members of the phyla Acidobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (Thiobacillus spp., Nitrosomonadaceae). The most abundant groups in bulk soil library were Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria, and no common phylotypes were shared with the rhizosphere libraries. Many of the clones detected were related with chemolithotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, characteristic of an environment with a high concentration of heavy metal-sulfur complexes, and lacking carbon and organic energy sources. PMID:20084459

  8. Construction, Characterization, and Preliminary BAC-End Sequence Analysis of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinke Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the construction and characterization of a publicly available BAC library for the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. Using modified methods, the library was constructed with the aim of developing public molecular resources to advance tea plant genomics research. The library consists of a total of 401,280 clones with an average insert size of 135 kb, providing an approximate coverage of 13.5 haploid genome equivalents. No empty vector clones were observed in a random sampling of 576 BAC clones. Further analysis of 182 BAC-end sequences from randomly selected clones revealed a GC content of 40.35% and low chloroplast and mitochondrial contamination. Repetitive sequence analyses indicated that LTR retrotransposons were the most predominant sequence class (86.93%–87.24%, followed by DNA retrotransposons (11.16%–11.69%. Additionally, we found 25 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that could potentially be used as genetic markers.

  9. Undergraduate Urban Metagenomics Research Module †

    OpenAIRE

    Muth, Theodore R.; McEntee, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The undergraduate urban metagenomics research module is an adaptable and tractable project that can be incorporated into exisiting microbiology, ecology, bioinformatics, introductory biology or other courses.  The module takes advantage of recent advances in metagenomics and next generation sequencing, giving students an opportunity to apply these current technologies to novel questions regarding microbial community diversity and dynamics.

  10. Metagenomic data analysis : computational methods and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is the study of the genomic content of microbial communities, acquired through DNA sequencing technology. The main advantage of metagenomics is that it can overcome the limitations of individual genome sequencing, that can work only on the few culturable microbes. Unfortunately, the an

  11. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities. PMID:27558781

  12. Exploring the viral world through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Karyna; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-10-01

    Viral metagenomics, or shotgun sequencing of purified viral particles, has revolutionized the field of environmental virology by allowing the exploration of viral communities in a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere. The introduction of viral metagenomics has demonstrated that dominant viruses in environmental communities are not well-represented by the cultured viruses in existing sequence databases. Viral metagenomic studies have provided insights into viral ecology by elucidating the genetic potential, community structure, and biogeography of environmental viruses. In addition, viral metagenomics has expanded current knowledge of virus-host interactions by uncovering genes that may allow viruses to manipulate their hosts in unexpected ways. The intrinsic potential for virus discovery through viral metagenomics can help advance a wide array of disciplines including evolutionary biology, pathogen surveillance, and biotechnology.

  13. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  14. Targeted metagenomics: finding rare tryptophan dimer natural products in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Yuan; Ternei, Melinda A; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2015-05-13

    Natural product discovery from environmental genomes (metagenomics) has largely been limited to the screening of existing environmental DNA (eDNA) libraries. Here, we have coupled a chemical-biogeographic survey of chromopyrrolic acid synthase (CPAS) gene diversity with targeted eDNA library production to more efficiently access rare tryptophan dimer (TD) biosynthetic gene clusters. A combination of traditional and synthetic biology-based heterologous expression efforts using eDNA-derived gene clusters led to the production of hydroxysporine (1) and reductasporine (2), two bioactive TDs. As suggested by our phylogenetic analysis of CPAS genes, identified in our survey of crude eDNA extracts, reductasporine (2) contains an unprecedented TD core structure: a pyrrolinium indolocarbazole core that is likely key to its unusual bioactivity profile. This work demonstrates the potential for the discovery of structurally rare and biologically interesting natural products using targeted metagenomics, where environmental samples are prescreened to identify the most phylogenetically unique gene sequences and molecules associated with these genes are accessed through targeted metagenomic library construction and heterologous expression.

  15. Comparing viral metagenomics methods using a highly multiplexed human viral pathogens reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Mee, Edward T; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Anderson, Rob; Schepelmann, Silke; Minor, Philip D; Delwart, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Unbiased metagenomic sequencing holds significant potential as a diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of any previously genetically described viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral genome sequences can also inform on likely phenotypes including drug susceptibility or neutralization serotypes. In this study, different variables of the laboratory methods often used to generate viral metagenomics libraries were compared for their abilities to detect multiple viruses and generate full genome coverage. A biological reagent consisting of 25 different human RNA and DNA viral pathogens was used to estimate the effect of filtration and nuclease digestion, DNA/RNA extraction methods, pre-amplification and the use of different library preparation kits on the detection of viral nucleic acids. Filtration and nuclease treatment led to slight decreases in the percentage of viral sequence reads and number of viruses detected. For nucleic acid extractions silica spin columns improved viral sequence recovery relative to magnetic beads and Trizol extraction. Pre-amplification using random RT-PCR while generating more viral sequence reads resulted in detection of fewer viruses, more overlapping sequences, and lower genome coverage. The ScriptSeq library preparation method retrieved more viruses and a greater fraction of their genomes than the TruSeq and Nextera methods. Viral metagenomics sequencing was able to simultaneously detect up to 22 different viruses in the biological reagent analyzed including all those detected by qPCR. Further optimization will be required for the detection of viruses in biologically more complex samples such as tissues, blood, or feces.

  16. 大白菜细菌人工染色体文库的构建及鉴定%Construction and Characterization of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library from Chinese Cabbage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯大领; 石学萍; 杨煜; 王彦华; 轩淑欣; 赵建军; 申书兴

    2011-01-01

    以我国优良的大白菜自交系'85-1'为材料,利用 pIndigoBAC-5 为载体,通过对高分子量DNA 的制备、大片段 DNA 的选择、连接转化条件等几个方面的优化,构建了大白菜细菌人工染色体文库.该文库由 57 600个克隆组成,平均大小为98.4 kb,空载率为1.5%;覆盖大白菜基因组 10.3 倍;挑取 6 个克隆培养5 d 后,经HindⅢ完全酶切检测,其指纹图谱稳定一致.大白菜细菌人工染色体文库的构建为重要功能基因的克隆和定位及比较基因组研究奠定了基础.%A bacterial artificial chromosome library of Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis ( Lour.)Olsson (Chinese cabbage) was constructed from inbred line‘ 85-1’ with the vector pIndigoBAC-5. The key processes of the construction, such as preparation of high molecular weight DNA, selection of digested fragments, condition of ligation and transformation, were studied. The library consists of 57 600 clones in which the average insert size is about 98.4 kb and the empty clones are about 1.5%. The library represents an equivalent of 10.3 fold size of Chinese cabbage genome. Six clones randomly picked from this library show no HindⅢ fingerprint changes after 5 days' successive culture, which indicates that the clones in the library are stable. The library will lay the foundation for gene clone, location and comparative genomics research of Brassica.

  17. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Stevens and its application to physically map the Sw-5 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassova, MI; Prins, M; Stevens, MR; Hille, J; Goldbach, RW; Spassova, Mariana I.; Stevens, Mikel R.; Goldbach, Rob W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sw-5 gene is a dominantly inherited resistance gene in tomato and functional against a number of tospovirus species. The gene has been mapped on chromosome 9, tightly linked to RFLP markers CT220 and SCAR421. To analyse the Sw-5 locus, a BAC genomic library was constructed of tomato cv. Stevens,

  18. Exploration of soil metagenome diversity for prospection of enzymes involved in lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, T.M.; Squina, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paixao, D.A.A.; Franco Cairo, J.P.L.; Buchli, F.; Ruller, R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Prade, R. [Oklahoma State University, Sillwater, OK (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Metagenomics allows access to genetic information encoded in DNA of microorganisms recalcitrant to cultivation. They represent a reservoir of novel biocatalyst with potential application in environmental friendly techniques aiming to overcome the dependence on fossil fuels and also to diminish air and water pollution. The focus of our work is the generation of a tool kit of lignocellulolytic enzymes from soil metagenome, which could be used for second generation ethanol production. Environmental samples were collected at a sugarcane field after harvesting, where it is expected that the microbial population involved on lignocellulose degradation was enriched due to the presence of straws covering the soil. Sugarcane Bagasse-Degrading-Soil (SBDS) metagenome was massively-parallel-454-Roche-sequenced. We identified a full repertoire of genes with significant match to glycosyl hydrolases catalytic domain and carbohydrate-binding modules. Soil metagenomics libraries cloned into pUC19 were screened through functional assays. CMC-agar screening resulted in positive clones, revealing new cellulases coding genes. Through a CMC-zymogram it was possible to observe that one of these genes, nominated as E-1, corresponds to an enzyme that is secreted to the extracellular medium, suggesting that the cloned gene carried the original signal peptide. Enzymatic assays and analysis through capillary electrophoresis showed that E-1 was able to cleave internal glycosidic bonds of cellulose. New rounds of functional screenings through chromogenic substrates are being conducted aiming the generation of a library of lignocellulolytic enzymes derived from soil metagenome, which may become key component for development of second generation biofuels. (author)

  19. Exploration of soil metagenome diversity for prospection of enzymes involved in lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Metagenomics allows access to genetic information encoded in DNA of microorganisms recalcitrant to cultivation. They represent a reservoir of novel biocatalyst with potential application in environmental friendly techniques aiming to overcome the dependence on fossil fuels and also to diminish air and water pollution. The focus of our work is the generation of a tool kit of lignocellulolytic enzymes from soil metagenome, which could be used for second generation ethanol production. Environmental samples were collected at a sugarcane field after harvesting, where it is expected that the microbial population involved on lignocellulose degradation was enriched due to the presence of straws covering the soil. Sugarcane Bagasse-Degrading-Soil (SBDS) metagenome was massively-parallel-454-Roche-sequenced. We identified a full repertoire of genes with significant match to glycosyl hydrolases catalytic domain and carbohydrate-binding modules. Soil metagenomics libraries cloned into pUC19 were screened through functional assays. CMC-agar screening resulted in positive clones, revealing new cellulases coding genes. Through a CMC-zymogram it was possible to observe that one of these genes, nominated as E-1, corresponds to an enzyme that is secreted to the extracellular medium, suggesting that the cloned gene carried the original signal peptide. Enzymatic assays and analysis through capillary electrophoresis showed that E-1 was able to cleave internal glycosidic bonds of cellulose. New rounds of functional screenings through chromogenic substrates are being conducted aiming the generation of a library of lignocellulolytic enzymes derived from soil metagenome, which may become key component for development of second generation biofuels. (author)

  20. A Metagenomic Study Highlights Phylogenetic Proximity of Quorum-Quenching and Xenobiotic-Degrading Amidases of the AS-Family

    OpenAIRE

    Mélanie Tannières; Amélie Beury-Cirou; Armelle Vigouroux; Samuel Mondy; Franck Pellissier; Yves Dessaux; Denis Faure

    2013-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL) class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. A...

  1. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  2. Glycans affect DNA extraction and induce substantial differences in gut metagenomic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Angelakis, E; Bachar, D.; Henrissat, B; Armougom, Fabrice; Audoly, G.; Lagier, J. C.; Robert, C.; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by bacterial species and present in feces are extremely inhibitory to DNA restriction and can cause discrepancies in metagenomic studies. We determined the effects of different DNA extraction methods on the apparent composition of the gut microbiota using Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing technology. DNA was extracted from the stool from an obese female using 10 different methods and the choice of DNA extraction method affected the proportional abundance at the phylum...

  3. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  4. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  5. Bioprospecting metagenomes: glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luen-Luen; McCorkle, Sean R; Monchy, Sebastien; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes) for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies. PMID:19450243

  6. Bioprospecting metagenomes: glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monchy Sebastien

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

  7. 宏基因组学及其在海洋微生物领域的应用∗%Metagenomics and its Applications in the Field of Marine Microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘如运; 黄毅梅

    2013-01-01

      宏基因组学是研究生态群体基因功能和相互作用的新科学领域。文章从宏基因组DNA的提取和宏基因文库筛选两方面分析了宏基因组学的研究策略,并综述了宏基因组学在海洋微生物领域的应用。%  Metagenomics is a new field of science applied to study gene function and interaction ecotype communi-ties. This review is analyzed the strategies of metagenomics on extraction of metagenome DNA and screening of met-agenome library, and discussed the applications of metagenomics in the field of marine microorganisms.

  8. Metagenomics and its Applications in the Field of Marine Microorganisms%宏基因组学及其在海洋微生物领域的应用∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘如运; 黄毅梅

    2013-01-01

      Metagenomics is a new field of science applied to study gene function and interaction ecotype communi-ties. This review is analyzed the strategies of metagenomics on extraction of metagenome DNA and screening of met-agenome library, and discussed the applications of metagenomics in the field of marine microorganisms.%  宏基因组学是研究生态群体基因功能和相互作用的新科学领域。文章从宏基因组DNA的提取和宏基因文库筛选两方面分析了宏基因组学的研究策略,并综述了宏基因组学在海洋微生物领域的应用。

  9. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Of Microbial Communities From Active Layer And Permafrost After Short-Term Thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chauhan, A.; Saarunya, G.; Murphy, J.; Williams, D.; Layton, A. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Sanders, R.; Lau, C. M.; myneni, S.; Phelps, T. J.; Fountain, A. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    decreased with depth from 7x108 to 1x108 copies /g of soil. Characterization of the metagenomic sequences derived from the samples before thawing elucidated differences between the permafrost and active-layer with Acidobacteria and Alpha-Proteobacteria are being significantly higher in active layer than in permafrost, on the contrary permafrost had higher abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes than active layer. Currently additional metagenomic DNA illumina libraries for 20 samples after 1 week thawing are in preparation and will be analyzed to determine whether variations in the metagenomic sequences are correlated to the geochemical data.

  10. Metagenomics and future perspectives in virus discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokili, John L; Rohwer, Forest; Dutilh, Bas E

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring the emergence and re-emergence of viral diseases with the goal of containing the spread of viral agents requires both adequate preparedness and quick response. Identifying the causative agent of a new epidemic is one of the most important steps for effective response to disease outbreaks. Traditionally, virus discovery required propagation of the virus in cell culture, a proven technique responsible for the identification of the vast majority of viruses known to date. However, many viruses cannot be easily propagated in cell culture, thus limiting our knowledge of viruses. Viral metagenomic analyses of environmental samples suggest that the field of virology has explored less than 1% of the extant viral diversity. In the last decade, the culture-independent and sequence-independent metagenomic approach has permitted the discovery of many viruses in a wide range of samples. Phylogenetically, some of these viruses are distantly related to previously discovered viruses. In addition, 60-99% of the sequences generated in different viral metagenomic studies are not homologous to known viruses. In this review, we discuss the advances in the area of viral metagenomics during the last decade and their relevance to virus discovery, clinical microbiology and public health. We discuss the potential of metagenomics for characterization of the normal viral population in a healthy community and identification of viruses that could pose a threat to humans through zoonosis. In addition, we propose a new model of the Koch's postulates named the 'Metagenomic Koch's Postulates'. Unlike the original Koch's postulates and the Molecular Koch's postulates as formulated by Falkow, the metagenomic Koch's postulates focus on the identification of metagenomic traits in disease cases. The metagenomic traits that can be traced after healthy individuals have been exposed to the source of the suspected pathogen.

  11. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangming; Passey, Thomas; Wei, Feng; Saville, Robert; Harrison, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites had a yield-decline problem, the other two did not. More than 2000 fungal or bacterial operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were found in these samples. Relative abundance of individual OTUs was statistically compared for differences between samples from sites with or without yield decline. A total of 721 individual comparisons were statistically significant - involving 366 unique bacterial and 44 unique fungal OTUs. Based on further selection criteria, we focused on 34 bacterial and 17 fungal OTUs and found that yield decline resulted probably from one or more of the following four factors: (1) low abundance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas populations, which are well known for their ability of supressing pathogen development and/or promoting plant growth; (2) lack of the nematophagous fungus (Paecilomyces species); (3) a high level of two non-specific fungal root rot pathogens; and (4) wet soil conditions. This study demonstrated the usefulness of an amplicon-based metagenomics approach to profile soil microbiota and to detect differential abundance in microbes. PMID:26504572

  12. Functional Metagenomics of the Bronchial Microbiome in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Millares

    Full Text Available The course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is frequently aggravated by exacerbations, and changes in the composition and activity of the microbiome may be implicated in their appearance. The aim of this study was to analyse the composition and the gene content of the microbial community in bronchial secretions of COPD patients in both stability and exacerbation. Taxonomic data were obtained by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing, and metabolic information through shotgun metagenomics, using the Metagenomics RAST server (MG-RAST, and the PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States programme, which predict metagenomes from 16S data. Eight severe COPD patients provided good quality sputum samples, and no significant differences in the relative abundance of any phyla and genera were found between stability and exacerbation. Bacterial biodiversity (Chao1 and Shannon indexes did not show statistical differences and beta-diversity analysis (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index showed a similar microbial composition in the two clinical situations. Four functional categories showed statistically significant differences with MG-RAST at KEGG level 2: in exacerbation, Cell growth and Death and Transport and Catabolism decreased in abundance [1.6 (0.2-2.3 vs 3.6 (3.3-6.9, p = 0.012; and 1.8 (0-3.3 vs 3.6 (1.8-5.1, p = 0.025 respectively], while Cancer and Carbohydrate Metabolism increased [0.8 (0-1.5 vs 0 (0-0.5, p = 0.043; and 7 (6.4-9 vs 5.9 (6.3-6.1, p = 0.012 respectively]. In conclusion, the bronchial microbiome as a whole is not significantly modified when exacerbation symptoms appear in severe COPD patients, but its functional metabolic capabilities show significant changes in several pathways.

  13. Functional Metagenomics of the Bronchial Microbiome in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millares, Laura; Pérez-Brocal, Vicente; Ferrari, Rafaela; Gallego, Miguel; Pomares, Xavier; García-Núñez, Marian; Montón, Concepción; Capilla, Silvia; Monsó, Eduard; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently aggravated by exacerbations, and changes in the composition and activity of the microbiome may be implicated in their appearance. The aim of this study was to analyse the composition and the gene content of the microbial community in bronchial secretions of COPD patients in both stability and exacerbation. Taxonomic data were obtained by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing, and metabolic information through shotgun metagenomics, using the Metagenomics RAST server (MG-RAST), and the PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) programme, which predict metagenomes from 16S data. Eight severe COPD patients provided good quality sputum samples, and no significant differences in the relative abundance of any phyla and genera were found between stability and exacerbation. Bacterial biodiversity (Chao1 and Shannon indexes) did not show statistical differences and beta-diversity analysis (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index) showed a similar microbial composition in the two clinical situations. Four functional categories showed statistically significant differences with MG-RAST at KEGG level 2: in exacerbation, Cell growth and Death and Transport and Catabolism decreased in abundance [1.6 (0.2-2.3) vs 3.6 (3.3-6.9), p = 0.012; and 1.8 (0-3.3) vs 3.6 (1.8-5.1), p = 0.025 respectively], while Cancer and Carbohydrate Metabolism increased [0.8 (0-1.5) vs 0 (0-0.5), p = 0.043; and 7 (6.4-9) vs 5.9 (6.3-6.1), p = 0.012 respectively]. In conclusion, the bronchial microbiome as a whole is not significantly modified when exacerbation symptoms appear in severe COPD patients, but its functional metabolic capabilities show significant changes in several pathways.

  14. Diversity of the bacterial community in the rice rhizosphere managed under conventional and no-tillage practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Zubair; Yasir, Muhammad; Yoon, Hwan Sik; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial diversity in the rice rhizosphere at different rice growth stages, managed under conventional and no-tillage practices, was explored using a culture-based approach. Actinobacteria are among the bacterial phyla abundant in the rice rhizosphere. Their diversity was further examined by constructing metagenomic libraries based on the 16S rRNA gene, using actinobacterial- and streptomycete-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. The study included 132 culturable strains and 125 clones from the 16S rRNA gene libraries. In conventional tillage, there were 38% Proteobacteria, 22% Actinobacteria, 33% Firmicutes, 5% Bacteroidetes, and 2% Acidobacteria, whereas with no-tillage management there were 63% Proteobacteria, 24% Actinobacteria, 6% Firmicutes, and 8% Bacteroidetes as estimated using the culture-dependent method during the four stages of rice cultivation. Principal coordinates analysis was used to cluster the bacterial communities along axes of maximal variance. The different growth stages of rice appeared to influence the rhizosphere bacterial profile for both cultivation practices. Novel clones with low similarities (89-97%) to Actinobacteria and Streptomyces were retrieved from both rice fields by screening the 16S rRNA gene libraries using actinobacterial- and streptomycete-specific primers. By comparing the actinobacterial community retrieved by culture-dependent and molecular methods, it was clear that a more comprehensive assessment of microbial diversity in the rice rhizosphere can be obtained using a combination of both techniques than by using either method alone. We also succeeded in culturing a number of bacteria that were previously described as unculturable. These were in a phylogenetically deep lineage when compared with related cultivable genera. PMID:24385351

  15. A comparative analysis of the intestinal metagenomes present in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and humans (Homo sapiens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrand, Falk; Ebersbach, Tine; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is an important model for human intestinal research. We have characterized the faecal microbiota of 60 guinea pigs using Illumina shotgun metagenomics, and used this data to compile a gene catalogue of its prevalent microbiota. Subsequently, we compared...... the guinea pig microbiome to existing human gut metagenome data from the MetaHIT project. Results: We found that the bacterial richness obtained for human samples was lower than for guinea pig samples. The intestinal microbiotas of both species were dominated by the two phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes...

  16. EBI metagenomics--a new resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah; Corbett, Matthew; Denise, Hubert; Fraser, Matthew; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hunter, Christopher; Jones, Philip; Leinonen, Rasko; McAnulla, Craig; Maguire, Eamonn; Maslen, John; Mitchell, Alex; Nuka, Gift; Oisel, Arnaud; Pesseat, Sebastien; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Vaughan, Daniel; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively recently established but rapidly expanding field that uses high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting different ecosystems (including oceans, lakes, soil, tundra, plants and body sites). Metagenomics brings with it a number of challenges, including the management, analysis, storage and sharing of data. In response to these challenges, we have developed a new metagenomics resource (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) that allows users to easily submit raw nucleotide reads for functional and taxonomic analysis by a state-of-the-art pipeline, and have them automatically stored (together with descriptive, standards-compliant metadata) in the European Nucleotide Archive.

  17. The change of microbial community from chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater after biostimulation using the metagenome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Ming; Liao, Hung-Yu; Chien, Chih-Ching; Tseng, Yi-Kuan; Tang, Petrus; Lin, Chih-En; Chen, Ssu-Ching

    2016-01-25

    The compositions of bacterial community in one site contaminated with PCE/TCE after the slow polycolloid-releasing substrate (SPRS) (contained vegetable oil, cane molasses, and surfactants) addition were analyzed. Results show that SPRS caused a rapid enhancement of reductive dechlorination of TCE. The transformation of PCE/TCE into ethene was observed after 20 days of operation. To compare the change of bacterial communities before and after SPRS addition, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using the metagenome analysis was performed. Results demonstrated the detection of the increased amounts of Dehalogenimonas by 2.2-fold, Pseudomonas by 3.4-fold and Sulfuricurvum by 4-fold with the analysis of the ribosomal database project (RDP). Metagenomic DNA was extracted from PCE/TCE-contaminated groundwater after SPRS addition, and subjected to sequencing. Results obtained from metagenomic sequencing indicate that genes from Dehalococcoides mccartyi was ranked as the second abundant bacteria among all of the detected bacteria via the analysis of the lowest common ancestor (LCA). Abundance of these bacterial groups, as shown above suggests their role in TCE biodegradation. Functional analysis of the metagenome, with the specific reference to chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation, revealed the presence of some genes responsible for TCE biodegradation. Overall, results of this study provided new insights for a better understanding of the potential of biostimulation on TCE-contaminated sites. PMID:26474376

  18. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  19. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  20. Comparative metagenomics of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-26

    Metagenome produces a tremendous amount of data that comes from the organisms living in the environments. This big data enables us to examine not only microbial genes but also the community structure, interaction and adaptation mechanisms at the specific location and condition. The Red Sea has several unique characteristics such as high salinity, high temperature and low nutrition. These features must contribute to form the unique microbial community during the evolutionary process. Since 2014, we started monthly samplings of the metagenomes in the Red Sea under KAUST-CCF project. In collaboration with Kitasato University, we also collected the metagenome data from the ocean in Japan, which shows contrasting features to the Red Sea. Therefore, the comparative metagenomics of those data provides a comprehensive view of the Red Sea microbes, leading to identify key microbes, genes and networks related to those environmental differences.

  1. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  2. Genome signature-based dissection of human gut metagenomes to extract subliminal viral sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Bowler, Lucas D.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James E.; Jones, Brian V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) have a key role in shaping the development and functional outputs of host microbiomes. Although metagenomic approaches have greatly expanded our understanding of the prokaryotic virosphere, additional tools are required for the phage-oriented dissection of metagenomic data sets, and host-range affiliation of recovered sequences. Here we demonstrate the application of a genome signature-based approach to interrogate conventional whole-community metagenomes and access subliminal, phylogenetically targeted, phage sequences present within. We describe a portion of the biological dark matter extant in the human gut virome, and bring to light a population of potentially gut-specific Bacteroidales-like phage, poorly represented in existing virus like particle-derived viral metagenomes. These predominantly temperate phage were shown to encode functions of direct relevance to human health in the form of antibiotic resistance genes, and provided evidence for the existence of putative ‘viral-enterotypes’ among this fraction of the human gut virome. PMID:24036533

  3. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic data sets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monzoorul Haque Mohammed; Sudha Chadaram Dinakar; Dinakar Komanduri; Tarini Shankar Ghosh; Sharmila S Mande

    2011-09-01

    Physical partitioning techniques are routinely employed (during sample preparation stage) for segregating the prokaryotic and eukaryotic fractions of metagenomic samples. In spite of these efforts, several metagenomic studies focusing on bacterial and archaeal populations have reported the presence of contaminating eukaryotic sequences inmetagenomic data sets. Contaminating sequences originate not only from genomes of micro-eukaryotic species but also from genomes of (higher) eukaryotic host cells. The latter scenario usually occurs in the case of host-associatedmetagenomes. Identification and removal of contaminating sequences is important, since these sequences not only impact estimates of microbial diversity but also affect the accuracy of several downstream analyses. Currently, the computational techniques used for identifying contaminating eukaryotic sequences, being alignment based, are slow, inefficient, and require huge computing resources. In this article, we present Eu-Detect, an alignment-free algorithm that can rapidly identify eukaryotic sequences contaminating metagenomic data sets. Validation results indicate that on a desktop with modest hardware specifications, the Eu-Detect algorithm is able to rapidly segregate DNA sequence fragments of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin, with high sensitivity. A Web server for the Eu-Detect algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/Eu-Detect/.

  4. Discovery of novel enzymes with industrial potential from a cold and alkaline environment by a combination of functional metagenomics and culturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    to these conditions. Since only a small fraction of the total microbial diversity can be cultured in the laboratory, a combined approach involving functional screening of a strain collection and a metagenomic library was undertaken for discovery of novel enzymes from the ikaite columns.Results: A strain collection......-amylases and β-galactosidases were characterized in more detail with respect to temperature and pH profiles and one of the β-galactosidases, BGalI17E2, was able to hydrolyze lactose at 5°C. A metagenome sequence of the expression library indicated that the majority of enzymatic activities were not detected....../or alkaline-active enzymes of industrial relevance were identified in the culture based approach and the majority of the enzyme-producing isolates were closely related to previously characterized strains. The function-based metagenomic approach, on the other hand, identified several enzymes (β...

  5. Rapid and simple DNA extraction protocol from goat rumen digesta for metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Yasir; Rather, Irfan A; Konwar, B K

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to the traditional culturing techniques and microscopy that have led to the identification and characterization of only about 15-20 % of the rumen microbes till date, nucleic acid-based molecular approaches are rapid, reproducible, and allow both the qualitative and quantitative assessment of microbial diversity. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, rapid and effective extraction protocol for the recovery of high-molecular-weight and cloneable metagenomic DNA (mDNA) from goat rumen contents. An efficient method was devised to isolate high-molecular-weight mDNA (&>23kb) that was pure and cloneable after isolation in a relatively short period (3.5 h). This is the first report wherein purification of isolated mDNA could be passed. The purity and cloneability of mDNA was found to be possible with the successful restriction digestion, 16S rDNA PCR amplification of the isolated mDNA and mDNA library construction.The screening of 1600 clones from the metagenomic library revealed one clone with adistinct hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) agar suggesting its endoglucanase activity. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed aDNA insert of ~1.5kb size on digestion with BamH1. The metagenomic clones offer a prodigious non-conventional means to explore the genetically untapped resources from nature. PMID:26687757

  6. Metagenomics: Facts and Artifacts, and Computational Challenges*

    OpenAIRE

    Wooley, John C.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2009-01-01

    Metagenomics is the study of microbial communities sampled directly from their natural environment, without prior culturing. By enabling an analysis of populations including many (so-far) unculturable and often unknown microbes, metagenomics is revolutionizing the field of microbiology, and has excited researchers in many disciplines that could benefit from the study of environmental microbes, including those in ecology, environmental sciences, and biomedicine. Specific computational and stat...

  7. Metagenomics: Application of Genomics to Uncultured Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Handelsman, Jo

    2004-01-01

    Metagenomics (also referred to as environmental and community genomics) is the genomic analysis of microorganisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from an assemblage of microorganisms. The development of metagenomics stemmed from the ineluctable evidence that as-yet-uncultured microorganisms represent the vast majority of organisms in most environments on earth. This evidence was derived from analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified directly from the environment, an approach that ...

  8. Metagenomics: A new horizon in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Joyita Banerjee; Neetu Mishra; Yogita Dhas

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics has broadened the scope of targeting microbes responsible for inducing various types of cancers. About 16.1% of cancers are associated with microbial infection. Metagenomics is an equitable way of identifying and studying micro-organisms within their habitat. In cancer research, this approach has revolutionized the way of identifying, analyzing and targeting the microbial diversity present in the tissue specimens of cancer patients. The genomic analyses of these micro-organisms t...

  9. Library Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakne, B. N.; Giri, V. V; Waghmode, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies library provides several new materials, media and mode of storing and communicating the information. Library Automation reduces the drudgery of repeated manual efforts in library routine. By use of library automation collection, Storage, Administration, Processing, Preservation and communication etc.

  10. Statistical methods for detecting differentially abundant features in clinical metagenomic samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert White

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are currently underway to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting our world. These studies aim to dramatically expand our understanding of the microbial biosphere and, more importantly, hope to reveal the secrets of the complex symbiotic relationship between us and our commensal bacterial microflora. An important prerequisite for such discoveries are computational tools that are able to rapidly and accurately compare large datasets generated from complex bacterial communities to identify features that distinguish them.We present a statistical method for comparing clinical metagenomic samples from two treatment populations on the basis of count data (e.g. as obtained through sequencing to detect differentially abundant features. Our method, Metastats, employs the false discovery rate to improve specificity in high-complexity environments, and separately handles sparsely-sampled features using Fisher's exact test. Under a variety of simulations, we show that Metastats performs well compared to previously used methods, and significantly outperforms other methods for features with sparse counts. We demonstrate the utility of our method on several datasets including a 16S rRNA survey of obese and lean human gut microbiomes, COG functional profiles of infant and mature gut microbiomes, and bacterial and viral metabolic subsystem data inferred from random sequencing of 85 metagenomes. The application of our method to the obesity dataset reveals differences between obese and lean subjects not reported in the original study. For the COG and subsystem datasets, we provide the first statistically rigorous assessment of the differences between these populations. The methods described in this paper are the first to address clinical metagenomic datasets comprising samples from multiple subjects. Our methods are robust across datasets of varied complexity and sampling level. While designed for metagenomic applications, our software

  11. Metagenomic Analysis of Water Distribution System Bacterial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial quality of drinking water is assessed using culture-based methods that are highly selective and that tend to underestimate the densities and diversity of microbial populations inhabiting distribution systems. In order to better understand the effect of different dis...

  12. Metagenome-wide association studies: fine-mining the microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jia, Huijue

    2016-08-01

    Metagenome-wide association studies (MWAS) have enabled the high-resolution investigation of associations between the human microbiome and several complex diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The associations that can be identified by MWAS are not limited to the identification of taxa that are more or less abundant, as is the case with taxonomic approaches, but additionally include the identification of microbial functions that are enriched or depleted. In this Review, we summarize recent findings from MWAS and discuss how these findings might inform the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease in the future. Furthermore, we highlight the need to better characterize the biology of many of the bacteria that are found in the human microbiota as an essential step in understanding how bacterial strains that have been identified by MWAS are associated with disease. PMID:27396567

  13. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-11-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 10(9) bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  14. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria. PMID:22210605

  15. Metagenomics of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Metagenomics approach was used to identify unknown organisms which live in association with the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Metagenomics combines molecular biology and genetics to identify, and characterize genetic material from unique biological ...

  16. HORSE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM: Canine intestinal microbiology and metagenomics: From phylogeny to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard, B C; Suchodolski, J S

    2016-06-01

    Recent molecular studies have revealed a complex microbiota in the dog intestine. Convincing evidence has been reported linking changes in microbial communities to acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation, especially in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The most common microbial changes observed in intestinal inflammation are decreases in the bacterial phyla Firmicutes (i.e., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and ) and Bacteroidetes, with concurrent increases in Proteobacteria (i.e., ). Due to the important role of microbial-derived metabolites for host health, it is important to elucidate the metabolic consequences of gastrointestinal dysbiosis and physiological pathways implicated in specific disease phenotypes. Metagenomic studies have used shotgun sequencing of DNA as well as phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) to characterize functional changes in the bacterial metagenome in gastrointestinal disease. Furthermore, wide-scale and untargeted measurements of metabolic products derived by the host and the microbiota in intestinal samples allow a better understanding of the functional alterations that occur in gastrointestinal disease. For example, changes in bile acid metabolism and tryptophan catabolism recently have been reported in humans and dogs. Also, metabolites associated with the pentose phosphate pathway were significantly altered in chronic gastrointestinal inflammation and indicate the presence of oxidative stress in dogs with IBD. This review focuses on the advancements made in canine metagenomics and metabolomics and their implications in understanding gastrointestinal disease as well as the development of better treatment approaches. PMID:27285902

  17. Use of Shotgun Metagenome Sequencing To Detect Fecal Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Heidi; Connolly, Natalia; Bangar, Hansraj; Staat, Mary; Mortensen, Joel; Deburger, Barbara; Haslam, David B

    2016-07-01

    Prevention of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections relies on accurate detection of these organisms. We investigated shotgun metagenome sequencing for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae Fecal metagenomes were analyzed from high-risk inpatients and compared to those of low-risk outpatients and controls with minimal risk for a MDR bacterial infection. Principal-component analysis clustered patient samples into distinct cohorts, confirming that the microbiome composition was significantly different between cohorts (P = 0.006). Microbial diversity and relative anaerobe abundance were preserved in outpatients compared to those in controls. Relative anaerobe abundance was significantly reduced in inpatients compared to that in outpatients (P = 0.006). Although the potential for MDR bacteria was increased in inpatients and outpatients compared to that in controls (P shotgun sequencing quantitatively characterizes the burdens of multiple MDR bacteria relative to all of the microbiota within the intestinal community. We propose consideration of key microbiome features, such as diversity and relative anaerobe abundance, in addition to the detection of MDR bacteria by shotgun metagenome sequencing as a novel method that might better identify patients who are at increased risk of a MDR infection. PMID:27122381

  18. Single sample resolution of rare microbial dark matter in a marine invertebrate metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ian J.; Weyna, Theodore R.; Fong, Stephen S.; Lim-Fong, Grace E.; Kwan, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Direct, untargeted sequencing of environmental samples (metagenomics) and de novo genome assembly enable the study of uncultured and phylogenetically divergent organisms. However, separating individual genomes from a mixed community has often relied on the differential-coverage analysis of multiple, deeply sequenced samples. In the metagenomic investigation of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, we uncovered seven bacterial genomes associated with a single B. neritina individual that appeared to be transient associates, two of which were unique to one individual and undetectable using certain “universal” 16S rRNA primers and probes. We recovered high quality genome assemblies for several rare instances of “microbial dark matter,” or phylogenetically divergent bacteria lacking genomes in reference databases, from a single tissue sample that was not subjected to any physical or chemical pre-treatment. One of these rare, divergent organisms has a small (593 kbp), poorly annotated genome with low GC content (20.9%) and a 16S rRNA gene with just 65% sequence similarity to the closest reference sequence. Our findings illustrate the importance of sampling strategy and de novo assembly of metagenomic reads to understand the extent and function of bacterial biodiversity. PMID:27681823

  19. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  20. Gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes as an alternative to directed evolution for enzyme screening: a case study using phenylacetaldehyde reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuya; Kazama, Miki; Takeuchi, Nami; Isotani, Kentaro; Kurokawa, Junji

    2016-06-01

    Screening gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes (S-GAM) is a highly promising technique for the isolation of genes encoding enzymes for biochemical and industrial applications. From metagenomes, we isolated phenylacetaldehyde reductase (par) genes, which code for an enzyme that catalyzes the production of various Prelog's chiral alcohols. Nearly full-length par genes were amplified by PCR from metagenomic DNA, the products of which were fused with engineered par sequences at both terminal regions of the expression vector to ensure proper expression and then used to construct Escherichia coli plasmid libraries. Sequence- and activity-based screening of these libraries identified different homologous par genes, Hpar-001 to -036, which shared more than 97% amino acid sequence identity with PAR. Comparative characterization of these active homologs revealed a wide variety of enzymatic properties including activity, substrate specificity, and thermal stability. Moreover, amino acid substitutions in these genes coincided with those of Sar268 and Har1 genes, which were independently engineered by error-prone PCR to exhibit increased activity in the presence of concentrated 2-propanol. The comparative data from both approaches suggest that sequence information from homologs isolated from metagenomes is quite useful for enzyme engineering. Furthermore, by examining the GAM-based sequence dataset derived from soil metagenomes, we easily found amino acid substitutions that increase the thermal stability of PAR/PAR homologs. Thus, GAM-based approaches can provide not only useful homologous enzymes but also an alternative to directed evolution methodologies. PMID:27419059

  1. Cultivation-independent comprehensive survey of bacterial diversity in Tulsi Shyam Hot Springs, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Ghelani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic description of bacteria was deduced from 5.78 Mb metagenomic sequence retrieved from Tulsi Shyam hot spring, India using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP. Metagenome contained 10,893 16S rDNA sequences that were analyzed by MG-RAST server to generate the comprehensive profile of bacteria. Metagenomic data are available at EBI under EBI Metagenomics database with accession no. ERP009559. Metagenome sequences represented the 98.2% bacteria origin, 1.5% of eukaryotic and 0.3% were unidentified. A total of 16 bacterial phyla demonstrating 97 families and 287 species were revealed in the hot spring metagenome. Most abundant phyla were Firmicutes (65.38%, Proteobacteria (21.21% and unclassified bacteria (10.69%. Whereas, Peptostreptococcaceae (37.33%, Clostridiaceae (23.36%, and Enterobacteriaceae (16.37% were highest reported families in metagenome. Ubiquitous species were Clostridium bifermentans (17.47%, Clostridium lituseburense (13.93% and uncultured bacterium (10.15%. Our data provide new information on hot spring bacteria and shed light on their abundance, diversity, distribution and coexisting organisms.

  2. Cultivation-independent comprehensive survey of bacterial diversity in Tulsi Shyam Hot Springs, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelani, Anjana; Patel, Rajesh; Mangrola, Amitsinh; Dudhagara, Pravin

    2015-06-01

    A taxonomic description of bacteria was deduced from 5.78 Mb metagenomic sequence retrieved from Tulsi Shyam hot spring, India using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP). Metagenome contained 10,893 16S rDNA sequences that were analyzed by MG-RAST server to generate the comprehensive profile of bacteria. Metagenomic data are available at EBI under EBI Metagenomics database with accession no. ERP009559. Metagenome sequences represented the 98.2% bacteria origin, 1.5% of eukaryotic and 0.3% were unidentified. A total of 16 bacterial phyla demonstrating 97 families and 287 species were revealed in the hot spring metagenome. Most abundant phyla were Firmicutes (65.38%), Proteobacteria (21.21%) and unclassified bacteria (10.69%). Whereas, Peptostreptococcaceae (37.33%), Clostridiaceae (23.36%), and Enterobacteriaceae (16.37%) were highest reported families in metagenome. Ubiquitous species were Clostridium bifermentans (17.47%), Clostridium lituseburense (13.93%) and uncultured bacterium (10.15%). Our data provide new information on hot spring bacteria and shed light on their abundance, diversity, distribution and coexisting organisms.

  3. Gut bacterial profile in patients newly diagnosed with treatment-naïve Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricanek P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Petr Ricanek,1,2 Sheba M Lothe,1 Stephan A Frye,1 Andreas Rydning,2 Morten H Vatn,3,4 Tone Tønjum1,51Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Department of Microbiology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog and Faculty Division Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, 3EpiGen Institute, Faculty Division Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, 4Department of Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, 5Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Department of Microbiology, University of Oslo, Oslo, NorwayObjectives: The aim of this study was to define the composition of the gut bacterial flora in Norwegian patients with early stage Crohn's disease (CD. Methods: By using a nonselective metagenomics approach, the general bacterial composition in mucosal biopsies from the ileum and the colon of five subjects, four patients with different phenotypes of CD, and one noninflammatory bowel disease control, was characterized. After partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequencing, BLAST homology searches for species identification and phylogenetic analysis were performed.Results: An overall biodiversity of 106 different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs was detected in the cloned libraries. Nearly all OTUs belonged to the phylae Bacteroidetes (42% in CD, 71% in the control or Firmicutes (42% in CD, 28% in the control, except for some OTUs that belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria (15% in CD, 0% in the control and a few OTUs that could not be assigned to a phylum (2% in CD, 1% in the control.Conclusion: Based on the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in Norway, this pilot study represents a relevant determination of the gut microbiota in Norwegian patients compared to previous findings in other countries. The bacterial profile of Norwegian CD patients was found to be similar

  4. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-06-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  5. Soil Metagenomes from Different Pristine Environments of Northwest Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Colman, Déborah I.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to use a high-throughput metagenomic shotgun approach to explore the biosynthetic potential of soil metagenomes from different pristine environments of northwest Argentina. Our data sets characterize these metagenomes and provide information on the possible effect these ecosystems have on their diversity and biosynthetic potential.

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Chicken Gut Microbiota for Improving Metabolism and Health of Chickens - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Kwon; Sul, Woo Jun

    2015-09-01

    Chicken is a major food source for humans, hence it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in nutrient absorption in chicken. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), the microbiota plays a central role in enhancing nutrient absorption and strengthening the immune system, thereby affecting both growth and health of chicken. There is little information on the diversity and functions of chicken GIT microbiota, its impact on the host, and the interactions between the microbiota and host. Here, we review the recent metagenomic strategies to analyze the chicken GIT microbiota composition and its functions related to improving metabolism and health. We summarize methodology of metagenomics in order to obtain bacterial taxonomy and functional inferences of the GIT microbiota and suggest a set of indicator genes for monitoring and manipulating the microbiota to promote host health in future. PMID:26323514

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Chicken Gut Microbiota for Improving Metabolism and Health of Chickens - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Kwon; Sul, Woo Jun

    2015-09-01

    Chicken is a major food source for humans, hence it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in nutrient absorption in chicken. In the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), the microbiota plays a central role in enhancing nutrient absorption and strengthening the immune system, thereby affecting both growth and health of chicken. There is little information on the diversity and functions of chicken GIT microbiota, its impact on the host, and the interactions between the microbiota and host. Here, we review the recent metagenomic strategies to analyze the chicken GIT microbiota composition and its functions related to improving metabolism and health. We summarize methodology of metagenomics in order to obtain bacterial taxonomy and functional inferences of the GIT microbiota and suggest a set of indicator genes for monitoring and manipulating the microbiota to promote host health in future.

  8. Novel Metagenome-Derived, Cold-Adapted Alkaline Phospholipase with Superior Lipase Activity as an Intermediate between Phospholipase and Lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi-Hwa; Oh, Ki-Hoon; Kang, Chul-Hyung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Ryu, Choong-Min; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    A novel lipolytic enzyme was isolated from a metagenomic library obtained from tidal flat sediments on the Korean west coast. Its putative functional domain, designated MPlaG, showed the highest similarity to phospholipase A from Grimontia hollisae CIP 101886, though it was screened from an emulsified tricaprylin plate. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MPlaG is far from family I.6 lipases, including Staphylococcus hyicus lipase, a unique lipase which can hydrolyze phospholipids, and is more ...

  9. Taxon-specific metagenomics of Trichoderma reveals a narrow community of opportunistic species that regulate each other’s development

    OpenAIRE

    Friedl, Martina A; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the in situ diversity of the mycotrophic fungus Trichoderma (teleomorph Hypocrea, Ascomycota, Dikarya) revealed by a taxon-specific metagenomic approach. We designed a set of genus-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 and ITS2 rRNA primers and constructed a clone library containing 411 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). The overall species composition in the soil of the two distinct ecosystems in the Danube floodplain consisted of 15 known specie...

  10. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  11. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  12. Shotgun metagenomic data streams: surfing without fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berendzen, Joel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Timely information about bio-threat prevalence, consequence, propagation, attribution, and mitigation is needed to support decision-making, both routinely and in a crisis. One DNA sequencer can stream 25 Gbp of information per day, but sampling strategies and analysis techniques are needed to turn raw sequencing power into actionable knowledge. Shotgun metagenomics can enable biosurveillance at the level of a single city, hospital, or airplane. Metagenomics characterizes viruses and bacteria from complex environments such as soil, air filters, or sewage. Unlike targeted-primer-based sequencing, shotgun methods are not blind to sequences that are truly novel, and they can measure absolute prevalence. Shotgun metagenomic sampling can be non-invasive, efficient, and inexpensive while being informative. We have developed analysis techniques for shotgun metagenomic sequencing that rely upon phylogenetic signature patterns. They work by indexing local sequence patterns in a manner similar to web search engines. Our methods are laptop-fast and favorable scaling properties ensure they will be sustainable as sequencing methods grow. We show examples of application to soil metagenomic samples.

  13. Library statistics.

    OpenAIRE

    Melita Ambrožič

    1991-01-01

    The contribution deals with the purpose, beginnings and development of library statistics and the strivings for international standardization in this field. International recommendations are presented, as well as the ISO standard for library statistics. An overview is given of the theoretical contributions and statistical practice in Slovenian librarianship. Cautionary notice on the limitations of the applicability of library statistics in determining library performance is given and the inte...

  14. Digital Libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Papy, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    Of vital interest to all librarians and information specialists, this book presents all aspects of the effects of digitization of today's and tomorrow's libraries. From social to technical issues, Digital Libraries includes chapters on the growth of the role of librarian, the reader experience, cataloging, search engines, OPAC, law, ergonomic studies, and the future of libraries.

  15. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  16. The research methods of metagenomic and the application of metagenomic study in the oral microbiota%宏基因组学及其在口腔微生物研究领域中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆剑; 李宇红; 杜民权

    2013-01-01

      宏基因组学研究特定生物环境中全部微小生物的基因组,直接从土壤和海水以及人体胃肠道和口腔等环境中获取样品 DNA,利用适宜的载体将其克隆到替代宿主细胞中构建宏基因文库,以筛选新的活性物质和新的基因;因此,利用宏基因组学技术不仅能够有效地检测口腔微生物群落结构,同时还极大地扩展了口腔微生物资源的利用空间,增加了获得新的生物活性物质和基因的机会。本文就宏基因组学的研究方法和宏基因组学口腔微生物研究领域中的应用等研究进展作一综述。%Metagenomics is the genomes of the total microbiota found in nature. Metagenome libraries were con-structed by directly extracting DNA from environmental samples, Such as soil, oceans, human gastrointestinal tract and mouth, etc., and transforming to surrogate host. The libraries were screened for novel bioactive compounds or genes. Therefore, Metagenomics can effectively detect oral microbial community structure, and also can enormously amplified the space of microbial resource utilization and enhanced the opportunity of obtain novel bioactive com-pounds. This review included the research progress of the methods of metagenomic and the application of metage-nomic study in the oral microbiota.

  17. 宏基因组学及其在口腔微生物研究领域中的应用%The research methods of metagenomic and the application of metagenomic study in the oral microbiota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆剑; 李宇红; 杜民权

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is the genomes of the total microbiota found in nature. Metagenome libraries were con-structed by directly extracting DNA from environmental samples, Such as soil, oceans, human gastrointestinal tract and mouth, etc., and transforming to surrogate host. The libraries were screened for novel bioactive compounds or genes. Therefore, Metagenomics can effectively detect oral microbial community structure, and also can enormously amplified the space of microbial resource utilization and enhanced the opportunity of obtain novel bioactive com-pounds. This review included the research progress of the methods of metagenomic and the application of metage-nomic study in the oral microbiota.%  宏基因组学研究特定生物环境中全部微小生物的基因组,直接从土壤和海水以及人体胃肠道和口腔等环境中获取样品 DNA,利用适宜的载体将其克隆到替代宿主细胞中构建宏基因文库,以筛选新的活性物质和新的基因;因此,利用宏基因组学技术不仅能够有效地检测口腔微生物群落结构,同时还极大地扩展了口腔微生物资源的利用空间,增加了获得新的生物活性物质和基因的机会。本文就宏基因组学的研究方法和宏基因组学口腔微生物研究领域中的应用等研究进展作一综述。

  18. FANTOM: Functional and taxonomic analysis of metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Kemal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of quantitative metagenomics data is important for our understanding of ecosystem functioning and assessing differences between various environmental samples. There is a need for an easy to use tool to explore the often complex metagenomics data in taxonomic and functional context. Results Here we introduce FANTOM, a tool that allows for exploratory and comparative analysis of metagenomics abundance data integrated with metadata information and biological databases. Importantly, FANTOM can make use of any hierarchical database and it comes supplied with NCBI taxonomic hierarchies as well as KEGG Orthology, COG, PFAM and TIGRFAM databases. Conclusions The software is implemented in Python, is platform independent, and is available at http://www.sysbio.se/Fantom.

  19. Viral metagenomics: are we missing the giants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halary, S; Temmam, S; Raoult, D; Desnues, C

    2016-06-01

    Amoeba-infecting giant viruses are recently discovered viruses that have been isolated from diverse environments all around the world. In parallel to isolation efforts, metagenomics confirmed their worldwide distribution from a broad range of environmental and host-associated samples, including humans, depicting them as a major component of eukaryotic viruses in nature and a possible resident of the human/animal virome whose role is still unclear. Nevertheless, metagenomics data about amoeba-infecting giant viruses still remain scarce, mainly because of methodological limitations. Efforts should be pursued both at the metagenomic sample preparation level and on in silico analyses to better understand their roles in the environment and in human/animal health and disease. PMID:26851442

  20. Metagenomic exploration of antibiotic resistance in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Jean-Michel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Delmont, Tom O; Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-06-01

    The ongoing development of metagenomic approaches is providing the means to explore antibiotic resistance in nature and address questions that could not be answered previously with conventional culture-based strategies. The number of available environmental metagenomic sequence datasets is rapidly expanding and henceforth offer the ability to gain a more comprehensive understanding of antibiotic resistance at the global scale. Although there is now evidence that the environment constitutes a vast reservoir of antibiotic resistance gene determinants (ARGDs) and that the majority of ARGDs acquired by human pathogens may have an environmental origin, a better understanding of their diversity, prevalence and ecological significance may help predict the emergence and spreading of newly acquired resistances. Recent applications of metagenomic approaches to the study of ARGDs in natural environments such as soil should help overcome challenges concerning expanding antibiotic resistances. PMID:21601510

  1. Pathway-Based Functional Analysis of Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Sharon, Itai; Pinter, Ron Y.; Shlomi, Tomer

    Metagenomic data enables the study of microbes and viruses through their DNA as retrieved directly from the environment in which they live. Functional analysis of metagenomes explores the abundance of gene families, pathways, and systems, rather than their taxonomy. Through such analysis researchers are able to identify those functional capabilities most important to organisms in the examined environment. Recently, a statistical framework for the functional analysis of metagenomes was described that focuses on gene families. Here we describe two pathway level computational models for functional analysis that take into account important, yet unaddressed issues such as pathway size, gene length and overlap in gene content among pathways. We test our models over carefully designed simulated data and propose novel approaches for performance evaluation. Our models significantly improve over current approach with respect to pathway ranking and the computations of relative abundance of pathways in environments.

  2. Metagenomic discovery of novel enzymes and biosurfactants in a slaughterhouse biofilm microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Stephan; Rausch, Sonja Christina; Kovacic, Filip; Schmidt-Thaler, Alexandra; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Daniel, Rolf; Streit, Wolfgang; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-01-01

    DNA derived from environmental samples is a rich source of novel bioactive molecules. The choice of the habitat to be sampled predefines the properties of the biomolecules to be discovered due to the physiological adaptation of the microbial community to the prevailing environmental conditions. We have constructed a metagenomic library in Escherichia coli DH10b with environmental DNA (eDNA) isolated from the microbial community of a slaughterhouse drain biofilm consisting mainly of species from the family Flavobacteriaceae. By functional screening of this library we have identified several lipases, proteases and two clones (SA343 and SA354) with biosurfactant and hemolytic activities. Sequence analysis of the respective eDNA fragments and subsequent structure homology modelling identified genes encoding putative N-acyl amino acid synthases with a unique two-domain organisation. The produced biosurfactants were identified by NMR spectroscopy as N-acyltyrosines with N-myristoyltyrosine as the predominant species. Critical micelle concentration and reduction of surface tension were similar to those of chemically synthesised N-myristoyltyrosine. Furthermore, we showed that the newly isolated N-acyltyrosines exhibit antibiotic activity against various bacteria. This is the first report describing the successful application of functional high-throughput screening assays for the identification of biosurfactant producing clones within a metagenomic library. PMID:27271534

  3. Metagenomic discovery of novel enzymes and biosurfactants in a slaughterhouse biofilm microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Stephan; Rausch, Sonja Christina; Kovacic, Filip; Schmidt-Thaler, Alexandra; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Daniel, Rolf; Streit, Wolfgang; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-01-01

    DNA derived from environmental samples is a rich source of novel bioactive molecules. The choice of the habitat to be sampled predefines the properties of the biomolecules to be discovered due to the physiological adaptation of the microbial community to the prevailing environmental conditions. We have constructed a metagenomic library in Escherichia coli DH10b with environmental DNA (eDNA) isolated from the microbial community of a slaughterhouse drain biofilm consisting mainly of species from the family Flavobacteriaceae. By functional screening of this library we have identified several lipases, proteases and two clones (SA343 and SA354) with biosurfactant and hemolytic activities. Sequence analysis of the respective eDNA fragments and subsequent structure homology modelling identified genes encoding putative N-acyl amino acid synthases with a unique two-domain organisation. The produced biosurfactants were identified by NMR spectroscopy as N-acyltyrosines with N-myristoyltyrosine as the predominant species. Critical micelle concentration and reduction of surface tension were similar to those of chemically synthesised N-myristoyltyrosine. Furthermore, we showed that the newly isolated N-acyltyrosines exhibit antibiotic activity against various bacteria. This is the first report describing the successful application of functional high-throughput screening assays for the identification of biosurfactant producing clones within a metagenomic library. PMID:27271534

  4. Unbiased Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Use of RNA Sequencing-Based Metagenomics: a Systematic Comparison to a Commercial PCR Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Erin H; Simmon, Keith E; Tardif, Keith D; Hymas, Weston; Flygare, Steven; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark; Schlaberg, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Current infectious disease molecular tests are largely pathogen specific, requiring test selection based on the patient's symptoms. For many syndromes caused by a large number of viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, such as respiratory tract infections, this necessitates large panels of tests and has limited yield. In contrast, next-generation sequencing-based metagenomics can be used for unbiased detection of any expected or unexpected pathogen. However, barriers for its diagnostic implementation include incomplete understanding of analytical performance and complexity of sequence data analysis. We compared detection of known respiratory virus-positive (n= 42) and unselected (n= 67) pediatric nasopharyngeal swabs using an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based metagenomics approach and Taxonomer, an ultrarapid, interactive, web-based metagenomics data analysis tool, with an FDA-cleared respiratory virus panel (RVP; GenMark eSensor). Untargeted metagenomics detected 86% of known respiratory virus infections, and additional PCR testing confirmed RVP results for only 2 (33%) of the discordant samples. In unselected samples, untargeted metagenomics had excellent agreement with the RVP (93%). In addition, untargeted metagenomics detected an additional 12 viruses that were either not targeted by the RVP or missed due to highly divergent genome sequences. Normalized viral read counts for untargeted metagenomics correlated with viral burden determined by quantitative PCR and showed high intrarun and interrun reproducibility. Partial or full-length viral genome sequences were generated in 86% of RNA-seq-positive samples, allowing assessment of antiviral resistance, strain-level typing, and phylogenetic relatedness. Overall, untargeted metagenomics had high agreement with a sensitive RVP, detected viruses not targeted by the RVP, and yielded epidemiologically and clinically valuable sequence information.

  5. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach. PMID:24989343

  6. [Metagenomics in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Yunjuan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-12-01

    Animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. The gut microbial community of humans and animals has received significant attention from researchers because of its association with health and disease. The application of metagenomics technology enables researchers to study not only the microbial composition but also the function of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, combined with our own findings, we summarized advances in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism with metagenomics and the bioinformatics technology.

  7. Characterization of a Forest Soil Metagenome Clone That Confers Indirubin and Indigo Production on Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, He Kyoung; Chung, Eu Jin; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Chung, Young Ryun; Cho, Kwang Yun; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2005-01-01

    A microbial community analysis of forest soil from Jindong Valley, Korea, revealed that the most abundant rRNA genes were related to Acidobacteria, a major taxon with few cultured representatives. To access the microbial genetic resources of this forest soil, metagenomic libraries were constructed in fosmids, with an average DNA insert size of more than 35 kb. We constructed 80,500 clones from Yuseong and 33,200 clones from Jindong Valley forest soils. The double-agar-layer method allowed us ...

  8. Comparative (Meta)genomic Analysis and Ecological Profiling of Human Gut-Specific Bacteriophage φB124-14

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Bowler, Lucas; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James; Jones, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage associated with the human gut microbiome are likely to have an important impact on community structure and function, and provide a wealth of biotechnological opportunities. Despite this, knowledge of the ecology and composition of bacteriophage in the gut bacterial community remains poor, with few well characterized gut-associated phage genomes currently available. Here we describe the identification and in-depth (meta)genomic, proteomic, and ecological analysis of a human gut-s...

  9. A metagenomic-based survey of microbial (de)halogenation potential in a German forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Pascal; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Ruecker, Alexander; Huson, Daniel H.; Scholten, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In soils halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine) are cycled through the transformation of inorganic halides into organohalogen compounds and vice versa. There is evidence that these reactions are microbially driven but the key enzymes and groups of microorganisms involved are largely unknown. Our aim was to uncover the diversity, abundance and distribution of genes encoding for halogenating and dehalogenating enzymes in a German forest soil by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Metagenomic libraries of three soil horizons revealed the presence of genera known to be involved in halogenation and dehalogenation processes such as Bradyrhizobium or Pseudomonas. We detected a so far unknown diversity of genes encoding for (de)halogenating enzymes in the soil metagenome including specific and unspecific halogenases as well as metabolic and cometabolic dehalogenases. Genes for non-heme, no-metal chloroperoxidases and haloalkane dehalogenases were the most abundant halogenase and dehalogenase genes, respectively. The high diversity and abundance of (de)halogenating enzymes suggests a strong microbial contribution to natural halogen cycling. This was also confirmed in microcosm experiments in which we quantified the biotic formation of chloroform and bromoform. Knowledge on microorganisms and genes that catalyze (de)halogenation reactions is critical because they are highly relevant to industrial biotechnologies and bioremediation applications. PMID:27353292

  10. A metagenomic-based survey of microbial (de)halogenation potential in a German forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Pascal; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Ruecker, Alexander; Huson, Daniel H; Scholten, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In soils halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine) are cycled through the transformation of inorganic halides into organohalogen compounds and vice versa. There is evidence that these reactions are microbially driven but the key enzymes and groups of microorganisms involved are largely unknown. Our aim was to uncover the diversity, abundance and distribution of genes encoding for halogenating and dehalogenating enzymes in a German forest soil by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Metagenomic libraries of three soil horizons revealed the presence of genera known to be involved in halogenation and dehalogenation processes such as Bradyrhizobium or Pseudomonas. We detected a so far unknown diversity of genes encoding for (de)halogenating enzymes in the soil metagenome including specific and unspecific halogenases as well as metabolic and cometabolic dehalogenases. Genes for non-heme, no-metal chloroperoxidases and haloalkane dehalogenases were the most abundant halogenase and dehalogenase genes, respectively. The high diversity and abundance of (de)halogenating enzymes suggests a strong microbial contribution to natural halogen cycling. This was also confirmed in microcosm experiments in which we quantified the biotic formation of chloroform and bromoform. Knowledge on microorganisms and genes that catalyze (de)halogenation reactions is critical because they are highly relevant to industrial biotechnologies and bioremediation applications. PMID:27353292

  11. [Biodiversity and Function Analyses of BIOLAK Activated Sludge Metagenome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mei; Liu, Han-hu; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Fang-qing; Chen, Shuai; Yao, Yong-jia

    2015-05-01

    The BIOLAK is a multi-stage activated sludge process, which has been successfully promoted worldwide. However, the biological community and function of the BIOLAK activated sludge ( the core component in the process) have not been reported so far. In this study, taking Lianyungang Dapu Industrial Zone WWTP as an example, a large-scale metagenomic data (428 588 high-quality DNA sequences) of the BIOLAK activated sludge were obtained by means of a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology. Amazing biodiversity was revealed in the BIOLAK activated sludge, which included 47 phyla, 872 genera and 1351 species. There were 33 phyla identified in the Bacteria domain (289 933 sequences). Proteohacteria was the most abundant phylum (62.54%), followed by Bacteroidetes (11.29%), Nitrospirae ( 5. 65%) and Planctomycetes (4.79%), suggesting that these groups played a key role in the BIOLAK wastewater treatment system. Among the 748 bacterial genera, Nitrospira (5.60%) was the most prevalent genus, which was a key group in the nitrogen cycle. Followed by Gemmatimonas (2.45%), which was an important genus in the biological phosphorus removal process. In Archaea domain (1019 sequences), three phyla and 39 genera were detected. In Eukaryota domain (1055 sequences), 60 genera and 10 phyla were identified, among which Ciliophora was the largest phylum (257 sequences). Meanwhile, 448 viral sequences were detected in the BIOLAK sludge metagenome, which were dominated by bacteriophages. The proportions of nitrogen, aromatic compounds and phosphorus metabolism in the BIOLAK sludge were 2.50%, 2.28% and 1.56%, respectively, which were higher than those in the sludge of United States and Australia. Among four processes of nitrogen metabolism, denitrification-related genes were most abundant (80.81%), followed by ammonification (12.78%), nitrification,(4.38%) and nitrogen fixation (2.04%). In conclusion, the BIOLAK activated sludge had amazing biodiversity, meanwhile

  12. [Comparative Metagenomics of BIOLAK and A2O Activated Sludge Based on Next-generation Sequencing Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mei; Liu, Han-hu; Shen, Xin

    2016-02-15

    This is the first report of comparative metagenomic analyses of BIOLAK sludge and anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) sludge. In the BIOLAK and A2O sludge metagenomes, 47 and 51 phyla were identified respectively, more than the numbers of phyla identified in Australia EBPR (enhanced biological phosphorus removal), USA EBPR and Bibby sludge. All phyla found in the BIOLAK sludge were detected in the A2O sludge, but four phyla were exclusively found in the A20 sludge. The proportion of the phylum Ignavibacteriae in the A2O sludge was 2.0440%, which was 3.2 times as much as that in the BIOLAK sludge (0.6376%). Meanwhile, the proportion of the bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes in the BIOLAK sludge was 2.4673%, which was >17 times as much as that in the A2O sludge (0.1404%). The proportion of the bacterial phylum Chlamydiae in the BIOLAK metagenome (0.2192%) was >6 times higher than that in the A2O (0.0360%). Furthermore, 167 genera found in the A20 sludge were not detected in the BIOLAK sludge. And 50 genera found in the BIOLAK sludge were not detected in the A20 sludge. From the analyses of both the phylum and genus levels, there were huge differences between the two biological communities of A2O and BIOLAK sludge. However, the proportions of each group of functional genes associated with metabolism of nitrogen, phosphor, sulfur and aromatic compounds in BIOLAK were very similar to those in A2O sludge. Moreover, the rankings of all six KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia for Genes and Genomes) categories were identical in the two sludges. In addition, the analyses of functional classification and pathway related nitrogen metabolism showed that the abundant enzymes had identical ranking in the BIOLAK and A2O metagenomes. Therefore, comparative metagenomics of BIOLAK and A2O activated sludge indicated similar function assignments from the two different biological communities.

  13. Applications of metagenomics for industrial bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent progress in mining the rich genetic resource of non-culturable microbes has led to the discovery of new genes, enzymes, and natural products. The impact of metagenomics is witnessed in the development of commodity and fine chemicals, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals where the benefit of enz...

  14. Towards a more complete metagenomics toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerging scientific discipline of metagenomics has not only created a myriad of opportunities for biologists to reveal new insights into the microbial underpinnings of our environment, but has also presented a number of interesting challenges for bioinformatics algorithms and software developers...

  15. The metagenomic approach and causality in virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beres Castrignano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the metagenomic approach has been a very important tool in the discovery of new viruses in environmental and biological samples. Here we discuss how these discoveries may help to elucidate the etiology of diseases and the criteria necessary to establish a causal association between a virus and a disease.

  16. Building on basic metagenomics with complementary technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Warnecke, Falk; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomics, the application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples, is a powerful approach for characterizing microbial communities. However, this method only represents the cornerstone of what can be achieved using a range of complementary technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics, cell sorting and microfluidics. Together, these approaches hold great promise for the study of microbial ecology and evolution.

  17. Snowball: Strain aware gene assembly of Metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregor, I.; Schoenhuth, A.; McHardy, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Gene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the studied species to be av

  18. Biomolecular and metagenomic analyses of biofouling communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the decades of research that have focused on understanding the formation of biofouling communities, relatively little is known about the soft fouling consortia that are responsible for their formation and function. In this study, we used PhyloChip microbial profiling, metagenomic DNA sequenc...

  19. Functional metagenomics: recent advances and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistoserdovai, Ludmila

    2010-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively new but fast growing field within environmental biology directed at obtaining knowledge on genomes of environmental microbes as well as of entire microbial communities. With the sequencing technologies improving steadily, generating large amounts of sequence is becoming routine. However, it remains difficult to connect specific microbial phyla to specific functions in the environment. A number of 'functional metagenomics' approaches have been implemented in the recent years that allow high-resolution genomic analysis of uncultivated microbes, connecting them to specific functions in the environment. These include analysis of niche-specialized low complexity communities, reactor enrichments, and the use labeling technologies. Metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics are the newest sub-disciplines within the metagenomics field that provide further levels of resolution for functional analysis of uncultivated microbes and communities. The recent emergence of new (next generation) sequencing technologies, resulting in higher sequence output and dramatic drop in the price of sequencing, will be defining a new era in metagenomics. At this time the sequencing effort will be taken to a new level to allow addressing new, previously unattainable biological questions as well as accelerating genome-based discovery for medical and biotechnological applications.

  20. Metagenomic Assembly of the Dominant Zetaproteobacteria in an Iron-oxidizing Hydrothermal Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, C. L.; Fullerton, H.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Despite the rapid abiotic oxidation rate of iron, many microbes have adapted to feeding off this fleeting energy source. One such bacterial class is the Zetaproteobacteria. Iron-dominated microbial mat material was collected with a small-scale syringe sampler from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. From this sample, gDNA was extracted and prepared for paired-end Illumina sequencing. Reconstruction of SSU rDNA genes using EMERGE allowed for comparison to previous SSU rDNA surveys. Clone libraries and qPCR show these microbial mats to be dominated by Zetaproteobacteria. Results from our in silico reconstruction confirm these initial findings. RDP classification of the EMERGE reconstructed sequences resulted in 44% of the community being identified as Zetaproteobacteria. The most abundant SSU rDNA has 99% similarity to Zeta OTU-2, and only a 94% similarity to M. ferrooxidans PV-1. Zeta OTU-2 has been shown to be the most cosmopolitan population in iron-dominated hydrothermal systems from across Pacific Ocean. Metagenomic assembly has resulted in many contigs with high identity to M. ferrooxidans as identified, by BLAST. However, with large differences in SSU rRNA similarity, M. ferrooxidans PV-1 is not an adequate reference. Current work is focusing on reconstruction of the dominant microbial mat member, without the use of a reference genome through an iterative assembly approach. The resulting 'pan-genome' will be compared to other Zetaproteobacteria (at the class level) and the functional ecology of this cosmopolitan microbial mat community member will be extrapolated. Thus far, we have detected multiple housekeeping genes involved in DNA replication, transcription and translation. The most abundant metabolic gene we have found is Aconitase, a key enzyme in the

  1. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours.

  2. A potential source for cellulolytic enzyme discovery and environmental aspects revealed through metagenomics of Brazilian mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Beys-da-Silva, Walter Orlando; Santi, Lucélia; Berger, Markus; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Guima Rães, Jorge Almeida; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    The mangroves are among the most productive and biologically important environments. The possible presence of cellulolytic enzymes and microorganisms useful for biomass degradation as well as taxonomic and functional aspects of two Brazilian mangroves were evaluated using cultivation and metagenomic approaches. From a total of 296 microorganisms with visual differences in colony morphology and growth (including bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungus), 179 (60.5%) and 117 (39.5%) were isolated from the Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Bahia (BA) samples, respectively. RJ metagenome showed the higher number of microbial isolates, which is consistent with its most conserved state and higher diversity. The metagenomic sequencing data showed similar predominant bacterial phyla in the BA and RJ mangroves with an abundance of Proteobacteria (57.8% and 44.6%), Firmicutes (11% and 12.3%) and Actinobacteria (8.4% and 7.5%). A higher number of enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic compounds were found in the BA mangrove. Specific sequences involved in the cellulolytic degradation, belonging to cellulases, hemicellulases, carbohydrate binding domains, dockerins and cohesins were identified, and it was possible to isolate cultivable fungi and bacteria related to biomass decomposition and with potential applications for the production of biofuels. These results showed that the mangroves possess all fundamental molecular tools required for building the cellulosome, which is required for the efficient degradation of cellulose material and sugar release.

  3. Analyzing the antagonistic potential of the lichen microbiome against pathogens by bridging metagenomic with culture studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav eCernava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antagonists towards pathogens play an important role to avoid pathogen outbreaks in ecosystems, and they can be applied as biocontrol agents for crops. Lichens present long-living symbiotic systems continuously exposed to pathogens. To analyze the antagonistic potential in lichens, we studied the bacterial community active against model bacteria and fungi by an integrative approach combining isolate screening, omics techniques and high resolution mass spectrometry. The highly diverse microbiome of the lung lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria (L. Hoffm. included an abundant antagonistic community dominated by Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas and Burkholderia. While antagonists represent 24.5% of the isolates, they were identified with only 7% in the metagenome; which means that they were overrepresented in the culturable fraction. Isolates of the dominant antagonistic genus Stenotrophomonas produced spermidine as main bioactive component. Moreover, spermidine-related genes, especially for the transport, were identified in the metagenome. The majority of hits identified belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, while Stenotrophomonas-specific spermidine synthases were not present in the dataset. Evidence for plant growth promoting effects was found for lichen-associated strains of Stenotrophomonas. Linking of metagenomic and culture data was possible but showed partly contradictory results, which required a comparative assessment. However, we have shown that lichens are important reservoirs for antagonistic bacteria, which open broad possibilities for biotechnological applications.

  4. Analyzing the antagonistic potential of the lichen microbiome against pathogens by bridging metagenomic with culture studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernava, Tomislav; Müller, Henry; Aschenbrenner, Ines A; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring antagonists toward pathogens play an important role to avoid pathogen outbreaks in ecosystems, and they can be applied as biocontrol agents for crops. Lichens present long-living symbiotic systems continuously exposed to pathogens. To analyze the antagonistic potential in lichens, we studied the bacterial community active against model bacteria and fungi by an integrative approach combining isolate screening, omics techniques, and high resolution mass spectrometry. The highly diverse microbiome of the lung lichen [Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm.] included an abundant antagonistic community dominated by Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Burkholderia. While antagonists represent 24.5% of the isolates, they were identified with only 7% in the metagenome; which means that they were overrepresented in the culturable fraction. Isolates of the dominant antagonistic genus Stenotrophomonas produced spermidine as main bioactive component. Moreover, spermidine-related genes, especially for the transport, were identified in the metagenome. The majority of hits identified belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, while Stenotrophomonas-specific spermidine synthases were not present in the dataset. Evidence for plant growth promoting effects was found for lichen-associated strains of Stenotrophomonas. Linking of metagenomic and culture data was possible but showed partly contradictory results, which required a comparative assessment. However, we have shown that lichens are important reservoirs for antagonistic bacteria, which open broad possibilities for biotechnological applications. PMID:26157431

  5. Metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera using next-generation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsanya, Mushafau Adewale; Goh, Joo Kheng; Lim, Siew Ping; Ting, Adeline Su Yien

    2015-12-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) enables rapid analysis of the composition and diversity of microbial communities in several habitats. We applied the high throughput techniques of NGS to the metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera plant, by assessing its PCR amplicon of 16S rDNA sequences (V3-V4 regions) with the Illumina metagenomics technique used to generate a total of 5,199,102 reads from the samples. The analyses revealed Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteriodetes as the predominant genera. The roots have the largest composition with 23% not present in other tissues. The stems have more of the genus-Pseudomonas and the unclassified Pseudomonadaceae. The α-diversity analysis indicated the richness and inverse Simpson diversity index of the bacterial endophyte communities for the leaf, root and stem tissues to be 2.221, 6.603 and 1.491 respectively. In a similar study on culturable endophytic bacteria in the same A. vera plants (unpublished work), the dominance of Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera was similar, with equal proportion of four species each in root, stem and leaf tissues. It is evident that NGS technology captured effectively the metagenomics of microbiota in plant tissues and this can improve our understanding of the microbial-plant host interactions. PMID:26697361

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of clustered irregularly interspaced short palindromic repeat systems in the ocean metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Valery A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Artamonova, Irena I

    2010-04-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) form a recently characterized type of prokaryotic antiphage defense system. The phage-host interactions involving CRISPRs have been studied in experiments with selected bacterial or archaeal species and, computationally, in completely sequenced genomes. However, these studies do not allow one to take prokaryotic population diversity and phage-host interaction dynamics into account. This gap can be filled by using metagenomic data: in particular, the largest existing data set, generated from the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. The application of three publicly available CRISPR recognition programs to the Global Ocean metagenome produced a large proportion of false-positive results. To address this problem, a filtering procedure was designed. It resulted in about 200 reliable CRISPR cassettes, which were then studied in detail. The repeat consensuses were clustered into several stable classes that differed from the existing classification. Short fragments of DNA similar to the cassette spacers were more frequently present in the same geographical location than in other locations (P, CRISPR-forming events and reconstructed the likely evolutionary history of cassettes that had common spacers. Metagenomic collections allow for relatively unbiased analysis of phage-host interactions and CRISPR evolution. The results of this study demonstrate that CRISPR cassettes retain the memory of the local virus population at a particular ocean location. CRISPR evolution may be described using a limited vocabulary of elementary events that have a natural biological interpretation.

  7. Metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera using next-generation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushafau Adewale Akinsanya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS enables rapid analysis of the composition and diversity of microbial communities in several habitats. We applied the high throughput techniques of NGS to the metagenomics study of endophytic bacteria in Aloe vera plant, by assessing its PCR amplicon of 16S rDNA sequences (V3–V4 regions with the Illumina metagenomics technique used to generate a total of 5,199,102 reads from the samples. The analyses revealed Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteriodetes as the predominant genera. The roots have the largest composition with 23% not present in other tissues. The stems have more of the genus—Pseudomonas and the unclassified Pseudomonadaceae. The α-diversity analysis indicated the richness and inverse Simpson diversity index of the bacterial endophyte communities for the leaf, root and stem tissues to be 2.221, 6.603 and 1.491 respectively. In a similar study on culturable endophytic bacteria in the same A. vera plants (unpublished work, the dominance of Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera was similar, with equal proportion of four species each in root, stem and leaf tissues. It is evident that NGS technology captured effectively the metagenomics of microbiota in plant tissues and this can improve our understanding of the microbial–plant host interactions.

  8. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Morgan M [ORNL; Li, Zhou [ORNL; Effler, Chad [Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Boyer, Gergory [College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse; Wilhelm, Steven W [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloomassociated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised .90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloomassociated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  9. Quantifying the biases in metagenome mining for realistic assessment of microbial ecology of naturally fermented foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisam, Santosh; Romi, Wahengbam; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cultivation-independent investigation of microbial ecology is biased by the DNA extraction methods used. We aimed to quantify those biases by comparative analysis of the metagenome mined from four diverse naturally fermented foods (bamboo shoot, milk, fish, soybean) using eight different DNA extraction methods with different cell lysis principles. Our findings revealed that the enzymatic lysis yielded higher eubacterial and yeast metagenomic DNA from the food matrices compared to the widely used chemical and mechanical lysis principles. Further analysis of the bacterial community structure by Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing revealed a high recovery of lactic acid bacteria by the enzymatic lysis in all food types. However, Bacillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Clostridiaceae and Proteobacteria were more abundantly recovered when mechanical and chemical lysis principles were applied. The biases generated due to the differential recovery of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) by different DNA extraction methods including DNA and PCR amplicons mix from different methods have been quantitatively demonstrated here. The different methods shared only 29.9–52.0% of the total OTUs recovered. Although similar comparative research has been performed on other ecological niches, this is the first in-depth investigation of quantifying the biases in metagenome mining from naturally fermented foods. PMID:27669673

  10. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  11. Investigation of bacterial diversity of hot springs of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rajesh Kumar; Subudhi, Enketeswara; Kumar, Mohit

    2015-12-01

    16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis, targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. Sediment samples from two hot springs (Atri and Taptapani) were collected. Atri and Taptapani metagenomes were classified into 50 and 51 bacterial phyla. Proteobacteria (45.17%) dominated the Taptapani sample metagenome followed by Bacteriodetes (23.43%) and Cyanobacteria (10.48%) while in the Atri sample, Chloroflexi (52.39%), Nitrospirae (10.93%) and Proteobacteria (9.98%) dominated. A large number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved in both hot springs, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in these two unique habitats thus unraveling the importance of the current study. Metagenome sequence information is now available at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP057428.

  12. Investigation of bacterial diversity of hot springs of Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar Sahoo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 16S rRNA deep sequencing analysis, targeting V3 region was performed using Illumina bar coded sequencing. Sediment samples from two hot springs (Atri and Taptapani were collected. Atri and Taptapani metagenomes were classified into 50 and 51 bacterial phyla. Proteobacteria (45.17% dominated the Taptapani sample metagenome followed by Bacteriodetes (23.43% and Cyanobacteria (10.48% while in the Atri sample, Chloroflexi (52.39%, Nitrospirae (10.93% and Proteobacteria (9.98% dominated. A large number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved in both hot springs, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in these two unique habitats thus unraveling the importance of the current study. Metagenome sequence information is now available at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP057428.

  13. 宏基因组技术在筛选未培养微生物中新型酶的研究进展%Research Progress on Metagenomic Technology in Screening New Enzymes from Uncultured Microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜海琴; 范彩云; 李吕木; 程建波

    2011-01-01

    介绍了宏基因组文库的构建及酶基因的筛选方法,对瘤胃、土壤及其他环境中微生物宏基因组文库的构建和酶基因的筛选研究进行了综述,同时就宏基因组技术在未培养微生物研究中的应用进行了展望.%The metagenomic library construction and gene screening methods were described, and the microbiol metagenomic library construction and gene screening strudies of rumen,soil and extreme environments were reviewed. Meanwhile,the applications of metagenomic in uncultured microbial research were discussed.

  14. Identification and characterization of a novel fumarase gene by metagenome expression cloning from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Xian-Lai

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fumarase catalyzes the reversible hydration of fumarate to L-malate and is a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and in amino acid metabolism. Fumarase is also used for the industrial production of L-malate from the substrate fumarate. Thermostable and high-activity fumarases from organisms that inhabit extreme environments may have great potential in industry, biotechnology, and basic research. The marine environment is highly complex and considered one of the main reservoirs of microbial diversity on the planet. However, most of the microorganisms are inaccessible in nature and are not easily cultivated in the laboratory. Metagenomic approaches provide a powerful tool to isolate and identify enzymes with novel biocatalytic activities for various biotechnological applications. Results A plasmid metagenomic library was constructed from uncultivated marine microorganisms within marine water samples. Through sequence-based screening of the DNA library, a gene encoding a novel fumarase (named FumF was isolated. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the FumF protein shared the greatest homology with Class II fumarate hydratases from Bacteroides sp. 2_1_33B and Parabacteroides distasonis ATCC 8503 (26% identical and 43% similar. The putative fumarase gene was subcloned into pETBlue-2 vector and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3pLysS. The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Functional characterization by high performance liquid chromatography confirmed that the recombinant FumF protein catalyzed the hydration of fumarate to form L-malate. The maximum activity for FumF protein occurred at pH 8.5 and 55°C in 5 mM Mg2+. The enzyme showed higher affinity and catalytic efficiency under optimal reaction conditions: Km= 0.48 mM, Vmax = 827 μM/min/mg, and kcat/Km = 1900 mM/s. Conclusions We isolated a novel fumarase gene, fumF, from a sequence-based screen of a plasmid metagenomic library from uncultivated

  15. Libraries - Iowa DNR - NRGIS Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Natural Resources Geographic Information System (NRGIS) Library is a Geographic Information System (GIS) repository developed and maintained by the GIS Section...

  16. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Boissy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance. The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70% at the phylum level, Clostridia (44% at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%. In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the

  17. Privatizing Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  18. Library Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konzack, Lars

    2012-01-01

    A seminar paper about a survey of role-playing games in public libraries combined with three cases and a presentation of a model.......A seminar paper about a survey of role-playing games in public libraries combined with three cases and a presentation of a model....

  19. Metagenomic analysis of lysogeny in Tampa Bay: implications for prophage gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren McDaniel

    Full Text Available Phage integrase genes often play a role in the establishment of lysogeny in temperate phage by catalyzing the integration of the phage into one of the host's replicons. To investigate temperate phage gene expression, an induced viral metagenome from Tampa Bay was sequenced by 454/Pyrosequencing. The sequencing yielded 294,068 reads with 6.6% identifiable. One hundred-three sequences had significant similarity to integrases by BLASTX analysis (e < or =0.001. Four sequences with strongest amino-acid level similarity to integrases were selected and real-time PCR primers and probes were designed. Initial testing with microbial fraction DNA from Tampa Bay revealed 1.9 x 10(7, and 1300 gene copies of Vibrio-like integrase and Oceanicola-like integrase L(-1 respectively. The other two integrases were not detected. The integrase assay was then tested on microbial fraction RNA extracted from 200 ml of Tampa Bay water sampled biweekly over a 12 month time series. Vibrio-like integrase gene expression was detected in three samples, with estimated copy numbers of 2.4-1280 L(-1. Clostridium-like integrase gene expression was detected in 6 samples, with estimated copy numbers of 37 to 265 L(-1. In all cases, detection of integrase gene expression corresponded to the occurrence of lysogeny as detected by prophage induction. Investigation of the environmental distribution of the two expressed integrases in the Global Ocean Survey Database found the Vibrio-like integrase was present in genome equivalents of 3.14% of microbial libraries and all four viral metagenomes. There were two similar genes in the library from British Columbia and one similar gene was detected in both the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea libraries. In contrast, in the Arctic library eleven similar genes were observed. The Clostridium-like integrase was less prevalent, being found in 0.58% of the microbial and none of the viral libraries. These results underscore the value of metagenomic data

  20. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity.

  1. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Kumar; Kishore Kumar Krishnani; Bharat Bhushan; Manoj Pandit Brahmane

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metage...

  2. Metagenomic Surveys of Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shubhra Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota of higher vertebrates is host-specific. The number and diversity of the organisms residing within the gut ecosystem are defined by physiological and environmental factors, such as host genotype, habitat, and diet. Recently, culture-independent sequencing techniques have added a new dimension to the study of gut microbiota and the challenge to analyze the large volume of sequencing data is increasingly addressed by the development of novel computational tools and methods. Interestingly, gut microbiota maintains a constant relative abundance at operational taxonomic unit (OTU levels and altered bacterial abundance has been associated with complex diseases such as symptomatic atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the study of gut microbial population has emerged as an important field of research in order to ultimately achieve better health. In addition, there is a spontaneous, non-linear, and dynamic interaction among different bacterial species residing in the gut. Thus, predicting the influence of perturbed microbe–microbe interaction network on health can aid in developing novel therapeutics. Here, we summarize the population abundance of gut microbiota and its variation in different clinical states, computational tools available to analyze the pyrosequencing data, and gut microbe–microbe interaction networks.

  3. Metagenomic Surveys of Gut Microbiota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Shubhra Mandal; Sudipto Saha; Santasabuj Das

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota of higher vertebrates is host-specific. The number and diversity of the organisms residing within the gut ecosystem are defined by physiological and environmental factors, such as host genotype, habitat, and diet. Recently, culture-independent sequencing techniques have added a new dimension to the study of gut microbiota and the challenge to analyze the large volume of sequencing data is increasingly addressed by the development of novel computational tools and methods. Interestingly, gut microbiota maintains a constant relative abundance at operational tax-onomic unit (OTU) levels and altered bacterial abundance has been associated with complex diseases such as symptomatic atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the study of gut microbial population has emerged as an important field of research in order to ulti-mately achieve better health. In addition, there is a spontaneous, non-linear, and dynamic interac-tion among different bacterial species residing in the gut. Thus, predicting the influence of perturbed microbe–microbe interaction network on health can aid in developing novel therapeutics. Here, we summarize the population abundance of gut microbiota and its variation in different clinical states, computational tools available to analyze the pyrosequencing data, and gut microbe–microbe inter-action networks.

  4. Year-long metagenomic study of river microbiomes across land use and water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea eVan Rossum

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Select bacteria, such as Escherichia coli or coliforms, have been widely used as sentinels of low water quality; however, there are concerns regarding their predictive accuracy for the protection of human and environmental health. To develop improved monitoring systems, a greater understanding of bacterial community structure, function and variability across time is required in the context of different pollution types, such as agricultural and urban contamination. Here, we present a year-long survey of free-living bacterial DNA collected from seven sites along rivers in three watersheds with varying land use in Southwestern Canada. This is the first study to examine the bacterial metagenome in flowing freshwater (lotic environments over such a time span, providing an opportunity to describe bacterial community variability as a function of land use and environmental conditions. Characteristics of the metagenomic data, such as sequence composition and average genome size, vary with sampling site, environmental conditions, and water chemistry. For example, average genome size was correlated with hours of daylight in the agricultural watershed and, across the agriculturally and urban-affected sites, k-mer composition clustering corresponded to nutrient concentrations. In addition to indicating a community shift, this change in average genome size has implications in terms of the normalisation strategies required, and considerations surrounding such strategies in general are discussed. When comparing abundances of gene functional groups between high- and low-quality water samples collected from an agricultural area, the latter had a higher abundance of nutrient metabolism and bacteriophage groups, possibly reflecting an increase in agricultural runoff. This work presents a valuable dataset representing a year of monthly sampling across watersheds and an analysis targeted at establishing a foundational understanding of how bacterial lotic communities

  5. Forest soil metagenome gene cluster involved in antifungal activity expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eu Jin; Lim, He Kyoung; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Chung, Young Ryun; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2008-02-01

    Using two forest soils, we previously constructed two fosmid libraries containing 113,700 members in total. The libraries were screened to select active antifungal clones using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a target fungus. One clone from the Yuseong pine tree rhizosphere soil library, pEAF66, showed S. cerevisiae growth inhibition. Despite an intensive effort, active chemicals were not isolated. DNA sequence analysis and transposon mutagenesis of pEAF66 revealed 39 open reading frames (ORFs) and indicated that eight ORFs, probably in one transcriptional unit, might be directly involved in the expression of antifungal activity in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of eight ORFs were similar to those of the core genes encoding type II family polyketide synthases, such as the acyl carrier protein (ACP), ACP synthases, aminotransferase, and ACP reductase. The gene cluster involved in antifungal activity was similar in organization to the putative antibiotic production locus of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, although we could not select a similar active clone from the KT2440 genomic DNA library in E. coli. ORFs encoding ATP binding cassette transporters and membrane proteins were located at both ends of the antifungal gene cluster. Upstream ORFs encoding an IclR family response regulator and a LysR family response regulator were involved in the positive regulation of antifungal gene expression. Our results suggested the metagenomic approach as an alternative to search for novel antifungal antibiotics from unculturable soil bacteria. This is the first report of an antifungal gene cluster obtained from a soil metagenome using S. cerevisiae as a target fungus. PMID:18065615

  6. An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-03-01

    The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

  7. Algal biogeography: metagenomics shows distribution of a picoplanktonic pelagophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A

    2012-09-11

    How can we determine the distribution of uncultured marine microorganisms? Targeted metagenomics has provided the complete chloroplast genome sequence, and the distribution, for a picoplanktonic pelagophyte alga.

  8. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U;

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate...... the quantitative phylogenetic and functional compositions of metagenomes, to compare compositions of multiple metagenomes and to produce intuitive visual representations of such analyses. AVAILABILITY: SmashCommunity is freely available at http://www.bork.embl.de/software/smash CONTACT: bork@embl.de....

  9. Metagenomic analysis of the rumen microbial community following inhibition of methane formation by a halogenated methane analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Stuart E; Martinez Fernandez, Gonzalo; Shinkai, Takumi; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Japanese goats fed a diet of 50% Timothy grass and 50% concentrate with increasing levels of the anti-methanogenic compound, bromochloromethane (BCM) were investigated with respect to the microbial population and functional shifts in the rumen. Microbial ecology methods identified species that exhibited positive and negative responses to the increasing levels of BCM. The methane-inhibited rumen appeared to adapt to the higher H2 levels by shifting fermentation to propionate which was mediated by an increase in the population of H2-consuming Prevotella and Selenomonas spp. Metagenomic analysis of propionate production pathways was dominated by genomic content from these species. Reductive acetogenic marker gene libraries and metagenomics analysis indicate that reductive acetogenic species do not play a major role in the BCM treated rumen.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of the rumen microbial community following inhibition of methane formation by a halogenated methane analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E Denman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Japanese goats fed a diet of 50% Timothy grass and 50% concentrate with increasing levels of the anti-methanogenic compound, bromochloromethane (BCM were investigated with respect to the microbial shifts in the rumen. Microbial ecology methods identified many species that exhibited positive and negative responses to the increasing levels of BCM. The methane-inhibited rumen appeared to adapt to the higher H2 levels by shifting fermentation to propionate which was mediated by an increase in the population of hydrogen-consuming Prevotella and Selenomonas spp. Metagenomic analysis of propionate production pathways was dominated by genomic content from these species. Reductive acetogenic marker gene libraries and metagenomics analysis indicate that reductive acetogenic species do not play a major role in the BCM treated rumen.

  11. The metagenomics RAST server – a public resource for the automatic phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens R; Rodriguez A. (ed.); Paczian T; Kubal M; Glass EM; Olson R; D'Souza M; Paarmann D; Meyer F; Wilke A; Wilkening J; Edwards RA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Random community genomes (metagenomes) are now commonly used to study microbes in different environments. Over the past few years, the major challenge associated with metagenomics shifted from generating to analyzing sequences. High-throughput, low-cost next-generation sequencing has provided access to metagenomics to a wide range of researchers. Results A high-throughput pipeline has been constructed to provide high-performance computing to all researchers interested in u...

  12. Genomics and metagenomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Roshan; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, sequencing tools have evolved from laborious time-consuming methodologies to real-time detection and deciphering of genomic DNA. Genome sequencing, especially using next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the landscape of microbiology and infectious disease. This deluge of sequencing data has not only enabled advances in fundamental biology but also helped improve diagnosis, typing of pathogen, virulence and antibiotic resistance detection, and development of new vaccines and culture media. In addition, NGS also enabled efficient analysis of complex human micro-floras, both commensal, and pathological, through metagenomic methods, thus helping the comprehension and management of human diseases such as obesity. This review summarizes technological advances in genomics and metagenomics relevant to the field of medical microbiology.

  13. CAMERA: A Community Resource for Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Seshadri; Kravitz, Saul A; Larry Smarr; Paul Gilna; Marvin Frazier

    2007-01-01

    Microbes are responsible for most of the chemical transformations that are crucial to sustaining life on Earth. Their ability to inhabit almost any environmental niche suggests that they possess an incredible diversity of physiological capabilities. However, we have little to no information on a majority of the millions of microbial species that are predicted to exist, mainly because of our inability to culture them in the laboratory. A growing discipline called metagenomics allows u...

  14. Metagenomics for pathogen detection in public health

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Ruth R.; Montoya, Vincent; Gardy, Jennifer L; Patrick, David M.; Tang, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Traditional pathogen detection methods in public health infectious disease surveillance rely upon the identification of agents that are already known to be associated with a particular clinical syndrome. The emerging field of metagenomics has the potential to revolutionize pathogen detection in public health laboratories by allowing the simultaneous detection of all microorganisms in a clinical sample, without a priori knowledge of their identities, through the use of next-generation DNA sequ...

  15. Genometa--a fast and accurate classifier for short metagenomic shotgun reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin F Davenport

    Full Text Available Metagenomic studies use high-throughput sequence data to investigate microbial communities in situ. However, considerable challenges remain in the analysis of these data, particularly with regard to speed and reliable analysis of microbial species as opposed to higher level taxa such as phyla. We here present Genometa, a computationally undemanding graphical user interface program that enables identification of bacterial species and gene content from datasets generated by inexpensive high-throughput short read sequencing technologies. Our approach was first verified on two simulated metagenomic short read datasets, detecting 100% and 94% of the bacterial species included with few false positives or false negatives. Subsequent comparative benchmarking analysis against three popular metagenomic algorithms on an Illumina human gut dataset revealed Genometa to attribute the most reads to bacteria at species level (i.e. including all strains of that species and demonstrate similar or better accuracy than the other programs. Lastly, speed was demonstrated to be many times that of BLAST due to the use of modern short read aligners. Our method is highly accurate if bacteria in the sample are represented by genomes in the reference sequence but cannot find species absent from the reference. This method is one of the most user-friendly and resource efficient approaches and is thus feasible for rapidly analysing millions of short reads on a personal computer.The Genometa program, a step by step tutorial and Java source code are freely available from http://genomics1.mh-hannover.de/genometa/ and on http://code.google.com/p/genometa/. This program has been tested on Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP/7.

  16. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  17. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weynberg, Karen D; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M; Suttle, Curtis A; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

  18. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  19. Soil Microbial Metagenome Technology Research Progress%土壤微生物元基因组技术的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾艳; 郎红; 王敏; 高俊莲

    2011-01-01

    对元基因组文库的概念进行了详细的阐述,对国内外利用元基因组技术进行土壤微生物方面的研究进展、文库构建流程及筛选技术进行了综述,以期促进国内这一国际热点领域的研究.%The concept of metagenome library was explained and soil research advances, library construction and screening technique process in China and abroad using metagenome method were summarized in order to promote domestic research in the field of the international hot spot.

  20. Comparison of microbial DNA enrichment tools for metagenomic whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoendel, Matthew; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Yao, Janet Z; Chia, Nicholas; Hanssen, Arlen D; Abdel, Matthew P; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Metagenomic whole genome sequencing for detection of pathogens in clinical samples is an exciting new area for discovery and clinical testing. A major barrier to this approach is the overwhelming ratio of human to pathogen DNA in samples with low pathogen abundance, which is typical of most clinical specimens. Microbial DNA enrichment methods offer the potential to relieve this limitation by improving this ratio. Two commercially available enrichment kits, the NEBNext Microbiome DNA Enrichment Kit and the Molzym MolYsis Basic kit, were tested for their ability to enrich for microbial DNA from resected arthroplasty component sonicate fluids from prosthetic joint infections or uninfected sonicate fluids spiked with Staphylococcus aureus. Using spiked uninfected sonicate fluid there was a 6-fold enrichment of bacterial DNA with the NEBNext kit and 76-fold enrichment with the MolYsis kit. Metagenomic whole genome sequencing of sonicate fluid revealed 13- to 85-fold enrichment of bacterial DNA using the NEBNext enrichment kit. The MolYsis approach achieved 481- to 9580-fold enrichment, resulting in 7 to 59% of sequencing reads being from the pathogens known to be present in the samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of these tools when testing clinical samples with low microbial burden using next generation sequencing. PMID:27237775

  1. Characterization of the gut microbiota of Kawasaki disease patients by metagenomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko eKinumaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute febrile illness of early childhood. Previous reports have suggested that genetic disease susceptibility factors, together with a triggering infectious agent, could be involved in KD pathogenesis; however, the precise etiology of this disease remains unknown. Additionally, previous culture-based studies have suggested a possible role of intestinal microbiota in KD pathogenesis. In this study, we performed metagenomic analysis to comprehensively assess the longitudinal variation in the intestinal microbiota of twenty-eight KD patients. Several notable bacterial genera were commonly extracted during the acute phase, whereas a relative increase in the number of Ruminococcus bacteria was observed during the non-acute phase of KD. The metagenomic analysis results based on bacterial species classification suggested that the number of sequencing reads with similarity to five Streptococcus spp. (S. pneumonia, pseudopneumoniae, oralis, gordonii, and sanguinis, in addition to patient-derived Streptococcus isolates, markedly increased during the acute phase in most patients. Streptococci include a variety of pathogenic bacteria and probiotic bacteria that promote human health; therefore, this further species discrimination could comprehensively illuminate the KD-associated microbiota. The findings of this study suggest that KD-related Streptococci might be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  2. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Mou

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  3. Whole metagenome profiling reveals skin microbiome-dependent susceptibility to atopic dermatitis flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Kern Rei; Tay, Angeline Su Ling; Li, Chenhao; Ng, Amanda Hui Qi; Wang, Jingjing; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; McGovern, Naomi; Janela, Baptiste; Wong, Xuan Fei Colin C; Sio, Yang Yie; Au, Bijin Veonice; Wilm, Andreas; De Sessions, Paola Florez; Lim, Thiam Chye; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Ginhoux, Florent; Connolly, John E; Lane, E Birgitte; Chew, Fook Tim; Common, John E A; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Whole metagenome analysis has the potential to reveal functional triggers of skin diseases, but issues of cost, robustness and sampling efficacy have limited its application. Here, we have established an alternative, clinically practical and robust metagenomic analysis protocol and applied it to 80 skin microbiome samples epidemiologically stratified for atopic dermatitis (AD). We have identified distinct non-flare, baseline skin microbiome signatures enriched for Streptococcus and Gemella but depleted for Dermacoccus in AD-prone versus normal healthy skin. Bacterial challenge assays using keratinocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells established distinct IL-1-mediated, innate and Th1-mediated adaptive immune responses with Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Bacterial differences were complemented by perturbations in the eukaryotic community and functional shifts in the microbiome-wide gene repertoire, which could exacerbate a dry and alkaline phenotype primed for pathogen growth and inflammation in AD-susceptible skin. These findings provide insights into how the skin microbial community, skin surface microenvironment and immune system cross-modulate each other, escalating the destructive feedback cycle between them that leads to AD flare. PMID:27562258

  4. Metagenomic insights into particles and their associated microbiota in a coastal margin ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Simon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our previously published research was one of the pioneering studies on the use of metagenomics to directly compare taxonomic and metabolic properties of aquatic microorganisms from different filter size-fractions. We compared size-fractionated water samples representing free-living and particle-attached communities from four diverse habitats in the Columbia River coastal margin, analyzing 12 metagenomes consisting of >5 million sequence reads (>1.6 Gbp. With predicted peptide and rRNA data we evaluated eukaryotic, bacterial and archaeal populations across size fractions and related their properties to attached and free-living lifestyles, and their potential roles in carbon and nutrient cycling. In this focused review, we expand our discussion on the use of high-throughput sequence data to relate microbial community structure and function to the origin, fate and transport of particulate organic matter in coastal margins. We additionally discuss the potential impact of the priming effect on organic matter cycling at the land-ocean interface, and build a case for the importance, in particle-rich estuaries and coastal margin waters, of bacterial activities in low-oxygen microzones within particle interiors.

  5. Comparison of microbial communities in marinated and unmarinated broiler meat by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, T T; Koskinen, K; Laine, P; Hultman, J; Säde, E; Paulin, L; Paloranta, A; Johansson, P; Björkroth, J; Auvinen, P

    2012-07-01

    Most raw poultry sold in Finland at the retail level is mixed with marinades containing oil, sugar, spices and acetic acid and packaged under modified atmosphere. Premature spoilage of marinated poultry preparations has been observed and associated with high levels of Leuconostoc spp. in meat. In this study we investigated whether marination of broiler fillet strips increased the proportion of Leuconostoc spp. in the microbial communities. To obtain a comprehensive view of the microbiota, we sequenced total DNA and 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the microbial communities. The lactic acid bacterial communities were characterized also by identification of colonies. The results showed that marinade increased the proportions of the spoilage-associated Leuconostoc gasicomitatum in the communities as well as the proportions of Leuconostoc gelidum and Lactobacillus spp. The proportions of Carnobacterium, Vagococcus, Brochothrix thrermosphacta, Clostridium, Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrio were diminished in marinated meat. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons resulted in 312 and 284 operational taxonomical units (dissimilarity 0.03) in unmarinated and marinated meat, respectively, indicating that the meat communities were more diverse than hitherto shown. Metagenomic analysis revealed a number of bacterial taxa that have not been associated with late shelf-life meat before, including Vagococcus and Vibrio that belonged to the predominating part of the microbial community in unmarinated meat. According to the functional analysis of the metagenomes, the communities in both marinated and unmarinated poultry were characterized by high proportions (15.6% or 17.9%) of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism.

  6. Learning Microbial Interaction Networks from Metagenomic Count Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Surojit; Mcdonald, Meredith; Lundberg, Derek S; Dangl, Jeffery L; Jojic, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Many microbes associate with higher eukaryotes and impact their vitality. To engineer microbiomes for host benefit, we must understand the rules of community assembly and maintenance that, in large part, demand an understanding of the direct interactions among community members. Toward this end, we have developed a Poisson-multivariate normal hierarchical model to learn direct interactions from the count-based output of standard metagenomics sequencing experiments. Our model controls for confounding predictors at the Poisson layer and captures direct taxon-taxon interactions at the multivariate normal layer using an ℓ1 penalized precision matrix. We show in a synthetic experiment that our method handily outperforms state-of-the-art methods such as SparCC and the graphical lasso (glasso). In a real in planta perturbation experiment of a nine-member bacterial community, we show our model, but not SparCC or glasso, correctly resolves a direct interaction structure among three community members that associates with Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We conclude that our method provides a structured, accurate, and distributionally reasonable way of modeling correlated count-based random variables and capturing direct interactions among them. PMID:27267776

  7. Comparative Metagenomics of Eight Geographically Remote Terrestrial Hot Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Peter; Gudbergsdóttir, Sóley Ruth; Rike, Anne Gunn; Lin, Lianbing; Zhang, Qi; Contursi, Patrizia; Moracci, Marco; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Bolduc, Benjamin; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ravin, Nikolai; Mardanov, Andrey; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta; Young, Mark; Krogh, Anders; Peng, Xu

    2015-08-01

    Hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria. In this paper, we present the metagenomic analysis of eight globally distributed terrestrial hot springs from China, Iceland, Italy, Russia, and the USA with a temperature range between 61 and 92 (∘)C and pH between 1.8 and 7. A comparison of the biodiversity and community composition generally showed a decrease in biodiversity with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. Another important factor shaping microbial diversity of the studied sites was the abundance of organic substrates. Several species of the Crenarchaeal order Thermoprotei were detected, whereas no single bacterial species was found in all samples, suggesting a better adaptation of certain archaeal species to different thermophilic environments. Two hot springs show high abundance of Acidithiobacillus, supporting the idea of a true thermophilic Acidithiobacillus species that can thrive in hyperthermophilic environments. Depending on the sample, up to 58 % of sequencing reads could not be assigned to a known phylum, reinforcing the fact that a large number of microorganisms in nature, including those thriving in hot environments remain to be isolated and characterized.

  8. Metagenomics of the Methane Ice Worm, Hesiocaeca methanicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, K. D.; Edsall, L.; Xin, W.; Head, S. R.; Gelbart, T.; Wood, A. M.; Gaasterland, T.

    2012-12-01

    The methane ice worm (Hesiocaeca methanicola) is a polychaete found on methane hydrate deposits for which there appears to be no publically available genomic or metagenomic data. Methane ice worms were collected in 2009 by the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible (543m depth; N 27:44.7526 W 91:13.3168). Next-generation sequencing (HiSeq2000) was applied to samples of tissue and gut contents. A subset of the assembled data (40M reads, randomly selected) was run through MG-RAST. Preliminary results for the gut content (1,269,153 sequences, average length 202 bp) indicated that 0.1% of the sequences contained ribosomal RNA genes with the majority (67%) classified as Bacteria, a relatively small per cent (1.4%) as Archae, and 31% as Eukaryota. Campylobacterales was the predominant order (14%), with unclassified (7.5%) and Desulfobacterales (4%) being the next dominant. Preliminary results for the worm tissue (2,716,461 sequences, average length 241 bp) indicated that the majority of sequences were Eukaryota (73%), with 256 sequences classified as phylum Annelida and 58% of those belonging to class Polychaeta. For the bacterial sequences obtained from the tissue samples, the predominant order was Actinomycetales (2.7%). For both the tissue and gut content samples, the majority of proteins were classified as clustering-based subsystems. This preliminary analysis will be compared to an assembly consisting of 40M of the highest quality reads.; methane ice worms on methane hydrate

  9. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Alison L [ORNL; Cantarel, Brandi [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Lamendella, Regina [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Darzi, Youssef [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Mongodin, Emmanuel [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Halfvarsson, J [Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden; Tysk, C [Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden; Henrissat, Bernard [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; Raes, Jeroen [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Fraser-Liggett, C [University of Maryland; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Jansson, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  10. Integrated metagenomics/metaproteomics reveals human host-microbiota signatures of Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison R Erickson

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD or colon (CCD. Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  11. Glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase retrieved from the metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku eUchiyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available β-glucosidases (BGLs hydrolyze cellooligosaccharides to glucose and play a crucial role in the enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Despite their significance for the production of glucose, most identified BGLs are commonly inhibited by low (~mM concentrations of glucose. Therefore, BGLs that are insensitive to glucose inhibition have great biotechnological merit. We applied a metagenomic approach to screen for such rare glucose-tolerant BGLs. A metagenomic library was created in Escherichia coli (approximately 10,000 colonies and grown on LB agar plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-glucoside, yielding 828 positive (blue colonies. These were then arrayed in 96-well plates, grown in LB, and secondarily screened for activity in the presence of 10% (w/v glucose. Seven glucose-tolerant clones were identified, each of which contained a single bgl gene. The genes were classified into two groups, differing by two nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes were identical (452 aa and found to belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 1. The recombinant protein (Ks5A7 was overproduced in E. coli as a C-terminal 6 × His-tagged protein and purified to apparent homogeneity. The molecular mass of the purified Ks5A7 was determined to be 54 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and 160 kDa by gel filtration analysis. The enzyme was optimally active at 45°C and pH 5.0–6.5 and retained full or 1.5–2-fold enhanced activity in the presence of 0.1–0.5 M glucose. It had a low KM (78 µM with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 0.36 mM with cellobiose and high Vmax (91 µmol min-1 mg-1 with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 155 µmol min-1 mg-1 with cellobiose among known glucose-tolerant BGLs and was free from substrate (0.1 M cellobiose inhibition. The efficient use of Ks5A7 in conjunction with Trichoderma reesei cellulases in enzymatic saccharification of alkaline-treated rice straw was demonstrated by increased production of glucose.

  12. Cross-cutting activities: Soil quality and soil metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Motavalli, Peter P.; Garrett, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reports on the work of the SANREM CRSP cross-cutting activities "Assessing and Managing Soil Quality for Sustainable Agricultural Systems" and "Soil Metagenomics to Construct Indicators of Soil Degradation." The introduction gives an overview of the extensiveness of soil degradation globally and defines soil quality. The objectives of the soil quality cross cutting activity are: CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  13. Online semi-supervised learning: algorithm and application in metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Imangaliyev; B. Keijser; W. Crielaard; E. Tsivtsivadze

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key role in metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm an

  14. Online Semi-Supervised Learning: Algorithm and Application in Metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key rolein metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm and

  15. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); A. Ruiz-Gonzalez (Aritz); V. Baumgärtner (Volkmar); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractInfectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: "what is causing the disease?" in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by "what is out there?" In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral

  16. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Sequence-Based Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Sean M.

    The use of metagenomic methods that directly sequence environmental samples has revealed the extraordinary microbial diversity missed by traditional culture-based methodologies. Therefore, to develop a complete and representative model of an environment's microbial community and activities, metagenomic analysis is an essential tool.

  17. Combination of metagenomics and culture-based methods to study the interaction between ochratoxin a and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingzhang; Huang, Kunlun; Chen, Siyuan; Qi, Xiaozhe; He, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Luo, Yunbo; Xia, Kai; Xu, Wentao

    2014-09-01

    Gut microbiota represent an important bridge between environmental substances and host metabolism. Here we reported a comprehensive study of gut microbiota interaction with ochratoxin A (OTA), a major food-contaminating mycotoxin, using the combination of metagenomics and culture-based methods. Rats were given OTA (0, 70, or 210 μg/kg body weight) by gavage and fecal samples were collected at day 0 and day 28. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and both 16S rRNA and shotgun sequencing (two main methods of metagenomics) were performed. The results indicated OTA treatment decreased the within-subject diversity of the gut microbiota, and the relative abundance of Lactobacillus increased considerably. Changes in functional genes of gut microbiota including signal transduction, carbohydrate transport, transposase, amino acid transport system, and mismatch repair were observed. To further understand the biological sense of increased Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus selective medium was used to isolate Lactobacillus species from fecal samples, and a strain with 99.8% 16S rRNA similarity with Lactobacillus plantarum strain PFK2 was obtained. Thin-layer chromatography showed that this strain could absorb but not degrade OTA, which was in agreement with the result in metagenomics that no genes related to OTA degradation increased. In conclusion, combination of metagenomics and culture-based methods can be a new strategy to study intestinal toxicity of toxins and find applicable bacterial strains for detoxification. When it comes to OTA, this kind of mycotoxin can cause compositional and functional changes of gut microbiota, and Lactobacillus are key genus to detoxify OTA in vivo.

  18. Metagenomics and Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology: Current Status and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Yang, Ching-Chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-09-29

    Metagenomic approaches are now commonly used in microbial ecology to study microbial communities in more detail, including many strains that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory. Bioinformatic analyses make it possible to mine huge metagenomic datasets and discover general patterns that govern microbial ecosystems. However, the findings of typical metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses still do not completely describe the ecology and evolution of microbes in their environments. Most analyses still depend on straightforward sequence similarity searches against reference databases. We herein review the current state of metagenomics and bioinformatics in microbial ecology and discuss future directions for the field. New techniques will allow us to go beyond routine analyses and broaden our knowledge of microbial ecosystems. We need to enrich reference databases, promote platforms that enable meta- or comprehensive analyses of diverse metagenomic datasets, devise methods that utilize long-read sequence information, and develop more powerful bioinformatic methods to analyze data from diverse perspectives. PMID:27383682

  19. Metagenomics and Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology: Current Status and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches are now commonly used in microbial ecology to study microbial communities in more detail, including many strains that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory. Bioinformatic analyses make it possible to mine huge metagenomic datasets and discover general patterns that govern microbial ecosystems. However, the findings of typical metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses still do not completely describe the ecology and evolution of microbes in their environments. Most analyses still depend on straightforward sequence similarity searches against reference databases. We herein review the current state of metagenomics and bioinformatics in microbial ecology and discuss future directions for the field. New techniques will allow us to go beyond routine analyses and broaden our knowledge of microbial ecosystems. We need to enrich reference databases, promote platforms that enable meta- or comprehensive analyses of diverse metagenomic datasets, devise methods that utilize long-read sequence information, and develop more powerful bioinformatic methods to analyze data from diverse perspectives. PMID:27383682

  20. Assessment of metagenomic assembly using simulated next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mende, Daniel R; Waller, Alison S; Sunagawa, Shinichi;

    2012-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the protocols and a limited knowledge of the nature of microbial communities, simulating metagenomic sequences plays an important role in testing the performance of existing tools and data analysis methods with metagenomic data. We developed metagenomic read simulators...... with platform-specific (Sanger, pyrosequencing, Illumina) base-error models, and simulated metagenomes of differing community complexities. We first evaluated the effect of rigorous quality control on Illumina data. Although quality filtering removed a large proportion of the data, it greatly improved....... Although the increase in contig length was accompanied by increased chimericity, it resulted in more complete genes and a better characterization of the functional repertoire. The metagenomic simulators developed for this research are freely available....

  1. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metagenomes of diverse habitats. The present review also highlights the paradigm shift of metagenomics from basic study of community composition to insight into the microbial community dynamics for harnessing the full potential of uncultured microbes with more emphasis on the implication of breakthrough developments, namely, Next Generation Sequencing, advanced bioinformatics tools, and systems biology.

  2. Shotgun metagenomics indicates novel family A DNA polymerases predominate within marine virioplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Helen F; Sakowski, Eric G; Williamson, Shannon J; Polson, Shawn W; Wommack, K Eric

    2014-01-01

    Virioplankton have a significant role in marine ecosystems, yet we know little of the predominant biological characteristics of aquatic viruses that influence the flow of nutrients and energy through microbial communities. Family A DNA polymerases, critical to DNA replication and repair in prokaryotes, are found in many tailed bacteriophages. The essential role of DNA polymerase in viral replication makes it a useful target for connecting viral diversity with an important biological feature of viruses. Capturing the full diversity of this polymorphic gene by targeted approaches has been difficult; thus, full-length DNA polymerase genes were assembled out of virioplankton shotgun metagenomic sequence libraries (viromes). Within the viromes novel DNA polymerases were common and found in both double-stranded (ds) DNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA libraries. Finding DNA polymerase genes in ssDNA viral libraries was unexpected, as no such genes have been previously reported from ssDNA phage. Surprisingly, the most common virioplankton DNA polymerases were related to a siphovirus infecting an α-proteobacterial symbiont of a marine sponge and not the podoviral T7-like polymerases seen in many other studies. Amino acids predictive of catalytic efficiency and fidelity linked perfectly to the environmental clades, indicating that most DNA polymerase-carrying virioplankton utilize a lower efficiency, higher fidelity enzyme. Comparisons with previously reported, PCR-amplified DNA polymerase sequences indicated that the most common virioplankton metagenomic DNA polymerases formed a new group that included siphoviruses. These data indicate that slower-replicating, lytic or lysogenic phage populations rather than fast-replicating, highly lytic phages may predominate within the virioplankton. PMID:23985748

  3. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  4. COMBINATORIAL LIBRARIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a method for the production of a combinatorial library of compound of general formula (I) using solid phase methodologies. The cleavage of the array of immobilised compounds of the phthalimido type from the solid support matrix is accomplished by using an array of dinucleop......The invention provides a method for the production of a combinatorial library of compound of general formula (I) using solid phase methodologies. The cleavage of the array of immobilised compounds of the phthalimido type from the solid support matrix is accomplished by using an array of...... dinucleophiles, e.g. hydrazines (hydrazinolysis) or N-hydroxylamines, whereby a combinatorial dimension is introduced in the cleavage step. The invention also provides a compound library....

  5. Identification and characterization of a halotolerant, cold-active marine endo-β-1,4-glucanase by using functional metagenomics of seaweed-associated microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marjolaine; Biver, Sophie; Steels, Sébastien; Barbeyron, Tristan; Jam, Murielle; Portetelle, Daniel; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2014-08-01

    A metagenomic library was constructed from microorganisms associated with the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum. Functional screening of this library revealed 13 novel putative esterase loci and two glycoside hydrolase loci. Sequence and gene cluster analysis showed the wide diversity of the identified enzymes and gave an idea of the microbial populations present during the sample collection period. Lastly, an endo-β-1,4-glucanase having less than 50% identity to sequences of known cellulases was purified and partially characterized, showing activity at low temperature and after prolonged incubation in concentrated salt solutions. PMID:24907332

  6. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  7. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples.

  8. [From molecular to genomic and metagenomic epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebrun, A B

    2014-01-01

    The notion "molecular epidemiology" was introduced into scientific literature by Kilburn E. et al. in 1973. The first period of development of infectious diseases molecular epidemiology may be called "genotypic" (1980-1990s). During this period methodology of molecular marking of pathogens for purposes of monitoring of their spread and outbreak detection (novel nomenclature of diphtheria corynebacteria based on ribotyping; international network PulseNet for monitoring food source infections; international database of tuberculosis mycobacteria spoligotypes) was created. The second--"genomic" period started in the 2000s. Molecular epidemiology rapidly went through single markers (genotypes or single genes) to deciphering the whole genome of pathoge "mobileome", "resistome", "virulome" etc. took an important place in the studies of emerging and pandemic infections. Knowledge on genetic mechanisms leading to emergence and global dissemination of novel pathogens give molecular epidemiology its own scientific content and transforms it from a methodical approach to an independent field of epidemiology. The third--"metagenomic" period starts nowadays based on meta-genomic approach that allows to determine the whole set ofgenomes in the studied sample without the cultivation procedure. In the short-term this would lead to a change of a century-long paradigm of diagnostics and control of infections: instead of search of separate (key) pathogens--characteristics of the full specter of microorganisms in the material from patients and environmental samples with its identification up to any taxonomic depth. In the systems of regional and global epidemiologic control a universal monitoring of all known and re-emerging pathogens with construction and maintenance of metagenomic passports of human habitats will be realized. PMID:25286516

  9. [From molecular to genomic and metagenomic epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhebrun, A B

    2014-01-01

    The notion "molecular epidemiology" was introduced into scientific literature by Kilburn E. et al. in 1973. The first period of development of infectious diseases molecular epidemiology may be called "genotypic" (1980-1990s). During this period methodology of molecular marking of pathogens for purposes of monitoring of their spread and outbreak detection (novel nomenclature of diphtheria corynebacteria based on ribotyping; international network PulseNet for monitoring food source infections; international database of tuberculosis mycobacteria spoligotypes) was created. The second--"genomic" period started in the 2000s. Molecular epidemiology rapidly went through single markers (genotypes or single genes) to deciphering the whole genome of pathoge "mobileome", "resistome", "virulome" etc. took an important place in the studies of emerging and pandemic infections. Knowledge on genetic mechanisms leading to emergence and global dissemination of novel pathogens give molecular epidemiology its own scientific content and transforms it from a methodical approach to an independent field of epidemiology. The third--"metagenomic" period starts nowadays based on meta-genomic approach that allows to determine the whole set ofgenomes in the studied sample without the cultivation procedure. In the short-term this would lead to a change of a century-long paradigm of diagnostics and control of infections: instead of search of separate (key) pathogens--characteristics of the full specter of microorganisms in the material from patients and environmental samples with its identification up to any taxonomic depth. In the systems of regional and global epidemiologic control a universal monitoring of all known and re-emerging pathogens with construction and maintenance of metagenomic passports of human habitats will be realized.

  10. Phylogeny and phylogeography of functional genes shared among seven terrestrial subsurface metagenomes reveal N-cycling and microbial evolutionary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Maggie C Y; Cameron, Connor; Magnabosco, Cara; Brown, C Titus; Schilkey, Faye; Grim, Sharon; Hendrickson, Sarah; Pullin, Michael; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; van Heerden, Esta; Kieft, Thomas L; Onstott, Tullis C

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on community phylogenetics and phylogeography of microorganisms living in extreme environments are rare. Terrestrial subsurface habitats are valuable for studying microbial biogeographical patterns due to their isolation and the restricted dispersal mechanisms. Since the taxonomic identity of a microorganism does not always correspond well with its functional role in a particular community, the use of taxonomic assignments or patterns may give limited inference on how microbial functions are affected by historical, geographical and environmental factors. With seven metagenomic libraries generated from fracture water samples collected from five South African mines, this study was carried out to (1) screen for ubiquitous functions or pathways of biogeochemical cycling of CH4, S, and N; (2) to characterize the biodiversity represented by the common functional genes; (3) to investigate the subsurface biogeography as revealed by this subset of genes; and (4) to explore the possibility of using metagenomic data for evolutionary study. The ubiquitous functional genes are NarV, NPD, PAPS reductase, NifH, NifD, NifK, NifE, and NifN genes. Although these eight common functional genes were taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse and distinct from each other, the dissimilarity between samples did not correlate strongly with geographical or environmental parameters or residence time of the water. Por genes homologous to those of Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii detected in all metagenomes were deep lineages of Nitrospirae, suggesting that subsurface habitats have preserved ancestral genetic signatures that inform the study of the origin and evolution of prokaryotes. PMID:25400621

  11. Phylogeny and phylogeography of functional genes shared among seven terrestrial subsurface metagenomes reveal N-cycling and microbial evolutionary relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie CY Lau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies on community phylogenetics and phylogeography of microorganisms living in extreme environments are rare. Terrestrial subsurface habitats are valuable for studying microbial biogeographical patterns due to their isolation and the restricted dispersal mechanisms. Since the taxonomic identity of a microorganism does not always correspond well with its functional role in a particular community, the use of taxonomic assignments or patterns may give limited inference on how microbial functions are affected by historical, geographical and environmental factors. With seven metagenomic libraries generated from fracture water samples collected from five South African mines, this study was carried out to (1 screen for ubiquitous functions or pathways of biogeochemical cycling of CH4, S and N; (2 to characterize the biodiversity represented by the common functional genes; (3 to investigate the subsurface biogeography as revealed by this subset of genes; and (4 to explore the possibility of using metagenomic data for evolutionary study. The ubiquitous functional genes are NarV, NPD, PAP reductase, NifH, NifD, NifK, NifE and NifN genes. Although these 8 common functional genes were taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse and distinct from each other, the dissimilarity between samples did not correlate strongly with either geographical, environmental or residence time of the water. Por genes homologous to those of Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii detected in all metagenomes were deep lineages of Nitrospirae, suggesting that subsurface habitats have preserved ancestral genetic signatures that inform the study of the origin and evolution of prokaryotes.

  12. Metagenomic islands of hyperhalophiles: the case of Salinibacter ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohwer Forest

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saturated brines are extreme environments of low diversity. Salinibacter ruber is the only bacterium that inhabits this environment in significant numbers. In order to establish the extent of genetic diversity in natural populations of this microbe, the genomic sequence of reference strain DSM 13855 was compared to metagenomic fragments recovered from climax saltern crystallizers and obtained with 454 sequencing technology. This kind of analysis reveals the presence of metagenomic islands, i.e. highly variable regions among the different lineages in the population. Results Three regions of the sequenced isolate were scarcely represented in the metagenome thus appearing to vary among co-occurring S. ruber cells. These metagenomic islands showed evidence of extensive genomic corruption with atypically low GC content, low coding density, high numbers of pseudogenes and short hypothetical proteins. A detailed analysis of island gene content showed that the genes in metagenomic island 1 code for cell surface polysaccharides. The strain-specific genes of metagenomic island 2 were found to be involved in biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharide components. Finally, metagenomic island 3 was rich in DNA related enzymes. Conclusion The genomic organisation of S. ruber variable genomic regions showed a number of convergences with genomic islands of marine microbes studied, being largely involved in variable cell surface traits. This variation at the level of cell envelopes in an environment devoid of grazing pressure probably reflects a global strategy of bacteria to escape phage predation.

  13. [Research in metagenomics and its applications in translational medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiahuan, Chen; Zheng, Sun; Xiaojun, Wang; Xiaoquan, Su; Kang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    Humans are born with microbiota, which have accompanied us through our life-span. There is an important symbiotic relationship between us and the microbial communities, thus microbial communities are of great importance to our health. All genomic information within this microbiota is referered to as "metagenomics" (also referred to as "human's second genome"). The analysis of high throughput metagenomic data generated from biomedical experiments would provide new approaches for translational research, and it have several applications in clinics. With the help of next generation sequencing technology and the emerging metagenomic approach (analysis of all genomic information in microbiota as a whole), we can overcome the pitfalls of tedious traditional method of isolation and cultivation of single microbial species. The metagenomic approach can also help us to analyze the whole microbial community efficiently and offer deep insights in human-microbe relationships as well as new ideas on many biomedical problems. In this review, we summarize frontiers in metagenomic research, including new concepts and methods. Then, we focus on the applications of metagenomic research in medical researches and clinical applications in recent years, which would clearly show the importance of metagenomic research in the field of translational medicine.

  14. Characterization of a Soil Metagenome-Derived Gene Encoding Wax Ester Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, Eunsook; So, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-02-01

    A soil metagenome contains the genomes of all microbes included in a soil sample, including those that cannot be cultured. In this study, soil metagenome libraries were searched for microbial genes exhibiting lipolytic activity and those involved in potential lipid metabolism that could yield valuable products in microorganisms. One of the subclones derived from the original fosmid clone, pELP120, was selected for further analysis. A subclone spanning a 3.3 kb DNA fragment was found to encode for lipase/esterase and contained an additional partial open reading frame encoding a wax ester synthase (WES) motif. Consequently, both pELP120 and the full length of the gene potentially encoding WES were sequenced. To determine if the wes gene encoded a functioning WES protein that produced wax esters, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was conducted using ethyl acetate extract from an Escherichia coli strain that expressed the wes gene and was grown with hexadecanol. The ethyl acetate extract from this E. coli strain did indeed produce wax ester compounds of various carbon-chain lengths. DNA sequence analysis of the full-length gene revealed that the gene cluster may be derived from a member of Proteobacteria, whereas the clone does not contain any clear phylogenetic markers. These results suggest that the wes gene discovered in this study encodes a functional protein in E. coli and produces wax esters through a heterologous expression system.

  15. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. Left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected. PMID:25926546

  16. Novel α-L-Fucosidases from a Soil Metagenome for Production of Fucosylated Human Milk Oligosaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Lezyk

    Full Text Available This paper describes the discovery of novel α-L-fucosidases and evaluation of their potential to catalyse the transglycosylation reaction leading to production of fucosylated human milk oligosaccharides. Seven novel α-L-fucosidase-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenome library and expressed in E. coli as recombinant 6xHis-tagged proteins. All seven fucosidases belong to glycosyl hydrolase family 29 (GH 29. Six of the seven α-L-fucosidases were substrate-inhibited, moderately thermostable and most hydrolytically active in the pH range 6-7, when tested with para-nitrophenyl-α-L-fucopyranoside (pNP-Fuc as the substrate. In contrast, one fucosidase (Mfuc6 exhibited a high pH optimum and an unusual sigmoidal kinetics towards pNP-Fuc substrate. When tested for trans-fucosylation activity using pNP-Fuc as donor, most of the enzymes were able to transfer fucose to pNP-Fuc (self-condensation or to lactose. With the α-L-fucosidase from Thermotoga maritima and the metagenome-derived Mfuc5, different fucosyllactose variants including the principal fucosylated HMO 2'-fucosyllactose were synthesised in yields of up to ~6.4%. Mfuc5 was able to release fucose from xyloglucan and could also use it as a fucosyl-donor for synthesis of fucosyllactose. This is the first study describing the use of glycosyl hydrolases for the synthesis of genuine fucosylated human milk oligosaccharides.

  17. Metagenomic analysis of the gut microbiota of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Richard William; Cochran, Philip A; Dowd, Scot E

    2015-07-01

    Snakes are capable of surviving long periods without food. In this study we characterized the microbiota of a Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), devoid of digesta, living in the wild. Pyrosequencing-based metagenomics were used to analyze phylogenetic and metabolic profiles with the aid of the MG-RAST server. Pyrosequencing of samples taken from the stomach, small intestine and colon yielded 691696, 957756 and 700419 high quality sequence reads. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated Eukarya was the most predominant domain, followed by bacteria and then viruses, for all three tissues. The most predominant phylum in the domain Bacteria was Proteobacteria for the tissues examined. Functional classifications by the subsystem database showed cluster-based subsystems were most predominant (10-15 %). Almost equally predominant (10-13 %) was carbohydrate metabolism. To identify bacteria in the colon at a finer taxonomic resolution, a 16S rRNA gene clone library was created. Proteobacteria was again found to be the most predominant phylum. The present study provides a baseline for understanding the microbial ecology of snakes living in the wild. PMID:25663091

  18. Cloning, expression and characterization of a lipase encoding gene from human oral metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeti, Arivaradarajan; Hemalatha, Devaraj; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Mullany, Peter; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2014-09-01

    The human oral metagenomic DNA cloned into plasmid pUC19 was used to construct a DNA library in Escherichia coli. Functional screening of 40,000 metagenomic clones led to identification of a clone LIP2 that exhibited halo on tributyrin agar plate. Sequence analysis of LIP2 insert DNA revealed a 939 bp ORF (omlip1) which showed homology to lipase 1 of Acinetobacter junii SH205. The omlip1 ORF was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) using pET expression system. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and the biochemical properties were studied. The purified OMLip1 hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl esters and triacylglycerol esters of medium and long chain fatty acids, indicating the enzyme is a true lipase. The purified protein exhibited a pH and temperature optima of 7 and 37 °C respectively. The lipase was found to be stable at pH range of 6-7 and at temperatures lower than 40 °C. Importantly, the enzyme activity was unaltered, by the presence or absence of many divalent cations. The metal ion insensitivity of OMLip1offers its potential use in industrial processes. PMID:24891735

  19. Metagenomic analysis of the gut microbiota of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Richard William; Cochran, Philip A; Dowd, Scot E

    2015-07-01

    Snakes are capable of surviving long periods without food. In this study we characterized the microbiota of a Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), devoid of digesta, living in the wild. Pyrosequencing-based metagenomics were used to analyze phylogenetic and metabolic profiles with the aid of the MG-RAST server. Pyrosequencing of samples taken from the stomach, small intestine and colon yielded 691696, 957756 and 700419 high quality sequence reads. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated Eukarya was the most predominant domain, followed by bacteria and then viruses, for all three tissues. The most predominant phylum in the domain Bacteria was Proteobacteria for the tissues examined. Functional classifications by the subsystem database showed cluster-based subsystems were most predominant (10-15 %). Almost equally predominant (10-13 %) was carbohydrate metabolism. To identify bacteria in the colon at a finer taxonomic resolution, a 16S rRNA gene clone library was created. Proteobacteria was again found to be the most predominant phylum. The present study provides a baseline for understanding the microbial ecology of snakes living in the wild.

  20. Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase MHlip from an Antarctic Soil Metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Galleni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An Antarctic soil metagenomic library was screened for lipolytic enzymes and allowed for the isolation of a new cytosolic esterase from the a/b hydrolase family 6, named MHlip. This enzyme is related to hypothetical genes coding esterases, aryl-esterases and peroxydases, among others. MHlip was produced, purified and its activity was determined. The substrate profile of MHlip reveals a high specificity for short p-nitrophenyl-esters. The apparent optimal activity of MHlip was measured for p-nitrophenyl-acetate, at 33 °C, in the pH range of 6–9. The MHlip thermal unfolding was investigated by spectrophotometric methods, highlighting a transition (Tm at 50 °C. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed its adaptation to cold temperatures, even when it did not present evident signatures associated with cold-adapted proteins. Thus, MHlip adaptation to cold probably results from many discrete structural modifications, allowing the protein to remain active at low temperatures. Functional metagenomics is a powerful approach to isolate new enzymes with tailored biophysical properties (e.g., cold adaptation. In addition, beside the ever growing amount of sequenced DNA, the functional characterization of new catalysts derived from environment is still required, especially for poorly characterized protein families like α/b hydrolases.

  1. Metagenomic analysis of the coral holobiont during a natural bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Raechel; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated seawater temperatures on each member of the coral holobiont (the complex comprised of coral polyps and associated symbiotic microorganisms, including Bacteria, viruses, Fungi, Archaea and endolithic algae) is becoming increasingly important as evidence accumulates that microbial members contribute to overall coral health, particularly during thermal stress. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify metabolic and taxonomic shifts in microbial communities associated with the hard coral Acropora millepora throughout a natural thermal bleaching event at Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef). A direct comparison of metagenomic data sets from healthy versus bleached corals indicated major shifts in microbial associates during heat stress, including Bacteria, Archaea, viruses, Fungi and micro-algae. Overall, metabolism of the microbial community shifted from autotrophy to heterotrophy, including increases in genes associated with the metabolism of fatty acids, proteins, simple carbohydrates, phosphorus and sulfur. In addition, the proportion of virulence genes was higher in the bleached library, indicating an increase in microorganisms capable of pathogenesis following bleaching. These results demonstrate that thermal stress results in shifts in coral-associated microbial communities that may lead to deteriorating coral health. PMID:23761353

  2. Viral metagenomics analysis of planktonic viruses in East Lake, Wuhan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xingyi; Wu, Yongquan; Wang, Meiniang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Lijun; Yang, Xinglou; Zhang, Yuji; Shi, Zhengli

    2013-10-01

    East Lake (Lake Donghu), located in Wuhan, China, is a typical city freshwater lake that has been experiencing eutrophic conditions and algal blooming during recent years. Marine and fresh water are considered to contain a large number of viruses. However, little is known about their genetic diversity because of the limited techniques for culturing viruses. In this study, we conducted a viral metagenomic analysis using a high-throughput sequencing technique with samples collected from East Lake in Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter. The libraries from four samples each generated 234,669, 71,837, 12,820, and 34,236 contigs (> 90 bp each), respectively. The genetic structure of the viral community revealed a high genetic diversity covering 23 viral families, with the majority of contigs homologous to DNA viruses, including members of Myoviridae, Podoviridae, Siphoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, and Microviridae, which infect bacteria or algae, and members of Circoviridae, which infect invertebrates and vertebrates. The highest viral genetic diversity occurred in samples collected in August, then December and June, and the least diversity in March. Most contigs have low-sequence identities with known viruses. PCR detection targeting the conserved sequences of genes (g20, psbA, psbD, and DNApol) of cyanophages further confirmed that there are novel cyanophages in the East Lake. Our viral metagenomic data provide the first preliminary understanding of the virome in one freshwater lake in China and would be helpful for novel virus discovery and the control of algal blooming in the future.

  3. Comparative metagenomics of viral assemblages inhabiting four phyla of marine invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Michael Gudenkauf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on Earth, killing 10-20% of oceanic biomass each day. However, despite their ecological importance, viruses inhabiting many echinoderms, cnidarians, urochordates, and marine arthropods have not been investigated with significant breadth. We conducted a broad survey of the viral assemblages inhabiting these hosts through viral metagenomics and phylogenetic analysis. Results indicate that different invertebrate groups harbor distinct viral assemblages. Interestingly, however, no significant difference is observed between the viral assemblages of echinoderms and arthropods. These similarities and differences may be due to cellular, immunological, geographical, and ecological differences amongst host phyla, although mechanistic determination is beyond the purview of this work. Additionally, we present evidence of the detection of several viral families that have not yet been observed in these hosts. Finally, we confirm the result of previous investigation that method of library construction significantly biases metagenomic results by altering the representation of of ssDNA and dsDNA viral genomes.

  4. Metagenomic analysis of the coral holobiont during a natural bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Raechel; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated seawater temperatures on each member of the coral holobiont (the complex comprised of coral polyps and associated symbiotic microorganisms, including Bacteria, viruses, Fungi, Archaea and endolithic algae) is becoming increasingly important as evidence accumulates that microbial members contribute to overall coral health, particularly during thermal stress. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify metabolic and taxonomic shifts in microbial communities associated with the hard coral Acropora millepora throughout a natural thermal bleaching event at Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef). A direct comparison of metagenomic data sets from healthy versus bleached corals indicated major shifts in microbial associates during heat stress, including Bacteria, Archaea, viruses, Fungi and micro-algae. Overall, metabolism of the microbial community shifted from autotrophy to heterotrophy, including increases in genes associated with the metabolism of fatty acids, proteins, simple carbohydrates, phosphorus and sulfur. In addition, the proportion of virulence genes was higher in the bleached library, indicating an increase in microorganisms capable of pathogenesis following bleaching. These results demonstrate that thermal stress results in shifts in coral-associated microbial communities that may lead to deteriorating coral health.

  5. Characterization of a novel β-glucosidase from a compost microbial metagenome with strong transglycosylation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2013-06-21

    The β-glucosidase encoded by the td2f2 gene was isolated from a compost microbial metagenomic library by functional screening. The protein was identified to be a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 1 and was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The recombinant β-glucosidase, Td2F2, exhibited enzymatic activity with β-glycosidic substrates, with preferences for glucose, fucose, and galactose. Hydrolysis occurred at the nonreducing end and in an exo manner. The order of catalytic efficiency for glucodisaccharides and cellooligosaccharides was sophorose > cellotetraose > cellotriose > laminaribiose > cellobiose > cellopentaose > gentiobiose, respectively. Intriguingly, the p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside hydrolysis activity of Td2F2 was activated by various monosaccharides and sugar alcohols. At a D-glucose concentration of 1000 mM, enzyme activity was 6.7-fold higher than that observed in the absence of D-glucose. With 31.3 mM D-glucose, Td2F2 catalyzed transglycosylation to generate sophorose, laminaribiose, cellobiose, and gentiobiose. Transglycosylation products were detected under all activated conditions, suggesting that the activity enhancement induced by monosaccharides and sugar alcohols may be due to the transglycosylation activity of the enzyme. These results show that Td2F2 obtained from a compost microbial metagenome may be a potent candidate for industrial applications. PMID:23661705

  6. Characterization of a Novel β-Glucosidase from a Compost Microbial Metagenome with Strong Transglycosylation Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2013-01-01

    The β-glucosidase encoded by the td2f2 gene was isolated from a compost microbial metagenomic library by functional screening. The protein was identified to be a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 1 and was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The recombinant β-glucosidase, Td2F2, exhibited enzymatic activity with β-glycosidic substrates, with preferences for glucose, fucose, and galactose. Hydrolysis occurred at the nonreducing end and in an exo manner. The order of catalytic efficiency for glucodisaccharides and cellooligosaccharides was sophorose > cellotetraose > cellotriose > laminaribiose > cellobiose > cellopentaose > gentiobiose, respectively. Intriguingly, the p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside hydrolysis activity of Td2F2 was activated by various monosaccharides and sugar alcohols. At a d-glucose concentration of 1000 mm, enzyme activity was 6.7-fold higher than that observed in the absence of d-glucose. With 31.3 mm d-glucose, Td2F2 catalyzed transglycosylation to generate sophorose, laminaribiose, cellobiose, and gentiobiose. Transglycosylation products were detected under all activated conditions, suggesting that the activity enhancement induced by monosaccharides and sugar alcohols may be due to the transglycosylation activity of the enzyme. These results show that Td2F2 obtained from a compost microbial metagenome may be a potent candidate for industrial applications. PMID:23661705

  7. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative metagenome-derived lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A putative lipase, LipS, from the soil metagenome of an environmental sample taken at the Biocenter Klein Flottbek, Hamburg, Germany was cloned, expressed and purified. Two different constructs of the protein were crystallized in a search for well diffracting crystals. Preliminary X-ray analyses indicated that crystals in space groups P42212 and P4 diffracted X-ray radiation to 2.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. LipS is a novel thermostable putative lipase that was isolated from a metagenomic library using functional screening methods. The corresponding gene shows high similarity to that encoding a putative but uncharacterized esterase from Symbiobacterium thermophilum IAM14863 (99% nucleotide-sequence similarity). Two different constructs of the recombinant lipase were crystallized. Crystals belonging to space group P42212 diffracted X-ray radiation to 2.8 Å resolution and crystals belonging to space group P4 diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. The most probable content of their asymmetric units were two molecules (P42212) and four or five molecules (P4), respectively

  8. Metagenomic profiling of microbial composition and antibiotic resistance determinants in Puget Sound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A Port

    Full Text Available Human-health relevant impacts on marine ecosystems are increasing on both spatial and temporal scales. Traditional indicators for environmental health monitoring and microbial risk assessment have relied primarily on single species analyses and have provided only limited spatial and temporal information. More high-throughput, broad-scale approaches to evaluate these impacts are therefore needed to provide a platform for informing public health. This study uses shotgun metagenomics to survey the taxonomic composition and antibiotic resistance determinant content of surface water bacterial communities in the Puget Sound estuary. Metagenomic DNA was collected at six sites in Puget Sound in addition to one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP that discharges into the Sound and pyrosequenced. A total of ~550 Mbp (1.4 million reads were obtained, 22 Mbp of which could be assembled into contigs. While the taxonomic and resistance determinant profiles across the open Sound samples were similar, unique signatures were identified when comparing these profiles across the open Sound, a nearshore marina and WWTP effluent. The open Sound was dominated by α-Proteobacteria (in particular Rhodobacterales sp., γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes while the marina and effluent had increased abundances of Actinobacteria, β-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. There was a significant increase in the antibiotic resistance gene signal from the open Sound to marina to WWTP effluent, suggestive of a potential link to human impacts. Mobile genetic elements associated with environmental and pathogenic bacteria were also differentially abundant across the samples. This study is the first comparative metagenomic survey of Puget Sound and provides baseline data for further assessments of community composition and antibiotic resistance determinants in the environment using next generation sequencing technologies. In addition, these genomic signals of potential human impact can be used

  9. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  10. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan M Steffen

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America, Lake Tai (Taihu, China, and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  11. Metagenome Fragment Classification Using -Mer Frequency Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Rosen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of microbial sequencing data is being generated through large-scale projects in ecology, agriculture, and human health. Efficient high-throughput methods are needed to analyze the mass amounts of metagenomic data, all DNA present in an environmental sample. A major obstacle in metagenomics is the inability to obtain accuracy using technology that yields short reads. We construct the unique -mer frequency profiles of 635 microbial genomes publicly available as of February 2008. These profiles are used to train a naive Bayes classifier (NBC that can be used to identify the genome of any fragment. We show that our method is comparable to BLAST for small 25 bp fragments but does not have the ambiguity of BLAST's tied top scores. We demonstrate that this approach is scalable to identify any fragment from hundreds of genomes. It also performs quite well at the strain, species, and genera levels and achieves strain resolution despite classifying ubiquitous genomic fragments (gene and nongene regions. Cross-validation analysis demonstrates that species-accuracy achieves 90% for highly-represented species containing an average of 8 strains. We demonstrate that such a tool can be used on the Sargasso Sea dataset, and our analysis shows that NBC can be further enhanced.

  12. Genovo: De Novo Assembly for Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserson, Jonathan; Jojic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne

    Next-generation sequencing technologies produce a large number of noisy reads from the DNA in a sample. Metagenomics and population sequencing aim to recover the genomic sequences of the species in the sample, which could be of high diversity. Methods geared towards single sequence reconstruction are not sensitive enough when applied in this setting. We introduce a generative probabilistic model of read generation from environmental samples and present Genovo, a novel de novo sequence assembler that discovers likely sequence reconstructions under the model. A Chinese restaurant process prior accounts for the unknown number of genomes in the sample. Inference is made by applying a series of hill-climbing steps iteratively until convergence. We compare the performance of Genovo to three other short read assembly programs across one synthetic dataset and eight metagenomic datasets created using the 454 platform, the largest of which has 311k reads. Genovo's reconstructions cover more bases and recover more genes than the other methods, and yield a higher assembly score.

  13. Metagenomic search strategies for interactions among plants and multiple microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Karl Melcher

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants harbor multiple microbes. Metagenomics can facilitate understanding of the significance, for the plant, of the microbes and of the interactions among them. However, current approaches to metagenomic analysis of plants are computationally time-consuming. Efforts to speed the discovery process include improvement of computational speed, condensing the sequencing reads into smaller datasets before BLAST searches, simplifying the target database of BLAST searches, and flipping the roles of metagenomic and reference datasets. The latter is exemplified by the E-probe diagnostic nucleic acid analysis (EDNA approach originally devised for improving analysis during plant quarantine.

  14. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomic selections represent a powerful technique that is widely applied for identification of novel genes from complex metagenomic sources. However, whereas hundreds to thousands of clones can be easily generated and sequenced over a few days of experiments, analyzing the data...... is time consuming and constitutes a major bottleneck for experimental researchers in the field. Here we present the deFUME web server, an easy-to-use web-based interface for processing, annotation and visualization of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non...

  15. Enhancing metagenomics investigations of microbial interactions with biofilm technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert J C; Kakirde, Kavita S

    2013-11-11

    Investigations of microbial ecology and diversity have been greatly enhanced by the application of culture-independent techniques. One such approach, metagenomics, involves sample collections from soil, water, and other environments. Extracted nucleic acids from bulk environmental samples are sequenced and analyzed, which allows microbial interactions to be inferred on the basis of bioinformatics calculations. In most environments, microbial interactions occur predominately in surface-adherent, biofilm communities. In this review, we address metagenomics sampling and biofilm biology, and propose an experimental strategy whereby the resolving power of metagenomics can be enhanced by incorporating a biofilm-enrichment step during sample acquisition.

  16. Modular approach to customise sample preparation procedures for viral metagenomics: a reproducible protocol for virome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Lefrère, Hanne; De Bruyn, Pieter; Beller, Leen; Deboutte, Ward; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Lavigne, Rob; Maes, Piet; Van Ranst, Marc; Heylen, Elisabeth; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-11-12

    A major limitation for better understanding the role of the human gut virome in health and disease is the lack of validated methods that allow high throughput virome analysis. To overcome this, we evaluated the quantitative effect of homogenisation, centrifugation, filtration, chloroform treatment and random amplification on a mock-virome (containing nine highly diverse viruses) and a bacterial mock-community (containing four faecal bacterial species) using quantitative PCR and next-generation sequencing. This resulted in an optimised protocol that was able to recover all viruses present in the mock-virome and strongly alters the ratio of viral versus bacterial and 16S rRNA genetic material in favour of viruses (from 43.2% to 96.7% viral reads and from 47.6% to 0.19% bacterial reads). Furthermore, our study indicated that most of the currently used virome protocols, using small filter pores and/or stringent centrifugation conditions may have largely overlooked large viruses present in viromes. We propose NetoVIR (Novel enrichment technique of VIRomes), which allows for a fast, reproducible and high throughput sample preparation for viral metagenomics studies, introducing minimal bias. This procedure is optimised mainly for faecal samples, but with appropriate concentration steps can also be used for other sample types with lower initial viral loads.

  17. A response regulator from a soil metagenome enhances resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K Allen

    Full Text Available Functional metagenomic analysis of soil metagenomes is a method for uncovering as-yet unidentified mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. Here we report an unconventional mode by which a response regulator derived from a soil metagenome confers resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic carbenicillin in Escherichia coli. A recombinant clone (βlr16 harboring a 5,169 bp DNA insert was selected from a metagenomic library previously constructed from a remote Alaskan soil. The βlr16 clone conferred specific resistance to carbenicillin, with limited increases in resistance to other tested antibiotics, including other β-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, fusidic acid, and gentamicin. Resistance was more pronounced at 24°C than at 37°C. Zone-of-inhibition assays suggested that the mechanism of carbenicillin resistance was not due to antibiotic inactivation. The DNA insert did not encode any genes known to confer antibiotic resistance, but did have two putative open reading frames (ORFs that were annotated as a metallopeptidase and a two-component response regulator. Transposon mutagenesis and subcloning of the two ORFs followed by phenotypic assays showed that the response regulator gene was necessary and sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that the response regulator suppressed expression of the ompF porin gene, independently of the small RNA regulator micF, and enhanced expression of the acrD, mdtA, and mdtB efflux pump genes. This work demonstrates that antibiotic resistance can be achieved by the modulation of gene regulation by heterologous DNA. Functional analyses such as these can be important for making discoveries in antibiotic resistance gene biology and ecology.

  18. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becraft, Eric D; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Ohlsson, J Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P; Swingley, Wesley D

    2015-12-04

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This "microbial dark matter" represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum "Calescamantes" (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs.

  19. Structural and Functional Insights from the Metagenome of an Acidic Hot Spring Microbial Planktonic Community in the Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Chaves, Diego; Montaña, José Salvador; Osorio-Forero, Cesar; Junca, Howard; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level) acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC). A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation), and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ), associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA) indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment. PMID:23251687

  20. Semi-automatic in silico gap closure enabled de novo assembly of two Dehalobacter genomes from metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuiquan; Gong, Yunchen; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Typically, the assembly and closure of a complete bacterial genome requires substantial additional effort spent in a wet lab for gap resolution and genome polishing. Assembly is further confounded by subspecies polymorphism when starting from metagenome sequence data. In this paper, we describe an in silico gap-resolution strategy that can substantially improve assembly. This strategy resolves assembly gaps in scaffolds using pre-assembled contigs, followed by verification with read mapping. It is capable of resolving assembly gaps caused by repetitive elements and subspecies polymorphisms. Using this strategy, we realized the de novo assembly of the first two Dehalobacter genomes from the metagenomes of two anaerobic mixed microbial cultures capable of reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethanes and chloroform. Only four additional PCR reactions were required even though the initial assembly with Newbler v. 2.5 produced 101 contigs within 9 scaffolds belonging to two Dehalobacter strains. By applying this strategy to the re-assembly of a recently published genome of Bacteroides, we demonstrate its potential utility for other sequencing projects, both metagenomic and genomic. PMID:23284863

  1. Structural and functional insights from the metagenome of an acidic hot spring microbial planktonic community in the Colombian Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Javier Jiménez

    Full Text Available A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC. A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation, and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ, associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment.

  2. Scaling up the 454 Titanium Library Construction and Pooling of Barcoded Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Wilson; Hack, Christopher; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2009-03-23

    We have been developing a high throughput 454 library construction process at the Joint Genome Institute to meet the needs of de novo sequencing a large number of microbial and eukaryote genomes, EST, and metagenome projects. We have been focusing efforts in three areas: (1) modifying the current process to allow the construction of 454 standard libraries on a 96-well format; (2) developing a robotic platform to perform the 454 library construction; and (3) designing molecular barcodes to allow pooling and sorting of many different samples. In the development of a high throughput process to scale up the number of libraries by adapting the process to a 96-well plate format, the key process change involves the replacement of gel electrophoresis for size selection with Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization (SPRI) beads. Although the standard deviation of the insert sizes increases, the overall quality sequence and distribution of the reads in the genome has not changed. The manual process of constructing 454 shotgun libraries on 96-well plates is a time-consuming, labor-intensive, and ergonomically hazardous process; we have been experimenting to program a BioMek robot to perform the library construction. This will not only enable library construction to be completed in a single day, but will also minimize any ergonomic risk. In addition, we have implemented a set of molecular barcodes (AKA Multiple Identifiers or MID) and a pooling process that allows us to sequence many targets simultaneously. Here we will present the testing of pooling a set of selected fosmids derived from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. By combining the robotic library construction process and the use of molecular barcodes, it is now possible to sequence hundreds of fosmids that represent a minimal tiling path of this genome. Here we present the progress and the challenges of developing these scaled-up processes.

  3. Library news

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Library has been providing electronic access to the "Techniques de l'Ingénieur" database for the past 8 months. As a reminder, this is a multidisciplinary database of over 4000 technical and scientific articles in French, covering a broad range of topics such as mechanical engineering, safety, electronics and the environment. In a few simple steps, you can create your own account, select the types of documents you are interested in and configure your settings so as to receive alerts when articles in your field of activity are published. You can now access this resource from outside CERN using the "remote access to electronic resources" service. Further information is available here. Direct access to the database. Remote access to electronic resources. If you have any questions or comments, don't hesitate to contact us at: library.desk@cern.ch.

  4. Combination of Metagenomics and Culture-Based Methods to Study the Interaction Between Ochratoxin A and Gut Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Mingzhang; Huang, Kunlun; Chen, Siyuan; Qi, Xiaozhe; He, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Luo, Yunbo; Xia, Kai; Xu, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota represent an important bridge between environmental substances and host metabolism. Here we reported a comprehensive study of gut microbiota interaction with ochratoxin A (OTA), a major food-contaminating mycotoxin, using the combination of metagenomics and culture-based methods. Rats were given OTA (0, 70, or 210 μg/kg body weight) by gavage and fecal samples were collected at day 0 and day 28. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and both 16S rRNA and sh...

  5. Analysis and comparison of very large metagenomes with fast clustering and functional annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The remarkable advance of metagenomics presents significant new challenges in data analysis. Metagenomic datasets (metagenomes are large collections of sequencing reads from anonymous species within particular environments. Computational analyses for very large metagenomes are extremely time-consuming, and there are often many novel sequences in these metagenomes that are not fully utilized. The number of available metagenomes is rapidly increasing, so fast and efficient metagenome comparison methods are in great demand. Results The new metagenomic data analysis method Rapid Analysis of Multiple Metagenomes with a Clustering and Annotation Pipeline (RAMMCAP was developed using an ultra-fast sequence clustering algorithm, fast protein family annotation tools, and a novel statistical metagenome comparison method that employs a unique graphic interface. RAMMCAP processes extremely large datasets with only moderate computational effort. It identifies raw read clusters and protein clusters that may include novel gene families, and compares metagenomes using clusters or functional annotations calculated by RAMMCAP. In this study, RAMMCAP was applied to the two largest available metagenomic collections, the "Global Ocean Sampling" and the "Metagenomic Profiling of Nine Biomes". Conclusion RAMMCAP is a very fast method that can cluster and annotate one million metagenomic reads in only hundreds of CPU hours. It is available from http://tools.camera.calit2.net/camera/rammcap/.

  6. Metagenomic analysis of microbial community in uranium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xun; Luo, Xuegang; Zhao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Uranium tailing is a serious pollution challenge for the environment. Based on metagenomic sequencing analysis, we explored the functional and structural diversity of the microbial community in six soil samples taken at different soil depths from uranium-contaminated and uncontaminated areas. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology (KO) groups were obtained using a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search based on the universal protein resource database. The KO-pathway network was then constructed using the selected KOs. Finally, alpha and beta diversity analyses were performed to explore the differences in soil bacterial diversity between the radioactive soil and uncontaminated soil. In total, 30-68 million high-quality reads were obtained. Sequence assembly yielded 286,615 contigs; and these contigs mostly annotated to 1699 KOs. The KO distributions were similar among the six soil samples. Moreover, the proportion of the metabolism of other amino acids (e.g., beta-alanine, taurine, and hypotaurine) and signal transduction was significantly lower in radioactive soil than in uncontaminated soil, whereas the proportion of membrane transport and carbohydrate metabolism was higher. Additionally, KOs were mostly enriched in ATP-binding cassette transporters and two-component systems. According to diversity analyses, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in radioactive and uncontaminated soil, and Robiginitalea, Microlunatus, and Alicyclobacillus were the dominant genera in radioactive soil. Taken together, these results demonstrate that soil microbial community, structure, and functions show significant changes in uranium-contaminated soil. The dominant categories such as Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria may be applied in environmental governance for uranium-contaminated soil in southern China.

  7. Differences in Bacterial Community Structure on Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria americana in a Freshwater Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon-Bradley, Nadine; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.; Williams, Henry Neal

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition of the epiphytic bacterial community of an invasive aquatic plant (Hydrilla verticillata) and a native species (Vallisneria americana [eelgrass]) of the Wakulla Spring (Florida) was investigated, along with the water column bacterial composition, using clone libraries of the 16S rRNA genes. The bacterial clones from three clone libraries were classified into 182 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), most of which were affiliated with bacterial divisions commonly fou...

  8. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  9. A metagenomic survey of viral abundance and diversity in mosquitoes from Hubei province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyan Shi

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes as one of the most common but important vectors have the potential to transmit or acquire a lot of viruses through biting, however viral flora in mosquitoes and its impact on mosquito-borne disease transmission has not been well investigated and evaluated. In this study, the metagenomic techniquehas been successfully employed in analyzing the abundance and diversity of viral community in three mosquito samples from Hubei, China. Among 92,304 reads produced through a run with 454 GS FLX system, 39% have high similarities with viral sequences belonging to identified bacterial, fungal, animal, plant and insect viruses, and 0.02% were classed into unidentified viral sequences, demonstrating high abundance and diversity of viruses in mosquitoes. Furthermore, two novel viruses in subfamily Densovirinae and family Dicistroviridae were identified, and six torque tenosus virus1 in family Anelloviridae, three porcine parvoviruses in subfamily Parvovirinae and a Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus in Family Rhabdoviridae were preliminarily characterized. The viral metagenomic analysis offered us a deep insight into the viral population of mosquito which played an important role in viral initiative or passive transmission and evolution during the process.

  10. Comparative metagenomic analysis of PAH degradation in soil by a mixed microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Taylor, Todd D; Absalón, Angel E; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we used a taxonomic and functional metagenomic approach to analyze some of the effects (e.g. displacement, permanence, disappearance) produced between native microbiota and a previously constructed Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microbial consortium during the bioremediation process of a soil polluted with PAHs. Bioaugmentation with a fungal-bacterial consortium and biostimulation of native microbiota using corn stover as texturizer produced appreciable changes in the microbial diversity of polluted soils, shifting native microbial communities in favor of degrading specific populations. Functional metagenomics showed changes in gene abundance suggesting a bias towards aromatic hydrocarbon and intermediary degradation pathways, which greatly favored PAH mineralization. In contrast, pathways favoring the formation of toxic intermediates such as cytochrome P450-mediated reactions were found to be significantly reduced in bioaugmented soils. PAH biodegradation in soil using the microbial consortium was faster and reached higher degradation values (84% after 30 d) as a result of an increased co-metabolic degradation when compared with other mixed microbial consortia. The main differences between inoculated and non-inoculated soils were observed in aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, laccase, protocatechuate, salicylate and benzoate-degrading enzyme genes. Based on our results, we propose that several concurrent metabolic pathways are taking place in soils during PAH degradation. PMID:27484946

  11. An Alignment-Free "Metapeptide" Strategy for Metaproteomic Characterization of Microbiome Samples Using Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Damon H; Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Mikan, Molly P; Harvey, H Rodger; Borenstein, Elhanan; Nunn, Brook L; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    In principle, tandem mass spectrometry can be used to detect and quantify the peptides present in a microbiome sample, enabling functional and taxonomic insight into microbiome metabolic activity. However, the phylogenetic diversity constituting a particular microbiome is often unknown, and many of the organisms present may not have assembled genomes. In ocean microbiome samples, with particularly diverse and uncultured bacterial communities, it is difficult to construct protein databases that contain the bulk of the peptides in the sample without losing detection sensitivity due to the overwhelming number of candidate peptides for each tandem mass spectrum. We describe a method for deriving "metapeptides" (short amino acid sequences that may be represented in multiple organisms) from shotgun metagenomic sequencing of microbiome samples. In two ocean microbiome samples, we constructed site-specific metapeptide databases to detect more than one and a half times as many peptides as by searching against predicted genes from an assembled metagenome and roughly three times as many peptides as by searching against the NCBI environmental proteome database. The increased peptide yield has the potential to enrich the taxonomic and functional characterization of sample metaproteomes. PMID:27396978

  12. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D; Hester, Eric R; Martynova, Daria; Maughan, Heather; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide. PMID:26713242

  13. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D; Hester, Eric R; Martynova, Daria; Maughan, Heather; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide.

  14. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:27312355

  15. Metagenomic insights into ultraviolet disinfection effects on antibiotic resistome in biologically treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Jia, Shuyu; Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Shi, Peng; Ye, Lin; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-09-15

    High-throughput sequencing-based metagenomic approaches were used to comprehensively investigate ultraviolet effects on the microbial community structure, and diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in biologically treated wastewater. After ultraviolet radiation, some dominant genera, like Aeromonas and Halomonas, in the wastewater almost disappeared, while the relative abundance of some minor genera including Pseudomonas and Bacillus increased dozens of times. Metagenomic analysis showed that 159 ARGs within 14 types were detectable in the samples, and the radiation at 500 mJ/cm(2) obviously increased their total relative abundance from 31.68 ppm to 190.78 ppm, which was supported by quantitative real time PCR. As the dominant persistent ARGs, multidrug resistance genes carried by Pseudomonas and bacitracin resistance gene bacA carried by Bacillus mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. Bacterial community shift and MGEs replication induced by the radiation might drive the resistome alteration. The findings may shed new light on the mechanism behind the ultraviolet radiation effects on antibiotic resistance in wastewater. PMID:27267479

  16. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA mainly from Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. Two clones with lipolytic activity in tributyrin as a substrate were recovered. Clone BAA3G2 (pSK-estGX1) was selected and the entire 4.6 Kb insert sequence was determined. The sequence had a GC content of 70.6% and could be derived from an undescribed Actinobacteria genome. One open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (gene estGX1) with a molecular mass of 22.4 kDa that contained the pentapeptide G-P-S-G-G near the N-terminus essential for lipase activity and the putative catalytic triad was identified, also a putative ribosomal binding site located 18 bp upstream the estGX1 ATG start codon was identified. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein belonged to a new lipase family. The secreted enzyme showed a preference for short length fatty acids, with specific activity against p-nitrophenyl-butyrate (0.142 U/mg of total protein), it was cold active with relative activity of 30% at 10°C and moderately thermo active with relative activity of 80% at 50°C and had a pH optimum of 8.0 at 40°C. PMID:22806812

  17. [Comparative Metagenomics of BIOLAK and A2O Activated Sludge Based on Next-generation Sequencing Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mei; Liu, Han-hu; Shen, Xin

    2016-02-15

    This is the first report of comparative metagenomic analyses of BIOLAK sludge and anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) sludge. In the BIOLAK and A2O sludge metagenomes, 47 and 51 phyla were identified respectively, more than the numbers of phyla identified in Australia EBPR (enhanced biological phosphorus removal), USA EBPR and Bibby sludge. All phyla found in the BIOLAK sludge were detected in the A2O sludge, but four phyla were exclusively found in the A20 sludge. The proportion of the phylum Ignavibacteriae in the A2O sludge was 2.0440%, which was 3.2 times as much as that in the BIOLAK sludge (0.6376%). Meanwhile, the proportion of the bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes in the BIOLAK sludge was 2.4673%, which was >17 times as much as that in the A2O sludge (0.1404%). The proportion of the bacterial phylum Chlamydiae in the BIOLAK metagenome (0.2192%) was >6 times higher than that in the A2O (0.0360%). Furthermore, 167 genera found in the A20 sludge were not detected in the BIOLAK sludge. And 50 genera found in the BIOLAK sludge were not detected in the A20 sludge. From the analyses of both the phylum and genus levels, there were huge differences between the two biological communities of A2O and BIOLAK sludge. However, the proportions of each group of functional genes associated with metabolism of nitrogen, phosphor, sulfur and aromatic compounds in BIOLAK were very similar to those in A2O sludge. Moreover, the rankings of all six KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia for Genes and Genomes) categories were identical in the two sludges. In addition, the analyses of functional classification and pathway related nitrogen metabolism showed that the abundant enzymes had identical ranking in the BIOLAK and A2O metagenomes. Therefore, comparative metagenomics of BIOLAK and A2O activated sludge indicated similar function assignments from the two different biological communities. PMID:27363155

  18. mmnet: An R Package for Metagenomics Systems Biology Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiome plays important roles in human health and disease. Previous microbiome studies focused mainly on single pure species function and overlooked the interactions in the complex communities on system-level. A metagenomic approach introduced recently integrates metagenomic data with community-level metabolic network modeling, but no comprehensive tool was available for such kind of approaches. To facilitate these kinds of studies, we developed an R package, mmnet, to implement community-level metabolic network reconstruction. The package also implements a set of functions for automatic analysis pipeline construction including functional annotation of metagenomic reads, abundance estimation of enzymatic genes, community-level metabolic network reconstruction, and integrated network analysis. The result can be represented in an intuitive way and sent to Cytoscape for further exploration. The package has substantial potentials in metagenomic studies that focus on identifying system-level variations of human microbiome associated with disease.

  19. mmnet: An R Package for Metagenomics Systems Biology Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Zheng, Xiaofei; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaochen

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome plays important roles in human health and disease. Previous microbiome studies focused mainly on single pure species function and overlooked the interactions in the complex communities on system-level. A metagenomic approach introduced recently integrates metagenomic data with community-level metabolic network modeling, but no comprehensive tool was available for such kind of approaches. To facilitate these kinds of studies, we developed an R package, mmnet, to implement community-level metabolic network reconstruction. The package also implements a set of functions for automatic analysis pipeline construction including functional annotation of metagenomic reads, abundance estimation of enzymatic genes, community-level metabolic network reconstruction, and integrated network analysis. The result can be represented in an intuitive way and sent to Cytoscape for further exploration. The package has substantial potentials in metagenomic studies that focus on identifying system-level variations of human microbiome associated with disease.

  20. Quantitative metagenomic analyses based on average genome size normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Jeremy Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Over the past quarter-century, microbiologists have used DNA sequence information to aid in the characterization of microbial communities. During the last decade, this has expanded from single genes to microbial community genomics, or metagenomics, in which the gene content of an environment can...... provide not just a census of the community members but direct information on metabolic capabilities and potential interactions among community members. Here we introduce a method for the quantitative characterization and comparison of microbial communities based on the normalization of metagenomic data...... by estimating average genome sizes. This normalization can relieve comparative biases introduced by differences in community structure, number of sequencing reads, and sequencing read lengths between different metagenomes. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by comparing metagenomes from two different...