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Sample records for bacterial lipopolysaccharide lps

  1. Changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of γ-irradiated bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization radiation is known to alter the biological properties of LPS. The author treated a highly purified LPS from E. coli in aqueous medium with 60Co-radiation. The changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of LPS were studied in double immunodiffusion/immunoelectrophoresis (rabbit antiserum) and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Untreated LPS revealed two major antigenic components and, due to varying lengths of the O-polysaccharide side chain, a series of homopolymers (SDS-PAGE). High doses of γ-radiation destroyed all antigenic reactivities and all stainable bands on SDS-PAGE. However, lower doses of radiation were selective. Disappearance of the more radiation-sensitive, electrophoretically fast-migrating antigenic component paralleled elimination of the long O-side chain containing molecules. The relatively radiation-resistant, less anodic second antigenic component cross-reacted with LPS of another E. coli strain and corresponded to LPS molecules composed of R-core and lipid A (SDS-PAGE). These findings explain the in vivo loss of antibody protection from shock before non-specific resistance with γ-irradiation of LPS

  2. Pulmonary hypertensive responses of broilers to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS): evaluation of LPS source and dose, and impact of pre-existing pulmonary hypertension and cellulose micro-particle selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M E; Wang, W; Erf, G F; Wideman, R F

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) triggers pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to pulmonary hypertension (PHS, ascites) in broilers. The lungs of broilers are constantly challenged with LPS that can trigger pulmonary vasoconstriction. Among broilers from a single genetic line, some individuals respond to LPS with large increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), whereas others fail to exhibit any response to the same supramaximal dose of LPS. In the present study we evaluated the impact of a variety of factors on the magnitude of the PAP response of male broilers to LPS, including: (1) the role of the initial PAP (low vs. high initial PAP); (2) the source of the LPS (Salmonella typhimurium vs. Escherichia coli); (3) the dose of LPS (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 mg/kg of BW); and (4) the role of micro-particle selection for improved pulmonary vascular capacity (cellulose survivors vs. saline-injected controls). Broilers in the low initial PAP group (21 +/- 0.34 mmHg, mean +/- SEM) did not differ in their pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS compared with broilers in the high initial PAP group (29 +/- 0.55 mmHg, mean +/- SEM). Lipopolysaccharide from S. typhimurium elicited pulmonary hypertensive responses qualitatively similar to those elicited by E. coli LPS. A detailed evaluation revealed that an LPS dose of 0.1 mg/kg of BW elicits a maximal pulmonary hypertensive response in male broilers, and broilers selected by micro-particle injection for a robust pulmonary vascular capacity did not differ in their pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS compared with unselected broilers. This research confirms that the variable pulmonary hypertensive responses among broilers cannot be attributed to the source or dosage of LPS, or to differences in the baseline pulmonary arterial pressure or micro-particle selection before injecting LPS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that innate rather than acquired variability may

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein opsonizes LPS-bearing particles for recognition by a novel receptor on macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase reactant that binds bacterial LPS. We show that LBP binds to the surface of live Salmonella and to LPS coated erythrocytes (ELPS), and strongly enhances the attachment of these particles to macrophages. LBP bridges LPS- coated particles to macrophages (MO) by first binding to the LPS, then binding to MO. Pretreatment of ELPS with LBP enabled binding to MO, but pretreatment of MO had no effect. Moreover, MO did not recognize erythrocyt...

  4. Variation suggestive of horizontal gene transfer at a lipopolysaccharide (lps biosynthetic locus in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial leaf blight pathogen of rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonti Ramesh V

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animal pathogenic bacteria, horizontal gene transfer events (HGT have been frequently observed in genomic regions that encode functions involved in biosynthesis of the outer membrane located lipopolysaccharide (LPS. As a result, different strains of the same pathogen can have substantially different lps biosynthetic gene clusters. Since LPS is highly antigenic, the variation at lps loci is attributed to be of advantage in evading the host immune system. Although LPS has been suggested as a potentiator of plant defense responses, interstrain variation at lps biosynthetic gene clusters has not been reported for any plant pathogenic bacterium. Results We report here the complete sequence of a 12.2 kb virulence locus of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo encoding six genes whose products are homologous to functions involved in LPS biosynthesis and transport. All six open reading frames (ORFs have atypical G+C content and altered codon usage, which are the hallmarks of genomic islands that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The lps locus is flanked by highly conserved genes, metB and etfA, respectively encoding cystathionine gamma lyase and electron transport flavoprotein. Interestingly, two different sets of lps genes are present at this locus in the plant pathogens, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac. The genomic island is present in a number of Xoo strains from India and other Asian countries but is not present in two strains, one from India (BXO8 and another from Nepal (Nepal624 as well as the closely related rice pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoor. TAIL-PCR analysis indicates that sequences related to Xac are present at the lps locus in both BXO8 and Nepal624. The Xoor strain has a hybrid lps gene cluster, with sequences at the metB and etfA ends, being most closely related to sequences from Xac and the tomato pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

  5. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Promotes Destabilization of Lung Surfactant-Like Films

    OpenAIRE

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M.W.; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the bi...

  6. Binding and neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide by colistin nonapeptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, H S; Kania, S A; Siber, G R

    1985-01-01

    Polymyxin nonapeptides, proteolytic derivatives of polymyxin antibiotics, are less toxic than their parent compounds but retain some of their antibacterial activities. To confirm and expand observations that polymyxin nonapeptides have anti-endotoxin activity, we studied the ability of colistin nonapeptide to bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to inhibit the effects of LPS on Limulus amoebocyte lysate and lymphocyte mitogenicity. Colistin nonapeptide was purified by high-pressure ...

  7. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-resistant mutant isolated from a macrophagelike cell line, J774.1, exhibits an altered activated-macrophage phenotype in response to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, F; Akamatsu, Y

    1991-06-01

    A bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-resistant mutant was isolated from murine macrophagelike cell line J774.1. The mutant showed selective resistance to LPS and lipid A and was almost 10(5)- to 10(6)-fold more resistant than the parent; it grew even in the presence of 1 mg of Escherichia coli O55:B5 LPS per liter, whereas the parent did not grow with less than 10 ng of LPS per milliliter. We next examined the mutant for activation of various functions of macrophages on LPS treatment. This LPS-resistant mutant secreted interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor almost as effectively as the parent did. The mutant cells also changed transiently from a round to a spread form; however, they became round again afterwards. The mutant cells secreted less arachidonic acid in response to LPS. These results also suggest that this LPS-resistant mutant responds to LPS and shows activation of some macrophage functions. However, this mutant did not exhibit elevation of O2- generation or H2O2 generation after LPS treatment. Also, treatment of the mutant cells with murine recombinant gamma interferon was partly able to correct the defect in O(2-)-generating activity in response to LPS, suggesting that this defect is probably due to some of the LPS signal pathways. This implies that there is some correlation between O2- metabolism in LPS-activated macrophages and decreases in cell growth and viability. PMID:1645329

  8. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes destabilization of lung surfactant-like films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M W; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the biophysical properties of lung surfactant-like films composed of either DPPC or DPPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/palmitic acid (PA) (28:9:5.6, w/w/w). Our results show that low amounts of S-LPS fluidized DPPC monolayers, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and changes in the compressibility modulus. This promoted early collapse and prevented the attainment of high surface pressures. These destabilizing effects could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles. Similar effects were observed with surfactant-like films composed of DPPC/POPG/PA. On the other hand, the interaction of SP-A, a surfactant membrane-associated alveolar protein that also binds to LPS, with surfactant-like films containing S-LPS increased monolayer destabilization due to the extraction of lipid molecules from the monolayer, leading to the dissolution of monolayer material in the aqueous subphase. This suggests that SP-A may act as an LPS scavenger. PMID:21190662

  9. DMPD: Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. Schumann RR. Res Immunol. 1992 Jan;143(1):11-5. (.png) (.svg) (...ride (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. Authors Schuma.../LBP complexes: a short review. PubmedID 1373512 Title Function of lipopolysaccha....html) (.csml) Show Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS

  10. Adipokinetic hormone enhances nodule formation and phenoloxidase activation in adult locusts injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsworthy, Graham J.; Chandrakant, S.; Opoku-Ware, K.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions between the locust endocrine and immune systems have been studied in vivo in relation to nodule formation and activation of the prophenoloxidase cascade in the haemolymph. Injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Escherichia coli induces nodule formation in larval and adult locusts but does not increase phenoloxidase activity in the haemolymph. Nodule formation starts rapidly after injection of LPS and is virtually complete within 8 h, nodules occurring main...

  11. A broadband capacitive sensing method for label-free bacterial LPS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydosz, Artur; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Wincza, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Gruszczynski, Slawomir

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, the authors present a new type of highly sensitive label-free microwave sensor in a form of interdigital capacitor coated with T4 bacteriophage gp37 adhesin. The adhesin binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by precise recognizing its bacterial host lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The C-terminal part of the adhesin consists of the receptor-binding amino acid residues which are involved in a specific interaction with two terminal glucose residues of the bacterial LPS. The change of the sensors' capacitance and conductance as a subject to LPS presence is an indicator of the detection. The measurements in the frequency range of 0-3GHz utilizing vector network analyzer have been carried out at different concentrations to verify experimentally the proposed method. The measured capacitance change between the reference and the biofunctionalized sensor equals 15% in the entire frequency range and the measured conductance change exceeds 19%. The changes of both parameters can be used as good indicators of the LPS detection. The selectivity has been confirmed by the ELISA experiments and tested by sensor measurements with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli B, E. coli 056, E. coli 0111, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NBRC 13743 and Hafnia alvei 1185. PMID:26339930

  12. Peripheral and central mediators of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced suppression of defensive rage behavior in the cat

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha S; Zalcman, Steven S; Siegel, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Based upon recent findings in our laboratory that cytokines microinjected into the medial hypothalamus or periaqueductal gray (PAG) powerfully modulate defensive rage behavior in cat, the present study determined the effects of peripherally released cytokines following lipopolysaccharide LPS challenge upon defensive rage. The study involved initial identification of the effects of peripheral administration of LPS upon defensive rage by electrical stimulation from PAG and subsequent determinat...

  13. Detrimental Effect of the Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib in Bacterial Superantigen- and Lipopolysaccharide-induced Systemic Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y.; Theuer, Jayne E; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S.; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial superantigen (BSAg)–induced toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced shock are characterized by severe systemic inflammation. As nuclear factor κB (NFκB) plays an important role in inflammation and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor widely used in cancer chemotherapy, is a potent inhibitor of NFκB activation, we evaluated the therapeutic and prophylactic use of bortezomib in these conditions using murine models. Bortezomib prophylaxis significantly r...

  14. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  15. Sheep Lung Segmental Delivery Strategy Demonstrates Adenovirus Priming of Local Lung Responses to Bacterial LPS and the Role of Elafin as a Response Modulator

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Thomas I; Collie, David S; Shaw, Darren J; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Jean-Michel Sallenave

    2014-01-01

    Viral lung infections increase susceptibility to subsequent bacterial infection. We questioned whether local lung administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors in the sheep would alter the susceptibility of the lung to subsequent challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We further questioned whether local lung expression of elafin, a locally produced alarm anti-LPS/anti-bacterial molecule, would modulate the challenge response. We established that adenoviral vector treatment prim...

  16. Application of bacterial lipopolysaccharide to improve survival of the black tiger shrimp after Vibrio harveyi exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates an effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as feed supplement to improve immunity of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). LPS was coated to commercial feed pellets and given to the shrimp once or twice a day for 10 days before an exposure with shrimp pathogenic bacterium Vibrio harveyi. The growth rates, percent weight gains, total hemocyte and granulocyte counts and survival rates of shrimp between the LPS-coated pellet fed groups and a control group where shrimp fed with commercial feed pellets were compared. After 10 days of the feeding trials, growth rates were not significantly different in all groups, suggesting no toxicity from LPS supplement. To determine beneficial effect of LPS diets, each group was subsequently exposed to V. harveyi by immersion method and the survival rates were recorded for seven days after the immersion. Regardless of the dosages of LPS, the shrimp groups fed with LPS-coated pellets showed higher survival rates than the control group. There was no significant difference in survival rates between the two LPS dosages groups. In addition to survival under pathogen challenge, we also determine effect of LPS on immune-related genes after 10-day feeding trial. Gene expression analysis in the P. monodon intestines revealed that antilipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 (ALF3), C-type lectin, and mucine-like peritrophin (mucin-like PM) were expressed significantly higher in a group fed with LPS supplemental diet once or twice a day than in a control group. The transcript levels of C-type lectin and mucin-like PM had increased significantly when LPS was given once a day, while significant induction of ALF3 transcripts was observed when shrimp were fed with LPS twice a day. The up-regulation of the immune gene levels in intestines and higher resistance to V. harveyi of the shrimp fed with LPS provide the evidence for potential application of LPS as an immunostimulant in P. monodon farming. PMID:23751331

  17. Gelam Honey Has a Protective Effect against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Organ Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Kassim; Marzida Mansor; Nazeh Al-Abd; Kamaruddin Mohd Yusoff

    2012-01-01

    Gelam honey exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and is thought to have potent effects in reducing infections and healing wounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenously-injected Gelam honey in protecting organs from lethal doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six groups of rabbits (N = 6) were used in this study. Two groups acted as controls and received only saline and no LPS injections. For the test groups, 1 mL honey (500 mg/...

  18. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Ti...tle Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  19. Gelam Honey Has a Protective Effect against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Induced Organ Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kassim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Gelam honey exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and is thought to have potent effects in reducing infections and healing wounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenously-injected Gelam honey in protecting organs from lethal doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Six groups of rabbits (N = 6 were used in this study. Two groups acted as controls and received only saline and no LPS injections. For the test groups, 1 mL honey (500 mg/kg in saline was intravenously injected into two groups (treated, while saline (1 mL was injected into the other two groups (untreated; after 1 h, all four test groups were intravenously-injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg. Eight hours after the LPS injection, blood and organs were collected from three groups (one from each treatment stream and blood parameters were measured and biochemical tests, histopathology, and myeloperoxidase assessment were performed. For survival rate tests, rabbits from the remaining three groups were monitored over a 2-week period. Treatment with honey showed protective effects on organs through the improvement of organ blood parameters, reduced infiltration of neutrophils, and decreased myeloperoxidase activity. Honey-treated rabbits also showed reduced mortality after LPS injection compared with untreated rabbits. Honey may have a therapeutic effect in protecting organs during inflammatory diseases.

  20. Attenuation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced cytotoxicity by tocopherols and tocotrienols

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    Keiko Nishio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces host inflammatory responses and tissue injury and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various age-related diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, vascular diseases, and periodontal disease. Antioxidants, particularly vitamin E, have been shown to suppress oxidative stress induced by LPS, but the previous studies with different vitamin E isoforms gave inconsistent results. In the present study, the protective effects of α- and γ-tocopherols and α- and γ-tocotrienols on the oxidative stress induced by LPS against human lung carcinoma A549 cells were studied. They suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen formation, lipid peroxidation, induction of inflammatory mediator cytokines, and cell death. Tocopherols were incorporated into cultured cells much slower than tocotrienols but could suppress LPS-induced oxidative stress at much lower intracellular concentration than tocotrienols. Considering the bioavailability, it was concluded that α-tocopherol may exhibit the highest protective capacity among the vitamin E isoforms against LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  1. Impaired production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.;

    1999-01-01

    Ageing is associated with decreased resistance to bacterial infections and concomitant increased circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to research age-related changes in levels of early mediators of the acute-phase response in whole blood supernatants...... following LPS stimulation, representing an ex vivo model of sepsis. Levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1 beta and IL-6 in whole blood supernatants were measured after in vitro LPS stimulation for 24 h in 168 elderly humans aged 81 years from the 1914 cohort in Glostrup, Denmark and in 91...... proinflammatory cytokines compared with young men, but this difference was blurred by ageing. No relation was found between circulating plasma levels of TNF-alpha and levels after in vitro LPS stimulation. In conclusion, decreased production of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta after exposure to LPS may reflect impaired...

  2. Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on structurization properties of bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory E. Brill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose — to investigate the effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the process of dehydration selforganization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Material and Methods — The method of wedge dehydration has been used to study the structure formation of bacterial LPS. Image-phases analysis included their qualitative characteristics, as well as the calculation of quantitative indicators, followed by statistical analysis. Results — Low-intensity ultra high frequency (UHF radiation (1 GHz, 0.1 μW/cm2, 10 min has led to the changes in the suspension system of the LPS-saline reflected in the kinetics of structure formation. Conclusion — 1 GHz corresponds to the natural frequency of oscillation of water clusters and, presumably, the effect of UHF on structure of LPS mediates through the changes in water-salt environment. Under these conditions, properties of water molecules of hydration and possibly the properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the molecule of LPS, which can affect the ability of toxin molecules to form aggregates change. Therefore the LPS structure modification may result in the change of its toxic properties.

  3. Upregulation of prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP in lipopolysaccharide (LPS treated endothelium promotes inflammation

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    Kolte Dhaval

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolylcarboxypeptidase (Prcp gene, along with altered PRCP and kallikrein levels, have been implicated in inflammation pathogenesis. PRCP regulates angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7 – and bradykinin (BK – stimulated nitric oxide production in endothelial cells. The mechanism through which kallikrein expression is altered during infection is not fully understood. Investigations were performed to determine the association between PRCP and kallikrein levels as a function of the upregulation of PRCP expression and the link between PRCP and inflammation risk in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced endothelium activation. Methods The Prcp transcript expression in LPS-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC activation was determined by RT-PCR for mRNA. PRCP-dependent kallikrein pathway was determined either by Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA or by biochemical assay. Results We report that PRCP is critical to the maintenance of the endothelial cells, and its upregulation contributes to the risk of developing inflammation. Significant elevation in kallikrein was seen on LPS-treated HUVECs. The conversion of PK to kallikrein was blocked by the inhibitor of PRCP, suggesting that PRCP might be a risk factor for inflammation. Conclusion The increased PRCP lead to a sustained production of bradykinin in endothelium following LPS treatment. This amplification may be an additional mechanism whereby PRCP promotes a sustained inflammatory response. A better appreciation of the role of PRCP in endothelium may contribute to a better understanding of inflammatory vascular disorders and to the development of a novel treatment.

  4. Minocycline attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuroinflammation, sickness behavior, and anhedonia

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    Bailey Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the peripheral innate immune system stimulates the secretion of CNS cytokines that modulate the behavioral symptoms of sickness. Excessive production of cytokines by microglia, however, may cause long-lasting behavioral and cognitive complications. The purpose of this study was to determine if minocycline, an anti-inflammatory agent and purported microglial inhibitor, attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuroinflammation, sickness behavior, and anhedonia. Methods In the first set of experiments the effect of minocycline pretreatment on LPS-induced microglia activation was assessed in BV-2 microglia cell cultures. In the second study, adult (3–6 m BALB/c mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of vehicle or minocycline (50 mg/kg for three consecutive days. On the third day, mice were also injected (i.p. with saline or Escherichia coli LPS (0.33 mg/kg and behavior (i.e., sickness and anhedonia and markers of neuroinflammation (i.e., microglia activation and inflammatory cytokines were determined. In the final study, adult and aged BALB/c mice were treated with the same minocycline and LPS injection regimen and markers of neuroinflammation were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results Minocycline blocked LPS-stimulated inflammatory cytokine secretion in the BV-2 microglia-derived cell line and reduced LPS-induced Toll-like-receptor-2 (TLR2 surface expression on brain microglia. Moreover, minocycline facilitated the recovery from sickness behavior (i.e., anorexia, weight loss, and social withdrawal and prevented anhedonia in adult mice challenged with LPS. Furthermore, the minocycline associated recovery from LPS-induced sickness behavior was paralleled by reduced mRNA levels of Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and indoleamine 2

  5. Intratracheal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide elicits pulmonary hypertension in broilers with primed airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, A G; Wideman, R F

    2008-04-01

    Broilers reared under commercial conditions inhale irritant gases and aerosolized particulates contaminated with gram-negative bacteria and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Previous studies demonstrated that i.v. injections of LPS can trigger an increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP); however, the pulmonary hemodynamic response to aerosolized LPS entering via the most common route, the respiratory tract, had not been evaluated in broilers. In experiment 1, broilers reared on new wood shavings litter in clean environmental chambers either were not pretreated (control group) or were pretreated via aerosol inhalation of substances (food color dyes and propylene glycol) known to sensitize the airways. One day later, the broilers were anesthetized, catheterized to record the PAP, and an intratracheal aerosol spray of LPS (1 mL of 2 mg/mL of LPS) was administered. Broilers in the control group as well as broilers pretreated with aerosolized distilled water or yellow and blue food color dyes did not develop pulmonary hypertension (PH; an increase in PAP) after the intratracheal spray of LPS, whereas broilers that had been pretreated with red food color did develop PH in response to intratracheal LPS. In experiment 2, birds raised under commercial conditions on used wood shavings litter developed PH in response to intratracheal LPS regardless of whether they had been pretreated with aerosolized red food color dye. In experiment 3, broilers reared in clean environmental chambers on new wood shavings litter were used to demonstrate that Red Dye #3 and propylene glycol are capable of priming the responsiveness of the airways to a subsequent intratracheal LPS challenge. Common air contaminants such as LPS can result in PH leading to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers with appropriately primed airways. PMID:18339984

  6. Picrasma quassiodes (D. Don) Benn. attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Ji-Won; Shin, Na-Rae; Park, So-Yeon; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Park, Hyun Ah; Lim, Yourim; Ryu, Hyung Won; Yuk, Heung Joo; Kim, Jung Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-09-01

    Picrasma quassiodes (D.Don) Benn. (PQ) is a medicinal herb belonging to the family Simaroubaceae and is used as a traditional herbal remedy for various diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PQ on airway inflammation using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and LPS-stimulated raw 264.7 cells. ALI was induced in C57BL/6 mice by the intranasal administration of LPS, and PQ was administered orally 3 days prior to exposure to LPS. Treatment with PQ significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). PQ also decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 in BALF. In addition, PQ inhibited airway inflammation by reducing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and by increasing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the lungs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PQ blocked the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the lungs of mice with LPS-induced ALI. In the LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, PQ inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased the mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Treatment with PQ decreased the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB to the nucleus, and increased the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the expression of HO-1. PQ also inhibited the activation of p38 in the LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PQ exerts anti-inflammatory effects against LPS-induced ALI, and that these effects are associated with the modulation of iNOS, HO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Therefore, we suggest that PQ has therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of ALI. PMID:27431288

  7. Analysis of Ionomic Profiles of Canine Hairs Exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Kyoung-Min; Lee, Yoonseok; Bok, Jin Duck; Kim, Eun Bae; Chung, Myung Il

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a new insight on the response of canines to stress exposure; the ionomic profiles of canine hair (2.8 ± 0.3 years, 15.17 ± 2.1 kg) (n = 10) was determined before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections. LPS was intramuscularly injected to induce inflammatory stress responses which were confirmed by observing increases in the level of serum cortisol, aldosterone, and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. The hair contents of 17 elements were obtained by applying analytical procedures using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The following elements: sodium(Na) and potassium(K) among macro-elements, iron(Fe) and manganese(Mn) among micro-elements, and aluminum(Al), nickel(Ni), and lead(Pb) for toxic elements, showed significant increased levels with the immunological stress. The degree of increase in toxic elements was remarkable with the stress exposure. A forty-five-fold increase seen in Al accumulation with the stress exposure was noteworthy. Although mercury(Hg) and cadmium(Cd) showed decreased levels with the stress exposure, the degree was negligible compared to the level of increase. Correlation pattern between the elements was changed with the immunological stress. Toxic elements became more correlated with macro- or micro-elements than with toxic elements themselves after the stress exposure. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that LPS challenge shifted the overall hair mineral profiles to a consistent direction changing Al and K up, even in animals with different hair mineral profiles before LPS treatment. In conclusion, the multivariate data processing and study of element distribution patterns provided new information about the ionomic response of the canine hairs to immunological stress, i.e., the ionomic profiles of canine hairs is strongly affected by the stress induced by LPS injections. PMID:26758868

  8. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13133.001 PMID:27296646

  9. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes profibrotic activation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts play a critical role in intestinal wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of commensal gut bacteria. The effects of LPS on intestinal fibroblast activation were characterized. METHODS: Expression of the LPS receptor, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, was assessed in cultured primary human intestinal fibroblasts using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Fibroblasts were treated with LPS and\\/or transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. Nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) pathway activation was assessed by inhibitory kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and NFkappaB promoter activity. Fibroblast contractility was measured using a fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. Smad-7, a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression were assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The NFkappaB pathway was inhibited by IkappaBalpha transfection. RESULTS: TLR-4 was present on the surface of intestinal fibroblasts. LPS treatment of fibroblasts induced IkappaBalpha degradation, enhanced NFkappaB promoter activity and increased collagen contraction. Pretreatment with LPS (before TGF-beta1) significantly increased CTGF production relative to treatment with TGF-beta1 alone. LPS reduced whereas TGF-beta1 increased smad-7 expression. Transfection with an IkappaBalpha plasmid enhanced basal smad-7 expression. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fibroblasts express TLR-4 and respond to LPS by activating NFkappaB and inducing collagen contraction. LPS acts in concert with TGF-beta1 to induce CTGF. LPS reduces the expression of the TGF-beta1 inhibitor, smad-7.

  10. Effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on gastric emptying of liquids in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Collares

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present investigation were 1 to study the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS on rat gastric emptying (GE and 2 to investigate a possible involvement of the vagus nerve in the gastric action of LPS. Endotoxin from E. coli (strain 055:B5 was administered sc, ip or iv to male Wistar rats (220-280 g body weight at a maximum dose of 50 µg/kg animal weight. Control animals received an equivalent volume of sterile saline solution. At a given time period after LPS administration, GE was evaluated by measuring gastric retention 10 min after the orogastric infusion of a test meal (2 ml/100 g animal weight, which consisted of 0.9% NaCl plus the marker phenol red (6 mg/dl. One group of animals was subjected to bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or sham operation 15 days before the test. A significant delay in GE of the test meal was observed 5 h after iv administration of the endotoxin at the dose of 50 µg/kg animal weight. The LPS-induced delay of GE was detected as early as 30 min and up to 8 h after endotoxin administration. The use of different doses of LPS ranging from 5 to 50 µg/kg animal weight showed that the alteration of GE was dose dependent. In addition, vagotomized animals receiving LPS displayed a GE that was not significantly different from that of the sham control group. However, a participation of the vagus nerve in LPS-induced delay in GE could not be clearly demonstrated by these experiments since vagotomy itself induced changes in this gastric parameter. The present study provides a suitable model for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of LPS on gastric emptying

  11. Detection of lipopolysaccharides in Polyacrylamide gels by transfer to nitrocellulose followed by immunoautoradiography with antibody and 125I-protein A: LPS blotting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which constitute the somatic (O) antigen of gram-negative bacteria, were used to demonstrate the procedure of LPS blotting involving the electrophoretic transfer of electrophoretically resolved LPS from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose filters. Immobilized LPS could then be immunoautoradiographically visualized in situ by reaction with specific anti-LPS antibody and subsequent binding of radioiodinated Staphylococcus protein A. LPS blotting is expected to provide an efficient and specific means of investigating the LPS (O) antigens of gram-negative bacteria. 18 references

  12. Hydration, Ionic Valence and Cross-Linking Propensities of Cations Determine the Stability of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Agrinaldo; Pontes, Frederico J.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.

    2013-10-29

    The supra-molecular structure of LPS aggregates governs outer membrane permeability and activation of the host immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infections. Molecular dynamics simulations unveil at atomic resolution 10 the subtle balance between cation hydration and cross-link ability in modulating phase transitions of LPS membranes.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 2- and 6-Mediated Stimulation by Macrophage-Activating Lipopeptide 2 Induces Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Cross Tolerance in Mice, Which Results in Protection from Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha but in Only Partial Protection from Lethal LPS Doses

    OpenAIRE

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F.

    2003-01-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cyt...

  14. Sheep lung segmental delivery strategy demonstrates adenovirus priming of local lung responses to bacterial LPS and the role of elafin as a response modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas I; Collie, David S; Shaw, Darren J; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Viral lung infections increase susceptibility to subsequent bacterial infection. We questioned whether local lung administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors in the sheep would alter the susceptibility of the lung to subsequent challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We further questioned whether local lung expression of elafin, a locally produced alarm anti-LPS/anti-bacterial molecule, would modulate the challenge response. We established that adenoviral vector treatment primed the lung for an enhanced response to bacterial LPS. Whereas this local effect appeared to be independent of the transgene used (Ad-o-elafin or Ad-GFP), Ad-o-elafin treated sheep demonstrated a more profound lymphopenia in response to local lung administration of LPS. The local influence of elafin in modulating the response to LPS was restricted to maintaining neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of alveolar macrophage and neutrophil phagocytosis at higher levels post-LPS. Adenoviral vector-bacterial synergism exists in the ovine lung and elafin expression modulates such synergism both locally and systemically. PMID:25216250

  15. Sheep lung segmental delivery strategy demonstrates adenovirus priming of local lung responses to bacterial LPS and the role of elafin as a response modulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I Brown

    Full Text Available Viral lung infections increase susceptibility to subsequent bacterial infection. We questioned whether local lung administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors in the sheep would alter the susceptibility of the lung to subsequent challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We further questioned whether local lung expression of elafin, a locally produced alarm anti-LPS/anti-bacterial molecule, would modulate the challenge response. We established that adenoviral vector treatment primed the lung for an enhanced response to bacterial LPS. Whereas this local effect appeared to be independent of the transgene used (Ad-o-elafin or Ad-GFP, Ad-o-elafin treated sheep demonstrated a more profound lymphopenia in response to local lung administration of LPS. The local influence of elafin in modulating the response to LPS was restricted to maintaining neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of alveolar macrophage and neutrophil phagocytosis at higher levels post-LPS. Adenoviral vector-bacterial synergism exists in the ovine lung and elafin expression modulates such synergism both locally and systemically.

  16. Structural modifications of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that facilitate Gram-negative bacteria evasion of host innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro eMatsuura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a cell wall component characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria, is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern that allows mammalian cells to recognize bacterial invasion and trigger innate immune responses. The polysaccharide moiety of LPS primary plays protective roles for bacteria such as prevention from complement attacks or camouflage with common host carbohydrate residues. The lipid moiety, termed lipid A, is recognized by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD-2 complex, which transduces signals for activation of host innate immunity. The basic structure of lipid A is a glucosamine disaccharide substituted by phosphate groups and acyl groups. Lipid A with 6 acyl groups (hexa-acylated form has been indicated to be a strong stimulator of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. This type of lipid A is conserved among a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria, and those bacteria are easily recognized by host cells for activation of defensive innate immune responses. Modifications of the lipid A structure to less-acylated forms have been observed in some bacterial species, and those forms are poor stimulators of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. Such modifications are thought to facilitate bacterial evasion of host innate immunity, thereby enhancing pathogenicity. This hypothesis is supported by studies of Yersinia pestis LPS, which contains hexa-acylated lipid A when the bacterium grows at 27ºC (the temperature of the vector flea, and shifts to contain less-acylated forms when grown at the human body temperature of 37ºC. This alteration of lipid A forms following transmission of Y. pestis from fleas to humans contributes predominantly to the virulence of this bacterium over other virulence factors. A similar role for less-acylated lipid A forms has been indicated in some other bacterial species, such as Francisella tularensis, Helicobacter pylori, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and further studies to explore this concept are

  17. Interaction between complement subcomponent C1q and bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohair, A; Chesne, S; Wade, R H; Colomb, M G

    1989-02-01

    The heptose-less mutant of Escherichia coli, D31m4, bound complement subcomponent C1q and its collagen-like fragments (C1qCLF) with Ka values of 1.4 x 10(8) and 2.0 x 10(8) M-1 respectively. This binding was suppressed by chemical modification of C1q and C1qCLF using diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC). To investigate the role of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in this binding, biosynthetically labelled [14C]LPS were purified from E. coli D31m4 and incorporated into liposomes prepared from phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) [PC/PE/LPS, 2:2:1, by wt.]. Binding of C1q or its collagen-like fragments to the liposomes was estimated via a flotation test. These liposomes bound C1q and C1qCLF with Ka values of 8.0 x 10(7) and 2.0 x 10(7) M-1; this binding was totally inhibited after chemical modification of C1q and C1qCLF by DEPC. Liposomes containing LPS purified from the wild-strain E. coli K-12 S also bound C1q and C1qCLF, whereas direct binding of C1q or C1qCLF to the bacteria was negligible. Diamines at concentrations which dissociate C1 into C1q and (C1r, C1s)2, strongly inhibited the interaction of C1q or C1qCLF with LPS. Removal of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid; KDO) from E. coli D31m4 LPS decreases the binding of C1qCLF to the bacteria by 65%. When this purified and modified LPS was incorporated into liposomes, the C1qCLF binding was completely abolished. These results show: (i) the essential role of the collagen-like moiety and probably its histidine residues in the interaction between C1q and the mutant D31m4; (ii) the contribution of LPS, particularly the anionic charges of KDO, to this interaction. PMID:2649081

  18. Regulation of pulmonary and systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide responses in transgenic mice expressing human elafin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J-M; Cunningham, G A; James, R M; McLachlan, G; Haslett, C

    2003-07-01

    The control of lung inflammation is of paramount importance in a variety of acute pathologies, such as pneumonia, the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. It is becoming increasingly apparent that local innate immune responses in the lung are negatively influenced by systemic inflammation. This is thought to be due to a local deficit in cytokine responses by alveolar macrophages and neutrophils following systemic bacterial infection and the development of a septic response. Recently, using an adenovirus-based strategy which overexpresses the human elastase inhibitor elafin locally in the lung, we showed that elafin is able to prime lung innate immune responses. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse strain expressing human elafin and studied its response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) when the LPS was administered locally in the lungs and systemically. When LPS was delivered to the lungs, we found that mice expressing elafin had lower serum-to-bronchoalveolar lavage ratios of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein 2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, than wild-type mice. There was a concomitant increase in inflammatory cell influx, showing that there was potential priming of innate responses in the lungs. When LPS was given systemically, the mice expressing elafin had reduced levels of serum TNF-alpha compared to the levels in wild-type mice. These results indicate that elafin may have a dual function, promoting up-regulation of local lung innate immunity while simultaneously down-regulating potentially unwanted systemic inflammatory responses in the circulation. PMID:12819058

  19. Detrimental effect of the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib in bacterial superantigen- and lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Theuer, Jayne E; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2010-06-01

    Bacterial superantigen (BSAg)-induced toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced shock are characterized by severe systemic inflammation. As nuclear factor kappaB (NF kappaB) plays an important role in inflammation and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor widely used in cancer chemotherapy, is a potent inhibitor of NF kappaB activation, we evaluated the therapeutic and prophylactic use of bortezomib in these conditions using murine models. Bortezomib prophylaxis significantly reduced serum levels of many cytokines and chemokines induced by BSAg. However, at 3 hours, serum level of TNF-a, an important cytokine implicated in TSS, was significantly reduced but not abolished. At 6 hours, there was no difference in the serum TNF-a levels between bortezomib treated and untreated mice challenged with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Paradoxically, all mice treated with bortezomib either before or after BSAg challenge succumbed to TSS. Neither bortezomib nor BSAg was lethal if given alone. Serum biochemical parameters and histopathological findings suggested acute liver failure as the possible cause of mortality. Liver tissue from SEB-challenged mice treated with bortezomib showed a significant reduction in NF kappaB activation. Because NF kappaB-dependent antiapoptotic pathways protect hepatocytes from TNF-alpha-induced cell death, inhibition of NF kappaB brought forth by bortezomib in the face of elevated TNF-alpha levels caused by BSAg or LPS is detrimental. PMID:20372109

  20. The influence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the thermoregulation of the box turtle Terrapene carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, José Pedro Sousa; Marvin, Glenn A; Hutchison, Victor H

    2002-01-01

    Ectotherms can adjust their thermoregulatory set points in response to bacterial infection; the result may be similar to endothermic fever. We examined the influence of dose on the set point of body temperature (T(b)) in Terrapene carolina. After acclimating postprandial turtles to 20 degrees C, we injected them with two doses of bacterial endotoxin (LPS; lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli), 0.0025 or 0.025 mg LPS/g nonshell body mass, or with reptilian saline (control group). We placed the animals singly in linear thigmothermal gradients and recorded their T(b)'s for 48 h. The turtles showed dose-influenced thermal selection. Turtles injected with the high dose had T(b)'s significantly higher than control turtles, whereas low-dose turtles had T(b)'s significantly lower than control turtles. Also, there was a low daily effect on the T(b) of the turtles injected with the high dose. High-dose turtles had significantly higher T(b)'s than the control turtles during the first day but not during the second. Our results support the prediction of Romanovsky and Székely that an infectious agent may elicit opposite thermoregulatory responses depending on quality and quantity of the agent and the host health status. PMID:12177830

  1. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matera Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procalcitonin (PCT is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS, reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. Results PCT significantly decreased (p Salmonella typhimurium (rough chemotype and Escherichia coli (smooth chemotype. Subsequently, the in vitro effects of PCT on LPS-induced cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators.

  2. The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on gastric emptying in rats suffering from moderate renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigatto S.Z.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the response of rats suffering from moderate renal insufficiency to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin. The study involved 48 eight-week-old male SPF Wistar rats (175-220 g divided into two groups of 24 animals each. One group underwent 5/6 nephrectomy while the other was sham-operated. Two weeks after surgery, the animals were further divided into two subgroups of 12 animals each and were fasted for 20 h but with access to water ad libitum. One nephrectomized and one sham-treated subgroup received E. coli LPS (25 µg/kg, iv while the other received a sterile, pyrogen-free saline solution. Gastric retention (GR was determined 10 min after the orogastric infusion of a standard saline test meal labeled with phenol red (6 mg/dl. The gastric emptying of the saline test meal was studied after 2 h. Renal function was evaluated by measuring the plasma levels of urea and creatinine. The levels of urea and creatinine in 5/6 nephrectomized animals were two-fold higher than those observed in the sham-operated rats. Although renal insufficiency did not change gastric emptying (median %GR = 26.6 for the nephrectomized subgroup and 29.3 for the sham subgroup, LPS significantly retarded the gastric emptying of the sham and nephretomized groups (median %GR = 42.0 and 61.0, respectively, and was significantly greater (P<0.01 in the nephrectomized rats. We conclude that gastric emptying in animals suffering from moderate renal insufficiency is more sensitive to the action of LPS than in sham animals

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Complexes with Pasteurella haemolytica Leukotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in gram-negative bacterial repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin preparations, as well as the harsh conditions required to remove it, suggests that LPS may complex with RTX toxins. Concentrated culture supernatant (CCS) preparations of the RTX toxin Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin (LKT) contained LKT and LPS as the most prominent components, with LKT and LPS constituting ≈30 and 50% of the density of the silver-stained fraction on sodium dodecyl sulfate-poly...

  4. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  5. Comparison of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide concentrations in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid: a clinical case of bovine metritis

    OpenAIRE

    MAGATA, Fumie; ISHIDA, Yoshikazu; MIYAMOTO, Akio; FURUOKA, Hidefumi; INOKUMA, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid of a clinical case of bovine metritis. A 2-year-old lactating Holstein cow exhibited continuous fever >39.5°C for more than 2 weeks after normal calving. The cow produced a fetid, watery, red-brown uterine discharge from the vagina and was diagnosed with metritis. The LPS concentrations in plasma and uterine fluid were 0.94 and 6.34 endotoxin units (EU...

  6. Comparison of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide concentrations in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid: a clinical case of bovine metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magata, Fumie; Ishida, Yoshikazu; Miyamoto, Akio; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Inokuma, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid of a clinical case of bovine metritis. A 2-year-old lactating Holstein cow exhibited continuous fever >39.5°C for more than 2 weeks after normal calving. The cow produced a fetid, watery, red-brown uterine discharge from the vagina and was diagnosed with metritis. The LPS concentrations in plasma and uterine fluid were 0.94 and 6.34 endotoxin units (EU)/ml, respectively. One of seven follicles showed an extremely high level of LPS (12.40 EU/ml) compared to the other follicles (0.62-0.97 EU/ml). These results might suggest the presence of high concentration of LPS in follicles in cows with postpartum metritis. PMID:25223344

  7. Effect of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Contamination on Gutta Percha- versus Resilon-Induced Human Monocyte Cell Line Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Hadjati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic effects of obturation materials were tested in presence and absence of endotoxin on human monocytes in vitro.Human monocytes from THP-1 cell line were cultured. Three millimeters from the tip of each Resilon and gutta percha points were cut and directly placed at the bottom of the culture wells. Cultured cells were exposed to gutta percha (groups G1 and G2 and Resilon (R1 and R2. Ten μg/ml bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS was added to the culture wells in groups G1 and R1. Positive control included the bacterial LPS without the root canal filling material and the negative control contained the cells in culture medium only. Viability of cells was tested in all groups after 24, 48, and 72 hours using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay for at least 3 times to obtain reproducible results. Optical density values were read and the data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post hoc statistical test.The results showed that cells in G2 had the lowest rate of viability at 24 hours, but the lowest rate of viable cells was recorded in G1 at 48 and 72 hours. The effect of LPS treatment was not statistically significant. Resilon groups showed cell viability values higher than those of gutta percha groups, although statistically non-significant (P=0.105. Cell viability values were lower in gutta percha than Resilon groups when LPS-treated and LPS-untreated groups were compared independently at each time point.It could be concluded that none of the tested root canal filling materials had toxic effects on cultured human monocyte cells whether in presence or absence of LPS contamination.

  8. Gene expression and TNF-alpha secretion profile in rainbow trout macrophages following exposures to copper and bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, M; Mackenzie, S; Boltaña, S; Callol, A; Tort, L

    2011-01-01

    Fish macrophage function can be altered after exposure to pathogens as well as to xenobiotics. Considering that wild and farmed fish can be exposed in their habitats simultaneously to different types of stressors, including chemical contaminants (e.g. heavy metals) and pathogens (e.g. bacteria), it is fundamental to study their impact either isolated or in combination. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of copper and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone and in combination, on the transcription of target genes related with immune system, respiratory burst activity and cell death, using rainbow trout macrophages as in vitro model. A cell viability experiment was performed to determine the sub-lethal concentrations of copper for rainbow trout macrophages and the LC50-24 h was estimated at 60 μM. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) increased after copper and copper plus LPS exposure. Copper and LPS interact positively inducing an increase in cytokine expression, which may be indicative of an increased inflammatory response. However, the increase in TNFα mRNA expression induced by 50 μM copper was not accompanied by protein secretion indicating that mRNA abundance does not always reflect the level of protein and that the translation of the TNFα mRNA is somehow inhibited. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and trout C-polysaccharide binding protein (TCPBP) mRNA expression also increased after copper, LPS or LPS plus copper exposure, indicating a role of acute phase proteins in the local response to inflammation. NADPH oxidase and glutathione peroxidase gene expression increased in macrophages after 24 h exposure to copper, LPS or LPS plus copper. The results from the present study improve the understanding of mechanisms involved in copper toxicity, as well as the interaction with a simulated-inflammatory process. PMID:21078395

  9. Cardiorespiratory control and cytokine profile in response to heat stress, hypoxia, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure during early neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Fiona B; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Wilson, Richard J A; Hasan, Shabih U

    2016-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of the most common causes of postneonatal infant mortality in the developed world. An insufficient cardiorespiratory response to multiple environmental stressors (such as prone sleeping positioning, overwrapping, and infection), during a critical period of development in a vulnerable infant, may result in SIDS. However, the effect of multiple risk factors on cardiorespiratory responses has rarely been tested experimentally. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify the independent and possible interactive effects of infection, hyperthermia, and hypoxia on cardiorespiratory control in rats during the neonatal period. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration will negatively impact cardiorespiratory responses to increased ambient temperature and hypoxia in neonatal rats. Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat pups were studied at postnatal day 6-8. Rats were examined at an ambient temperature of 33°C or 38°C. Within each group, rats were allocated to control, saline, or LPS (200 μg/kg) treatments. Cardiorespiratory and thermal responses were recorded and analyzed before, during, and after a hypoxic exposure (10% O2). Serum samples were taken at the end of each experiment to measure cytokine concentrations. LPS significantly increased cytokine concentrations (such as TNFα, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-10) compared to control. Our results do not support a three-way interaction between experimental factors on cardiorespiratory control. However, independently, heat stress decreased minute ventilation during normoxia and increased the hypoxic ventilatory response. Furthermore, LPS decreased hypoxia-induced tachycardia. Herein, we provide an extensive serum cytokine profile under various experimental conditions and new evidence that neonatal cardiorespiratory responses are adversely affected by dual interactions of environmental stress factors. PMID:26811056

  10. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 release from human monocytes treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the capacity of counterflow-isolated human monocytes to independently synthesize thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) when stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Independent metabolism was confirmed by establishing different specific activities (dpm/ng) of TxB2 and PGE2 released from LPS-treated cells. For metabolites released during the initial 2-hr treatment period, the specific activity of PGE2 was approximately threefold higher than that of TxB2 regardless of labeling with [3H]arachidonic acid (AA) or [14C]AA. Cells that were pulse-labeled for 2 hr with [3H]AA demonstrated a decreasing PGE2 specific activity over 24 hr, whereas the TxB2 specific activity remained unchanged. In contrast, cells continuously exposed to [14C]AA demonstrated an increasing TxB2 specific activity that approached the level of PGE2 by 24 hr. These results suggest the presence of at least 2 cyclooxygenase metabolic compartments in counterflow-isolated monocytes. Although freshly isolated monocytes have been reported to contain variable numbers of adherent platelets, additional experiments demonstrated that counterflow-isolated platelets are not capable of releasing elevated levels of TxB2 or PGE2 when treated with LPS. It is proposed from these findings that at least two subsets of monocytes exist in peripheral blood that can be distinguished on the basis of independent conversion of AA to TxB2 and PGE2

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated macrophage activation: the role of calcium in the generation of tumoricidal activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drysdale, B.E.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-01

    As the authors reported, calcium ionophore, A23187, activates macrophages (M theta) for tumor cell killing and the activated M theta produce a soluble cytotoxic factor (M theta-CF) that is similar if not identical to tumor necrosis factor. Based on these observations they have investigated whether calcium is involved in the activation mediated by another potent M theta activator, LPS. The authors have shown that A23187 caused uptake of extracellular /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ but LPS did not. They have examined the effect of depleting extracellular calcium by using medium containing no added calcium containing 1.0 mM EGTA. In no case did depletion result in decreased M theta-CF production by the M theta activated with LPS. Measurements using the fluorescent, intracellular calcium indicator, Quin 2 have also been performed. While ionomycin, caused a rapid change in the Quin-2 signal, LPS at a concentration even in excess of that required to activate the M theta caused no change in the signal. When high doses of Quin 2 or another intracellular chelator, 8-(diethylaminol-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, were used to treat M theta, M theta-CF production decreased and cytotoxic activity was impaired. These data indicate that one or more of the processes involved in M theta-CF production does require calcium, but that activation mediated by LPS occurs without the influx of extracellular calcium or redistribution of intracellular calcium.

  12. Activation of nitric oxide synthase and induction of defense genes in Arabidopsis thaliana by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Dana

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are novel elicitors of plant innate immunity using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system. LPS are the major outer membrane components of Gram-negative bacteria and consist of three distinct structural domains: O-antigen, core region and lipid A. They represent microbe-/pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in animal patho-systems and act as extremely potent stimulators of the mammalian and insect innate immunity. As fo...

  13. Chromium supplementation enhances the metabolic response of steers to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) supplementation on the metabolic response to LPS challenge was examined. Steers (n=20; 235±4 kg body weight (BW)) received a premix that added 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg Cr to the total diet (DM (dry matter) basis) for ...

  14. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  15. Chromium supplementation enhances the acute phase response of steers to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty crossbred steers (235±4 kg BW) received 0 ppb (Control; C) or 200 ppb chromium propionate (CHR) for 55 days. Steers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording...

  16. Lack of binding of bacterial lipopolysaccharide to mouse lung macrophages and restoration of binding by gamma interferon

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Although peritoneal resident macrophages (PRM) or peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to kill tumor cells in vitro, lung macrophages (LM) obtained by mincing lung tissues or by harvesting bronchial lavage were not activated by LPS under any experimental conditions, i.e., different LPS concentrations, incubation times and cytotoxicity assay methods. The unresponsiveness of LM to LPS was seen in all of the mouse strains tested. Treatment of LM with in...

  17. Enhancement of Methacholine-Evoked Tracheal Contraction Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides Depends on Epithelium and Tumor Necrosis Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Secher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs induce an acute tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α- dependent inflammatory response in the murine airways mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 via the myeloid differentiation MyD88 adaptor protein pathway. However, the contractile response of the bronchial smooth muscle and the role of endogenous TNFα in this process have been elusive. We determined the in vivo respiratory pattern of C57BL/6 mice after intranasal LPS administration with or without the presence of increasing doses of methacholine (MCh. We found that LPS administration altered the basal and MCh-evoked respiratory pattern that peaked at 90 min and decreased thereafter in the next 48 h, reaching basal levels 7 days later. We investigated in controlled ex vivo condition the isometric contraction of isolated tracheal rings in response to MCh cholinergic stimulation. We observed that preincubation of the tracheal rings with LPS for 90 min enhanced the subsequent MCh-induced contractile response (hyperreactivity, which was prevented by prior neutralization of TNFα with a specific antibody. Furthermore, hyperreactivity induced by LPS depended on an intact epithelium, whereas hyperreactivity induced by TNFα was well maintained in the absence of epithelium. Finally, the enhanced contractile response to MCh induced by LPS when compared with control mice was not observed in tracheal rings from TLR4- or TNF- or TNF-receptor-deficient mice. We conclude that bacterial endotoxin-mediated hyperreactivity of isolated tracheal rings to MCh depends upon TLR4 integrity that signals the activation of epithelium, which release endogenous TNFα.

  18. Protective effects of carnosine alone and together with alpha-tocopherol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus ethanol-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaz, Esra Betül; Aydın, A Fatih; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Çoban, Jale; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of carnosine (CAR) alone and together with vitamin E (Vit E) on alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) in rats. ASH was induced by ethanol (3 times; 5 g/kg; 12 h intervals, via gavage), followed by a single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg; i.p.). CAR (250 mg/kg; i.p.) and Vit E (200 mg D-α-tocopherol/kg; via gavage) were administered 30 min before and 90 min after the LPS injection. CAR treatment lowered high serum transaminase activities together with hepatic histopathologic improvements in rats with ASH. Reactive oxygen species formation, malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activities and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen 1α1 (COL1A1) expressions were observed to decrease. These improvements were more remarkable in CAR plus Vit E-treated rats. Our results indicate that CAR may be effective in suppressing proinflammatory, prooxidant, and profibrotic factors in the liver of rats with ASH. PMID:26773358

  19. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruairi C. Robertson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%–42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%–7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-6 (p < 0.05 and IL-8 (p < 0.05 while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01 production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1 by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases.

  20. Chitosan-based Matrix, Used to Determine the Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry M. Frolov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the technology of chitosan-based matrix creation, and results of the study of its affine properties to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in aerosol dispersion. High degree of deacylation of polymer (over 97%, three-dimensional-porous structure, and multilayer packaging in analytical cartridge were the features of this matrix. Specified air volume, containing aerosol concentration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, was passed through the glass cylinder with analytical container. The share of captured molecules ranged from 1.0% to 1.5%, demonstrating the efficiency of chitosan matrix. It is suitable for the creation of the devices for bacterial lipopolysaccharide detection in the air, based on the obtained matrix.

  1. Regulation of the immune response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide by adherent cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Citron, M O; Michael, J G

    1981-01-01

    Immune response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide is usually short lived, but it often reappears without additional stimulus in a cyclic fashion. Activated adherent cells, presumably macrophages, were found to have a role in the reduction of the immune response to Escherichia coli O127 lipopolysaccharide. The suppressive activity of the adherent cells was abrogated before renewal of the responsiveness.

  2. Identification of a new anti-LPS agent, geniposide, from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, and its ability of direct binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinchuan; Yang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Li, Bin; Cao, Hongwei; Lu, Yongling; Wei, Guo; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin) is a key pathogen recognition molecule for sepsis. Currently, one of the therapeutic approaches for severe sepsis is focusing on the neutralization of LPS, and clinical trials have shown a lot of traditional Chinese herbs possess anti-sepsis function. Herein, to elucidate the bioactive components of traditional Chinese herbs that can neutralize LPS, the lipid A-binding abilities of sixty herbs were tested using affinity biosensor technology. The aqueous extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, traditionally used to treat inflammation in Asian countries for centuries, was further investigated. Subsequently, a monomer, identified as geniposide, was isolated. In vitro, geniposide was found to directly bind LPS and neutralize LPS. It dose-dependently inhibited cytokines release from RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS without affecting the cell viability, and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS. However, geniposide did not decrease TNF-α release induced by CpG DNA, Poly I:C or IL-1β. Significantly, geniposide dose-dependently down-regulated TLR4 mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS, and suppressed the phosphorylations of p38 MAKP induced by LPS but not by IL-1β. In vivo, geniposide (40mg/kg) could significantly protect mice challenge with lethal heat-killed E. coli, and dose-dependently decreased the level of serum endotoxin which was tightly associated with the cytokine levels in endotoxemia mice. In summary, we successfully isolated geniposide from G. jasminoides Ellis. Geniposide directly bound LPS and neutralized LPS in vitro, and significantly protected sepsis model mice. Therefore, geniposide could be as a useful lead compound for anti-sepsis drug development. PMID:20655404

  3. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL). TNF-α might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-κB and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed

  4. Chitosan-based Matrix, Used to Determine the Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Air

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry M. Frolov; Valery G. Zaitsev

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the technology of chitosan-based matrix creation, and results of the study of its affine properties to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in aerosol dispersion. High degree of deacylation of polymer (over 97%), three-dimensional-porous structure, and multilayer packaging in analytical cartridge were the features of this matrix. Specified air volume, containing aerosol concentration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, was passed through the glass cylinder with analytical container...

  5. Modification of the silver staining technique to detect lipopolysaccharide in polyacrylamide gels.

    OpenAIRE

    Fomsgaard, A; Freudenberg, M. A.; Galanos, C

    1990-01-01

    A silver staining method used routinely for detecting bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels (C. Tsai and E. Frasch, Anal. Biochem. 119:115-119, 1982) appeared to be inappropriate for visualizing certain LPS preparations. It did not stain S-form fractions of polyagglutinable Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS or several partly deacylated (alkali-treated) S-form LPS after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, these LPS preparation...

  6. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    A Martirosyan; Ohne, Y. (Yoichiro); Degos, C. (Clara); Gorvel, L. (Laurent); Moriyon, I; Oh, S.; Gorvel, J P

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defec...

  7. Importance of bacterial endotoxin (LPS in endodontics A importância da endotoxina bacteriana (LPS na endodontia atual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Roberto Leonardo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available New knowledge of the structure and biological activity of endotoxins (LPS has revolutionized concepts concerning their mechanisms of action and forms of inactivation. Since the 1980's, technological advances in microbiological culture and identification have shown that anaerobic microorganisms, especially Gram-negative, predominate in root canals of teeth with pulp necrosis and radiographically visible chronic periapical lesions. Gram-negative bacteria not only have different factors of virulence and generate sub-products that are toxic to apical and periapical tissues, as also contain endotoxin (LPS on their cell wall. This is especially important because endotoxin is released during multiplication or bacterial death, causing a series of biological effects that lead to an inflammatory reaction and resorption of mineralized tissues. Thus, due to the role of endotoxin in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions, we reviewed the literature concerning the biological activity of endotoxin and the relevance of its inactivation during treatment of teeth with pulp necrosis and chronic periapical lesion.O conhecimento mais aprofundado sobre a estrutura e atividade biológica das endotoxinas (LPS revolucionou os conceitos sobre seu mecanismo de ação e formas de inativação. A partir da década de 80, os avanços tecnológicos na cultura e identificação microbiológica demonstraram que, em canais radiculares de dentes portadores de necrose pulpar e lesão periapical crônica, visível radiograficamente, predominam microrganismos anaeróbios, particularmente os gram-negativos. Como se sabe, os microrganismos gram-negativos, além de possuírem diferentes fatores de virulência e gerarem produtos e sub-produtos tóxicos aos tecidos apicais e periapicais, contêm endotoxina em sua parede celular. Esse conhecimento é particularmente importante, uma vez que a endotoxina é liberada durante a multiplicação ou morte bacteriana, exercendo uma série de

  8. Enhanced Expression of Aquaporin-9 in Rat Brain Edema Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaili WANG; Runming JIN; Peichao TIAN; Zhihong ZHUO

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the role of AQP9 in brain edema,the expression of AQP9 in an infectious rat brain edema model induced by the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was examined.Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein at all observed intervals were significantly increased in LPS-treated animals in comparison with the control animals.Time-course analysis showed that the first signs of blood-brain barrier disruption and the increase of brain water content in LPS-treated animals were evident 6 h after LPS injection,with maximum value appearing at 12 h,which coincided with the expression profiles of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.The further correlation analysis revealed strong positive correlations among the brain water content,the disruption of the blood-brain barrier and the enhanced expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.These results suggested that the regulation of AQP9 expression may play important roles in water movement and in brain metabolic homeostasis associated with the pathophysiology of brain edema induced by LPS injection.

  9. Regulation of adenovirus-mediated elafin transgene expression by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, A J; Cunningham, G A; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-07-20

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a mediator of inflammatory lung injury. Selective augmentation of host defense molecules such as elafin (an elastase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity) at the onset of pulmonary inflammation is an attractive potential therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to determine whether elafin expression could be induced by LPS administered after transfection with adenovirus (Ad) encoding human elafin downstream of the murine cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (known to be potentially responsive to LPS). In addition, we aimed to determine the effect of local elafin augmentation on neutrophil migration to the lung. LPS significantly up-regulated elafin expression from pulmonary epithelial cells transfected with Ad-elafin in vitro. In murine airways expression of human elafin was achieved using doses low enough (3 x 10(7) plaque forming units) to circumvent overt vector-induced inflammation. LPS significantly up-regulated human elafin secretion in murine airways treated with Ad-elafin [117 ng/ml in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after LPS administration, 5.9 ng/ml after PBS, p < 0.01)]. Over-expression of elafin significantly augmented LPS-mediated neutrophil migration into the airways in vivo (1.30 x 10(6) neutrophils in BALF after Ad-elafin/LPS treatment, 0.54 x 10(6) after Ad-lacZ/LPS (p < 0.05), 0.63 x 10(6) after PBS/LPS (p < 0.05)) and significantly enhanced human neutrophil migration in vitro. These data suggest novel functions for elafin in neutrophil migration, and that judicious selection of promoters may allow single, low-dose adenoviral administration to effect inflammation-specific expression of potentially therapeutic transgenes. PMID:11485631

  10. Immune modulation of the pulmonary hypertensive response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, R F; Chapman, M E; Wang, W; Erf, G F

    2004-04-01

    The lungs of broilers are constantly challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) that can activate leukocytes and trigger thromboxane A2 (TxA2)- and serotonin (5HT)-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to pulmonary hypertension. Among broilers from a single genetic line, some individuals respond to LPS with large increases in pulmonary arterial pressure, whereas others fail to exhibit any response to the same supramaximal dose of LPS. This extreme variability in the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS appears to reflect variability in the types or proportions of chemical mediators released by leukocytes. Our research has confirmed that TxA2 and 5HT are potent pulmonary vasoconstrictors in broilers and that broilers hatched and reared together consistently exhibit pulmonary hypertension after i.v. injections of TxA2 or 5HT. Previous in vitro studies conducted using macrophages from different lines of chickens demonstrated innate variability in the LPS-stimulated induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by the onset of an LPS-refractory state. The NOS enzyme converts arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). It is known that NO produced by endothelial NOS serves as a key modulator of flow-dependent pulmonary vasodilation, and it is likely that NO generated by iNOS also contributes to the pulmonary vasodilator response. Accordingly, it is our hypothesis that the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in broilers is minimal when more vasodilators (NO, prostacyclin) than vasoconstrictors (TxA2, 5HT) are generated during an LPS challenge. Indeed, inhibiting NO production through pharmacological blockade of NOS with the inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester modestly increased the baseline pulmonary arterial pressure and dramatically increased the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in all broilers evaluated. Innate differences in the effect of LPS on the pulmonary vasculature may contribute to differences in susceptibility of

  11. Lethal effect and apoptotic DNA fragmentation in response of D-GalN-treated mice to bacterial LPS can be suppressed by pre-exposure to minute amount of bacterial LPS: Dual role of TNF receptor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Rong Zhou; Marina Gumenscheimer; Marina A.Freudenberg; Chris Galanos

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether induction of tolerance of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was able to inhibit apoptotic reaction in terms of characteristic DNA fragmentation and protect mice from lethal effect.METHODS: Experimental groups of mice were pretreated with non-lethal amount of LPS (0.05 μg). Both control and experimental groups simultaneously were challenged with LPS plus D-GalN for 6-7 h. The evaluations of bothDNA fragmentations from the livers and the protection effficacy against lethality to mice through induction of tolerance to LPS were conducted.RESULTS: In the naive mice challenge with LPS plus D-GalNresulted in complete death in 24 h, whereas a characteristic apoptotic DNA fragmentation was exclusively seen in the livers of mice receiving LPS in combination with D-GalN. The mortality in the affected mice was closely correlated to the onset of DNA fragmentation. By contrast, in the mice pre-exposed to LPS, both lethal effect and apoptotic DNA fragmentation were suppressed when challenged with LPS/D-GalN. In addition to LPS, the induction of mouse tolerance to TNF also enabled mice to cross-react against death and apoptotic DNA fragmentation when challenged with TNF and/or LPS in the presence of D-GalN. Moreover,this protection effect by LPS could last up to 24 h. TNFR1 rather than TNFR2 played a dual role in signaling pathway of either induction of tolerance to LPS for the protection of mice from mortality or inducing morbidity leading to the death of mice.CONCLUSION: The mortality of D-GaiN-treated mice in response to LPS was exceedingly correlated to the onset of apoptosis in the liver, which can be effectively suppressed by brief exposure of mice to a minute amount of LPS. The induced tolerance status was mediated not only by LPS but also by TNF. The developed tolerance to either LPS orTNF can be reciprocally cross-reacted between LPS and TNF challenges, whereas the signaling of induction of tolerance and promotion of apoptosis was through TNFR1

  12. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides in plant and mammalian innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Cristina; Holst, Otto; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review gives a structural view on the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the endotoxin from Gram negative bacteria, paying attention on the features that are relevant for their activity as elicitors of the innate immune system of humans, animals and plants. PMID:22533617

  13. Enhancement of anti-Shigella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response by addition of the cholera toxin B subunit to oral and intranasal proteosome-Shigella flexneri 2a LPS vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, N; Arnon, R; Rubin, G; Cohen, D; Bercovier, H; Lowell, G H

    1994-01-01

    Addition of the cholera toxin B subunit to oral and intranasal proteosome-Shigella flexneri 2a lipopolysaccharide vaccines improved their immunogenicities. Enhancement of anti-O-Shigella immunoglobulin A levels was most evident in lung lavages following oral immunization and in lung and intestinal fluids when suboptimal doses were used with either immunization route.

  14. Prebiotic administration normalizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety and cortical 5-HT2A receptor and IL1-β levels in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savignac, Helene M; Couch, Yvonne; Stratford, Michael; Bannerman, David M; Tzortzis, George; Anthony, Daniel C; Burnet, Philip W J

    2016-02-01

    The manipulation of the enteric microbiota with specific prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to reduce the host's inflammatory response, alter brain chemistry, and modulate anxiety behaviour in both rodents and humans. However, the neuro-immune and behavioural effects of prebiotics on sickness behaviour have not been explored. Here, adult male CD1 mice were fed with a specific mix of non-digestible galacto-oligosaccharides (Bimuno®, BGOS) for 3 weeks, before receiving a single injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induces sickness behaviour and anxiety. Locomotor and marble burying activities were assessed 4h after LPS injection, and after 24h, anxiety in the light-dark box was assessed. Cytokine expression, and key components of the serotonergic (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and glutamatergic system were evaluated in the frontal cortex to determine the impact of BGOS administration at a molecular level. BGOS-fed mice were less anxious in the light-dark box compared to controls 24h after the LPS injection. Elevated cortical IL-1β concentrations in control mice 28 h after LPS were not observed in BGOS-fed animals. This significant BGOS×LPS interaction was also observed for 5HT2A receptors, but not for 5HT1A receptors, 5HT, 5HIAA, NMDA receptor subunits, or other cytokines. The intake of BGOS did not influence LPS-mediated reductions in marble burying behaviour, and its effect on locomotor activity was equivocal. Together, our data show that the prebiotic BGOS has an anxiolytic effect, which may be related to the modulation of cortical IL-1β and 5-HT2A receptor expression. Our data suggest a potential role for prebiotics in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders where anxiety and neuroinflammation are prominent clinical features. PMID:26476141

  15. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component. PMID:25300227

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Bacteroides fragilis lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Linko-Kettunen, L; Arstila, P; Jalkanen, M; Jousimies-Somer, H; Lassila, O; Lehtonen, O P; Weintraub, A; Viljanen, M K

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Bacteroides fragilis were produced by immunizing mice before hybridization with bacterial outer membranes solubilized with Triton X-100. Nineteen stabile clones were established. They all produced antibodies that reacted more strongly with purified B. fragilis LPS than with crude sonicated antigen in an enzyme immunoassay. Four MoAbs were studied by immunoblotting and enzyme immunoassay inhibition. Immunoblotting confirmed that ...

  17. Bacterial lipoprotein-induced self-tolerance and cross-tolerance to LPS are associated with reduced IRAK-1 expression and MyD88-IRAK complex formation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Chong Hui

    2012-02-03

    Tolerance to bacterial cell-wall components may represent an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. We have demonstrated previously that the inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was present in bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) self-tolerance and its cross-tolerance to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, the effect of BLP-induced tolerance on the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent upstream signaling pathway for NF-kappaB activation in vitro was examined further. When compared with nontolerant human monocytic THP-1 cells, BLP-tolerant cells had a significant reduction in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in response to a high-dose BLP (86+\\/-12 vs. 6042+\\/-245 ng\\/ml, P < 0.01) or LPS (341+\\/-36 vs. 7882+\\/-318 ng\\/ml, P < 0.01) stimulation. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) protein was down-regulated in BLP-tolerant cells, whereas no significant differences in TLR4, MyD88, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4), and TNF receptor-associated factor 6 expression were observed between nontolerant and BLP-tolerant cells, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. The IRAK-1 protein was reduced markedly in BLP-tolerant cells, although IRAK-1 mRNA expression remained unchanged as revealed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Furthermore, decreased MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, was observed in BLP-tolerant cells following a second BLP or LPS stimulation. BLP pretreatment also resulted in a marked inhibition in total and phosphorylated inhibitor of kappaB-alpha (IkappaB-alpha) expression, which was not up-regulated by subsequent BLP or LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that in addition to the down-regulation of TLR2 expression, BLP tolerance is associated with a reduction in IRAK-1 expression, MyD88-IRAK association, and IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation. These

  18. Yohimbine Enhances Protection of Berberine against LPS-Induced Mouse Lethality through Multiple Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Li; Yiyang Wang; Haoqing Zhang; Baoyin Jia; Daan Wang; Hongmei Li; Daxiang Lu; Renbin Qi; Yuxia Yan; Huadong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care units, better therapies are urgently needed. Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important trigger of sepsis. We have demonstrated that berberine (Ber) protects against lethality induced by LPS, which is enhanced by yohimbine (Y) pretreatment, and Ber combined with Y also improves survival in septic mice. However, the precise mechanisms by which Y enhances protection of Ber against LPS - induced lethality remain un...

  19. Importance of bacterial endotoxin (LPS) in endodontics A importância da endotoxina bacteriana (LPS) na endodontia atual

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Roberto Leonardo; Raquel Assed Bezerra da Silva; Sada Assed; Paulo Nelson-Filho

    2004-01-01

    New knowledge of the structure and biological activity of endotoxins (LPS) has revolutionized concepts concerning their mechanisms of action and forms of inactivation. Since the 1980's, technological advances in microbiological culture and identification have shown that anaerobic microorganisms, especially Gram-negative, predominate in root canals of teeth with pulp necrosis and radiographically visible chronic periapical lesions. Gram-negative bacteria not only have different factors of viru...

  20. Murine lymphoid procoagulant activity induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and immune complexes is a monocyte prothrombinase

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, BS; Levy, GA; Fair, DS; Edgington, TS

    1982-01-01

    Murine lymphoid cells respond rapidly to bacterial lipopolysaccharide or antigen-antibody complexes to initiate or accelerate the blood coagulation pathways. The monocyte or macrophage has been identified as the cellular source, although lymphocyte collaboration is required for the rapid induction of the procoagulant response. This procoagulant activity is identified in the present study as a direct prothrombin activator, i.e., a prothrombinase. Studies with plasmas deficient in single coagul...

  1. Lipopolysaccharide density and structure govern the extent and distance of nanoparticle interaction with actual and model bacterial outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide augments febrile-range hyperthermia-induced heat shock protein 70 expression and extracellular release in human THP1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan E Tulapurkar

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a devastating and often lethal complication of severe infection, is characterized by fever and dysregulated inflammation. While infections activate the inflammatory response in part through Toll-like receptors (TLRs, fever can partially activate the heat shock response with generation of heat shock proteins (HSPs. Since extracellular HSPs, especially HSP70 (eHSP70, are proinflammatory TLR agonists, we investigated how exposure to the TLR4 agonist, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS and febrile range hyperthermia (FRH; 39.5°C modify HSP70 expression and extracellular release. Using differentiated THP1 cells, we found that concurrent exposure to FRH and LPS as well as TLR2 and TLR3 agonists synergized to activate expression of inducible HSP72 (HSPA1A mRNA and protein via a p38 MAP kinase-requiring mechanism. Treatment with LPS for 6 h stimulated eHSP70 release; levels of eHSP70 released at 39.5°C were higher than at 37°C roughly paralleling the increase in intracellular HSP72 in the 39.5°C cells. By contrast, 6 h exposure to FRH in the absence of LPS failed to promote eHSP70 release. Release of eHSP70 by LPS-treated THP1 cells was inhibited by glibenclamide, but not brefeldin, indicating that eHSP70 secretion occurred via a non-classical protein secretory mechanism. Analysis of eHSP70 levels in exosomes and exosome-depleted culture supernatants from LPS-treated THP1 cells using ELISA demonstrated similar eHSP70 levels in unfractionated and exosome-depleted culture supernatants, indicating that LPS-stimulated eHSP70 release did not occur via the exosome pathway. Immunoblot analysis of the exosome fraction of culture supernatants from these cells showed constitutive HSC70 (HSPA8 to be the predominant HSP70 family member present in exosomes. In summary, we have shown that LPS stimulates macrophages to secrete inducible HSP72 via a non-classical non-exosomal pathway while synergizing with FRH exposure to increase both intracellular and

  3. Interferons and bacterial lipopolysaccharide protect macrophages from productive infection by human immunodeficiency virus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effects of immunomodulatory agents upon HIV replication in macrophages, cultured monocyte-derived macrophages were treated with various substances and then infected with a macrophage- tropic strain of HIV-1. Pretreatment with rIFN-alpha, IFN-beta, and IFN- gamma, or bacterial LPS prevented viral replication in macrophages. In treated cultures, little or no infectious HIV or p24 core antigen was released into the supernatant, no virions were seen by electron microscopy, no vir...

  4. Role of interleukin-1 in augmenting serum neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Riveau, G R; Novitsky, T J; Roslansky, P F; Dinarello, C A; Warren, H S

    1987-01-01

    We have previously described an assay to quantify the serum neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide which is based on a spectrophotometric Limulus amoebocyte lysate test (T.J. Novitsky, P.F. Roslansky, G.R. Siber, and H.S. Warren, J. Clin. Microbiol. 21:211-216, 1985). Studies since have shown that serum samples drawn from patients with leukemia and fever, gram-negative or gram-positive bacterial infections, or shock caused by gram-negative bacteria neutralize approximately 10-fold mor...

  5. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: association with toll-like receptor 4 expression and plasma levels of interleukin 8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanab, Ahmed Abu

    2011-05-01

    Experimental and clinical studies suggest an association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver injury and fibrosis could be related to exposure to bacterial products of intestinal origin and, most notably, endotoxin, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  6. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor. PMID:25000727

  7. miR-146a is essential for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cross-tolerance against kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan; Jia, Ping; Fang, Yi; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Xiaoyan; He, John C.; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-146a is one of most important microRNAs involved in development of endotoxin tolerance via (toll-like receptors) TLRs/ NF-κB pathway. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanistic role of miR-146a in mediating the protective effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment on kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury. A locked nucleic acid–modified anti-miR-146a given before LPS treatment knocked down miR-146a expression and completely negated LPS-mediated protection against kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury. Knockdown of miR-146a resulted in significantly higher histopathological scores for tubular damage, expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-146a greatly up-regulated the protein levels of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK-1) and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), which are known target genes of miR-146a, leading to activation of NF-κB. Finally, elevation of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65/p50 and caspase-3 expression, degradation of cytosolic IkBα and BcL-xL, and substantially exacerbation of tubular cell apoptosis were inversely correlated with miR-146a expression. Taken together, our results identify that miR146a exerts a kidney protective effect through negative regulation of acute inflammatory response by suppressing NF-κB activation and proinflammatory genes expression. PMID:27250735

  8. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  9. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm−2 or 10 J cm−2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators. (letters)

  10. Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides and human health – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schluter Philip J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharide/s (LPS are frequently cited in the cyanobacteria literature as toxins responsible for a variety of heath effects in humans, from skin rashes to gastrointestinal, respiratory and allergic reactions. The attribution of toxic properties to cyanobacterial LPS dates from the 1970s, when it was thought that lipid A, the toxic moiety of LPS, was structurally and functionally conserved across all Gram-negative bacteria. However, more recent research has shown that this is not the case, and lipid A structures are now known to be very different, expressing properties ranging from LPS agonists, through weak endotoxicity to LPS antagonists. Although cyanobacterial LPS is widely cited as a putative toxin, most of the small number of formal research reports describe cyanobacterial LPS as weakly toxic compared to LPS from the Enterobacteriaceae. We systematically reviewed the literature on cyanobacterial LPS, and also examined the much lager body of literature relating to heterotrophic bacterial LPS and the atypical lipid A structures of some photosynthetic bacteria. While the literature on the biological activity of heterotrophic bacterial LPS is overwhelmingly large and therefore difficult to review for the purposes of exclusion, we were unable to find a convincing body of evidence to suggest that heterotrophic bacterial LPS, in the absence of other virulence factors, is responsible for acute gastrointestinal, dermatological or allergic reactions via natural exposure routes in humans. There is a danger that initial speculation about cyanobacterial LPS may evolve into orthodoxy without basis in research findings. No cyanobacterial lipid A structures have been described and published to date, so a recommendation is made that cyanobacteriologists should not continue to attribute such a diverse range of clinical symptoms to cyanobacterial LPS without research confirmation.

  11. NAC Attenuates LPS-Induced Toxicity in Aspirin-Sensitized Mouse Macrophages via Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of A...

  12. A potential role for macrophages in maintaining lipopolysaccharide-induced subacute airway inflammation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Lei; WANG, YONGSHENG; Yang, Hua; Chen, Yifang; Xu, Xiaoya; Zhou, Hang; JIANG, FANGPING; LI, TONGLIN; Wang, Junli

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a key factor in airway inflammation. The present study describes the time-dependent changes in the leukocyte counts and cytokine levels of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) following subacute airway inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS (200 μg/rat) or saline was intratracheally administered to rats which were sacrificed 2, 4 or 7 days after LPS treatment. Airway inflammation was e...

  13. Estradiol-mediated increases in the anorexia induced by intraperitoneal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Nori; Asarian, Lori; Sheahan, James; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2004-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria causes a robust acute phase response (APR) that includes fever, anorexia, and many other elements. Because immune system function, including some models of illness anorexia, is sexually differentiated, we investigated the sexual differentiation of the anorexia induced by intraperitoneal LPS injections in rats. Cycling female Long-Evans rats tested either during diestrus or estrus ate less following 6.25 microg/kg LPS than did intact males. Following 12.5 microg/kg LPS, females in estrus ate less than either females during diestrus or males. Similarly, a more pronounced anorexia occurred following 12.5, 25, and 50 microg/kg LPS in ovariectomized females that received cyclic estradiol treatment and were tested on the day modeling estrus than in untreated ovariectomized rats. LPS also increased the length of the rats' ovarian cycles, usually by a day, especially when injected during diestrus. As in male rats, when LPS injections were repeated in the same rats, both estradiol-treated and untreated rats failed to display any significant anorexia. The inhibitory effects of LPS on eating in intact and ovariectomized rats were expressed solely as decreases in spontaneous meal frequency, without significant alteration of spontaneous meal size. These data indicate that anorexia following peripheral LPS administration is sexually differentiated and that estradiol is sufficient to produce this response. The mechanism of the pathophysiological effect of estradiol on meal frequency appears to be different from the physiological effect of estradiol on food intake because the latter is expressed solely as a change in meal size. PMID:15276786

  14. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    OpenAIRE

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological prope...

  15. Apolipophorin III: lipopolysaccharide binding requires helix bundle opening

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Leonardo J.; Idangodage, Hasitha; Wan, Chung-Ping L.; Weers, Paul M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is a prototypical apolipoprotein used for structure-function studies. Besides its crucial role in lipid transport, apoLp-III is able to associate with fungal and bacterial membranes and stimulate cellular immune responses. We recently demonstrated binding interaction of apoLp-III of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In the present study, the requirement of helix bundle opening for LPS binding interaction was investigated. ...

  16. Molecular characterization and immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, 2 and 3 genes in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai-Zhi; He, An-Yuan; Chen, Li-Qiao; Limbu, Samwel Mchele; Wang, Ya-Wen; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inverse feedback regulators of cytokine and hormone signaling mediated by the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway that are involved in immunity, growth and development of organisms. In the present study, three SOCS genes, SOCS-1, SOCS-2 and SOCS-3, were identified in an economically important fish, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred to as NtSOCS-1, NtSOCS-2 and NtSOCS-3. Multiple alignments showed that, the three SOCS molecules share highly conserved functional domains, including the SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain, the extended SH2 subdomain (ESS) and the SOCS box with others vertebrate counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 belong to the SOCS type II subfamily. Whereas NtSOCS-1 and 3 showed close evolutionary relationship with Perciformes, NtSOCS-2 was more related to Salmoniformes. Tissue specific expression results showed that, NtSOCS-1, 2 and 3 were constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined. NtSOCS-1 and 3 were highly expressed in immune-related tissues, such as gills, foregut and head kidney. However, NtSOCS-2 was superlatively expressed in liver, brain and heart. In vivo, NtSOCS-1 and 3 mRNA levels were up-regulated after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge while NtSOCS-2 was down-regulated. In vitro, LPS stimulation increased NtSOCS-3 mRNA expression, however it inhibited the transcription of NtSOCS-1 and 2. Collectively, our findings suggest that, the NtSOCS-1 and 3 might play significant role(s) in innate immune response, while NtSOCS-2 may be more involved in metabolic regulation. PMID:26820103

  17. Protective Role of Flavonoids and Lipophilic Compounds from Jatropha platyphylla on the Suppression of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Inflammation in Macrophage Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriz-Pérez, Dulce L; Bang, Woo Young; Nair, Vimal; Angulo-Escalante, Miguel A; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Heredia, J Basilio

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen polyphenols (e.g, apigenin, genistein, and luteolin glycosides) and 11 lipophilic compounds (e.g., fatty acids, sterols, and terpenes) were detected by LC-MS/MS-ESI and GC-MS, respectively, in Jatropha platyphylla. Extracts from pulp, kernel, and leaves and fractions were studied to know their effect on some pro-inflammatory mediators. Phenolic and lipophilic extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on ROS and NO production while not affecting mitochondrial activity or superoxide generation rate in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. In addition, NO production was also diminished by lipophilic leaf fractions F1 and F2 with the latter fraction showing a greater effect and composed mainly of sterols and terpene. Furthermore, total extracts showed nonselective inhibitions against cyclooxygenase COX-1 and COX-2 activities. All together, these results suggest that J. platyphylla extracts have potential in treating inflammatory diseases and their activity is mediated by flavonoids and lipophilic compounds. PMID:26872073

  18. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  19. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  20. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF of Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2 from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB’WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Hong Zhang; Run-Dong Wu; Hong-Yi Zheng; Xiao-Liang Zhang; Ming-Xu Zhang; Ren-Rong Tian; Guang-Ming Liu; Wei Pang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB’WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  3. Microfiltration, Nano-filtration and Reverse Osmosis for the Removal of Toxins (LPS Endotoxins) from Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtar, Guizani; Naoyuki, Funamizu

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin, a bacterial byproduct abundantly present in wastewater, is more and more representing a major concern in wastewater treatment sector for the potential health risk it represents. It is, therefore, more urgent than before to protect consumers from contaminating their fresh potable water reserves with LPS endotoxin through aquifer replenishment using reclaimed wastewater or by supplying reclaimed wastewater as potable water. Membrane treatment is an alternativ...

  4. Expression Profiling of LPS Responsive miRNA in Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Zhong, Sheng; Dang, Hong; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador; Khan, Asma

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of the innate and adaptive immune response. The purpose of the present study was to interrogate miRNA profiles of primary human macrophages challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with focus on expression kinetics. We employed Nanostring platform to precisely characterize the changes in miRNA expression following different doses and durations of LPS exposure. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in response to LPS challenge with convergent and divergent expression profiles. Pathway analysis of LPS-responsive miRNAs revealed regulation of biological processes linked to key cell signaling (including PIK3-Akt, MAP kinase, ErbB) and pathogen response pathways. Our data provide a comprehensive miRNA profiling of human primary macrophages treated with LPS. These results show that bacterial Toll like receptor (TLR) ligands can temporally modulate macrophage miRNA expression. PMID:27307950

  5. Role of berberine in anti-bacterial as a high-affinity LPS antagonist binding to TLR4/MD-2 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Ming; Ding, Ran; Chu, Zheng-yun; Zhang, Ming-bo; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Shao-Hua; Zhai, Yan-jun; Wang, Yue-dan

    2014-01-01

    Background Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly extracted from Rhizoma Coptidis and has been shown to possess a potent inhibitory activity against bacterial. However, the role of berberine in anti-bacterial action has not been extensively studied. Methods The animal model was established to investigate the effects of berberine on bacterial and LPS infection. Docking analysis, Molecular dynamics simulations and Real-time RT-PCR analysis was adopted to investigate the molecular mechanis...

  6. WaaA of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Aquifex aeolicus Is a Monofunctional 3-Deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic Acid Transferase Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Mamat, Uwe; Schmidt, Helgo; Munoz, Eva; Lindner, Buko; Fukase, Koichi; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; WU, Jing; Meredith, Timothy C.; Ronald W Woodard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Mesters, Jeroen R.; Holst, Otto

    2009-01-01

    The hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus belongs to the deepest branch in the bacterial genealogy. Although it has long been recognized that this unique Gram-negative bacterium carries genes for different steps of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation, data on the LPS itself or detailed knowledge of the LPS pathway beyond the first committed steps of lipid A and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) synthesis are still lacking. We now report the functional characterization of the thermostable K...

  7. Brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate dorsal pontine and medullar structures after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskiel, Léa; Paul, Flora; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Hübschle, Thomas; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-01

    During infection-induced inflammation food intake is reduced. Vagal and brainstem pathways are important both in feeding regulation and immune-to-brain communication. Glutamate is released by vagal afferent terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract and by its neurons projecting to the parabrachial nuclei. We therefore studied the role of brainstem glutamate receptors in spontaneous food intake of healthy animals and during sickness-associated hypophagia after peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides or interleukin-1beta. Brainstem group I and II metabotropic, but not ionotropic, glutamate receptor antagonism increased food intake both in saline- and lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. In these animals, expression of the cellular activation marker c-Fos in the lateral parabrachial nuclei and lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the nucleus of the solitary tract rostral to the area postrema were suppressed. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors did not colocalize with c-Fos or neurons regulating gastric function in these structures. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were, however, found on raphé magnus neurons that were part of the brainstem circuit innervating the stomach and on trigeminal and hypoglossal motor neurons. In conclusion, our findings show that brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate the lateral parabrachial nuclei as well as the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration. They also provide insight into potential group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent brainstem circuits mediating these effects. PMID:27016016

  8. Lipopolysaccharide increases gastric and circulating NUCB2/nesfatin-1 concentrations in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Jawien, Janusz; Kobelt, Peter; Taché, Yvette; Lambrecht, Nils W. G.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an established animal model to study the innate immune response to Gram-negative bacteria mimicking symptoms of infection including reduction of food intake. LPS decreases acyl ghrelin associated with decreased concentrations of circulating ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) likely contributing to the anorexigenic effect. We also recently described the prominent expression of the novel anorexigenic hormone, nucleobindin2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1 in gastric X/A-li...

  9. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between bacterial phospholipid biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) regulation. Because LPS is a potent endotoxin in addition to being essential for the survival of gram-negative bacteria, our experimental findings are of importance to the fields of microbiology, immunology, and drug design. In addition, the computational aspect of this work represents an in-depth kinetic model comprising 81 chemical reactions; hence, computational and systems biologi...

  10. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative antibody-producing cell responses to lipopolysaccharide in cell walls of the bacterial form and in membranes of the protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1980-01-01

    Membranes of the stable protoplast L-form of Proteus mirabilis strain VI were highly immunogenic carriers of lipopolysaccharide when compared with the immune responses to lipopolysaccharide contained in cell walls of the bacterial form of this organism.

  11. Priming, induction and modulation of plant defence responses by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Mari-Anne; Dow, J. Maxwell; Molinaro, Antonio;

    2007-01-01

    the triggering of defence responses or to the priming of the plant to respond more rapidly and/or to a greater degree to subsequent pathogen challenge. LPS from symbiotic bacteria can have quite different effects on plants to those of pathogens. Some details are emerging of the structures within LPS...... that are responsible for induction of these different plant responses. The lipid A moiety is not solely responsible for all of the effects of LPS in plants; core oligosaccharide and O-antigen components can elicit specific responses. Here, we review the effects of LPS in induction of defence......-related responses in plants, the structures within LPS responsible for eliciting these effects and discuss the possible nature of the (as yet unidentified) LPS receptors in plants....

  12. Inadequate Clearance of Translocated Bacterial Products in HIV-Infected Humanized Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, Ursula; Schlaepfer, Erika; Baenziger, Stefan; Nischang, Marc; Regenass, Stephan; Schwendener, Reto; Kempf, Werner; Nadal, David; Speck, Roberto F.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial translocation from the gut and subsequent immune activation are hallmarks of HIV infection and are thought to determine disease progression. Intestinal barrier integrity is impaired early in acute retroviral infection, but levels of plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a marker of bacterial translocation, increase only later. We examined humanized mice infected with HIV to determine if disruption of the intestinal barrier alone is responsible for elevated levels of LPS and if bacterial ...

  13. Inadequate clearance of translocated bacterial products in HIV-infected humanized mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, U.; Schlaepfer, E; Baenziger, S; Nischang, M; Regenass, S.; Schwendener, R.; Kempf, W; Nadal, D; Speck, R F

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial translocation from the gut and subsequent immune activation are hallmarks of HIV infection and are thought to determine disease progression. Intestinal barrier integrity is impaired early in acute retroviral infection, but levels of plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a marker of bacterial translocation, increase only later. We examined humanized mice infected with HIV to determine if disruption of the intestinal barrier alone is responsible for elevated levels of LPS and if bacterial ...

  14. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:25637446

  15. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses. PMID:22752448

  16. Antigenic potential of a highly conserved Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide inner core structure defined by chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Anika; Yang, You; Claus, Heike; Pereira, Claney L; Cox, Andrew D; Vogel, Ulrich; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-01-22

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. We studied the potential of synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core structures as broadly protective antigens against N. meningitidis. Based on the specific reactivity of human serum antibodies to synthetic LPS cores, we selected a highly conserved LPS core tetrasaccharide as a promising antigen. This LPS inner core tetrasaccharide induced a robust IgG response in mice when formulated as an immunogenic glycoconjugate. Binding of raised mouse serum to a broad collection of N. meningitidis strains demonstrated the accessibility of the LPS core on viable bacteria. The distal trisaccharide was identified as the crucial epitope, whereas the proximal Kdo moiety was immunodominant and induced mainly nonprotective antibodies that are responsible for lack of functional protection in polyclonal serum. Our results identified key antigenic determinants of LPS core glycan and, hence, may aid the design of a broadly protective immunization against N. meningitidis. PMID:25601073

  17. A Complete Lipopolysaccharide Inner Core Oligosaccharide Is Required for Resistance of Burkholderia cenocepacia to Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Survival In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Loutet, Slade A.; Flannagan, Ronald S.; Kooi, Cora; Sokol, Pamela A.; Valvano, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important opportunistic pathogen of patients with cystic fibrosis. This bacterium is inherently resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial agents, including high concentrations of antimicrobial peptides. We hypothesized that the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of B. cenocepacia is important for both virulence and resistance to antimicrobial peptides. We identified hldA and hldD genes in B. cenocepacia strain K56-2. These two genes encode enzymes involved in the modific...

  18. Quantitative lipopolysaccharide analysis using HPLC/MS/MS and its combination with the limulus amebocyte lysate assay[S

    OpenAIRE

    Pais De Barros, Jean-Paul; Gautier, Thomas; Sali, Wahib; Adrie, Christophe; Choubley, Hélène; Charron, Emilie; Lalande, Caroline; Le Guern, Naig; Deckert, Valérie; Monchi, Mehran; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Lagrost, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Quantitation of plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) might be used to document Gram-negative bacterial infection. In the present work, LPS-derived 3-hydroxymyristate was extracted from plasma samples with an organic solvent, separated by reversed phase HPLC, and quantitated by MS/MS. This mass assay was combined with the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) bioassay to monitor neutralization of LPS activity in biological samples. The described HPLC/MS/MS method is a reliable, practical, accurate, and ...

  19. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Schmidt, Mette; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Boye, Mette; Weber, Nicolai R.; Peter M H Heegaard; Burrin, Douglas G.; Sangild, Per T

    2011-01-01

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that improve resistance towards necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in pre-term neonates. At approximately 85% gestation, pig fetuses were injected intramuscularly with saline or LPS (0.014 mg/kg), or intra-am...

  20. Biophysical characterization of the interaction of Limulus polyphemus endotoxin neutralizing protein with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrä, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Majerle, Andreja; Jerala, Roman; Ridge, Richard; Paus, Erik; Novitsky, Tom; Koch, Michel H J; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Endotoxin-neutralizing protein (ENP) of the horseshoe crab is one of the most potent neutralizers of endotoxins [bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)]. Here, we report on the interaction of LPS with recombinant ENP using a variety of physical and biological techniques. In biological assays (Limulus amebocyte lysate and tumour necrosis factor-alpha induction in human mononuclear cells), ENP causes a strong reduction of the immunostimulatory ability of LPS in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the accessible negative surface charges of LPS and lipid A (zeta potential) are neutralized and even converted into positive values. The gel to liquid crystalline phase transitions of LPS and lipid A shift to higher temperatures indicative of a rigidification of the acyl chains, however, the only slight enhancement of the transition enthalpy indicates that the hydrophobic moiety is not strongly disturbed. The aggregate structure of lipid A is converted from a cubic into a multilamellar phase upon ENP binding, whereas the secondary structure of ENP does not change due to the interaction with LPS. ENP contains a hydrophobic binding site to which the dye 1-anilino-8-sulfonic acid binds at a K(d) of 19 micro m, which is displaced by LPS. Because lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is not able to bind to LPS when ENP and LPS are preincubated, tight binding of ENP to LPS can be deduced with a K(d) in the low nonomolar range. Importantly, ENP is able to incorporate by itself into target phospholipid liposomes, and is also able to mediate the intercalation of LPS into the liposomes thus acting as a transport protein in a manner similar to LBP. Thus, LPS-ENP complexes might enter target membranes of immunocompetent cells, but are not able to activate due to the ability of ENP to change LPS aggregates from an active into an inactive form. PMID:15128313

  1. Lipopolysaccharide modification in Gram-negative bacteria during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rita F; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2016-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer membrane that plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions with the innate immune system. During infection, bacteria are exposed to a host environment that is typically dominated by inflammatory cells and soluble factors, including antibiotics, which provide cues about regulation of gene expression. Bacterial adaptive changes including modulation of LPS synthesis and structure are a conserved theme in infections, irrespective of the type or bacteria or the site of infection. In general, these changes result in immune system evasion, persisting inflammation and increased antimicrobial resistance. Here, we review the modifications of LPS structure and biosynthetic pathways that occur upon adaptation of model opportunistic pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria, Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella enterica) to chronic infection in respiratory and gastrointestinal sites. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms of these variations and their role in the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27075488

  2. The roles of prostaglandin E2 and D2 in lipopolysaccharide-mediated changes in sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Oishi, Yo; Yoshida, Kyoko; Scammell, Thomas E.; Urade, Yoshihiro; Lazarus, Michael; Saper, Clifford B.

    2014-01-01

    When living organisms become sick as a result of a bacterial infection, a suite of brain-mediated responses occur, including fever, anorexia and sleepiness. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a common constituent of bacterial cell walls, increases body temperature and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in animals and induces the production of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the principal mediator of fever, and both PGE2 and PGD2 regulate sl...

  3. Intrapulmonary Delivery of Ethyl Pyruvate Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide : and Lipoteichoic Acid-Induced Lung Inflammation in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    van Zoelen, Marieke A.D.; de Vos, Alex F.; Larosa, Gregory J.; Draing, Christian; Aulock, Sonja von; van der Poll, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a stable pyruvate derivative that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in various models of systemic inflammation including endotoxemia. We here sought to determine the local effects of EP, after intrapulmonary delivery, in models of lung inflammation induced by instillation via the airways of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a constituent of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wal...

  4. C-reactive protein (CRP, interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS are associated with risk of tuberculosis after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Tenforde

    Full Text Available The association between pre-antiretroviral (ART inflammation and immune activation and risk for incident tuberculosis (TB after ART initiation among adults is uncertain.Nested case-control study (n = 332 within ACTG PEARLS trial of three ART regimens among 1571 HIV-infected, treatment-naïve adults in 9 countries. We compared cases (participants with incident TB diagnosed by 96 weeks to a random sample of controls (participants who did not develop TB, stratified by country and treatment arm.We measured pre-ART C-reactive protein (CRP, EndoCab IgM, ferritin, interferon gamma (IFN-γ, interleukin 6 (IL-6, interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, soluble CD14 (sCD14, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and CD4/DR+/38+ and CD8/DR+/38+ T cells. Markers were defined according to established cutoff definitions when available, 75th percentile of measured values when not, and detectable versus undetectable for LPS. Using logistic regression, we measured associations between biomarkers and incident TB, adjusting for age, sex, study site, treatment arm, baseline CD4 and log10 viral load. We assessed the discriminatory value of biomarkers using receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis.Seventy-seven persons (4.9% developed incident TB during follow-up. Elevated baseline CRP (aOR 3.25, 95% CI: 1.55-6.81 and IP-10 (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.05-3.39, detectable plasma LPS (aOR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.13-5.06, and the established TB risk factors anemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with incident TB. In ROC analysis, CRP, albumin, and LPS improved discrimination only modestly for TB risk when added to baseline routine patient characteristics including CD4 count, body mass index, and prior TB.Incident TB occurs commonly after ART initiation. Although associated with higher post-ART TB risk, baseline CRP, IP-10, and LPS add limited value to routine patient characteristics in discriminating who develops active TB. Besides

  5. Role of splenic stroma in the action of bacterial lipopolysaccharides on radiation mortality: a study in mice carrying the Slsup(j) allele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slsup(j)/+ mice display a slight macrocytic anaemia due to a defect in their haemopoietic organ stroma. They have a deficient endogenous spleen colony (CFU-end) formation following sublethal doses of gamma-radiation compared with their normal +/+ littermates, which is likely to be due to the low pre-irradiation CFU-S content of the Slsup(j)/+ spleen. CFU-S in these congenic mice do not differ in their sensitivity to gamma-irradiation or stem cell-activating factor. While injection of +/+ mice with 10 μg of lipopolysaccharide-W (LPS) one day prior to irradiation led to a substantial increase in their survival, the survival of Slsup(j)/+ mice was only slightly increased. Irradiation induced a similar dose-related reduction in the numbers of CFU-S in the spleen and femora of LPS-injected Slsup(j)/+ mice compared to similarly treated +/+ mice when measured directly after irradiation. At Day 9 after irradiation injection of LPS led to a significantly higher CFU-end formation and higher numbers of CFU-S and nucleated cells in the Slsup(j)/+ spleens compared to LPS-injected +/+ mice. No such differences in the radioprotective effect of LPS were observed in the +/+ and Slsup(j)/+ mice with respect to the splenic and femoral 59Fe-incorporation and the femoral CFU-S numbers at Day 9. (author)

  6. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel α-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. α-iso-cubebenol inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. Consistent with these findings, α-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. α-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Furthermore, α-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel α-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  7. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Materials and Methods: Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Results: Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Conclusions: Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies. PMID:26862376

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O.; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R. G.; Bocking, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4...

  9. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli. PMID:26303386

  10. PGRN缺失型腹膜巨噬细胞对细菌脂多糖的体外炎症应答%Inflammatory responses of PGRN-deficient peritoneal macrophage to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘露; 张雯; 陈翰祥; 郑琳; 卢翌; 王红; 唐伟; 赵蔚明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of progranulin (PGRN) in the inflammatory responses of peritoneal macrophages (PMs) to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Methods Peritoneal exudate cells (PECs) were induced and extracted from wild-type (WT) mice and PGRN gene knock-out mice (KO), then the number, morpholo gy and classes of PECs were subsequently evaluated. Surface markers CD11 b and F4/80 of PMs were tested by flow cytometry. PMs derived from WT or KO mice were treated with LPS and WT PMs were treated with PBS, LPS, re-combinant PGRN or LPS plus recombinant PGRN respectively. Supernatants of cultivation were collected after 24-hours incubation and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and production of NO were detected by ELISA or Griess assay respectively. Results There were no significant differences in cell number, classes and expression of surface makers CD11b and F4/80 between WT and KO mice-derived PECs. Higher concentration of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and more NO production were detected in the supernatants of KO PMs stimulated by LPS compared to those of WT PMs. Additionally,recombinant PGRN dramatically inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and in flammatory intermediate NO of WT PMs stimulated by LPS. Conclusion PGRN KO PMs display a stronger inflam matory response than WT PMs when treated with LPS. In addition, recombinant PGRN powerfully inhibits LPS stimu lating production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and NO of PMs.%目的 观察颗粒蛋白前体(PGRN)对细菌脂多糖(LPS)诱导腹膜巨噬细胞(PM)炎症应答的影响.方法 诱导提取野生型(WT)小鼠及PGRN基因敲除小鼠(KO)腹膜细胞(PEC),观察PEC数目、形态和类型;流式细胞术检测PEC的巨噬细胞表面标志物CD11b、F4/80.LPS分别处理WT或KO小鼠PM,LPS、重组PGRN或LPS加重组PGRN分别处理WT小鼠PM,培养24 h后收集细胞上清,ELISA法检测肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)、白细胞介素1β(IL-1

  11. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of 125-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses

  12. Biophysical characterization of lipopolysaccharide and lipid A inactivation by lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, K; Jürgens, G; Müller, M; Fukuoka, S; Koch, M H

    2001-08-01

    The interaction of bacterial endotoxins (LPS Re and lipid A, the 'endotoxic principle' of LPS) with the endogenous antibiotic lactoferrin (LF) was investigated using various physical techniques and biological assays. By applying Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, we find that LF binds to the phosphate group within the lipid A part and induces a rigidification of the acyl chains of LPS. The secondary structure of the protein - as monitored by the amide I band - is, however, not changed. Concomitant with the IR data, scanning calorimetric data indicate a sharpening of the acyl chain phase transition. From titration calorimetric and zeta potential data, saturation of LF binding to LPS was found to lie at a [LF]:[LPS] ratio of 1:3 to 1:5 M from the former and 1:10 M from the latter technique. X-ray scattering data indicate a change of the lipid A aggregate structure from inverted cubic to multilamellar, and with fluorescence (FRET) spectroscopy, LF is shown to intercalate by itself into phospholipid liposomes and may also block the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP)-induced intercalation of LPS. The LPS-induced cytokine production of human mononuclear cells exhibits a decrease due to LF binding, whereas the coagulation of amebocyte lysate in the Limulus test exhibited concentration-dependent changes. Based on these results, a model for the mechanisms of endotoxin inactivation by LF is proposed. PMID:11592403

  13. A novel human tectonin protein with multivalent beta-propeller folds interacts with ficolin and binds bacterial LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hooi Ping Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the human genome database has been completed a decade ago, approximately 50% of the proteome remains hypothetical as their functions are unknown. The elucidation of the functions of these hypothetical proteins can lead to additional protein pathways and revelation of new cascades. However, many of these inferences are limited to proteins with substantial sequence similarity. Of particular interest here is the Tectonin domain-containing family of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified hTectonin, a hypothetical protein in the human genome database, as a distant ortholog of the limulus galactose binding protein (GBP. Phylogenetic analysis revealed strong evolutionary conservation of hTectonin homologues from parasite to human. By computational analysis, we showed that both the hTectonin and GBP form beta-propeller structures with multiple Tectonin domains, each containing beta-sheets of 4 strands per beta-sheet. hTectonin is present in the human leukocyte cDNA library and immune-related cell lines. It interacts with M-ficolin, a known human complement protein whose ancient homolog, carcinolectin (CL5, is the functional protein partner of GBP during infection. Yeast 2-hybrid assay showed that only the Tectonin domains of hTectonin recognize the fibrinogen-like domain of the M-ficolin. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time interaction between the Tectonin domains 6 & 11 and bacterial LPS, indicating that despite forming 2 beta-propellers with its different Tectonin domains, the hTectonin molecule could precisely employ domains 6 & 11 to recognise bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By virtue of a recent finding of another Tectonin protein, leukolectin, in the human leukocyte, and our structure-function analysis of the hypothetical hTectonin, we propose that Tectonin domains of proteins could play a vital role in innate immune defense, and that this function has been conserved over several

  14. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation

  15. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Cao, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Hongjie [Section of Neurobiology, Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Port Saint Lucie, FL (United States); Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Ming, E-mail: xiangming@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  16. Fluorescent turn-on sensing of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in artificial urine sample with sensitivity down to nanomolar by tetraphenylethylene based aggregation induced emission molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoyu; Wang, Jianguo; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Yaling; Lin, He; Zhang, Guilan; Li, Yongdong; Fan, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A tetraphenylethylene based aggregation induced emission (AIE) probe, TPEPyE, bearing a positively charged pyridinium pendant was designed and synthesized. The positively charged TPEPyE can efficiently bind to the negatively charged lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged species. As a result, upon the addition of LPS into the PBS solution of TPEPyE, this probe aggregated immediately onto the surface of LPS and resulted over 22-fold of fluorescence enhancement. TPEPyE exhibited good selectivity and high sensitivity toward LPS in PBS buffer solution and the detection limit was calculated to be 370 pM (3.7ng/mL). More notably, TPEPyE also retained good sensitivity and selectivity in artificial urine system (with much higher ionic strength) with the detection limit down to nanomolar. Moreover, this probe can also make a distinction between gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli), making it a promising sensor for clinical monitoring of urinary tract infections. PMID:27155117

  17. Transiently enhanced LPS-induced fever following hyperthermic stress in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaaki; Uno, Tadashi; Riedel, Walter; Nishimaki, Michiyo; Watanabe, Kaori

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to induce an enhanced febrile response to the bacterial-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the enhanced LPS-induced fever seen in heat stressed (HS) animals is caused by leakage of intestinal bacterial LPS into the circulation. Male rabbits were rendered transiently hyperthermic (a maximum rectal temperature of 43°C) and divided into three groups. They were then allowed to recover in a room at 24°C for 1, 2 or 3 days post-HS. One day after injection with LPS, the post-HS rabbits exhibited significantly higher fevers than the controls, though this was not seen in rabbits at either 2 or 3 days post-HS. The plasma levels of endogenous LPS were significantly increased during the HS as compared to those seen in normothermic rabbits prior to HS. LPS fevers were not induced in these animals. One day post-HS, rabbits that had been pretreated with oral antibiotics exhibited significantly attenuated LPS levels. When challenged with human recombinant interleukin-1β instead of LPS, the 1-day post-HS rabbits did not respond with enhanced fevers. The plasma levels of TNFα increased similarly during LPS-induced fevers in both the control and 1-day post-HS rabbits, while the plasma levels of corticosterone and the osmolality of the 1-day post-HS rabbits showed no significant differences to those seen prior to the HS. These results suggest that the enhanced fever in the 1-day post-HS rabbits is LPS specific, and may be caused by increased leakage of intestinal endotoxin into blood circulation.

  18. Inadequate clearance of translocated bacterial products in HIV-infected humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Hofer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial translocation from the gut and subsequent immune activation are hallmarks of HIV infection and are thought to determine disease progression. Intestinal barrier integrity is impaired early in acute retroviral infection, but levels of plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a marker of bacterial translocation, increase only later. We examined humanized mice infected with HIV to determine if disruption of the intestinal barrier alone is responsible for elevated levels of LPS and if bacterial translocation increases immune activation. Treating uninfected mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS induced bacterial translocation, but did not result in elevated plasma LPS levels. DSS-induced translocation provoked LPS elevation only when phagocytic cells were depleted with clodronate liposomes (clodrolip. Macrophages of DSS-treated, HIV-negative mice phagocytosed more LPS ex vivo than those of control mice. In HIV-infected mice, however, LPS phagocytosis was insufficient to clear the translocated LPS. These conditions allowed higher levels of plasma LPS and CD8+ cell activation, which were associated with lower CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios and higher viral loads. LPS levels reflect both intestinal barrier and LPS clearance. Macrophages are essential in controlling systemic bacterial translocation, and this function might be hindered in chronic HIV infection.

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of an orange peel polymethoxylated flavone, 3’,4’,3,5,6,7,8,-heptamethoxyflavone, in the rat carrageenan/paw edema and mouse LPS-challenge assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The anti-inflammatory properties of 3',4',3,5,6,7,8-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF), a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, were studied in the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge/tumor necrosis factor-a (TNFa) response in mice, and in the carrageenan/paw edema assay in rats. In each of these trials,...

  20. Impact of bacterial endotoxin on the structure of DMPC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Michael; Brauckmann, Stephan; Moegle-Hofacker, Franzeska; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; Hartmann, Matthias; de Groot, Herbert; Mayer, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are believed to have a toxic effect on human cell membranes. In this study, the influence of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli on the structure, the dynamics and the mechanical strength of phospholipid membranes are monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Model membranes are formed from 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and are either prepared as multilamellar bulk samples or multilamellar vesicles. Field gradient NMR data directly prove the rapid integration of LPS into DMPC membranes. Solid state NMR experiments primarily detect decreasing molecular order parameters with increasing LPS content. This is accompanied by a mechanical softening of the membrane bilayers as is shown by AFM indentation measurements. Altogether, the data prove that lipopolysaccharide molecules quickly insert into phospholipid bilayers, increase membrane fluctuation amplitudes and significantly weaken their mechanical stiffness. PMID:26071197

  1. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  2. Structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahashi, H; Amano, F

    1998-10-01

    The structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) were examined in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1. TNF-alpha production is one of the characteristic phenotypes of LPS-activated macrophages, and is observed upon incubation with LPS. On the contrary, macrophage cell death, which had been found in our laboratory (Amano F., Karahashi H., J. Endotoxin Res., 3, 415423 (1996)) and was examined as the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from cells into the culture supernatant, was observed 2.5 h after the addition of LPS in the presence of CHX. However, both TNF-alpha production and macrophage cell death were similarly dependent on the structures of LPS and lipid A. At more than 10 ng/ml, wild-type LPS from E.coli and S. minnesota exhibited the highest activity, and LPS as well as diphosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota rough mutants also exhibited activity, but E. coli LPS detoxified by alkaline treatment or monophosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota exhibited no activity even at 100 ng/ml. These results suggest that LPS-induced macrophage cell death in the presence of CHX shows similar requirements for LPS and/or lipid A structures as for the macrophage activation at higher doses than 10 ng/ml, although the former was not observed at 1 ng/ml LPS, while the latter was. However, TNF-alpha does not seem to be involved in the induction of macrophage cell death, because a neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha antibody failed to block the macrophage cell death and because recombinant TNF-alpha had little effect on the extent of LDH release in the presence or absence of LPS and/or CHX, and also because TNF-alpha production by LPS was abolished in the presence of CHX. PMID:9821819

  3. Cellular and molecular basis of TNFa, IL-1ß and LPS mediated signaling in rat dorsal root ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanzhang

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines TNFa and IL-1ß as well as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are known to affect primary afferent functions related to pain and neurogenic inflammation. However, it is not completely understood how these molecules signal to primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In order to clarify this question RT-PCR, Northern blot, Western blot, RT-PCR in combination with laser capture microdiss...

  4. Uninephrectomy in rats on a fixed food intake potentiates both anorexia and circulating cytokine subsets in response to LPS.

    OpenAIRE

    Denis eArsenijevic; Jean-Pierre eMontani

    2015-01-01

    Recent human studies have suggested that mild reduction in kidney function can alter immune response and increase susceptibility to infection. The role of mild reduction in kidney function in altering susceptibility to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses was investigated in uninephrectomized rats compared to Sham-operated controls rats 4 weeks after surgery. Throughout the 4 weeks, all rats were maintained under mild food restriction at 90% of ad libitum intake to ensure the same cal...

  5. Uninephrectomy in Rats on a Fixed Food Intake Potentiates Both Anorexia and Circulating Cytokine Subsets in Response to LPS

    OpenAIRE

    Arsenijevic, Denis; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Recent human studies have suggested that mild reduction in kidney function can alter immune response and increase susceptibility to infection. The role of mild reduction in kidney function in altering susceptibility to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses was investigated in uninephrectomized rats compared to Sham-operated controls rats 4 weeks after surgery. Throughout the 4 weeks, all rats were maintained under mild food restriction at 90% of ad libitum intake to ensure the same cal...

  6. Activation of macrophage nuclear factor-κB and induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase by LPS

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Zhong-Qun; Li Ying-Hua; Brauner Annelie; Tullus Kjell

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity is a major problem of neonatal care. Bacterial infection and inflammatory response have been thought to play an important role in the development of CLD and steroids have been given, with some benefit, to neonates with this disease. In the present study, we assessed the ability of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate rat alveolar macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and activate ...

  7. Bupleurum Polysaccharides Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation via Modulating Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jian; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Guo, Li; LI Hong; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupleurum polysaccharides (BPs), isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium, possesses immunomodulatory activity, particularly on inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers innate immune responses through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cell membrane. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the therapeutic efficacy of BPs on suppression of LPS’s pathogenecity could be associated with the modulating of TLR4 signaling pathway. Methodolog...

  8. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  9. Experimental chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats. Non-specific stimulation with LPS reduces lethality as efficiently as specific immunization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Hougen, H P; Høiby, N;

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis, we investigated the possibility of preventing chronic lung inflammation or decreasing the progression of the infection. We compared the lethality, pathology, bacterial clearance, and immunogenicity after...... stimulation of the non-specific defence mechanisms by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or P. aeruginosa sonicate, or the acquired specific immune response by vaccination with the same bacterial antigens. One day prior to challenge with P. aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads, rats were stimulated...... with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Four and two weeks prior to challenge other rats were vaccinated with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Controls did not receive any stimulation or vaccination. The lethality after challenge was lower in rats stimulated with E. coli LPS (p...

  10. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  11. Dependence of Bacterial Protein Adhesins on Toll-Like Receptors for Proinflammatory Cytokine Induction

    OpenAIRE

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Schifferle, Robert E.; DeNardin, Ernesto; Russell, Michael W.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signal transducers that mediate inflammatory reactions induced by microbes through pattern recognition of virulence molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoproteins. We investigated whether proinflammatory cytokine responses induced by certain bacterial protein adhesins may also depend on TLRs. In differentiated THP-1 mononuclear cells stimulated by LPS-free recombinant fimbrillin (rFimA) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, cytokine release was a...

  12. NAC attenuates LPS-induced toxicity in aspirin-sensitized mouse macrophages via suppression of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of ASA, on metabolic and oxidative stress, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function using J774.2 mouse macrophage cell line. Protection from LPS-induced toxicity by NAC was also studied. LPS alone markedly induced ROS production and oxidative stress in macrophage cells. When ASA was added to LPS-treated macrophages, the increase in oxidative stress was significantly higher than that with LPS alone. Similarly, alteration in glutathione-dependent redox metabolism was also observed in macrophages after treatment with LPS and ASA. The combination of LPS and ASA selectively altered the CYP 3A4, CYP 2E1 and CYP 1A1 catalytic activities. Mitochondrial respiratory complexes and ATP production were also inhibited by LPS-ASA treatment. Furthermore a higher apoptotic cell death was also observed in LPS-ASA treated macrophages. NAC pre-treatment showed protection against oxidative stress induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects are presumed, at least in part, to be associated with alterations in NF-κB/Nrf-2 mediated cell signaling. These results suggest that macrophages are more sensitive to LPS when challenged with ASA and that NAC pre-treatment protects the macrophages from these deleterious effects.

  13. Regulation of Pulmonary and Systemic Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Responses in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Elafin

    OpenAIRE

    Sallenave, J-M; Cunningham, G A; James, R M; McLachlan, G.; Haslett, C

    2003-01-01

    The control of lung inflammation is of paramount importance in a variety of acute pathologies, such as pneumonia, the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. It is becoming increasingly apparent that local innate immune responses in the lung are negatively influenced by systemic inflammation. This is thought to be due to a local deficit in cytokine responses by alveolar macrophages and neutrophils following systemic bacterial infection and the development of a septic response. Recent...

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Leiva-Salcedo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  16. Effects of organic chemicals derived from ambient particulate matter on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Kobayashi, Takahiro [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Health Science, Oita (Japan); Yoshikawa, Toshikazu [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    The effects of components of ambient particulate matter (PM) on individuals with predisposing respiratory disorders are not well defined. We have previously demonstrated that airway exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or organic chemicals (OC) extracted from DEP (DEP-OC) enhances lung inflammation related to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The present study aimed to examine the effects of airway exposure to OC extracted from urban PM (PM-OC) on lung inflammation related to LPS. ICR mice were divided into four experimental groups that intratracheally received vehicle, LPS (2.5 mg/kg), PM-OC (4 mg/kg), or PM-OC + LPS. Lung inflammation, lung water content, and lung expression of cytokines were evaluated 24 h after intratracheal administration. LPS challenge elicited lung inflammation evidenced by cellular profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung histology, which was further aggravated by the combined challenge with PM-OC. The combination with PM-OC and LPS did not significantly exaggerate LPS-elicited pulmonary edema. LPS instillation induced elevated lung expression of interleukin-1{beta}, macrophage inflammatory protein-1{alpha}, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte chemoattractant, whereas the combined challenge with PM-OC did not influence these levels. All the results were consistent with our previous reports on DEP-OC. These results suggest that the extracted organic chemicals from PM exacerbate infectious lung inflammation. The mechanisms underlying the enhancing effects are not mediated via the enhanced local expression of proinflammatory cytokines. (orig.)

  17. The lipopolysaccharide-activated innate immune response network of the horseshoe crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kawabata

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary stimulation of the horseshoe crab innate immune system by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates a network of responses to ensure host defense against invading pathogens. Granular hemocytes selectively respond to LPS via a G protein-dependent exocytic pathway that critically depends on the proteolytic activity of the LPS-responsive coagulation factor C. In response to stimulation by LPS, the hemocyte secretes transglutaminase (TGase and several kinds of defense molecules, such as coagulation factors, lectins, antimicrobial peptides, and protein substrates for TGase. LPS-induced hemocyte exocytosis is enhanced by a feedback mechanism in which the antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin serves as an endogenous mediator. The coagulation cascade triggered by LPS or β-1,3-D-glucans results in the formation of coagulin fibrils that are subsequently stabilized by TGase-dependent cross-linking. A cuticle-derived chitin-binding protein additionally forms a TGase-stabilized mesh at sites of injury. Invading pathogens are agglutinated by both hemocyte- and plasma-derived lectins. In addition, the proclotting enzyme and tachyplesin functionally convert hemocyanin to phenoloxidase. In the plasma, coagulation factor C acts an LPS-sensitive complement C3 convertase on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. In this manner, LPS-induced hemocyte exocytosis leads not only to coagulation but also activates a sophisticated innate immune response network that coordinately effects pathogen recognition, prophenoloxidase activation, pathogen clearance, and TGase-dependent wound healing

  18. Bupleurum polysaccharides attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation via modulating Toll-like receptor 4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bupleurum polysaccharides (BPs, isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium, possesses immunomodulatory activity, particularly on inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS triggers innate immune responses through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 on host cell membrane. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the therapeutic efficacy of BPs on suppression of LPS's pathogenecity could be associated with the modulating of TLR4 signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LPS stimulated expression and activation of factors in the TLR4 signaling system, including TLR4, CD14, IRAK4, TRAF6, NF-κB, and JNK, determined using immunocytochemical and/or Western blot assays. BPs significantly inhibited these effects of LPS. LPS increased pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12p40, and IFN-β and NO production, evaluated using ELISA and Griess reaction assays, respectively. BPs antagonized these effects of LPS. Interestingly, BPs alone augmented secretion of some pro-inflammatory cytokines of non-LPS stimulated macrophages and enhanced phagocytic activity towards fluorescent E.coli bioparticles. In a rat model of acute lung injury (ALI with pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation, BPs ameliorated lung injuries and suppressed TLR4 expression. SIGNIFICANCE: The therapeutic properties of BPs in alleviating inflammatory diseases could be attributed to its inhibitory effect on LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling.

  19. Comparison of the effect of recombinant bovine wild and mutant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in lipopolysaccharide-challenged bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Lian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Genlin

    2016-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) plays a crucial role in the recognition of bacterial components, such as LPS that causes an immune response. The aim of this study was to compare the different effects of recombinant bovine wild LBP and mutant LBP (67 Ala → Thr) on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). When BMECs were treated with various concentrations of recombinant bovine lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (RBLBP) (1, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL) for 12 h, RBLBP of 5 μg/mL increased the apoptosis of BMECs induced by LPS without cytotoxicity, and mutant LBP resulted in a higher cell apoptosis than wild LBP did. By gene-chip microarray and bioinformatics, the data identified 2306 differentially expressed genes that were changed significantly between the LPS-induced inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of mutant LBP and the BMECs only treated with 10 μg/mL of LPS (fold change ≥2). Meanwhile, 1585 genes were differently expressed between the inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of wild LBP and 10 μg/mL of LPS-treated BMECs. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses showed that these differentially expressed genes were involved in different pathways that regulate the inflammation response. It predicted that carriers of this mutation increase the risk for a more severe inflammatory response. Our study provides an overview of the gene expression profile between wild LBP and mutant LBP on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of BMECs, which will lead to further understanding of the potential effects of LBP mutations on bovine mammary glands. PMID:26813383

  20. Impedimetric biosensor based on self-assembled hybrid cystein-gold nanoparticles and CramoLL lectin for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria D L; Andrade, Cesar A S; Correia, Maria T S; Coelho, Luana C B B; Singh, Pankaj R; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a new selective and specific electrochemical biosensor for bacterial lipolysaccharide (LPS). An electrode interface was constructed using a l-cysteine-gold nanoparticle (AuNpCys) composite to be immobilized by electrostatic interaction in the network of a poly(vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate maleic acid) (PVM) layer on a gold bare electrode. The impedimetric biosensor is fabricated by self-assembled CramoLL lectin on the PVM-AuNpCys-modified gold electrode through electrostatic interaction. CramoLL is used as the recognition interface. AFM images showed that LPS was specifically recognized on the PVM-AuNpCys-CramoLL system surface. The measurements of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the electrochemical response of a redox probe system (K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)](4-)/K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)](3-)) were blocked, due to the procedures of modified electrode with PVM-AuNpCys-CramoLL. In the majority of the experiments the lectin retained its activity as observed through its interaction with LPS from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella enterica and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The results are expressed in terms of the charge transfer resistance and current peak anodic using the EIS and CV techniques for the development of a biosensor for contamination by endotoxins. A new type of sensor for selective discrimination of LPS types with a high sensitivity has been obtained. PMID:21752390

  1. The effectiveness of potent dental adhesives on the viability of LPS challenged human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Angelia D; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2014-01-01

    Dental adhesives are necessary for the retention of specific dental restorations utilized to repair the anatomy of the tooth after dental decay is removed. Adhesives come into contact with healthy and diseased periodontal tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram negative bacterial pathogen, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) is an endotoxin found in gingival connective tissues of patients who suffer from periodontal disease. The presence of the endotoxin causes inflammation. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of potent dental adhesives when human gingival fibroblasts are challenged with LPS-PG. The fibroblasts were exposed to the dental adhesives polymethly methacrylate (PMMA), OptiBond®, and Prime & Bond® which were purchased from Patterson Dental, a national dental materials supplier. The human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1, ATCC® CRL-2014™) were purchased from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). The porphyromonas gingival lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) was purchased from Fisher Scientific (Pittsburg, PA). No significant differences in metabolic behavior was detected among the groups (p<0.132). While the glutathione assay determined that there was not any significant increase in oxidative stress levels; the lactate dehydrogenase assay identified significant cellular damage in the group exposed to combinations of the Prime & Bond® adhesives and LPS-PG at 48 hour intervals (p<0.003). No significant changes were noted in cellular morphology at any phases, and all cells demonstrated typical fibroblast spindle shape. PMID:25405402

  2. Yohimbine enhances protection of berberine against LPS-induced mouse lethality through multiple mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care units, better therapies are urgently needed. Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an important trigger of sepsis. We have demonstrated that berberine (Ber protects against lethality induced by LPS, which is enhanced by yohimbine (Y pretreatment, and Ber combined with Y also improves survival in septic mice. However, the precise mechanisms by which Y enhances protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality remain unclear. The present study confirmed that simultaneously administered Y also enhanced protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality. Ber or/and Y attenuated liver injury, but not renal injury in LPS-challenged mice. Ber or/and Y all inhibited LPS-stimulated IκBα, JNK and ERK phosphorylation, NF-κB activation as well as TNF-α production. Ber also increased IL-10 production in LPS-challenged mice, which was enhanced by Y. Furthermore, Ber or/and Y all suppressed LPS-induced IRF3, TyK2 and STAT1 phosphorylation, as well as IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA expression in spleen of mice at 1 h after LPS challenge. Especially, Y enhanced the inhibitory effect of Ber on LPS-induced IP-10 mRNA expression. In vitro experiments further demonstrated that Y significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect of Ber on TNF-α production in LPS-treated peritoneal macrophages, Ber combined with Y promoted LPS-induced IL-10 production and LPS-stimulated IκBα, JNK, ERK and IRF3 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation were also suppressed by Ber or/and Y pretreatment in peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Y enhances the protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality in mice via attenuating liver injury, upregulating IL-10 production and suppressing IκBα, JNK, ERK and IRF3 phosphorylation. Ber combined with Y may be an effective immunomodulator agent for the prevention of sepsis.

  3. Soluble CD14 Enhances the Response of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells to P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrukhov, Oleh; Andrukhova, Olena; Özdemir, Burcu; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are lacking membrane CD14, which is an important component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study we investigated the effect of soluble CD14 on the response of human PDLSCs to LPS of Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis. Human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) were stimulated with P. gingivalis LPS in the presence or in the absence of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and the production of interleukin (IL)-6, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL8), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) was measured. The response to P. gingivalis LPS was compared with that to TLR4 agonist Escherichia coli LPS and TLR2-agonist Pam3CSK4. The response of hPDLSCs to both P. gingivalis LPS and E. coli LPS was significantly enhanced by sCD14. In the absence of sCD14, no significant difference in the hPDLSCs response to two kinds of LPS was observed. These responses were significantly lower compared to that to Pam3CSK4. In the presence of sCD14, the response of hPdLSCs to P. gingivalis LPS was markedly higher than that to E. coli LPS and comparable with that to Pam3CSK4. The response of hPdLSCs to bacterial LPS is strongly augmented by sCD14. Local levels of sCD14 could be an important factor for modulation of the host response against periodontal pathogens. PMID:27504628

  4. Lipopolysaccharide promotes lipid accumulation in human adventitial fibroblasts via TLR4-NF-κB pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic degenerative disease of the arteries and is thought to be one of the most common causes of death globally. In recent years, the functions of adventitial fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis and tissue repair have gained increased interests. LPS can increase the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis-associated cardiovascular disease. Although LPS increases neointimal via TLR4 activation has been reported, how LPS augments atherogenesis through acting on adventitial fibroblasts is still unknown. Here we explored lipid deposition within adventitial fibroblasts mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS to imitate inflammatory conditions. Results In our study, LPS enhanced lipid deposition by the up-regulated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP as the silencing of ADRP abrogated lipid deposition in LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts. In addition, pre-treatment with anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 antibody diminished the LPS-induced lipid deposition and ADRP expression. Moreover, LPS induced translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, which could markedly up-regulate lipid deposition as pre-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly reduced lipid droplets. In addition, the lowering lipid accumulation was accompanied with the decreased ADRP expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced adventitial fibroblasts secreted more monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, compared with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that LPS promotes lipid accumulation via the up-regulation of ADRP expression through TLR4 activated downstream of NF-κB in adventitial fibroblasts. Increased levels of MCP-1 released from LPS-activated adventitial fibroblasts and lipid accumulation may accelerate monocytes recruitment and lipid-laden macrophage foam cells formation. Here, our study provides a new explanation as to how bacterial

  5. Simvastatin Reduces Lipopolysaccharides-Accelerated Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Jalin, Angela M. A.; Lee, Jae-Chul; CHO, GEUM-SIL; Kim, Chunsook; Ju, Chung; Pahk, Kisoo; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Won-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Preceding infection or inflammation such as bacterial meningitis has been associated with poor outcomes after stroke. Previously, we reported that intracorpus callosum microinjection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly accelerated the ischemia/reperfusion-evoked brain tissue damage via recruiting inflammatory cells into the ischemic lesion. Simvastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgultaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in vascular diseases. Thus, we in...

  6. Lipid lateral organization on giant unilamellar vesicles containing lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Jakub; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Søren; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new (to our knowledge) protocol to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of mixtures of single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species and Escherichia coli polar lipid extracts. Four different LPSs that differed in the size of the polar headgroup (i.e., LPS smooth > LPS...... no more than 15 mol % for LPS-smooth and LPS-Ra, and up to 25 mol % for LPS-Rc and LPS-Rd (with respect to total lipids). We used the GUVs to evaluate the impact of different LPS species on the lateral structure of the host membrane (i.e., E. coli polar lipid extract). Rhodamine-DPPE-labeled GUVs......-Ra > LPS-Rc > LPS-Rd) were selected to generate GUVs composed of different LPS/E. coli polar lipid mixtures. Our procedure consists of two main steps: 1), generation and purification of oligolamellar liposomes containing LPSs; and 2), electroformation of GUVs using the LPS-containing oligolamellar vesicles...

  7. 褪黑素对细菌脂多糖导致的宫内感染脑损伤的保护作用%Protective effect of melatonin on brain injury of intrauterine infection induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利芬; 钱志红; 史明

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin on free radical in brain tissues of fetal rats with intrauterine infection,explore the protective effect of melatonin on brain tissues of fetal rats with intrauterine infection. Methods: The models of cerebral palsy rat induced by intrauterine infection were established by injecting bacterial lipopolysaccharide into pregnant rats, melatonin intervention was carried out; the SD rats on the 19th day after pregnancy were selected as blank control group, intrauterine infection group and melatonin treatment group; the pregnant rats in intrauterine infection group were treated with intraperitoneal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (500 μg/kg), and the pregnant rats in melatonin treatment group were treated with intraperitoneal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (500 μg/kg) and melatonin ( 10 mg/kg); then the rats in each group were divided into 2 - hour group, 6 - hour group and 12 - hour group according to different observing times, 4 pregnant rats in each group; the pregnant rats in each group were executed at corresponding time points, then the brain tissues of fetal rats were obtained; the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GSH -Px) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the brain tissues of fetal rats after homogenate were detected; HE staining was used to observe the pathological changes of brain tissues, and the differences among different groups were compared. Results: Compared with blank control group, SOD activity and GSH- Px activity of brain tissues of fetal rats in intrauterine infection group decreased, MDA content increased;with the extension of infection time, the above - mentioned changes became more obvious, there was significant difference; compared with intrauterine infection group, SOD activity and GSH - Px activity of brain tissues of fetal rats in melatonin treatment group increased, MDA content decreased. Conclusion: Brain injury of fetal rats with

  8. Clinico-pathological Responses of Calves Associated with Infection of Pasteurella multocida Type B and the Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and Outer Membrane Protein Immunogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faez Firdaus Jesse Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to investigate the Clinico-pathological responses of calves associated with the infections of Pasteurella multocida type B and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein immunogens. Alterations in the behavior of animals and pathological lesions observed following innate or experimental infections usually divulge extensive and detrimental changes in the clinical signs, organs and tissues of the animals afflicted with the disease. These alterations are imperative for Veterinary evaluation of herd health. Eight clinically healthy, non-pregnant and non-lactating Brangus cross heifers weighing 150±50 kg were used in the study. The heifers (n = 8 were divided into 4 groups of 2 calves per group. The control calves in group 1 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of sterile Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS. Calves in group 2 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of 1012 colony forming unit (cfu of wild-type P. multocida and calves in group 3 were inoculated intravenously with 10 mL of LPS broth extract. Calves in group 4 were inoculated intramuscularly with 10 mL of OMP broth extract. All animals were observed for 48 h for clinical signs, changes in behavior and mortality pattern, including the time of death. The results divulged significant differences in the Clinico-pathological alterations. Calves inoculated with whole cell P. multocida type B: 2 showed a significant (p<0.05 increased in rectal temperature. The affected calves showed significant severe dullness (p<0.000 and significant rumen hypomotility (p<0.000 was also exhibited. The calves showed signs of hypersalivation at 14 h. There is no significant difference (p = 0.240 in pulmonary oedema in the Calves of group 2 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 4 also showed no significant difference in pulmonary oedema (p = 0.612 compared to control group 1. Calves of group 3 showed significantly moderate pulmonary oedema (p<0.000. All the

  9. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S;

    1991-01-01

    There are conflicting data on the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the function of human neutrophils. The present study was designed to examine the relationship between chemical composition and the modulatory effect of LPS on human neutrophil function. LPS was extracted from five...... strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients by the hot phenol-water method. Chemical characterization included neutral sugars, amino components, and fatty acids. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were preincubated with different concentrations...... neutrophil function seen as inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis toward the chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and priming of the cells for less than or equal to 8-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence response to f-Met-Leu-Phe. Conversely, LPS from strain 1118-O:3 had no...

  10. Interleukin-10 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced upregulation of tissue factor in canine peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Seigo; Stokol, Tracy

    2012-08-15

    The potentially fatal hemostatic disorder of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is initiated in bacterial sepsis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tissue factor (TF) expression on monocytes. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent inhibitory cytokine that downregulates monocyte inflammatory and procoagulant responses. We hypothesized that canine recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) would inhibit LPS-induced TF upregulation on canine monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), obtained by double-density gradient centrifugation, and monocytes, purified from PBMC by immunomagnetic bead separation with an anti-canine CD14 antibody (Ab), were stimulated in suspension with LPS (0.1-1000 ng/mL) for various times. Recombinant IL-10 (10-5000 pg/mL) was added with LPS or up to 2h later. Tissue factor procoagulant activity was measured by cleavage of a chromogenic substrate by activated Factor X generated by the TF-factor VII complex. We found that rIL-10, when given concurrently or 1h after LPS, strongly inhibited LPS-induced TF procoagulant activity in canine PBMC and monocytes. This inhibition was dose-dependent and blocked by an anti-canine IL-10 Ab. Our results indicate that rIL-10 effectively inhibits LPS-induced TF upregulation in canine monocytes and could potentially be useful in limiting the development of DIC in dogs with endotoxemia. PMID:22609246

  11. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Anna; Ohne, Yoichiro; Degos, Clara; Gorvel, Laurent; Moriyón, Ignacio; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity. PMID:23390517

  12. Maternal aggression persists following lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Zachary M; Bowers, Stephanie L; Dow, Eliot R; Nelson, Randy J

    2006-04-15

    Lactating females direct aggressive behaviors towards intruders presumably to reduce the likelihood of infanticide of their pups. Infected animals display a constellation of responses that include lethargy, anorexia, and decreased social interactions. This suite of responses is referred to as sickness behavior, and is putatively part of an adaptive strategy to aid the organism in recovery from infection. Previous work has suggested that animals can suppress the behavioral symptoms of sickness in order to engage in adaptive behaviors. To test whether adaptive nest defense is affected by illness, dams received a peripheral injection of either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS [50, 400, or 1000 microg/kg]), a non-replicating component of bacterial cell walls that activates the immune system. Simulated infection with LPS reduced body mass and food intake in dams and interfered with litter growth in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, nest defense was unaffected by LPS; the proportion of dams displaying maternal aggression against a male intruder, as well as the latency and duration of aggressive encounters were only suppressed at the highest LPS dose tested. Further, LPS treatment also altered non-agonistic behavior during the aggression test as indicated by reduced social investigation of the intruder and an increased time spent immobile during the session. LPS administration also significantly increased serum corticosterone concentrations in lactating females. These findings suggest that maternal aggression is not suppressed by LPS-evoked immune activation at doses that attenuate other aspects of maternal and social behavior. PMID:16490223

  13. Induction of bacterial lipoprotein tolerance is associated with suppression of toll-like receptor 2 expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    Tolerance to bacterial cell wall components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may represent an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Two members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, TLR2 and TLR4, recognize the specific pattern of bacterial cell wall components. TLR4 has been found to be responsible for LPS tolerance. However, the role of TLR2 in bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) tolerance and LPS tolerance is unclear. Pretreatment of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a synthetic bacterial lipopeptide induced tolerance to a second BLP challenge with diminished tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, termed BLP tolerance. Furthermore, BLP-tolerized THP-1 cells no longer responded to LPS stimulation, indicating a cross-tolerance to LPS. Induction of BLP tolerance was CD14-independent, as THP-1 cells that lack membrane-bound CD14 developed tolerance both in serum-free conditions and in the presence of a specific CD14 blocking monoclonal antibody (MEM-18). Pre-exposure of THP-1 cells to BLP suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB activation in response to subsequent BLP and LPS stimulation, which is comparable with that found in LPS-tolerized cells, indicating that BLP tolerance and LPS tolerance may share similar intracellular pathways. However, BLP strongly enhanced TLR2 expression in non-tolerized THP-1 cells, whereas LPS stimulation had no effect. Furthermore, a specific TLR2 blocking monoclonal antibody (2392) attenuated BLP-induced, but not LPS-induced, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, indicating BLP rather than LPS as a ligand for TLR2 engagement and activation. More importantly, pretreatment of THP-1 cells with BLP strongly inhibited TLR2 activation in response to subsequent BLP stimulation. In contrast, LPS tolerance did not prevent BLP-induced TLR2 overexpression. These results demonstrate that BLP tolerance develops through down-regulation of TLR2

  14. Muramyl Dipeptide Enhances Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption through Increased RANKL Expression in Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ishida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is bacterial cell wall component capable of inducing osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP, the minimal essential structural unit responsible for the immunological activity of peptidoglycans, is ubiquitously expressed by bacterium. In this study, we investigated the effect of MDP in LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. LPS was administered with or without MDP into the supracalvariae of mice. The number of osteoclasts, the level of mRNA for cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, the ratio of the bone destruction area, the level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form 5b (TRACP 5b, and C-terminal telopeptides fragments of type I collagen as a marker of bone resorption in mice administrated both LPS and MDP were higher than those in mice administrated LPS or MDP alone. On the other hand, MDP had no effect on osteoclastogenesis in parathyroid hormone administrated mice. MDP enhanced LPS-induced receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL expression and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 expression in vivo and in stromal cells in vitro. MDP also enhanced LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, including ERK, p38, and JNK, in stromal cells. These results suggest that MDP might play an important role in pathological bone resorption in bacterial infection diseases.

  15. The structure of lipopolysaccharide from rough strains of escherichia coli at the air – liquid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane (OM) of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope is an important biological interface as it initiates bacterial cell adhesion, activates innate immunity during infection, withstands environmental stresses and acts as a gate keeper to nutrients and toxins. The OM is a complex structure consisting of an asymmetric bilayer with an inner leaflet of phospholipids and an outer leaflet of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with LPS consisting of approximately 75 % of the Gram-negative bacterial surface. Due to the complexity of LPS there are very few OM models that include this important molecule and thus little is known about LPS structure at interfaces. In this work we used a truncated LPS from E. coli (Rc-LPS, consisting of Lipid A and the first seven sugars of the core polysaccharide) to form stable monolayers at the air – liquid interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to probe the vertical structure of the monolayers, with the neutron reflectometry enhanced by the production of a deuterated Rc- LPS. The lateral structure was studied with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Brewster angle microscopy. It was found that at surface pressures above 20 mN/m the Rc-LPS monolayers could be resolved as hydrocarbon tails, inner headgroup, and outer headgroup of polysaccharide with increasing solvation from tails to outer headgroup. The lateral organisation of the hydrocarbon tails was of an oblique hexagonal unit cell across all surface pressures with only the tilt angle of the chains changing with surface pressure. The study of the monolayer structure provides the first complete analysis of a realistic E. coli OM surface model.

  16. The role of horizontal transfer in the evolution of a highly variable lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis locus in xanthomonads that infect rice, citrus and crucifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanove Adam J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP of animal and plant pathogenic bacteria. Variation at the interstrain level is common in LPS biosynthetic gene clusters of animal pathogenic bacteria. This variation has been proposed to play a role in evading the host immune system. Even though LPS is a modulator of plant defense responses, reports of interstrain variation in LPS gene clusters of plant pathogenic bacteria are rare. Results In this study we report the complete sequence of a variant 19.9 kb LPS locus present in the BXO8 strain of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice. This region is completely different in size, number and organization of genes from the LPS locus present in most other strains of Xoo from India and Asia. Surprisingly, except for one ORF, all the other ORFs at the BXO8 LPS locus are orthologous to the genes present at this locus in a sequenced strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri (Xac; a pathogen of citrus plants. One end of the BXO8 LPS gene cluster, comprised of ten genes, is also present in the related rice pathogen, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc. In Xoc, the remainder of the LPS gene cluster, consisting of seven genes, is novel and unrelated to LPS gene clusters of any of the sequenced xanthomonads. We also report substantial interstrain variation suggestive of very recent horizontal gene transfer (HGT at the LPS biosynthetic locus of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, the black rot pathogen of crucifers. Conclusion Our analyses indicate that HGT has altered the LPS locus during the evolution of Xanthomonas oryzae pathovars and suggest that the ancestor of all Xanthomonas oryzae pathovars had an Xac type of LPS gene cluster. Our finding of interstrain variation in two major xanthomonad pathogens infecting different hosts suggests that the LPS locus in plant pathogenic bacteria, as in animal pathogens, is under intense

  17. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines. PMID:25187406

  18. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  19. Comparison of TNFα to Lipopolysaccharide as an Inflammagen to Characterize the Idiosyncratic Hepatotoxicity Potential of Drugs: Trovafloxacin as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey F. Waring

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs are poorly understood, unpredictable, and not detected in preclinical studies. Although the cause of these reactions is likely multi-factorial, one hypothesis is that an underlying inflammatory state lowers the tolerance to a xenobiotic. Previously used in an inflammation IDR model, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS is heterogeneous in nature, making development of standardized testing protocols difficult. Here, the use of rat tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα to replace LPS as an inflammatory stimulus was investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with separate preparations of LPS or TNFα, and hepatic transcriptomic effects were compared. TNFα showed enhanced consistency at the transcriptomic level compared to LPS. TNFα and LPS regulated similar biochemical pathways, although LPS was associated with more robust inflammatory signaling than TNFα. Rats were then codosed with TNFα and trovafloxacin (TVX, an IDR-associated drug, and evaluated by liver histopathology, clinical chemistry, and gene expression analysis. TNFα/TVX induced unique gene expression changes that clustered separately from TNFα/levofloxacin, a drug not associated with IDRs. TNFα/TVX cotreatment led to autoinduction of TNFα resulting in potentiation of underlying gene expression stress signals. Comparison of TNFα/TVX and LPS/TVX gene expression profiles revealed similarities in the regulation of biochemical pathways. In conclusion, TNFα could be used in lieu of LPS as an inflammatory stimulus in this model of IDRs.

  20. Modeling the LPS Neutralization Activity of Anti-Endotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS, also known as endotoxins, are major structural components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria that serve as a barrier and protective shield between them and their surrounding environment. LPS is considered to be a major virulence factor as it strongly stimulates the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines which mediate the host immune response and culminating in septic shock. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies of the LPS neutralization activities of anti-endotoxins were performed using charge and quantum chemical descriptors. Artificial neural network implementing the back-propagation algorithm was selected for the multivariate analysis. The predicted activities from leave-one-out cross-validation were well correlated with the experimental values as observed from the correlation coefficient and root mean square error of 0.930 and 0.162, respectively. Similarly, the external testing set also yielded good predictivity with correlation coefficient and root mean square error of 0.983 and 0.130. The model holds great potential for the rational design of novel and robust compounds with enhanced neutralization activity.

  1. VISUALIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF LPS DISTRIBUTION IN BINARY PHOSPHOLIPID BILAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Florencia, Henning María; Susana, Sanchez; Laura, Bakás

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a rol in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes.

  2. Nanostructure formation enhances the activity of LPS-neutralizing peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mas-Moruno, C.; Cascales, L.; Cruz, L.J.; Mora, P.; Perez-Paya, E.; Albericio, F.

    2008-01-01

    Peptides that interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can provide the basis for the development of new antisepsis agents. In this work, several LPS-neutralizing acyl peptides derived from LALF, BPI, and SAP were prepared, structurally characterized, and biologically evaluated. In all cases, peptides

  3. Zoledronic acid increases the circulating soluble RANKL level in mice, with a further increase in lymphocyte-derived soluble RANKL in zoledronic acid- and glucocorticoid-treated mice stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takahiro; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Hori, Naoko; Shimamura, Yumiko; Sato, Tomoya; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BP) zoledronic acid (ZA) is a potent antiresorptive drug used in conjunction with standard cancer therapy to treat osteolysis or hypercalcemia due to malignancy. However, it is unclear how ZA influences the circulating levels of bone remodeling factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ZA on the serum levels of soluble receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (sRANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The following four groups of C57BL/6 mice were used (five mice per group): (1) the placebo+phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) group, in which placebo-treated mice were injected once weekly with PBS for 4weeks; (2) the placebo+ZA group, in which placebo-treated mice were injected once weekly with ZA for 4weeks; (3) the prednisolone (PSL)+PBS group, in which PSL-treated mice were injected once weekly with PBS for 4weeks; and (4) the PSL+ZA group, in which PSL-treated mice were injected once weekly with ZA for 4weeks. At the 3-week time point, all mice were subjected to oral inflammatory stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The sera of these mice were obtained every week and the levels of sRANKL and OPG were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At the time of sacrifice, femurs were prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), histological, and histomorphometric analyses. Our data indicated that ZA administration remarkably reduced bone turnover and significantly increased the basal level of sRANKL. Interestingly, the PSL+ZA group showed a dramatically elevated sRANKL level after LPS stimulation. In contrast, the PSL+ZA group in nonobese diabetic mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD-SCID mice), which are characterized by the absence of functional T- and B-lymphocytes, showed no increase in the sRANKL level. Our data suggest that, particularly with combination treatment of ZA and glucocorticoids, surviving lymphocytes might be the source of inflammation-induced sRANKL. Thus

  4. Influence of Periodontal Therapy on Systemic Lipopolysaccharides in Children with Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    KALASH, D.; Vovk, A.; Huang, H.; Aukhil, I.; Wallet, S.M.; Shaddox, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has shown that children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) demonstrate a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) hyper-responsiveness in addition to elevated levels of systemic LPS when compared to periodontally healthy children.

  5. Hyphomonas spp., Shewanella spp., and Other Marine Bacteria Lack Heterogeneous (Ladderlike) Lipopolysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Sledjeski, Darren D.; Ronald M Weiner

    1991-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of 19 marine bacteria were examined for size heterogeneities by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in conjunction with an LPS-specific silver staining method. Fifteen marine bacteria had an R-type LPS instead of the ladderlike LPS array characteristic of most bacteria. In addition, three marine bacteria also had a single large LPS molecule. Without constraints (e.g., surface masking), R-type LPS, a more hydrophobic molecule, predomina...

  6. Identification of the Zinc Finger Protein ZRANB2 as a Novel Maternal Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein That Protects Embryos of Zebrafish against Gram-negative Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Du, Xiaoyuan; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-02-19

    Zinc finger ZRANB2 proteins are widespread in animals, but their functions and mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we clearly demonstrate that ZRANB2 is a newly identified LPS-binding protein present abundantly in the eggs/embryos of zebrafish. We also show that recombinant ZRANB2 (rZRANB2) acts as a pattern recognition receptor capable of identifying the bacterial signature molecule LPS as well as binding the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguilarum, and Aeromonas hydrophila and functions as an antibacterial effector molecule capable of directly killing the bacteria. Furthermore, we reveal that N-terminal residues 11-37 consisting of the first ZnF_RBZ domain are indispensable for ZRANB2 antimicrobial activity. Importantly, microinjection of rZRANB2 into early embryos significantly enhanced the resistance of the embryos against pathogenic A. hydrophila challenge, and this enhanced bacterial resistance was markedly reduced by co-injection of anti-ZRANB2 antibody. Moreover, precipitation of ZRANB2 in the embryo extracts by preincubation with anti-ZRANB2 antibody caused a marked decrease in the antibacterial activity of the extracts against the bacteria tested. In addition, the N-terminal peptide Z1/37 or Z11/37 with in vitro antibacterial activity also promoted the resistance of embryos against A. hydrophila, but the peptide Z38/198 without in vitro antibacterial activity did not. Collectively, these results indicate that ZRANB2 is a maternal LPS-binding protein that can protect the early embryos of zebrafish against pathogenic attacks, a novel role ever assigned to ZRANB2 proteins. This work also provides new insights into the immunological function of the zinc finger proteins that are widely distributed in various animals. PMID:26740623

  7. Sero-characterization of lipopolysaccharide from Burkholderia thailandensis

    OpenAIRE

    Qazi, Omar; Prior, Joann L.; Judy, Barbara M; Whitlock, Gregory C.; Kitto, G. Barrie; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Brown, Katherine A

    2008-01-01

    We report the successful purification of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Burkholderia thailandesis, a Gram-negative bacterium, closely related to the highly pathogenic organisms Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. B. thailandensis LPS is shown to cross-react with rabbit and mouse sera obtained from inoculation with B. pseudomallei or B. mallei, respectively. These data suggest that B. thailandensis LPS shares similar structural features with LPS molecules from highly pathogenic B...

  8. Effect of Synthetic Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in Rodents: Differences in Response Based on Strains and Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Gary A; Estrada, Eduardo Y.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs) reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and prevent cell death. Animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage, and bacterial meningitis respond to treatment with MMPIs. We have used the intracerebral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rat, which induces MMP production and results in a delayed opening of the BBB, to screen MMPIs to identify therapeutic agents. We hypothesized that the mouse would respond similarly to...

  9. Development of a Rapid Multiplex PCR Assay To Genotype Pasteurella multocida Strains by Use of the Lipopolysaccharide Outer Core Biosynthesis Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Turni, Conny; Edmunds, Mark; St. Michael, Frank; Adler, Ben; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew D.; Boyce, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is the causative agent of a wide range of diseases in many animal species, including humans. A widely used method for differentiation of P. multocida strains involves the Heddleston serotyping scheme. This scheme was developed in the early 1970s and classifies P. multocida strains into 16 somatic or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serovars using an agar gel diffusion precipitin test. However, this gel diffusion assay is problematic, wi...

  10. Dendritic Cell Activation and Cytokine Production Induced by Group B Neisseria meningitidis: Interleukin-12 Production Depends on Lipopolysaccharide Expression in Intact Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Garth L. J.; Newton, Phillippa J.; Chain, Benjamin M; Katz, David; Andersen, Svein Rune; Wong, Simon; van der Ley, Peter; Klein, Nigel; Callard, Robin E.

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and microbial pathogens are fundamental to the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Upon stimulation with bacteria or bacterial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), immature DCs undergo a maturation process that involves expression of costimulatory molecules, HLA molecules, and cytokines and chemokines, thus providing critical signals for lymphocyte development and differentiation. In this study, we investigated the response of...

  11. Dual effects of soluble CD14 on LPS priming of neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troelstra, A; Giepmans, B N; Van Kessel, K P; Lichenstein, H S; Verhoef, J; Van Strijp, J A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of soluble CD14 (sCD14) on human neutrophil response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we developed an LPS-priming assay that measures the chemiluminescence response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine stimulation. Priming by 1 ng/mL rough LPS occurred in the presence of eit

  12. On the role and fate of LPS-dephosphorylating activity in the rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, A; Huizinga -van der Vlag, Ali; van Loenen - Weemaes, Anne-miek; Meijer, DKF; Poelstra, K

    2006-01-01

    Gut-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a role in the pathogenesis of liver diseases like fibrosis. The enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) is present in, among others, the intestinal wall and liver and has been previously shown to dephosphorylate LPS. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LPS on

  13. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF INTERACTIONS OF POLYMYXIN B3 AND ITS ALA-MUTANTS WITH LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emergence of nosocomial bacterial pathogens (especially Gram-negative bacteria with multiple resistance against almost all available antibiotics is a growing medical problem. No novel drugs targeting multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria have been developed in recent years. In this context, there has been greatly renewed interest to cyclic lipodecapeptides polymyxins. Polymyxins exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, they are specific and highly potent against Gramnegative bacteria, but have potential nephrotoxic side effects. So polymyxins are attractive lead compounds to develop analogues with improved microbiological, pharmacological and toxicological properties. A detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of polymyxin interactions with its cell targets is a prerequisite for the purposeful improvement of its therapeutic properties. The primary cell target of a polymyxin is a lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The binding site of polymyxin on LPS has been supposed to be Kdo2-lipid A fragment. Methods. For all molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation experiments the YASARA suite of programs was used. Complex of antimicrobial peptide polymyxin В3 (PmB3 with Kdo2-lipid A portion of E. coli lipopolysaccharide was constructed by rigid docking with flexible side chains of the peptide. By alanine scanning of polymyxin В3 bound to LPS followed by simulated annealing minimization of the complexes in explicit water environment, the molecular aspects of PmB3-LPS binding have been studied by 20 ns molecular dynamics simulations at 298 K and pH 7.0. The AMBER03 force field was used with a 1.05 nm force cutoff. To treat long range electrostatic interactions the Particle Mesh Ewald algorithm was used. Results. Ala-mutations of polymyxin’s residues Dab1, Dab3, Dab5, Dab8 and Dab9 in the PmB3-LPS complex caused sustained structural changes resulting in the notable loss in stability of

  14. Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis on Glutathione-Based Detoxification Pathways in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Berry

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae” are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST, glutathione peroxidase (GPx/glutathione reductase (GR, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT, and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems.

  15. LPS-induced clustering of CD14 triggers generation of PI(4,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Zdioruk, Mykola I; Traczyk, Gabriela; Świątkowska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-15

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces strong pro-inflammatory reactions after sequential binding to CD14 protein and TLR4 receptor. Here, we show that CD14 controls generation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] in response to LPS binding. In J774 cells and HEK293 cells expressing CD14 exposed to 10-100 ng/ml LPS, the level of PI(4,5)P2 rose in a biphasic manner with peaks at 5-10 min and 60 min. After 5-10 min of LPS stimulation, CD14 underwent prominent clustering in the plasma membrane, accompanied by accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 and type-I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) isoforms Iα and Iγ (encoded by Pip5k1a and Pip5k1c, respectively) in the CD14 region. Clustering of CD14 with antibodies, without LPS and TLR4 participation, was sufficient to trigger PI(4,5)P2 elevation. The newly generated PI(4,5)P2 accumulated in rafts, which also accommodated CD14 and a large portion of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ. Silencing of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ, or application of drugs interfering with PI(4,5)P2 synthesis and availability, abolished the LPS-induced PI(4,5)P2 elevation and inhibited downstream pro-inflammatory reactions. Taken together, these data indicate that LPS induces clustering of CD14, which triggers PI(4,5)P2 generation in rafts that is required for maximal pro-inflammatory signaling of TLR4. PMID:26446256

  16. Monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli J5 lipopolysaccharide: cross-reaction with other gram-negative bacterial species.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutharia, L M; Crockford, G; Bogard, W C; Hancock, R E

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against Escherichia coli J5 were studied. Each of these monoclonal antibodies reacted with purified lipopolysaccharides from E. coli J5, the deep rough mutant Salmonella minnesota Re595, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as well as with the purified lipid A of P. aeruginosa. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using the outer membranes from a variety of gram-negative bacteria demonstrated that these lipid A-specific monoclonal antibodies inte...

  17. Synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanoparticles potently inhibit cell signaling and production of inflammatory mediators induced by lipopolysaccharide binding Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foit, Linda; Thaxton, C Shad

    2016-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in the innate immune system. Stimulation of TLR4 occurs upon binding lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls. Due to the potency of the induced inflammatory response, there is a growing interest in agents that can most proximally modulate this LPS/TLR4 interaction to prevent downstream cell signaling events and the production of inflammatory mediators. Building on the natural ability of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to bind LPS, we synthesized a suite of HDL-like nanoparticles (HDL-like NP). We identified one HDL-like NP that was particularly effective at decreasing TLR4 signaling caused by addition of purified LPS or Gram-negative bacteria to model human cell lines or primary human peripheral blood cells. The HDL-like NP functioned to inhibit TLR4-dependent inflammatory response to LPS derived from multiple bacterial species. Mechanistically, data show that the NP mainly functions by scavenging and neutralizing the LPS toxin. Taken together, HDL-like NPs constitute a powerful endotoxin scavenger with the potential to significantly reduce LPS-mediated inflammation. PMID:27244690

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-inflammatory acute phase response is enhanced in spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Sironen, Reijo; Alhonen, Leena; Uimari, Anne

    2012-02-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an effective activator of the components of innate immunity. It has been shown that polyamines and their metabolic enzymes affect the LPS-induced immune response by modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory actions. On the other hand, LPS causes changes in cellular polyamine metabolism. In this study, the LPS-induced inflammatory response in spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase overexpressing transgenic mice (SSAT mice) was analyzed. In liver and kidneys, LPS enhanced the activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase and increased the intracellular putrescine content in both SSAT overexpressing and wild-type mice. In survival studies, the enhanced polyamine catabolism and concomitantly altered cellular polyamine pools in SSAT mice did not affect the LPS-induced mortality of these animals. However, in the acute phase of LPS-induced inflammatory response, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interferon-γ were significantly reduced and, on the contrary, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 was significantly increased in the sera of SSAT mice compared with the wild-type animals. In addition, hepatic acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and α(1)-acid glycoprotein were expressed in higher amounts in SSAT mice than in the wild-type animals. In summary, the study suggests that SSAT overexpression obtained in SSAT mice enhances the anti-inflammatory actions in the acute phase of LPS-induced immune response. PMID:21814792

  19. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-κB activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17β-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-κB after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-κB co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17β-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K

  20. Functional Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in lactotrophs mediates LPS-induced proliferation in experimental pituitary hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabatino, María Eugenia; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Mascanfroni, Iván Darío; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología (CIBICI-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); Gutiérrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia Inés [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina); De Paul, Ana Lucía, E-mail: adepaul@cmefcm.uncor.edu [Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Av. Enrique Barros y Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 5000, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-11-15

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been characterized for its ability to recognize bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Considering that infections or inflammatory processes might contribute to the progression of pituitary tumors, we analyzed the TLR4 functional role by evaluating the LPS effect on lactotroph proliferation in primary cultures from experimental pituitary tumors, and examined the involvement of PI3K-Akt and NF-κB activation in this effect. In addition, the role of 17β-estradiol as a possible modulator of LPS-induced PRL cell proliferation was further investigated. In estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, LPS triggered lactotroph cell proliferation. However, endotoxin failed to increase the number of lactotrophs taking up BrdU in normal pituitaries. Moreover, incubation with anti-TLR4 antibody significantly reduced LPS-induced lactotroph proliferation, suggesting a functional role of this receptor. As a sign of TLR4 activation, an LPS challenge increased IL-6 release in normal and tumoral cells. By flow cytometry, TLR4 baseline expression was revealed at the plasma membrane of tumoral lactotrophs, without changes noted in the percentage of double PRL/TLR4 positive cells after LPS stimulus. Increases in TLR4 intracellular expression were detected as well as rises in CD14, p-Akt and NF-κB after an LPS challenge, as assessed by western blotting. The TLR4/PRL and PRL/NF-κB co-localization was also corroborated by immunofluorescence and the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling in lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release was revealed through the PI3K inhibitor Ly-294002. In addition, 17β-estradiol attenuated the LPS-evoked increase in tumoral lactotroph proliferation and IL-6 release. Collectively these results demonstrate the presence of functional TLR4 in lactotrophs from estrogen-induced hyperplasic pituitaries, which responded to the proliferative stimulation and IL-6 release induced by LPS through TLR4/CD14, with a contribution of the PI3K

  1. Relating the physical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides to virulence by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivan E; Kintz, Erica N; Porter, Laura A; Goldberg, Joanna B; Burnham, Nancy A; Camesano, Terri A

    2011-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are an important class of macromolecules that are components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa contains two different sugar chains, the homopolymer common antigen (A band) and the heteropolymer O antigen (B band), which impart serospecificity. The characteristics of LPS are generally assessed after isolation rather than in the context of whole bacteria. Here we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical properties of the LPS of P. aeruginosa strain PA103 (serogroup O11) in situ. This strain contains a mixture of long and very long polymers of O antigen, regulated by two different genes. For this analysis, we studied the wild-type strain and four mutants, ΔWzz1 (producing only very long LPS), ΔWzz2 (producing only long LPS), DΔM (with both the wzz1 and wzz2 genes deleted), and Wzy::GM (producing an LPS core oligosaccharide plus one unit of O antigen). Forces of adhesion between the LPS on these strains and the silicon nitride AFM tip were measured, and the Alexander and de Gennes model of steric repulsion between a flat surface and a polymer brush was used to calculate the LPS layer thickness (which we refer to as length), compressibility, and spacing between the individual molecules. LPS chains were longest for the wild-type strain and ΔWzz1, at 170.6 and 212.4 nm, respectively, and these values were not statistically significantly different from one another. Wzy::GM and DΔM have reduced LPS lengths, at 34.6 and 37.7 nm, respectively. Adhesion forces were not correlated with LPS length, but a relationship between adhesion force and bacterial pathogenicity was found in a mouse acute pneumonia model of infection. The adhesion forces with the AFM probe were lower for strains with LPS mutations, suggesting that the wild-type strain is optimized for maximal adhesion. Our research contributes to further understanding of the role of LPS in the adhesion and virulence of

  2. Overnutrition Determines LPS Regulation of Mycotoxin Induced Neurotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian James Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are now associated with obesity and diabetes and linked to the developing and developed world. Interests in healthy diets have escalated that may prevent neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. The global metabolic syndrome involves lipoprotein abnormalities and insulin resistance and is the major disorder for induction of neurological disease. The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS on dyslipidemia and NAFLD indicate that the clearance and metabolism of fungal mycotoxins are linked to hypercholesterolemia and amyloid beta oligomers. LPS and mycotoxins are associated with membrane lipid disturbances with effects on cholesterol interacting proteins, lipoprotein metabolism, and membrane apo E/amyloid beta interactions relevant to hypercholesterolemia with close connections to neurological diseases. The influence of diet on mycotoxin metabolism has accelerated with the close association between mycotoxin contamination from agricultural products such as apple juice, grains, alcohol, and coffee. Cholesterol efflux in lipoproteins and membrane cholesterol are determined by LPS with involvement of mycotoxin on amyloid beta metabolism. Nutritional interventions such as diets low in fat/carbohydrate/cholesterol have become of interest with relevance to low absorption of lipophilic LPS and mycotoxin into lipoproteins with rapid metabolism of mycotoxin to the liver with the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  3. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: Biological activities in vitro and in vivo, pathological correlation to human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yi-Hui; Yan, Jie; Mao, Ya-Fei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the biological activity of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) lipopolysaccharide (H-LPS) and understand pathological correlation between H-LPS and human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer.

  4. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  5. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryon; Ellis; Leah; Kaercher; Courtney; Snavely

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene tran-scription. METHODS:Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. RESULTS:Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from thecytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli , two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overex-pressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment.CONCLUSION:These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  6. Differential inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Havell, E A

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been implicated as a major mediator of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phenomena. Administration to mice of a polyclonal, monospecific antibody prepared against recombinant murine TNF alpha abolished detection of LPS-induced TNF alpha activity and significantly reduced levels of LPS-induced colony-stimulating factor but failed to reduce the production of LPS-induced interferon, corticosterone, or LPS-induced hypoglycemia.

  7. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  8. Alcohol metabolites and lipopolysaccharide: Roles in the development and/or progression of alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtney S Schaffert; Michael J Duryee; Carlos D Hunter; Bartlett C Hamilton 3rd; Amy L DeVeney; Mary M Huerter; Lynell W Klassen; Geoffrey M Thiele

    2009-01-01

    The onset of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is initiated by different cell types in the liver and a number of different factors including: products derived from ethanol- induced inflammation, ethanol metabolites, and the indirect reactions from those metabolites. Ethanol oxidation results in the production of metabolites that have been shown to bind and form protein adducts,and to increase inflammatory, fibrotic and cirrhotic responses. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has many deleterious effects and plays a significant role in a number of disease processes by increasing inflammatory cytokine release. In ALD, LPS is thought to be derived from a breakdown in the intestinal wall enabling LPS from resident gut bacterial cell walls to leak into the blood stream. The ability of adducts and LPS to independently stimulate the various cells of the liver provides for a two-hit mechanism by which various biological responses are induced and result in liver injury. Therefore,the purpose of this article is to evaluate the effects of a two-hit combination of ethanol metabolites and LPS on the cells of the liver to increase inflammation inflammation and fibrosis, and play a role in the development and/or progression of ALD.

  9. Characterization of ovine hepatic gene expression profiles in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide using a bovine cDNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boermans Herman J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During systemic gram-negative bacterial infections, lipopolysaccharide (LPS ligation to the hepatic Toll-like receptor-4 complex induces the production of hepatic acute phase proteins that are involved in the host response to infection and limit the associated inflammatory process. Identifying the genes that regulate this hepatic response to LPS in ruminants may provide insight into the pathogenesis of bacterial diseases and eventually facilitate breeding of more disease resistant animals. The objective of this research was to profile the expression of ovine hepatic genes in response to Escherichia coli LPS challenge (0, 200, 400 ng/kg using a bovine cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Results Twelve yearling ewes were challenged iv with E. coli LPS (0, 200, 400 ng/kg and liver biopsies were collected 4–5 hours post-challenge to assess hepatic gene expression profiles by bovine cDNA microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. The expression of CD14, C3, IL12R, NRAMP1, SOD and IGFBP3 genes was down regulated, whereas the expression of ACTHR, IFNαR, CD1, MCP-1 and GH was increased during LPS challenge. With the exception of C3, qRT-PCR analysis of 7 of these genes confirmed the microarray results and demonstrated that GAPDH is not a suitable housekeeping gene in LPS challenged sheep. Conclusion We have identified several potentially important genes by bovine cDNA microarray and qRT-PCR analyses that are differentially expressed during the ovine hepatic response to systemic LPS challenge. Their potential role in regulating the inflammatory response to LPS warrants further investigation.

  10. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  11. Simvastatin Reduces Lipopolysaccharides-Accelerated Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony Jalin, Angela M A; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kim, Chunsook; Ju, Chung; Pahk, Kisoo; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Won-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Preceding infection or inflammation such as bacterial meningitis has been associated with poor outcomes after stroke. Previously, we reported that intracorpus callosum microinjection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly accelerated the ischemia/reperfusion-evoked brain tissue damage via recruiting inflammatory cells into the ischemic lesion. Simvastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgultaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in vascular diseases. Thus, we investigated whether simvastatin could reduce the LPS-accelerated ischemic injury. Simvastatin (20 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats prior to cerebral ischemic insults (4 times at 72, 48, 25, and 1-h pre-ischemia). LPS was microinjected into rat corpus callosum 1 day before the ischemic injury. Treatment of simvastatin reduced the LPS-accelerated infarct size by 73%, and decreased the ischemia/reperfusion-induced expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2 and IL-1β in LPS-injected rat brains. However, simvastatin did not reduce the infiltration of microglial/macrophageal cells into the LPS-pretreated brain lesion. In vitro migration assay also showed that simvastatin did not inhibit the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-evoked migration of microglial/macrophageal cells. Instead, simvastatin inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a key signaling event in expressions of various proinflammatory mediators, by decreasing the degradation of IκB. The present results indicate that simvastatin may be beneficial particularly to the accelerated cerebral ischemic injury under inflammatory or infectious conditions. PMID:26535078

  12. Effects of Prenatal Lipopolysaccharide Exposure on Reproductive Activities and Serum Concentrations of Pituitary-Gonadal Hormones in Mice Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Solati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal infection during pregnancy is a risk factor for some behavioralproblems with neurodevelopmental origin. This study aimed to evaluate the effects ofexposure of pregnant mice to the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS on sexual behaviourand serum level of pituitary-gonadal hormones of offspring in adulthood.Materials and Methods: In this Expremental study, pregnant NMRI mice (n=7/groupwere treated with intra-peritoneal administration of LPS (1, 5 and 10 μg/kg at day 10of gestation. Induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured in maternalserum 2 hours following the maternal LPS challenge. Behavior in the adult male offspringreproductive activity was investigated using receptive female mice. Concentrationsof testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSHin adult offspring serum were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA method (at postnatal day 60, n=10/group.Results: One-way ANOVA showed that LPS administration induces a significant increasein TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels of maternal serum. Prenatal LPS exposure reduces sexualbehavior and serum concentration of LH and testosterone in adult male offspring.Conclusion: The overall results suggest that prenatal exposure to LPS increases proinflammatorycytokine levels, affects development of neuroendocrine systems and resultsin the inhibition of reproductive behaviors and reactivity of hypothalamic–pituitary-gonadal(HPG axis in adult male offspring.

  13. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages from Schisandra chinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You Jin [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Young [Korea BIO-IT Foundry Center, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sik [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hun [Korea BIO-IT Foundry Center, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Whan, E-mail: ywchoi@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-22

    A novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol, which has anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) production. Consistent with these findings, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also reduced the LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 at the protein and mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner. {alpha}-iso-cubebenol also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Furthermore, {alpha}-iso-cubebenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase induced by LPS. Since the novel {alpha}-iso-cubebenol blocked the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators induced by LPS in macrophages, the molecule can be useful material for the development of anti-inflammatory agents against bacterial infections or endotoxin.

  14. Hepcidin regulation by BMP signaling in macrophages is lipopolysaccharide dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinggang Wu

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is an antimicrobial peptide, which also negatively regulates iron in circulation by controlling iron absorption from dietary sources and iron release from macrophages. Hepcidin is synthesized mainly in the liver, where hepcidin is regulated by iron loading, inflammation and hypoxia. Recently, we have demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-hemojuvelin (HJV-SMAD signaling is central for hepcidin regulation in hepatocytes. Hepcidin is also expressed by macrophages. Studies have shown that hepcidin expression by macrophages increases following bacterial infection, and that hepcidin decreases iron release from macrophages in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Although previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS can induce hepcidin expression in macrophages, whether hepcidin is also regulated by BMPs in macrophages is still unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of BMP signaling on hepcidin expression in RAW 264.7 and J774 macrophage cell lines, and in primary peritoneal macrophages. We found that BMP4 or BMP6 alone did not have any effect on hepcidin expression in macrophages although they stimulated Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and Id1 expression. In the presence of LPS, however, BMP4 and BMP6 were able to stimulate hepcidin expression in macrophages, and this stimulation was abolished by the NF-κB inhibitor Ro1069920. These results suggest that hepcidin expression is regulated differently in macrophages than in hepatocytes, and that BMPs regulate hepcidin expression in macrophages in a LPS-NF-κB dependent manner.

  15. N-acetylcysteine attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced impairment in lamination of Ctip2-and Tbr1- expressing cortical neurons in the developing rat fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Chen, Chie-Pein; Yang, Yu-Hsiu; Chuang, Yu-Chen; Chu, Tzu-Yun; Tseng, Chia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory insults are the major instigating events of bacterial intrauterine infection that lead to fetal brain injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the remedial effects of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) for inflammation-caused deficits in brain development. We found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by RAW264.7 cells. Macrophage-conditioned medium caused noticeable cortical cell damage, specifically in cortical neurons. LPS at 25 μg/kg caused more than 75% fetal loss in rats. An increase in fetal cortical thickness was noted in the LPS-treated group. In the enlarged fetal cortex, laminar positioning of the early born cortical cells expressing Tbr1 and Ctip2 was disrupted, with a scattered distribution. The effect was similar, but minor, in later born Satb2-expressing cortical cells. NAC protected against LPS-induced neuron toxicity in vitro and counteracted pregnancy loss and alterations in thickness and lamination of the neocortex in vivo. Fetal loss and abnormal fetal brain development were due to LPS-induced ROS production. NAC is an effective protective agent against LPS-induced damage. This finding highlights the key therapeutic impact of NAC in LPS-caused abnormal neuronal laminar distribution during brain development. PMID:27577752

  16. p-Cresyl sulfate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-bacterial immune responses in murine macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Takahiro; Makino, Ikuyo; Kawakami, Koji; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2016-03-14

    p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) is a known uremic toxin that is metabolized from p-cresol produced by intestinal bacteria. Abnormal accumulation of pCS in the blood is a characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). pCS is suggested to cause immune dysfunction and increase the risk of infectious diseases in CKD patients. In this study, we focused on the effects of pCS on macrophage functions related to host defense. We evaluated the effects of pCS on cytokine production, nitric oxide (NO) production, arginase activity, expression of cell-surface molecules, and phagocytosis in the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. pCS significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-12 p40 production and increased IL-10 production. pCS also decreased NO production, but did not influence arginase activity. pCS suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced CD40 expression on the cell surface, but did not influence phagocytosis. We further assessed whether the effects of pCS observed in the macrophage-like cell line were consistent in primary macrophages. Similar to RAW264.7 cells, pCS decreased IL-12 p40 and p70 production and increased IL-10 production in primary peritoneal macrophages. These data indicate that pCS suppresses certain macrophage functions that contribute to host defense, and may play a role in CKD-related immune dysfunction. PMID:26784855

  17. The lipopolysaccharide core of Brucella abortus acts as a shield against innate immunity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Iriarte, Maite; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Martirosyan, Anna; von Bargen, Kristine; Grilló, María-Jesús; Jerala, Roman; Brandenburg, Klaus; Llobet, Enrique; Bengoechea, José A; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity recognizes bacterial molecules bearing pathogen-associated molecular patterns to launch inflammatory responses leading to the activation of adaptive immunity. However, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the gram-negative bacterium Brucella lacks a marked pathogen-associated molecular pattern, and it has been postulated that this delays the development of immunity, creating a gap that is critical for the bacterium to reach the intracellular replicative niche. We found that a B. abortus mutant in the wadC gene displayed a disrupted LPS core while keeping both the LPS O-polysaccharide and lipid A. In mice, the wadC mutant induced proinflammatory responses and was attenuated. In addition, it was sensitive to killing by non-immune serum and bactericidal peptides and did not multiply in dendritic cells being targeted to lysosomal compartments. In contrast to wild type B. abortus, the wadC mutant induced dendritic cell maturation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. All these properties were reproduced by the wadC mutant purified LPS in a TLR4-dependent manner. Moreover, the core-mutated LPS displayed an increased binding to MD-2, the TLR4 co-receptor leading to subsequent increase in intracellular signaling. Here we show that Brucella escapes recognition in early stages of infection by expressing a shield against recognition by innate immunity in its LPS core and identify a novel virulence mechanism in intracellular pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. These results also encourage for an improvement in the generation of novel bacterial vaccines. PMID:22589715

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-induced acute renal failure in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Thomas E N; Graebe, Martin; Promeneur, Dominique;

    2002-01-01

    In conscious, chronically instrumented rats we examined 1) renal tubular functional changes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute renal failure; 2) the effects of LPS on the expression of selected renal tubular water and sodium transporters; and 3) effects of milrinone, a......-alpha and lactate, inhibited the LPS-induced tachycardia, and exacerbated the acute LPS-induced fall in GFR. Furthermore, Ro-20-1724-treated rats were unable to maintain MAP. We conclude 1) PDE3 or PDE4 inhibition exacerbates LPS-induced renal failure in conscious rats; and 2) LPS treated rats develop an...... phosphodiesterase type 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, and Ro-20-1724, a PDE4 inhibitor, on LPS-induced changes in renal function. Intravenous infusion of LPS (4 mg/kg b.wt. over 1 h) caused an immediate decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proximal tubular outflow without changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP...

  20. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Z. G.; L. L. Zhang; C.Y. Niu; J. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg...

  1. Gastrointestinal and hepatic mechanisms limiting entry and dissemination of lipopolysaccharide into the systemic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerville, Mathilde; Boudry, Gaëlle

    2016-07-01

    The human microbiota consists of 100 trillion microorganisms that provide important metabolic and biological functions benefiting the host. However, the presence in host plasma of a gut-derived bacteria component, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has been identified as a causal or complicating factor in multiple serious diseases such as sepsis and septic shock and, more recently, obesity-associated metabolic disorders. Understanding the precise mechanisms by which gut-derived LPS is transported from the gut lumen to the systemic circulation is crucial to advance our knowledge of LPS-associated diseases and elaborate targeted strategies for their prevention. The aim of this review is to synthetize current knowledge on the host mechanisms limiting the entry and dissemination of LPS into the systemic circulation. To prevent bacterial colonization and penetration, the intestinal epithelium harbors multiple defense mechanisms including the secretion of antimicrobial peptides and mucins as well as detoxification enzymes. Despite this first line of defense, LPS can reach the apical site of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and, because of its large size, likely crosses IECs via transcellular transport, either lipid raft- or clathrin-mediated endocytosis or goblet cell-associated passage. However, the precise pathway remains poorly described. Finally, if LPS crosses the gut mucosa, it is directed via the portal vein to the liver, where major detoxification processes occur by deacetylation and excretion through the bile. If this disposal process is not sufficient, LPS enters the systemic circulation, where it is handled by numerous transport proteins that clear it back to the liver for further excretion. PMID:27151941

  2. Isolation of prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein gene and its expression in responding to bacterial and viral infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qianqian; Li, Jian; Duan, Yafei; Li, Jitao; Sun, Ming; Zhao, Fazhen

    2016-04-01

    The pattern recognition proteins (PRPs) play a major role in immune response of crustacean to resist pathogens. In the present study, as one of PRPs, lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) gene in the ridge tail white prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) ( EcLGBP) was isolated. The full-length cDNA of EcLGBP was 1338 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 366 amino acid residules. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcLGBP shared high similarities with LGBP and BGBP from other crustaceans. Some conservative domains were predicted in EcLGBP sequence. EcLGBP constitutively expressed in most tissues at different levels, and the highest expression was observed in hepatopancreas. With infection time, the cumulative mortality increased gradually followed by the proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The expression of EcLGBP in response to V. parahaemolyticus infection was up-regulated in hemocytes and hepatopancreas, and the up-regulation in hepatopancreas was earlier than that in hemocytes. EcLGBP expression after WSSV infection increased at 3 h, then significantly decreased in both hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The results indicated that EcLGBP was involved in the immune defense against bacterial and viral infections.

  3. Colistin-resistant, lipopolysaccharide-deficient Acinetobacter baumannii responds to lipopolysaccharide loss through increased expression of genes involved in the synthesis and transport of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rebekah; Vithanage, Nuwan; Harrison, Paul; Seemann, Torsten; Coutts, Scott; Moffatt, Jennifer H; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii can result from mutational inactivation of genes essential for lipid A biosynthesis (Moffatt JH, et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 54:4971-4977). Consequently, strains harboring these mutations are unable to produce the major Gram-negative bacterial surface component, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To understand how A. baumannii compensates for the lack of LPS, we compared the transcriptional profile of the A. baumannii type strain ATCC 19606 to that of an isogenic, LPS-deficient, lpxA mutant strain. The analysis of the expression profiles indicated that the LPS-deficient strain showed increased expression of many genes involved in cell envelope and membrane biogenesis. In particular, upregulated genes included those involved in the Lol lipoprotein transport system and the Mla-retrograde phospholipid transport system. In addition, genes involved in the synthesis and transport of poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) also were upregulated, and a corresponding increase in PNAG production was observed. The LPS-deficient strain also exhibited the reduced expression of genes predicted to encode the fimbrial subunit FimA and a type VI secretion system (T6SS). The reduced expression of genes involved in T6SS correlated with the detection of the T6SS-effector protein AssC in culture supernatants of the A. baumannii wild-type strain but not in the LPS-deficient strain. Taken together, these data show that, in response to total LPS loss, A. baumannii alters the expression of critical transport and biosynthesis systems associated with modulating the composition and structure of the bacterial surface. PMID:22024825

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Erickson

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  6. Bioactivity of Samsum ant (Pachycondyla sennaarensis venom against lipopolysaccharides through antioxidant and upregulation of Akt1 signaling in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebaid Hossam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at investigating the oxidative stress ameliorating effect, lipids profile restoration, and the anti-inflammatory effect of Samsum Ant Venom (SAV in induced endotoxemic male rats, injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS. Results Results revealed that LPS significantly increased the oxidative stress indications in LPS-injected rats. A significant increase of both malondialdehyde (MDA, and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP, as well as a significant suppression of glutathione were all detected. Treatment with 100 μg/kg dose of SAV significantly restored the oxidative stress normal indications and increased the total glutathione levels. Treatment of the LPS-rats with 100 μg/kg dose of SAV showed a clear anti-inflammatory function; as the histological architecture of the hepatic tissue was partially recovered, along with a valuable decrease in the leukocytes infiltrated the hepatic tissues. Treatment of some rat groups with 600 μg/kg dose of SAV after LPS injection induced a severe endotoxemia that resulted in very high mortality rates. SAV versus the effects of LPS on AKT1, Fas, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNA expression. SAV was found to significantly lower Fas gene expression comparing to the LPS group and restore the level of IFN-γ mRNA expression to that of the control group. Conclusion In conclusion, SAV, at the dose of 100 μg/kg body weight, maintained and restored the oxidative stability, the anti-inflammatory, and the hypolipidemic bioactivity in rats after induced disruption of these parameters by LPS injection. This improvement by SAV was mediated by upregulation of AKT1.

  7. An LPS based method to stimulate the inflammatory response in growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Knudsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliable indicators are needed to study the relationship between the inflammatory response of the growing rabbit and breeding factors such as feeding practices. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation of the inflammatory response is a valid model of bacterial infection in laboratory animals, but no data on the growing rabbit has yet been obtained. The aim of our study was to determine an adequate dose of LPS to inject in growing rabbits in order to elicit a measurable inflammatory response in terms of plasmatic TNF-α and rise in rectal temperature. Three trials were carried out in this study: 2 development trials, the first (n=18 testing 3 doses of LPS (2, 10, 50 μg/kg on the plasmatic TNF-α concentration at 90 and 180 min post injection, and the second trial (n=36 testing 4 doses of LPS (50, 75, 100 and 150 μg/kg on the TNF-α concentration 90 min post injection and the rectal temperature. The third trial was designed as an application of the method in a large number of animals (n=32 to study the effect of feed restriction and dietary increase in digestible fibre to starch ratio on the LPS inflammatory challenge response of growing rabbits. In development trials 1 and 2, animals had measurable TNF-α responses for doses higher than 10 μg/kg at 90 min post injection, with an increase in the number of responsive animals along with the dose. High variability was observed in TNF-α concentrations in responsive animals (coefficient of variation from 44 to 94%. Animals demonstrated an increase in rectal temperature for all doses injected in the range of 50-150 μg/kg from 90 min post injection with a peak at 180 min (ΔTr =1.9±0.7°C. Our observations led us to choose a dose of 100 μg/kg of LPS for our following studies, as the responses in terms of temperature and TNF-α were the most satisfactory. The application of our LPS injection protocol to our nutritional study enabled us to validate our protocol (ΔTr =1.1±0.7°C at 180 min and 15

  8. Increased susceptibility of Cftr-/- mice to LPS-induced lung remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruscia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Barone, Christina; Scholte, Bob J; Homer, Robert; Krause, Diane S; Egan, Marie E

    2016-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by homozygous mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, which result in chronic pulmonary infection and inflammation, the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Although these processes are clearly related to each other, each is likely to contribute to the pathology differently. Understanding the contribution of each of these processes to the overall pathology has been difficult, because they are usually so intimately connected. Various CF mouse models have demonstrated abnormal immune responses compared with wild-type (WT) littermates when challenged with live bacteria or bacterial products acutely. However, these studies have not investigated the consequences of persistent inflammation on lung tissue in CF mice, which may better model the lung pathology in patients. We characterized the lung pathology and immune response of Cftr(-/-) (CF) and Cftr(+/+) (WT) mice to chronic administration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that, after long-term repeated LPS exposure, CF mice develop an abnormal and persistent immune response, which is associated with more robust structural changes in the lung than those observed in WT mice. Although CF mice and their WT littermates develop lung pathology after chronic exposure to LPS, the inflammation and damage resolve in WT mice. However, CF mice do not recover efficiently, and, as a consequence of their chronic inflammation, CF mice are more susceptible to morphological changes and lung remodeling. This study shows that chronic inflammation alone contributes significantly to aspects of CF lung pathology. PMID:26851259

  9. Social management of LPS-induced inflammation in Formica polyctena ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, A; Richard, F-J

    2008-08-01

    Invertebrates, and especially insects, constitute valuable and convenient models for the study of the evolutionary roots of immune-related behaviors. With stable conditions in the nest, high population densities, and frequent interactions, social insects such as ants provide an excellent system for examining the spread of pathogens. The evolutionary success of these species raises questions about the behavioral responses of social insects to an infected nestmate. In this experiment, we tested the behavioral changes of the red wood ant Formica polyctena toward an immune-stimulated nestmate. We used bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) to active the innate immune system of individual worker ants without biasing our observation with possible cues or host-manipulation from a living pathogen. We show that LPS-induced immune activation in ants triggers behavioral changes in nestmates. Contrary to what would be expected, we did not find removal strategies (e.g. agonistic behaviors) or avoidance of the pathogenic source, but rather a balance between a limitation of pathogen dissemination (i.e. decreased trophallaxis and locomotion of the LPS-treated ant), and what could constitute the behavioral basis for a "social vaccination" (i.e. increased grooming). This supports the importance of social interactions in resistance to disease in social insects, and perhaps social animals in general. PMID:18331785

  10. Cinnamaldehyde modulates LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Saulo J F; Sousa, Fernanda I A B; Pereira, Domingos M S; Ferro, Thiago A F; Pereira, Ione C P; Silva, Bruna L R; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Mouchrek, Adriana Q S; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Costa, Soraia K P; Nascimento, José L M; Grisotto, Marcos A G; da Costa, Robson; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural essential oil suggested to possess anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; and to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels expressed on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of cinnamaldehyde in an in vivo model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by lipopolysaccharide. Swiss mice received a single oral treatment with cinnamaldehyde 1 h before LPS injection. To investigate whether cinnamaldehyde effects are dependent on TRPA1 activation, animals were treated subcutaneously with the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 5 min prior to cinnamaldehyde administration. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Cinnamaldehyde ameliorated SIRS severity in LPS-injected animals. Diminished numbers of circulating mononuclear cells and increased numbers of peritoneal mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell numbers were also observed. Cinnamaldehyde augmented the number of peritoneal Ly6C(high) and Ly6C(low) monocyte/macrophage cells in LPS-injected mice. Reduced levels of nitric oxide, plasma TNFα and plasma and peritoneal IL-10 were also detected. Additionally, IL-1β levels were increased in the same animals. TRPA1 antagonism by HC-030031 reversed the changes in the number of circulating and peritoneal leukocytes in cinnamaldehyde-treated animals, whilst increasing the levels of peritoneal IL-10 and reducing peritoneal IL-1β. Overall, cinnamaldehyde modulates SIRS through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26922677

  11. Phylogenomic analysis supports the ancestral presence of LPS-outer membranes in the Firmicutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Luisa CS; Poppleton, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Criscuolo, Alexis; Dupuy, Bruno; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Beloin, Christophe; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    One of the major unanswered questions in evolutionary biology is when and how the transition between diderm (two membranes) and monoderm (one membrane) cell envelopes occurred in Bacteria. The Negativicutes and the Halanaerobiales belong to the classically monoderm Firmicutes, but possess outer membranes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-OM). Here, we show that they form two phylogenetically distinct lineages, each close to different monoderm relatives. In contrast, their core LPS biosynthesis enzymes were inherited vertically, as in the majority of bacterial phyla. Finally, annotation of key OM systems in the Halanaerobiales and the Negativicutes shows a puzzling combination of monoderm and diderm features. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the LPS-OMs of Negativicutes and Halanaerobiales are remnants of an ancient diderm cell envelope that was present in the ancestor of the Firmicutes, and that the monoderm phenotype in this phylum is a derived character that arose multiple times independently through OM loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14589.001 PMID:27580370

  12. Enterobacter agglomerans lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in pulmonary surfactant as a factor in the pathogenesis of byssinosis.

    OpenAIRE

    DeLucca, A J; Brogden, K.A.; Engen, R

    1988-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Enterobacter agglomerans and pulmonary surfactant mixtures were centrifuged in discontinuous sucrose gradients to determine whether LPS bound to surfactant and examined in a Langmuir trough with a Wilhelmy balance to determine whether LPS altered the surface activity of surfactant. The LPS was found to bind to the surfactant and altered its surface tension properties. The binding of LPS to surfactant in the lung may change the physiological properties of surfacta...

  13. Variation in Microbiome LPS Immunogenicity Contributes to Autoimmunity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatanen, Tommi; Kostic, Aleksandar D; d'Hennezel, Eva; Siljander, Heli; Franzosa, Eric A; Yassour, Moran; Kolde, Raivo; Vlamakis, Hera; Arthur, Timothy D; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Uibo, Raivo; Mokurov, Sergei; Dorshakova, Natalya; Ilonen, Jorma; Virtanen, Suvi M; Szabo, Susanne J; Porter, Jeffrey A; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Cullen, Thomas W; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-05-01

    According to the hygiene hypothesis, the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases in western countries may be explained by changes in early microbial exposure, leading to altered immune maturation. We followed gut microbiome development from birth until age three in 222 infants in Northern Europe, where early-onset autoimmune diseases are common in Finland and Estonia but are less prevalent in Russia. We found that Bacteroides species are lowly abundant in Russians but dominate in Finnish and Estonian infants. Therefore, their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures arose primarily from Bacteroides rather than from Escherichia coli, which is a potent innate immune activator. We show that Bacteroides LPS is structurally distinct from E. coli LPS and inhibits innate immune signaling and endotoxin tolerance; furthermore, unlike LPS from E. coli, B. dorei LPS does not decrease incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Early colonization by immunologically silencing microbiota may thus preclude aspects of immune education. PMID:27133167

  14. 细菌脂多糖联合高体积分数氧对未成熟大鼠脑发育的影响%Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide and normobaric hyperoxia on immature brain development of neonatal rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐发林; 段佳佳; 王举; 张彦华; 郭佳佳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and / or normobaric hyperoxia on brain development of neonatal rat and the possible mechanisms.Methods One hundred and twenty postnatal day 2 (P2) SD rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups:air group,LPS group,hyperoxia group,LPS + hyperoxia group.General condition and body weight of the rats in each group were observed and recorded every day.The expression of active Caspase-3 and nuclear factor-κappaB P65 (NF-κB P65) in the brain were detected by immunohistochemistry staining on P7,and the level of IL-6 and 8-iso-PGF2α in the brain homogenate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA).The expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the brain was detected by immunohistochemistry staining on P12.Results The expressions of Caspase-3 and NF-κB P65 had the same trends:the number of positive cells from high to low was in LPS + hyperoxia group,LPS group/hyperoxia group,air group.There were significant differences between the first three groups and air group(all P < 0.05).There were also significant differences between LPS + hyperoxia group and LPS group or hyperoxia group(all P <0.01).MBP in the brain had the completely reverse expression:from high to low order was in air group,hyperoxia group,LPS group,LPS + hyperoxia group.There were significant differences between the last three groups and air group (all P < 0.05).There were also significant differences between LPS + hyperoxia group and LPS group or hyperoxia group(all P <0.01).The level of IL-6 in the brain from high to low order respectively was in LPS + hyperoxia group,LPS group,hyperoxia group,air group;and 8-iso-PGF2α was also in LPS + hyperoxia group,hyperoxia group,LPS group,air group,Significant differences were found among the four groups (all P < 0.05).Conclusions Both postnatal infection and normobaric hyperoxia may induce premature rat brain injury,and increase the number of apoptosis cell and reduce the

  15. Lipopolysaccharides from Commensal and Opportunistic Bacteria: Characterization and Response of the Immune System of the Host Sponge Suberites domuncula

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    Johan Gardères

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges harbor a rich bacterioflora with which they maintain close relationships. However, the way these animals make the distinction between bacteria which are consumed to meet their metabolic needs and opportunistic and commensal bacteria which are hosted is not elucidated. Among the elements participating in this discrimination, bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS could play a role. In the present study, we investigated the LPS chemical structure of two bacteria associated with the sponge Suberites domuncula: a commensal Endozoicomonas sp. and an opportunistic Pseudoalteromonas sp. Electrophoretic patterns indicated different LPS structures for these bacteria. The immunomodulatory lipid A was isolated after mild acetic acid hydrolysis. The electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectra revealed monophosphorylated molecules corresponding to tetra- and pentaacylated structures with common structural features between the two strains. Despite peculiar structural characteristics, none of these two LPS influenced the expression of the macrophage-expressed gene S. domuncula unlike the Escherichia coli ones. Further research will have to include a larger number of genes to understand how this animal can distinguish between LPS with resembling structures and discriminate between bacteria associated with it.

  16. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intervention Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Weight Loss in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced sepsis is a critical medical condition, characterized by a severe systemic inflammation and rapid loss of muscle mass. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for this complex disease are still lacking. Here, we evaluated the effect of omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA intervention on LPS-challenged mice with respect to inflammation, body weight and the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 pathway components. LPS administration induced a dramatic loss of body weight within two days. Treatment with n-3 PUFA not only stopped loss of body weight but also gradually reversed it back to baseline levels within one week. Accordingly, the animals treated with n-3 PUFA exhibited markedly lower levels of inflammatory cytokines or markers in plasma and tissues, as well as down-regulation of TLR4 pathway components compared to animals without n-3 PUFA treatment or those treated with omega-6 PUFA. Our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFA intervention can suppress LPS-induced inflammation and weight loss via, at least in part, down-regulation of pro-inflammatory targets of the TLR4 signaling pathway, and highlight the therapeutic potential of n-3 PUFA in the management of sepsis.

  18. Morphological heterogeneity among Salmonella lipopolysaccharide chemotypes in silver-stained polyacrylamide gels.

    OpenAIRE

    Hitchcock, P J; Brown, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    The morphological heterogeneity of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) among salmonella mutants with different LPS chemotypes was analyzed in silver-stained polyacrylamide gels. The biochemical differences in the LPS chemotypes were reflected in the unique profiles of the purified LPSs. The LPS profiles in the whole-cell lysates were also unique for each chemotype. (Whole-cell lysates were assessed by a method which preferentially silver stains LPS and by a proteinase K digest of whole-cell lysates. T...

  19. Orally Administered Melatonin Prevents Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neural Tube Defects in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lin; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xia, Mi-Zhen; WANG Hua; Cheng ZHANG; Tao, Fang-biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), neural tube defects (NTDs) and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25...

  20. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE ATTENUATES PHRENIC LONG-TERM FACILITATION FOLLOWING ACUTE INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit, Stéphane; Windelborn, James A; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammatory responses, including microglial activation in the central nervous system. Since LPS impairs certain forms of hippocampal and spinal neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that LPS would impair phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) in outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) and inbred Lewis (L) rats.. Approximately three hours following a single LPS injection (i.p.), the phrenic response during hypoxic episodes is reduced i...

  1. Differential Inflammatory Response to Inhaled Lipopolysaccharide Targeted Either to the Airways or the Alveoli in Man

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, Winfried; Heimbeck, Irene; Hofer, Thomas P J; Khadem Saba, Gülnaz; Neiswirth, Margot; Frankenberger, Marion; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Löms

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS) is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease. In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and...

  2. Innate immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana: Lipopolysaccharides activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and induce defense genes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Dana; Zähringer, Ulrich; Gerber, Isak; Dubery, Ian; Hartung, Thomas; Bors, Wolf; Hutzler, Peter; Durner, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell-surface components of Gram-negative bacteria and are microbe-/pathogen-associated molecular patterns in animal pathosystems. As for plants, the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction in response to LPS are not known. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana reacts to LPS with a rapid burst of NO, a hallmark of innate immunity in animals. Fifteen LPS preparations (among them Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Erwinia carotovora) as well as ...

  3. Uninephrectomy in rats on a fixed food intake potentiates both anorexia and circulating cytokine subsets in response to LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eArsenijevic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent human studies have suggested that mild reduction in kidney function can alter immune response and increase susceptibility to infection. The role of mild reduction in kidney function in altering susceptibility to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS responses was investigated in uninephrectomized rats compared to Sham-operated controls rats 4 weeks after surgery. Throughout the 4 weeks, all rats were maintained under mild food restriction at 90% of ad libitum intake to ensure the same caloric intake in both groups.In comparison to Sham, uninephrectomy (UniNX potentiated LPS-induced anorexia by 2.1 fold. The circulating anorexigenic cytokines granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor, interferon- tumor necrosis factor- and complement derived acylation stimulating protein were elevated after LPS in UniNX animals compared to Sham animals. Interleukin(IL1 and IL6 pro-inflammatory cytokines were transiently increased. Anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 and IL10 did not differ or had a tendency to be lower in UniNX group compared to Sham animals. LPS-induced anorexia was associated with increased anorexigenic neuropeptides mRNA for pro-opiomelanocortin, corticotrophin releasing factor and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript in the hypothalamus of both Sham and UniNX groups, but at higher levels in the UniNX group. Melanocortin-4-receptor mRNA was markedly increased in the UniNX group, which may have contributed to the enhanced anorexic response to LPS of the UniNX group. In summary, UniNX potentiates pro-inflammatory cytokine production, anorexia and selected hypothalamic anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to LPS.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamon water extract in vivo and in vitro LPS-induced models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Joung-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cinnamon bark is one of the most popular herbal ingredients in traditional oriental medicine and possesses diverse pharmacological activities including anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-cancer properties. The goal of this study is to investigate the in vivo and in vitro inhibitory effect of cinnamon water extract (CWE on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and its underlying intracellular mechanisms. Methods CWE was orally administrated to mice for 6 days prior to intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Serum levels of TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 were determined 1 hour after LPS stimulation. Peritoneal macrophages from thioglycollate-injected mice were isolated and assayed for viability, cytokine expression and signaling molecules upon LPS stimulation. CWE was further fractioned according to molecular size, and the levels of total polyphenols and biological activities of each fraction were measured. Results The oral administration of CWE to mice significantly decreased the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6. CWE treatment in vitro decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α. CWE blocked the LPS-induced degradation of IκBα as well as the activation of JNK, p38 and ERK1/2. Furthermore, size-based fractionation of CWE showed that the observed inhibitory effect of CWE in vitro occurred in the fraction containing the highest level of total polyphenols. Conclusions Treatment with CWE decreased LPS-induced TNF-α in serum. In vitro inhibition of TNF-α gene by CWE may occur via the modulation of IκBα degradation and JNK, p38, and ERK1/2 activation. Our results also indicate that the observed anti-inflammatory action of CWE may originate from the presence of polyphenols.

  5. Uninephrectomy in Rats on a Fixed Food Intake Potentiates Both Anorexia and Circulating Cytokine Subsets in Response to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, Denis; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Recent human studies have suggested that mild reduction in kidney function can alter immune response and increase susceptibility to infection. The role of mild reduction in kidney function in altering susceptibility to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses was investigated in uninephrectomized rats compared to Sham-operated controls rats 4 weeks after surgery. Throughout the 4 weeks, all rats were maintained under mild food restriction at 90% of ad libitum intake to ensure the same caloric intake in both groups. In comparison to Sham, uninephrectomy (UniNX) potentiated LPS-induced anorexia by 2.1-fold. The circulating anorexigenic cytokines granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and complement-derived acylation-stimulating protein were elevated after LPS in UniNX animals compared to Sham animals. Interleukin(IL)1β and IL6 pro-inflammatory cytokines were transiently increased. Anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 and IL10 did not differ or had a tendency to be lower in UniNX group compared to Sham animals. LPS-induced anorexia was associated with increased anorexigenic neuropeptides mRNA for pro-opiomelanocortin, corticotrophin-releasing factor, and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript in the hypothalamus of both Sham and UniNX groups, but at higher levels in the UniNX group. Melanocortin-4-receptor mRNA was markedly increased in the UniNX group, which may have contributed to the enhanced anorexic response to LPS of the UniNX group. In summary, UniNX potentiates pro-inflammatory cytokine production, anorexia, and selected hypothalamic anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to LPS. PMID:26734008

  6. Inhibition of LPS-Induced Activation of Coagulation by p38 MAPK Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz Koch; Stefan Hofer; Weigand, Markus A.; David Frommhold; Johannes Poeschl; Peter Ruef

    2012-01-01

    During Gram-negative sepsis, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and induces complex responses of immune system and coagulation. However, the underlying LPS signalling mechanism on coagulation activation remains complex. To determine the role of the intracellular signalling factors p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF- κ B), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the procoagulant response to LPS, coagulation process of human whole blo...

  7. Serum Levels of Lipopolysaccharide and 1,3-β-D-Glucan Refer to the Severity in Patients with Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Interactions between the host and gut microbial community contribute to the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD. In this study, we aimed to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS and 1,3-β-D-glucan (BG in the sera of CD patients and clarify the potential role in the diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 46 patients with active CD (A-CD, 22 CD patients at remission stage (R-CD, and 20 healthy controls, and the levels of LPS, BG, and TNF in sera were determined by ELISA. Moreover, sixteen patients with A-CD received anti-TNF monoclonal antibody therapy (infliximab, IFX at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight at weeks 0, 2, and 6, and the levels of LPS and BG were also tested at week 12 after the first intravenous infusion. Results. Serum levels of LPS and BG were found to be markedly increased in A-CD patients compared with R-CD patients and healthy controls (P<0.05. They were also observed to be positively correlated with CDAI, ESR, and SES-CD, respectively (P<0.05. Furthermore, the levels of TNF in sera had a significant correlation with LPS and BG, respectively. The concentrations of LPS and BG were demonstrated to be significantly downregulated in the sera of A-CD patients 12 weeks after IFX treatment (P<0.05, suggesting that blockade of TNF could inhibit bacterial endotoxin absorption, partially through improving intestinal mucosal barrier. Conclusions. Serum levels of LPS and BG are significantly increased in A-CD patients and positively correlated with the severity of the disease. Blockade of intestinal mucosal inflammation with IFX could reduce the levels of LPS and BG in sera. Therefore, this study has shed some light on measurement of serum LPS and BG in the diagnosis and treatment of CD patients.

  8. Contribution of the lipopolysaccharide to resistance of Shigella flexneri 2a to extreme acidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Martinić

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is endemic in most underdeveloped countries, causing diarrheal disease and dysentery among young children. In order to reach its target site, the colon, Shigella must overcome the acid environment of the stomach. Shigella is able to persist in this stressful environment and, because of this ability it can initiate infection following the ingestion of very small inocula. Thus, acid resistance is considered an important virulence trait of this bacterium. It has been reported that moderate acid conditions regulate the expression of numerous components of the bacterial envelope. Because the lipopolysaccharide (LPS is the major component of the bacterial surface, here we have addressed the role of LPS in acid resistance of S. flexneri 2a. Defined deletion mutants in genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis, assembly and length regulation of the LPS O antigen were constructed and assayed for resistance to pH 2.5 after adaptation to pH 5.5. The results showed that a mutant lacking O antigen was significantly more sensitive to extreme acid conditions than the wild type. Not only the presence of polymerized O antigen, but also a particular polymer length (S-OAg was required for acid resistance. Glucosylation of the O antigen also contributed to this property. In addition, a moderate acidic pH induced changes in the composition of the lipid A domain of LPS. The main modification was the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the 1' phosphate of lipid A. This modification increased resistance of S. flexneri to extreme acid conditions, provide that O antigen was produced. Overall, the results of this work point out to an important role of LPS in resistance of Shigella flexneri to acid stress.

  9. Antioxidant Effects of Cranberry Powder in Lipopolysaccharide Treated Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Joung; Kim, Jung Hee; Kwak, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of cranberry power on antioxidant defense system in rats fed an atherogenic diet and injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following 5 groups: normal diet+saline (NS), atherogenic diet+saline (AS), atherogenic diet+LPS (AL), atherogenic diet with 5% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C5), and atherogenic diet with 10% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C10). Total antioxidant status measured by ferric reducing ability...

  10. Role of phosphoglucomutase of Bordetella bronchiseptica in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N P; Jungnitz, H; Fitter, J T; McArthur, J D; Guzmán, C A; Walker, M J

    2000-08-01

    The phosphoglucomutase (PGM)-encoding gene of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. An insertion mutant of the wild-type B. bronchiseptica strain BB7865 which disrupted LPS biosynthesis was created and characterized (BB7865pgm). Genetic analysis of the mutated gene showed it shares high identity with PGM genes of various bacterial species and forms part of an operon which also encompasses the gene encoding phosphoglucose isomerase. Functional assays for PGM revealed that enzyme activity is expressed in both bvg-positive and bvg-negative strains of B. bronchiseptica and is substantially reduced in BB7865pgm. Complementation of the mutated PGM gene with that from BB7865 restored the wild-type condition for all phenotypes tested. The ability of the mutant BB7865pgm to survive within J774. A1 cells was significantly reduced at 2 h (40% reduction) and 24 h (56% reduction) postinfection. BB7865pgm was also significantly attenuated in its ability to survive in vivo following intranasal infection of mice, being effectively cleared from the lungs within 4 days, whereas the wild-type strain persisted at least 35 days. The activities of superoxide dismutase, urease, and acid phosphatase were unaffected in the PGM-deficient strain. In contrast, the inability to produce wild-type LPS resulted in a reduced bacterial resistance to oxidative stress and a higher susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P. PMID:10899872

  11. Innate immune defenses exhibit circadian rhythmicity and differential temporal sensitivity to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2016-01-01

    :24D (DD), for 20 days to characterize the rhythms of humoral immunity. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lysozyme (LYZ), peroxidase (PER) and protease (PRO) exhibited significant rhythmicity under LD but not in DD. No significant rhythms were observed in esterase (ESA) and anti-protease (ANTI) in......The present study investigated the daily dynamics of humoral immune defenses and the temporal influence in the sensitivity of these responses to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The first experiment subjected the fish to two photoperiod conditions, 12L:12D (LD) and 0L...... experiment, fish were injected with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either at ZT3 (day) or at ZT15 (night) to evaluate the temporal sensitivity of humoral immunity to a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. The results demonstrated that responses to LPS were gated by the time of day. LPS...

  12. Effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide and COX-2 mediators on human colonic neuromuscular function and epithelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, B K; Sia, T C; Wattchow, D A; Smid, S D

    2016-07-01

    Chronic colitis is associated with decreased colonic muscle contraction and loss of mucosal barrier function. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are important in the generation and maintenance of inflammation. While colitis is associated with upregulated COX-2 -derived prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO), the direct activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines on human colonic neuromuscular function is less clear. This study investigated the effects of IBD-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-17, TNF-α, IL-1β and LPS on human colonic muscle strip contractility, alone and following inhibition of COX-2 or nitric oxide production. In addition, human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers were treated with LPS or COX-2 mediators including prostaglandins (PGE2, PGF2α) or their corresponding ethanolamides (PGE2-EA or PGF2α-EA) over 48h and trans-epithelial electrical resistance used to record permeability changes. Longitudinal muscle strips were obtained from healthy colonic resection margins and mounted in organ baths following IL-17, TNF-α, IL-1β and bacterial LPS incubations in an explant setting over 20h. Contraction in response to acetylcholine (ACh) was then measured, before and after either COX-2 inhibition (nimesulide; 10(-5)M) or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition (l-NNA; 10(-4)M). None of the cytokine or LPS explant incubations affected the potency or maximum cholinergic contraction in vitro, and subsequent COX-2 blockade with nimesulide revealed a significant but similar decrease in potency of ACh-evoked contraction in control, LPS and cytokine-incubated muscle strips. Pre-treatment with l-NNA provided no functional differences in the potency or maximum contractile responses to ACh in cytokine or LPS-incubated colonic longitudinal smooth muscle. Only PGE2 transiently increased Caco-2 monolayer permeability at 24h, while LPS (10μg/ml) increased permeability over 24-48h. These findings indicate that cholinergic

  13. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (pAsparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent. PMID:25730806

  14. [Characterization of Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanets, L D; Brovarskaya, O S; Bulygina, T N; Garkavaya, E G; Zhitkevich, N V

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven Pantoea agglomerans strains isolated from various plants were purified and chemically identified. LPS of the studied P. agglomerans strains were heterogeneous in monosaccharide composition. Thus, the LPS of P. agglomerans 8606 differed considerably from the LPSs of other strains, containing mannose as the predominant monosaccharide (69.8%), as well as ribose (15.1%) and xylose (12.6%), while the content of rhamnose, one of the predominant monosaccharides in other LPS samples, was 2.5%. Analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed the presence of C12-C16 acids. In lipids A of all the studied strains, 3-OH-C14:0 was the predominant acid (31.7 to 39.1%, depending on the strain). C12:0 (8.2 to 31.5%), C14:0 (12.9 to 30.8%), and C16:0 acids (3.4 to 16.9%) were also revealed. The studied P. agglomerans strains fell into three groups according to their fatty acid composition. The differences stemmed from the presence or absence of two fatty acids, 2-OH-C14:0 and C16:1. Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion in agar revealed that all the LPS under study exhibited antigenic activity in homologous systems. The results of serological cross reactions indicated immunochemical heterogeneity of the species P. agglomerans. Comparative investigation of the complex of parameters of peripheral blood cells from a healthy donor before and after treatment with LPS solutions showed that the values of no parameters exceeded the normal range. PMID:25941715

  15. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is synthesized via a novel pathway with an evolutionary connection to protein N-glycosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Hug

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component on the surface of Gram negative bacteria and is composed of lipid A-core and the O antigen polysaccharide. O polysaccharides of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori contain Lewis antigens, mimicking glycan structures produced by human cells. The interaction of Lewis antigens with human dendritic cells induces a modulation of the immune response, contributing to the H. pylori virulence. The amount and position of Lewis antigens in the LPS varies among H. pylori isolates, indicating an adaptation to the host. In contrast to most bacteria, the genes for H. pylori O antigen biosynthesis are spread throughout the chromosome, which likely contributed to the fact that the LPS assembly pathway remained uncharacterized. In this study, two enzymes typically involved in LPS biosynthesis were found encoded in the H. pylori genome; the initiating glycosyltransferase WecA, and the O antigen ligase WaaL. Fluorescence microscopy and analysis of LPS from H. pylori mutants revealed that WecA and WaaL are involved in LPS production. Activity of WecA was additionally demonstrated with complementation experiments in Escherichia coli. WaaL ligase activity was shown in vitro. Analysis of the H. pylori genome failed to detect a flippase typically involved in O antigen synthesis. Instead, we identified a homolog of a flippase involved in protein N-glycosylation in other bacteria, although this pathway is not present in H. pylori. This flippase named Wzk was essential for O antigen display in H. pylori and was able to transport various glycans in E. coli. Whereas the O antigen mutants showed normal swimming motility and injection of the toxin CagA into host cells, the uptake of DNA seemed to be affected. We conclude that H. pylori uses a novel LPS biosynthetic pathway, evolutionarily connected to bacterial protein N-glycosylation.

  16. Global transcriptomic profiling of bovine endometrial immune response in vitro. II. Effect of bovine viral diarrhea virus on the endometrial response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguejiofor, Chike F; Cheng, Zhangrui; Abudureyimu, Ayimuguli; Anstaett, Olivia L; Brownlie, Joe; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A; Wathes, D Claire

    2015-10-01

    Infection with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV) is associated with uterine disease and infertility. This study investigated the influence of ncpBVDV on immune functions of the bovine endometrium by testing the response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Primary cultures of mixed epithelial and stromal cells were divided into four treatment groups (control [CONT], BVDV, CONT+LPS, and BVDV+LPS) and infected with ncpBVDV for 4 days followed by treatment with LPS for 6 h. Whole-transcriptomic gene expression was measured followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Differential expression of 184 genes was found between CONT and BVDV treatments, showing interplay between induction and inhibition of responses. Up-regulation of TLR3, complement, and chemotactic and TRIM factors by ncpBVDV all suggested an ongoing immune response to viral infection. Down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, CXCR4, and serine proteinase inhibitors suggested mechanisms by which ncpBVDV may simultaneously counter the host response. Comparison between BVDV+LPS and CONT+LPS treatments showed 218 differentially expressed genes. Canonical pathway analysis identified the key importance of interferon signaling. Top down-regulated genes were RSAD2, ISG15, BST2, MX2, OAS1, USP18, IFIT3, IFI27, SAMD9, IFIT1, and DDX58, whereas TRIM56, C3, and OLFML1 were most up-regulated. Many of these genes are also regulated by IFNT during maternal recognition of pregnancy. Many innate immune genes that typically respond to LPS were inhibited by ncpBVDV, including those involved in pathogen recognition, inflammation, interferon response, chemokines, tissue remodeling, cell migration, and cell death/survival. Infection with ncpBVDV can thus compromise immune function and pregnancy recognition, thereby potentially predisposing infected cows to postpartum bacterial endometritis and reduced fertility. PMID:26353892

  17. The effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on pregnancy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, A; van Pampus, M G; Aarnoudse, J G; van der Schans, C P; Abbas, F; Faas, M M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Periodontitis, mostly associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, has frequently been related to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We therefore investigated whether lipopolysaccharides of P. gingivalis (Pg-LPS) induced pregnancy complications in the rat. METHODS: Experiment 1: pregnant rats (day

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hyperalgesia of intracranial capsaicin sensitive afferents in conscious rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, RHA; Spoelstra, MB; Meijler, WJ; Ter Horst, GJ

    1998-01-01

    Migraineous and non-migraineous headache is reported to be at highest intensity after an infection. This study investigated whether activation of the immune system can induce hyperalgesia in intracranial capsaicin sensitive afferents. The effects of intraperitoneal injected lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

  19. Diet-induced bacterial immunogens in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy cows: Impacts on immunity and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dairy cows are often fed high grain diets to meet the energy demand for high milk production or simply due to a lack of forages at times. As a result, ruminal acidosis, especially subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA, occurs frequently in practical dairy production. When SARA occurs, bacterial endotoxin (or lipopolysaccharide, LPS is released in the rumen and the large intestine in a large amount. Many other bacterial immunogens may also be released in the digestive tract following feeding dairy cows diets containing high proportions of grain. LPS can be translocated into the bloodstream across the epithelium of the digestive tract, especially the lower tract, due to possible alterations of permeability and injuries of the epithelial tissue. As a result, the concentration of blood LPS increases. Immune responses are subsequently caused by circulating LPS, and the systemic effects include increases in concentrations of neutrophils and the acute phase proteins such as serum amyloid-A (SAA, haptoglobin (Hp, LPS binding protein (LBP, and C-reactive protein (CRP in blood. Entry of LPS into blood can also result in metabolic alterations. Blood glucose and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations are enhanced accompanying an increase of blood LPS after increasing the amount of grain in the diet, which adversely affects feed intake of dairy cows. As the proportions of grain in the diet increase, patterns of plasma β-hydoxybutyric acid, cholesterol, and minerals (Ca, Fe, and Zn are also perturbed. The bacterial immunogens can also lead to reduced supply of nutrients for synthesis of milk components and depressed functions of the epithelial cells in the mammary gland. The immune responses and metabolic alterations caused by circulating bacterial immunogens will exert an effect on milk production. It has been demonstrated that increases in concentrations of ruminal LPS and plasma acute phase proteins (CRP, SAA, and LBP are associated with declines in

  20. Bacterial and fungal markers in tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous research has demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains bacterial and fungal components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ergosterol. In the present study we used gas chromatography–mass spectrometry to analyze tobacco as well as mainstream and second hand smoke for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) of 10 to 18 carbon chain lengths, used as LPS markers, and ergosterol, used as a marker of fungal biomass. The air concentrations of LPS were 0.0017 nmol/m3 (N = 5) and 0.0007/m3 (N = 6) in the smoking vs. non-smoking rooms (p = 0.0559) of the studied private houses, and 0.0231 nmol/m3 (N = 5) vs. 0.0006 nmol/m3 (N = 5) (p = 0.0173), respectively, at the worksite. The air concentrations of ergosterol were also significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than in rooms without smoking. A positive correlation was found between LPS and ergosterol in rooms with smoking but not in rooms without smoking. 3-OH C14:0 was the main 3-OH FA, followed by 3-OH C12:0, both in mainstream and second hand smoke and in phenol:water smoke extracts prepared in order to purify the LPS. The Limulus activity of the phenolic phase of tobacco was 3900 endotoxin units (EU)/cigarette; the corresponding amount of the smoke, collected on filters from 8 puffs, was 4 EU/cigarette. Tobacco smoking has been associated with a range of inflammatory airway conditions including COPD, asthma, bronchitis, alveolar hypersensitivity etc. Significant levels of LPS and ergosterol were identified in tobacco smoke and these observations support the hypothesis that microbial components of tobacco smoke contribute to inflammation and airway disease. -- Highlights: ► Air concentration of bacterial and fungal markers is significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than without smoking. ► Bacterial LPS correlates with fungal marker in rooms with ongoing smoking but not without smoking. ► LPS from mainstream smoke contains 3-hydroxy 14:0 and 12:0 fatty acids in similar proportion as in

  1. Bacterial and fungal markers in tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szponar, B., E-mail: szponar@iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Pehrson, C.; Larsson, L. [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-11-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains bacterial and fungal components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ergosterol. In the present study we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze tobacco as well as mainstream and second hand smoke for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) of 10 to 18 carbon chain lengths, used as LPS markers, and ergosterol, used as a marker of fungal biomass. The air concentrations of LPS were 0.0017 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) and 0.0007/m{sup 3} (N = 6) in the smoking vs. non-smoking rooms (p = 0.0559) of the studied private houses, and 0.0231 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) vs. 0.0006 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) (p = 0.0173), respectively, at the worksite. The air concentrations of ergosterol were also significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than in rooms without smoking. A positive correlation was found between LPS and ergosterol in rooms with smoking but not in rooms without smoking. 3-OH C14:0 was the main 3-OH FA, followed by 3-OH C12:0, both in mainstream and second hand smoke and in phenol:water smoke extracts prepared in order to purify the LPS. The Limulus activity of the phenolic phase of tobacco was 3900 endotoxin units (EU)/cigarette; the corresponding amount of the smoke, collected on filters from 8 puffs, was 4 EU/cigarette. Tobacco smoking has been associated with a range of inflammatory airway conditions including COPD, asthma, bronchitis, alveolar hypersensitivity etc. Significant levels of LPS and ergosterol were identified in tobacco smoke and these observations support the hypothesis that microbial components of tobacco smoke contribute to inflammation and airway disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Air concentration of bacterial and fungal markers is significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacterial LPS correlates with fungal marker in rooms with ongoing smoking but not without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS

  2. Single-Cell and Population NF-κB Dynamic Responses Depend on Lipopolysaccharide Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Miriam V Gutschow; Hughey, Jacob J.; Nicholas A Ruggero; Bryce T Bajar; Valle, Sean D.; Covert, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), found in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, elicits a strong response from the transcription factor family Nuclear factor (NF)-κB via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. The cellular response to lipopolysaccharide varies depending on the source and preparation of the ligand, however. Our goal was to compare single-cell NF-κB dynamics across multiple sources and concentrations of LPS. Methodology/Principal Findings Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy...

  3. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  4. Minocycline and sulforaphane inhibited lipopolysaccharide-mediated retinal microglial activation

    OpenAIRE

    Li-ping YANG; Zhu, Xiu-an; Tso, Mark O.M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the inhibitory effect of minocycline and sulforaphane on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced retinal microglial activation and the mechanisms through which they exerted their inhibitory effects. Methods Primary retinal microglial cultures were exposed to LPS with or without minocycline and sulforaphane. The mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, MCP-3, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-1β, eotaxin, regulated upon activation normal T-cell express...

  5. Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Death by Fluoroquinolones

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anis A.; Slifer, Teri R.; Araujo, Fausto G.; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Remington, Jack S.

    2000-01-01

    Because fluoroquinolones have an immunomodulatory effect on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human monocytes, we examined the effect of fluoroquinolones on the survival of mice injected with a lethal dose of LPS. Trovafloxacin (100 mg/kg), ciprofloxacin (250 mg/kg), and tosufloxacin (100 mg/kg) protected 75% (P = 0.0001), 25% (P = 0.002), and 50% (P = 0.002), respectively, of mice against death. The fluoroquinolones significantly reduced serum levels of interleukin-6 an...

  6. Activation of macrophage nuclear factor-κB and induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase by LPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Hua; Yan, Zhong-Qun; Brauner, Annelie; Tullus, Kjell

    2002-01-01

    Background Chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity is a major problem of neonatal care. Bacterial infection and inflammatory response have been thought to play an important role in the development of CLD and steroids have been given, with some benefit, to neonates with this disease. In the present study, we assessed the ability of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate rat alveolar macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in vitro. In addition, we investigated the impact of dexamethasone and budesonide on these processes. Methods Griess reaction was used to measure the nitrite level. Western blot and a semi-quantitative RT-PCR were performed to detect iNOS expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed to analyze the activation of NF-κB. Results We found that LPS stimulated the rat alveolar macrophages to produce NO in a dose (≥10 ng/ml) and time dependent manner (p < 0.05). This effect was further enhanced by IFN-γ (≥10 IU/ml, p < 0.05), but was attenuated by budesonide (10-4–10-10 M) and dexamethasone (10-4–10-6 M) (p < 0.05). The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS were also induced in response to LPS and attenuated by steroids. LPS triggered NF-κB activation, a mechanism responsible for the iNOS expression. Conclusion Our findings imply that Gram-negative bacterial infection and the inflammatory responses are important factors in the development of CLD. The down-regulatory effect of steroids on iNOS expression and NO production might explain the beneficial effect of steroids in neonates with CLD. PMID:12323081

  7. Activation of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)·Myeloid Differentiation Factor 2 (MD-2) by Hypoacylated Lipopolysaccharide from a Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Kubik, Łukasz; Oblak, Alja; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Hamad, Mohamad A; De Soyza, Anthony; Silipo, Alba; Jerala, Roman; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Valvano, Miguel A; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-08-28

    Lung infection by Burkholderia species, in particular Burkholderia cenocepacia, accelerates tissue damage and increases post-lung transplant mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Host-microbe interplay largely depends on interactions between pathogen-specific molecules and innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which recognizes the lipid A moiety of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human TLR4·myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) LPS receptor complex is strongly activated by hexa-acylated lipid A and poorly activated by underacylated lipid A. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia LPS strongly activates human TLR4·MD-2 despite its lipid A having only five acyl chains. Furthermore, we show that aminoarabinose residues in lipid A contribute to TLR4-lipid A interactions, and experiments in a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxic shock confirmed the proinflammatory potential of B. cenocepacia penta-acylated lipid A. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis of TLR4-MD-2 interactive surfaces suggests that longer acyl chains and the aminoarabinose residues in the B. cenocepacia lipid A allow exposure of the fifth acyl chain on the surface of MD-2 enabling interactions with TLR4 and its dimerization. Our results provide a molecular model for activation of the human TLR4·MD-2 complex by penta-acylated lipid A explaining the ability of hypoacylated B. cenocepacia LPS to promote proinflammatory responses associated with the severe pathogenicity of this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:26160169

  8. The effect of omega- 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on endothelial tight junction occludin expression in rat aorta during lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizak, Jakub; Frimmel, Karel; Bernatova, Iveta; Navarova, Jana; Sotnikova, Ruzena; Okruhlicova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Occludin is essential for proper assembly of tight junctions (TJs) which regulate paracellular endothelial permeability. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (Ω-3 PUFA) protect endothelial barrier function against injury. Materials and Methods: We examined anti-inflammatory effect of Ω-3 PUFA intake (30 mg/kg/day for 10 days) on expression and location of occludin in the aorta of adult Wistar rats after a single dose of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli, 1 mg/kg). The ultrastructure of TJs after LPS administration was also investigated. We measured plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and CD68 expression and determined the total activity of NO synthase (NOS) in the aortic tissue. Results: LPS induced a significant decrease of occludin expression accompanied by structural alterations of TJs. Levels of CRP, MDA, CD68 and NOS activity were elevated after LPS injection compared to controls indicating presence of moderate inflammation. Ω-3 PUFA supplementation did not affect occludin expression in treated inflammatory group. However they reduced CRP and MDA concentration and CD68 expression, but conversely, they increased NOS activity compared to inflammatory group. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a single dose of LPS could have a long-term impact on occludin expression and thus contribute to endothelial barrier dysfunction. 10-day administration of Ω-3 PUFA had partial anti-inflammatory effects on health of rats without any effect on occludin expression. PMID:27114799

  9. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilieborg, Malene S; Schmidt, Mette; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Boye, Mette; Weber, Nicolai R; Heegaard, Peter M; Burrin, Douglas G; Sangild, Per T

    2011-09-01

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that improve resistance towards necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in pre-term neonates. At approximately 85 % gestation, pig fetuses were injected intramuscularly with saline or LPS (0·014 mg/kg), or intra-amniotically with LPS (0·4 mg/kg). Pigs were delivered by caesarean section 3-5 d later and fed colostrum (C) or formula (F) for 48 h. Gut indices did not differ between pigs injected intramuscularly with saline or LPS, and these groups were therefore pooled into two control groups according to diet (control-F, n 32 and control-C, n 11). Control-F pigs showed reduced villus heights, mucosal structure, gut integrity, digestive enzymes, elevated NEC incidence (38 v. 0 %, P gut to Gram-negative bacteria may modulate the immediate postnatal response to an enteral diet and colonising bacteria. PMID:21676273

  10. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Yu; Owen Addison; Stephen J Baker; Alison J Davenport

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4–7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo.

  11. STAT4 knockout protects LPS-induced lung injury by increasing of MDSC and promoting of macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Cuiping; Jiang, Liyan; Xu, Xiaobo; Zhu, Fen; Zhang, Shuqi; Wu, Xu; Liu, Zilong; Yang, Xiangdong; Li, Shanqun

    2016-03-01

    The disruption of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) signal can inhibit the inflammation and protect organs from injury during severe bacterial infection. However, the mechanism of STAT4 signal in lung injury remains poor understood. Here we report that STAT4 deficiency decreased the lethality and protein leakage in STAT4(-/-) mice and protected lipopolysaccharid (LPS)-induced lung injury with ameliorated edema, inflammatory infiltration and hemorrhage. The expression of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) markedly increased in the circulation of STAT4(-/-) mice after LPS stimuli, accompanying with increased macrophages infiltration in inflamed lung tissue. In addition, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 decreased while anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of STAT4(-/-) mice. Thus, these results indicate that the accumulation of MDSCs and macrophages play a critical role in LPS-induced lung injury. Targeting MDSCs and macrophages polarization through a STAT4 dependent signaling pathway might help to reduce the inflammation and damage of lung tissue. PMID:26644077

  12. Lack of Interaction of Fluoroquinolones with Lipopolysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, B.; Wiese, A.; Brandenburg, K; Seydel, U.; Dalhoff, A

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are known to chelate with di- and trivalent cations, and it has accordingly been claimed that they perturb the integrity of the outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria. So far, chelation has not been assessed in biologically relevant test systems. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin in the absence and presence of Mg2+ with whole bacteria and isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from various rough mutant strains of Salmonella enteric...

  13. Persistent cystic fibrosis isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RP73 exhibits an under-acylated LPS structure responsible of its low inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Silipo, Alba; Bianconi, Irene; Lore', Nicola Ivan; Scamporrino, Andrea; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the major pathogen involved in lethal infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) population, is able to cause permanent chronic infections that can persist over the years. This ability to chronic colonize CF airways is related to a series of adaptive bacterial changes involving the immunostimulant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The structure of LPSs isolated from several P. aeruginosa strains showed conserved features that can undergo chemical changes during the establishment of the chronic infection. In the present paper, we report the elucidation of the structure and the biological activity of the R-LPS (lipooligosaccharide, LOS) isolated from the persistent CF isolate P. aeruginosa strain RP73, in order to give further insights in the adaptation mechanism of the pathogen in the CF environment. The complete structural analysis of P. aeruginosa RP73 LOS was achieved by chemical analyses, NMR spectroscopy and MALDI MS spectrometry, while the assessment of the biological activity was attained testing the in vivo pro-inflammatory capacity of the isolated LOS molecule. While a typical CF LPS is able to trigger a high immune response and production of pro-inflammatory molecules, this P. aeruginosa RP73 LOS showed to possess a low pro-inflammatory capacity. This was possible due to a singular chemical structure possessing an under-acylated lipid A very similar to the LPS of P. aeruginosa found in chronic lung diseases such as bronchiectstasis. PMID:24856407

  14. Preparation of a Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli 01lla, 01llb, k58: h21 bacterial wall, labeled with carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the morphological and chemical structure of Li po polysaccharides is given, as well as its occurrence in nature and its mechanisms of action. It is emphasized the usefulness for actual biochemical and biomedical research of the labeled Lipopolysaccharide. The method for the labelling, isolation and purification of 14''C-Lipopolysacchari de is described. (Author) 23 refs

  15. Thalidomide protects mice against LPS-induced shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalidomide has been shown to selectively inhibit TNF-a production in vitro by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated monocytes. TNF-a has been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of endotoxic shock. Using a mouse model of LPS-induced shock, we investigated the effects of thalidomide on the production of TNF-a and other cytokines and on animal survival. After injection of 100-350 µg LPS into mice, cytokines including TNF-a, IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ß, GM-CSF and IFN-g were measured in the serum. Administration of 200 mg/kg thalidomide to mice before LPS challenge modified the profile of LPS-induced cytokine secretion. Serum TNF-a levels were reduced by 93%, in a dose-dependent manner, and TNF-a mRNA expression in the spleens of mice was reduced by 70%. Serum IL-6 levels were also inhibited by 50%. Thalidomide induced a two-fold increase in serum IL-10 levels. Thalidomide treatment did not interfere with the production of GM-CSF, IL-1ß or IFN-g. The LD50 of LPS in this model was increased by thalidomide pre-treatment from 150 µg to 300 µg in 72 h. Thus, at otherwise lethal doses of LPS, thalidomide treatment was found to protect animals from death

  16. Early effects of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation on foetal brain development in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A Ghiani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies in humans and animal models link maternal infection and imbalanced levels of inflammatory mediators in the foetal brain to the aetiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In a number of animal models, it was shown that exposure to viral or bacterial agents during a period that corresponds to the second trimester in human gestation triggers brain and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. However, little is known about the early cellular and molecular events elicited by inflammation in the foetal brain shortly after maternal infection has occurred. In this study, maternal infection was mimicked by two consecutive intraperitoneal injections of 200 μg of LPS (lipopolysaccharide/kg to timed-pregnant rats at GD15 (gestational day 15 and GD16. Increased thickness of the CP (cortical plate and hippocampus together with abnormal distribution of immature neuronal markers and decreased expression of markers for neural progenitors were observed in the LPS-exposed foetal forebrains at GD18. Such effects were accompanied by decreased levels of reelin and the radial glial marker GLAST (glial glutamate transporter, and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in maternal serum and foetal forebrains. Foetal inflammation elicited by maternal injections of LPS has discrete detrimental effects on brain development. The early biochemical and morphological changes described in this work begin to explain the sequelae of early events that underlie the neurobehavioural deficits reported in humans and animals exposed to prenatal insults.

  17. Changes in DNA methylation and gene expression during 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced suppression of the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IgM response in splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Emily A; North, Colin M; Kaminski, Norbert E; Goodman, Jay I

    2011-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a bacterial endotoxin and a potent B-cell activator capable of inducing a humoral immune response. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a well-established immunotoxicant that can suppress humoral immune responses, including those initiated by LPS stimulation. In murine models, TCDD-induced suppression of the LPS-activated primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) response is observed both in vivo and in vitro and is typically evaluated as a decrease in the number of IgM antibody-forming cells. The TCDD-induced suppression of the primary humoral immune response occurs, at least in part, upstream of IgM production. The current study was designed as an initial test of our hypothesis that altered DNA methylation, an epigenetic event, is involved in the LPS-induced IgM response by splenocytes as is the suppression of this response by TCDD. Splenocyte-derived DNA from mice treated in vivo with sesame oil + PBS, LPS, TCDD, or LPS + TCDD was used for the current investigation. DNA methylation was evaluated using a technique that permits assessment of the methylation status of multiple genomic regions simultaneously in an unbiased fashion (no specific genes or genomic regions are preselected). Additionally, the expression of selected genes was determined. Our results indicate that treatment with LPS or TCDD can alter DNA methylation and, importantly, combined TCDD + LPS results in altered DNA methylation that was not simply the addition of the changes discerned in the individual treatment groups. Thus, we have identified cross talk between LPS and TCDD at the level of DNA methylation and gene expression. PMID:21212295

  18. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal tr...

  19. Gut microbiota and lipopolysaccharide content of the diet influence development of regulatory T cells: studies in germ-free mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudcovic Tomas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammals are essentially born germ-free but the epithelial surfaces are promptly colonized by astounding numbers of bacteria soon after birth. The most extensive microbial community is harbored by the distal intestine. The gut microbiota outnumber ~10 times the total number of our somatic and germ cells. The host-microbiota relationship has evolved to become mutually beneficial. Studies in germ-free mice have shown that gut microbiota play a crucial role in the development of the immune system. The principal aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the presence of gut microbiota and the quality of a sterile diet containing various amounts of bacterial contaminants, measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS content, can influence maturation of the immune system in gnotobiotic mice. Results We have found that the presence of gut microbiota and to a lesser extent also the LPS-rich sterile diet drive the expansion of B and T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. The most prominent was the expansion of CD4+ T cells including Foxp3-expressing T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. Further, we have observed that both the presence of gut microbiota and the LPS-rich sterile diet influence in vitro cytokine profile of spleen cells. Both gut microbiota and LPS-rich diet increase the production of interleukin-12 and decrease the production of interleukin-4. In addition, the presence of gut microbiota increases the production of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ. Conclusion Our data clearly show that not only live gut microbiota but also microbial components (LPS contained in sterile diet stimulate the development, expansion and function of the immune system. Finally, we would like to emphasize that the composition of diet should be regularly tested especially in all gnotobiotic models as the LPS content and other microbial components present in the diet may significantly alter the outcome of experiments.

  20. Short communication: Differential loss of bovine mammary epithelial barrier integrity in response to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellnitz, Olga; Zbinden, Christina; Huang, Xiao; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary gland, the blood-milk barrier prevents an uncontrolled intermixture of blood and milk constituents and hence maintains the osmotic gradient to draw water into the mammary secretion. During mastitis, the permeability of the blood-milk barrier is increased, which is reflected by the transfer of blood constituents into milk and vice versa. In this study, we aimed to investigate changes in the barrier function of mammary epithelial cells in vitro as induced by cell wall components of different pathogens. Primary bovine mammary epithelial cells from 3 different cows were grown separately on Transwell (Corning Inc., Corning, NY) inserts. The formation of tight junctions between adjacent epithelial cells was shown by transmission electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence staining of the tight junction protein zona occludens-1. The integrity of the epithelial barrier was assayed by means of transepithelial electrical resistance, as well as by diffusion of the fluorophore Lucifer yellow across the cell layer. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was used as an indicator for cytotoxic effects. In response to a 24-h challenge with bacterial endotoxin, barrier integrity was reduced after 3 or 7h, respectively, in response to 0.5mg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli or 20mg/mL lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus. No paracellular leakage was observed in response to 0.2mg/mL LPS or 2mg/mL LTA. Although LPS and LTA affected barrier permeability, most likely by opening the tight junctions, only LPS caused cell damage, reflected by increased LDH concentrations in cell culture medium. These results prove a pathogen-specific loss of blood-milk barrier integrity during mastitis, which is characterized by tight junction opening by both LPS and LTA and by additional epithelial cell destruction through LPS. PMID:27060811

  1. RNA interference prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced preprotachykinin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We showed previously that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces noncholinergic airway hyperreactivity to capsaicin via an upregulation of tachykinin synthesis. This study was designed to test whether double-stranded preprotachykinin (ds PPT) RNA, RNA interference (RNAi), prevents the LPS-induced alterations. First, cultured primary nodose ganglial cells of newborn Brown-Norway rats were divided into four groups: control; LPS; LPS+RNAi; and LPS+RNAi+liposome. Second, young Brown-Norway rats for the in vivo study were divided into three groups (control; LPS; and LPS+RNAi), and ds PPT RNA was microinjected bilaterally into the nodose ganglia in the LPS+RNAi group. Then, ganglial cells were collected from the culture whereas the nodose ganglia and lungs were sampled from the animals, and PPT mRNA and substance P (SP) levels were analyzed. Also, airway reactivity to capsaicin was performed in vivo. LPS induced significant increases in PPT mRNA and SP levels in vitro and in vivo and an increase in airway reactivity to capsaicin in vivo. However, ds PPT RNA, but not scrambled RNA, prevented all LPS-induced alterations. The effect of ds PPT RNA was not enhanced by liposome in vitro. Therefore, we demonstrated that the local application of RNAi prevents effectively the activation of the noncholinergic system modulating the lungs/airways

  2. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

  3. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMAL RESPONSES TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND TURPENTINE ABSCESS IN FEMALE RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes as well as the response to inflammatory agents. Two such agents, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and turpentine (TPT) are inducers of fever in rats. LPS, given intraperitoneally (i.p.), involves a sys...

  4. An Approach to the Use of Modern Biological Assay Methods as a Fast Criterion for the Surface Cleaning/Assay Decision (LPS and ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, R.; Wainwright, N.; Kazarians, G.; Kuhlman, G.; Kempf, M.; Chen, F.; Venkateswaran, K.

    NASA has an ongoing research effort to introduce new methodologies to evaluate trace levels of biological contamination on spacecraft outbound from Earth to the surface of Mars. Present NASA regulations call for the evaluation of bioburden on spacecraft surfaces by the determination of aerobic spore-forming bacteria as a proxy for the total bioburden actually present. We are currently investigating molecular based methodologies that assess bioburden in a more rapid manner than the NASA standard technique. These are expected to find initial use, not for regulatory purposes, but for assisting the engineering team during the assembly of spacecraft by providing a rapid indicator of bioburden. We have evaluated two complementary methodologies and found they correlate to a significant degree with the presence of bacterial spores. A bioluminescence based detection method is capable of rapidly monitoring ATP levels from 10-13 M to 10-10 M. Similarly a Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay is capable of rapidly monitoring levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from 0.005 to 50 endotoxin units (approx. 5x10-13 to 5x10-10 g E. coli LPS). Both methods have been tested during the course of the Mars Exploration Rover's assembly with a total of over 500 samples taken. Not only do these methods give one an independent measure of bioburden, they can also reasonably predict the presence of spores. There appears to be a significant correlation between samples containing ATP, LPS and spores.

  5. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins.

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keehoon Jung

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR, and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM, resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  7. Endothelin receptor antagonists attenuate the inflammatory response of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells to bacterial endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Feldmann, Maria; Wahl, Chiara; Jungck, David; Behr, Jürgen; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial infections induce exacerbations in chronic lung diseases, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by enhancing airway inflammation. Exacerbations are frequently associated with right heart decompensation and accelerate disease progression. Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) might have therapeutic potential as pulmonary vasodilators and anti-inflammatory agents, but utility in exacerbations of chronic lung diseases is unknown. We hypothesized that cytokine releases induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major bacterial trigger of inflammation, are reduced by ERAs in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs). Ex vivo cultivated human PVSMCs were preincubated with the endothelin-A-receptor selective inhibitor ambrisentan, with the endothelin-B-receptor selective inhibitor BQ788 [sodium (2R)-2-{[(2S)-2-({[(2R,6S)-2,6-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl}amino)-4,4-dimethylpentanoyl][1-(methoxycarbonyl)-d-tryptophyl]amino}hexanoate], or with the dual blocker bosentan before stimulation with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (Re-LPS), or a mixture of long and short forms (M-LPS). Expression of cytokines and LPS receptors (TLR4, CD14) were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). All LPS forms induced interleukin (IL)-6-, IL-8-, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Bosentan and BQ788 inhibited M-LPS-induced release of all cytokines and soluble CD14 (sCD14) but not TLR4 expression. Ambrisentan blocked M-LPS-induced IL-6 release but not IL-8, GM-CSF, or LPS receptors. IL-8 release induced by S-LPS, which requires CD14 to activate TLR4, was blocked by bosentan and BQ788. IL-8 release induced by Re-LPS, which does not require CD14 to activate TLR4, was insensitive to both bosentan and BQ788. In conclusion, PVSMCs contribute to inflammation in bacteria-induced exacerbations of chronic lung diseases. Inhibition of the endothelin

  8. Incorporation of Substrate Cell Lipid A Components into the Lipopolysaccharide of Intraperiplasmically Grown Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, David R.; Rittenberg, Sydney C.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was determined for cells grown axenically and intraperiplasmically on Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas putida. The LPS of axenically grown bdellovibrios contained glucose and fucosamine as the only detectable neutral sugar and amino sugar, and nonadecenoic acid (19:1) as the predominant fatty acid. Additional fatty acids, heptose, ketodeoxyoctoic acid, and phosphate were also detected. LPS from bdellovibrios grown intraperi...

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Pulpitis Up-regulates TRPV1 in Trigeminal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, M.-K.; Lee, J.; Duraes, G.; Ro, J. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Tooth pain often accompanies pulpitis. Accumulation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a product of Gram-negative bacteria, is associated with painful clinical symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying LPS-induced tooth pain are not clearly understood. TRPV1 is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and hyperalgesia under inflammation or injury. Although TRPV1 is expressed in pulpal afferents, it is not known whether the application of LPS to teeth mod...

  10. Lipopolysaccharide gel profiles of Haemophilus influenzae type b are not stable epidemiologic markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Tolan, R W; Munson, R S; Granoff, D M

    1986-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to assess the usefulness of this technique for the epidemiologic analysis of Haemophilus influenzae type b isolates. LPS samples were prepared from isolates which had been passaged either in vitro or in infant rats. Preparations from paired isolates from a number of epidemiologically related clinical situations also were examined. The gel patterns of LPS prepared on different occasions from an ...

  11. Lipopolysaccharide hyperreactivity of animals infected with Trypanosoma lewisi or Trypanosoma musculi.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, A; Carter, R. F.; Ferluga, J.; Allison, A C

    1984-01-01

    Rats and mice infected with Trypanosoma lewisi and Trypanosoma musculi, respectively, showed hyperreactivity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria. Fatal shock could be precipitated with a dose of LPS 100 to 1,000 times less in infected compared with noninfected animals. In trypanosome-infected rats and mice, extensive liver damage was evident after LPS challenge. These animals showed a pronounced hypoglycemia, marked elevation of blood aspartate transaminase level, and diff...

  12. Local lung responses following endobronchial elastase and lipopolysaccharide instillation in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Collie, D David S; McLean, Nicola; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Baker, Alison; Blundell, Richard; Milne, Elspeth; Rhind, Susan; Woodall, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Chronic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure may contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of lung diseases including COPD and emphysema. We sought to develop a large- animal model of emphysema using repeated LPS administration into sheep lung segments. An experimental protocol was designed to facilitate comparisons with elastase-treated and control segments within the same lung of individual sheep. Histopathologic evaluation of segments treated with LPS demonstrated low-grade inflammation char...

  13. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Li Lin; Lijun Zhang; Liangzhu Yu; Lu Han; Wanli Ji; Hui Shen; Zhenwu Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley ra...

  14. The effect of exogenous rhizobial lipopolysaccharide on symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with red clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Głowacka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effectivity of symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with red clover in the presence of exogenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS preparation was measured as a yield of green mass of infected plants. The addition of complete LPS that had been obtained from homological Rhizobium strains influenced significantly the growth of plants. In the presence of defective LPS of Rhizobium mutant the effectivity of symbiosis did not change.

  15. Study of Nitric Oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages induced by Brucella Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Kavoosi G; Kabodanian Ardestani S; Kariminia A

    2001-01-01

    Brueclla is a gram negative bacteria that causes Brucellosis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ", the pathogenic agent of Brucella is composed of O-chain, core oligosaccharide and lipid A. in addition, the structural and biological properties of different LPS extracted from different strains are not identical. The first defense system against LPS is nonspecific immunity that causes macrophage activation. Activated macrophages produce oxygen and nitrogen radicals that enhance the protection again...

  16. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC gene encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    OpenAIRE

    Eleonora Aquilini; Susana Merino; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Miguel Regué; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycer...

  17. Cyclooxygenase-1 is involved in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Isabella; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto; Barlati, Sergio; Bosetti, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that neuroinflammation can alter adult neurogenesis by mechanisms as yet unclear. We have previously demonstrated that the neuroinflammatory response and neuronal damage after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection is reduced in cyclooxygenase-1 deficient (COX-1-/-) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of CoX-1 on hippocampal neurogenesis during LPS-induced neuroinflammation, using COX-1-/- and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that LPS-induced neuroinflammation re...

  18. The effect of exogenous rhizobial lipopolysaccharide on symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with red clover

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Głowacka; Agnieszka Stępień; Sylwia Szyprowska

    2014-01-01

    The effectivity of symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with red clover in the presence of exogenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparation was measured as a yield of green mass of infected plants. The addition of complete LPS that had been obtained from homological Rhizobium strains influenced significantly the growth of plants. In the presence of defective LPS of Rhizobium mutant the effectivity of symbiosis did not change.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R G; Bocking, Alan D

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection. PMID:24429676

  20. Neuroprotective Activity of (−)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders.

  1. DMPD: Lipopolysaccharide sensing an important factor in the innate immune response toGram-negative bacterial infections: benefits and hazards of LPShypersensitivity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se toGram-negative bacterial infections: benefits and hazards of LPShypersensitivity. Freudenberg MA, Tchapt...portant factor in the innate immune response toGram-negative bacterial infections: benefits and hazards of L...une response toGram-negative bacterial infections: benefits and hazards of LPShyp

  2. A natural formulation (imoviral™) increases macrophage resistance to LPS-induced oxidative and inflammatory stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, L; Leporini, L; Pintore, G; Ferrante, C; Recinella, L; Orlando, G; Vacca, M; Brunetti, L

    2014-01-01

    Imoviral™ is a natural product formulation containing a mixture of uncaria, shiitake and ribes extracts. All ingredients are recognized as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory agent and immunomodulant. In order to evaluate the rational basis of extract mixture as immunomodulatory agent, we tested the effect of Imoviral™ formulation on macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stress. The effect was evaluated as variation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and as cytokine gene expression. The extract did not affect cell viability up to 250 μg/ml. Treatment with extract (10-150 μg/ml) reduced ROS and PGE2 production as well as IL-8 and TNF-α gene expression. A pre-treatment with extract blunted LPS-induced production of ROS and PGE2, markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress, as well as the gene expression of all cytokines tested, indicators, in vitro, of immune response activation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Imoviral™ formulation could be a useful tool to modulate the immune function, reducing the oxidative and inflammatory markers related to bacterial attack. Experimental data suggest that Imoviral™ extract mixture could also represent a preventive pharmacological strategy to enhance cell resistance to bacterial infections. PMID:25620186

  3. Detection of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbaek, E.I.; HovindHaugen, K.

    1996-01-01

    linear repeating pentasaccharide units with an O-acetyl group linked to a glucose unit. A monoclonal antibody (MAb 102-G02) directed against A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 was characterized in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS...

  4. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES EXPOSURE OF FIBRINOGEN RECEPTORS ON HUMAN PLATELETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于希春; 吴其夏

    1995-01-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors was investigated.The results showed that:1)LPS increased the binding of fibrinogen-gold complexes to platelets and the labels were primarily limited to shape-changed platelets;2)LPS caused a dose-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in platelets;3)LPS induced the activation of platelet protein kinase C(PKC) and the phosphorylation of glycoprotein llla (GP llla) which was inhibited by H-7.All these results suggest that stimulation of platelets with LPS causes a conformational change in glycoprotein llb/Illa (GPllb/llla) through platelet shape change and/or phosphorylation of GPllla via PKC,which serves to expose the fibrinogen binding sites of GPllb/llla on human platelets.

  5. Kinetic analysis of interaction between lipopolysaccharide and biomolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan YANG; Xiurong YANG

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major compo-nent of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria. It interacts with some biomolecules and triggers a toxic reaction. In this paper, we studied the interaction between LPS from Salmonella Minnesota and some biomolecules using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Biomolecules were immobilized on a CM5 sensor chip using the amino coupling method and LPS was injected over the immobilized surfaces. The affinity constant KA of LPS with serum albumin, hemoglobin, chitosan and lysozyme was 2.36 × 107, 2.03 × 108,7.58×106, 2.82 × 104 L·mol-1, respectively. However, LPS could not interact with ferritin.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension triggered by lipopolysaccharide in ascites-susceptible and -resistant broilers is not amplified by aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, O T; Erf, G F; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent pulmonary vasodilator that modulates the pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary hypertension (PH) triggered by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in broilers. The amplitude and duration of the LPS-induced PH are markedly enhanced following pretreatment with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), which inhibits NO synthesis by both the constitutive (endothelial) and inducible (inflammatory) forms of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and iNOS, respectively). In the present study L-NAME and the selective iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) were administered to differentiate between iNOS and eNOS as the primary source of NO that attenuates the pulmonary vascular response to LPS. Clinically healthy male progeny from ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant lines were anesthetized, and their pulmonary artery was cannulated. The initial pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) was recorded, then the broilers either remained untreated (control group) or were injected i.v. with AG. Ten minutes later all birds received an i.v. injection of LPS, followed 40 min later by an i.v. injection of L-NAME. When compared with untreated controls, AG neither increased the baseline PAP nor did it increase or prolong the PH response to LPS. The ascites-susceptible broilers maintained a higher PAP than the ascites-resistant broilers throughout the experiment, and the ascites-resistant broilers exhibited greater relative increases in PAP in response to LPS than did the ascites-susceptible broilers. Within 40 min after the LPS injection, PAP subsided to a level that did not differ from the respective preinjection value for each line. Injecting L-NAME reversed the decline in PAP, and within 5 min PAP returned to hypertensive levels approaching the maximum peak PH response to LPS. The absence of any impact of AG coupled with the profound response to L-NAME indicates that NO synthesized by eNOS rather than iNOS likely modulated the acute (within 1 h) PH elicited by

  7. Immunological properties of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide from serogroups A, B & C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T J; Kharazmi, A; Shand, G; Nielsen, H; Tvede, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and compare the oxidative burst, chemotaxis and cytokine production of human white blood cells, stimulated with meningococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from three different serogroups (A, B and C) of Neisseria meningitidis, and to evaluate whether con...

  8. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajide, Olumayokun A; Bhatia, Harsharan S; de Oliveira, Antonio C P; Wright, Colin W; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2013-01-01

    Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF- κ B) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF α ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1 β ), nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that I κ B-independent inhibition of NF- κ B nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5  μ M) did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF- κ B signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2. PMID:23737832

  9. Activation of Master Autophagy Regulator TFEB During Systemic LPS Administration in the Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Kyoko; Unuma, Kana; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of autophagy in the cornea during the systemic inflammatory response elicited by intravenous administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.v. with 15 mg/kg body weight LPS. RC4 rabbit corneal keratocytes were also used and treated with 100 ng/mL of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and/or cycloheximide (CHX). The nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), the master transcriptional regulator for ...

  10. Capric Acid Inhibits NO Production and STAT3 Activation during LPS-Induced Osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sun A.; Choi, Yong-Min; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Shim, Wooyoung; Lee, Gwang; Choi, Sangdun

    2011-01-01

    Capric acid is a second medium-chain fatty acid, and recent studies have shown that fatty acids are associated with bone density and reduce bone turnover. In this study, we investigated the effects of capric acid on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. After treatment with capric acid (1 mM), the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells decreased significantly. Capric acid reduced LPS-induced TRAP expression, an osteoclast different...

  11. Comparative studies on the analysis of glycoproteins and lipopolysaccharides by the gel-based microchip and SDS-PAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Jung-Feng; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine time efficiency between the gel-based microchip (LabChip) and traditional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), glycoproteins and lipopolysaccharides were analyzed in this study. After 90 min of gel electrophoresis, glycoproteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, and apo-transferrin) and fluorescent lipopolysaccharides (LPS-O and LPS-S) under reducing conditions could be analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and it would take (including imaging ...

  12. LPS Catch and Effort Estimation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data collected from the LPS dockside (LPIS) and the LPS telephone (LPTS) surveys are combined to produce estimates of total recreational catch, landings, and...

  13. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN. PMID:25946018

  14. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Barquero-Calvo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs, enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  15. Grape seed procyanidin extract reduces the endotoxic effects induced by lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarès, Victor; Fernández-Iglesias, Anabel; Cedó, Lídia; Castell-Auví, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Salvadó, Maria Josepa; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Blay, Mayte

    2013-07-01

    Acute inflammation is a response to injury, infection, tissue damage, or shock. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin implicated in triggering sepsis and septic shock, and LPS promotes the inflammatory response, resulting in the secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as the interleukins (IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-α by the immune cells. Furthermore, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species levels increase rapidly, which is partially due to the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in several tissues in response to inflammatory stimuli. Previous studies have shown that procyanidins, polyphenols present in foods such as apples, grapes, cocoa, and berries, have several beneficial properties against inflammation and oxidative stress using several in vitro and in vivo models. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of two physiological doses and two pharmaceutical doses of grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) were analyzed using a rat model of septic shock by the intraperitoneal injection of LPS derived from Escherichia coli. The high nutritional (75mg/kg/day) and the high pharmacological doses (200mg/kg/day) of GSPE showed anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing the proinflammatory marker NOx in the plasma, red blood cells, spleen, and liver. Moreover, the high pharmacological dose also downregulated the genes Il-6 and iNos; and the high nutritional dose decreased the glutathione ratio (GSSG/total glutathione), further illustrating the antioxidant capability of GSPE. In conclusion, several doses of GSPE can alleviate acute inflammation triggered by LPS in rats at the systemic and local levels when administered for as few as 15 days before the injection of endotoxin. PMID:23439188

  16. Role of CD14 in a mouse model of acute lung inflammation induced by different lipopolysaccharide chemotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Anas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS is required for effective defense against invading gram-negative bacteria. Recently, in vitro studies revealed that CD14 is required for activation of the myeloid differentiation factor (MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR4 signaling pathway by smooth (S-LPS, but not by rough (R-LPS. The present study investigated the role of CD14 in induction of lung inflammation in mice by these different LPS chemotypes. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Neutrophil accumulation and tumor necrosis factor (TNF release in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined 6 hours after intranasal treatment of wild type (WT and CD14 knock-out (KO mice with different doses S-LPS or R-LPS. The contribution of CD14 to lung inflammation induced by S-LPS or R-LPS depended on the LPS dose. At low doses, S-LPS and R-LPS induced neutrophil influx in a CD14-dependent manner. Low dose S-LPS-induced cytokine release also depended on CD14. Strikingly, neutrophil influx and TNF release induced by high dose S-LPS or R-LPS was diminished in the presence of CD14. Intranasal administration of sCD14 to CD14 KO mice treated with S-LPS partially reversed the inflammatory response to the response observed in WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, CD14 modulates effects of both S-LPS and R-LPS within the lung in a similar way. Except for R-LPS-induced TNF release, S-LPS and R-LPS at low dose induced acute lung inflammation in a CD14-dependent manner, while the inflammatory response triggered by high dose S-LPS or R-LPS was diminished by CD14.

  17. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 μg/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus

  18. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P laying hens after LPS challenge (P laying hens. In summary, in addition to improving production performance, there were effects of dietary FA supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections. PMID:24570431

  19. Disruptions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rat offspring following prenatal maternal exposure to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvolskaia, Marina S; Tillet, Yves; Sharova, Viktoria S; Voronova, Svetlana N; Zakharova, Lyudmila A

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal treatment with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) changes the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) surge in rats. Exposure to an immune challenge in the critical periods of development has profound and long-lasting effects on the stress response, immune, metabolic, and reproductive functions. Prenatal LPS treatment delays the migration of GnRH neurons associated with increased cytokine release in maternal and fetal compartments. We investigated the effects of a single maternal exposure to LPS (18 μg/kg, i.p.) on day 12 (embryonic day (E)12) of pregnancy on reproductive parameters in rat offspring. Hypothalamic GnRH content, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and estradiol concentrations were measured in both male and female offsprings at different stages of postnatal development by RIA and ELISA (n = 10 each per group). Body weight and in females day of vaginal opening (VO) were recorded. In offspring exposed to LPS prenatally, compared with controls, body weight was decreased in both sexes at P5 and P30; in females, VO was delayed; hypothalamic GnRH content was decreased at postnatal days 30-60 (P30-P60) in both sexes; plasma LH concentration was decreased at P14-P60 in females; plasma concentrations of testosterone/estradiol were increased at P14 in females, and plasma estradiol was increased at P14 in males. Hence activation of the maternal immune system by LPS treatment at a prenatal critical period leads to decreased GnRH and LH levels in pre- and postpubertal life and sex steroid imbalance in the prepubertal period, and delayed sexual maturation of female offspring. PMID:26941006

  20. The LPS trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Leading Proton Spectrometer (LPS) has been equipped with microstrip silicon detectors specially designed to trigger events with high values of xLvertical stroke anti p'p vertical stroke / vertical stroke anti pp vertical stroke ≥0.95 where vertical stroke anti p'p vertical stroke and vertical stroke anti pp vertical stroke are respectively the momenta of outgoing and incoming protons. The LPS First Level Trigger can provide a clear tag for very high momentum protons in a kinematical region never explored before. In the following we discuss the physics motivation in tagging very forward protons and present a detailed description of the detector design, the front end electronics, the readout electronics, the Monte Carlo simulation and some preliminary results from 1995 data taking. (orig.)

  1. Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Ní Gabhann

    Full Text Available Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a strong inducer of inflammation and does so by inducing polarization of macrophages to the classic inflammatory M1 population. Given the role of Btk as a critical signal transducer downstream of TLR4, we investigated its role in M1/M2 induction. In Btk deficient (Btk (-\\- mice we observed markedly reduced recruitment of M1 macrophages following intraperitoneal administration of LPS. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated an impaired ability of Btk(-/- macrophages to polarize into M1 macrophages, instead showing enhanced induction of immunosuppressive M2-associated markers in response to M1 polarizing stimuli, a finding accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of STAT1 and enhanced STAT6 phosphorylation. In addition to STAT activation, M1 and M2 polarizing signals modulate the expression of inflammatory genes via differential activation of transcription factors and regulatory proteins, including NF-κB and SHIP1. In keeping with a critical role for Btk in macrophage polarization, we observed reduced levels of NF-κB p65 and Akt phosphorylation, as well as reduced induction of the M1 associated marker iNOS in Btk(-/- macrophages in response to M1 polarizing stimuli. Additionally enhanced expression of SHIP1, a key negative regulator of macrophage polarisation, was observed in Btk(-/- macrophages in response to M2 polarizing stimuli. Employing classic models of allergic M2 inflammation, treatment of Btk (-/- mice with either Schistosoma mansoni eggs or chitin resulted in increased recruitment of M2 macrophages and induction of M2-associated genes. This demonstrates an enhanced M2 skew in the absence of Btk, thus promoting the development of allergic inflammation.

  2. Btk Regulates Macrophage Polarization in Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Gabhann, Joan; Hams, Emily; Smith, Siobhán; Wynne, Claire; Byrne, Jennifer C.; Brennan, Kiva; Spence, Shaun; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Johnston, James A.; Fallon, Padraic G.; Jefferies, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a strong inducer of inflammation and does so by inducing polarization of macrophages to the classic inflammatory M1 population. Given the role of Btk as a critical signal transducer downstream of TLR4, we investigated its role in M1/M2 induction. In Btk deficient (Btk−\\−) mice we observed markedly reduced recruitment of M1 macrophages following intraperitoneal administration of LPS. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated an impaired ability of Btk−/− macrophages to polarize into M1 macrophages, instead showing enhanced induction of immunosuppressive M2-associated markers in response to M1 polarizing stimuli, a finding accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of STAT1 and enhanced STAT6 phosphorylation. In addition to STAT activation, M1 and M2 polarizing signals modulate the expression of inflammatory genes via differential activation of transcription factors and regulatory proteins, including NF-κB and SHIP1. In keeping with a critical role for Btk in macrophage polarization, we observed reduced levels of NF-κB p65 and Akt phosphorylation, as well as reduced induction of the M1 associated marker iNOS in Btk−/− macrophages in response to M1 polarizing stimuli. Additionally enhanced expression of SHIP1, a key negative regulator of macrophage polarisation, was observed in Btk−/− macrophages in response to M2 polarizing stimuli. Employing classic models of allergic M2 inflammation, treatment of Btk−/− mice with either Schistosoma mansoni eggs or chitin resulted in increased recruitment of M2 macrophages and induction of M2-associated genes. This demonstrates an enhanced M2 skew in the absence of Btk, thus promoting the development of allergic inflammation. PMID:24465735

  3. Participation of α2 -adrenoceptors in sodium appetite inhibition during sickness behaviour following administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Laurival A; Almeida, Roberto L; David, Richard B; de Paula, Patricia M; Andrade, Carina A F; Menani, José V

    2016-03-15

    Sickness behaviour, a syndrome characterized by a general reduction in animal activity, is part of the active-phase response to fight infection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an effective endotoxin to model sickness behaviour, reduces thirst and sodium excretion, and increases neurohypophysial secretion. Here we review the effects of LPS on thirst and sodium appetite. Altered renal function and hydromineral fluid intake in response to LPS occur in the context of behavioural reorganization, which manifests itself as part of the syndrome. Recent data show that, in addition to its classical effect on thirst, non-septic doses of LPS injected intraperitoneally produce a preferential inhibition of intracellular thirst versus extracellular thirst. Moreover, LPS also reduced hypertonic NaCl intake in sodium-depleted rats that entered a sodium appetite test. Antagonism of α2 -adrenoceptors abolished the effect of LPS on sodium appetite. LPS and cytokine transduction potentially recruit brain noradrenaline and α2 -adrenoceptors to control sodium appetite and sickness behaviour. PMID:26036817

  4. Study of Nitric Oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages induced by Brucella Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavoosi G

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Brueclla is a gram negative bacteria that causes Brucellosis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS ", the pathogenic agent of Brucella is composed of O-chain, core oligosaccharide and lipid A. in addition, the structural and biological properties of different LPS extracted from different strains are not identical. The first defense system against LPS is nonspecific immunity that causes macrophage activation. Activated macrophages produce oxygen and nitrogen radicals that enhance the protection against intracellular pathogens.In this experiment LPS was extracted by hot phenol- water procedure and the effect of various LPSs on nitric oxide prodution by peritoneal mouse macrophages was examined.Our results demonstrated that the effect of LPS on nitric oxide production is concentration-dependent we observed the maximum response in concentration of 10-20 microgram per milliliter. Also our results demonstrate that LPS extracted from vaccine Brucella abortus (S 19 had a highe effect on nitric oxide production than the LPS from other strains

  5. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core. PMID:18067253

  6. Efficient subtractive cloning of genes activated by lipopolysaccharide and interferon γ in primary-cultured cortical cells of newborn mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Miyauchi

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses play a central role in neuroprotection and neurotoxicity during inflammatory processes that are triggered by pathogen-associated molecular pattern-exhibiting agents such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS and that are modulated by inflammatory cytokines such as interferon γ (IFNγ. Recent findings describing the unexpected complexity of mammalian genomes and transcriptomes have stimulated further identification of novel transcripts involved in specific physiological and pathological processes, such as the neural innate immune response that alters the expression of many genes. We developed a system for efficient subtractive cloning that employs both sense and antisense cRNA drivers, and coupled it with in-house cDNA microarray analysis. This system enabled effective direct cloning of differentially expressed transcripts, from a small amount (0.5 µg of total RNA. We applied this system to isolation of genes activated by LPS and IFNγ in primary-cultured cortical cells that were derived from newborn mice, to investigate the mechanisms involved in neuroprotection and neurotoxicity in maternal/perinatal infections that cause various brain injuries including periventricular leukomalacia. A number of genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response were identified, showing that neonatal neuronal/glial cells are highly responsive to LPS and IFNγ. Subsequent RNA blot analysis revealed that the identified genes were activated by LPS and IFNγ in a cooperative or distinctive manner, thereby supporting the notion that these bacterial and cellular inflammatory mediators can affect the brain through direct but complicated pathways. We also identified several novel clones of apparently non-coding RNAs that potentially harbor various regulatory functions. Characterization of the presently identified genes will give insights into mechanisms and interventions not only for perinatal infection-induced brain damage, but also for

  7. Low-Level Laser Therapy Attenuates LPS-Induced Rats Mastitis by Inhibiting Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yueqiang; HE, Xianjing; HAO, Dandan; Yu, Debin; LIANG, Jianbin; QU, Yanpeng; Sun, Dongbo; Yang, Bin; YANG, Keli; Wu, Rui; WANG, Jianfa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on a rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The rat model of mastitis was induced by inoculation of LPS through the canals of the mammary gland. The results showed that LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β and IL-8 significantly decreased after LLLT (650 nm, 2.5 mW, 30 mW/cm2). LLLT also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressi...

  8. Branched Peptide, B2088, Disrupts the Supramolecular Organization of Lipopolysaccharides and Sensitizes the Gram-negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Tan, Wei Xiang; Aung, Thet Tun; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Li, Jianguo; Chang, Jamie Ya Ting; Dikshit, Neha; Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Lim, Rayne Rui; Kang, Tse Siang; Balamuralidhar, Vanniarajan; Sukumaran, Bindu; Verma, Chandra S.; Sivaraman, Jayaraman; Chaurasia, Shyam Sunder; Liu, Shouping; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2016-05-01

    Dissecting the complexities of branched peptide-lipopolysaccharides (LPS) interactions provide rationale for the development of non-cytotoxic antibiotic adjuvants. Using various biophysical methods, we show that the branched peptide, B2088, binds to lipid A and disrupts the supramolecular organization of LPS. The disruption of outer membrane in an intact bacterium was demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy and checkerboard assays, the latter confirming strong to moderate synergism between B2088 and various classes of antibiotics. The potency of synergistic combinations of B2088 and antibiotics was further established by time-kill kinetics, mammalian cell culture infections model and in vivo model of bacterial keratitis. Importantly, B2088 did not show any cytotoxicity to corneal epithelial cells for at least 96 h continuous exposure or hemolytic activity even at 20 mg/ml. Peptide congeners containing norvaline, phenylalanine and tyrosine (instead of valine in B2088) displayed better synergism compared to other substitutions. We propose that high affinity and subsequent disruption of the supramolecular assembly of LPS by the branched peptides are vital for the development of non-cytotoxic antibiotic adjuvants that can enhance the accessibility of conventional antibiotics to the intracellular targets, decrease the antibiotic consumption and holds promise in averting antibiotic resistance.

  9. Allergen immunotherapy with nanoparticles containing lipopolysaccharide from Brucella ovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Sara; Gamazo, Carlos; San Roman, Beatriz; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, Maria Luisa; Espuelas, Socorro; Irache, Juan M

    2008-11-01

    The adjuvant and protective capacity against anaphylactic shock of the association between rough lipopolysaccharide of Brucella ovis (LPS) coencapsulated with ovalbumin (OVA), as a model allergen, in Gantrez AN nanoparticles was investigated. Several strategies were performed in order to study the adjuvant effect of the LPS either encapsulated or coating the nanoparticles. OVA, as well as LPS, was incorporated either during the manufacturing process (OVA-encapsulated or LPS-encapsulated nanoparticles, respectively) or after the preparation (OVA-coated or LPS-coated nanoparticles, respectively). After the administration of 10 microg of OVA incorporated in the different formulations, all the nanoparticles, with or without LPS, were capable of amplifying the immune response (IgG(1) and IgG(2a)). However, in a model of sensitized mice to OVA, the formulation with OVA and LPS-entrapped inside the nanoparticles administered intradermally in three doses of 3 microg of OVA each was the only treatment that totally protected the mice from death after a challenge with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA. In contrast, the control group administered with OVA adsorbed onto a commercial alhydrogel adjuvant showed 80% mortality. These results are highly suggestive for the valuable use of Gantrez nanoparticles combined with rough LPS of B. ovis in immunotherapy. PMID:18582571

  10. Enhancement of endotoxin lethality and generation of anaphylactoid reactions by lipopolysaccharides in muramyl-dipeptide-treated mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Takada, H.; Galanos, C

    1987-01-01

    Intravenous injection of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and Salmonella lipopolysaccharides (LPS) enhanced lethal toxicity of the LPS in C57BL/6 mice. This was true for S (smooth)- and R (rough)-form LPS and free lipid A. Enhancement of toxicity was maximum when the LPS was administered 4 h after MDP, at which time the lethal doses for 50% of mice of S- and R-form LPS and free lipid A were between 1 and 10 micrograms, compared with more than 100 micrograms in normal animals. This sensitization was ab...

  11. Endothelin receptor-antagonists suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release from alveolar macrophages of non-smokers, smokers and COPD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Kathrin; Köhler-Bachmann, Stefanie; Jungck, David; Körber, Sandra; Yanik, Sarah; Knoop, Heiko; Wehde, Deborah; Rheinländer, Sonja; Walther, Jörg W; Kronsbein, Juliane; Knobloch, Jürgen; Koch, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Smoking-induced COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, which becomes enhanced by bacterial infections resulting in accelerated disease progression called exacerbation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) release endothelin-1 (ET-1), IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9, all of which are linked to COPD pathogenesis and exacerbation. ET-1 signals via ETA- and ETB-receptors (ETAR, ETBR). This is blocked by endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), like bosentan, which targets both receptors, ETAR-selective ambrisentan and ETBR-specific BQ788. Therefore, ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential, which might be useful in COPD and other inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that ERAs suppress cytokine release from AM of smokers and COPD subjects induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the most important immunogen of gram-negative bacteria. AM were isolated from the broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) of n=29 subjects (11 non-smokers, 10 current smokers without COPD, 8 smokers with COPD), cultivated and stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of ERAs. Cytokines were measured by ELISA. Endothelin receptor expression was investigated by RT-PCR and western blot. AM expressed ETAR and ETBR mRNA, but only ETBR protein was detected. LPS and ET-1 both induced IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9. LPS-induced IL-6 release was increased in COPD versus non-smokers and smokers. Bosentan, ambrisentan and BQ788 all partially reduced all cytokines without differences between cohorts. Specific ETBR inhibition was most effective. LPS induced ET-1, which was exclusively blocked by BQ788. In conclusion, LPS induces ET-1 release in AM, which in turn leads to CCL-2, IL-6 and MMP-9 expression rendering AM sensitive for ERAs. ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential in smoking-induced COPD. PMID:26526351

  12. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  13. Bone repair: Effects of physical exercise and LPS systemic exposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Jonatas E; Branco, Luiz G S; Issa, João Paulo M

    2016-08-01

    Bone repair can be facilitated by grafting, biochemical and physical stimulation. Conversely, it may be delayed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Physical exercise exerts beneficial effects on the bone, but its effect on bone repair is not known. We investigated the effect of exercise on the LPS action on bone healing through bone densitometry, quantitative histological analysis for bone formation rate and immunohistochemical markers in sedentary and exercised animals. Rats ran on the treadmill for four weeks. After training the rats were submitted to a surgical procedure (bone defect in the right tibia) and 24h after the surgery LPS was administered at a dose of 100μg/kg i.p., whereas the control rats received a saline injection (1ml/kg, i.p.). Right tibias were obtained for analysis after 10days during which rats were not submitted to physical training. Physical exercise had a positive effect on bone repair, increasing bone mineral density, bone mineral content, bone formation rate, type I collagen and osteocalcin expression. These parameters were not affected by systemic administration of LPS. Our data indicate that physical exercise has an important osteogenic effect, which is maintained during acute systemic inflammation induced by exposure to a single dose of LPS. PMID:27319388

  14. Aggravation of myocardial dysfunction by injurious mechanical ventilation in LPS-induced pneumonia in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, Lonneke; Kuiper, Jan Willem; Plotz, Frans B.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation (MV) may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and may thereby contribute to fatal multiple organ failure. We tested the hypothesis that injurious MV of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pre-injured lungs induces myocardial inflammation and further dysfunction ex vivo

  15. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS from Shewanella spp. MR-4

    OpenAIRE

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Korenevsky, Anton

    2008-01-01

    The rough type lipopolysaccharide isolated from Shewanella spp. strain MR-4 was analyzed using NMR, mass spectroscopy and chemical methods. Two structural variants have been found, both contained 8-amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid and lacked l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. A minor variant of the LPS contained phosphoramide substituent.

  16. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russe, Otto Quintus, E-mail: quintus@russe.eu; Möser, Christine V., E-mail: chmoeser@hotmail.com; Kynast, Katharina L., E-mail: katharina.kynast@googlemail.com; King, Tanya S., E-mail: tanya.sarah.king@googlemail.com; Olbrich, Katrin, E-mail: Katrin.olbrich@gmx.net; Grösch, Sabine, E-mail: groesch@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Geisslinger, Gerd, E-mail: geisslinger@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  17. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells

  18. Contact sensitizers modulate the arachidonic acid metabolism of PMA-differentiated U-937 monocytic cells activated by LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bufalo, Aurélia; Bernad, José; Dardenne, Christophe; Verda, Denis; Meunier, Jean Roch; Rousset, Françoise; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Pipy, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    For the effective induction of a hapten-specific T cell immune response toward contact sensitizers, in addition to covalent-modification of skin proteins, the redox and inflammatory statuses of activated dendritic cells are crucial. The aim of this study was to better understand how sensitizers modulate an inflammatory response through cytokines production and COX metabolism cascade. To address this purpose, we used the human monocytic-like U-937 cell line differentiated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and investigated the effect of 6 contact sensitizers (DNCB, PPD, hydroquinone, propyl gallate, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol) and 3 non sensitizers (lactic acid, glycerol and tween 20) on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) and on the arachidonic acid metabolic profile after bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Our results showed that among the tested molecules, all sensitizers specifically prevent the production of PMA/LPS-induced COX-2 metabolites (PGE(2,) TxB(2) and PGD(2)), eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibiting also the production of IL-1β and TNF-α. We further demonstrated that there is no unique PGE(2) inhibition mechanism: while the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from membrane phospholipids does not appear do be a target of modulation, COX-2 expression and/or COX-2 enzymatic activity are the major steps of prostaglandin synthesis that are inhibited by sensitizers. Altogether these results add a new insight into the multiple biochemical effects described for sensitizers. PMID:21807015

  19. Passive Protection of Diabetic Rats with Antisera Specific for the Polysaccharide Portion of the Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Larry E.; Wong, Sallene; Woods, Don E; Dance, David AB; Chaowagul, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antisera raised to tetanus toxoid-conjugated polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (lps) and purified lps of Pseudomonas pseudomallei that reacted with a collection of 41 strains of this bacterium from 23 patients are described. The common antigen recognized by these sera was within the polysaccharide component of the lps of the cells. The sera were specific for P pseudomallei in that none of 37 strains of other bacteria, including 20 Gram-negative and three Gram-posi...

  20. Modulation of macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide: stem cell requirements, accessory lymphocyte involvement, and IA-inducing factor production.

    OpenAIRE

    Wentworth, P A; Ziegler, H K

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of induction of murine macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. Intraperitoneal injection of 1 microgram of LPS resulted in a 3- to 10-fold increase in the number of IA-positive peritoneal macrophages (flow cytometry and immunofluorescence and a 6-to 16-fold increase by radioimmunoassay. The isolated lipid A moiety of LPS was a potent inducer of macrophage Ia expression. Ia induction required a functional myelopoietic system as indicated by the finding t...

  1. Ouabain Modulates the Lipid Composition of Hippocampal Plasma Membranes from Rats with LPS-induced Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Israel José Pereira; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Scavone, Cristoforo; Mignaco, Julio Alberto; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto de Oliveira; Santos, Hérica de Lima

    2015-12-01

    The effects of ouabain (OUA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo on hippocampal membranes (RHM) of Wistar male rats aged 3 months were analyzed. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of OUA only, LPS only, OUA plus LPS, or saline, the content of proteins, phospholipids, cholesterol and gangliosides from RHM was analyzed. The total protein and cholesterol contents of RHM were not significantly affected by OUA or LPS for the experimentally paired groups. In contrast, total phospholipids and gangliosides were strongly modulated by either OUA or LPS treatments. LPS reduced the total phospholipids (roughly 23 %) and increased the total gangliosides (approximately 40 %). OUA alone increased the total phospholipids (around 23 %) and also the total gangliosides (nearly 34 %). OUA pretreatment compensated the LPS-induced changes, preserving the total phospholipids and gangliosides around the same levels of the control. Thus, an acute treatment with OUA not only modulated the composition of hippocampal membranes from 3-month-old rats, but also was apparently able to counteract membrane alterations resulting from LPS-induced neuroinflammation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the OUA capacity modulates the lipid composition of hippocampal plasma membranes from rats with LPS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26362341

  2. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups...

  3. Effect of the anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 (ALFPm3) from Penaeus monodon on Vibrio harveyi cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaree, Phattarunda; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2012-12-01

    The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 3 from Penaeus monodon (ALFPm3) has previously been shown to have very active in vitro antimicrobial activity against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, certain fungi and viruses, including known pathogens of P. monodon shrimp. With respect to the strong bactericidal effect on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the ALFPm3 binds to their principal cell wall components, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), with a high affinity. The aim of this study was, therefore, to reveal the effects of treating ALFPm3 on membrane of Vibrio harveyi, a P. monodon pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium. The recombinant (r)ALFPm3 protein was found to localize on the V. harveyi cells in vivo, followed by inducing membrane permeabilization and leakage of cytoplasmic components. Moreover, the effect of rALFPm3 treatment on the bacterial cell morphology was confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Membrane disruption and damage, bleb and pore formation, and the leakage of cytoplasmic contents were all clearly observed. Taken together, these results suggested that ALFPm3 effectively kills bacteria through bacterial membrane permeabilization. PMID:23000267

  4. Lipopolysaccharide directly alters renal tubule transport through distinct TLR4-dependent pathways in basolateral and apical membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Good, David W.; George, Thampi; Watts, Bruns A.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infection of the kidney is associated with renal tubule dysfunction and dysregulation of systemic electrolyte balance. Whether bacterial molecules directly affect renal tubule transport is unknown. We examined the effects of LPS on HCO3− absorption in the isolated rat and mouse medullary thick ascending limb (MTAL). LPS decreased HCO3− absorption when added to bath or lumen. The MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 eliminated inhibition by bath LPS but had no effect on inhibition by lumen LPS. C...

  5. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sik [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Kwang [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won, E-mail: kwon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  6. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  7. Differential inflammatory response to inhaled lipopolysaccharide targeted either to the airways or the alveoli in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Möller

    Full Text Available Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease.In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and 20 µg LPS to the airways and 5 µg LPS to the alveoli using controlled aerosol bolus inhalation. Inflammatory parameters were assessed during a 72 h time period. LPS deposited in the airways induced dose dependent systemic responses with increases of blood neutrophils (peaking at 6 h, Interleukin-6 (peaking at 6 h, body temperature (peaking at 12 h, and CRP (peaking at 24 h. 5 µg LPS targeted to the alveoli caused significantly stronger effects compared to 5 µg airway LPS deposition. Local responses were studied by measuring lung function (FEV(1 and reactive oxygen production, assessed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in fractionated exhaled breath condensate (EBC. FEV(1 showed a dose dependent decline, with lowest values at 12 h post LPS challenge. There was a significant 2-fold H(2O(2 induction in airway-EBC at 2 h post LPS inhalation. Alveolar LPS targeting resulted in the induction of very low levels of EBC-H(2O(2.Targeting LPS to the alveoli leads to stronger systemic responses compared to airway LPS targeting. Targeted LPS inhalation may provide a novel model of airway inflammation for studying the role of LPS contamination of air pollution in lung diseases, exacerbation and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in mouse brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chuen-Mao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, an arachidonic acid metabolite converted by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, plays important roles in the regulation of endothelial functions in response to bacterial infection. The enzymatic activity of COX-2 can be down-regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction. However, the mechanisms underlying HO-1 modulating COX-2 protein expression are not known. Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the up-regulation of HO-1 regulates COX-2 expression induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin produced by Gram negative bacteria, in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3 Methods Cultured bEnd.3 cells were used to investigate LPS-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. Cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP, an HO-1 inducer, infection with a recombinant adenovirus carried with HO-1 gene (Adv-HO-1, or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, an HO-1 inhibitor was used to stimulate HO-1 induction or inhibit HO-1 activity. The expressions of COX-2 and HO-1 were evaluated by western blotting. PGE2 levels were detected by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Hemoglobin (a chelator of carbon monoxide, CO, one of metabolites of HO-1 and CO-RM2 (a CO releasing molecule were used to investigate the mechanisms of HO-1 regulating COX-2 expression. Results We found that LPS-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production were mediated through NF-κB (p65 via activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. LPS-induced COX-2 expression was inhibited by HO-1 induction by pretreatment with CoPP or infection with Adv-HO-1. This inhibitory effect of HO-1 was reversed by pretreatment with either ZnPP or hemoglobin. Pretreatment with CO-RM2 also inhibited TLR4/MyD88 complex formation, NF-κB (p65 activation, COX-2 expression, and PGE2 production induced by LPS. Conclusions We show here a novel inhibition of HO-1 on LPS-induced COX-2/PGE2 production in bEnd.3. Our results reinforce the emerging role of cerebral endothelium-derived HO-1

  9. Effect of Lipopolysaccharide on Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Control Nasal Mucosa Fibroblasts and in Fibroblasts from Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bertolín, Laura; Mullol, Joaquim; Fuentes-Prado, Mireya; Roca-Ferrer, Jordi; Alobid, Isam; Picado, César; Pujols, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper airways frequently associated with asthma. Bacterial infection is a feature of CRSwNP that can aggravate the disease and the response to glucocorticoid treatment. Objective We examined whether the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function in control nasal mucosa (NM) fibroblasts and in nasal polyp (NP) fibroblasts from patients with CRSwNP and asthma. Methods NP (n = 12) and NM fibroblasts (n = 10) were in vitro pre-incubated with LPS (24 hours) prior to the addition of dexamethasone. Cytokine/chemokine secretion was measured by ELISA and Cytometric Bead Array. GRα, GRβ, mitogen-activated protein-kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) expression was measured by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, GRα nuclear translocation by immunocytochemistry, and GRβ localization by immunoblotting. The role of MKP-1 and GILZ on dexamethasone-mediated cytokine inhibition was analyzed by small interfering RNA silencing. Results Pre-incubation of nasal fibroblasts with LPS enhanced the secretion of IL-6, CXCL8, RANTES, and GM-CSF induced by FBS. FBS-induced CXCL8 secretion was higher in NP than in NM fibroblasts. LPS effects on IL-6 and CXCL8 were mediated via activation of p38α/β MAPK and IKK/NF-κB pathways. Additionally, LPS pre-incubation: 1) reduced dexamethasone’s capacity to inhibit FBS-induced IL-6, CXCL8 and RANTES, 2) reduced dexamethasone-induced GRα nuclear translocation (only in NM fibroblasts), 3) did not alter GRα/GRβ expression, 4) decreased GILZ expression, and 5) did not affect dexamethasone’s capacity to induce MKP-1 and GILZ expression. MKP-1 knockdown reduced dexamethasone’s capacity to suppress FBS-induced CXCL8 release. Conclusion The bacterial product LPS negatively affects GR function in control NM and NP fibroblasts by interfering with the capacity of the

  10. Chikusetsusaponin V attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan Wen; Zhang, Chang Cheng; Zhao, Hai Xia; Wan, Jing Zhi; Deng, Li Li; Zhou, Zhi Yong; Dun, Yao Yan; Liu, Chao Qi; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Ting

    2016-06-01

    Chikusetsusaponin V (CsV), a saponin from Panax japonicus, has been reported to inhibit inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage cells. However, whether CsV could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury in vivo and the potential mechanisms involved remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of CsV on LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and further explored the potential mechanisms involved. Our results showed that CsV significantly attenuated elevation of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and improved liver histopathological changes in LPS-induced mice. In addition, CsV decreased serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels and inhibited mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS challenged mice. Furthermore, CsV inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation by downregulating phosphorylated NF-κB, IκB-α, ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 levels in the liver tissue, which ultimately decreased nucleus NF-κB protein level. In conclusion, our data suggested that CsV could be a promising drug for preventing LPS challenged liver injury since it attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses, partly via inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26981791

  11. Montelukast attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodir, A E; Ghoneim, H A; Rahim, M A; Suddek, G M

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of montelukast (MNT) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac injury, in comparison to dexamethasone (DEX), a standard anti-inflammatory. Male Sprague Dawley rats (160-180 g) were assigned to five groups (n = 8/group): (1) control; (2) LPS (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)); (3) LPS + MNT (10 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)); (4) LPS + MNT (20 mg/kg, p.o.); and (5) LPS + DEX (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, heart/body weight (BW) ratio and percent survival of rats were determined. Serum total protein, creatine kinase muscle/brain (CK-MB), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were measured. Heart samples were taken for histological assessment and for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Cardiac tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. LPS significantly increased heart/BW ratio, serum CK-MB, ALP, and LDH activities and decreased percent survival and serum total protein levels. MDA content increased in heart tissues with a concomitant reduction in GSH content. Immunohistochemical staining of heart specimens from LPS-treated rats revealed high expression of TNF-α. MNT significantly reduced percent mortality and suppressed the release of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers when compared with LPS group. Additionally, MNT effectively preserved tissue morphology as evidenced by histological evaluation. MNT (20 mg/kg) was more effective in alleviating LPS-induced heart injury when compared with both MNT (10 mg/kg) and DEX (1 mg/kg), as evidenced by decrease in positive staining by TNF-α immunohistochemically, decrease MDA, and increase GSH content in heart tissue. This study demonstrates that MNT might have cardioprotective effects against the inflammatory process during endotoxemia. This effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26089034

  12. Frankincense improves memory retrieval in rats treated with Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beheshti Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frankincense has been shown to possess anti-inf lammatory activity. In this studythe effect of pretreatment with the hydro-alcoholic extract of frankincense on memory retrievalwas assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS treated rats.Methods: Forty-two adult male Wistar rats were distributed into 7 groups of 6 each. One groupreceived LPS (1 mg/kg; i.p pre-test. The control group received saline (1 ml/kg; i.p. 2 groups ofanimals received frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O or DMSO 5% (1 ml/kg; P.O and 30 minutes laterLPS (1 mg/kg; i.p. Two other groups of animals received frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O or DMSO5% (1 ml/kg; P.O and 30 minutes later saline (1 ml/kg; i.p. Another group of rats received LPS(1 mg/kg; i.p and 30 minutes later Ibuprofen (100 mg/kg; P.O. In all the experimental groups,memory retrieval was assessed 4 hours following the last injection, using a passive avoidancetask (PAT. Hippocampal TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA as an index of LPS-inducedneuroinf lammation.Results: LPS impaired memory retrieval by decreasing step-through latency (STL, significantly.LPS also increased levels of TNF-α in the hippocampus as compared to the control group.Administration of frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O before LPS (1 mg/kg; i.p improved memoryretrieval as compared to the control group. Frankincense reduced hippocampal TNF-α level in theLPS treated rats, significantly, compared to the control group.Conclusion: The results indicate that the hydro-alcoholic extract of frankincense has the potentialto improve memory retrieval in LPS treated rats, possibly via an anti-neuroinf lammatory activity.

  13. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché; P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used purifi

  14. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  15. IL-33 enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production from mouse macrophages by regulating lipopolysaccharide receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinassous, Quentin; Garcia-de-Paco, Elvira; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Synguelakis, Monique; von Aulock, Sonja; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Kanellopoulos, Jean

    2009-07-15

    Bacterial LPS triggers monocytes and macrophages to produce several inflammatory cytokines and mediators. However, once exposed to LPS, they become hyporesponsive to a subsequent endotoxin challenge. This phenomenon is defined as LPS desensitization or tolerance. Previous studies have identified some components of the biochemical pathways involved in negative modulation of LPS responses. In particular, it has been shown that the IL-1R-related protein ST2 could be implicated in LPS tolerance. The natural ligand of ST2 was recently identified as IL-33, a new member of the IL-1 family. In this study, we investigated whether IL-33 triggering of ST2 was able to induce LPS desensitization of mouse macrophages. We found that IL-33 actually enhances the LPS response of macrophages and does not induce LPS desensitization. We demonstrate that this IL-33 enhancing effect of LPS response is mediated by the ST2 receptor because it is not found in ST2 knockout mice. The biochemical consequences of IL-33 pretreatment of mouse macrophages were investigated. Our results show that IL-33 increases the expression of the LPS receptor components MD2 (myeloid differentiation protein 2) and TLR-4, the soluble form of CD14 and the MyD88 adaptor molecule. In addition, IL-33 pretreatment of macrophages enhances the cytokine response to TLR-2 but not to TLR-3 ligands. Thus, IL-33 treatment preferentially affects the MyD88-dependent pathway activated by the TLR. PMID:19553541

  16. Contact sensitizers modulate the arachidonic acid metabolism of PMA-differentiated U-937 monocytic cells activated by LPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the effective induction of a hapten-specific T cell immune response toward contact sensitizers, in addition to covalent-modification of skin proteins, the redox and inflammatory statuses of activated dendritic cells are crucial. The aim of this study was to better understand how sensitizers modulate an inflammatory response through cytokines production and COX metabolism cascade. To address this purpose, we used the human monocytic-like U-937 cell line differentiated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and investigated the effect of 6 contact sensitizers (DNCB, PPD, hydroquinone, propyl gallate, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol) and 3 non sensitizers (lactic acid, glycerol and tween 20) on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) and on the arachidonic acid metabolic profile after bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Our results showed that among the tested molecules, all sensitizers specifically prevent the production of PMA/LPS-induced COX-2 metabolites (PGE2, TxB2 and PGD2), eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibiting also the production of IL-1β and TNF-α. We further demonstrated that there is no unique PGE2 inhibition mechanism: while the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from membrane phospholipids does not appear do be a target of modulation, COX-2 expression and/or COX-2 enzymatic activity are the major steps of prostaglandin synthesis that are inhibited by sensitizers. Altogether these results add a new insight into the multiple biochemical effects described for sensitizers. - Highlights: → We investigated how contact sensitizers modulate an inflammatory response. → We used macrophage-differentiated cell line, U-937 treated with PMA/LPS. → Sensitizers specifically inhibit the production of COX metabolites (PGE2, TxB2). → Several mechanisms of inhibition: COX-2 expression/enzymatic activity, isomerases. → New insight in the biochemical properties of sensitizers.

  17. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure does not diminish the innate immune response to a subsequent lipopolysaccharide challenge in Holstein bull calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, A L; Korkmaz, F T; Elsasser, T H; Kerr, D E

    2016-07-01

    The innate immune response following experimental mastitis is quite variable between individual dairy cattle. An inflammatory response that minimizes collateral damage to the mammary gland while still effectively resolving the infection following pathogen exposure is beneficial to dairy producers. The ability of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in early life to generate a low-responding phenotype and thus reduce the inflammatory response to a later-life LPS challenge was investigated in neonatal bull calves. Ten Holstein bull calves were randomly assigned to either an early life LPS (ELL) group (n=5) or an early life saline (ELS) group (n=5). At 7d of age, calves received either LPS or saline, and at 32d of age, all calves were challenged with an intravenous dose of LPS to determine the effect of the early life treatment (LPS or saline) on the immune response generated toward a subsequent LPS challenge. Dermal fibroblast and monocyte-derived macrophage cultures from each calf were established at age 20 and 27d, respectively, to model sustained effects from the early life LPS exposure on gene expression and protein production of components within the LPS response pathway. The ELL calves had greater levels of plasma IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α than the ELS calves following the early life LPS or saline treatments. However, levels of these 2 immune markers were similar between ELL and ELS calves when both groups were subsequently challenged with LPS. A comparison of the in vitro LPS responses of the ELL and ELS calves revealed similar patterns of protein production and gene expression following an LPS challenge of both dermal fibroblast and monocyte-derived macrophage cultures established from the treatment groups. Whereas an early life exposure to LPS did not result in a dampened inflammatory response toward a later LPS challenge in these neonatal bull calves, the potential that exposure to inflammation or stress in early life or in utero can create an

  18. The roles of lipopolysaccharide receptor cluster and large-conductance Ca2 +-activated potassium channel in the lipopolysaccharide recognition%脂多糖受体簇和大电导Ca2+活K+通道在脂多糖信号识别中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮; 王焕亮; 李东亮; 张丽; 类维富

    2012-01-01

    背景 细菌脂多糖(lipopolysaccharide,LPS)可激活细胞合成和释放多种细胞因子,导致全身炎症反应.LPS识别及跨膜信号转导是引起细胞效应的关键,成为近年的研究热点.目的 对新近提出的“LPS受体簇”理论和大电导Ca2+激活K+通道(MaxiK)在LPS信号识别中的作用研究进展进行综述.内容 LPS与CD14结合后,不同的信号分子在脂质筏内聚集,LPS被释放到脂质双分子层,并与由多种受体分子组成的受体簇相互作用.根据不同的细胞类型和细菌刺激,形成了不同的LPS受体簇.MaxiK通道在LPS诱导的巨噬细胞信号转导过程的早期即被激活.并且以IκB-α/NF-κB为中心的促炎症反应依赖MaxiK的功能.趋向 需要进一步研究来阐明LPS受体簇在细胞膜特定区域内形成的确切分子机制,以及组成受体簇的几种蛋白分子在刺激识别和信号转导过程中的作用.%Background Bacterial lipopolysaccharide(LPS) induces cytokine synthesis and secretion in cells,subsequently resulting in systemic inflammatory response.The LPS receptor recognition and transmembrane signal transduction play a key role in LPS-induced cell activation. Objective To review a novel theory of LPS receptor activation cluster and the role of largeconductance Ca2+-activated potassium channel (MaxiK) in LPS recognition.Content Following ligation of CD14 by LPS,different signaling molecules are recruited at the site of the ligation within lipid rafts,where LPS is then briefly released into the lipid bilayer and finally interacts with a complex of receptors.Depending on the cell type and the bacterial stimulus,different LPS receptor clusters can be formed.The activation of the MaxiK channel is an early step in LPS-induced transmembrane signal transduction in macrophages.And the central IκB-α/NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory pathway depends on the function of MaxiK channel in macrophages.Trend The molecular mechanism of LPS receptor recruitment

  19. What's LPS Got to Do with It? A Role for Gut LPS Variants in Driving Autoimmune and Allergic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehley, Taylor; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-05-11

    The bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies have a profound influence on our health. In a new paper in Cell, Vatanen et al. (2016) report that the composition of the early-life gut microbiome, particularly those species producing lipopolysaccharide, influences the onset of autoimmune and allergic disease. PMID:27173923

  20. Effect of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharides and inflammatory cytokines: an in vitro study using a human colonic microbiota model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodes, Laetitia; Khan, Afshan; Paul, Arghya; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Marinescu, Daniel; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Shao, Wei; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-04-01

    Gut-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical to the development and progression of chronic low-grade inflammation and metabolic diseases. In this study, the effects of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharide and inflammatory cytokine concentrations were evaluated using a human colonic microbiota model. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, Bifidobacterium animalis, B. bifidum, B. longum, and B. longum subsp. infantis were identified from the literature for their anti-inflammatory potential. Each bacterial culture was administered daily to a human colonic microbiota model during 14 days. Colonic lipopolysaccharides, and Gram-positive and negative bacteria were quantified. RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were stimulated with supernatant from the human colonic microbiota model. Concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-4 cytokines were measured. Lipopolysaccharide concentrations were significantly reduced with the administration of B. bifidum (-46.45 +/- 5.65%), L. rhamnosus (-30.40 +/- 5.08%), B. longum (-42.50 +/- 1.28%), and B. longum subsp. infantis (-68.85 +/- 5.32%) (p bacteria were distinctly affected by the probiotic administered. There was a probiotic strain-specific effect on immunomodulatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. B. longum subsp. infantis demonstrated higher capacities to reduce TNF-alpha concentrations (-69.41 +/- 2.78%; p probiotic bacteria, such as B. longum subsp. infantis, might decrease colonic lipopolysaccharide concentrations, which might reduce the proinflammatory tone. This study has noteworthy applications in the field of biotherapeutics for the prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory and metabolic diseases. PMID:23568206

  1. Evaluation of the serotonin receptor blocker methiothepin in broilers injected intravenously with lipopolysaccharide and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M E; Wideman, R F

    2006-12-01

    There has been considerable interest in the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension due to episodes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans linked to serotoninergic appetite-suppressant drugs. In this study, we investigated the effect of 5-HT on the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by injecting bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) and cellulose microparticles intravenously, using the nonselective 5-HT(1/2)receptor, antagonist methiothepin. In Experiment 1, broilers selected for ascites susceptibility or resistance under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia were treated with methiothepin or saline, followed by injection of LPS, while recording pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). In Experiment 2 ascites-susceptible broilers were treated with methiothepin or saline, followed by injection of cellulose microparticles, while recording PAP. In Experiment 3, an i.v. microparticle injection dose shown to cause 50% mortality was injected into ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers after methiothepin or saline treatment. Injecting methiothepin reduced PAP below baseline values in ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers, suggesting a role for 5-HT in maintaining the basal tone of the pulmonary vasculature in broilers. Injecting microparticles into the wing vein had no affect on the PAP in the broilers treated with methiothepin, suggesting that 5-HT is an important mediator in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to microparticles. Furthermore, injecting an 50% lethal dose of microparticles into ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers pretreated with methiothepin resulted in reduced mortality. Serotonin appears to play a less prominent role in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to intravenously injected LPS, indicating that other mediators within the innate response to inflammatory stimuli may also be involved. These results are consistent with our

  2. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumayokun A. Olajide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β, nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that IκB-independent inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5 μM did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF-κB signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Clearance, Bacterial Clearance, and Systemic Inflammatory Responses Are Regulated by Cell Type–Specific Functions of TLR4 during Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Meihong; Scott, Melanie J.; Loughran, Patricia; Gibson, Gregory; Sodhi, Chhinder; Watkins, Simon; Hackam, David; Billiar, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity associated with bacterial sepsis is the result of host immune responses to pathogens, which are dependent on pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. TLR4 is expressed on a range of cell types, yet the mechanisms by which cell-specific functions of TLR4 lead to an integrated sepsis response are poorly understood. To address this, we generated mice in which TLR4 was specifically deleted from myeloid cells (LysMTLR4KO) or hepatocytes (HCTLR4KO) and then...

  4. Quercetin Reduces Inflammatory Responses in LPS-Stimulated Cardiomyoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids possess several biological and pharmacological activities. Quercetin (Q, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been shown to downregulate inflammatory responses and provide cardioprotection. However, the mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory properties of Q in cardiac cells are poorly understood. In inflammation, nitric oxide (NO acts as a proinflammatory mediator and is synthesized by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in response to pro-inflammatory agents such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a causative agent in myocardial depression during sepsis. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effect of Q on rat cardiac dysfunction during sepsis induced by LPS. Pretreatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with Q inhibited LPS-induced iNOS expression and NO production and counteracted oxidative stress caused by the unregulated NO production that leads to the generation of peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species. In addition, Q pretreatment significantly counteracted apoptosis cell death as measured by immunoblotting of the cleaved caspase 3 and caspase 3 activity. Q also inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPK and p38 MAP kinase that are involved in the inhibition of cell growth as well as the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q might serve as a valuable protective agent in cardiovascular inflammatory diseases.

  5. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  6. Lipopolysaccharide induces IFN-γ production in human NK cells

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    Leonid M Kanevskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells have been shown to play a regulatory role in sepsis. According to the current view, NK cells become activated via macrophages or dendritic cells primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Recently TLR4 gene expression was detected in human NK cells suggesting the possibility of a direct action of LPS on NK cells. In this study, effects of LPS on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were studied using highly purified human NK cells. LPS induced IFN-γ production in the presence of IL-2 in cell populations containing >98% CD56+ cells. Surprisingly, in the same experiments LPS decreased NK cell degranulation. No significant expression of markers related to blood dendritic cells, monocytes or T or B lymphocytes in the NK cell preparations was observed; the portions of HLA-DRbright, CD14+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells amounted to less than 0.1% within the cell populations. No more than 0.2% of NK cells were shown to be slightly positive for surface TLR4 in our experimental system, although intracellular staining revealed moderate amounts of TLR4 inside the NK cell population. These cells were negative for surface CD14, the receptor participating in LPS recognition by TLR4. Incubation of NK cells with IL-2 or/and LPS did not lead to an increase in TLR4 surface expression. TLR4–CD56+ NK cells isolated by cell sorting secreted IFN-γ in response to LPS. Antibody to TLR4 did not block the LPS-induced increase in IFN-γ production. We have also shown that Re-form of LPS lacking outer core oligosaccharide and O-antigen induces less cytokine production in NK cells than full length LPS. We speculate that the polysaccharide fragments of LPS molecule may take part in LPS-induced IFN-γ production by NK cells. Collectively our data suggest the existence of a mechanism of LPS direct action on NK cells distinct from established TLR4-mediated signaling.

  7. Urinary IgG antibody against mixed heat-killed coliform antigen and lipopolysaccharide core antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, A P; Edmond, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether antibody to lipopolysaccharide-core (LPS-core) antigen is an important component of the antibody, detected by mixed heat-killed coliform antigen, in urine from patients with suspected urinary tract infection. METHODS: LPS-core antigen and mixed heat-killed coliform antigen were used in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure IgG antibody in midstream urine samples. Seventy two samples from students attending their general practitioner with symptoms s...

  8. Neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide enhances vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to rotenone neurotoxicity in later life

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Tien, Lu-Tai; Lin, Rick C. S.; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Rhodes, Philip G.; Cai, Zhengwei

    2011-01-01

    Brain inflammation in early life has been proposed to play important roles in the development of neurodegenerative disorders in adult life. To test this hypothesis, we used a neonatal rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure (1,000 EU/g body weight, intracerebral injection on P5) to produce brain inflammation. By P70, when LPS-induced behavioral deficits were spontaneously recovered, animals were challenged with rotenone, a commonly used pesticide, through subcutaneous mini-pump infusio...

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Differential Expression of miRNAs in Male and Female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides Ticks

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Wang; Haiyan Gong; Houshuang Zhang; Yongzhi Zhou; Jie Cao; Jinlin Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates the innate immune response in arthropods. In tick vectors, LPS activates expression of immune genes, including those for antibacterial peptides. miRNAs are 21-24 nt non-coding small RNAs that regulate target mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. However, our understanding of tick innate immunity is limited to a few cellular immune reactions and some characterized immune molecules. Moreover, there is little information on the regulation of the immune syst...

  10. Chronic lipopolysaccharide exposure induces cognitive dysfunction without affecting BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Ding, Jie; Liu, Ning; WANG Da-ming; Ding, Liang-cai; YANG, CHUN

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has the potential to cause cognitive dysfunction. However, the underlying pathogenesis has yet to be fully elucidated. Increasing attention is being focused on infection in the central nervous system. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the behavioral performance of rats receiving intraperitoneal injections of LPS and to determine the expression levels of amyloid-β (Aβ), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-in...

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Biliary Factors Enhance Invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Abul F. M. W.; Nathan D. Moss; Dai, Yung; Smith, Murray S. R.; Collins, Andrew M.; Jackson, Graham D. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the role of the hepatobiliary system in the early pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis infection was investigated in a rat model. Intravenous (i.v.) challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has previously been shown to enhance the translocation of normal gut flora. We first confirmed that LPS can similarly promote the invasion of S. enteritidis. Oral infection of outbred Australian Albino Wistar rats with 106 to 107 CFU of S. enteritidis led to widespread tissue invasion after...

  12. Lithium modifies brain arachidonic and docosahexaenoic metabolism in rat lipopolysaccharide model of neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Basselin, Mireille; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Chen, Mei; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Robert C. Murphy; Farias, Santiago E.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, caused by 6 days of intracerebroventricular infusion of a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.5 ng/h), stimulates brain arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in rats, but 6 weeks of lithium pretreatment reduces this effect. To further understand this action of lithium, we measured concentrations of eicosanoids and docosanoids generated from AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively, in high-energy microwaved rat brain using LC/MS/MS and two doses of LPS. In rats fed a l...

  13. Arginine-Rich Cationic Polypeptides Amplify Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Bosshart, Herbert; Heinzelmann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The human neutrophil-derived cationic protein CAP37, also known as azurocidin or heparin-binding protein, enhances the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in isolated human monocytes. We measured the release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in human whole blood and found that in addition to CAP37, other arginine-rich cationic polypeptides, such as the small structurally related protamines, enhance LPS-induced monocyte activation....

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-induced leptin release is neurally controlled

    OpenAIRE

    Mastronardi, C. A.; Yu, W. H.; Srivastava, V. K.; Dees, W L; McCann, S M

    2001-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that leptin release is controlled neurohormonally. Conscious, male rats bearing indwelling, external, jugular catheters were injected with the test drug or 0.9% NaCl (saline), and blood samples were drawn thereafter to measure plasma leptin. Anesthesia decreased plasma leptin concentrations within 10 min to a minimum at 120 min, followed by a rebound at 360 min. Administration (i.v.) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased plasma leptin to almost tw...

  15. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelena Caboni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Induction of Concurrent IL-1β and IL-23 Expression in THP-1 Cells Exhibits Differential Requirements for Caspase-1 and Cathepsin B Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynick, Christopher; Petes, Carlene; Tigert, Alexander; Gee, Katrina

    2016-08-01

    The inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex required for interleukin (IL)-1β production. Upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and subsequent ATP signaling, the NOD-like receptor containing-pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is activated to cleave pro-caspase-1 into caspase-1, allowing the secretion of IL-1β. IL-1β is known to function with IL-23 in the regulation of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells, Th17 cells, in adaptive immunity. Recently, studies have shown that IL-1β and IL-23 together activate IL-17-producing innate lymphoid cells, demonstrating that the pair may exhibit additional effects on cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of bacterial infection, LPS treatment of human monocytic cells, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. We found that IL-1β is partially required for optimal LPS-induced IL-23 production. We also found that IL-23 production was partially dependent on ATP signaling via the P2X7 receptor, whereas IL-1β production required this signaling. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for cathepsin B activity in IL-23 production. Taken together, this study identifies differential requirements for the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. Due to their similar roles in Th17 differentiation, characterization of the regulatory mechanisms for LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-23 may reveal novel information into the pathology of the inflammatory response particularly during bacterial infection. PMID:27096899

  17. Sexually dimorphic effects of prenatal exposure to propionic acid and lipopolysaccharide on social behavior in neonatal, adolescent, and adult rats: implications for autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kelly A; MacFabe, Derrick F; Vaz, Alisha; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the gut microbiome plays an important role in immune functioning, behavioral regulation and neurodevelopment. Altered microbiome composition, including altered short chain fatty acids, and/or immune system dysfunction, may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with some children with ASD exhibiting both abnormal gut bacterial metabolite composition and immune system dysfunction. This study describes the effects of prenatal propionic acid (PPA), a short chain fatty acid and metabolic product of many antibiotic resistant enteric bacteria, and of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic and microbiome component, on social behavior in male and female neonatal, adolescent and adult rats. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were injected once a day with either a low level of PPA (500 mg/kg SC) on gestation days G12-16, LPS (50 μg/kg SC) on G12, or vehicle control on G12 or G12-16. Sex- and age-specific, subtle effects on behavior were observed. Both male and female PPA treated pups were impaired in a test of their nest seeking response, suggesting impairment in olfactory-mediated neonatal social recognition. As well, adolescent males, born to PPA treated dams, approached a novel object more than control animals and showed increased levels of locomotor activity compared to prenatal PPA females. Prenatal LPS produced subtle impairments in social behavior in adult male and female rats. These findings raise the possibility that brief prenatal exposure to elevated levels of microbiome products, such as PPA or LPS, can subtly influence neonatal, adolescent and adult social behavior. PMID:24747144

  18. Modulation of cytochrome P450 2A5 activity by lipopolysaccharide: low-dose effects and non-monotonic dose-response relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C A X De-Oliveira

    Full Text Available Mouse cytochrome P450 (CYP 2A5 is induced by inflammatory conditions and infectious diseases that down-regulate the expression and activity of most other CYP isoforms. Enhanced oxidative stress and nuclear factor (erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 transcription factor activation have been hypothesised to mediate up-regulation of CYP2A5 expression in the murine liver. The unique and complex regulation of CYP2A5, however, is far from being thoroughly elucidated. Sepsis and high doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS elicit oxidative stress in the liver, but depression, not induction, of CYP2A5 has been observed in studies of mice treated with LPS. The foregoing facts prompted us to evaluate the response of CYP2A5 liver activity in female DBA-2 mice over a broad range of LPS doses (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, interferon gamma, tumour necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide (NO were measured in the blood serum. Activities of CYP1A (EROD and CYP2B (BROD in the liver were also determined for comparative purposes. LPS depressed CYP2A5 at low doses (0.025-2.0 mg/kg but not at doses (>2 mg/kg that increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO serum levels, and depressed CYP1A and CYP2B activities. Blockade of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the overproduction of NO induced by co-treatment with pentoxifylline and LPS and iNOS inhibition with aminoguanidine both extended down-regulation of CYP2A5 to the high dose range while not affecting LPS-induced depression of CYP1A and CYP2B. Overall, the results suggested that NO plays a role in the reversal of the low-dose LPS-induced depression of CYP2A5 observed when mice were challenged with higher doses of LPS.

  19. On the association between lipopolysaccharide induced catalepsy and serotonin metabolism in the brain of mice genetically different in the predisposition to catalepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenova, Ekaterina Yu; Kulikov, Alexander V; Tikhonova, Maria A; Bazovkina, Daria V; Fursenko, Daria V; Popova, Nina K

    2013-10-01

    The study of the interaction between nervous and immune systems in the mechanism of psychopathology is an important problem of neuroscience. Catalepsy (freezing reaction) is a passive defensive strategy in response to threatening stimuli. An exaggerated form of catalepsy is a syndrome of some grave mental disorders. Both the brain serotonin (5-HT) and immune systems were shown to be involved in the mechanism of catalepsy. Here we compared the effects of two doses (50 or 200 μg/kg, ip) of innate immune system activator, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), on catalepsy, 5-HT and its main metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) in the hippocampus, striatum, and midbrain of mice of catalepsy-prone (CBA/Lac and AKR.CBA-D13Mit76) and catalepsy-resistant (AKR/J) strains. The expression of LPS-induced catalepsy as well as 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the midbrain and striatum were significantly higher in mice of the catalepsy-prone strains compared with animals of the catalepsy-resistant strains. These results indicated an involvement of the brain 5-HT system in the cataleptogenic effect of LPS and open up new vistas for understanding the nervous-immune mechanism of behavioral disorders. PMID:23994663

  20. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal transduction pathway. Cells exposed to Pg-LPS, but not to Ec-LPS, displayed persisting expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase without apparent degradation, presumably allowing prolonged relay of downstream signals. Accordingly, cells pretreated with Pg-LPS, but not with Ec-LPS, were effectively activated in response to subsequent exposure to either LPS molecule, as evidenced by assessing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity. In fact, Pg-LPS primed THP-1 cells for enhanced NF-κB activation and TNF-α release upon restimulation with the same LPS. This was a dose-dependent effect and correlated with upregulation of surface TLR2 expression. Furthermore, we observed inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription in a reporter cell line pretreated with Ec-LPS and restimulated with Pg-LPS (compared to cells pretreated with medium only and restimulated with Pg-LPS), but not when the reverse treatment was made. Although Pg-LPS could not make cells tolerant to subsequent activation by Ec-LPS, Pg-LPS inhibited Ec-LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 release when the two molecules were added simultaneously into THP-1 cell cultures. Pg-LPS also suppressed P. gingivalis FimA protein-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription in the 3E10/huTLR4 reporter cell line, which does not express TLR2. This rules out competition for common signaling intermediates, suggesting that Pg-LPS may block component(s) of the TLR4 receptor complex. Interactions between TLR2 and TLR4 agonists may be important in the

  1. Induction of oxidative burst response in human neutrophils by immune complexes made in vitro of lipopolysaccharide and hyperimmune serum from chronically infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, G; Fomsgaard, Anette; Jensen, E T;

    1993-01-01

    Purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as an antigen for immune complex (IC) formation in vitro together with hyperimmune sera from chronically P. aeruginosa-infected patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). P. aeruginosa LPS by itself did not induce an oxidative burst ...

  2. Emodin ameliorates lipopolysaccharides-induced corneal inflammation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ling; Chen; Jing-Jing; Zhang; Xin; Kao; Lu-Wan; Wei; Zhi-Yu; Liu

    2015-01-01

    · AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides(LPS)-induced corneal inflammation in rats.· METHODS: Corneal infection was induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS in Wistar rats. The inflammation induced by LPS were examined by slit lamp microscope and cytological checkup of aqueous humor.Corneal tissue structure was observed by hematoxylin and eosin(HE) staining. The activation of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-κB) was determined by Western blot.Messenger ribonucleic acid(m RNA) of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) in LPS-challenged rat corneas were measured with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).· RESULTS: Typical manifestations of acute corneal inflammation were observed in LPS-induce rat model,and the corneal inflammatory response and structure were improved in rats pretreated with emodin. Treatment with emodin could improve corneal structure, reduce corneal injure by reducing corneal inflammatory response. Emodin could inhibit the decreasing lever of inhibitor of kappa B alpha(IкBα) express, and the m RNA expression of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in corneal tissues was also inhibited by emodin. The differences were statistically significant between groups treated with emodin and those without treatment(P <0.01).·CONCLUSION: Emodin could ameliorate LPS-induced corneal inflammation, which might via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  3. Nitric oxide production by murine spleen cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosroseno, Wihaskoro; Herminajeng, Endang; Susilowati, Heni; Budiarti, Sri

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide (LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans) could induce murine spleen cells to produce nitric oxide (NO). Spleen cells derived from Balb/c mice were stimulated with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans or LPS from Escherichia coli for 4 days. The effects of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), polymyxin B, and cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-4) on the production of NO were also assessed. The NO production from the carrageenan-treated spleen cells stimulated with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans or both LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans and IFN-gamma was determined. The carrageenan-treated mice were transferred with splenic macrophages and the NO production was assessed from the spleen cells stimulated with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans or LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans and IFN-gamma. The results showed that NO production was detectable in the cultures of spleen cells stimulated with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans in a dose-dependent fashion, but was lower than in the cells stimulated with LPS from E. coli. The NO production was blocked by NMMA and polymyxin B. IFN-gamma up-regulated but IL-4 suppressed the production of NO by the spleen cells stimulated with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans. The carrageenan-treated spleen cells failed to produce NO after stimulation with LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans or both LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans and IFN-gamma. Adoptive transfer of splenic macrophages to the carrageenan-treated mice could restore the ability of the spleen cells to produce NO. The results of the present study suggest that LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans under the regulatory control of cytokines induces murine spleen cells to produce NO and that splenic macrophages are the cellular source of the NO production. Therefore, these results may support the view that NO production by LPS-A. actinomycetemcomitans-stimulated macrophages may play a role in the course of periodontal diseases. PMID:16887678

  4. Cross-reactive polyclonal antibodies to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Svein Rune; Guthrie, Terry; Guile, Geoffrey R; Kolberg, Jan; Hou, Sam; Hyland, Lisa; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-03-01

    Sera from mice immunized with native or detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant 44/76(Mu-4) of Neisseria meningitidis were analyzed for antibodies to LPS. The carbohydrate portion of 44/76(Mu-4) LPS consists of the complete inner core, Glc beta 1-->4[GlcNAc alpha 1-->2Hep alpha 1-->3]Hep alpha 1-->5KDO[4-->2 alpha KDO]. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some sera contained antibodies to wild-type LPS which has a fully extended carbohydrate chain of immunotype L3,7, as well as to the homologous LPS. Sera reacted only weakly to LPS from 44/76(Mu-3), which lacks the terminal glucose of the inner core. No binding to more truncated LPS was observed. Consequently, the cross-reactive epitopes are expressed mainly by the complete inner core. Dephosphorylation of wild-type LPS abolished antibody binding to LPS in all but one serum. Thus, at least two specificities of cross-reactive antibodies exist: one is dependent on phosphoethanolamine groups in LPS, and one is not. Detection of these cross-reactive antibodies strongly supports the notion that epitopes expressed by meningococcal LPS inner core are also accessible to antibodies when the carbohydrate chain is fully extended. Also, these inner core epitopes are sufficiently immunogenic to induce antibody levels detectable in polyclonal antibody responses. Meningococci can escape being killed by antibodies to LPS that bind only to a specific LPS variant, by altering the carbohydrate chain length. Cross-reactive antibodies may prevent such escape. Therefore, inner core LPS structures may be important antigens in future vaccines against meningococcal disease. PMID:11854213

  5. Recruitment of CD16(+) monocytes to endothelial cells in response to LPS-treatment and concomitant TNF release is regulated by CX3CR1 and interfered by soluble fractalkine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Knut; Heisig, Kerstin; Groeger, Marko; Wallert, Maria; Funke, Harald; Lorkowski, Stefan; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Fractalkine (FKN, CX3CL1) is a regulator of leukocyte recruitment and adhesion, and controls leukocyte migration on endothelial cells (ECs). We show that FKN triggers different effects in CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes, the two major subsets of human monocytes. In the presence of ECs a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulus led to a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-secretion by CD16(+) monocytes, which depends on the interaction of CX3CR1 expressed on CD16(+) monocytes with endothelial FKN. Soluble FKN that was efficiently shed from the surface of LPS-activated ECs in response to binding of CD16(+) monocytes to ECs, diminished monocyte adhesion in down-regulating CX3CR1 expression on the surface of CD16(+) monocytes resulting in decreased TNF-secretion. In this process the TNF-converting enzyme (TACE) acts as a central player regulating FKN-shedding and TNFα-release through CD16(+) monocytes interacting with ECs. Thus, the release and local accumulation of sFKN represents a mechanism that limits the inflammatory potential of CD16(+) monocytes by impairing their interaction with ECs during the initial phase of an immune response to LPS. This regulatory process represents a potential target for therapeutic approaches to modulate the inflammatory response to bacterial components. PMID:27031442

  6. The in vivo effect of lipopolysaccharide on the spontaneous release of transmitter from motor nerve terminals.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S H; Sheu, T. J.; Lin, R. H.; Lin-Shiau, S. Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. The in vivo effect of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the spontaneous release of transmitter was studied in the isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation of the mouse. 2. The resting membrane potential was decreased and frequency of miniature endplate potentials (m.e.p.ps) was increased by treatment with LPS. 3. Pretreatment of diaphragms with ouabain markedly increased the frequency of m.e.p.ps in control group but not in the LPS group. 4. When mice were treated with polymyxin B (a...

  7. Interaction of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein C with CD14 and Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto, Luis A.; Synguelakis, Monique; Johansson, Jan; Pedron, Thierry; Girard, Robert; Chaby, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In addition to their effects on alveolar surface tension, some components of lung surfactant also have immunological functions. We found recently that the hydrophobic lung surfactant protein SP-C specifically binds to the lipid A region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, we show that SP-C also interacts with CD14. Four observations showed cross talk between the three molecules SP-C, LPS, and CD14. (i) Like LBP, SP-C allows the binding of a fluorescent LPS to cells expressing CD14 (th...

  8. Seroreactivity of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen in comparison with lipopolysaccharide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Lind, Peter; Bell, M.M.; Thorns, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The IgG seroreaction of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen (SEF14) was compared with that against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sera from 23 dairy herds (n = 205) from an island with no occurrence of salmonellosis, four herds (n = 303) with recent outbreaks of S....... dublin and four herds (n = 168) with recent outbreaks of S. typhimurium, were tested in a SEF14-ELISA, S. dublin LPS (0:1, 9, 12) ELISA and S. typhimurium LPS (0:1, 4, 5; 12) ELISA. At a cut-off OD of 0.5, only one of the animals tested from the salmonellosis-free island showed significant seroreaction...

  9. Attenuation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Venkatesh; Radish, Aaron C; Eis, Annie L; Broniowska, Katarzyna; Hogg, Neil; Konduri, Girija G

    2009-03-01

    Pulmonary vascular endothelial injury resulting from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and oxygen toxicity contributes to vascular simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Whether the severity of endotoxin-induced endothelial injury is modulated by ambient oxygen tension (hypoxic intrauterine environment vs. hyperoxic postnatal environment) remains unknown. We posited that ovine fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (FPAEC) will be more resistant to LPS toxicity under hypoxic conditions (20-25 Torr) mimicking the fetal milieu. LPS (10 microg/ml) inhibited FPAEC proliferation and induced apoptosis under normoxic conditions (21% O(2)) in vitro. LPS-induced FPAEC apoptosis was attenuated in hypoxia (5% O(2)) and exacerbated by hyperoxia (55% O(2)). LPS increased intracellular superoxide formation, as measured by 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) formation, in FPAEC in normoxia and hypoxia. 2-HE formation in LPS-treated FPAEC increased in parallel with the severity of LPS-induced apoptosis in FPAEC, increasing from hypoxia to normoxia to hyperoxia. Differences in LPS-induced apoptosis between hypoxia and normoxia were abolished when LPS-treated FPAEC incubated in hypoxia were pretreated with menadione to increase superoxide production. Apocynin decreased 2-HE formation, and attenuated LPS-induced FPAEC apoptosis under normoxic conditions. We conclude that ambient oxygen concentration modulates the severity of LPS-mediated injury in FPAEC by regulating superoxide levels produced in response to LPS. PMID:19135525

  10. Immunogenicity and efficacy of oral or intranasal Shigella flexneri 2a and Shigella sonnei proteosome-lipopolysaccharide vaccines in animal models.

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, N; Robin, G; Cohen, D; Arnon, R; Lowell, G H

    1993-01-01

    Immunity against shigellosis has been shown to correlate with the presence of antibodies specific for Shigella lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We here propose a new candidate vaccine for shigellosis composed of purified Shigella flexneri 2a or Shigella sonnei LPS hydrophobically complexed with group C type 2b Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein proteosomes. Immunization of mice either orally or intranasally with this complex induced specific homologous anti-LPS antibodies in both intestin...

  11. Application of two different kinds of sera against the Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharide core region in search of epitopes determining cross-reactions with antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Palusiak, Agata; Dzieciątkowska, Monika; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core regions are characterized by a greater structural variability than that observed in other Enterobacteriaceae. This fact and the small amount of published data concerning the serological activity of this part of P. penneri LPS prompted an examination of which fragment might determine cross-reactions with antibodies. To date, such epitopes have been found in the LPS core regions of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris strains. Materials and Me...

  12. Release of outer membrane fragments from wild-type Escherichia coli and from several E. coli lipopolysaccharide mutants by EDTA and heat shock treatments.

    OpenAIRE

    Marvin, H J; ter Beest, M B; Witholt, B

    1989-01-01

    EDTA-induced outer membrane losses from whole cells of wild-type Escherichia coli (O111:B4) and several lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants derived from E. coli K-12 D21 were analyzed. EDTA treatment induced losses of LPS (up to 40%), outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpF/C, and lipoprotein, periplasmic proteins, and phosphatidylethanolamine. The extent of these releases was strain specific. Successively more EDTA was necessary to induce these losses from strains containing LPS with increasing poly...

  13. Recurrent exposure to subclinical lipopolysaccharide increases mortality and induces cardiac fibrosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur Y W Lew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating subclinical lipopolysaccharide (LPS occurs in health and disease. Ingesting high fatty meals increases LPS that cause metabolic endotoxemia. Subclinical LPS in periodontal disease may impair endothelial function. The heart may be targeted as cardiac cells express TLR4, the LPS receptor. It was hypothesized that recurrent exposure to subclinical LPS increases mortality and causes cardiac fibrosis. METHODS: C57Bl/6 mice were injected with intraperitoneal saline (control, low dose LPS (0.1 or 1 mg/kg, or moderate dose LPS (10 or 20 mg/kg, once a week for 3 months. Left ventricular (LV function (echocardiography, hemodynamics (tail cuff pressure and electrocardiograms (telemetry were measured. Cardiac fibrosis was assessed by picrosirius red staining and LV expression of fibrosis related genes (QRT-PCR. Adult cardiac fibroblasts were isolated and exposed to LPS. RESULTS: LPS injections transiently increased heart rate and blood pressure (<6 hours and mildly decreased LV function with full recovery by 24 hours. Mice tolerated weekly LPS for 2-3 months with no change in activity, appearance, appetite, weight, blood pressure, LV function, oximetry, or blood chemistries. Mortality increased after 60-90 days with moderate, but not low dose LPS. Arrhythmias occurred a few hours before death. LV collagen fraction area increased dose-dependently from 3.0±0.5% (SEM in the saline control group, to 5.6±0.5% with low dose LPS and 9.7±0.9% with moderate dose LPS (P<0.05 moderate vs low dose LPS, and each LPS dose vs control. LPS increased LV expression of collagen Iα1, collagen IIIα1, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, periostin and IL-6 (P<0.05 moderate vs low dose LPS and vs control. LPS increased α-SMA immunostaining of myofibroblasts. LPS dose-dependently increased IL-6 in isolated adult cardiac fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent exposure to subclinical LPS increases mortality and induces cardiac fibrosis.

  14. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS- or IL-1 beta-induced chronic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Wen; Lindeman, Jan H.; Menke, Aswin L.; Koonen, Debby P.; Morrison, Martine; Havekes, Louis M.; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Kleemann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1 beta

  15. Resveratrol Inhibits Inflammatory Responses via the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway in Cultured LPS-Stimulated Microglial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Lian-Mei; Zong, Yi; Sun, Lin; Guo, Jia-Zhi; Zhang, Wei; He, Ying; Song, Rui; Wang, Wen-Min; Xiao, Chun-jie; Lu, Di

    2012-01-01

    Background Resveratrol have been known to possess many pharmacological properties including antioxidant, cardioprotective and anticancer effects. Although current studies indicate that resveratrol produces neuroprotection against neurological disorders, the precise mechanisms for its beneficial effects are still not fully understood. We investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory and mechamisms of resveratrol by using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells. Methodolo...

  16. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  17. Compound list: LPS [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LPS LPS 00A07 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/LPS.Human.in_vitro....Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/LPS.Rat.in_vitro

  18. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  19. Protective effects of paroxetine on the lipopolysaccharide injured hippocampal-derived neural stem cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭正午

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of paroxetine on the cell viability and expression of the phosphorylated ERK1/2 in lipopolysaccharide LPS injured hippocampalderived neural stem cells (NSCs) .Methods The NSCs were derived from hippocampus of fetal rats,after the

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Hua; Hsu, Pei-Chien; Sun, Yu-Yo; Huang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Jiun-Horng; Wang, Chen-Yu; Gan, Yu-Ling; Hung, Chia-Chi; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Shie, Feng-Shiun

    2015-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates peripheral immunity; but its role in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AhR mediates both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. Activation of AhR by its ligands, formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), attenuated LPS-induced microglial immune responses. AhR also showed proinflammatory effects, as evidenced by the findings that genetic silence of AhR ameliorated the LPS-induced microglial immune responses and LPS-activated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Similarly, LPS-induced expressions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were reduced in the cerebral cortex of AhR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, LPS upregulated and activated AhR in the absence of AhR ligands via the MEK1/2 signaling pathway, which effects were associated with a transient inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). Although AhR ligands synergistically enhance LPS-induced AhR activation, leading to suppression of LPS-induced microglial immune responses, they cannot do so on their own in microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results further revealed that LPS-FICZ co-treatment, but not LPS alone, not only resulted in co-recruitment of both AhR and NFκB onto the κB site of TNFα gene promoter but also reduced LPS-induced AhR binding to the DRE site of iNOS gene promoter. Together, we provide evidence showing that microglial AhR, which can be activated by LPS, exerts bi-directional effects on the regulation of LPS-induced neuroinflammation, depending on the availability of external AhR ligands. These findings confer further insights into the potential link between environmental factors and the inflammatory brain disorders. PMID:25690886

  1. Liposomal lipopolysaccharide initiates TRIF-dependent signaling pathway independent of CD14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Watanabe

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is recognized by CD14 with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, and initiates 2 major pathways of TLR4 signaling, the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways. The MyD88-dependent pathway induces inflammatory responses such as the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 via the activation of NFκB and MAPK. The TRIF-dependent pathway induces the production of type-I IFN, and RANTES via the activation of IRF-3 and NFκB, and is also important for the induction of adaptive immune responses. CD14 plays a critical role in initiating the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway response to LPS, to support the internalization of LPS via endocytosis. Here, we clearly demonstrate that intracellular delivery of LPS by LPS-formulated liposomes (LPS-liposomes initiate only TRIF-dependent signaling via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, independent of CD14. In fact, LPS-liposomes do not induce the production of TNF-α and IL-6 but induce RANTES production in peritoneal macrophages. Additionally, LPS-liposomes could induce adaptive immune responses effectively in CD14-deficient mice. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that LPS-liposomes are useful as a TRIF-dependent signaling-based immune adjuvant without inducing unnecessary inflammation.

  2. The antimicrobial antiproteinase elafin binds to lipopolysaccharide and modulates macrophage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Jonathan W; Roghanian, Ali; Jiang, Lu; Ramage, Robert; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2005-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria represent a primary target for innate immune responses. We demonstrate here that the antimicrobial/anti-neutrophil elastase full-length elafin (FL-EL) is able to bind both smooth and rough forms of LPS. The N-terminus was shown to bind both forms of LPS more avidly. We demonstrate that the lipid A core-binding proteins polymyxin B (PB) and LPS-binding protein (LBP) compete with elafin for binding, and that LBP is able to displace prebound elafin from LPS. When PB, FL-EL, N-EL, and C-EL were pre-incubated with LPS before addition to immobilized LBP, PB was the most potent inhibitor of LPS transfer to LBP. These data prompted us to examine the biological consequences of elafin binding to LPS, using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release by murine macrophages. In serum-containing conditions, N-EL had no effect, whereas both C-EL and FL-EL inhibited TNF-alpha production. In serum-free conditions, however, all moieties had a stimulatory activity on TNF-alpha release, with C-EL being the most potent at the highest concentration. The differential biological activity of elafin in different conditions suggests a role for this molecule in either LPS detoxification or activation of innate immune responses, depending on the external cellular environment. PMID:15668324

  3. Physiological and Behavioral Responses to Interleukin-1β and LPS in Vagotomized Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wieczorek, Marek; Swiergiel, Artur H.; Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Hossein; Dunn, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    It is well established that peripheral administration of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, alter brain catecholamine and indoleamine metabolism, and affect behavior. However, the mechanisms of these effects are not fully understood. Stimulation of afferents of the vagus nerve has been implicated in the induction of Fos in the brain, changes in body temperature, brain norepinephrine, and some behavioral responses...

  4. Systemic LPS administration induces brain inflammation but not dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hey-Kyeong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-hye

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that brain inflammation is important in aggravation of brain damage and/or that inflammation causes neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, systemic inflammation has also emerged as a risk factor for PD. In the present study, we evaluated how systemic inflammation induced by intravenous (iv) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) injection affected brain inflammation and neuronal damage in the rat. Interestingly, almost all brain inflammatory response...

  5. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Attenuate Organ Injury Induced by LPS and Burn

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kitagawa, Yuko; Tilles, Arno W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Yarmush, Martin L

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress immune cell responses and have beneficial effects in various inflammatory-related immune disorders. A therapeutic modality for systemic inflammation and its consequences is not available yet. Thus, this work investigates the therapeutic effects of MSCs in injury-models induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or burn. Gene expression was analyzed in MSCs when exposed to inflammatory serum from injured animals and it showed remarkable alteration...

  6. Silymarin Inhibits Morphological Changes in LPS-Stimulated Macrophages by Blocking NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Min Young; Jeon, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    The present study showed that silymarin, a polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced morphological changes in the mouse RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. We also showed that silymarin inhibited the nuclear translocation and transactivation activities of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which is important for macrophage activation-associated changes in cell morphology and gene expression of inflammatory cytokines. BAY-11-7085, ...

  7. Paroxetine differentially modulates LPS-induced TNFα and IL-6 production in mouse macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Durairaj, Haritha; Steury, Michael D.; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is clinically used for the treatment of depression in human patients. Because of recent reports on the role of serotonin in modulating inflammation and the link between inflammation and depression, we sought to test the effect of paroxetine directly on macrophage response to an inflammatory stimulus. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of mouse macrophages significantly enhanced TNFα and IL-6 production. Paroxeti...

  8. NADPH oxidase and aging drive microglial activation, oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration following systemic LPS administration

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Liya; Liu, Yuxin; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Crews, Fulton T.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by a progressive degeneration of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic neurons with age. We previously found that a single systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) injection caused a slow progressive loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH+IR) neurons in SN associated with increasing motor dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in inflammation-mediated SN neurotoxicity. A comparison of control (NOX2+/+) mic...

  9. Involvement of CD14 on human gingival fibroblasts in Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin-6 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P L; Sato, K; Oido, M; Fujii, T; Kowashi, Y; Shinohara, M; Ohura, K; Tani, H; Kuboki, Y

    1998-09-01

    The lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis are implicated in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying P. gingivalis LPS-mediated periodontal destruction are still unknown. Here, it was found that P. gingivalis LPS activates human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) to release interleukin 6 (IL-6) via CD14. Flow-cytometric analysis showed that HGFs bind to fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled LPS, and express CD14 on their surfaces. The binding of FITC LPS was competitively suppressed by unlabelled synthetic lipid A as well as by LPS. LPS-induced IL-6 production was inhibited by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody in a dose-dependent manner. The binding of FITC LPS to HGF was abrogated by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody. Engagement of LPS initiated the protein tyrosine phosphorylation of several intracellular proteins including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, and these events were suppressed by the anti-CD14 monoclonal. These results suggest that CD14 is a cell surface binding site for LPS and is involved in the LPS-mediated activation of HGF. PMID:9783822

  10. Effects of dexamethasone and cox inhibitors on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion in the lipopolysaccharide treated rats with hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Johan; Pedersen, Hans; Bjerring, Peter N;

    2015-01-01

    lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the brain can be prevented by dexamethasone and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors. METHOD: Fifty-four male Wistar rats, 6 in each group, were divided into the following groups: Saline+ saline; LPS (2 mg/kg)+saline; LPS+indomethacin (10 mg/kg); LPS+diclofenac (10mg/kg); LPS+dexamethasone (2......mg/kg) in experiment A. Experiment-B included the following groups: LPS+NH3 (140 μmol/kg/min)+saline; LPS+NH3+indomethacin; LPS+NH3+diclofenac and LPS+NH3+dexamethasone. ICP was monitored via a catheter placed in cisterna magna and changes in CBF were recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry. RESULTS: LPS...... was associated with a decrease in 6-keto-PGF1α. Dexamethasone only reduced the LPS induced increase in ICP but not CBF, and partly the 6-keto-PGF1α plasma concentration in the combined setup. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that activation of cycloooxygenases is of central importance for development...

  11. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC

  12. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.fiedler@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Taubenheim, Jan [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma is not necessary for the development of LPS-induced tolerance in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Fan, Hongkuan; Ashton, Sarah; Piraino, Giovanna; Mangeshkar, Prajakta; Cook, James A

    2008-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory properties in endotoxic shock and sepsis. One phenomenon that alters the inflammatory response to endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] is endotoxin tolerance, which is caused by previous exposure to endotoxin. Here, we investigate whether changes in endogenous PPARgamma function regulate this phenomenon using three different models of LPS-induced tolerance in macrophages. In a first in vitro model, previous LPS exposure of murine J774.2 macrophages suppressed tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release in response to subsequent LPS challenge. Treatment of J774.2 cells with the PPARgamma inhibitor GW9662 did not alter tolerance induction because these cells were still hyporesponsive to the secondary LPS challenge. In a second ex vivo model, primary rat peritoneal macrophages from LPS-primed rats exhibited suppression of thromboxane B2 and TNF-alpha production, while maintaining nitrite production in response to in vitro LPS challenge. Pretreatment of rats with the PPARgamma inhibitor GW9662 in vivo failed to alter the tolerant phenotype of these primary macrophages. In a third ex vivo model, primary peritoneal macrophages with conditional deletion of PPARgamma were harvested from LPS-primed Cre-lox mice (Cre+/+ PPARgamma-/-) and exhibited significant suppression of TNF-alpha production in response to in vitro LPS challenge. Furthermore, both LPS-primed PPARgamma-deficient Cre+/+ PPARgamma-/- mice and wild-type Cre-/- PPARgamma+/+ mice exhibited reduced plasma TNF-alpha levels in response to a high dose of LPS in vivo. These data demonstrate that PPARgamma does not play a role in the LPS-induced tolerant phenotype in macrophages. PMID:18028370

  14. Lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in the perivascular space in lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabst Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS contained in tobacco smoke and a variety of environmental and occupational dusts is a toxic agent causing lung inflammation characterized by migration of neutrophils and monocytes into alveoli. Although migration of inflammatory cells into alveoli of LPS-treated rats is well characterized, the dynamics of their accumulation in the perivascular space (PVS leading to a perivascular inflammation (PVI of pulmonary arteries is not well described. Methods Therefore, we investigated migration of neutrophils and monocytes into PVS in lungs of male Sprague-Dawley rats treated intratracheally with E. coli LPS and euthanized after 1, 6, 12, 24 and 36 hours. Control rats were treated with endotoxin-free saline. H&E stained slides were made and immunohistochemistry was performed using a monocyte marker and the chemokine Monocyte-Chemoattractant-Protein-1 (MCP-1. Computer-assisted microscopy was performed to count infiltrating cells. Results Surprisingly, the periarterial infiltration was not a constant finding in each animal although LPS-induced alveolitis was present. A clear tendency was observed that neutrophils were appearing in the PVS first within 6 hours after LPS application and were decreasing at later time points. In contrast, mononuclear cell infiltration was observed after 24 hours. In addition, MCP-1 expression was present in perivascular capillaries, arteries and the epithelium. Conclusion PVI might be a certain lung reaction pattern in the defense to infectious attacks.

  15. The Effect of Divergence in Feed Efficiency on the Intestinal Microbiota and the Intestinal Immune Response in Both Unchallenged and Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Ileal and Colonic Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigors, Stafford; O'Doherty, John V; Kelly, Alan K; O'Shea, Cormac J; Sweeney, Torres

    2016-01-01

    Feed efficiency is an important trait in pig production, with evidence to suggest that the efficiencies of a variety of biological systems contribute to variation in this trait. Little work has been conducted on the contribution of the intestinal innate immune response to divergence in feed efficiency. Hence, the objective of this study was to examine select bacterial populations and gene expression profiles of a range of targets relating to gut health and immunity in the intestine of pigs phenotypically divergent in feed efficiency in: a) the basal state; and (b) following an ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge of ileal and colonic tissue. Male pigs (initial BW 22.4 kg (SD = 2.03)) were fed a standard finishing diet for the final 43 days prior to slaughter to evaluate feed intake and growth for the purpose of calculating residual feed intake (RFI). On day 115, 16 animals (average weight 85 kg, SEM 2.8 kg), designated high RFI (HRFI) and low RFI (LRFI) were slaughtered. The LRFI pigs had increased lactobacillus spp. in the caecum compared to HRFI pigs (P RFI groups did not differ in the expression of the measured genes involved in the innate immune system in the basal ileal or colonic tissues (P > 0.10). Interestingly, there was an interaction between RFI and LPS for the cytokines IL-8, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and SOCS3, with the LRFI group having consistently lower gene expression in the colon following the LPS challenge, compared to the HRFI group. The lower gene expression of SOCS and cytokines following an ex vivo LPS challenge supports the theory that a possible energy saving mechanism exists in the intestinal innate immune response to an immune challenge in more feed efficient pigs. PMID:26840831

  16. Anti-Metalloproteinase-9 Activities of Selected Indonesian Zingiberaceae Rhizome Extracts in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Human Vascular Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atherosclerosis is associated with chronic inflammation triggered by bacterial infection that activates the breakdown of extracellular matrix protein by matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs. Zingiberaceae, a group of tropical food crops grown in Indonesia and other Southeast Asia regions, has been traditionally used for food coloring, seasoning, culinary and medicinal purposes. However, its efficacy as natural vascular protection has not been explored. Approach: The research was aimed to investigate the effects of 10 Indonesian Zingiberaceae rhizome extracts on inhibition of MMP-9 expression in human vascular endothelial cells treated with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vitro by conducting gelatin zymogram, Western blotting and RT-PCR assays. Results: LPS (2 μg mL−1 significantly elevated the expression of MMP-9 secretion, protein and mRNA in the vascular endothelial cells. Selected Zingiberaceae exctracts (5 μg mL−1, i.e., Curcuma xanthorrhiza, C. aeruginosa, C. mangga, C. longa, Kaempferia galanga, Alpinia galanga and Zingiberaceae officinale, effectively attenuated the expression of MMP-9 secretion, protein and mRNA in LPS-induced vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, MMP-9 expression was specifically blocked by MAPK inhibitors, i.e., PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor, SB203580 (p38 inhibitor, SP600125 (JNK inhibitor and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002, indicating that MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in regulation of MMP-9 gene expression in LPS-induced vascular endothelial cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that selected Indonesian Zingiberaceae rhizomes with potent MMP- 9 inhibitory activity may scientifically offer the promising therapeutic target in vascular diseases, particularly atherosclerosis.

  17. Pre- and neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide or the enteric metabolite, propionic acid, alters development and behavior in adolescent rats in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kelly A; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin; Macfabe, Derrick F

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome and/or immune system function may have a role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined the effects of prenatal and early life administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial mimetic, and the short chain fatty acid, propionic acid (PPA), a metabolic fermentation product of enteric bacteria, on developmental milestones, locomotor activity, and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent male and female offspring. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected once a day with PPA (500 mg/kg) on gestation days G12-16, LPS (50 µg/kg) on G15-16, or vehicle control on G12-16 or G15-16. Male and female offspring were injected with PPA (500 mg/kg) or vehicle twice a day, every second day from postnatal days (P) 10-18. Physical milestones and reflexes were monitored in early life with prenatal PPA and LPS inducing delays in eye opening. Locomotor activity and anxiety were assessed in adolescence (P40-42) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field. Prenatal and postnatal treatments altered behavior in a sex-specific manner. Prenatal PPA decreased time spent in the centre of the open-field in males and females while prenatal and postnatal PPA increased anxiety behavior on the EPM in female rats. Prenatal LPS did not significantly influence those behaviors. Evidence for the double hit hypothesis was seen as females receiving a double hit of PPA (prenatal and postnatal) displayed increased repetitive behavior in the open-field. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that by-products of enteric bacteria metabolism such as PPA may contribute to ASD, altering development and behavior in adolescent rats similar to that observed in ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24466331

  18. Modulation of macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide: Stem cell requirements, accessory lymphocyte involvement, and IA-inducing factor production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of induction of murine macrophage Ia expression by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. Intraperitoneal injection of 1 microgram of LPS resulted in a 3- to 10-fold increase in the number of IA-positive peritoneal macrophages (flow cytometry and immunofluorescence) and a 6-to 16-fold increase by radioimmunoassay. The isolated lipid A moiety of LPS was a potent inducer of macrophage Ia expression. Ia induction required a functional myelopoietic system as indicated by the finding that the response to LPS was eliminated in irradiated (900 rads) mice and reinstated by reconstitution with bone marrow cells. Comparison of LPS-induced Ia expression in normal and LPS-primed mice revealed a faster secondary response to LPS. The memory response could be adoptively transferred to normal mice with nonadherent spleen cells prepared 60 days after LPS injection. Spleen cells prepared 5 days after LPS injection caused Ia induction in LPS-nonresponder mice; such induction was not observed in irradiated (900 rads) recipients. The cell responsible for this phenomenon was identified as a Thy-1+, immunoglobulin-negative nonadherent cell. The biosynthesis and expression of Ia were not increased by direct exposure of macrophages to LPS in vitro. Small amounts of LPS inhibited Ia induction by gamma interferon. LPS showed positive regulatory effects on Ia expression by delaying the loss of Ia expression on cultured macrophages and by stimulating the production of Ia-inducing factors. Supernatants from cultured spleen cells stimulated with LPS in vitro contained antiviral and Ia-inducing activity that was acid labile, indicating that the active factor is gamma interferon. We conclude that induction of Ia expression by LPS in vivo is a bone-marrow-dependent, radiation-sensitive process which involves the stimulation of a gamma interferon-producing accessory lymphocyte and a delay in Ia turnover

  19. Effect of 60Co γ-rays on PWM and LPS induced lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between lymphocytes induced by PWM (pokeweed mitogen) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide) was investigated by means of 3H-TdR incorporation. The study showed that, in vitro, PWM-induced cells were able to promote the stimulating effect of LPS to B lymphocytes. The stimulating effect of PWM-induced cells was obviously weakened after PWM cells being irradiated with γ-rays. When PWM-induced cells and LPS-induced cells were incubated together, with one kind of cells exposed to 60Co γ-ray, incorporation value of 3H-TdR became much smaller and the synergetic function disappeared, especially, when PWM-induced cells were irradiated. For patients suffering from carcinoma of nasopharynx, while treated with 60Co γ-rays, the incorporation value in LPS-induced cells approached normal level, meanwhile, the incorporation value in PEM-induced cells reduced significantly and the stimulating effect of PWM-induced cells on LPS-induced cells became much weaker. The facts described above demonstrated that PWM-induced cells have the function of T-helper cells and play more important role in the synergy than LPS-induced cells

  20. A framework to identify gene expression profiles in a model of inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide after treatment with thalidomide

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva Renata T; Saliba Alessandra M; Fulco Tatiana O; de Souza Sales Jorgenilce; Serra de Carvalho Daniel; Sampaio Elizabeth P; Lopes Ulisses G; Sarno Euzenir N.; Nobre Flavio F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Thalidomide is an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic drug currently used for the treatment of several diseases, including erythema nodosum leprosum, which occurs in patients with lepromatous leprosy. In this research, we use DNA microarray analysis to identify the impact of thalidomide on gene expression responses in human cells after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We employed a two-stage framework. Initially, we identified 1584 altered genes in response to LPS. ...

  1. Effect of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor activity in thioglycolate-treated mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, T.; Ogata, M.; Koga, K.; Shigematsu, A

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effect of peripheral and central benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity in mouse macrophages, three types of ligands, 4'-chlorodiazepam (pure peripheral), midazolam (mixed), and clonazepam (pure central), were compared. Midazolam and 4'-chlorodiazepam significantly suppressed LPS (1-microgram/ml)-induced TNF activity in thioglycolate-elicited mouse macrophages. In every concentration examined (0.001 to 100 mi...

  2. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure induces long-lasting learning impairment, less anxiety-like response and hippocampal injury in adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kuo-Ching; Fan, Lir-Wan; Kaizaki, Asuka; Pang, Yi; Cai, Zhengwei; Tien, Lu-Tai

    2013-01-01

    Infection during early neonatal period has been shown to cause lasting neurological disabilities and is associated with the subsequent impairment in development of learning and memory ability and anxiety-related behavior in adults. We have previously reported that neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure resulted in cognitive deficits in juvenile rats (P21); thus, the goal of the present study was to determine whether neonatal LPS exposure has long-lasting effects in adult rats. After an LP...

  3. IL-17A is implicated in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment in aged rats via microglial activation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jie; Zhang, Susu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaobao; Dong, Hongquan; Qian, Yanning

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation is considered a risk factor for impairments in neuronal function and cognition that arise with trauma, infection, and/or disease. IL-17A has been determined to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Recently, IL-17A has been shown to be upregulated in lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced systemic inflammation. This study aims to explore the role of IL-17A in LPS-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment. Methods Male Sprague–Dawl...

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of Hwang-Heuk-San, a traditional Korean herbal formulation, on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hye Joo; Hong, Su Hyun; Kang, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Cheol; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Hwang-Heuk-San (HHS), a Korean traditional herbal formula comprising four medicinal herbs, has been used to treat patients with inflammation syndromes and digestive tract cancer for hundreds of years; however, its anti-inflammatory potential is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of HHS using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophage model. Methods The inhibitory effects of HHS on LPS-induced nitric oxide ...

  5. CD14 - a receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bažil, Vladimír

    Paříž : Flammarion MedicineScience, 1993 - (Baumgartner, J.; Calandra, T.; Carlet, J.), s. 47-54 [Colloguium: Mediators of sepsis : From patophysiology to therapeutic approaches. Les-Baux-de Provence (FR), 05.11.1992-06.11.1992

  6. Genome-wide immunity studies in the rabbit: transcriptome variations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after in vitro stimulation by LPS or PMA-Ionomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquier, Vincent; Estellé, Jordi; Schmaltz-Panneau, Barbara; Lecardonnel, Jerôme,; Moroldo, Marco; Lemonnier, Gaetan; Turner-Maier, Jason; Duranthon, Veronique; Oswald, Isabelle; Gidenne, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundOur purpose was to obtain genome-wide expression data for the rabbit species on the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after in vitro stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. This transcriptome profiling was carried out using microarrays enriched with immunity-related genes, and annotated with the most recent data available for the rabbit genome.ResultsThe LPS affected 15 to 20 times fewer genes than PMA-Ionomycin...

  7. Genome-wide immunity studies in the rabbit: transcriptome variations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after in vitro stimulation by LPS or PMA-Ionomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquier, Vincent; Estellé, Jordi; Schmaltz-Panneau, Barbara; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Turner-Maier, Jason; Duranthon, Véronique; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Gidenne, Thierry; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to obtain genome-wide expression data for the rabbit species on the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after in vitro stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. This transcriptome profiling was carried out using microarrays enriched with immunity-related genes, and annotated with the most recent data available for the rabbit genome. Results The LPS affected 15 to 20 times fewer genes than PMA-Ionomy...

  8. Single-cell and population NF-κB dynamic responses depend on lipopolysaccharide preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam V Gutschow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, found in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, elicits a strong response from the transcription factor family Nuclear factor (NF-κB via Toll-like receptor (TLR 4. The cellular response to lipopolysaccharide varies depending on the source and preparation of the ligand, however. Our goal was to compare single-cell NF-κB dynamics across multiple sources and concentrations of LPS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we determined the NF-κB activation dynamics of hundreds of single cells expressing a p65-dsRed fusion protein. We used computational image analysis to measure the nuclear localization of the fusion protein in the cells over time. The concentration range spanned up to nine orders of magnitude for three E. coli LPS preparations. We find that the LPS preparations induce markedly different responses, even accounting for potency differences. We also find that the ability of soluble TNF receptor to affect NF-κB dynamics varies strikingly across the three preparations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work strongly suggests that the cellular response to LPS is highly sensitive to the source and preparation of the ligand. We therefore caution that conclusions drawn from experiments using one preparation may not be applicable to LPS in general.

  9. Molecular cloning of Japanese eel Anguilla japonica TNF-α and characterization of its expression in response to LPS, poly I:C and Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianjun; Guan, Ruizhang; Guo, Songlin; Lin, Peng; Zadlock, Frank

    2014-09-01

    As a potent pleiotropic cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in innate immune responses. The cDNA sequence and genomic structure of the TNF-α gene ( Aj TNF-α) in the Japanese eel ( Anguilla japonica) were identified and characterized. The full-length AjTNF-α cDNA was 1 546 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 13 bp, a 3'-UTR of 879 bp and an open reading frame of 654 bp encoding a protein of 218 amino acids. The full-length genomic sequence of AjTNF-α was 2 392 bp and included four exons and three introns. The putative AjTNF-α protein contained TNF family signature motifs, including a protease cleavage site, a transmembrane domain and two conserved cysteine residues. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed AjTNF-α expression in a wide range of tissues, with predominant expression in blood and liver. Lower levels of expression were seen in spleen, gills, kidney, intestine, heart, and skin, with very low levels in muscle. The modulation of AjTNF-α expression after injection of eels with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the viral mimic, poly I:C, or Aeromonas hydrophila was assessed in blood, liver, and kidney. In blood, TNF-α mRNA levels increased rapidly and then rapidly decreased after stimulation with LPS, poly I:C or A. hydrophila. However, the response to LPS and A. hydrophila peaked at 6 h while for poly I:C the peak was at 12 h. In liver, after injection with A. hydrophila, an up- and down-regulation of AjTNF-α expression occurred twice, peaking at 6 h and 24 h, respectively. No remarkable increase of AjTNF-α expression appeared in liver until 72 h after LPS or poly I:C treatment. In kidney, AjTNF-α expression increased significantly only at 72 h post-stimulation with LPS or A. hydrophila. Our results suggest that AjTNF-α plays an important role in fish in the defense against viral and bacterial infection.

  10. Gut microbiota-derived lipopolysaccharide uptake and trafficking to adipose tissue: implications for inflammation and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersoug, L-G; Møller, P; Loft, S

    2016-04-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota and excessive ingestion of high-fat diets (HFD) are considered to be important factors for development of obesity. In this review we describe a coherent mechanism of action for the development of obesity, which involves the composition of gut microbiota, HFD, low-grade inflammation, expression of fat translocase and scavenger receptor CD36, and the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI). SR-BI binds to both lipids and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria, which may promote incorporation of LPS in chylomicrons (CMs). These CMs are transported via lymph to the circulation, where LPS is transferred to other lipoproteins by translocases, preferentially to HDL. LPS increases the SR-BI binding, transcytosis of lipoproteins over the endothelial barrier,and endocytosis in adipocytes. Especially large size adipocytes with high metabolic activity absorb LPS-rich lipoproteins. In addition, macrophages in adipose tissue internalize LPS-lipoproteins. This may contribute to the polarization from M2 to M1 phenotype, which is a consequence of increased LPS delivery into the tissue during hypertrophy. In conclusion, evidence suggests that LPS is involved in the development of obesity as a direct targeting molecule for lipid delivery and storage in adipose tissue. PMID:26712364

  11. Associations of Escherichia coli K-12 OmpF trimers with rough and smooth lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The associations of both rough and smooth lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the OmpF porin of Escherichia coli K-12 were examined in galE strains deleted for ompC. Transformation with pSS37 and growth with galactose conferred the ability to assemble a Shigella dysenteriae O antigen onto the core oligosaccharide of E. coli K-12 LPS. The association of LPS with OmpF trimers was assessed by staining, autoradiography of LPS specifically labeled with [1-14C]galactose, and Western immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody specific for OmpF trimers. These techniques revealed that the migration distances and multiple banding patterns of OmpF porin trimers in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were dictated by the chemotype of associated LPS. Expression of smooth LPS caused almost all of the trimeric OmpF to run in gels with a slower mobility than trimers from rough strains. The LPS associated with trimers from a smooth strain differed from the bulk-phase LPS by consisting almost exclusively of molecules with O antigen

  12. Interaction of peptide-bound beads with lipopolysaccharide and lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatsugu M; Matsumoto, Megumi; Omi, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Tomomi; Nakamura, Akio; Kishi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Sei; Takagi, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported the generation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding peptides by phage display and chemical modification. Among them, a dodecapeptide designated Li5-025 (K'YSSSISSIRAC'; K' and C' denote d-lysine and d-cysteine, respectively) showed a high binding affinity for LPS and was resistant to protease digestion (Suzuki et al., 2010). In the current study, Li5-025-bound silica beads, hereafter referred to as P-beads, were generated and found to be devoid of LPS-neutralizing activity. Thus, LPS bound to the P-beads could be directly used in the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. P-beads bound LPS dissolved in solutions of ethanol, pH4, pH10, and 0.5M NaCl and LPS bound to the P-beads was quantitatively assayed. The sensitivity of this assay was observed to be approximately 0.1pg/mL LPS. P-beads bound LPS dissolved in antithrombin III (AT III) solution which is a strong inhibitor of activated factors C and B as well as the clotting enzyme in the LAL assay; the inhibitory effect of AT III was completely reversed upon washing the P-beads with 25% acetonitrile. This was employed as the first step for the detection of free LPS in plasma using the LAL assay. LPS added to human plasma at 0°C followed by application to the P-beads and subsequent washing with 25% acetonitrile resulted in low LPS activity as detected by the LAL assay. However, further washing of the P-beads with 0.1% Triton X100 in 25% acetonitrile resulted in high LPS activity. This is the first instance of quantitative detection of free LPS in plasma using the LAL assay, and the sensitivity of this method was observed to be 1pg/mL of LPS. The proteins eluted in the 0.1% Triton X-100 wash were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands of 28kDa and 18kDa were predominantly observed. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the 28kDa and 18kDa bands corresponded to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II), respectively. Apo

  13. α-Phenyl-n-tert-butyl-nitrone Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Brain Injury and Improves Neurological Reflexes and Early Sensorimotor Behavioral Performance in Juvenile Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Chen, Ruei-Feng; Mitchell, Helen J.; Lin, Rick C.S.; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Rhodes, Philip G.; Cai, Zhengwei

    2008-01-01

    Our previous study showed that treatment with α-phenyl-n-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced LPS-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain. The object of the current study was to further examine whether PBN has long-lasting protective effects and ameliorates LPS-induced neurological dysfunction. Intracerebral (i.c.) injection of LPS (1 mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day (P) 5 Sprague Dawley rat pups and PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline was admin...

  14. Dexamethasone protects airway epithelial cell line NCI-H292 against lipopolysaccharide induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yan; WANG Fang; BAI Chong; HUANG Yi; ZHAO Li-jun; YAO Xiao-peng; LI Qiang; SUN Shu-han

    2011-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ER stress-mediated apoptosis were reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases. In a recent study, it was reported that the ER stress pathway was activated in the lungs of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. It was also found that the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), an apoptosis-related molecule, played a key role in LPS-induced lung damage. The aim of this study was to verify whether LPS could activate the ER stress response in airway epithelial cells and which molecule was involved in the pathway.This study was also aimed at finding new reagents to protect the airway epithelial cells during LPS injury.Methods ER stress markers were observed in LPS-incubated NCI-H292 cells. SiRNA-MUC5AC was transfected into NCI-H292 cells. The effects of dexamethasone and erythromycin were observed in LPS-induced NCI-H292 cells.Results LPS incubation increased the expression of ER stress markers at the protein and mRNA levels. The knockout of MUC5AC in cells attenuated the increase in ER stress markers after incubation with LPS. Dexamethasone and erythromycin decreased caspase-3 activity in LPS-induced NCI-H292 cells.Conclusions LPS may activate ER stress through the overexpression of MUC5AC. Dexamethasone may protect human airway epithelial cells against ER stress-related apoptosis by attenuating the overload of MUC5AC.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells : Intracellular localization of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta detected with a three-color immunofluorescence technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBont, ESJM; Niemarkt, AE; Tamminga, RYJ; Kimpen, JLL; Kamps, WA; deLeij, LHMF

    1996-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce monocytes to produce various cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). In the present study, the kinetics of both intracellular and extra cellular accumulation of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta in LPS stimulated mononuc

  16. Effects of PEGylation on membrane and lipopolysaccharide interactions of host defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Papareddy, Praveen; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2014-04-14

    Effects of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugation on peptide interactions with lipid membranes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated for KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR), an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptide derived from human heparin cofactor II. In particular, effects of PEG length and localization was investigated by ellipsometry, circular dichroism, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and fluorescence/electron microscopy. PEGylation of KYE28 reduces peptide binding to lipid membranes, an effect accentuated at increasing PEG length, but less sensitive to conjugation site. The reduced binding causes suppressed liposome leakage induction, as well as bacterial lysis. As a result of this, the antimicrobial effects of KYE28 is partially lost with increasing PEG length, but hemolysis also strongly suppressed and selecticity improved. Through this, conditions can be found, at which the PEGylated peptide displays simultaneously efficient antimicrobial affects and low hemolysis in blood. Importantly, PEGylation does not markedly affect the anti-inflammatory effects of KYE28. The combination of reduced toxicity, increased selectivity, and retained anti-inflammatory effect after PEGylation, as well as reduced scavenging by serum proteins, thus shows that PEG conjugation may offer opportunities in the development of effective and selective anti-inflammatory peptides. PMID:24588750

  17. Long-term impact of systemic bacterial infection on the cerebral vasculature and microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Püntener Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic infection leads to generation of inflammatory mediators that result in metabolic and behavioural changes. Repeated or chronic systemic inflammation leads to a state of innate immune tolerance: a protective mechanism against overactivity of the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immune adaptation of microglia and brain vascular endothelial cells in response to systemic inflammation or bacterial infection. Methods Mice were given repeated doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS or a single injection of live Salmonella typhimurium. Inflammatory cytokines were measured in serum, spleen and brain, and microglial phenotype studied by immunohistochemistry. To assess priming of the innate immune response in the brain, mice were infected with Salmonella typhimurium and subsequently challenged with a focal unilateral intracerebral injection of LPS. Results Repeated systemic LPS challenges resulted in increased brain IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 levels, despite attenuated systemic cytokine production. Each LPS challenge induced significant changes in burrowing behaviour. In contrast, brain IL-1β and IL-12 levels in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice increased over three weeks, with high interferon-γ levels in the circulation. Behavioural changes were only observed during the acute phase of the infection. Microglia and cerebral vasculature display an activated phenotype, and focal intracerebral injection of LPS four weeks after infection results in an exaggerated local inflammatory response when compared to non-infected mice. Conclusions These studies reveal that the innate immune cells in the brain do not become tolerant to systemic infection, but are primed instead. This may lead to prolonged and damaging cytokine production that may have a profound effect on the onset and/or progression of pre-existing neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.G. Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg was administered to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups, respectively, at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. Hepatocellular injury indices and hepatic histomorphology, as well as levels of P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and Na+-K+-ATPase, were assessed in hepatic tissues. Liver tissue damage occurred after LPS injection. All levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST in plasma as well as the wet/dry weight ratio of hepatic tissue in plasma increased. Similarly, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and MPO levels in hepatic tissues were elevated, whereas Na+-K+-ATPase activity in hepatocytes decreased. ENL treatment lessened hepatic tissue damage and decreased levels of AST, ALT, ICAM-1, and MPO. Meanwhile, the treatment increased the activity of Na+-K+-ATPase. These results indicated that ENL could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury, thereby suggesting an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver injury accompanied by severe infection or sepsis.

  19. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.G.; Zhang, L.L.; Niu, C.Y.; Zhang, J. [Institute of Microcirculation, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, China, Institute of Microcirculation, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China)

    2014-02-17

    The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg) was administered to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups, respectively, at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. Hepatocellular injury indices and hepatic histomorphology, as well as levels of P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase, were assessed in hepatic tissues. Liver tissue damage occurred after LPS injection. All levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in plasma as well as the wet/dry weight ratio of hepatic tissue in plasma increased. Similarly, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and MPO levels in hepatic tissues were elevated, whereas Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in hepatocytes decreased. ENL treatment lessened hepatic tissue damage and decreased levels of AST, ALT, ICAM-1, and MPO. Meanwhile, the treatment increased the activity of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. These results indicated that ENL could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury, thereby suggesting an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver injury accompanied by severe infection or sepsis.

  20. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg) was administered to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups, respectively, at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. Hepatocellular injury indices and hepatic histomorphology, as well as levels of P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and Na+-K+-ATPase, were assessed in hepatic tissues. Liver tissue damage occurred after LPS injection. All levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in plasma as well as the wet/dry weight ratio of hepatic tissue in plasma increased. Similarly, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and MPO levels in hepatic tissues were elevated, whereas Na+-K+-ATPase activity in hepatocytes decreased. ENL treatment lessened hepatic tissue damage and decreased levels of AST, ALT, ICAM-1, and MPO. Meanwhile, the treatment increased the activity of Na+-K+-ATPase. These results indicated that ENL could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury, thereby suggesting an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver injury accompanied by severe infection or sepsis

  1. Smooth and rough Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides studied by total internal reflection ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleńska-Olender, J., E-mail: joannaglenska@wp.pl [Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Świętokrzyski Biobank, Regional Science and Technology Center, 26-060 Chęciny (Poland); Dworecki, K. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Sęk, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Kwinkowski, M.; Kaca, W. [Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2013-12-02

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), a label-free optical detection technique for studying interactions between biomolecules, was used to examine the adsorption of various forms of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from Proteus mirabilis S1959, R110, and R45 strains on a gold surface. The thickness of the adsorbed layers was determined by TIRE, with the average values for S1959, R110, and R45 LPS layers being 78 ± 5, 39 ± 3, and 12 ± 2 nm, respectively. The thickness of LPS layers corresponds to the presence and length of O-specific parts in P. mirabilis LPS molecules. Atomic force microscopy was used as a complementary technique for visualizing lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Force measurements seem to confirm the data obtained from TIRE experiments. - Highlights: • Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides were adsorbed on the gold surface. • Thickness of adsorbed layers was determined by total internal reflection ellipsometry. • Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize lipopolysaccharide build-up on gold surface. • Time is important in the evolution of biomolecular film thickness created on gold surface.

  2. Smooth and rough Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides studied by total internal reflection ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), a label-free optical detection technique for studying interactions between biomolecules, was used to examine the adsorption of various forms of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from Proteus mirabilis S1959, R110, and R45 strains on a gold surface. The thickness of the adsorbed layers was determined by TIRE, with the average values for S1959, R110, and R45 LPS layers being 78 ± 5, 39 ± 3, and 12 ± 2 nm, respectively. The thickness of LPS layers corresponds to the presence and length of O-specific parts in P. mirabilis LPS molecules. Atomic force microscopy was used as a complementary technique for visualizing lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Force measurements seem to confirm the data obtained from TIRE experiments. - Highlights: • Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides were adsorbed on the gold surface. • Thickness of adsorbed layers was determined by total internal reflection ellipsometry. • Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize lipopolysaccharide build-up on gold surface. • Time is important in the evolution of biomolecular film thickness created on gold surface

  3. Innate immune defenses exhibit circadian rhythmicity and differential temporal sensitivity to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the daily dynamics of humoral immune defenses and the temporal influence in the sensitivity of these responses to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The first experiment subjected the fish to two photoperiod conditions, 12L:12D (LD) and 0L:24D (DD), for 20 days to characterize the rhythms of humoral immunity. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lysozyme (LYZ), peroxidase (PER) and protease (PRO) exhibited significant rhythmicity under LD but not in DD. No significant rhythms were observed in esterase (ESA) and anti-protease (ANTI) in both photoperiod conditions. Fish reared under LD were subsequently subjected to DD while the group previously under DD was exposed to LD, and this carried on for 3 days before another set of samples was collected. Results revealed that the rhythms of LYZ, PER and PRO but not ALP persisted when photoperiod was changed from LD to DD. Nonetheless, immune parameters remained arrhythmic in the group subjected from DD to LD. Cluster analysis of the humoral immune responses under various light conditions revealed that each photic environment had distinct daily immunological profile. In the second experiment, fish were injected with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either at ZT3 (day) or at ZT15 (night) to evaluate the temporal sensitivity of humoral immunity to a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. The results demonstrated that responses to LPS were gated by the time of day. LPS significantly modulated serum ALP and ANTI activities but only when the endotoxin was administered at ZT3. Serum LYZ and PER were stimulated at both injection times but with differing response profiles. Modulated LYZ activity was persistent when injected at ZT3 but transient when LPS was applied at ZT15. The magnitude of LPS-induced PER activity was higher when the endotoxin was delivered at ZT3 versus ZT15. It was further shown that plasma cortisol was significantly elevated but only when LPS

  4. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel in renal inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel in the regulation of renal inflammation, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 3 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1−/−) mice. The kidney and serum were collected 6 or 24 h after LPS injection for morphological analysis and proinflammatory cytokine assay. LPS injection led to a similar degree of transient hypotension and bradycardia in WT and TRPV1−/− mice determine...

  5. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible. PMID:25498010

  6. Upregulation of PRDM5 Is Associated with Astrocyte Proliferation and Neuronal Apoptosis Caused by Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Xue, Huaqing; Liu, Xiaorong; Dai, Aihua; Song, Yan; Ke, Kaifu; Cao, Maohong

    2016-05-01

    PRDM5 (PR domain containing 5) belongs to PRDM family which consists of transcriptional regulators that modulate cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. However, the function of PRDM5 in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory response is unknown. In recent study, an adult rat neuroinflammation model via lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lateral ventricle injection was constructed. PRDM5 expression was increased in activated astrocytes and apoptotic neurons of the adult rat cerebral cortex after LPS injection. In vitro studies showed that the remarkable upregulation of PRDM5 might be involved in rat primary astrocyte proliferation and rat primary neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex following LPS administration. In addition, using PRDM5 RNA interference both in rat primary asrtocytes and neurons, further indicated that PRDM5 was required for astrocyte proliferation and neuronal apoptosis induced by LPS. Our findings on the cellular signaling pathway may provide a new therapeutic strategy against neuroinflammation in the CNS. PMID:27074744

  7. Bacterial toxicity of oxide nanoparticles and their effects on bacterial surface biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei

    Toxicity of nano-scaled Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2 and ZnO to bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) was examined and compared to that of their respective bulk (micro-scaled) counterparts. All nanoparticles (NPs) but TiO2 showed higher toxicity than their bulk counterparts. Toxicity of released metal ions was differentiated from that of the oxide particles. ZnO was the most toxic among the three NPs, causing 100% mortality to the three tested bacteria. TEM images showed attachment of NPs to the bacteria, suggesting that the toxicity was affected by bacterial attachment. The effects of oxide NPs on bacteria cells and bacterial surface biomolecules were studied by FTIR spectroscopy to provide a better understanding of their cytotoxicity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid could bind to oxide NPs through hydrogen bonding and ligand exchange, but the cytotoxicity of NPs seemed largely related to the function-involved or structural changes to proteins and phospholipids. The three NPs decreased the intensity ratio of beta-sheets/alpha-helices, indicating protein structure change, which may affect cell physiological activities. The phosphodiester bond of L-alpha-Phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE) was broken by ZnO NPs, forming phosphate monoesters and resulting in the highly disordered alkyl chain. Such damage to phospholipid molecular structure may lead to membrane rupture and cell leaking, which is consistent with the fact that ZnO is the most toxic of the three NPs. LPS and PE are amphiphilic biomolecules that are major constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Their micelles and vesicles were studied as model cell membranes to evaluate NP effects on membrane construction. The adsorption of polysaccharides on Al2O3 and TiO 2 NPs dispersed LPS vesicles and micelles. LPS coated Al2O 3 NPs, while it caused the aggregation of TiO2 NPs according to atom force microscopy images. Desorption from the two NPs was slow due

  8. Humoral immune response against lipopolysaccharide and cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella abortus in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, P C; Giambartolomei, G H; Goldbaum, F A; Abdón, L F; C.A. Velikovsky; Kittelberger, R; Fossati, C A

    1996-01-01

    The humoral immune responses against three different antigens of Brucella abortus were monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM responses against (i) B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS), (ii) total cytoplasmic proteins depleted of LPS (LPS-free CYT), and (iii) B. abortus 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein were measured. Vaccinated animals and Yersinia-inf...

  9. Drugs composed of polysaccharides obtained from lipopolysaccharides extracted from bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a protection and control agent against irradiation in living beings, composed of polysaccharides, called PS, obtained from lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which in turn are extracted from Gram-negative bacteria after separation of the major part and preferably all the initial lipid content of these LPS's. The molecular weight of the PS ingredients, once purified, is between 8,000 and 35,000 and mainly around 10,000. They contain: around 50 to 70% carbon hydrates by weight; around 1 to 8% hexoamines by weight; around 1 to 5% amino-compounds, among which 1 to 2% amino-acids by weight less than 1% and preferably no fatty acids or lipids and their phosphorus content is around 0.2 to 0.5% by weight

  10. Structural investigation of the antagonist LPS from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria planktothrix FP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Bedini, Emiliano; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2014-03-31

    Cyanobacteria are aquatic and photosynthetic microorganisms, which contribute up to 30% of the yearly oxygen production on the earth. They have the distinction of being the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old, and are one of the largest and most important groups of bacteria on earth. Cyanobacteria are an emerging source of potentially pharmacologically active products and, among these, there are the lipopolysaccharides. Despite their significant and well documented activity, very little is known about the cyanobacteria lipopolysaccharides (LPS) structure. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of the highly TLR4-antagonist lipopolysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria plankthotrix FP1. The LPS was purified and analysed by means of chemical analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The LPS was then degraded by Smith degradation, HF and acetic acid hydrolyses. All the obtained products were investigated in detail by chemical analysis, NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The LPS consists of a high molecular mass and very complex molecule lacking Kdo and heptose residues, where the polysaccharide chain is mainly constituted by a backbone of 3-substituted α-l-rhamnose units. The core region is rich in galacturonic acid and mannose residues. Moreover a glycolipid portion, similar to Gram-negative lipid A, was identified. This was built up of a non phosphorylated (1'→6) linked glucosamine disaccharide, acylated with 3-hydroxylated fatty acids. In particular 3-hydroxypentadecanoic and 3-hydroxyesadecanoic acids were found, together with esadecanoic and tetradecanoic ones. Finally the presence of a galacturonic acid residue at 6-position of the distal glucosamine in place of the Kdo residue is suggested. PMID:24632212

  11. Triptolide ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Jianling; Zhan, Ying; Chen, Jun; Wang, Lina; Yang, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious clinical syndrome with a high rate of mortality. In this study, the effects of triptolide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in rats were investigated. Methods Sixty-five male Sprague Dawley rats(approved by ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) were randomly divided into five groups. The control group was injected with 2.5 mL saline/kg body weight via the tail vein and intraperitoneally with 1% dimethyl s...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Apoptosis of Astrocytes: Therapeutic Intervention by Minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arpita; Patro, Nisha; Patro, Ishan K

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytes are most abundant glial cell type in the brain and play a main defensive role in central nervous system against glutamate-induced toxicity by virtue of numerous transporters residing in their membranes and an astrocyte-specific enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). In view of that, a dysregulation in the astrocytic activity following an insult may result in glutamate-mediated toxicity accompanied with astrocyte and microglial activation. The present study suggests that the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation results in significant astrocytic apoptosis compared to other cell types in hippocampus and minocycline could not efficiently restrict the glutamate-mediated toxicity and apoptosis of astrocytes. Upon LPS exposure 76 % astrocytes undergo degeneration followed by 44 % oligodendrocytes, 26 % neurons and 10 % microglia. The pronounced astrocytic apoptosis resulted from the LPS-induced glutamate excitotoxicity leading to their hyperactivation as evident from their hypertrophied morphology, glutamate transporter 1 upregulation and downregulation of GS. Therapeutic minocycline treatment to LPS-infused rats efficiently restricted the inflammatory response and degeneration of other cell types but could not significantly combat with the apoptosis of astrocytes. Our study demonstrates a novel finding on cellular degeneration in the hippocampus revealing more of astrocytic death and suggests a more careful consideration on the protective efficacy of minocycline. PMID:26188416

  13. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor. PMID:26829835

  14. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  15. Evidence for lipopolysaccharide-induced differentiation of RAW264⋅ 7 murine macrophage cell line into dendritic like cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajiv K Saxena; Val Vallyathan; Daniel M Lewis

    2003-02-01

    Effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was studied. LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells increased in cell size and acquired distinct dendritic morphology. At the optimal dose of LPS (1 g/ml), almost 70% RAW264.7 cells acquired dendritic morphology. Flow cytometric studies indicate that the cell surface markers known to be expressed on dendritic cells and involved in antigen presentation and T cell activation (B7.1, B7.2, CD40, MHC class II antigens and CD1d) were also markedly upregulated on LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest the possibility that LPS by itself could constitute a sufficient signal for differentiation of macrophages into DC-like cells.

  16. [The protective activity of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A in in vivo experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del'vig, A A; Krasnoproshina, L I; Volgareva, G M; Bobyleva, G V; Kuvakina, V I; Artem'eva, T A

    1990-10-01

    The protective activity of the sera of mice immunized with the preparations of native and detoxified N. meningitidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), group A, as well as with monoclonal antibodies to N. meningitidis antigens, groups A and B, was studied on the mucin model of meningococcal infection. The study showed that the maximum level of anti-LPS antibodies in mice was observed on day 7 after the injection of LPS. Immune sera obtained from mice were capable of protecting the animals from fetal meningococcemia induced by N. meningitidis strains of homologous and heterologous groups. As shown by the results of this study, the alkaline treatment of N. meningitidis native LPS did not decrease the protective properties of antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies under study were found to possess high preventive activity in mice challenged with N. meningitidis, groups A and B. Anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies showed greater protective activity than antipolysaccharide monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2127501

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibition protects human aortic endothelial cells against LPS-induced inflammation response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaonu Peng; Wenjun Li; Wei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease.Tolllike receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important signaling receptor and plays a critical role in the inflammatory response.Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a nuclear enzyme that can regulate the expression of various inflammatory genes.In this study,we investigated the role and the underlying mechanisms of PARP1 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in human aortic endothelial cells.Compared with the control,LPS stimulation increased the protein expression of TLR4 and PARP1.TLR4 inhibition reduced LPS-induced upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and ICAM-1 as well as PARP1. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibition decreased ICAM-1 and iNOS expression.Inhibition of PARP1 decreased protein expression of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS stimulation,probably through preventing NF-KB nuclear translocation. Our study demonstrated that LPS increased ICAM-1 and iNOS expression via TLR4/PARP1/NF-KB pathway.PARP1 might be an indispensable factor in TLR4-mediated inflammation after LPS stimulation.PARP1 inhibition might shed light on the treatment of LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines expression during atherosclerosis.

  18. Differential regulation of proinflammatory mediators following LPS- and ATP-induced activation of monocytes from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Anush; Petrek, Martin; Navratilova, Zdenka; Blbulyan, Armen; Boyajyan, Anna; Manukyan, Gayane

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in association with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Growing evidence supports the involvement of monocytes in APS pathogenesis. Inflammatory activation of monocytes promotes thrombus formation and other APS complications. However, mechanisms underlying their activation are poorly investigated. We aimed to determine transcriptional activity of monocytes after exposing them to low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS + adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using comparative qRT-PCR. The results showed that LPS significantly increased transcriptional levels of TLR2, IL-23, CCL2, CXCL10, IL-1β, and IL-6 in APS cells, while, in cells from healthy donors, LPS resulted in IL-6 and STAT3 elevated mRNAs. Double stimulation of the cells resulted in decreased mRNA levels of NLRP3 in monocytes isolated from healthy donors and CCL2, IL-1β in APS cells. By contrast, TLR2 mRNAs were elevated in both investigated groups after culture of the cells with LPS + ATP. Thus, the findings indicate increased sensitivity of APS cells to LPS that may contribute to thrombus formation and enhance development or progression of autoimmune processes. Low concentrations of ATP diminish LPS-induced inflammatory state of APS monocytes which might be a potential mechanism which regulates inflammatory state of the cells. PMID:25785264

  19. LPS impairs oxygen utilization in epithelia by triggering degradation of the mitochondrial enzyme Alcat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunbin; Synan, Matthew J; Li, Jin; Xiong, Sheng; Manni, Michelle L; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Bill B; Zhao, Yutong; Shiva, Sruti; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Jiang, Jianfei; Lee, Janet S; Das, Sudipta; Ray, Anuradha; Ray, Prabir; Kagan, Valerian E; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin (also known as PDL6) is an indispensable lipid required for mitochondrial respiration that is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling. Here, the cardiolipin remodeling enzyme, acyl-CoA:lysocardiolipin-acyltransferase-1 (Alcat1; SwissProt ID, Q6UWP7) is destabilized in epithelia by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) impairing mitochondrial function. Exposure to LPS selectively decreased levels of carbon 20 (C20)-containing cardiolipin molecular species, whereas the content of C18 or C16 species was not significantly altered, consistent with decreased levels of Alcat1. Alcat1 is a labile protein that is lysosomally degraded by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Skp-Cullin-F-box containing the Fbxo28 subunit (SCF-Fbxo28) that targets Alcat1 for monoubiquitylation at residue K183. Interestingly, K183 is also an acetylation-acceptor site, and acetylation conferred stability to the enzyme. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) interacted with Alcat1, and expression of a plasmid encoding HDAC2 or treatment of cells with LPS deacetylated and destabilized Alcat1, whereas treatment of cells with a pan-HDAC inhibitor increased Alcat1 levels. Alcat1 degradation was partially abrogated in LPS-treated cells that had been silenced for HDAC2 or treated with MLN4924, an inhibitor of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases. Thus, LPS increases HDAC2-mediated Alcat1 deacetylation and facilitates SCF-Fbxo28-mediated disposal of Alcat1, thus impairing mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26604221

  20. Impact of training status on LPS-induced acute inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Meinertz, S.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of training status on the ability to induce a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response systemically as well as in skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissue (AT) in human subjects. Methods: Seventeen young (23.8 ± 2.5 years of age....... Vastus lateralis muscle and abdominal subcutaneous AT biopsies were obtained Pre, 60 and 120 min after the LPS injection. Results: LPS increased the systemic plasma TNFα and IL-6 level as well as the TNFα and IL-6 mRNA content in SkM and AT of both UT and T. Whereas the LPS-induced inflammatory response...... in SkM was enhanced in T subjects relative to UT, the inflammatory response systemically and in AT was somewhat delayed in T subjects relative to UT. Conclusion: The present findings highlight that training status affects the ability to induce a LPS-induced acute inflammatory response in a tissue...

  1. Multiple intranigral unilateral LPS infusion protocol generates a persistent cognitive impairment without cumulative dopaminergic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, Ana Marcia; Carabelli, Bruno; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Pudell, Claudia; da Silva, Danielle R B L; Menezes, Isabela; Kempe, Paula R G; Staziaki, Pedro Vinícius; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; da Cunha, Claudio; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ferraz, Anete C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a continuous process and might be implicated in the progression of neuronal degeneration. Taking this into account, we proposed a new protocol with multiple and consecutive intranigral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in order to analyze its effects on cognitive behavior. Additionally, striatal concentrations of the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin and their respective metabolites were assessed in three different time-points with the purpose of identifying the consecutive and cumulative effects of LPS infusions. We demonstrated that with a minimum administered dose there was stabilization of neuronal damage as revealed by absence of synergic effect on DA concentration. Although the DA decrease (-43%) generates an animal model of early phase of PD, without apparent motor impairment, the LPS group exhibited deficit in episodic-like memory behavior from the first time-point until the last one, indicating persisted disturbances in memory-recognition responses. These findings provide evidence that multiple intranigral LPS infusions are not sufficient to cause cumulative and progressive damage to dopaminergic neurons, but confirm that the LPS model can be adopted as a useful tool providing insight about the cognitive impairment observed in pre-motor phase of PD. PMID:23844681

  2. 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone do not influence the production of cytokines from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, M; Heineman, MJ; Faas, M; Bouman, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To test whether 17beta-estradiol or progesterone influence the cytokine productive capacity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes in humans. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Academic research institution. Patient(s): Seven women in the luteal phase of a normal ovarian cycle,

  3. Early LPS-induced ERK activation in retinal pigment epithelium cells is dependent on PIP 2 -PLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Melina V; Kamerbeek, Constanza B; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2016-06-01

    This article presents additional data regarding the study "The phospholipase D pathway mediates the inflammatory response of the retinal pigment epithelium" [1]. The new data presented here show that short exposure of RPE cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces an early and transient activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). This early ERK1/2 activation is dependent on phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate-phospholipase C (PIP2-PLC). On the contrary, neither the phospholipase D 1 (PLD1) nor the PLD2 inhibition is able to modulate the early ERK1/2 activation induced by LPS in RPE cells. PMID:27006973

  4. LPS/TLR4-mediated stromal cells acquire an invasive phenotype and are implicated in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Guo; Li Chen; Ning Luo; Caixia Li; Rong Chen; Xiaoyan Qu; Mingmin Liu; Le Kang; Zhongping Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested whether the LPS/TLR4 signal pathway in endometrial stromal cells is essential for the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We tested the expression of TLR4, MD2 in the endometrium without adenomyosis (CE), the eutopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EuE) and the ectopic endometrium with adenomyosis (EE). We isolated the stromal cells from CE, EuE and EE (CESC, EuESC, EESC), treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TLR4 antagonist and detected the cell viability. And we also me...

  5. The β-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol is a potent inhibitor of the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izeboud, C.A.; Monshouwer, M.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van; Witkamp, R.F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective and Design: To investigate the suppressive effects of the β-agonist clenbuterol on the release of TNF-α and IL-6 in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-model of inflammation, both in vitro and in vivo. Material and Subjects: Human U-937 cell line (monocyte-derived macrophages), and male Wistar rats

  6. LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis increases the sensitivity of contractile response mediated by endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptors in cultured endothelium-intact rat coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Bahareh; Holmstrup, Palle; Edvinsson, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine if lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) modifies the vasomotor responses to Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) in rat coronary arteries. The arteries were studied directly or following organ culture for 24h in absence and ...

  7. Effects of neutral sulfate berberine on LPS-induced cardiomyocyte TNF-αsecretion, abnormal calcium cycling, and cardiac dysfunction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing YANG; Hua-dong WANG; Da-xiang LU; Yan-ping WANG; Ren-bin QI; Jing LI; Fei LI; Chu-jie LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of neutral sulfate berberine on cardiac function, tumornecrosis factor α (TNF-α) release, and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i)in cardiomyocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods: Primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes were prepared from ventricles of 3-4-day old SpragueDawley rats. TNF-α concentrations in cell-conditioned media were measured by using a Quantikine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, and cardiomyocyte [Ca2+]i was measured by using Fura-2/AM. The isolated rat hearts were perfused in the Langendorff mode. Results: LPS at doses of 1, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL markedly stimulated TNF-α secretion from cardiomyocytes, and neutral sulfate berberine inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production. Intracellular calcium concentration was significantly decreased after LPS stimulation for 1 h, and increased 2 h after LPS treatment. Pretreatment with neutral sulfate berberine reversed the LPS-induced [Ca2+]i alterations, although neutral sulfate berberine did not inhibit a rapid increase in cardiomyocyte [Ca2+]i induced by LPS. Perfusion of isolated hearts with LPS (100 μg/mL) for 20 min resulted in significantly impaired cardiac performance at 120 min after LPS challenge: the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise and fall (±dp/dtmax) decreased compared with the control. In contrast, ±dp/dtmax at 120min in hearts perfused with neutral sulfate berberine (1 μmol/L) for 10 min followed by 20 min LPS (100 μg/mL) was greater than the corresponding value in the LPS group. Conclusion: Neutral sulfate berberine inhibits LPS-stimulated myocardial TNF-α production, impairs calcium cycling, and improves LPS-induced contractile dysfunction in intact heart.

  8. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  9. Amiloride attenuates lipopolysaccharide-accelerated atherosclerosis via inhibition of NHE1-dependent endothelial cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-mei CUI; Yu-xi ZHAO; Na-na ZHANG; Zeng-shan LIU; Wan-chun SUN; Qi-sheng PENG

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the potassium-sparing diuretic amiloride on endothelial cell apoptosis during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-accelerated atherosclerosis.Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to LPS (100 ng/mL) in the presence of drugs tested.The activity of Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1) and calpain,intracellular free Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i),as well as the expression of apoptosis-related proteins in the cells were measured.For in vivo study,ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice were fed high-fat diets with 0.5% (w/w) amiloride for 4 weeks and LPS (10 μg/mouse) infusion into caudal veins.Afterwards,atherosclerotic lesions,NHE1 activity and Bcl-2 expression in the aortic tissues were evaluated.Results: LPS treatment increased NHE1 activity and [Ca2+]i in HUVECs in a time-dependent manner,which was associated with increased activity of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain.Amiloride (1-10 μmol/L) significantly suppressed LPS-induced increases in NHE1 activity,[Ca2+]i.and calpain activity.In the presence of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (0.5 mmol/L),LPS-induced increase of calpain activity was also abolished.In LPS-treated HUVECs,the expression of Bcl-2 protein was significantly decreased without altering its mRNA level.In the presence of amiloride (10 μmol/L) or the calpain inhibitor ZLLal (50 μmol/L),the down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein by LPS was blocked.LPS treatment did not alter the expression of Bax and Bak proteins in HUVECs.In the presence of amiloride,BAPTA or ZLLal,LPS-induced HUVEC apoptosis was significantly attenuated.In ApoE-/-mice,administration of amiloride significantly suppressed LPS-accelerated atherosclerosis and LPS-induced increase of NHE1 activity,and reversed LPS-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression.Conclusion: LPS stimulates NHE1 activity,increases [Ca2+]i,and activates calpain,which leads to endothelial cell apoptosis related to decreased Bcl-2 expression.Amiloride inhibits NHE1 activity,thus attenuates LPS

  10. Cerebrolysin attenuates cerebral and hepatic injury due to lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, O M E; Omara, E A; Mohammed, N A; Youness, E R; Khadrawy, Y A; Sleem, A A

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of cerebrolysin on oxidative stress in the brain and liver during systemic inflammation. Rats were intraperitoneally challenged with a single subseptic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 300 μg/kg) without or with cerebrolysin at doses of 21.5, 43 or 86 mg/kg. After 4 h, rats were euthanized and the brain and liver tissues were subjected to biochemical and histopathological analyses. Cerebrolysin revealed inhibitory effects on the elevation of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide induced by LPS. In contrast, the decrease in reduced glutathione level and paraoxonase activity induced by LPS was attenuated by an injection of cerebrolysin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cerebrolysin reduced LPS-induced activation of brain NF-κB and reversed LPS-induced decline of brain butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase activities in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological analyses revealed that neuronal damage and liver necrosis induced by LPS were ameliorated by cerebrolysin dose-dependently. Cerebrolysin treatment dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced expressions in cyclooxygenase 2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and caspase-3 in the cortex or striatum as well as the liver. These results suggest that cerebrolysin treatment might have beneficial therapeutic effects in cerebral inflammation. Cerebrolysin might also prove of value in liver disease and this possibility requires further exploration. PMID:24423658

  11. Intracellular delivery of lipopolysaccharide induces effective Th1-immune responses independent of IL-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Watanabe

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is responsible for many of the inflammatory responses and pathogenic effects of Gram-negative bacteria, however, it also induces protective immune responses. LPS induces the production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 from dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages. It is thought that IL-12 is required for one of the protective immune responses induced by LPS, the T helper 1 (Th1-immune response, which include the production of IFN-γ from Th1cells and IgG2c class switching. Here, we clearly demonstrate that intracellular delivery of LPS by LPS-formulated liposomes (LPS-liposomes does not induce the production of inflammatory cytokines from DCs, but enhances Th1-immune responses via type-I IFNs, independent of IL-12. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that LPS-liposomes can effectively induce Th1-immune responses without inducing unnecessary inflammation, and may be useful as an immune adjuvant to induce protective immunity.

  12. The effects of propolis on cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Özbilge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Propolis, a bee-product, has attracted researchers’ interest in recent years because of several biological and pharmacological properties. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and has an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock and several inflammatory diseases by causing excessive release of inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ethanol extract of propolis collected in Kayseri and its surroundings on production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated macrophages.Materials and methods: In vitro, U937 human macrophage cells were grown in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (10% and penicillin-streptomycin (2% and divided into: control, LPS treated, and propolis+LPS treated cell groups. After incubation in an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and at 37°C of cells, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α levels were measured in cell-free supernatants by ELISA.Results: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels increased in LPS treated cell group according to control, statistically significant. Each cytokine levels significantly decreased in LPS and propolis treated cell group according to only LPS treated cell group (p<0.05.Conclusion: Propolis is a natural product to be examined for usage when needed the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 366-370

  13. Activation of protein kinase C by the lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase C (PKC) was partially purified from the RAW264.7 macrophage-like cell and characterized by its activation by phosphatidylserine (PS) in the presence of calcium and its insensitivity to cyclic nucleotides or calmodulin. This PKC can also be activated by the acidic lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS lipids activate PKC in the absence of PS and, like PS, synergize with diacylglycerol (DAG). Intact RAW264.7 cells were prelabelled with 32Pi and treated with the well characterized PKC ligands, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or DAG. The phosphoproteins thereby induced were separated in 2-D gels and visualized by autoradiography. These phosphoproteins were used as standards to identify the PKC-associated phosphoproteins induced in these cells using other stimulators. The authors demonstrate that the LPS lipids as well as LPS itself induce the formation of phosphoproteins common to those induced by PMA or DAG. PMA, DAG, the LPS lipids, and LPS itself activate the RAW264.7 cell and stimulate the release of prostaglandin D2 at the same concentration that stimulate new protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the activation of PKC is an early event in the activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage by LPS

  14. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide regulated protein expression is only partly impaired in monocytes from patients with type I diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abke Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes play an important role in innate immunity and atherosclerosis. A disturbed secretion of cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocytes from type 1 diabetes (T1D patients has been described and may contribute to the impaired inflammatory response in these individuals. In the present study the influence of LPS on five different proteins with a function in immunity and atherosclerosis was analyzed in monocytes from controls and T1D patients. Methods Monocytes were isolated from controls and T1D patients and the LPS-stimulated increase of IL-6, CXCL8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (CCL2, MCP-1 and superoxide dismutase (SOD 2, as well as the LPS-mediated decrease of apolipoprotein E (Apo E in primary human monocytes from controls and T1D patients was determined. Results CCL2 and IL-6 secretion in response to LPS was found significantly reduced in monocytes from T1D patients when compared to controls whereas basal CCL2 release was similar in control and T1D cells. In contrast, CXCL8 and apolipoprotein E secretion and SOD 2 expression upon LPS stimulation is similar from T1D and control monocytes. Conclusion These data indicate that LPS-mediated protein expression is only partly disturbed in monocytes from T1D patients. Reduced secretion of IL-6 and CCL2 in activated monocytes of these patients may contribute to an impaired inflammatory response and vascular disease.

  16. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  17. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide/ D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hitoshi Matsumoto; Yuji Matsuzawa; Iichiro Shimomura; Norio Hayashi; Shinji Tamura; Yoshihiro Kamada; Shinichi Kiso; Juichi Fukushima; Akira Wada; Norikazu Maeda; Shinji Kihara; Tohru Funahashi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of adiponectin on the functions of Kupffer cells, key modulators of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced liver injury.METHODS: D-galactosamine (GaIN) and LPS were injected intraperitoneally into adiponectin-/- mice and wild type mice. Kupffer cells, isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, were preincubated with or without adiponectin, and then treated with LPS.RESULTS: In knockout mice, GalN/LPS injection significantly lowered the survival rate, significantly raised the plasma levels of alanine transaminase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and significantly reduced IL-10 levels compared with wild type mice. TNF-α gene expression in the liver was which higher and those of IL-10 were lower in knockout mice than in wild type mice. In cultured adiponectin-pre-treated Kupffer cells, LPS significantly lowered TNF-α levels and raised IL-10 levels in the culture media and their respective gene expression levels, compared with Kupffer cells without adiponectinpre-treatment.CONCLUSION: Adiponectin supresses TNF-α production and induces IL-10 production by Kupffer cells in response to LPS stimulation, and a lack of adiponectin enhances LPS-induced liver injury.

  18. Goat cathelicidin-2 is secreted by blood leukocytes regardless of lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisaikham, Supreena; Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Yoshimura, Yukinori; Isobe, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that goat cathelicidin-2, an antimicrobial peptide, localizes in leukocytes and is present in milk. Here, we examined whether cathelicidin-2 is secreted by leukocytes. Different concentrations (10(5) -10(8) cells/mL) of blood leukocytes were cultured for 0-48 h with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After culture, the concentrations of cathelicidin-2 in the conditioned media were measured. Blood was collected from male goats 0-24 h after the intravenous injection of Escherichia coli O111:B4 LPS. The plasma cathelicidin-2 concentrations were determined and the blood leukocytes immunostained with anti-cathelicidin-2 antibody to calculate the proportion of cathelicidin-2-positive cells in the total leukocytes. When higher concentrations of leukocytes were cultured, the cathelicidin-2 concentrations in the media increased significantly, whereas the addition of LPS to the media caused no further increase. The plasma cathelicidin-2 concentrations did not increase with time after LPS infusion. The proportion of cathelicidin-2-positive cells in the total leukocytes was significantly reduced 1 h after LPS injection compared with that at 0 h, but increased again at 6 h and thereafter. These results suggest that cathlicidin-2 is secreted by leukocytes even without LPS stimulation, whereas LPS may be required for cathelicidin-2-containing leukocytes to be recruited from the blood to tissues showing inflammation. PMID:26212721

  19. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg2+. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg2+, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  20. Obese mice exhibit an altered behavioural and inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine B. Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increase in the prevalence and severity of infections. Genetic animal models of obesity (ob/ob and db/db mice display altered centrally-mediated sickness behaviour in response to acute inflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. However, the effect of diet-induced obesity (DIO on the anorectic and febrile response to LPS in mice is unknown. This study therefore determined how DIO and ob/ob mice respond to a systemic inflammatory challenge. C57BL/6 DIO and ob/ob mice, and their respective controls, were given an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of LPS. Compared with controls, DIO and ob/ob mice exhibited an altered febrile response to LPS (100 μg/kg over 8 hours. LPS caused a greater and more prolonged anorexic effect in DIO compared with control mice and, in ob/ob mice, LPS induced a reduction in food intake and body weight earlier than it did in controls. These effects of LPS in obese mice were also seen after a fixed dose of LPS (5 μg. LPS (100 μg/kg induced Fos protein expression in several brain nuclei of control mice, with fewer Fos-positive cells observed in the brains of obese mice. An altered inflammatory response to LPS was also observed in obese mice compared with controls: changes in cytokine expression and release were detected in the plasma, spleen, liver and peritoneal macrophages in obese mice. In summary, DIO and ob/ob mice displayed an altered behavioural response and cytokine release to systemic inflammatory challenge. These findings could help explain why obese humans show increased sensitivity to infections.

  1. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  2. Localization of core lipopolysaccharide on the inner membrane of Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation to the outer membrane (OM) is poorly defined. The authors have used affinity purified antiR/sub a/ LPS-IgG in immunoelectron microscopy and 125I protein A radio-labeling experiments to localize newly synthesized R/sub a/ LPS on the inner and outer faces of the inner membrane (IM)/sup a/. Cells were pulsed with galactose for 5 min to permit synthesis of R/sub a/ LPS and chased 0-20' by dilution into glucose medium. LPS translocation was halted by addition of DNP at 00. Samples +/-gal were spheroplasted or french pressed to expose outer and inner faces of the IM respectively. Immunoelectron microscopy employed ferritin conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG as secondary Ab. Galactose pulsed cells showed no apparent labeling of core-LPS on the outer face of the IM. The outer face of the OM was well decorated. French pressed IM vesicles were purified by isopycnic sucrose gradient centrifugation and incubated sequentially with anti-R/sub a/ LPS and 125I protein A. 125I labeling was increased 5-fold over gal-negative controls, consistent with exposure of R/sub a/ LPS on the inner face of the IM. IM isolated after treatment of intact spheroplasts with anti-R/sub a/ LPS and 125I protein A showed no 125I labeling, although good radiolabeling of OM was found in all cases. These results suggest that core LPS is synthesized on the inner face of the IM and does not accumulate on the outer face in amounts detectable by these methods before translocation to the OM

  3. Genes of the adaptive immune system are expressed early in zebrafish larval development following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fengling; ZHANG Shicui; WANG Zhiping; LI Hongyan

    2011-01-01

    Information regarding immunocompetence of the adaptive immune system (AIS) in zebrafish Danio rerio remains limited. Here, we stimulated an immune response in fish embryos,larvae and adults using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and measured the upregulation of a number of AIS-related genes (Rag2, AID, TCRAC, IgLC-1, mIg, sIg, IgZ and DAB) 3 and 18 h later. We found that all of the genes evaluated were strongly induced following LPS stimulation, with most of them responding at 8 d post fertilization. This confirms that a functional adaptive immune response is present in D. rerio larvae, and provides a window for further functional analyses.

  4. Protective role of interleukin 6 in the lipopolysaccharide-galactosamine septic shock model.

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, B E; Jackson, J V

    1993-01-01

    C57BL/6J mice given low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng per mouse) plus D-galactosamine (8 mg per mouse) die within 24 h following LPS administration. We used this septic shock model to confirm the role of tumor necrosis factor in mortality using a monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor to prevent lethality. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interleukin 6, rather than playing a lethal role, protected mice against death in this septic shock model. Antibody to interleukin 6 did ...

  5. Genes of the adaptive immune system are expressed early in zebrafish larval development following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengling; Zhang, Shicui; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Hongyan

    2011-03-01

    Information regarding immunocompetence of the adaptive immune system (AIS) in zebrafish Danio rerio remains limited. Here, we stimulated an immune response in fish embryos, larvae and adults using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and measured the upregulation of a number of AIS-related genes ( Rag2, AID, TCRAC, IgLC-1, mIg, sIg, IgZ and DAB) 3 and 18 h later. We found that all of the genes evaluated were strongly induced following LPS stimulation, with most of them responding at 8 d post fertilization. This confirms that a functional adaptive immune response is present in D. rerio larvae, and provides a window for further functional analyses.

  6. Control of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and release by Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiguro, E E; Vanderwel, D; Kusser, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the relA gene on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis and release by Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Similar results were obtained with both species. The incorporation of [3H]galactose into LPS by galE mutants was inhibited by at least 50% (as compared with normal growing controls) during amino acid deprivation of relA+ strains. This inhibition could be prevented by the treatment of the amino acid-deprived relA+ bacteria with chloramphenicol, a ...

  7. Structural insights into the dual strategy of recognition by peptidoglycan recognition protein, PGRP-S: structure of the ternary complex of PGRP-S with lipopolysaccharide and stearic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Sharma

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs are part of the innate immune system. The 19 kDa Short PGRP (PGRP-S is one of the four mammalian PGRPs. The concentration of PGRP-S in camel (CPGRP-S has been shown to increase considerably during mastitis. The structure of CPGRP-S consists of four protein molecules designated as A, B, C and D forming stable intermolecular contacts, A-B and C-D. The A-B and C-D interfaces are located on the opposite sides of the same monomer leading to the the formation of a linear chain with alternating A-B and C-D contacts. Two ligand binding sites, one at C-D contact and another at A-B contact have been observed. CPGRP-S binds to the components of bacterial cell wall molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, and peptidoglycan (PGN from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It also binds to fatty acids including mycolic acid of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Previous structural studies of binary complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS and stearic acid (SA have shown that LPS binds to CPGRP-S at C-D contact (Site-1 while SA binds to it at the A-B contact (Site-2. The binding studies using surface plasmon resonance showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S in the presence of each other. The structure determination of the ternary complex showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S at Site-1 and Site-2 respectively. LPS formed 13 hydrogen bonds and 159 van der Waals contacts (distances ≤4.2 Å while SA formed 56 van der Waals contacts. The ELISA test showed that increased levels of productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ due to LPS and SA decreased considerably upon the addition of CPGRP-S.

  8. LPS-Enhanced Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Is Normalized by Resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøhr, Mark K.; Dudele, Anete; Poulsen, Morten M.; Ebbesen, Lene H.; Radko, Yulia; Christensen, Lars P.; Jessen, Niels; Richelsen, Bjørn; Lund, Sten; Pedersen, Steen B.

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation is seen with obesity and is suggested to be a mediator of insulin resistance. The eliciting factor of low-grade inflammation is unknown but increased permeability of gut bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) resulting in endotoxemia could be a candidate. Here we test the effect of LPS and the anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol on glucose homeostasis, insulin levels and inflammation. Mice were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic mini pumps infusing either low-dose LPS or saline for 28 days. Half of the mice were treated with resveratrol delivered through the diet. LPS caused increased inflammation of the liver and adipose tissue (epididymal and subcutaneous) together with enlarged spleens and increased number of leukocytes in the blood. Resveratrol specifically reduced the inflammatory status in epididymal fat (reduced expression of TNFa and Il1b, whereas the increased macrophage infiltration was unaltered) without affecting the other tissues investigated. By LC-MS, we were able to quantitate resveratrol metabolites in epididymal but not subcutaneous adipose tissue. LPS induced insulin resistance as the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test was increased despite similar plasma glucose level resulting in an increase in the insulinogenic index (IGI; delta0-15insulin / delta0-15glucose) from 13.73 to 22.40 pmol/mmol (P < 0.001). This aberration in insulin and glucose homeostasis was normalized by resveratrol. In conclusion: Low-dose LPS enhanced the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion without affecting the blood glucose suggesting increased insulin resistance. Resveratrol restored LPS-induced alteration of the insulin secretion and demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects specifically in epididymal adipose tissue possibly due to preferential accumulation of resveratrol metabolites pointing towards a possible important involvement of this tissue for the effects on insulin resistance and insulin

  9. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  10. Activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Peña, David; Housini, Mohammad; Cheng, Derek; Lopez, Diego; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Saderi, Nadia; Salgado Delgado, Roberto; Galindo Charles, Luis; Salgado Burgos, Humberto; Rose-John, Stefan; Flores, Gonzalo; Kilgard, Michael P; Atzori, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Stress is a potential trigger for a number of neuropsychiatric conditions, including anxiety syndromes and schizophrenic psychoses. The temporal neocortex is a stress-sensitive area involved in the development of such conditions. We have recently shown that aseptic inflammation and mild electric shock shift the balance between synaptic excitation and synaptic inhibition in favor of the former in this brain area (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2012), as well as in the prefrontal cortex (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2014). Given the potential clinical importance of this phenomenon in the etiology of hyperexcitable neuropsychiatric illness, this study investigates whether inactivation of the peripheral immune system by the "anti-inflammatory reflex" would reduce the central response to aseptic inflammation. For a model of aseptic inflammation, this study used i.p. injections of the bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 µM) and activated the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically by i.p. injections of the nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PHA543613 or physiologically through electrical stimulation of the left vagal nerve (VNS). Patch-clamp recording was used to monitor synaptic function. Recordings from LPS-injected Sprague Dawley rats show that activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically or by VNS blocks or greatly reduces the LPS-induced decrease of the synaptic inhibitory-to-excitatory ratio and the saturation level of inhibitory current input-output curves. Given the ample variety of pharmacologically available α7 nicotinic receptor agonists as well as the relative safety of clinical VNS already approved by the FDA for the treatment of epilepsy and depression, our findings suggest a new therapeutic avenue in the treatment of stress-induced hyperexcitable conditions mediated by a decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex. PMID:25626997

  11. Fish oil enhances intestinal barrier function and inhibits corticotropin-releasing hormone/corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 signalling pathway in weaned pigs after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Chen, Shaokui; Wang, Xiuying; Pi, Dingan; Leng, Weibo; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Stress induces injury in intestinal barrier function in piglets. Long-chain n-3 PUFA have been shown to exhibit potential immunomodulatory and barrier protective effects in animal models and clinical trials. In addition, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)/CRH receptor (CRHR) signalling pathways play an important role in stress-induced alterations of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesised that fish oil could affect intestinal barrier function and CRH/CRHR signalling pathways. In total, thirty-two weaned pigs were allocated to one of four treatments. The experiment consisted of a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors included immunological challenge (saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and diet (5 % maize oil or 5 % fish oil). On d 19 of the trial, piglets were treated with saline or LPS. At 4 h after injection, all pigs were killed, and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen and intestinal samples were collected. Fish oil decreased bacterial translocation incidence and the number of translocated micro-organisms in the MLN. Fish oil increased intestinal claudin-1 protein relative concentration and villus height, as well as improved the intestinal morphology. In addition, fish oil supplementation increased intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte number and prevented elevations in intestinal mast cell and neutrophil numbers induced by LPS challenge. Moreover, fish oil tended to decrease the mRNA expression of intestinal CRHR1, CRH and glucocorticoid receptors. These results suggest that fish oil supplementation improves intestinal barrier function and inhibits CRH/CRHR1 signalling pathway and mast cell tissue density. PMID:27080003

  12. Gene expression patterns in bone following lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Bone displays suppressed osteogenesis in inflammatory diseases such as sepsis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clearly explained. To identify the gene expression patterns in the bone, we performed Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array with RNA isolated from mouse femurs 4 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. The gene expressions were confirmed with real-time PCR. The serum concentration of the N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), a bone-formation marker, was determined using ELISA. A total of 1003 transcripts were upregulated and 159 transcripts were downregulated (more than twofold upregulation or downregulation). Increased expression levels of the inflammation-related genes interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were confirmed from in the period 4 h to 72 h after LPS administration using real-time PCR. Gene ontogene analysis found four bone-related categories involved in four biological processes: system development, osteoclast differentiation, ossification and bone development. These processes involved 25 upregulated genes. In the KEGG database, we further analyzed the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway, which is strongly related to osteogenesis. The upregulated bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and downregulated inhibitor of DNA binding 4 (Id4) expressions were further confirmed by real-time PCR after LPS stimulation. The osteoblast function was determined through examination of the expression levels of core binding factor 1 (Cbfa1) and osteocalcin (OC) in bone tissues and serum PINP from 4 h to 72 h after LPS administration. The expressions of OC and Cbfa1 decreased 6 h after administration (p early stage (4 h or 6 h, p > 0.05) of LPS stimulation. The results of this study suggest that LPS induces elevated expressions of skeletal system development- and osteoclast differentiation-related genes and inflammation genes at an early

  13. Expression Analysis of Immune Related Genes Identified from the Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in Response to LPS Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Dong; Hongjuan Sun; Zunchun Zhou; Aifu Yang; Zhong Chen; Xiaoyan Guan; Shan Gao; Bai Wang; Bei Jiang; Jingwei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition ...

  14. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianjun; Li Dong; Liu Xiaomei; Tang Shuhai; Wei Fengcai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced ...

  15. LPS-Induced Lung Inflammation in Marmoset Monkeys – An Acute Model for Anti-Inflammatory Drug Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Seehase; Hans-Dieter Lauenstein; Christina Schlumbohm; Simone Switalla; Vanessa Neuhaus; Christine Förster; Hans-Gerd Fieguth; Olaf Pfennig; Eberhard Fuchs; Franz-Josef Kaup; Martina Bleyer; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Armin Braun; Katherina Sewald; Sascha Knauf

    2012-01-01

    Increasing incidence and substantial morbidity and mortality of respiratory diseases requires the development of new human-specific anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying therapeutics. Therefore, new predictive animal models that closely reflect human lung pathology are needed. In the current study, a tiered acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation model