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Sample records for bacterial factors regulating

  1. Arabidopsis Clade I TGA Factors Regulate Apoplastic Defences against the Bacterial Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae through Endoplasmic Reticulum-Based Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipu Wang; Pierre R Fobert

    2013-01-01

    During the plant immune response, large-scale transcriptional reprogramming is modulated by numerous transcription (co) factors. The Arabidopsis basic leucine zipper transcription factors TGA1 and TGA4, which comprise the clade I TGA factors, have been shown to positively contribute to disease resistance against virulent strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae . Despite physically interacting with the key immune regulator, NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), f...

  2. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

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    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  3. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

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    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  4. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  5. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  6. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

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    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  7. Integration host factor assembly at the cohesive end site of the bacteriophage lambda genome: implications for viral DNA packaging and bacterial gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Saurarshi J; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2014-12-09

    Integration host factor (IHF) is an Escherichia coli protein involved in (i) condensation of the bacterial nucleoid and (ii) regulation of a variety of cellular functions. In its regulatory role, IHF binds to a specific sequence to introduce a strong bend into the DNA; this provides a duplex architecture conducive to the assembly of site-specific nucleoprotein complexes. Alternatively, the protein can bind in a sequence-independent manner that weakly bends and wraps the duplex to promote nucleoid formation. IHF is also required for the development of several viruses, including bacteriophage lambda, where it promotes site-specific assembly of a genome packaging motor required for lytic development. Multiple IHF consensus sequences have been identified within the packaging initiation site (cos), and we here interrogate IHF-cos binding interactions using complementary electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) approaches. IHF recognizes a single consensus sequence within cos (I1) to afford a strongly bent nucleoprotein complex. In contrast, IHF binds weakly but with positive cooperativity to nonspecific DNA to afford an ensemble of complexes with increasing masses and levels of condensation. Global analysis of the EMS and AUC data provides constrained thermodynamic binding constants and nearest neighbor cooperativity factors for binding of IHF to I1 and to nonspecific DNA substrates. At elevated IHF concentrations, the nucleoprotein complexes undergo a transition from a condensed to an extended rodlike conformation; specific binding of IHF to I1 imparts a significant energy barrier to the transition. The results provide insight into how IHF can assemble specific regulatory complexes in the background of extensive nonspecific DNA condensation.

  8. Evolutionary rewiring and reprogramming of bacterial transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fang-Fang Wang; Wei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Rewiring and reprogramming of transcriptional regulation took place during bacterial speciation. The mechanistic alterations among transcription factors, cis-regulatory elements and target genes confer bacteria novel ability to adapt to stochastic environmental changes. This process is critical to their survival, especially for bacterial pathogens subjected to accelerated evolution. In the past two decades, the investigators not only completed the sequences of numerous bacterial genomes, but also made great progress in understanding the molecular basis of evolution. Here we briefly reviewed the current knowledge on the mechanistic changes among orthologous, paralogous and xenogenic regulatory circuits, which were caused by genetic recombinations such as gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, transposable elements and different genetic contexts. We also discussed the potential impact of this area on theoretical and applied studies of microbes.

  9. Interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition regulates bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems

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    A. P. F. Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Resource identity and composition structure bacterial community, which in turn determines the magnitude of bacterial processes and ecological services. However, the complex interaction between resource identity and bacterial community composition (BCC has been poorly understood so far. Using aquatic microcosms, we tested whether and how resource identity interacts with BCC in regulating bacterial respiration and bacterial functional diversity. Different aquatic macrophyte leachates were used as different carbon resources while BCC was manipulated through successional changes of bacterial populations in batch cultures. We observed that the same BCC treatment respired differently on each carbon resource; these resources also supported different amounts of bacterial functional diversity. There was no clear linear pattern of bacterial respiration in relation to time succession of bacterial communities in all leachates, i.e. differences on bacterial respiration between different BCC were rather idiosyncratic. Resource identity regulated the magnitude of respiration of each BCC, e.g. Ultricularia foliosa leachate sustained the greatest bacterial functional diversity and lowest rates of bacterial respiration in all BCC. We conclude that both resource identity and the BCC interact affecting the pattern and the magnitude of bacterial respiration in aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens.

  11. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types...

  12. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-26

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2-4) that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  13. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-06

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  14. FACTORS REGULATING LIBERAL TRANSLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚海红

    2012-01-01

    Literal translation and liberal translation are two important methods and both play key roles in translation.However,some textbooks say that most translations are literal translations while others maintain most are liberal ones,besides,some others suggest a combination of the two.This paper focuses on the facts that regulate liberal translation.Because of the differences in culture,society,history,geography,and so on,there exists a great difference between Chinese language and English language,which does naturally lead to the liberal translation.

  15. Control of intestinal bacterial proliferation in regulation of lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Portal-Celhay Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A powerful approach to understanding complex processes such as aging is to use model organisms amenable to genetic manipulation, and to seek relevant phenotypes to measure. Caenorhabditis elegans is particularly suited to studies of aging, since numerous single-gene mutations have been identified that affect its lifespan; it possesses an innate immune system employing evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways affecting longevity. As worms age, bacteria accumulate in the intestinal tract. However, quantitative relationships between worm genotype, lifespan, and intestinal lumen bacterial load have not been examined. We hypothesized that gut immunity is less efficient in older animals, leading to enhanced bacterial accumulation, reducing longevity. To address this question, we evaluated the ability of worms to control bacterial accumulation as a functional marker of intestinal immunity. Results We show that as adult worms age, several C. elegans genotypes show diminished capacity to control intestinal bacterial accumulation. We provide evidence that intestinal bacterial load, regulated by gut immunity, is an important causative factor of lifespan determination; the effects are specified by bacterial strain, worm genotype, and biologic age, all acting in concert. Conclusions In total, these studies focus attention on the worm intestine as a locus that influences longevity in the presence of an accumulating bacterial population. Further studies defining the interplay between bacterial species and host immunity in C. elegans may provide insights into the general mechanisms of aging and age-related diseases.

  16. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

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    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  17. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhanglin

    2014-01-01

    Sigma (σ) factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ Factors recruit the core RNA polymerase to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently, engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  18. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi eTripathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigma (σ factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ factors recruit the core RNA polymerase (RNAP to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  19. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Arsenal, Alabama 35898 14. MARKED FOR D CODE IS. ITEW NO. 16. STOCK/PART NO. DESCRIPTION (Indicate number of shipping containers - type of...In mammals , the coatomer can only be recruited by membranes associated to ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are small GTP-binding proteins; the...different species from fungi to mammals . The high degree of conservation, in special in the nudC domain, suggests that they are genes with essential

  20. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Paget

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1 that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4 that control a wide variety of adaptive responses such as morphological development and the management of stress. A recurring theme in sigma factor control is their sequestration by anti-sigma factors that occlude their RNAP-binding determinants. Sigma factors are then released through a wide variety of mechanisms, often involving branched signal transduction pathways that allow the integration of distinct signals. Three major strategies for sigma release are discussed: regulated proteolysis, partner-switching, and direct sensing by the anti-sigma factor.

  1. Impact of genome reduction on bacterial metabolism and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus, Eva; Maier, Tobias; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; van Noort, Vera; Yamada, Takuji; Chen, Wei-Hua; Wodke, Judith A H; Güell, Marc; Martínez, Sira; Bourgeois, Ronan; Kühner, Sebastian; Raineri, Emanuele; Letunic, Ivica; Kalinina, Olga V; Rode, Michaela; Herrmann, Richard; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Russell, Robert B; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Bork, Peer; Serrano, Luis

    2009-11-27

    To understand basic principles of bacterial metabolism organization and regulation, but also the impact of genome size, we systematically studied one of the smallest bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A manually curated metabolic network of 189 reactions catalyzed by 129 enzymes allowed the design of a defined, minimal medium with 19 essential nutrients. More than 1300 growth curves were recorded in the presence of various nutrient concentrations. Measurements of biomass indicators, metabolites, and 13C-glucose experiments provided information on directionality, fluxes, and energetics; integration with transcription profiling enabled the global analysis of metabolic regulation. Compared with more complex bacteria, the M. pneumoniae metabolic network has a more linear topology and contains a higher fraction of multifunctional enzymes; general features such as metabolite concentrations, cellular energetics, adaptability, and global gene expression responses are similar, however.

  2. Plastid sigma factors: Their individual functions and regulation in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wei; He, Baoye; Mao, Juan; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    Sigma factors are the predominant factors involved in transcription regulation in bacteria. These factors can recruit the core RNA polymerase to promoters with specific DNA sequences and initiate gene transcription. The plastids of higher plants originating from an ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont also contain sigma factors that are encoded by a small family of nuclear genes. Although all plastid sigma factors contain sequences conserved in bacterial sigma factors, a considerable number of distinct traits have been acquired during evolution. The present review summarises recent advances concerning the regulation of the structure, function and activity of plastid sigma factors since their discovery nearly 40 years ago. We highlight the specialised roles and overlapping redundant functions of plastid sigma factors according to their promoter selectivity. We also focus on the mechanisms that modulate the activity of sigma factors to optimise plastid function in response to developmental cues and environmental signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  3. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  4. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. METHODS: We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common...

  5. Factors that influence the speed of bacterial wood degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.K.W.M.; Overeem, van B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial wood decay is a serious threat to the many wooden foundation piles in the Netherlands. In order to learn more about the factors that influence the process of decay, approx. 2000 wood samples taken from Amsterdam piles heads were analysed on type and degree of decay and for 59 extracted pil

  6. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

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    F. Van Wambeke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. Longitudinally, the enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From the Marquesas plateau (8° W to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (43±24 times in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates by a factor of 5.6±3.6, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (enhancement factor 49±32 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. While iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre, heterotrophic bacteria were only limited by availability of labile DOC in those environments.

  7. A processed noncoding RNA regulates an altruistic bacterial antiviral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Pei, Xue Y; Short, Francesca L; Fineran, Peter C; Humphreys, David P; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2011-02-01

    The ≥ 10³⁰ bacteriophages on Earth relentlessly drive adaptive coevolution, forcing the generation of protective mechanisms in their bacterial hosts. One such bacterial phage-resistance system, ToxIN, consists of a protein toxin (ToxN) that is inhibited in vivo by a specific RNA antitoxin (ToxI); however, the mechanisms for this toxicity and inhibition have not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of the ToxN-ToxI complex from Pectobacterium atrosepticum, determined to 2.75-Å resolution. ToxI is a 36-nucleotide noncoding RNA pseudoknot, and three ToxI monomers bind to three ToxN monomers to generate a trimeric ToxN-ToxI complex. Assembly of this complex is mediated entirely through extensive RNA-protein interactions. Furthermore, a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate at the 3' end of ToxI, and catalytic residues, identify ToxN as an endoRNase that processes ToxI from a repetitive precursor but is regulated by its own catalytic product.

  8. Climate factors influencing bacterial count in background air samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roy M; Jones, Alan M; Biggins, Peter D E; Pomeroy, Nigel; Cox, Christopher S; Kidd, Stephen P; Hobman, Jon L; Brown, Nigel L; Beswick, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Total (as opposed to culturable) bacterial number counts are reported for four sites in the United Kingdom measured during campaigns over four separate seasons. These are interpreted in relation to simple climatic factors, i.e. temperature, wind speed and wind direction. Temperature has a marked effect at all four sites with data for a rural coastal site conforming best to a simple exponential model. Data for the other rural and urban locations show a baseline similar to that determined at the coastal rural location, but with some very significant positive excursions. The temperature dependence of bacterial number is found to conform to that typical of bacterial growth rates. At the coastal rural location, bacterial numbers normalised for temperature show no dependence on wind speed whilst at the inland sites there is a decrease with increasing wind speed of the form expected for a large area source. Only one site appeared to show a systematic relationship of bacterial concentrations to wind direction that being a site in the suburbs of Birmingham with highest number concentrations observed on a wind sector approaching from the city centre. PCR techniques have been used to identify predominant types of bacteria and results are presented which show that Bacillus was the dominant genus observed at the three inland sites during the winter and summer seasons. Pseudomonas appeared with comparable frequency at certain sites and seasons. There was in general a greater diversity of bacteria at the coastal site than at the inland sites.

  9. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka eVadyvaloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Unity power factor switching regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A single or multiphase boost chopper regulator operating with unity power factor, for use such as to charge a battery is comprised of a power section for converting single or multiphase line energy into recharge energy including a rectifier (10), one inductor (L.sub.1) and one chopper (Q.sub.1) for each chopper phase for presenting a load (battery) with a current output, and duty cycle control means (16) for each chopper to control the average inductor current over each period of the chopper, and a sensing and control section including means (20) for sensing at least one load parameter, means (22) for producing a current command signal as a function of said parameter, means (26) for producing a feedback signal as a function of said current command signal and the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, means (28) for sensing current through said inductor, means (18) for comparing said feedback signal with said sensed current to produce, in response to a difference, a control signal applied to the duty cycle control means, whereby the average inductor current is proportionate to the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, and instantaneous line current is thereby maintained proportionate to the instantaneous line voltage, thus achieving a unity power factor. The boost chopper is comprised of a plurality of converters connected in parallel and operated in staggered phase. For optimal harmonic suppression, the duty cycles of the switching converters are evenly spaced, and by negative coupling between pairs 180.degree. out-of-phase, peak currents through the switches can be reduced while reducing the inductor size and mass.

  11. Negative regulation of bacterial quorum sensing tunes public goods cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Schuster, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) often coordinates the expression of other, generally more costly public goods involved in virulence and nutrient acquisition. In many Proteobacteria, the basic QS circuitry consists of a synthase that produces a diffusible acyl-homoserine lactone and a cognate receptor that activates public goods expression. In some species, the circuitry also contains negative regulators that have the potential to modulate the timing and magnitude of activation. In this study, we experimentally investigated the contribution of this regulatory function to the evolutionary stability of public goods cooperation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We compared fitness and public goods expression rates of strains lacking either qteE or qscR, each encoding a distinct negative regulator, with those of the wild-type parent and a signal-blind receptor mutant under defined growth conditions. We found that (1) qteE and qscR mutations behave virtually identically and have a stronger effect on the magnitude than on the timing of expression, (2) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants imposes a metabolic burden under nutrient conditions that advance induction and (3) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants increases population growth when QS is required, but also permits invasion by both wild-type and receptor mutant strains. Our data indicate that negative regulation of QS balances the costs and benefits of public goods by attenuating expression after transition to the induced state. As the cells cannot accurately assess the amount of cooperation needed, such bet-hedging would be advantageous in changing parasitic and nonparasitic environments.

  12. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  13. Alternative Sigma Factors and Their Roles in Bacterial Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kazmierczak, Mark J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2005-01-01

    Sigma factors provide promoter recognition specificity to RNA polymerase holoenzyme, contribute to DNA strand separation, and then dissociate from the core enzyme following transcription initiation. As the regulon of a single sigma factor can be composed of hundreds of genes, sigma factors can provide effective mechanisms for simultaneously regulating expression of large numbers of prokaryotic genes. One newly emerging field is identification of the specific roles of alternative sigma factors...

  14. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.;

    2011-01-01

    -P and glucose-C alone or in combination (0.01 and 0.3 mg L(-1), respectively) was added to 1.0 mu m filtered lake water and incubated in darkness at 20 degrees C. Additions of glucose (C) and phosphorus (P) alone did not lead to changes in the rates of bacterial metabolic processes, whereas bacterial...... respiration and bacterial production responded positively to C + P enrichment for most of the lakes sampled. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (2.5-28.7%) and low mean value (12%). These variations were not correlated with the DOC concentration. Our results show that heterotrophic bacterial...

  15. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  16. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  17. Bacterial Sigma Factors and Anti-Sigma Factors: Structure, Function and Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Paget, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are multi-domain subunits of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) that play critical roles in transcription initiation, including the recognition and opening of promoters as well as the initial steps in RNA synthesis. This review focuses on the structure and function of the major sigma-70 class that includes the housekeeping sigma factor (Group 1) that directs the bulk of transcription during active growth, and structurally-related alternative sigma factors (Groups 2–4) that control ...

  18. A combination of independent transcriptional regulators shapes bacterial virulence gene expression during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Shelburne

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulatory networks are fundamental to how microbes alter gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, thereby playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. However, understanding how bacterial transcriptional regulatory networks function during host-pathogen interaction is limited. Recent studies in group A Streptococcus (GAS suggested that the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA influences many of the same genes as the control of virulence (CovRS two-component gene regulatory system. To provide new information about the CcpA and CovRS networks, we compared the CcpA and CovR transcriptomes in a serotype M1 GAS strain. The transcript levels of several of the same genes encoding virulence factors and proteins involved in basic metabolic processes were affected in both DeltaccpA and DeltacovR isogenic mutant strains. Recombinant CcpA and CovR bound with high-affinity to the promoter regions of several co-regulated genes, including those encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Compared to the wild-type parental strain, DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains were significantly less virulent in a mouse myositis model. Inactivation of CcpA and CovR alone and in combination led to significant alterations in the transcript levels of several key GAS virulence factor encoding genes during infection. Importantly, the transcript level alterations in the DeltaccpA and DeltacovRDeltaccpA isogenic mutant strains observed during infection were distinct from those occurring during growth in laboratory medium. These data provide new knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which pathogenic bacteria respond to environmental signals to regulate virulence factor production and basic metabolic processes during infection.

  19. Factors that regulate embryonic gustatory development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krimm Robin F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous molecular factors orchestrate the development of the peripheral taste system. The unique anatomy/function of the taste system makes this system ideal for understanding the mechanisms by which these factors function; yet the taste system is underutilized for this role. This review focuses on some of the many factors that are known to regulate gustatory development, and discusses a few topics where more work is needed. Some attention is given to factors that regulate epibranchial placode formation, since gustatory neurons are thought to be primarily derived from this region. Epibranchial placodes appear to arise from a pan-placodal region and a number of regulatory factors control the differentiation of individual placodes. Gustatory neuron differentiation is regulated by a series of transcription factors and perhaps bone morphongenic proteins (BMP. As neurons differentiate, they also proliferate such that their numbers exceed those in the adult, and this is followed by developmental death. Some of these cell-cycling events are regulated by neurotrophins. After gustatory neurons become post-mitotic, axon outgrowth occurs. Axons are guided by multiple chemoattractive and chemorepulsive factors, including semaphorins, to the tongue epithelium. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, functions as a targeting factor in the final stages of axon guidance and is required for gustatory axons to find and innervate taste epithelium. Numerous factors are involved in the development of gustatory papillae including Sox-2, Sonic hedge hog and Wnt-β-catenin signaling. It is likely that just as many factors regulate taste bud differentiation; however, these factors have not yet been identified. Studies examining the molecular factors that regulate terminal field formation in the nucleus of the solitary tract are also lacking. However, it is possible that some of the factors that regulate geniculate ganglion development, outgrowth, guidance and

  20. Factors affecting daughter cells' arrangement during the early bacterial divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Tzu Su

    Full Text Available On agar plates, daughter cells of Escherichia coli mutually slide and align side-by-side in parallel during the first round of binary fission. This phenomenon has been previously attributed to an elastic material that restricts apparently separated bacteria from being in string. We hypothesize that the interaction between bacteria and the underneath substratum may affect the arrangement of the daughter bacteria. To test this hypothesis, bacterial division on hyaluronic acid (HA gel, as an alternative substratum, was examined. Consistent with our proposition, the HA gel differs from agar by suppressing the typical side-by-side alignments to a rare population. Examination of bacterial surface molecules that may contribute to the daughter cells' arrangement yielded an observation that, with disrupted lpp, the E. coli daughter cells increasingly formed non-typical patterns, i.e. neither sliding side-by-side in parallel nor forming elongated strings. Therefore, our results suggest strongly that the early cell patterning is affected by multiple interaction factors. With oscillatory optical tweezers, we further demonstrated that the interaction force decreased in bacteria without Lpp, a result substantiating our notion that the side-by-side sliding phenomenon directly reflects the strength of in-situ interaction between bacteria and substratum.

  1. Regulation of alternative sigma factor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Sofia; del Peso-Santos, Teresa; Shingler, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Alternative bacterial sigma factors bind the catalytic core RNA polymerase to confer promoter selectivity on the holoenzyme. The different holoenzymes are thus programmed to recognize the distinct promoter classes in the genome to allow coordinated activation of discrete sets of genes needed for adaptive responses. To form the holoenzymes, the different sigma factors must be available to compete for their common substrate (core RNA polymerase). This review highlights (a) the roles of antisigma factors in controlling the availability of alternative sigma factors and (b) the involvement of diverse regulatory molecules that promote the use of alternative sigma factors through subversion of the domineering housekeeping σ(70). The latter include the nucleotide alarmone ppGpp and small proteins (DksA, Rsd, and Crl), which directly target the transcriptional machinery to mediate their effects.

  2. Local and regional factors influencing bacterial community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Eva S; Langenheder, Silke

    2012-02-01

    The classical view states that microbial biogeography is not affected by dispersal barriers or historical events, but only influenced by the local contemporary habitat conditions (species sorting). This has been challenged during recent years by studies suggesting that also regional factors such as mass effect, dispersal limitation and neutral assembly are important for the composition of local bacterial communities. Here we summarize results from biogeography studies in different environments, i.e. in marine, freshwater and soil as well in human hosts. Species sorting appears to be the most important mechanism. However, this result might be biased since this is the mechanism that is easiest to measure, detect and interpret. Hence, the importance of regional factors may have been underestimated. Moreover, our survey indicates that different assembly mechanisms might be important for different parts of the total community, differing, for example, between generalists and specialists, and between taxa of different dispersal ability and motility. We conclude that there is a clear need for experimental studies, first, to clearly separate regional and local factors in order to study their relative importance, and second, to test whether there are differences in assembly mechanisms depending on different taxonomic or functional groups.

  3. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  4. A model for sigma factor competition in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Marco; Klumpp, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Sigma factors control global switches of the genetic expression program in bacteria. Different sigma factors compete for binding to a limited pool of RNA polymerase (RNAP) core enzymes, providing a mechanism for cross-talk between genes or gene classes via the sharing of expression machinery. To analyze the contribution of sigma factor competition to global changes in gene expression, we develop a theoretical model that describes binding between sigma factors and core RNAP, transcription, non-specific binding to DNA and the modulation of the availability of the molecular components. The model is validated by comparison with in vitro competition experiments, with which excellent agreement is found. Transcription is affected via the modulation of the concentrations of the different types of holoenzymes, so saturated promoters are only weakly affected by sigma factor competition. However, in case of overlapping promoters or promoters recognized by two types of sigma factors, we find that even saturated promoters are strongly affected. Active transcription effectively lowers the affinity between the sigma factor driving it and the core RNAP, resulting in complex cross-talk effects. Sigma factor competition is not strongly affected by non-specific binding of core RNAPs, sigma factors and holoenzymes to DNA. Finally, we analyze the role of increased core RNAP availability upon the shut-down of ribosomal RNA transcription during the stringent response. We find that passive up-regulation of alternative sigma-dependent transcription is not only possible, but also displays hypersensitivity based on the sigma factor competition. Our theoretical analysis thus provides support for a significant role of passive control during that global switch of the gene expression program.

  5. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experiment

  6. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brai

  7. Hydrological pulse regulating the bacterial heterotrophic metabolism between Amazonian mainstems and floodplain lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Oliveira Vidal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated in situ rates of bacterial carbon processing in Amazonian floodplain lakes and mainstems, during both high and low water phases (p < 0.05. Our results showed that Bacterial Production (BP was lower and more variable than Bacterial Respiration (BR, determined as total respiration. Bacterial Carbon Demand (BCD was mostly accounted by BR and presented the same pattern that BR in both water phases. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (0.2–23% and low mean value of 3 and 6 %, (in high and low water respectively suggesting that dissolved organic carbon (DOC was mostly allocated to catabolic metabolism. However, BGE was regulated by BP in low water phase. Consequently, changes in BGE showed the same pattern that BP. In addition, the hydrological pulse effects on mainstems and floodplains lakes connectivity were found for BP and BGE in low water. Multiple correlation analyses revealed that indexes of organic matter quality (chlorophyll-a, N stable isotopes and C/N ratios were the strongest seasonal drivers of bacterial carbon metabolism. Our work indicated that: (1 the bacterial metabolism was mostly driven by respiration in Amazonian aquatic ecosystems resulting in low BGE in either high and low water phase; (2 the hydrological pulse regulated

  8. IL-10 Function, Regulation, and in Bacterial Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazlett, Linda D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; McClellan, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system protects the host from pathogenic microbes, but tight regulation of the evoked response is requisite to limit bystander damage. The interleukin (IL)-10 family of cytokines, composed of 9 members: IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26, and 3 distantly related members, IL-28A, IL-28B, and IL-29, plays a central role in this regulation. IL-10 family cytokines emerged before the adaptive immune response and elicit diverse host defense mechanisms, especially from epithelial ce...

  9. Rapid method of determining factors limiting bacterial growth in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Aldén Demoling, Louise; Demoling, Fredrik; Bååth, Erland

    2001-01-01

    A technique to determine which nutrients limit bacterial growth in soil was developed. The method was based on measuring the thymidine incorporation rate of bacteria after the addition of C, N, and P in different combinations to soil samples. First, the thymidine incorporation method was tested in two different soils: an agricultural soil and a forest humus soil. Carbon (as glucose) was found to be the limiting substance for bacterial growth in both of these soils. The effect of adding differ...

  10. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  11. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability of the path......Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved...... our laboratory and others now suggests that EF-P, previously thought to be essential, instead plays an ancillary role in translation by regulating the synthesis of a relatively limited subset of proteins. Other observations suggest that the eukaryotic homolog of EF-P, eIF5A, may illicit similar...

  12. The yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase specificity factor, MTF1, is similar to bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, S H; Jaehning, J A

    1991-11-25

    We have purified the protein that confers selective promoter recognition on the core subunit of the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The N-terminal sequence of the 43-kDa specificity factor identified it as the product of the MTF1 gene described by Lisowsky and Michaelis (1988). We confirmed that MTF1 encoded the specificity factor by analyzing extracts from a yeast strain bearing a disruption of the gene. The extracts contained normal levels of core RNA polymerase but lacked selective transcription activity; adding the purified 43-kDa protein restored selective transcription. Comparison of the MTF1 protein sequence to the family of bacterial sigma factors has revealed striking similarity to domains identified with--10 promoter recognition, promoter melting, and holoenzyme stability.

  13. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  14. Modus operandi of the bacterial RNA polymerase containing the sigma54 promoter-specificity factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Bose, Daniel; Burrows, Patricia C; Joly, Nicolas; Schumacher, Jörg; Rappas, Mathieu; Pape, Tillmann; Zhang, Xiaodong; Stockley, Peter; Severinov, Konstantin; Buck, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Bacterial sigma (sigma) factors confer gene specificity upon the RNA polymerase, the central enzyme that catalyses gene transcription. The binding of the alternative sigma factor sigma(54) confers upon the RNA polymerase special functional and regulatory properties, making it suited for control of several major adaptive responses. Here, we summarize our current understanding of the interactions the sigma(54) factor makes with the bacterial transcription machinery.

  15. SLAM is a microbial sensor that regulates bacterial phagosome functions in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Scott B; Romero, Xavier; Ma, Chunyan; Wang, Guoxing; Faubion, William A; Liao, Gongxian; Compeer, Ewoud; Keszei, Marton; Rameh, Lucia; Wang, Ninghai; Boes, Marianne; Regueiro, Jose R; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Terhorst, Cox

    2010-10-01

    Phagocytosis is a pivotal process by which macrophages eliminate microorganisms after recognition by pathogen sensors. Here we unexpectedly found that the self ligand and cell surface receptor SLAM functioned not only as a costimulatory molecule but also as a microbial sensor that controlled the killing of gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. SLAM regulated activity of the NADPH oxidase NOX2 complex and phagolysosomal maturation after entering the phagosome, following interaction with the bacterial outer membrane proteins OmpC and OmpF. SLAM recruited a complex containing the intracellular class III phosphatidylinositol kinase Vps34, its regulatory protein kinase Vps15 and the autophagy-associated molecule beclin-1 to the phagosome, which was responsible for inducing the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, a regulator of both NOX2 function and phagosomal or endosomal fusion. Thus, SLAM connects the gram-negative bacterial phagosome to ubiquitous cellular machinery responsible for the control of bacterial killing.

  16. Macrofauna regulate heterotrophic bacterial carbon and nitrogen incorporation in low-oxygen sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, W.R.; Veuger, B.; Witte, U.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) currently impinge upon >1 million km(2) of sea floor and are predicted to expand with climate change. We investigated how changes in oxygen availability, macrofaunal biomass and retention of labile organic matter (OM) regulate heterotrophic bacterial C and N incorporation

  17. Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S

    2007-01-21

    When bacteria are grown in a batch culture containing a mixture of two growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including diauxic growth, simultaneous consumption, and bistable growth. In previous work, we showed that a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution captures all the substrate consumption patterns [Narang, A., 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121, Narang, A., 2006. Comparitive analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth, J. Theor. Biol. 242, 489-501]. In this work, we construct the bifurcation diagram of the minimal model, which shows the substrate consumption pattern at any given set of parameter values. The bifurcation diagram explains several general properties of mixed-substrate growth. (1) In almost all the cases of diauxic growth, the "preferred" substrate is the one that, by itself, supports a higher specific growth rate. In the literature, this property is often attributed to the optimality of regulatory mechanisms. Here, we show that the minimal model, which accounts for induction and growth only, displays the property under fairly general conditions. This suggests that the higher growth rate of the preferred substrate is an intrinsic property of the induction and dilution kinetics. It can be explained mechanistically without appealing to optimality principles. (2) The model explains the phenotypes of various mutants containing lesions in the regions encoding for the operator, repressor, and peripheral enzymes. A particularly striking phenotype is the "reversal of the diauxie" in which the wild-type and mutant strains consume the very same two substrates in opposite order. This phenotype is difficult to explain in terms of molecular mechanisms, such as inducer exclusion or CAP activation, but it turns out to be a natural

  18. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  19. Multivalent nanofibers of a controlled length: regulation of bacterial cell agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Il-Soo; Huang, Zhegang; Lee, Myongsoo

    2012-09-12

    Control of the size and shape of molecular assemblies on the nanometer scale in aqueous solutions is very important for the regulation of biological functions. Among the well-defined supramolecular structures of organic amphiphiles, one-dimensional nanofibers have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in biocompatible materials. Although much progress has been made in the field of self-assembled nanofibers, the ability to control the fiber length remains limited. The approach for control of the fiber length presented herein overcomes this limitation through the coassembly of amphiphilic rod-coil molecules in which the crystallinity of the aromatic segment can be regulated by π-π stacking interactions. The introduction of carbohydrate segments into the fiber exterior endows the nanofibers with the ability to adhere to bacterial cells. Notably, the fiber length systematically regulates the agglutination and proliferation of bacterial cells exposed to these fibers.

  20. Regulation of energy metabolism by the extracytoplasmic function (ECF σ factors of Arcobacter butzleri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irati Martinez-Malaxetxebarria

    Full Text Available The extracytoplasmic function (ECF σ factors are fundamental for bacterial adaptation to distinct environments and for survival under different stress conditions. The emerging pathogen Arcobacter butzleri possesses seven putative pairs of σ/anti-σ factors belonging to the ECF family. Here, we report the identification of the genes regulated by five out of the seven A. butzleri ECF σ factors. Three of the ECF σ factors play an apparent role in transport, energy generation and the maintenance of redox balance. Several genes like the nap, sox and tct genes are regulated by more than one ECF σ factor, indicating that the A. butzleri ECF σ factors form a network of overlapping regulons. In contrast to other eubacteria, these A. butzleri ECF regulons appear to primarily regulate responses to changing environments in order to meet metabolic needs instead of an obvious role in stress adaptation.

  1. CRISPR/Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWeiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP. Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes.

  2. Biotypes and virulence factors of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Udayalaxmi, J.; Bhat, G. K.; S Kotigadde

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to correlate the biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis and their virulence factors. Thirty-two strains of G. vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis were biotyped. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm production, surface hydrophobicity, phospholipase C and protease activity were tested on these isolates. Biotype 1 was the most prevalent (8; 25%), followed by biotype 2 (7; 21.9%) and biotypes ...

  3. Biotypes and virulence factors of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayalaxmi, J; Bhat, G K; Kotigadde, S

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to correlate the biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis and their virulence factors. Thirty-two strains of G. vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis were biotyped. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm production, surface hydrophobicity, phospholipase C and protease activity were tested on these isolates. Biotype 1 was the most prevalent (8; 25%), followed by biotype 2 (7; 21.9%) and biotypes 5 and 8 (5; 15.6%). We did not find any statistical correlation between G. vaginalis biotypes and its virulence factors. Virulence factors expressed by G. vaginalis were not associated with a single biotype.

  4. Biotypes and virulence factors of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Udayalaxmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to correlate the biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis and their virulence factors. Thirty-two strains of G. vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis were biotyped. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm production, surface hydrophobicity, phospholipase C and protease activity were tested on these isolates. Biotype 1 was the most prevalent (8; 25%, followed by biotype 2 (7; 21.9% and biotypes 5 and 8 (5; 15.6%. We did not find any statistical correlation between G. vaginalis biotypes and its virulence factors. Virulence factors expressed by G. vaginalis were not associated with a single biotype.

  5. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P.; Liu, Zhanfei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amended with 200 ppm light Louisiana sweet crude oil and bacterial inoculums from surface or bottom water, and incubated at 4 or 24°C for 50 days. Bacterial community and residual oil were analyzed by pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results showed that temperature played a key role in selecting oil-degrading bacteria. Incubation at 4°C favored the development of Cycloclasticus, Pseudoalteromonas, Sulfitobacter, and Reinekea, while 24°C incubations enhanced Oleibacter, Thalassobius, Phaeobacter, and Roseobacter. Water chemistry and the initial community also had potential roles in the development of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities. Pseudoalteromonas, Oleibacter, and Winogradskyella developed well in the nutrient-enriched bottom water, while Reinekea and Thalassobius were favored by low-nutrient surface water. We revealed that the combination of 4°C, crude oil and bottom inoculum was a key factor for the growth of Cycloclasticus, while the combination of surface inoculum and bottom water chemistry was important for the growth of Pseudoalteromonas. Moreover, regardless of the source of inoculum, bottom water at 24°C was a favorable condition for Oleibacter. Redundancy analysis further showed that temperature and initial community explained 57 and 19% of the variation observed, while oil and water chemistry contributed 14 and 10%, respectively. Overall, this study revealed the relative roles of temperature, water

  6. Factors Affecting Bacterial Growth in Drinking Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI LU; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To define the influence of some parameters, including assimilable organic carbon (AOC), chloramine residual, etc. on the bacterial growth in drinking water distribution systems. Methods Three typical water treatment plants in a northern city (City T) of China and their corresponding distribution systems were investigated. Some parameters of the water samples, such as heterotrophic plate content (HPC), AOC, CODMn, TOC, and phosphate were measured. Results The AOC in most water samples were more than 100 μg/L, or even more than 200 μg/L in some cases. The HPC in distribution systems increased significantly with the decrease of residual chlorine. When the residual chlorine was less than 0.1 mg/L, the magnitude order of HPC was 104 CFU/mL; when it was 0.5-0.7 mg/L, the HPC was about 500 CFU/mL. Conclusion For controlling the biostability of drinking water, the controlling of AOC and residual chlorine should be considered simultaneously. The influence of phosphors on the AOC tests of water is not significant. Phosphors may not be the limiting nutrient in the water distribution systems.

  7. The interaction between bacterial transcription factors and RNA polymerase during the transition from initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There are three stages of transcription: initiation, elongation and termination, and traditionally there has been a clear distinction between the stages. The specificity factor sigma is completely released from bacterial RNA polymerase after initiation, and then recycled for another round of transcription. Elongation factors then associate with the polymerase followed by termination factors (where necessary). These factors dissociate prior to initiation of a new round of transcription. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that sigma factors can be retained in the elongation complex. The structure of bacterial RNAP in complex with an essential elongation factor NusA has recently been published, which suggested rather than competing for the major σ binding site, NusA binds to a discrete region on RNAP. A model was proposed to help explain the way in which both factors could be associated with RNAP during the transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  8. Weak Coherence in Abundance Patterns Between Bacterial Classes and Their Constituent OTUs Along a Regulated River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Salazar, Guillem; Logares, Ramiro; Proia, Lorenzo; Gasol, Josep M.; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Deductions about the ecology of high taxonomic bacterial ranks (i.e., phylum, class, order) are often based on their abundance patterns, yet few studies have quantified how accurately variations in abundance of these bacterial groups represent the dynamics of the taxa within them. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we investigated whether the changes in abundance of six dominant bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Beta-/Alpha-/Gamma-proteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria) along a large dam-regulated river are reflected by those of their constituent Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs; 97% similarity level). The environmental impact generated by the reservoirs promoted clear compositional shifts in all bacterial classes that resulted from changes in the abundance of individual OTUs rather than from the appearance of new taxa along the river. Abundance patterns at the class level represented the dynamics of only a small but variable proportion of their constituting OTUs, which were not necessarily the most abundant ones. Within most classes, we detected sub-groups of OTUs showing contrasting responses to reservoir-induced environmental changes. Overall, we show that the patterns observed at the class level fail to capture the dynamics of a significant fraction of their constituent members, calling for caution when the ecological attributes of high-ranks are to be interpreted. PMID:26635761

  9. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discovery of virulence factors in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heffron Fred

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic bacterial infections are highly regulated and complex processes that are orchestrated by numerous virulence factors. Genes that are coordinately controlled by the set of regulators required for systemic infection are potentially required for pathogenicity. Results In this study we present a systems biology approach in which sample-matched multi-omic measurements of fourteen virulence-essential regulator mutants were coupled with computational network analysis to efficiently identify Salmonella virulence factors. Immunoblot experiments verified network-predicted virulence factors and a subset was determined to be secreted into the host cytoplasm, suggesting that they are virulence factors directly interacting with host cellular components. Two of these, SrfN and PagK2, were required for full mouse virulence and were shown to be translocated independent of either of the type III secretion systems in Salmonella or the type III injectisome-related flagellar mechanism. Conclusions Integrating multi-omic datasets from Salmonella mutants lacking virulence regulators not only identified novel virulence factors but also defined a new class of translocated effectors involved in pathogenesis. The success of this strategy at discovery of known and novel virulence factors suggests that the approach may have applicability for other bacterial pathogens.

  10. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discovery of virulence factors in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; McDermott, Jason E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-06-28

    Background: Systemic bacterial infections are highly regulated and complex processes that are orchestrated by numerous virulence factors. Genes that are coordinately controlled by the set of regulators required for systemic infection are potentially required for pathogenicity. Results: In this study we present a systems biology approach in which sample-matched multi-omic measurements of fourteen virulence-essential regulator mutants were coupled with computational network analysis to efficiently identify Salmonella virulence factors. Immunoblot experiments verified network-predicted virulence factors and a subset was determined to be secreted into the host cytoplasm, suggesting that they are virulence factors directly interacting with host cellular components. Two of these, SrfN and PagK2, were required for full mouse virulence and were shown to be translocated independent of either of the type III secretion systems in Salmonella or the type III injectisome-related flagellar mechanism. Conclusions: Integrating multi-omic datasets from Salmonella mutants lacking virulence regulators not only identified novel virulence factors but also defined a new class of translocated effectors involved in pathogenesis. The success of this strategy at discovery of known and novel virulence factors suggests that the approach may have applicability for other bacterial pathogens.

  11. Regulation of antimicrobial resistance by extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2017-01-30

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors are a subfamily of σ(70) sigma factors that activate genes involved in stress-response functions. In many bacteria, ECF sigma factors regulate resistance to antimicrobial compounds. This review will summarize the ECF sigma factors that regulate antimicrobial resistance in model organisms and clinically relevant pathogens.

  12. Intrinsic factors of Peltigera lichens influence the structure of the associated soil bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Diego; Clavero-León, Claudia; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2016-11-01

    Definition of lichens has evolved from bi(tri)partite associations to multi-species symbioses, where bacteria would play essential roles. Besides, although soil bacterial communities are known to be affected by edaphic factors, when lichens grow upon them these could become less preponderant. We hypothesized that the structure of both the lichen microbiota and the microbiota in the soil underneath lichens is shaped by lichen intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this work, intrinsic factors corresponded to mycobiont and cyanobiont identities of Peltigera lichens, metabolite diversity and phenoloxidase activity and extrinsic factors involved the site of the forest where lichens grow. Likewise, the genetic and metabolic structure of the lichen and soil bacterial communities were analyzed by fingerprinting. Among the results, metabolite diversity was inversely related to the genetic structure of bacterial communities of lichens and soils, highlighting the far-reaching effect of these substances; while phenoloxidase activity was inversely related to the metabolic structure only of the lichen bacterial microbiota, presuming a more limited effect of the products of these enzymes. Soil bacterial microbiota was different depending on the site and, strikingly, according to the cyanobiont present in the lichen over them, which could indicate an influence of the photobiont metabolism on the availability of soil nutrients.

  13. Risk factors for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: a population-based study on Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Vogel, Ida; Molsted, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    Background. No larger population-based study of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy has previously been available. The objective of this study was to examine risk factors for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy. Design. From a prospective population-based cohort of 3,596 eligible pregnant women, 2......,927 (81.4%) completed the study. Methods. Women were asked to participate in this study at their first prenatal visit at 17 gestational weeks (range 7+/324+/0). Samples from the genital tract were taken at enrolment. Bacterial vaginosis was determined by Amsel's clinical criteria (3 out of 4: pH>/4.......5, homogenous discharge, clue cells, and positive amine test). Data were collected from three questionnaires completed during the second and third trimesters and correlated with the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Crude and adjusted relative risks (reproductive, medical, behavioral, sexual...

  14. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  15. A full-length group 1 bacterial sigma factor adopts a compact structure incompatible with DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Edmund C; Shekhtman, Alexander; Dutta, Kaushik; Pratt, Matthew R; Cowburn, David; Darst, Seth; Muir, Tom W

    2008-10-20

    The sigma factors are the key regulators of bacterial transcription initiation. Through direct read-out of promoter DNA sequence, they recruit the core RNA polymerase to sites of initiation, thereby dictating the RNA polymerase promoter-specificity. The group 1 sigma factors, which direct the vast majority of transcription initiation during log phase growth and are essential for viability, are autoregulated by an N-terminal sequence known as sigma1.1. We report the solution structure of Thermotoga maritima sigmaA sigma1.1. We additionally demonstrate by using chemical crosslinking strategies that sigma1.1 is in close proximity to the promoter recognition domains of sigmaA. We therefore propose that sigma1.1 autoinhibits promoter DNA binding of free sigmaA by stabilizing a compact organization of the sigma factor domains that is unable to bind DNA.

  16. Bacterial sigma factors: a historical, structural, and genomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feklístov, Andrey; Sharon, Brian D; Darst, Seth A; Gross, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the crucial focal point of gene expression in prokaryotes. The key players in this process, sigma factors (σs), associate with the catalytic core RNA polymerase to guide it through the essential steps of initiation: promoter recognition and opening, and synthesis of the first few nucleotides of the transcript. Here we recount the key advances in σ biology, from their discovery 45 years ago to the most recent progress in understanding their structure and function at the atomic level. Recent data provide important structural insights into the mechanisms whereby σs initiate promoter opening. We discuss both the housekeeping σs, which govern transcription of the majority of cellular genes, and the alternative σs, which direct RNA polymerase to specialized operons in response to environmental and physiological cues. The review concludes with a genome-scale view of the extracytoplasmic function σs, the most abundant group of alternative σs.

  17. Bacterial pathogens activate a common inflammatory pathway through IFNλ regulation of PDCD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor S Cohen

    Full Text Available The type III interferon (IFNλ receptor IL-28R is abundantly expressed in the respiratory tract and has been shown essential for host defense against some viral pathogens, however no data are available concerning its role in the innate immune response to bacterial pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced significant production of IFNλ in the lung, and clearance of these bacteria from the lung was significantly increased in IL-28R null mice compared to controls. Improved bacterial clearance correlated with reduced lung pathology and a reduced ratio of pro- vs anti-inflammatory cytokines in the airway. In human epithelial cells IFNλ inhibited miR-21 via STAT3 resulting in upregulation of PDCD4, a protein known to promote inflammatory signaling. In vivo 18 hours following infection with either pathogen, miR-21 was significantly reduced and PDCD4 increased in the lungs of wild type compared to IL-28R null mice. Infection of PDCD4 null mice with USA300 resulted in improved clearance, reduced pathology, and reduced inflammatory cytokine production. These data suggest that during bacterial pneumonia IFNλ promotes inflammation by inhibiting miR-21 regulation of PDCD4.

  18. Interleukin-10 and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors in cerebrospinal fluid of children with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelisse, R.F.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Mulder, P.H.G.; Suur, M.H.; Straaten, van der P.J.C.; Heijden, van der A.J.; Sukhai, R.N.; Hählen, K.; Neijens, H.J.; Groot, de R.

    1996-01-01

    The antiinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-10 and soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors p55 (sTNFR-55) and sTNFR-75 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 37 children with bacterial meningitis were studied. CSF concentrations of IL-10, sTNFR-55, and sTNFR-75 and of the proinflammatory cytoki

  19. Divergent composition of algal-bacterial biofilms developing under various external factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barranguet, C.; Veuger, B.; van Beusekom, S.A.M.; Marvan, P.; Sinke, J.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of external factors other than nutrients on biofilm development and composition was studied with a combination of optical (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, PAM fluorometry) and chemical methods (EPS extraction, HPLC, TOC determination). The development of algal-bacterial biofilms wa

  20. Bacterial rotary export ATPases are allosterically regulated by the nucleotide second messenger cyclic-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampari, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Clare E M; Little, Richard H; Wilhelm, Thomas; Lawson, David M; Malone, Jacob G

    2015-10-01

    The widespread second messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (cdG) regulates the transition from motile and virulent lifestyles to sessile, biofilm-forming ones in a wide range of bacteria. Many pathogenic and commensal bacterial-host interactions are known to be controlled by cdG signaling. Although the biochemistry of cyclic dinucleotide metabolism is well understood, much remains to be discovered about the downstream signaling pathways that induce bacterial responses upon cdG binding. As part of our ongoing research into the role of cdG signaling in plant-associated Pseudomonas species, we carried out an affinity capture screen for cdG binding proteins in the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The flagella export AAA+ ATPase FliI was identified as a result of this screen and subsequently shown to bind specifically to the cdG molecule, with a KD in the low micromolar range. The interaction between FliI and cdG appears to be very widespread. In addition to FliI homologs from diverse bacterial species, high affinity binding was also observed for the type III secretion system homolog HrcN and the type VI ATPase ClpB2. The addition of cdG was shown to inhibit FliI and HrcN ATPase activity in vitro. Finally, a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and in silico analysis was used to predict that cdG binds to FliI in a pocket of highly conserved residues at the interface between two FliI subunits. Our results suggest a novel, fundamental role for cdG in controlling the function of multiple important bacterial export pathways, through direct allosteric control of export ATPase proteins.

  1. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  2. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt: related species and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study risk factors, contributing factors of bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt, test the isolated species sensitive to some therapeutic agents, and to investigate the air-borne bacteria and fungi in opthalmology operating rooms. Methods: Thirty one cases of endophthalmitis were clinically diagnosed and microbiologically studied. Indoor air-borne bacteria and fungi inside four air-conditioned operating rooms in the Ophthalmology Department at Assiut University...

  3. Differential regulation of horizontally acquired and core genome genes by the bacterial modulator H-NS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa C Baños

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal acquisition of DNA by bacteria dramatically increases genetic diversity and hence successful bacterial colonization of several niches, including the human host. A relevant issue is how this newly acquired DNA interacts and integrates in the regulatory networks of the bacterial cell. The global modulator H-NS targets both core genome and HGT genes and silences gene expression in response to external stimuli such as osmolarity and temperature. Here we provide evidence that H-NS discriminates and differentially modulates core and HGT DNA. As an example of this, plasmid R27-encoded H-NS protein has evolved to selectively silence HGT genes and does not interfere with core genome regulation. In turn, differential regulation of both gene lineages by resident chromosomal H-NS requires a helper protein: the Hha protein. Tight silencing of HGT DNA is accomplished by H-NS-Hha complexes. In contrast, core genes are modulated by H-NS homoligomers. Remarkably, the presence of Hha-like proteins is restricted to the Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, conjugative plasmids encoding H-NS variants have hitherto been isolated only from members of the family. Thus, the H-NS system in enteric bacteria presents unique evolutionary features. The capacity to selectively discriminate between core and HGT DNA may help to maintain horizontally transmitted DNA in silent form and may give these bacteria a competitive advantage in adapting to new environments, including host colonization.

  4. Putrescine regulating by stress-responsive MAPK cascade contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Hwa; Yoo, Seung-Jin; Min, Kwang-Hyun; Nam, Seung-Hee; Cho, Baik Ho; Yang, Kwang-Yeol

    2013-08-09

    Polyamines in plants are involved in various physiological and developmental processes including abiotic and biotic stress responses. We investigated the expression of ADCs, which are key enzymes in putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, and roles of Put involving defense response in Arabidopsis. The increased expression of ADC1 and ADC2, and the induction of Put were detected in GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic Arabidopsis, whereas, their performance was partially compromised in GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk3 and GVG-NtMEK2(DD)/mpk6 mutant following DEX treatment. The expression of ADC2 was highly induced by Pst DC3000 inoculation, while the transcript levels of ADC1 were slightly up-regulated. Compared to the WT plant, Put content in the adc2 knock-out mutant was reduced after Pst DC3000 inoculation, and showed enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infection. The adc2 mutant exhibited reduced expression of PR-1 after bacterial infection and the growth of the pathogen was about 4-fold more than that in the WT plant. Furthermore, the disease susceptibility of the adc2 mutant was recovered by the addition of exogenous Put. Taken together, these results suggest that Arabidopsis MPK3 and MPK6 play a positive role in the regulation of Put biosynthesis, and that Put contributes to bacterial pathogen defense in Arabidopsis.

  5. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  6. The bacterial two-hybrid system uncovers the involvement of acetylation in regulating of Lrp activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nε-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat - or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (deacetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36 in helix-turn-helix (HTH DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  7. The Bacterial Two-Hybrid System Uncovers the Involvement of Acetylation in Regulating of Lrp Activity in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ran; Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qiufen; Li, Shuxian; Cui, Zhongli; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    N𝜀-lysine acetylation is an abundant and important Post-translational modification in bacteria. We used the bacterial two-hybrid system to screen the genome library of the Salmonella Typhimurium to identify potential proteins involved in acetyltransferase Pat – or deacetylase CobB-mediated acetylation. Then, the in vitro (de)acetylation assays were used to validate the potential targets, such as STM14_1074, NrdF, RhaR. Lrp, a leucine-responsive regulatory protein and global regulator, was shown to interact with Pat. We further demonstrate that Lrp could be acetylated by Pat and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent CobB in vitro. Specifically, the conserved lysine residue 36 (K36) in helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain of Lrp was acetylated. Acetylation of K36 impaired the function of Lrp through altering the affinity with the target promoter. The mutation of K36 in chromosome mimicking acetylation enhanced the transcriptional level of itself and attenuated the mRNA levels of Lrp-regulated genes including fimA, which was confirmed by yeast agglutination assay. These findings demonstrate that the acetylation regulates the DNA-binding activity of Lrp, suggesting that acetylation modification of transcription factors is a conserved regulatory manner to modulate gene expression in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:27909434

  8. Bacterial global regulators DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanian, Mohammad; Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-02-18

    Collisions between paused transcription elongation complexes and replication forks inevitably happen, which may lead to collapse of replication fork and could be detrimental to cells. Bacterial transcription factor DksA and its cofactor alarmone ppGpp were proposed to contribute to prevention of such collisions, although the mechanism of this activity remains elusive. Here we show that DksA/ppGpp do not destabilise transcription elongation complexes or inhibit their backtracking, as was proposed earlier. Instead, we show, both in vitro and in vivo, that DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription elongation by slowing down misincorporation events. As misincorporation events cause temporary pauses, contribution to fidelity suggests the mechanism by which DksA/ppGpp contribute to prevention of collisions of transcription elongation complexes with replication forks. DksA is only the second known accessory factor, after transcription factor Gre, that increases fidelity of RNA synthesis in bacteria.

  9. Structure, circadian regulation and bioinformatic analysis of the unique sigma factor gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew L; Smith, Annette C; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Purton, Saul; Herrin, David L

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, the transcription of plastid genes is mediated by at least two types of RNA polymerase (RNAP); a plastid-encoded bacterial RNAP in which promoter specificity is conferred by nuclear-encoded sigma factors, and a nuclear-encoded phage-like RNAP. Green algae, however, appear to possess only the bacterial enzyme. Since transcription of much, if not most, of the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is regulated by the circadian clock and the nucleus, we sought to identify sigma factor genes that might be responsible for this regulation. We describe a nuclear gene (RPOD) that is predicted to encode an 80 kDa protein that, in addition to a predicted chloroplast transit peptide at the N-terminus, has the conserved motifs (2.1- 4.2) diagnostic of bacterial sigma-70 factors. We also identified two motifs not previously recognized for sigma factors, adjacent PEST sequences and a leucine zipper, both suggested to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PEST sequences were also found in approximately 40% of sigma factors examined, indicating they may be of general significance. Southern blot hybridization and BLAST searches of the genome and EST databases suggest that RPODmay be the only sigma factor gene in C. reinhardtii. The levels of RPODmRNA increased 2- 3-fold in the mid-to-late dark period of light-dark cycling cells, just prior to, or coincident with, the peak in chloroplast transcription. Also, the dark-period peak in RPOD mRNA persisted in cells shifted to continuous light or continuous dark for at least one cycle, indicating that RPODis under circadian clock control. These results suggest that regulation of RPODexpression contributes to the circadian clock's control of chloroplast transcription.

  10. HIV-Enhancing Factors Are Secreted by Reproductive Epithelia upon Inoculation with Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Diaz, Camila; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Amy L; Cole, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common reproductive infection in which commensal vaginal lactobacilli are displaced by a mixed population of pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis increases susceptibility to HIV, and it has been suggested that host innate immune responses to pathogenic bacteria contribute to enhanced infection, yet the cellular mechanisms mediating the increased HIV susceptibility remain uncharacterized. We evaluated the HIV-enhancing effects of bacterial vaginosis by inoculating endocervical epithelia with Atopobium vaginae, a bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and assaying secreted factors for HIV-enhancing activity. When epithelia and A. vaginae were cocultured, we observed increased HIV-enhancing activity mediated by secreted low molecular weight factors. From this complex mixture we identified several upregulated host proteins, which functioned in combination to enhance HIV infection. These studies suggest that the host immune response to bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria results in the release of HIV-enhancing factors. The combined activity of bacterial vaginosis-induced proteins likely mediates HIV enhancement.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  12. Steroid hormone signaling is essential to regulate innate immune cells and fight bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Regan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling immunity and development is essential to ensure survival despite changing internal conditions in the organism. Drosophila metamorphosis represents a striking example of drastic and systemic physiological changes that need to be integrated with the innate immune system. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms that coordinate development and immune cell activity in the transition from larva to adult. Here, we reveal that regulation of macrophage-like cells (hemocytes by the steroid hormone ecdysone is essential for an effective innate immune response over metamorphosis. Although it is generally accepted that steroid hormones impact immunity in mammals, their action on monocytes (e.g. macrophages and neutrophils is still not well understood. Here in a simpler model system, we used an approach that allows in vivo, cell autonomous analysis of hormonal regulation of innate immune cells, by combining genetic manipulation with flow cytometry, high-resolution time-lapse imaging and tissue-specific transcriptomic analysis. We show that in response to ecdysone, hemocytes rapidly upregulate actin dynamics, motility and phagocytosis of apoptotic corpses, and acquire the ability to chemotax to damaged epithelia. Most importantly, individuals lacking ecdysone-activated hemocytes are defective in bacterial phagocytosis and are fatally susceptible to infection by bacteria ingested at larval stages, despite the normal systemic and local production of antimicrobial peptides. This decrease in survival is comparable to the one observed in pupae lacking immune cells altogether, indicating that ecdysone-regulation is essential for hemocyte immune functions and survival after infection. Microarray analysis of hemocytes revealed a large set of genes regulated at metamorphosis by EcR signaling, among which many are known to function in cell motility, cell shape or phagocytosis. This study demonstrates an important role for steroid hormone regulation of

  13. MHC class I expression dependent on bacterial infection and parental factors in whitefish embryos (Salmonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emily S; Wilkins, Laetitia G E; Wedekind, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Ecological conditions can influence not only the expression of a phenotype, but also the heritability of a trait. As such, heritable variation for a trait needs to be studied across environments. We have investigated how pathogen challenge affects the expression of MHC genes in embryos of the lake whitefish Coregonus palaea. In order to experimentally separate paternal (i.e. genetic) from maternal and environmental effects, and determine whether and how stress affects the heritable variation for MHC expression, embryos were produced in full-factorial in vitro fertilizations, reared singly, and exposed at 208 degree days (late-eyed stage) to either one of two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens that differ in their virulence characteristics (one increased mortality, while both delayed hatching time). Gene expression was assessed 48 h postinoculation, and virulence effects of the bacterial infection were monitored until hatching. We found no evidence of MHC class II expression at this stage of development. MHC class I expression was markedly down-regulated in reaction to both pseudomonads. While MHC expression could not be linked to embryo survival, the less the gene was expressed, the earlier the embryos hatched within each treatment group, possibly due to trade-offs between immune function and developmental rate or further factors that affect both hatching timing and MHC expression. We found significant additive genetic variance for MHC class I expression in some treatments. That is, changes in pathogen pressures could induce rapid evolution in MHC class I expression. However, we found no additive genetic variance in reaction norms in our study population.

  14. Regulation of the Ets transcription factor Tel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roukens, Mark Guido

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we report novel studies on the molecular regulation of the transcriptional repressor Tel (Translocation Ets Leukemia). The work in this thesis is presented as follows: Chapter 1 is an introduction which summarizes the literature about Tel and its Drosophila orthologue Yan as it was k

  15. Bacterial phytase: potential application, in vivo function and regulation of its synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Konietzny

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise release of phosphate from phytate, the major storage form of phosphate in plant seeds and pollen, is initiated by a class of enzymes that have been collectively called phytases. The classification is solely due to the in vitro capability of these enzymes to accept phytate as a substrate. Phytases have been studied intensively in recent years because of the great interest in such enzymes for reducing phytate content in animal feed and food for human consumption. They have a wide distribution in plants, microorganisms, and in some animal tissues. Due to several biological characteristics, such as substrate specificity, resistance to proteolysis and catalytic efficiency, bacterial phytases have considerable potential in commercial applications. In bacteria, phytase is an inducible enzyme and its expression is subjected to a complex regulation, but phytase formation is not controlled uniformly among different bacteria. It was suggested that phytase is not required for balanced growth of bacterial cells, but may be synthesised in response to a nutrient or energy limitation.

  16. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  17. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  18. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  20. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Aebli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about genetic complementation experiments, and students must evaluate how genetic mutations in the lux operon affect gene expression and overall phenotype. The worksheet promotes critical thinking and problem solving skills, and emphasizes the roles of diffusible signaling molecules, regulatory proteins, and structural proteins in quorum sensing.

  1. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard H; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G

    2016-02-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  2. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Little

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG. Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome.

  3. Proteomic analysis of growth phase-dependent expression of Legionella pneumophila proteins which involves regulation of bacterial virulence traits.

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    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs. Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase.

  4. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

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    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  5. Long-distance delivery of bacterial virulence factors by Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Bomberger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use a variety of secreted virulence factors to manipulate host cells, thereby causing significant morbidity and mortality. We report a mechanism for the long-distance delivery of multiple bacterial virulence factors, simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm, thus obviating the need for direct interaction of the pathogen with the host cell to cause cytotoxicity. We show that outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMV secreted by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa deliver multiple virulence factors, including beta-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, hemolytic phospholipase C, and Cif, directly into the host cytoplasm via fusion of OMV with lipid rafts in the host plasma membrane. These virulence factors enter the cytoplasm of the host cell via N-WASP-mediated actin trafficking, where they rapidly distribute to specific subcellular locations to affect host cell biology. We propose that secreted virulence factors are not released individually as naked proteins into the surrounding milieu where they may randomly contact the surface of the host cell, but instead bacterial derived OMV deliver multiple virulence factors simultaneously and directly into the host cell cytoplasm in a coordinated manner.

  6. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

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    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  7. Calcium Regulates the Activity and Structural Stability of Tpr, a Bacterial Calpain-like Peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniec, Dominika; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Sroka, Aneta; Bryzek, Danuta; Bogyo, Matthew; Abrahamson, Magnus; Potempa, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a peptide-fermenting asaccharolytic periodontal pathogen. Its genome contains several genes encoding cysteine peptidases other than gingipains. One of these genes (PG1055) encodes a protein called Tpr (thiol protease) that has sequence similarity to cysteine peptidases of the papain and calpain families. In this study we biochemically characterize Tpr. We found that the 55-kDa Tpr inactive zymogen proteolytically processes itself into active forms of 48, 37, and 33 kDa via sequential truncations at the N terminus. These processed molecular forms of Tpr are associated with the bacterial outer membrane where they are likely responsible for the generation of metabolic peptides required for survival of the pathogen. Both autoprocessing and activity were dependent on calcium concentrations >1 mm, consistent with the protein's activity within the intestinal and inflammatory milieus. Calcium also stabilized the Tpr structure and rendered the protein fully resistant to proteolytic degradation by gingipains. Together, our findings suggest that Tpr is an example of a bacterial calpain, a calcium-responsive peptidase that may generate substrates required for the peptide-fermenting metabolism of P. gingivalis. Aside from nutrient generation, Tpr may also be involved in evasion of host immune response through degradation of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and complement proteins C3, C4, and C5. Taken together, these results indicate that Tpr likely represents an important pathogenesis factor for P. gingivalis.

  8. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt:related species and risk factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AA Gharamah; AM Moharram; MA Ismail; AK AL-Hussaini

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study risk factors, contributing factors of bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt, test the isolated species sensitive to some therapeutic agents, and to investigate the air-borne bacteria and fungi in opthalmology operating rooms. Methods: Thirty one cases of endophthalmitis were clinically diagnosed and microbiologically studied. Indoor air-borne bacteria and fungi inside four air-conditioned operating rooms in the Ophthalmology Department at Assiut University Hospitals were also investigated. The isolated microbes from endophthalmitis cases were tested for their ability to produce some extracellular enzymes including protease, lipase, urease, phosphatase and catalase. Also the ability of 5 fungal isolates from endophthalmitis origin to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to some therapeutic agents were studied. Results: Results showed that bacteria and fungi were responsihle for infection in 10 and 6 cases of endophthalmitis, respectively and only 2 cases produced a mixture of bacteria and fungi. Trauma was the most prevalent risk factor of endophthalmitis where 58.1% of the 31 cases were due to trauma. In ophthalmology operating rooms, different bacterial and fungal species were isolated. 8 bacterial and 5 fungal isolates showed their ability to produce enzymes while only 3 fungal isolates were able to produce mycotoxins. Terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusions: The ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and mycotoxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues. Microbial contamination of operating rooms with air-borne bacteria and fungi in the present work may be a source of postoperative endophthalmitis.

  9. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  10. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  11. Characterizing the interplay between multiple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juárez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P; Barrett, Christian L; Lovley, Derek R; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with σ(N) being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  12. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  13. Correlation models between environmental factors and bacterial resistance to antimony and copper.

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    Zunji Shi

    Full Text Available Antimony (Sb and copper (Cu are toxic heavy metals that are associated with a wide variety of minerals. Sb(III-oxidizing bacteria that convert the toxic Sb(III to the less toxic Sb(V are potentially useful for environmental Sb bioremediation. A total of 125 culturable Sb(III/Cu(II-resistant bacteria from 11 different types of mining soils were isolated. Four strains identified as Arthrobacter, Acinetobacter and Janibacter exhibited notably high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs for Sb(III (>10 mM,making them the most highly Sb(III-resistant bacteria to date. Thirty-six strains were able to oxidize Sb(III, including Pseudomonas-, Comamonas-, Acinetobacter-, Sphingopyxis-, Paracoccus- Aminobacter-, Arthrobacter-, Bacillus-, Janibacter- and Variovorax-like isolates. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA revealed that the soil concentrations of Sb and Cu were the most obvious environmental factors affecting the culturable bacterial population structures. Stepwise linear regression was used to create two predictive models for the correlation between soil characteristics and the bacterial Sb(III or Cu(II resistance. The concentrations of Sb and Cu in the soil was the significant factors affecting the bacterial Sb(III resistance, whereas the concentrations of S and P in the soil greatly affected the bacterial Cu(II resistance. The two stepwise linear regression models that we derived are as follows: MIC(Sb(III=606.605+0.14533 x C(Sb+0.4128 x C(Cu and MIC((Cu(II=58.3844+0.02119 x C(S+0.00199 x CP [where the MIC(Sb(III and MIC(Cu(II represent the average bacterial MIC for the metal of each soil (μM, and the C(Sb, C(Cu, C(S and C(P represent concentrations for Sb, Cu, S and P (mg/kg in soil, respectively, p<0.01]. The stepwise linear regression models we developed suggest that metals as well as other soil physicochemical parameters can contribute to bacterial resistance to metals.

  14. [The bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and factors determining its spectrum in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guira, O; Tiéno, H; Traoré, S; Diallo, I; Ouangré, E; Sagna, Y; Zabsonré, J; Yanogo, D; Traoré, S S; Drabo, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and to identify the factors which determine the bacterial spectrum in order to increase empiric antibiotic prescription in Ouagadougou. The study was a cross-sectional one, carried from July 1st, 2011 to June 30, 2012 in the departments of internal medicine and general and digestive surgery in Yalgado Ouédraogo teaching hospital. Samples for bacteriological tests consisted of aspiration of pus through the healthy skin, curettage and swab of the base of the ulceration or tissue biopsy from foot lesions. The bacteria's sensitivity to antibiotics has been tested by the qualitative method (Kirby-Bauer). The frequency of diabetic foot infection was 14.45% and the monthly incidence 5.33. The mean age of patients was 56 years and the sex ratio 1.37. Foot ulcerations were chronic in 33 (51.56%), necrotic in 51 (79.69%) and associated with osteitis in 40 (62.5%) patients. Infection was grade 3 in 70.3% cases. Thirty-nine patients had received antibiotics before hospital admission. Among the 71 samples, 62 (87.32%) cultures were positive: 53 (85.48%) monomicrobial and 9 (14.52%) bimicrobial. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (76%) were the most frequent from ulcerations: Staphylococcus aureus (32.39%), Streptococcus sp (18.30%). Negative coagulase staphylococci have been found in 23.94% cases. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli have been isolated from 24% ulcerations. No factor was associated with the type of bacteria. Gram-positive pathogen cocci showed a high sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and oxacillin. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or extended-spectrum beta lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) have been isolated. A better design is necessary to a clarification of bacterial flora in diabetic foot infections. Prevention of bacterial resistance is also needed.

  15. Exploring the Influence of Environmental Factors on Bacterial Communities within the Rhizosphere of the Cu-tolerant plant, Elsholtzia splendens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Longfei; Song, Mengke; Yang, Li; Zhang, Dayi; Sun, Yingtao; Shen, Zhenguo; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial communities of rhizospheric soils play an important role in the tolerance and uptake of metal-tolerant/hyperaccumulating plants to metals, e.g. the Cu-tolerant Elsholtzia splendens native to China. In this work, pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was firstly applied to investigate the rhizospheric bacterial community of E. splendens grown at Cu contaminated sites. The 47 phyla including 11 dominant phyla (>1%) in E. splendens rhizosphere were presented. The effects of Cu and other environmental factors (total organic carbon, total nitrogen and pH) on the rhizospheric bacterial community were studied comprehensively. The phyla abundances were affected by the environmental factors to different extent, and we found pH, instead of Cu concentration, influenced UniFrac distance significantly and was identified as the most important environmental factor affecting bacterial community. In addition, the influence of environmental factors on gene profiles was explored according to the predicted metagenomes obtained by PICRUSt (phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states). Our study illustrates a view about Cu-tolerant E. splendens rhizospheric bacterial communities (composition, diversity and gene profiles) and their influencing factors, giving a hand for the understanding on bacterial community is formed and affected in rhizosphere.

  16. Monocytes regulate the mechanism of T-cell death by inducing Fas-mediated apoptosis during bacterial infection.

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    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Monocytes and T-cells are critical to the host response to acute bacterial infection but monocytes are primarily viewed as amplifying the inflammatory signal. The mechanisms of cell death regulating T-cell numbers at sites of infection are incompletely characterized. T-cell death in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC showed 'classic' features of apoptosis following exposure to pneumococci. Conversely, purified CD3(+ T-cells cultured with pneumococci demonstrated necrosis with membrane permeabilization. The death of purified CD3(+ T-cells was not inhibited by necrostatin, but required the bacterial toxin pneumolysin. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T-cells in PBMC cultures required 'classical' CD14(+ monocytes, which enhanced T-cell activation. CD3(+ T-cell death was enhanced in HIV-seropositive individuals. Monocyte-mediated CD3(+ T-cell apoptotic death was Fas-dependent both in vitro and in vivo. In the early stages of the T-cell dependent host response to pneumococci reduced Fas ligand mediated T-cell apoptosis was associated with decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and increased bacteremia. In summary monocytes converted pathogen-associated necrosis into Fas-dependent apoptosis and regulated levels of activated T-cells at sites of acute bacterial infection. These changes were associated with enhanced bacterial clearance in the lung and reduced levels of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  17. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

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    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  18. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

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    Cristian Del Campo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  19. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  20. Cell cycle coordination and regulation of bacterial chromosome segregation dynamics by polarly localized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Whitman B; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-09-15

    What regulates chromosome segregation dynamics in bacteria is largely unknown. Here, we show in Caulobacter crescentus that the polarity factor TipN regulates the directional motion and overall translocation speed of the parS/ParB partition complex by interacting with ParA at the new pole. In the absence of TipN, ParA structures can regenerate behind the partition complex, leading to stalls and back-and-forth motions of parS/ParB, reminiscent of plasmid behaviour. This extrinsic regulation of the parS/ParB/ParA system directly affects not only division site selection, but also cell growth. Other mechanisms, including the pole-organizing protein PopZ, compensate for the defect in segregation regulation in ΔtipN cells. Accordingly, synthetic lethality of PopZ and TipN is caused by severe chromosome segregation and cell division defects. Our data suggest a mechanistic framework for adapting a self-organizing oscillator to create motion suitable for chromosome segregation.

  1. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

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    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  2. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  3. Epidemiology and Risk Factors Associated with Developing Bacterial Meningitis among Children in Gaza Strip.

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    Abdel Moat Al Jarousha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is still the leading cause of high morbidity and mortality among the children. The present study was conducted to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis and to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing the infection.This cross sectional study was conducted in three hospitals of Gaza strip -Palestine during the period 2009. All the children with clinical diagnosis of meningitis /meningoencephalitis admitted to these hospitals were included in the study. They were subjected to clinical examination as well as CSF bacteriological and serological investigations.During the period (2009, 1853 patients were admitted to the hospitals with suspect of meningitis by pediatricians, 73 (3.9% proved by culture to be acute bacterial meningitis, of these patients 62% were males and 38% were females. The common isolated pathogens were Neisseria meningitides (47.9%, Streptococcus pneumonia (15.1%, Haemophilus influenza (13.7%, E. coli (11.0%, Enterobacter spp. (6.8%, Citrobacter spp. (2.7%, Providencia spp. (1.4%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1.4%. The common recorded symptoms were fever (78%, neck stiffness (47%, vomiting (37%, poor feeding (19%, and irritability (16%. Statistical analysis showed that there was statistical significance associated developing of infection with malnutrition (low hemoglobin level, high house crowdness and irritability (P-value <0.05. The ANOVA statistical analysis showed that S. pneumonia has an impact on developing low hemoglobin level and leukocytosis.N. meningitides is still dominant and needs vaccination. The risk factors should be taken into consideration in any future plan.

  4. Meteorological factors and ambient bacterial levels in a subtropical urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Hua; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Chew, Ginger L.; Shih, Po-Wen; Lee, Chung-Te; Chao, H. Jasmine

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a study to investigate the characteristics and determinants of ambient bacteria in Taipei, Taiwan from August 2004 to March 2005. We monitored ambient culturable bacteria in Shin-Jhuang City, an urban area in the Taipei metropolitan areas, using duplicate Burkard Portable Air Samplers with R2A agar. The average concentration of total bacteria was 1,986 colony-forming units per cubic meter of air (CFU/m3) (median = 780 CFU/m3) over the study period, with the highest level in autumn. Most bacterial taxa had similar seasonal variation, with higher concentrations in autumn and winter. During the study period, Gram negative rods and cocci were predominant. Multivariate analyses indicated that wind speed and wind direction significantly influenced ambient bacterial distribution. Temperature and relative humidity were also important environmental factors positively associated with ambient bacterial concentrations. We observed statistically significant relationships between ambient bacteria and air pollutants, including sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone, particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10)), methane and total hydrocarbons. The concentrations of methane and total hydrocarbons during the previous day were positively associated with total bacteria and Gram negative rods, respectively. Ozone level on the previous day had a negative relationship with Gram negative cocci. SO2 level with a 3-day lag was positively correlated with concentrations of both total bacteria and Gram negative cocci. In the future, more longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the relationships and possible mechanisms between ambient bacteria and meteorological factors, as well as to evaluate the ecological and health impacts of ambient bacteria.

  5. A Salmonella small non-coding RNA facilitates bacterial invasion and intracellular replication by modulating the expression of virulence factors.

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    Hao Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that act as regulators of gene expression have been identified in all kingdoms of life, including microRNA (miRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA in eukaryotic cells. Numerous sRNAs identified in Salmonella are encoded by genes located at Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs that are commonly found in pathogenic strains. Whether these sRNAs are important for Salmonella pathogenesis and virulence in animals has not been reported. In this study, we provide the first direct evidence that a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA, IsrM, is important for Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells, intracellular replication inside macrophages, and virulence and colonization in mice. IsrM RNA is expressed in vitro under conditions resembling those during infection in the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, IsrM is found to be differentially expressed in vivo, with higher expression in the ileum than in the spleen. IsrM targets the mRNAs coding for SopA, a SPI-1 effector, and HilE, a global regulator of the expression of SPI-1 proteins, which are major virulence factors essential for bacterial invasion. Mutations in IsrM result in disregulation of expression of HilE and SopA, as well as other SPI-1 genes whose expression is regulated by HilE. Salmonella with deletion of isrM is defective in bacteria invasion of epithelial cells and intracellular replication/survival in macrophages. Moreover, Salmonella with mutations in isrM is attenuated in killing animals and defective in growth in the ileum and spleen in mice. Our study has shown that IsrM sRNA functions as a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA directly involved in Salmonella pathogenesis in animals. Our results also suggest that sRNAs may represent a distinct class of virulence factors that are important for bacterial infection in vivo.

  6. Soil factors exhibit greater influence than bacterial inoculation on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Ute; Kosier, Bob; Jahnke, Joachim; Priefer, Ursula B; Al-Halbouni, Djamila

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the effects of soil factors and bacterial inoculation on alfalfa (Medicago sativa), plants were inoculated with Ensifer meliloti L33 and Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 in pot experiments using two different soils separately as well as in a mixture. One soil was contaminated with chemical waste products; the other was an arable soil. Soil factors, including the availability of macro- and micronutrients as well as carbon and nitrogen contents, were found to exhibit a much greater influence on the growth of alfalfa than any of the inoculations. In contaminated soil, the shoot and root growth of alfalfa was decreased and nodules were diminished and ineffective. Bacterial inoculations did not significantly improve this hostile growth environment. However, in a mixture (44% arable, 22% contaminated soil, 34% vermiculite), growth conditions for alfalfa were improved so that shoot dry weight and nodule numbers increased up to 100- and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the contaminated soil. For the strain L33, its persistence in the rhizosphere was correlated to the presence of its host plant, but its dynamics were influenced by competition with indigenous rhizobia. The strain Sp7, once provided with a suitable soil, was not dependent on the plant's rhizosphere, but it enhanced the performance of L33 and native rhizobia.

  7. BATF: Bringing (in) Another Th17-regulating Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo J. Martinez; Chen Dong

    2009-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells are a recently identified subset of T cells that regulate tissue inflammation, and RORγt and RORα have been shown to be Th17-specific transcription factors that mediate Th17 cell generation. A new study of Batf-deficient mice shows that this AP-1 family transcription factor also regulates Th17 cell differentiation by binding to Th17-associated gene promoters and by maintaining RORa and RORgt expression, shedding new lights on current clinical modulation of Th17 cell function in inflammatory diseases.

  8. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression.

  9. [Participation of the antibiotics of Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis in the regulation of bacterial spore formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, A A; Korolev, V I

    1979-03-01

    Sporulation and antibiotic production, as well as the effect of exogenic antibacterial substances on bacterial sporogenesis were studied in various strains of Bac. pumilus and Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis. The bacteria were grown on a solid sporulation medium with and without the antibiotics. After 5-day incubation the presence of refractyl spores was determined with a phase-contrast method. It was found that in the strains of Bac. pumilus producing antibacterial substances the sporulation was normal. The loss of the capacity for synthesizing such substances resulted in asporegenicity or oligosporogenicity. This allowed a conclusion on existence of phenomenological connection between sporulation and antibiotic production. The study of the antibiotic effect on bacterial sporogenesis showed negative results which are discussed in the paper along two directions: (1) the antibiotics did not probably participate in regulation of the bacteria cell differentiation, (2) the antibiotics regulated the bacterial sporogenesis though their effect was not as yet detected because of methodical difficulties. Therefore, the problem of the antibiotic participation in regulation of sporulation in Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis remains open.

  10. Regulation of spermatogenesis by paracrine/autocrine testicular factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MahmoudHuleihel; EitanLunenfeld

    2004-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process regulated by endocrine and testicular paracrine/autocrine factors.Gonadotropins are involved in the regulation of several testicular paracrine factors, mainly of the IL-1 family and testicular hormones. Testicular cytokines and growth factors (such as IL-1, IL-6, TNF, IFN-T, LIF and SCF) were shown to affect both the germ cell proliferation and the Leydig and Sertoli cells functions and secretion. Cytokines and growth factors are produced by immune cells and in the interstitial and seminiferous tubular compartments by various testicular cells, including Sertoli, Leydig, peritubular cells, spermatogonia, differentiated spermatogonia and even spermatozoa. Corresponding cytokine and growth factor receptors were demonstrated on some of the testicular cells. These cytokines also control the secretion of the gonadotropins and testosterone in the testis. Under pathological conditions the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are increased and negatively affected spermatogenesis. Thus,the expression levels and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of testicular paracrine/autocrine factors should be considered in future therapeutic strategies for male infertility. (Asian J Androl 2004 Sep; 6: 259-268)

  11. EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR PREVENTS INCREASED PERMEABILITY AND BACTERIAL TRANSLOCATION IN RATS WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈冬利; 王为忠; 王俊义

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation in rats with acute pancreatitis during total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Methods. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were randomly divided into one of the following two groups: (1) received only TPN (control group) or (2) received TPN with EGF at a dose of 0.2 mg· kg-1· day-1 (Egf group). On fifth day of total parenteral nutrition, samples from mesenteric lymph nodes, pancreas, liver and spleen were harvested for cultures. Water, protein and DNA content in jejunal mucosa were determined. D-xylose and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran were instilled into the lumen of a ligated segament of small intestine. Thirty minutes later, superior mesenteric vein D-xylose and plasma FITC-dextran concentration were measured. Results. Positive cultures in liver and spleen, as well as FITC-dextran concentration in the Egf group were significantly lower than in the control group. Protein and DNA content in jejunal mucosa in the Egf group were significantly higher than in the control group. Conclusion. The results indicate that EGF may prevent increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation in rats with acute pancreatitis during TPN.

  12. Temporal scaling of bacterial taxa is influenced by both stochastic and deterministic ecological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Ager, Duane; Lilley, Andrew K

    2008-06-01

    Microorganisms operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales acting as key drivers of ecosystem properties. Therefore, many key questions in microbial ecology require the consideration of both spatial and temporal scales. Spatial scaling, in particular the species-area relationship (SAR), has a long history in ecology and has recently been addressed in microbial ecology. However, the temporal analogue of the SAR, the species-time relationship, has received far less attention even in the science of general ecology. Here we focus upon the role of temporal scaling in microbial ecological patterns by coupling molecular characterization of bacterial communities in discrete island (bioreactor) systems with a macroecological approach. Our findings showed that the temporal scaling exponent (slope), and therefore taxa turnover of the bacterial taxa-time relationship decreased as selective pressure (industrial wastewater concentration) increased. Also, as the concentration of industrial wastewater increased across the bioreactors, we observed a gradual switch from stochastic community assembly to more deterministic (niche)-based considerations. The identification of broad-scale statistical patterns is particularly relevant to microbial ecology, as it is frequently difficult to identify individual species or their functions. In this study, we identify wide-reaching statistical patterns of diversity and show that they are shaped by the prevalent underlying ecological factors.

  13. Key factors for causing poplar Ice Nucleation Active bacterial canker and its control techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The isolation, culture and the active determination of poplar ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria and the inoculation tests in laboratory and field were conducted, and the varieties, distribution and number of poplar INA bacteria and its pathogenicity and freezing injury property were determined. The study results showed that the INA bacteria widely spread on poplar in Northeast China and caused the frozen injury for poplar under the frost condition in Spring or Autumn, which was the key factor to induce INA bacterial canker. Through evaluation and investigation of different poplar varieties and inoculation tests, fine disease-resistant varieties and strains of poplar suitable for Northeast China were selected. Further tests for strong seedling showed that burying cuttings in sand and covering with plastic film could effectively avoid the frostbite, frozen and drought damage, reduce INA bacteria infection, and promote poplar growth. INA bacterial canker was detected early by highly specialized antiserums of INA bacteria and the agglutinated test of ring-shaped boundary surface. The inducers such as streptomycin, phenylmercuric acetae, salicylic acid and heat-killed bacteria to immerse cuttings, have obvious induced disease-resistant effect. Before poplar sprouted in early spring, through spraying the solution of frostbite agent, the control effect also was obvious.

  14. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application...... of contact uncoupling and TGFβ. Nox4 knockdown abrogates epithelial-myofibroblast transition-associated reactive oxygen species production. Laser capture microdissection reveals increased Nox4 expression in the tubular epithelium also during obstructive nephropathy. MRTF down-regulation/inhibition suppresses...

  15. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Heppner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway.

  16. GATA transcription factor required for immunity to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kerry

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to dissect several genetic pathways involved in immunity; however, little is known about transcription factors that regulate the expression of immune effectors. C. elegans does not appear to have a functional homolog of the key immune transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we show that that the intestinal GATA transcription factor ELT-2 is required for both immunity to Salmonella enterica and expression of a C-type lectin gene, clec-67, which is expressed in the intestinal cells and is a good marker of S. enterica infection. We also found that ELT-2 is required for immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. Lack of immune inhibition by DAF-2, which negatively regulates the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, rescues the hypersusceptibility to pathogens phenotype of elt-2(RNAi animals. Our results indicate that ELT-2 is part of a multi-pathogen defense pathway that regulates innate immunity independently of the DAF-2/DAF-16 signaling pathway.

  17. FACTORS WHICH MODIFY THE EFFECT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM ON BACTERIAL CELL MEMBRANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HENNEMAN, D H; UMBREIT, W W

    1964-06-01

    Henneman, Dorothy H. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), and W. W. Umbreit. Factors which modify the effect of sodium and potassium on bacterial cell membranes. J. Bacteriol. 87:1266-1273. 1964.-Suspensions of Escherichia coli B, when placed in 0.2 to 0.5 m solutions of NaCl, KCl, or LiCl, show an increased turbidity. With NaCl, this increased turbidity is stable with time; with KCl and LiCl, it is gradually lost. The stability to NaCl with time is due to substances removable from the cell by incubation in phosphate buffer; these materials exist in water washings from such phosphate-incubated cells.

  18. Autoregulation of a bacterial sigma factor explored by using segmental isotopic labeling and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A; Shekhtman, Alexander; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Chlenov, Mark; Gruber, Tanja M; Bryant, Donald A; Darst, Seth A; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W

    2002-06-25

    Bacterial sigma factors combine with the catalytic core RNA polymerase to direct the process of transcription initiation through sequence-specific interactions with the -10 and -35 elements of promoter DNA. In the absence of core RNA polymerase, the DNA-binding function of sigma is autoinhibited by its own N-terminal 90 amino acids (region 1.1), putatively by a direct interaction with conserved region 4.2, which binds the -35 promoter element. In the present work, this mechanism of autoinhibition was studied by using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and segmental isotopic labeling of a sigma70-like subunit from Thermotoga maritima. Our data argue strongly against a high-affinity interaction between these two domains. Instead we suggest that autoinhibition of DNA binding occurs through an indirect steric and/or electrostatic mechanism. More generally, the present work illustrates the power of segmental isotopic labeling for probing molecular interactions in large proteins by NMR.

  19. TALE-induced bHLH transcription factors that activate a pectate lyase contribute to water soaking in bacterial spot of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    AvrHah1 [avirulence (avr) gene homologous to avrBs3 and hax2, no. 1] is a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector (TALE) in Xanthomonas gardneri that induces water-soaked disease lesions on fruits and leaves during bacterial spot of tomato. We observe that water from outside the leaf is drawn into the apoplast in X. gardneri-infected, but not X. gardneriΔavrHah1 (XgΔavrHah1)-infected, plants, conferring a dark, water-soaked appearance. The pull of water can facilitate entry of additional bacterial cells into the apoplast. Comparing the transcriptomes of tomato infected with X. gardneri vs. XgΔavrHah1 revealed the differential up-regulation of two basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors with predicted effector binding elements (EBEs) for AvrHah1. We mined our RNA-sequencing data for differentially up-regulated genes that could be direct targets of the bHLH transcription factors and therefore indirect targets of AvrHah1. We show that two pectin modification genes, a pectate lyase and pectinesterase, are targets of both bHLH transcription factors. Designer TALEs (dTALEs) for the bHLH transcription factors and the pectate lyase, but not for the pectinesterase, complement water soaking when delivered by XgΔavrHah1. By perturbing transcriptional networks and/or modifying the plant cell wall, AvrHah1 may promote water uptake to enhance tissue damage and eventual bacterial egression from the apoplast to the leaf surface. Understanding how disease symptoms develop may be a useful tool for improving the tolerance of crops from damaging disease lesions. PMID:28100489

  20. New insights in the bacterial spore resistance to extreme terrestrial and extraterrestrial factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, Bacillus endospores are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. The extremely high resistance of bacterial endospores to environmental stress factors has intrigued researchers since long time and many characteristic spore features, especially those involved in the protection of spore DNA, have already been uncovered. The disclosure of the complete genomic sequence of Bacillus subtilis 168, one of the often used astrobiological model system, and the rapid development of tran-scriptional microarray techniques have opened new opportunities of gaining further insights in the enigma of spore resistance. Spores of B. subtilis were exposed to various extreme ter-restrial and extraterrestrial stressors to reach a better understanding of the DNA protection and repair strategies, which them to cope with the induced DNA damage. Following physical stress factors of environmental importance -either on Earth or in space -were selected for this thesis: (i) mono-and polychromatic UV radiation, (ii) ionizing radiation, (iii) exposure to ultrahigh vacuum; and (iv) high shock pressures simulating meteorite impacts. To reach a most comprehensive understanding of spore resistance to those harsh terrestrial or simulated extraterrestrial conditions, a standardized experimental protocol of the preparation and ana-lyzing methods was established including the determination of the following spore responses: (i) survival, (ii) induced mutations, (iii) DNA damage, (iv) role of different repair pathways by use of a set of repair deficient mutants, and (v) transcriptional responses during spore germi-nation by use of genome-wide transcriptome analyses and confirmation by RT-PCR. From this comprehensive set of data on spore resistance to a variety of environmental stress parameters a model of a "built-in" transcriptional program of bacterial spores in response to DNA damaging treatments to ensure DNA restoration

  1. Insights into the Regulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities by Application of Bio-organic Fertilizer in Pseudostellaria heterophylla Monoculture Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkun Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass and quality of Pseudostellariae heterophylla suffers a significant decline under monoculture. Since rhizosphere microbiome plays crucial roles in soil health, deep pyrosequencing combined with qPCR was applied to characterize the composition and structure of soil bacterial community under monoculture and different amendments. The results showed compared with the first-year planted (FP, second-year monoculture of P. heterophylla (SP led to a significant decline in yield and resulted in a significant increase in Fusarium oxysporum but a decline in Burkholderia spp. Bio-organic fertilizer (MT formulated by combining antagonistic bacteria with organic matter could significantly promote the yield by regulating rhizosphere bacterial community. However, organic fertilizer (MO without antagonistic bacteria could not suppress Fusarium wilt. Multivariate statistics analysis showed a distinct separation between the healthy samples (FP and MT and the unhealthy samples (SP and MO, suggesting a strong relationship between soil microbial community and plant performance. Furthermore, we found the application of bio-organic fertilizer MT could significantly increase the bacterial community diversity and restructure microbial community with relatively fewer pathogenic F. oxysporum and more beneficial Burkholderia spp. In conclusion, the application of novel bio-organic fertilizer could effectively suppress Fusarium wilt by enriching the antagonistic bacteria and enhancing the bacterial diversity.

  2. Environmental factors shaping the abundance and distribution of laccase-encoding bacterial community with potential phenolic oxidase capacity during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lunhui; Zeng, Guangming; Fan, Changzheng; Guo, Jinsong; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Ming; Wu, Haipeng; Yuan, Yujie; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Increasing molecular evidence points to a wide occurrence of laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO)-encoding genes in bacteria. Most researches mainly focused on the bacterial LMCO diversity, whereas the processes and the environmental factors responsible for structuring bacterial LMCO communities remain relatively unknown in a composting system. Six gene libraries were constructed from samples in representative stages during composting. A total of 185 sequences obtained from sample DNA extracts were classified to 59 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 10 % cutoff. The distribution profile of bacterial LMCO genes showed that proteobacterial- and actinobacterial-associated species were the dominant communities during composting. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the pile temperature and water-soluble carbon (WSC) content were significantly positively correlated with bacterial LMCO gene OTU numbers, Chao1 and Shannon index, whereas the humic acid (HA)-like carbon content had the most significant effect on the distribution of the bacterial LMCO genes during composting by redundancy analysis. These findings will improve the understanding of the mutual relationship between environmental factors and bacterial LMCO community compositions in composting.

  3. A two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor activates transcription in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Shawn R; Guariglia-Oropeza, Veronica; Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D

    2009-12-15

    The sigma-like factor YvrI and coregulator YvrHa activate transcription from a small set of conserved promoters in Bacillus subtilis. We report here that these two proteins independently contribute sigma-region 2 and sigma-region 4 functions to a holoenzyme-promoter DNA complex. YvrI binds RNA polymerase (RNAP) through a region 4 interaction with the beta-subunit flap domain and mediates specific promoter recognition but cannot initiate DNA melting at the -10 promoter element. Conversely, YvrHa possesses sequence similarity to a conserved core-binding motif in sigma-region 2 and binds to the N-terminal coiled-coil element in the RNAP beta'-subunit previously implicated in interaction with region 2 of sigma-factors. YvrHa plays an essential role in stabilizing the open complex and interacts specifically with the N-terminus of YvrI. Based on these results, we propose that YvrHa is situated in the transcription complex proximal to the -10 element of the promoter, whereas YvrI is responsible for -35 region recognition. This system presents an unusual example of a two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, food intake regulation, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Vargas, Haydeé; Martínez-Ezquerro, José Darío; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that plays a fundamental role in development and plasticity of the central nervous system (CNS). It is currently recognized as a major participant in the regulation of food intake. Multiple studies have shown that different regulators of appetite such as leptin, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) potentially exert anorexigenic effects through BDNF. Low circulating levels of BDNF are associated with a higher risk of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Strict food restriction reduces BDNF and may trigger binge-eating episodes and weight gain. The existence of mutations that cause haploinsufficiency of BDNF as well as some genetic variants, notably the BDNF p.Val66Met polymorphism, are also associated with the development of obese phenotypes and hyperphagia. However, association of the Met allele with AN and BN, which have different phenotypic characteristics, shows clearly the existence of other relevant factors that regulate eating behavior. This may, in part, be explained by the epigenetic regulation of BDNF through mechanisms like DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Environmental factors, primarily during early development, are crucial to the establishment of these stable but reversible changes that alter the transcriptional expression and are transgenerationally heritable, with potential concomitant effects on the development of eating disorders and body weight control.

  5. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  6. Salt marsh sediment characteristics as key regulators on the efficiency of hydrocarbons bioremediation by Juncus maritimus rhizospheric bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Almeida, C Marisa R; Magalhães, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Mucha, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Mitigation of petroleum hydrocarbons was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment, to assess the rhizoremediation (RR) potential in sediments with different characteristics colonized by Juncus maritimus, a salt marsh plant commonly found in temperate estuaries. Furthermore, the efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms, was tested in combination with RR. The effect of the distinct treatments on hydrocarbon degradation, root biomass weight, and bacterial community structure was assessed. Our result showed higher potential for hydrocarbon degradation (evaluated by total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis) in coarse rhizosediments with low organic matter (OM), than rhizosediments with high OM, and small size particles. Moreover, the bacterial community structure was shaped according to the rhizosediment characteristics, highlighting the importance of specific microbe-particle associations to define the structure of rhizospheric bacterial communities, rather than external factors, such as hydrocarbon contamination or the applied treatments. The potential for hydrocarbon RR seems to depend on root system development and bacterial diversity, since biodegradation efficiencies were positively related with these two parameters. Treatments with higher root biomass, and concomitantly with higher bacterial diversity yielded higher hydrocarbon degradation. Moreover, BS and BA did not enhance hydrocarbons RR. In fact, it was observed that higher nutrient availability might interfere with root growth and negatively influence hydrocarbon degradation performance. Therefore, our results suggested that to conduct appropriate hydrocarbon bioremediation strategies, the effect of sediment characteristics on root growth/exploration should be taken into consideration, a feature not explored in previous studies. Furthermore, strategies aiming for the recovery

  7. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  8. Allochthonous carbon is a major regulator to bacterial growth and community composition in subarctic freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, Toni; Peura, Sari; Cusson, Mathieu; Rautio, Milla

    2016-09-01

    In the subarctic region, climate warming and permafrost thaw are leading to emergence of ponds and to an increase in mobility of catchment carbon. As carbon of terrestrial origin is increasing in subarctic freshwaters the resource pool supporting their microbial communities and metabolism is changing, with consequences to overall aquatic productivity. By sampling different subarctic water bodies for a one complete year we show how terrestrial and algal carbon compounds vary in a range of freshwaters and how differential organic carbon quality is linked to bacterial metabolism and community composition. We show that terrestrial drainage and associated nutrients supported higher bacterial growth in ponds and river mouths that were influenced by fresh terrestrial carbon than in large lakes with carbon from algal production. Bacterial diversity, however, was lower at sites influenced by terrestrial carbon inputs. Bacterial community composition was highly variable among different water bodies and especially influenced by concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fulvic acids, proteins and nutrients. Furthermore, a distinct preference was found for terrestrial vs. algal carbon among certain bacterial tribes. The results highlight the contribution of the numerous ponds to cycling of terrestrial carbon in the changing subarctic and arctic regions.

  9. MUNC13-4 protein regulates the oxidative response and is essential for phagosomal maturation and bacterial killing in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfregola, Jlenia; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Meijler, Michael M; Napolitano, Gennaro; Catz, Sergio Daniel

    2012-12-28

    Neutrophils use diverse mechanisms to kill pathogens including phagocytosis, exocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neutrophil extracellular traps. These mechanisms rely on their ability to mobilize intracellular organelles and to deliver granular cargoes to specific cellular compartments or into the extracellular milieu, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vesicular trafficking in neutrophils are not well understood. MUNC13-4 is a RAB27A effector that coordinates exocytosis in hematopoietic cells, and its deficiency is associated with the human immunodeficiency familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 3. In this work, we have established an essential role for MUNC13-4 in selective vesicular trafficking, phagosomal maturation, and intracellular bacterial killing in neutrophils. Using neutrophils from munc13-4 knock-out (KO) mice, we show that MUNC13-4 is necessary for the regulation of p22(phox)-expressing granule trafficking to the plasma membrane and regulates extracellular ROS production. MUNC13-4 was also essential for the regulation of intracellular ROS production induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa despite normal trafficking of p22(phox)-expressing vesicles toward the phagosome. Importantly, in the absence of MUNC13-4, phagosomal maturation was impaired as observed by the defective delivery of azurophilic granules and multivesicular bodies to the phagosome. Significantly, this mechanism was intact in RAB27A KO neutrophils. Intracellular bacterial killing was markedly impaired in MUNC13-4 KO neutrophils. MUNC13-4-deficient cells showed a significant increase in neutrophil extracellular trap formation but were unable to compensate for the impaired bacterial killing. Altogether, these findings characterize novel functions of MUNC13-4 in the innate immune response of the neutrophil and have direct implications for the understanding of immunodeficiencies in patients with MUNC13-4 deficiency.

  10. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  11. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  12. Bacterial Etiology and Risk Factors Associated with Cellulitis and Purulent Skin Abscesses in Military Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Ellis, Michael W.; Schlett, Carey D.; Millar, Eugene V.; LaBreck, Patrick T.; Mor, Deepika; Elassal, Emad M.; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Redden, Cassie L.; Cui, Tianyuan; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Bishop, Danett K.; Hall, Eric R.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Although Staphylococcus aureus is associated with purulent SSTI, it is unclear to what degree this pathogen causes nonpurulent cellulitis. To inform effective prevention strategies and to provide novel insights into SSTI pathogenesis, we aimed to determine the etiology of SSTI in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study in US Army Infantry trainees with SSTI (cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis) from July 2012 through December 2014. We used standard microbiology, serology, and high-throughput sequencing to determine the etiology of SSTI. Furthermore, we compared purported risk factors as well as anatomic site colonization for S. aureus. Among 201 SSTI cases evaluated for SSTI risk factors, cellulitis was associated with lower extremity blisters (P = 0.01) and abscess was associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization (Pmicrobiome analysis, only 1 leading edge aspirate was culturable (Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Microbiome evaluation of aspirate specimens demonstrated that Rhodanobacter terrae was the most abundant species (66.8% average abundance), while abscesses were dominated by S. aureus (92.9% average abundance). Although abscesses and cellulitis share the spectrum of clinical SSTI, the bacterial etiologies as determined by current technology appear distinct. Furthermore, the presence of atypical bacteria within cellulitis aspirates may indicate novel mechanisms of cellulitis pathogenesis. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT01105767. PMID:27780238

  13. Anaerobes and Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Virulence Factors Contributing to Vaginal Colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene W. J. Africa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aetiology and pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV is unclear but it appears to be associated with factors that disrupt the normal acidity of the vagina thus altering the equilibrium between the normal vaginal microbiota. BV has serious implications for female morbidity, including reports of pelvic inflammatory disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and infertility. This paper reviewed new available information regarding possible factors contributing to the establishment of the BV vaginal biofilm, examined the proposed role of anaerobic microbial species recently detected by new culture-independent methods and discusses developments related to the effects of BV on human pregnancy. The literature search included Pubmed (NLM, LISTA (EBSCO, and Web of Science. Because of the complexity and diversity of population groups, diagnosis and methodology used, no meta-analysis was performed. Several anaerobic microbial species previously missed in the laboratory diagnosis of BV have been revealed while taking cognisance of newly proposed theories of infection, thereby improving our understanding and knowledge of the complex aetiology and pathogenesis of BV and its perceived role in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  14. Joint analysis of bacterial DNA methylation, predicted promoter and regulation motifs for biological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in long-read, single molecule real-time sequencing technology and analysis software over the last two years has enabled the efficient production of closed bacterial genome sequences. However, consistent annotation of these genomes has lagged behind the ability to create them, while the avai...

  15. Bacterial blight (Pseudomonas pisi Sackett) of peas in South Africa, with special reference to frost as a predisposing factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelema, B.H.

    1972-01-01

    In the beginning of the nineteen fifties bacterial blight caused much damage to pea crops in South Africa, particularly to those grown for seed production. A study has been made of the causal organism and the conditioning factors of the disease, special attention being paid to frost as a predisposin

  16. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. Design: Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES, were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Using presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann–Whitney tests with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis. Results: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value<0.01. Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI, and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles of saliva. Conclusions: The bacterial profile of saliva seems independent of diet intake, but influenced by smoking and maybe socioeconomic status.

  17. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF......-kappaB activation and cytokine secretion in vitro. Thus, DMBT1 may play an important role in the first line of mucosal defense conferring immune exclusion of bacterial cell wall components. Dysregulated intestinal DMBT1 expression due to mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene may be part of the complex pathophysiology...

  18. Bacterial colonisation in patients with bronchiectasis: microbiological pattern and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrill, J; Agusti, C; de Celis, R; Rano, A; Gonzalez, J; Sole, T; Xaubet, A; Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Torres, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to investigate the incidence, diagnostic yield of non-invasive and bronchoscopic techniques, and risk factors of airway colonisation in patients with bronchiectasis in a stable clinical situation. Methods: A 2 year prospective study of 77 patients with bronchiectasis in a stable clinical condition was performed in an 800 bed tertiary university hospital. The interventions used were pharyngeal swabs, sputum cultures and quantitative protected specimen brush (PSB) bacterial cultures (cut off point ≥102 cfu/ml) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (cut off point ≥103 cfu/ml). Results: The incidence of bronchial colonisation with potential pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) was 64%. The most frequent PPMs isolated were Haemophilus influenzae (55%) and Pseudomonas spp (26%). Resistance to antibiotics was found in 30% of the isolated pathogens. When the sample was appropriate, the operative characteristics of the sputum cultures were similar to those obtained with the PSB taken as a gold standard. Risk factors associated with bronchial colonisation by PPMs in the multivariate analysis were: (1) diagnosis of bronchiectasis before the age of 14 years (odds ratio (OR)=3.92, 95% CI 1.29 to 11.95), (2) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) <80% predicted (OR=3.91, 95% CI 1.30 to 11.78), and (3) presence of varicose or cystic bronchiectasis (OR=4.80, 95% CI 1.11 to 21.46). Conclusions: Clinically stable patients with bronchiectasis have a high prevalence of bronchial colonisation by PPMs. Sputum culture is a good alternative to bronchoscopic procedures for evaluation of this colonisation. Early diagnosis of bronchiectasis, presence of varicose-cystic bronchiectasis, and FEV1 <80% predicted appear to be risk factors for bronchial colonisation with PPMs. PMID:11809984

  19. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes of Bacterial and Fungal Scleritis at a Tertiary Eye Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jagadesh C.; Murthy, Somasheila I.; Reddy, Ashok K.; Garg, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to analyze demographics, risk factors, pathogenic organisms, and clinical outcome in cases with microbiologically proven bacterial or fungal scleritis. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of all the medical records of patients with microbiologically proven infectious scleritis examined from March 2005 to December 2009 in the cornea services of L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India was done. Results: Forty-two eyes of 42 patients were included in this study. The mean age at presentation was 48.52 ± 14.10 years (range: 12-70). Surgery was the major risk factor seen in 24 eyes (58.5%). Scleral infection was noted after vitreoretinal surgery (with scleral buckle) in 15 eyes, cataract surgery in 3 eyes, pterygium surgery in 3 eyes, corneoscleral tear repair and scleral buckle surgery in 3 eyes. Sixteen eyes (39%) were on systemic or topical steroids at the time of presentation. History of injury was noted in 9 eyes (22%) and diabetes mellitus in 7 patients (17%). Associated keratitis was noted in 9 eyes (21.4%). The scleral abscess was unifocal in 33 eyes (78.5%), multifocal in 6 eyes (14.2%) and diffuse in 3 eyes (7.14%). The final follow-up ranged from 24 days to 37 months. The final visual acuity was better in 18 eyes (42.8%), stable in 13 (30.9%), and deteriorated in 7 eyes (16.6%). Recurrence was seen in 4 eyes (9.5%). Conclusions: Surgery is a major risk factor for infectious scleritis in our series. Fungus was the most common organism isolated. Thorough debridement and intensive use of medications have improved the outcome. PMID:25949079

  20. Neuronal Goα and CAPS regulate behavioral and immune responses to bacterial pore-forming toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Ha, Christine; Aroian, Raffi V

    2013-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are abundant bacterial virulence factors that attack host cell plasma membranes. Host defense mechanisms against PFTs described to date all function in the host tissue that is directly attacked by the PFT. Here we characterize a rapid and fully penetrant cessation of feeding of Caenorhabditis elegans in response to PFT attack. We demonstrate via analyses of C. elegans mutants that inhibition of feeding by PFT requires the neuronal G protein Goα subunit goa-1, and that maintenance of this response requires neuronally expressed calcium activator for protein secretion (CAPS) homolog unc-31. Independently from their role in feeding cessation, we find that goa-1 and unc-31 are additionally required for immune protection against PFTs. We thus demonstrate that the behavioral and immune responses to bacterial PFT attack involve the cross-talk between the nervous system and the cells directly under attack.

  1. Neuronal Goα and CAPS regulate behavioral and immune responses to bacterial pore-forming toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C O Los

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs are abundant bacterial virulence factors that attack host cell plasma membranes. Host defense mechanisms against PFTs described to date all function in the host tissue that is directly attacked by the PFT. Here we characterize a rapid and fully penetrant cessation of feeding of Caenorhabditis elegans in response to PFT attack. We demonstrate via analyses of C. elegans mutants that inhibition of feeding by PFT requires the neuronal G protein Goα subunit goa-1, and that maintenance of this response requires neuronally expressed calcium activator for protein secretion (CAPS homolog unc-31. Independently from their role in feeding cessation, we find that goa-1 and unc-31 are additionally required for immune protection against PFTs. We thus demonstrate that the behavioral and immune responses to bacterial PFT attack involve the cross-talk between the nervous system and the cells directly under attack.

  2. The Bartonella quintana Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor RpoE Has a Role in Bacterial Adaptation to the Arthropod Vector Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abromaitis, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a vector-borne bacterial pathogen that causes fatal disease in humans. During the infectious cycle, B. quintana transitions from the hemin-restricted human bloodstream to the hemin-rich body louse vector. Because extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors often regulate adaptation to environmental changes, we hypothesized that a previously unstudied B. quintana ECF sigma factor, RpoE, is involved in the transition from the human host to the body louse vector. The genomic context of B. quintana rpoE identified it as a member of the ECF15 family of sigma factors found only in alphaproteobacteria. ECF15 sigma factors are believed to be the master regulators of the general stress response in alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we examined the B. quintana RpoE response to two stressors that are encountered in the body louse vector environment, a decreased temperature and an increased hemin concentration. We determined that the expression of rpoE is significantly upregulated at the body louse (28°C) versus the human host (37°C) temperature. rpoE expression also was upregulated when B. quintana was exposed to high hemin concentrations. In vitro and in vivo analyses demonstrated that RpoE function is regulated by a mechanism involving the anti-sigma factor NepR and the response regulator PhyR. The ΔrpoE ΔnepR mutant strain of B. quintana established that RpoE-mediated transcription is important in mediating the tolerance of B. quintana to high hemin concentrations. We present the first analysis of an ECF15 sigma factor in a vector-borne human pathogen and conclude that RpoE has a role in the adaptation of B. quintana to the hemin-rich arthropod vector environment. PMID:23564167

  3. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W; Reif, Andrew G; Krouse, Donna A; Isaacs, Natasha M

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfb(O157)) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but not Cryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfb(O157), STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2, stx1, and rfb

  4. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse,; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2

  5. Spatial Distribution of Bacterial Communities Driven by Multiple Environmental Factors in a Beach Wetland of the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eDing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distributions of bacterial communities may be driven by multiple environmental factors. Thus, understanding the relationships between bacterial distribution and environmental factors is critical for understanding wetland stability and the functioning of freshwater lakes. However, little research on the bacterial communities in deep sediment layers exists. In this study, thirty clone libraries of 16S rRNA were constructed from a beach wetland of the Poyang Lake along both horizontal (distance to the water-land junction and vertical (sediment depth gradients to assess the effects of sediment properties on bacterial community structure and diversity. Our results showed that bacterial diversity increased along the horizontal gradient and decreased along the vertical gradient. The heterogeneous sediment properties along gradients substantially affected the dominant bacterial groups at the phylum and species levels. For example, the NH4+ concentration decreased with increasing depth, which was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria. The changes in bacterial diversity and dominant bacterial groups showed that the top layer had a different bacterial community structure than the deeper layers. Principal component analysis revealed that both gradients, not each gradient independently, contributed to the shift in the bacterial community structure. A multiple linear regression model explained the changes in bacterial diversity and richness along the depth and distance gradients. Overall, our results suggest that spatial gradients associated with sediment properties shaped the bacterial communities in the Poyang Lake beach wetland.

  6. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  7. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V

    2014-01-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? While bacteria display a myriad of morphologies 1 , the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk 2,3 . The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct sub-cellul...

  8. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-Hui; Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-10-20

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection.

  9. MGMT expression: insights into its regulation. 1. Epigenetic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is the DNA repair enzyme responsible for removing of alkylation adducts from the O6-guanine in DNA. Despite MGMT prevents mutations and cell death, this enzyme can provide resistance of cancer cells to alkylating agents of chemotherapy. The high intra- and inter-individual variations in the human MGMT expression level have been observed indicating to a complicated regulation of this gene. This review is focused on the study of epigenetic factors which could be potentially involved in regulation of the human MGMT gene expression. These include chromatin remodeling via histone modifications and DNA methylation of promoter region and gene body, as well as RNA-based mechanisms, alternative splicing, protein post- translational modifications, and other.

  10. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  11. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR, mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP, whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  12. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor Listeriolysin O favors bacterial growth in co-culture with the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, causes protozoan encystment and promotes bacterial survival inside cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva Svetlana A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is widely spread in the nature. L. monocytogenes was reported to be isolated from soil, water, sewage and sludge. Listeriolysin O (LLO is a L. monocytogenes major virulence factor. In the course of infection in mammals, LLO is required for intracellular survival and apoptosis induction in lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the potential of LLO to promote interactions between L. monocytogenes and the ubiquitous inhabitant of natural ecosystems bacteriovorous free-living ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Results Wild type L. monocytogenes reduced T. pyriformis trophozoite counts and stimulated encystment. The effects were observed starting from 48 h of co-incubation. On the day 14, trophozoites were eliminated from the co-culture while about 5 × 104 cells/ml remained in the axenic T. pyriformis culture. The deficient in the LLO-encoding hly gene L. monocytogenes strain failed to cause mortality among protozoa and to trigger protozoan encystment. Replenishment of the hly gene in the mutant strain restored toxicity towards protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. The saprophytic non-haemolytic species L. innocua transformed with the LLO-expressing plasmid caused extensive mortality and encystment in ciliates. During the first week of co-incubation, LLO-producing L. monocytogenes demonstrated higher growth rates in association with T. pyriformis than the LLO-deficient isogenic strain. At latter stages of co-incubation bacterial counts were similar for both strains. T. pyriformis cysts infected with wild type L. monocytogenes caused listerial infection in guinea pigs upon ocular and oral inoculation. The infection was proved by bacterial plating from the internal organs. Conclusions The L. monocytogenes virulence factor LLO promotes bacterial survival and growth in the presence of bacteriovorous ciliate T. pyriformis. LLO is responsible for L. monocytogenes

  14. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of below ground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature, and speciation and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. The research is divided into two major parts, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Variant factors affecting sulfide flux include the wetlands' tidal range, seasonal salinity, and other hydrological conditions, grass species and plant growth, soil composition, and microbial activity.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  16. Bacterial elongation factors EF-Tu, their mutants, chimeric forms, and domains: isolation and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonák, J

    2007-04-15

    Prokaryotic elongation factors EF-Tu form a family of homologous, three-domain molecular switches catalyzing the binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs to ribosomes during the process of mRNA translation. They are GTP-binding proteins, or GTPases. Binding of GTP or GDP regulates their conformation and thus their activity. Because of their particular structure and regulation, various activities (also outside of the translation system) and a relative abundance they represent attractive tools for studies of many basic but still not fully understood mechanisms both of the translation process, the structure-function relationships in EF-Tu molecules themselves and proteins and energy transduction mechanisms in general. The review critically summarizes procedures for the isolation and purification of native and engineered eubacterial elongation factors EF-Tu and their mutants on a large as well as small scale. Current protocols for the purification of both native and polyHis-tagged or glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged EF-Tu proteins and their variants using conventional procedures and the Ni-NTA-Agarose or Glutathione Sepharose are presented.

  17. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  18. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  19. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  20. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeanne Y

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  1. Relationship among specific bacterial counts and total bacterial and somatic cell counts and factors influencing their variation in ovine bulk tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garnica, M L; Linage, B; Carriedo, J A; De La Fuente, L F; García-Jimeno, M C; Santos, J A; Gonzalo, C

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the relationship among the counts of different organisms and total bacterial count (BTTBC) and somatic cell count (BTSCC) as determined in dairy laboratories in ovine bulk tank milk, 751 bulk tank milk samples from 205 dairy sheep flocks belonging to Consortium for Ovine Promotion (CPO) were collected between January and December 2011. Four samplings were carried out in each flock, once per season, throughout 1 yr. Variables analyzed were bulk tank counts of thermoduric, psychrotrophic, coliform, and gram-positive catalase-negative cocci (GPCNC) bacterial groups. Thermoduric, psychrotrophic, and coliform species were significantly related to BTTBC, whereas GPCNC were correlated with both BTTBC and BTSCC variables. Highest counts were for psychrotroph and coliform groups, and a moderate to high correlation (r=0.51) was found between both variables, indicating that poor cleaning practices in the flocks tend to select for less-resistant organisms, such as gram-negative rods. In addition, BTTBC correlated with BTSCC (r=0.42). Some variation factors for specific bacterial counts, such as breed, season, milking type, dry therapy, and milk yield, were also analyzed. Flock information was collected from flock books, annual audits, and the CPO traceability system. Psychrotrophs and coliforms had elevated counts in winter, whereas GPCNC were higher in summer and in hand-milked flocks. Dry therapy contributed to the reduction in psychrotrophic bacteria; therefore, some strains of mammary pathogens could also be psychrotrophic bacteria. Results of this study would be helpful for troubleshooting milk quality problems and developing premium payment systems in dairy sheep.

  2. Factors influencing neurological outcome of children with bacterial meningitis at the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargui, Fatiha; D'Agostino, Irene; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Alberti, Corinne; Doit, Catherine; Bellier, Nathalie; Morin, Laurence; Galli Gibertini, Giuliano; Smail, Assia; Zanin, Anna; Lorrot, Mathie; Dauger, Stéphane; Neve, Mathieu; Faye, Albert; Armoogum, Priscilla; Bourrillon, Antoine; Bingen, Edouard; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Nigrovic, Lise E; Titomanlio, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    We performed a cohort study of children who survived bacterial meningitis after the neonatal period at a single pediatric center in France over a 10-year period (1995-2004) to identify predictors of death and long-term neurological deficits in children with bacterial meningitis. We performed multivariate regression to determine independent predictors of death and neurologic deficits. We identified 101 children with bacterial meningitis of which 19 died during initial hospitalization. Need for mechanical ventilation [hazard ratio (HR) 11.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.4-55.5)] and thrombocytopenia defined as a platelet count highest risk.

  3. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  4. Environmental factors shaping cultured free-living amoebae and their associated bacterial community within drinking water network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Bouchon, Didier; Héchard, Yann; Moulin, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) constitute an important part of eukaryotic populations colonising drinking water networks. However, little is known about the factors influencing their ecology in such environments. Because of their status as reservoir of potentially pathogenic bacteria, understanding environmental factors impacting FLA populations and their associated bacterial community is crucial. Through sampling of a large drinking water network, the diversity of cultivable FLA and their bacterial community were investigated by an amplicon sequencing approach, and their correlation with physicochemical parameters was studied. While FLA ubiquitously colonised the water network all year long, significant changes in population composition were observed. These changes were partially explained by several environmental parameters, namely water origin, temperature, pH and chlorine concentration. The characterisation of FLA associated bacterial community reflected a diverse but rather stable consortium composed of nearly 1400 OTUs. The definition of a core community highlighted the predominance of only few genera, majorly dominated by Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. Co-occurrence analysis also showed significant patterns of FLA-bacteria association, and allowed uncovering potentially new FLA - bacteria interactions. From our knowledge, this study is the first that combines a large sampling scheme with high-throughput identification of FLA together with associated bacteria, along with their influencing environmental parameters. Our results demonstrate the importance of physicochemical parameters in the ecology of FLA and their bacterial community in water networks.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vernia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a target of the hepatic JNK-signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21 deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. Moreover, the protective effects of hepatic JNK deficiency to suppress metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice were not observed in mice with hepatocyte-specific FGF21 deficiency, including reduced blood glucose concentration and reduced intolerance to glucose and insulin. Furthermore, we show that JNK contributes to the regulation of hepatic FGF21 expression during fasting/feeding cycles. These data demonstrate that the hepatokine FGF21 is a key mediator of JNK-regulated metabolic syndrome.

  6. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori eKageyama

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin1 (Ucn1, a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous lineage from CRF, are highly selective for the CRF type 2 receptor (CRF2 receptor. The HPA and HPG axes interact with each other, and gonadal function and reproduction are suppressed in response to various stressors. In this review, we focus on the regulation of gonadotropins by CRF and Ucn2 in pituitary gonadotrophs and of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. In corticotrophs, stress-induced increases in CRF stimulate Ucn2 production, which leads to the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion via the CRF2 receptor in the pituitary. GnRH in the hypothalamus is regulated by a variety of stress conditions. CRF is also involved in the suppression of the HPG axis, especially the GnRH pulse generator, via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. Thus, complicated regulation of GnRH in the hypothalamus and gonadotropins in the pituitary via CRF receptors contributes to stress responses and adaptation of gonadal functions.

  7. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  8. Host genetics and environmental factors regulate ecological succession of the mouse colon tissue-associated microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The integration of host genetics, environmental triggers and the microbiota is a recognised factor in the pathogenesis of barrier function diseases such as IBD. In order to determine how these factors interact to regulate the host immune response and ecological succession of the colon tissue-associated microbiota, we investigated the temporal interaction between the microbiota and the host following disruption of the colonic epithelial barrier. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oral administration of DSS was applied as a mechanistic model of environmental damage of the colon and the resulting inflammation characterized for various parameters over time in WT and Nod2 KO mice. RESULTS: In WT mice, DSS damage exposed the host to the commensal flora and led to a migration of the tissue-associated bacteria from the epithelium to mucosal and submucosal layers correlating with changes in proinflammatory cytokine profiles and a progressive transition from acute to chronic inflammation of the colon. Tissue-associated bacteria levels peaked at day 21 post-DSS and declined thereafter, correlating with recruitment of innate immune cells and development of the adaptive immune response. Histological parameters, immune cell infiltration and cytokine biomarkers of inflammation were indistinguishable between Nod2 and WT littermates following DSS, however, Nod2 KO mice demonstrated significantly higher tissue-associated bacterial levels in the colon. DSS damage and Nod2 genotype independently regulated the community structure of the colon microbiota. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of these experiments demonstrate the integration of environmental and genetic factors in the ecological succession of the commensal flora in mammalian tissue. The association of Nod2 genotype (and other host polymorphisms and environmental factors likely combine to influence the ecological succession of the tissue-associated microflora accounting in part for their

  9. Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its risk factors in HIV/AIDSpatients with abnormal vaginal discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel Nwadioha; Daniel Egah; Edmond Banwat; Julie Egesie; Ifeanyi Onwuezobe

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in theHIV/AIDS patients of primary health care clinics in Jos Plateau state, Nigeria.Methods: Female genital swabs were collected from primary health care centers, Jos and analyzed by microscopy, culture,etc. in Jos University Teaching Hospital from December2006 to December2007. Data on epidemiologic indices were collected, using structured interviewer-administered questionnaires.Results:The incidence of bacterial vaginosis in the study was 28%(n=196/700). Among theHIV/AIDS group, the bacterial vaginosis incidence was36% (n=126/350), while in the control (non-HIV patients) group, the rate was20% (70/350) with a statistically significant difference at 95 percent confidence level(P<0.05) .HIV/AIDSand non-HIV (control) patients contributed64% (n=126/196) and36%(n=70/196), respectively. The risks to bacterial vaginosis included vaginal douching with disinfectant/detergent constituted(60%), poor use of condom40%, a median age of26years, and a median number of3 sex partners per week.Conclusions: There was a significant statistical difference in prevalence of bacterial vaginosis between theHIV/AIDS group and non-HIV(control) group of patients in the study. Risk behaviors that promote the incidence of bacterial vaginosis should be especially paid attention.

  10. Thyroid hormones regulate fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling during chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Joanna C; Williams, Allan J; Rabier, Bénédicte; Chassande, Olivier; Samarut, Jacques; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Bassett, J H Duncan; Williams, Graham R

    2005-12-01

    Childhood hypothyroidism causes growth arrest with delayed ossification and growth-plate dysgenesis, whereas thyrotoxicosis accelerates ossification and growth. Thyroid hormone (T(3)) regulates chondrocyte proliferation and is essential for hypertrophic differentiation. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are also important regulators of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, and activating mutations of FGF receptor-3 (FGFR3) cause achondroplasia. We investigated the hypothesis that T(3) regulates chondrogenesis via FGFR3 in ATDC5 cells, which undergo a defined program of chondrogenesis. ATDC5 cells expressed two FGFR1, four FGFR2, and one FGFR3 mRNA splice variants throughout chondrogenesis, and expression of each isoform was stimulated by T(3) during the first 6-12 d of culture, when T(3) inhibited proliferation by 50%. FGFR3 expression was also increased in cells treated with T(3) for 21 d, when T(3) induced an earlier onset of hypertrophic differentiation and collagen X expression. FGFR3 expression was reduced in growth plates from T(3) receptor alpha-null mice, which exhibit skeletal hypothyroidism, but was increased in T(3) receptor beta(PV/PV) mice, which display skeletal thyrotoxicosis. These findings indicate that FGFR3 is a T(3)-target gene in chondrocytes. In further experiments, T(3) enhanced FGF2 and FGF18 activation of the MAPK-signaling pathway but inhibited their activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1. FGF9 did not activate MAPK or signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 pathways in the absence or presence of T(3). Thus, T(3) exerted differing effects on FGFR activation during chondrogenesis depending on which FGF ligand stimulated the FGFR and which downstream signaling pathway was activated. These studies identify novel interactions between T(3) and FGFs that regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during chondrogenesis.

  11. Self-regulation effects in QB-active bacterial reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goushcha, A. O.; Scott, G. W.; Holzwarth, A. R.; Kharkyanen, V. N.

    1999-10-01

    Dynamic self-organization effects in proteins under non-equilibrium conditions of photoinduced charge separation are discussed. Successive charge transfer turnover events induce cumulative structural rearrangements with long relaxation times. Perturbations by the modified macromolecular structure on the turnover rate result in an autocatalytic feedback mechanism and may lead to formation of new conformational states. Under such conditions, the efficiency of charge separation and transfer may change by several orders of magnitude, stabilizing the charge-separated state and facilitating charge flow through the molecule. Experimental results on bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers indicate that dynamic self-organization effects determine the function of these macromolecules, favoring stabilization of the charge-separated state over the non-functional recombination event. The protein-cofactor system of reaction centers may be described as a molecular machine that functions under non-equilibrium conditions of electron flow to promote a charge-separated state.

  12. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO with virulence regulating activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Chapalain

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5 M adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies.

  13. Bacterial Adrenergic Sensors Regulate Virulence of Enteric Pathogens in the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano G. Moreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteric pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and Citrobacter rodentium, which is largely used as a surrogate EHEC model for murine infections, are exposed to several host neurotransmitters in the gut. An important chemical exchange within the gut involves the neurotransmitters epinephrine and/or norepinephrine, extensively reported to increase virulence gene expression in EHEC, acting through two bacterial adrenergic sensors: QseC and QseE. However, EHEC is unable to establish itself and cause its hallmark lesions, attaching and effacing (AE lesions, on murine enterocytes. To address the role of these neurotransmitters during enteric infection, we employed C. rodentium. Both EHEC and C. rodentium harbor the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE that is necessary for AE lesion formation. Here we show that expression of the LEE, as well as that of other virulence genes in C. rodentium, is also activated by epinephrine and/or norepinephrine. Both QseC and QseE are required for LEE gene activation in C. rodentium, and the qseC and qseE mutants are attenuated for murine infection. C. rodentium has a decreased ability to colonize dopamine β-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh−/− mice, which do not produce epinephrine and norepinephrine. Both adrenergic sensors are required for C. rodentium to sense these neurotransmitters and activate the LEE genes during infection. These data indicate that epinephrine and norepinephrine are sensed by bacterial adrenergic receptors during enteric infection to promote activation of their virulence repertoire. This is the first report of the role of these neurotransmitters during mammalian gastrointestinal (GI infection by a noninvasive pathogen.

  14. Quorum sensing system regulation on bacterial resistance%群体感应系统对细菌耐药的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱艮苗; 杨维青

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing was a common mechanism that bacteria regulated the adapting ability of communities depending on cell density. Bacterial quorum sensing system regulated a number of specific functions,such as bacterial resistance-related traits. This paper reviewed the regulation of quorum sensing system on bacterial resistance-related traits.%群体感应是细菌依赖于细胞密度、调节群体适应能力的一种普遍机制.细菌群体感应系统调节许多特定的功能,如对细菌耐药相关性状的调节.本文就群体感应系统对细菌耐药相关性状的调控作用进行综述.

  15. Soil pH and electrical conductivity are key edaphic factors shaping bacterial communities of greenhouse soils in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Roh, An-Sung; Choi, Seung-Chul; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Moon-Tae; Ahn, Byung-Koo; Kim, Sun-Kuk; Lee, Young-Han; Joa, Jae-Ho; Kang, Seong-Soo; Lee, Shin Ae; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in soil ecosystem processes such as organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling, and plant nutrient availability. The land use for greenhouse cultivation has been increasing continuously, which involves an intensive input of agricultural materials to enhance productivity; however, relatively little is known about bacterial communities in greenhouse soils. To assess the effects of environmental factors on the soil bacterial diversity and community composition, a total of 187 greenhouse soil samples collected across Korea were subjected to bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis. A total of 11,865 operational taxonomic units at a 97% similarity cutoff level were detected from 847,560 sequences. Among nine soil factors evaluated; pH, electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+)), available P2O5, organic matter, and NO3-N, soil pH was most strongly correlated with bacterial richness (polynomial regression, pH: R(2) = 0.1683, P pH: R(2) = 0.1765, P pH and EC (Mantel test, pH: r = 0.2672, P 1%), the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were also more strongly correlated with pH and EC values, compared with other soil cation contents, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+). Our results suggest that, despite the heterogeneity of various environmental variables, the bacterial communities of the intensively cultivated greenhouse soils were particularly influenced by soil pH and EC. These findings therefore shed light on the soil microbial ecology of greenhouse cultivation, which should be helpful for devising effective management strategies to enhance soil microbial diversity and improving crop productivity.

  16. Myeloid Colony Stimulating Factors as Regulators of Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Hamilton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of functional heterogeneity in macrophages has been defined by two polarized end states known as M1 and M2, which exhibit the pro-inflammatory activities necessary for host defense and the tissue repair activities required for tissue repair respectively. Macrophage populations in different tissue locations exist in distinct phenotypic states across this M1/M2 spectrum and the development and abundance of individual subsets result from the local and systemic action of myeloid colony stimulating factors (CSFs including M-CSF and GM-CSF. These factors have relatively non-overlapping roles in the differentiation and maintenance of specific macrophage subsets. Furthermore there is now evidence that CSFs may also regulate macrophage phenotype during challenge. Cell culture studies from multiple laboratories demonstrate that macrophages developed in the presence of GM-CSF exhibit amplified response to M1 polarizing stimuli while M-CSF potentiates responses to M2 stimuli. As a consequence these factors can be important determinants of the magnitude and duration of both acute and chronic inflammatory pathology and may, therefore, be potential targets for therapeutic manipulation in specific human disease settings.

  17. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4-/- bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4-/- BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity.

  18. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L.; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G. David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4–/– bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4–/– BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity. PMID:20628199

  19. Fatores de risco para meningite bacteriana no recém-nascido Risk factors for bacterial meningitis in the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Jornada Krebs

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo é descrever os fatores de risco para meningite bacteriana em recém-nascidos e analisar a prevalência destes fatores, considerando-se a presença ou não de baixo peso ao nascimento. Foram analisados 50 recém-nascidos com meningite bacteriana, excluindo-se aqueles com meningomielocele ou infecção congênita. Na análise estatística utilizou-se o teste exato de Fisher, considerando-se significantes os valores de p The aim of this study is to describe the risk factors for bacterial meningitis in newborns, and to analyze the prevalence of these factors, considering or not the low birth weight presence. Fifty newborns with bacterial meningitis were analyzed, excluding the ones with meningomyelocele or congenital infection. In the statistical analysis, the Fisher's exact test was used, considering significant the p < 0.05 values. This study has shown that prematurity, low birth weight and presence of previous infectious diseases in the newborn or in the mother were important risk factors for meningitis. Among low birth weight newborns, invasive procedures, especially tracheal intubation, use of central venous catheter and previous use of antibiotics, were significantly associated to the meningitis occurrence. These results indicate that the improvement in the prenatal care and in the hospital infection control are measures of high importance in the decrease of the incidence of neonatal bacterial meningitis.

  20. Role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in paclitaxel-induced intestinal barrier breakdown and bacterial translocation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chi; XU Yang-guang; DUAN Xue-ning; LIU Yin-hua; ZHAO Jian-xin; XU Ling; YE Jing-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy causes breakdown of the intestinal barrier, which may lead to bacterial translocation. Paclitaxel, an anti-tubulin agent, has many side effects; however, its effect on the intestinal barrier is unknown. Previous studies show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in modulating intestinal barrier function, but these studies are not conclusive. Here, we investigated the effects of paclitaxel on the intestinal barrier, and whether G-CSF could prevent paclitaxel-induced bacterial translocation.Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, paclitaxel group and paclitaxel + G-CSF group. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rates of lactulose and mannitol administered by gavage. The mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and liver were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture. Endotoxin levels and white blood cell (WBC) counts were measured and bacterial quantification performed using relative real-time PCR. Jejunum samples were also obtained for histological observation. Intestinal apoptosis was evaluated using a fragmented DNA assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-biotin nick end-labeling staining. One-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test were used to compare differences between groups.Results Paclitaxel induced apoptosis in 12.5% of jejunum villus cells, which was reduced to 3.8% by G-CSF treatment. Apoptosis in the control group was 0.6%. Paclitaxel treatment also resulted in villus atrophy, increased intestinal permeability and a reduction in the WBC count. G-CSF treatment resulted in increased villus height and returned WBC counts to normal levels. No bacterial translocation was detected in the control group, whereas 6/8,8/8, and 8/8 rats in the paclitaxel group were culture-positive in the liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, respectively. Bacterial translocation was

  1. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway.

  2. Co-transcriptomic Analysis by RNA Sequencing to Simultaneously Measure Regulated Gene Expression in Host and Bacterial Pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-24

    Intramacrophage pathogens subvert antimicrobial defence pathways using various mechanisms, including the targeting of host TLR-mediated transcriptional responses. Conversely, TLR-inducible host defence mechanisms subject intramacrophage pathogens to stress, thus altering pathogen gene expression programs. Important biological insights can thus be gained through the analysis of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen during an infection. Traditionally, research methods have involved the use of qPCR, microarrays and/or RNA sequencing to identify transcriptional changes in either the host or the pathogen. Here we describe the application of RNA sequencing using samples obtained from in vitro infection assays to simultaneously quantify both host and bacterial pathogen gene expression changes, as well as general approaches that can be undertaken to interpret the RNA sequencing data that is generated. These methods can be used to provide insights into host TLR-regulated transcriptional responses to microbial challenge, as well as pathogen subversion mechanisms against such responses.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process.

  4. The role of T cell subsets and cytokines in the regulation of intracellular bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses are a critical part of the host's defense against intracellular bacterial infections. Immunity to Brucella abortus crucially depends on antigen-specific T cell-mediated activation of macrophages, which are the major effectors of cell-mediated killing of this organism. T lymphocytes that proliferate in response to B. abortus were characterized for phenotype and cytokine activity. Human, murine, and bovine T lymphocytes exhibited a type 1 cytokine profile, suggesting an analogous immune response in these different hosts. In vivo protection afforded by a particular cell type is dependent on the antigen presented and the mechanism of antigen presentation. Studies using MHC class I and class II knockout mice infected with B. abortus have demonstrated that protective immunity to brucellosis is especially dependent on CD8+ T cells. To target MHC class I presentation we transfected ex vivo a murine macrophage cell line with B. abortus genes and adoptively transferred them to BALB/c mice. These transgenic macrophage clones induced partial protection in mice against experimental brucellosis. Knowing the cells required for protection, vaccines can be designed to activate the protective T cell subset. Lastly, as a new strategy for priming a specific class I-restricted T cell response in vivo, we used genetic immunization by particle bombardment-mediated gene transfer

  5. Regulation of stem cell factor expression in inflammation and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A Da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a major mast cell growth factor, which could be involved in the local increase of mast cell number in the asthmatic airways. In vivo, SCF expression increases in asthmatic patients and this is reversed after treatment with glucocorticoids. In vitro in human lung fibroblasts in culture, IL-1beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, confirms this increased SCF mRNA and protein expression implying the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2 very early post-treatment, and glucocorticoids confirm this decrease. Surprisingly, glucocorticoids potentiate the IL-1beta-enhanced SCF expression at short term treatment, implying increased SCF mRNA stability and SCF gene transcription rate. This potentiation involves p38 and ERK1/2. Transfection experiments with the SCF promoter including intron1 also confirm this increase and decrease of SCF expression by IL-1beta and glucocorticoids, and the potentiation by glucocorticoids of the IL-1beta-induced SCF expression. Deletion of the GRE or kappaB sites abolishes this potentiation, and the effect of IL-1beta or glucocorticoids alone. DNA binding of GR and NF-kappaB are also demonstrated for these effects. In conclusion, this review concerns new mechanisms of regulation of SCF expression in inflammation that could lead to potential therapeutic strategy allowing to control mast cell number in the asthmatic airways.

  6. Allograft inflammatory factor 1 is a regulator of transcytosis in M cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Sari; Sato, Shintaro; Kaneto, Satoshi; Uchino, Shigeo; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Nakamura, Seiji; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    M cells in follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) are specialized antigen-sampling cells that take up intestinal luminal antigens. Transcription factor Spi-B regulates M-cell maturation, but the molecules that promote transcytosis within M cells are not fully identified. Here we show that mouse allograft inflammatory factor 1 (Aif1) is expressed by M cells and contributes to M-cell transcytosis. FAE in Aif1−/− mice has suppressed uptake of particles and commensal bacteria, compared with wild-type mice. Translocation of Yersinia enterocolitica, but not of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, leading to the generation of antigen-specific IgA antibodies, is also diminished in Aif1-deficient mice. Although β1 integrin, which acts as a receptor for Y. enterocolitica via invasin protein, is expressed on the apical surface membranes of M cells, its active form is rarely found in Aif1−/− mice. These findings show that Aif1 is important for bacterial and particle transcytosis in M cells. PMID:28224999

  7. An EJC factor RBM8a regulates anxiety behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alachkar, A; Jiang, D; Harrison, M; Zhou, Y; Chen, G; Mao, Y

    2013-07-01

    Neuroplasticity depends on the precise timing of gene expression, which requires accurate control of mRNA stability and rapid elimination of abnormal mRNA. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an RNA surveillance mechanism that ensures the speedy degradation of mRNAs carrying premature termination codons (PTCs). This mechanism relies on several key Exon Junction Complex (EJC) factors to distinguish PTCs from normal stop codons. NMD degrades not only aberrant transcripts carrying PTCs, but also normal transcripts harboring a normal stop codon [1]. Intriguingly, mutations in an NMD factor, Upf3b, have been found in patients with autism [2, 3]. A binding partner of Upf3b, RBM8a, is located in the 1q21.1 copy-number variation (CNV) associated with mental retardation, autism [4], schizophrenia [5], and microcephaly [6]. However, the functions of EJC factors and their roles in behavioral regulation are still elusive. RBM8a protein is a core component of the EJC that plays an important role in NMD. Recent genetic study indicated that RBM8a gain-of-function significantly associated with intellectual disability [7]. In this study we investigated the effect of RBM8a overexpression on affective behaviors in mice. Lentivirus expressing RBM8a was infused into the hippocampus of adult mice to conduct behavioral studies including social interaction, open field, elevated plus maze, and forced swimming tests. Our results showed that overexpression of RBM8a in the mouse dentate gyrus (DG) leads to increased anxiety-like behavior, abnormal social interaction and decreased immobile time in forced swimming test (FST). To examine the underlying mechanism, we found that overexpressing RBM8a in cultured primary neurons lead to significant higher frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). To explore the underlying mechanism of RBM8a mediated behavioral changes, RNA-immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) detected that RBM8a binds to CaMK2, GluR1 and Egr1 mRNA, suggesting that

  8. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H;

    2014-01-01

    : Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES), were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Using...

  9. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt: related species and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Gharamah

    2012-08-01

    Conclusions: The ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and mycotoxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues. Microbial contamination of operating rooms with air-borne bacteria and fungi in the present work may be a source of postoperative endophthalmitis.

  10. Regulation of energy metabolism by the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) s factors of Arcobacter butzleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extracytoplasmic function (ECF) s factors are fundamental for bacterial adaptation to distinct environments and for survival under different stress conditions. The emerging pathogen Arcobacter butzleri possesses seven putative pairs of s/anti-s factors belonging to the ECF family. Here, we repor...

  11. 细菌性阴道炎危险因素分析%Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宏宇; 王敬华; 祁建青; 卢艳阳

    2011-01-01

    目的:分析细菌性阴道炎患病的相关因素,探讨其预防措施.方法:选择本院门诊检测细菌性阴道炎阳性患者180 例作为病例组,180 例细菌性阴道炎阴性者作为对照组,对其细菌性阴道炎相关因素进行分析,本研究相关危险因素包括:其他性传播疾病(衣原体感染史、淋病史、霉菌性阴道炎史及滴虫性阴道炎史)、避孕方式(避孕套、宫内节育器及安全期避孕)、相关行为因素(阴道清洁次数、方式,内裤消毒、洗澡地点及方式、性卫生习惯,流产次数).结果:单因素分析结果:淋病史、霉菌性阴道炎史、滴虫性阴道炎史、多次流产、及经常清洗阴道可增加细菌性阴道炎患病风险,选择避孕套避孕及良好的卫生习惯是细菌性阴道炎的保护因素;多因素Logistic 回归结果:滴虫性阴道炎史(OR=9.21) 、人流次数(OR=5.34) 、清洗阴道(OR=2.16) 可升高细菌性阴道炎患病风险,使用避孕套(OR=0.49) 、良好性卫生习惯(OR=0.53) 则具有保护作用.结论:避孕套避孕和良好的性卫生习惯可降低细菌性阴道炎的发病风险.%Objective: Analysis the risk factors of bacterial vaginitis and explore its preventive measures. Methods: Detection bacterial vzginosis-positive patients 180 cases as patient case group, 180 patients with bacterial vaginitis-negative as control group and bacterial vaginitis-related faceors were analyzed. In this study, risk factors include other sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and the behavioral factors. Results: Univariste analysia result: the history of ginirrhea, fungal vaginitis, trichomonas vaginitis, miscarriages times and vagina cleaning may increase the disease risk of bacterial vaginitis and the use of condom and the good sexual health habits may be a protective factor for bacterial vaginitis. Logistic regression results: Trichomonas vaginitis history(OR=9.12), flow times(OR=5.34)and cleaning the vagina(OR=2.16) may

  12. Regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes by the small noncoding RNA PcrZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Nils N; Berghoff, Bork A; Hermanns, Yannick N; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-10-02

    The small RNA PcrZ (photosynthesis control RNA Z) of the facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is induced upon a drop of oxygen tension with similar kinetics to those of genes for components of photosynthetic complexes. High expression of PcrZ depends on PrrA, the response regulator of the PrrB/PrrA two-component system with a central role in redox regulation in R. sphaeroides. In addition the FnrL protein, an activator of some photosynthesis genes at low oxygen tension, is involved in redox-dependent expression of this small (s)RNA. Overexpression of full-length PcrZ in R. sphaeroides affects expression of a small subset of genes, most of them with a function in photosynthesis. Some mRNAs from the photosynthetic gene cluster were predicted to be putative PcrZ targets and results from an in vivo reporter system support these predictions. Our data reveal a negative effect of PcrZ on expression of its target mRNAs. Thus, PcrZ counteracts the redox-dependent induction of photosynthesis genes, which is mediated by protein regulators. Because PrrA directly activates photosynthesis genes and at the same time PcrZ, which negatively affects photosynthesis gene expression, this is one of the rare cases of an incoherent feed-forward loop including an sRNA. Our data identified PcrZ as a trans acting sRNA with a direct regulatory function in formation of photosynthetic complexes and provide a model for the control of photosynthesis gene expression by a regulatory network consisting of proteins and a small noncoding RNA.

  13. Structural basis of response regulator inhibition by a bacterial anti-activator protein.

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    Melinda D Baker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex interplay between the response regulator ComA, the anti-activator RapF, and the signaling peptide PhrF controls competence development in Bacillus subtilis. More specifically, ComA drives the expression of genetic competence genes, while RapF inhibits the interaction of ComA with its target promoters. The signaling peptide PhrF accumulates at high cell density and upregulates genetic competence by antagonizing the interaction of RapF and ComA. How RapF functions mechanistically to inhibit ComA activity and how PhrF in turn antagonizes the RapF-ComA interaction were unknown. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of RapF in complex with the ComA DNA binding domain. Along with biochemical and genetic studies, the X-ray crystal structure reveals how RapF mechanistically regulates ComA function. Interestingly, we found that a RapF surface mimics DNA to block ComA binding to its target promoters. Furthermore, RapF is a monomer either alone or in complex with PhrF, and it undergoes a conformational change upon binding to PhrF, which likely causes the dissociation of ComA from the RapF-ComA complex. Finally, we compare the structure of RapF complexed with the ComA DNA binding domain and the structure of RapH complexed with Spo0F. This comparison reveals that RapF and RapH have strikingly similar overall structures, and that they have evolved different, non-overlapping surfaces to interact with diverse cellular targets. To our knowledge, the data presented here reveal the first atomic level insight into the inhibition of response regulator DNA binding by an anti-activator. Compounds that affect the interaction of Rap and Rap-like proteins with their target domains could serve to regulate medically and commercially important phenotypes in numerous Bacillus species, such as sporulation in B. anthracis and sporulation and the production of Cry protein endotoxin in B. thuringiensis.

  14. A bacterial cytotoxin identifies the RhoA exchange factor Net1 as a key effector in the response to DNA damage.

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    Lina Guerra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure of adherent cells to DNA damaging agents, such as the bacterial cytolethal distending toxin (CDT or ionizing radiations (IR, activates the small GTPase RhoA, which promotes the formation of actin stress fibers and delays cell death. The signalling intermediates that regulate RhoA activation and promote cell survival are unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that the nuclear RhoA-specific Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF Net1 becomes dephosphorylated at a critical inhibitory site in cells exposed to CDT or IR. Expression of a dominant negative Net1 or Net1 knock down by iRNA prevented RhoA activation, inhibited the formation of stress fibers, and enhanced cell death, indicating that Net1 activation is required for this RhoA-mediated responses to genotoxic stress. The Net1 and RhoA-dependent signals involved activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38 and its downstream target MAPK-activated protein kinase 2. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data highlight the importance of Net1 in controlling RhoA and p38 MAPK mediated cell survival in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents and illustrate a molecular pathway whereby chronic exposure to a bacterial toxin may promote genomic instability.

  15. Propionibacterium acnes CAMP factor and host acid sphingomyelinase contribute to bacterial virulence: potential targets for inflammatory acne treatment.

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    Teruaki Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the progression of acne vulgaris, the disruption of follicular epithelia by an over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes permits the bacteria to spread and become in contact with various skin and immune cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated in the present study that the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson (CAMP factor of P. acnes is a secretory protein with co-hemolytic activity with sphingomyelinase that can confer cytotoxicity to HaCaT keratinocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The CAMP factor from bacteria and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase from the host cells were simultaneously present in the culture supernatant only when the cells were co-cultured with P. acnes. Either anti-CAMP factor serum or desipramine, a selective ASMase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the P. acnes-induced cell death of HaCaT and RAW264.7 cells. Intradermal injection of ICR mouse ears with live P. acnes induced considerable ear inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and an increase in cellular soluble ASMase. Suppression of ASMase by systemic treatment with desipramine significantly reduced inflammatory reaction induced by intradermal injection with P. acnes, suggesting the contribution of host ASMase in P. acnes-induced inflammatory reaction in vivo. Vaccination of mice with CAMP factor elicited a protective immunity against P. acnes-induced ear inflammation, indicating the involvement of CAMP factor in P. acnes-induced inflammation. Most notably, suppression of both bacterial CAMP factor and host ASMase using vaccination and specific antibody injection, respectively, cooperatively alleviated P. acnes-induced inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings envision a novel infectious mechanism by which P. acnes CAMP factor may hijack host ASMase to amplify bacterial virulence to degrade and invade host cells. This work has identified both CAMP factor and ASMase as potential molecular targets for the development of drugs

  16. Norepinephrine Regulates Condylar Bone Loss via Comorbid Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, K; Niu, L; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Li, X; Tay, F R; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Degenerative changes of condylar subchondral bone occur frequently in temporomandibular disorders. Although psychologic stresses and occlusal abnormalities have been implicated in temporomandibular disorder, it is not known if these risks represent synergistic comorbid factors that are involved in condylar subchondral bone degradation that is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system. In the present study, chronic immobilization stress (CIS), chemical sympathectomy, and unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) were sequentially applied in a murine model. Norepinephrine contents in the subjects' serum and condylar subchondral bone were detected by ELISA; bone and cartilage remodeling parameters and related gene expression in the subchondral bone were examined. Subchondral bone loss and increased subchondral bone norepinephrine level were observed in the CIS and UAC groups. These groups exhibited decreased bone mineral density, volume fraction, and bone formation rate; decreased expressions of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin; but increased trabecular separation, osteoclast number and surface, and RANKL expression. Combined CIS + UAC produced more severe subchondral bone loss, higher bone norepinephrine level, and decreased chondrocyte density and cartilage thickness when compared to CIS or UAC alone. Sympathectomy simultaneously prevented subchondral bone loss and decreased bone norepinephrine level in all experimental subgroups when compared to the vehicle-treated counterparts. Norepinephrine also decreased mRNA expression of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin by mesenchymal stem cells at 7 and 14 d of stimulation and increased the expression of RANKL and RANKL/OPG ratio by mesenchymal stem cells at 2 h. In conclusion, CIS and UAC synergistically promote condylar subchondral bone loss and cartilage degradation; such processes are partially regulated by norepinephrine within subchondral bone.

  17. Functional role of pyruvate kinase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus in acid tolerance and identification of its transcription factor by bacterial one-hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhengyuan; An, Haoran; Wang, Guohong; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2015-11-19

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus develops acid tolerance response when subjected to acid stress conditions, such as the induction of enzymes associated with carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, pyk gene encoding pyruvate kinase was over-expressed in heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the successful expression of this gene in NZ9000. The survival rate of Pyk-overproducing strain was 45-fold higher than the control under acid stress condition (pH 4.0). In order to determine the transcription factor (TF) which regulates the expression of pyk by bacterial one-hybrid, we constructed a TF library including 65 TFs of L. bulgaricus. Western blotting indicated that TFs in this library could be successfully expressed in host strains. Subsequently, the promoter of pfk-pyk operon in L. bulgaricus was identified by 5'-RACE PCR. The bait plasmid pH3U3-p01 carrying the deletion fragment of pfk-pyk promoter captured catabolite control protein A (CcpA) which could regulate the expression of pyk by binding to a putative catabolite-responsive element (5'-TGTAAGCCCTAACA-3') upstream the -35 region. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed the transcription of pyk was positively regulated by CcpA. This is the first report about identifying the TF of pyk in L. bulgaricus, which will provide new insight into the regulatory network.

  18. Identification of metabolism pathways directly regulated by sigma54 factor in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Wang, Guannan; Liu, Guiming; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2015-01-01

    Sigma54 (σ54) regulates nitrogen and carbon utilization in bacteria. Promoters that are σ54-dependent are highly conserved and contain short sequences located at the −24 and −12 positions upstream of the transcription initiation site. σ54 requires regulatory proteins known as bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) to activate gene transcription. We show that σ54 regulates the capacity to grow on various nitrogen sources using a Bacillus thuringiensis HD73 mutant lacking the sigL gene encoding σ54 (ΔsigL). A 2-fold-change cutoff and a false discovery rate cutoff of P < 0.05 were used to analyze the DNA microarray data, which revealed 255 genes that were downregulated and 121 that were upregulated in the ΔsigL mutant relative to the wild-type HD73 strain. The σ54 regulon (stationary phase) was characterized by DNA microarray, bioinformatics, and functional assay; 16 operons containing 47 genes were identified whose promoter regions contain the conserved −12/−24 element and whose transcriptional activities were abolished or reduced in the ΔsigL mutant. Eight σ54-dependent transcriptional bEBPs were found in the Bt HD73 genome, and they regulated nine σ54-dependent promoters. The metabolic pathways activated by σ54 in this process have yet to be identified in Bacillus thuringiensis; nonetheless, the present analysis of the σ54 regulon provides a better understanding of the physiological roles of σ factors in bacteria. PMID:26029175

  19. Homeostatic regulation of supercoiling sensitivity coordinates transcription of the bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Nicolas; Mavathur, Ramesh; Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2006-07-01

    Regulation of cellular growth implies spatiotemporally coordinated programmes of gene transcription. A central question, therefore, is how global transcription is coordinated in the genome. The growth of the unicellular organism Escherichia coli is associated with changes in both the global superhelicity modulated by cellular topoisomerase activity and the relative proportions of the abundant DNA-architectural chromatin proteins. Using a DNA-microarray-based approach that combines mutations in the genes of two important chromatin proteins with induced changes of DNA superhelicity, we demonstrate that genomic transcription is tightly associated with the spatial distribution of supercoiling sensitivity, which in turn depends on chromatin proteins. We further demonstrate that essential metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of growth respond distinctly to changes of superhelicity. We infer that a homeostatic mechanism organizing the supercoiling sensitivity is coordinating the growth-phase-dependent transcription of the genome.

  20. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  1. Specificity determinants for autoproteolysis of LexA, a key regulator of bacterial SOS mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Birdwell, L Dillon; Kohli, Rahul M

    2014-05-20

    Bacteria utilize the tightly regulated stress response (SOS) pathway to respond to a variety of genotoxic agents, including antimicrobials. Activation of the SOS response is regulated by a key repressor-protease, LexA, which undergoes autoproteolysis in the setting of stress, resulting in derepression of SOS genes. Remarkably, genetic inactivation of LexA's self-cleavage activity significantly decreases acquired antibiotic resistance in infection models and renders bacteria hypersensitive to traditional antibiotics, suggesting that a mechanistic study of LexA could help inform its viability as a novel target for combating acquired drug resistance. Despite structural insights into LexA, a detailed knowledge of the enzyme's protease specificity is lacking. Here, we employ saturation and positional scanning mutagenesis on LexA's internal cleavage region to analyze >140 mutants and generate a comprehensive specificity profile of LexA from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (LexAPa). We find that the LexAPa active site possesses a unique mode of substrate recognition. Positions P1-P3 prefer small hydrophobic residues that suggest specific contacts with the active site, while positions P5 and P1' show a preference for flexible glycine residues that may facilitate the conformational change that permits autoproteolysis. We further show that stabilizing the β-turn within the cleavage region enhances LexA autoproteolytic activity. Finally, we identify permissive positions flanking the scissile bond (P4 and P2') that are tolerant to extensive mutagenesis. Our studies shed light on the active site architecture of the LexA autoprotease and provide insights that may inform the design of probes of the SOS pathway.

  2. Expression of innate immune complement regulators on brain epithelial cells during human bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasque Philippe

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In meningitis, the cerebrospinal fluid contains high levels of innate immune molecules (e.g. complement which are essential to ward off the infectious challenge and to promote the infiltration of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes. However, epithelial cells of either the ependymal layer, one of the established niche for adult neural stem cells, or of the choroid plexus may be extremely vulnerable to bystander attack by cytotoxic and cytolytic complement components. Methods In this study, we assessed the capacity of brain epithelial cells to express membrane-bound complement regulators (ie, CD35, CD46, CD55 and CD59 in vitro and in situ by immunostaining of control and meningitis human brain tissue sections. Results Double immunofluorescence experiments for ependymal cell markers (GFAP, S100, ZO-1, E-cadherin and complement regulators indicated that the human ependymal cell line model was strongly positive for CD55, CD59 compared to weak stainings for CD46 and CD35. In tissues, we found that CD55 was weakly expressed in control choroid plexus and ependyma but was abundantly expressed in meningitis. Anti-CD59 stained both epithelia in apical location while increased CD59 staining was solely demonstrated in inflamed choroid plexus. CD46 and CD35 were not detected in control tissue sections. Conversely, in meningitis, the ependyma, subependyma and choroid plexus epithelia were strongly stained for CD46 and CD35. Conclusion This study delineates for the first time the capacity of brain ependymal and epithelial cells to respond to and possibly sustain the innate complement-mediated inflammatory insult.

  3. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses.

  4. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauger AR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexis R Mauger Endurance Research Group, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Kent, Chatham, UK Abstract: During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed "exercise-induced pain". Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. Keywords: pain, exercise-induced pain, discomfort, exercise performance, self-paced

  5. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  6. Secretion of a bacterial virulence factor is driven by the folding of a C-terminal segment

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Janine H.; Tian, Pu; Ieva, Raffaele; Dautin, Nathalie; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporters are bacterial virulence factors consisting of an N-terminal “passenger domain” that is secreted in a C- to-N-terminal direction and a C-terminal “β domain” that resides in the outer membrane (OM). Although passenger domain secretion does not appear to use ATP, the energy source for this reaction is unknown. Here, we show that efficient secretion of the passenger domain of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 autotransporter EspP requires the stable folding of a C-terminal ≈17-kDa pas...

  7. Up-regulation of intestinal vascular endothelial growth factor by Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Cane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis has been recently described as a novel component of inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been found increased in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis mucosa. To question whether a pro-inflammatory Escherichia coli could regulate the expression of VEGF in human intestinal epithelial cells, we examine the response of cultured human colonic T84 cells to infection by E. coli strain C1845 that belongs to the typical Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli family (Afa/Dr DAEC. METHODOLOGY: VEGF mRNA expression was examined by Northern blotting and q-PCR. VEGF protein levels were assayed by ELISA and its bioactivity was analysed in endothelial cells. The bacterial factor involved in VEGF induction was identified using recombinant E. coli expressing Dr adhesin, purified Dr adhesin and lipopolysaccharide. The signaling pathway activated for the up-regulation of VEGF was identified using a blocking monoclonal anti-DAF antibody, Western blot analysis and specific pharmacological inhibitors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C1845 bacteria induce the production of VEGF protein which is bioactive. VEGF is induced by adhering C1845 in both a time- and bacteria concentration-dependent manner. This phenomenon is not cell line dependent since we reproduced this observation in intestinal LS174, Caco2/TC7 and INT407 cells. Up-regulation of VEGF production requires: (1 the interaction of the bacterial F1845 adhesin with the brush border-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55 acting as a bacterial receptor, and (2 the activation of a Src protein kinase upstream of the activation of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrate that a Afa/Dr DAEC strain induces an adhesin-dependent activation of DAF signaling that leads to the up-regulation of bioactive VEGF in cultured human intestinal cells. Thus, these results suggest a link between an entero-adherent, pro

  8. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  9. The DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor functions as a regulator of epidermal innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-16 transcription factor is critical for diverse biological processes, particularly longevity and stress resistance. Disruption of the DAF-2 signaling cascade promotes DAF-16 activation, and confers resistance to killing by pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. However, daf-16 mutants exhibit similar sensitivity to these bacteria as wild-type animals, suggesting that DAF-16 is not normally activated by these bacterial pathogens. In this report, we demonstrate that DAF-16 can be directly activated by fungal infection and wounding in wild-type animals, which is independent of the DAF-2 pathway. Fungal infection and wounding initiate the Gαq signaling cascade, leading to Ca(2+ release. Ca(2+ mediates the activation of BLI-3, a dual-oxidase, resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS then activate DAF-16 through a Ste20-like kinase-1/CST-1. Our results indicate that DAF-16 in the epidermis is required for survival after fungal infection and wounding. Thus, the EGL-30-Ca(2+-BLI-3-CST-1-DAF-16 signaling represents a previously unknown pathway to regulate epidermal damage response.

  10. Forkhead transcription factor foxe1 regulates chondrogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Chisako; Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2009-12-15

    Forkhead transcription factor (Fox) e1 is a causative gene for Bamforth-Lazarus syndrome, which is characterized by hypothyroidism and cleft palate. Applying degenerate polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the conserved forkhead domain, we identified zebrafish foxe1 (foxe1). Foxe1 is expressed in the thyroid, pharynx, and pharyngeal skeleton during development; strongly expressed in the gill and weakly expressed in the brain, eye, and heart in adult zebrafish. A loss of function of foxe1 by morpholino antisense oligo (MO) exhibited abnormal craniofacial development, shortening of Meckel's cartilage and the ceratohyals, and suppressed chondrycytic proliferation. However, at 27 hr post fertilization, the foxe1 MO-injected embryos showed normal dlx2, hoxa2, and hoxb2 expression, suggesting that the initial steps of pharyngeal skeletal development, including neural crest migration and specification of the pharyngeal arch occurred normally. In contrast, at 2 dpf, a severe reduction in the expression of sox9a, colIIaI, and runx2b, which play roles in chondrocytic proliferation and differentiation, was observed. Interestingly, fgfr2 was strongly upregulated in the branchial arches of the foxe1 MO-injected embryos. Unlike Foxe1-null mice, normal thyroid development in terms of morphology and thyroid-specific marker expression was observed in foxe1 MO-injected zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our results indicate that Foxe1 plays an important role in chondrogenesis during development of the pharyngeal skeleton in zebrafish, probably through regulation of fgfr2 expression. Furthermore, the roles reported for FOXE1 in mammalian thyroid development may have been acquired during evolution.

  11. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  12. Sestrin 2 protein regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) expression by modulating proteasomal and Nrf2 transcription factor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasovic, Ana; Kurrle, Nina; Sürün, Duran; Heidler, Juliana; Husnjak, Koraljka; Poser, Ina; Schnütgen, Frank; Scheibe, Susan; Seimetz, Michael; Jaksch, Peter; Hyman, Anthony; Weissmann, Norbert; von Melchner, Harald

    2015-04-10

    We recently identified the antioxidant protein Sestrin 2 (Sesn2) as a suppressor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) signaling and Pdgfrβ signaling as an inducer of lung regeneration and injury repair. Here, we identified Sesn2 and the antioxidant gene inducer nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as positive regulators of proteasomal function. Inactivation of Sesn2 or Nrf2 induced reactive oxygen species-mediated proteasomal inhibition and Pdgfrβ accumulation. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic HeLa and mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged Sesn2 at nearly endogenous levels, we also showed that Sesn2 physically interacts with 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and Nrf2 albeit under different reductive conditions. Overall, we characterized a novel, redox-sensitive Sesn2/Pdgfrβ suppressor pathway that negatively interferes with lung regeneration and is up-regulated in the emphysematous lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  13. Short communication: bulk tank total bacterial count in dairy sheep: factors of variation and relationship with somatic cell count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, C; Carriedo, J A; Beneitez, E; Juárez, M T; De La Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F

    2006-02-01

    A total of 9,353 records for bulk tank total bacterial count (TBC) were obtained over 1 yr from 315 dairy ewe flocks belonging to the Sheep Improvement Consortium (CPO) in Castilla-León (Spain). Analysis of variance showed significant effects of flock, breed, month within flock, dry therapy, milking type and installation, and logSCC on logTBC. Flock and month within flock were important variation factors as they accounted for 22.0 and 22.1% of the variance, respectively. Considerable repeatability values were obtained for both random factors. Hand milking and bucket-milking machines elicited highest logTBC (5.31), whereas parlor systems with looped milkline (5.01) elicited the lowest logTBC. The implementation of dry therapy practice (5.12) showed significantly lower logTBC than when not used (5.25). Variability in logTBC among breeds ranged from 5.24 (Awassi) to 5.07 (Churra). However, clinical outbreaks of contagious agalactia did not increase TBC significantly. A statistically significant relationship was found between logTBC and logSCC, the correlation coefficient between the variables being r = 0.23. Programs for improving milk hygiene should be implemented for both total bacterial count and somatic cell count variables at the same time.

  14. Identification of ClpP substrates in Caulobacter crescentus reveals a role for regulated proteolysis in bacterial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nowsheen H; Vass, Robert H; Stoddard, Patrick R; Shin, Dong K; Chien, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Energy-dependent proteases ensure the timely removal of unwanted proteins in a highly selective fashion. In Caulobacter crescentus, protein degradation by the ClpXP protease is critical for cell cycle progression; however, only a handful of substrates are currently known. Here, we use a trapping approach to identify putative substrates of the ClpP associated proteases in C. crescentus. Biochemical validation of several of these targets reveals specific protease recognition motifs and suggests a need for ClpXP-specific degradation beyond degradation of known cell cycle regulators. We focus on a particular instance of regulated proteolysis in Caulobacter by exploring the role of ClpXP in degrading the stalk synthesis transcription factor TacA. We show that TacA degradation is controlled during the cell cycle dependent on the ClpXP regulator CpdR and that stabilization of TacA increases degradation of another ClpXP substrate, CtrA, while restoring deficiencies associated with prolific CpdR activity. Together, our work reveals a number of new validated ClpXP substrates, clarifies rules of protease substrate selection, and demonstrates how regulated protein degradation is critical for Caulobacter development and cell cycle progression.

  15. Exploring the factors influencing clinical students' self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, J.J.; Helmich, E.; Teunissen, P.W.; Berg, J.W. Ten; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Jaarsma, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The importance of self-regulated learning (SRL) has been broadly recognised by medical education institutions and regulatory bodies. Supporting the development of SRL skills has proven difficult because self-regulation is a complex interactive process and we know relatively little about

  16. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection.

  17. Predicting the pathway involved in post-translational modification of Elongation factor P in a subset of bacterial species

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    de Crécy-Lagard Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial elongation factor P (EF-P is strictly conserved in bacteria and essential for protein synthesis. It is homologous to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A. A highly conserved eIF5A lysine is modified into an unusual amino acid derived from spermidine, hypusine. Hypusine is absolutely required for eIF5A's role in translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous lysine of EF-P is also modified to a spermidine derivative in Escherichia coli. However, the biosynthesis pathway of this modification in the bacterial EF-P is yet to be elucidated. Presentation of the Hypothesis Here we propose a potential mechanism for the post-translational modification of EF-P. By using comparative genomic methods based on physical clustering and phylogenetic pattern analysis, we identified two protein families of unknown function, encoded by yjeA and yjeK genes in E. coli, as candidates for this missing pathway. Based on the analysis of the structural and biochemical properties of both protein families, we propose two potential mechanisms for the modification of EF-P. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis could be tested genetically by constructing a bacterial strain with a tagged efp gene. The tag would allow the purification of EF-P by affinity chromatography and the analysis of the purified protein by mass spectrometry. yjeA or yjeK could then be deleted in the efp tagged strain and the EF-P protein purified from each mutant analyzed by mass spectrometry for the presence or the absence of the modification. This hypothesis can also be tested by purifying the different components (YjeK, YjeA and EF-P and reconstituting the pathway in vitro. Implication of the hypothesis The requirement for a fully modified EF-P for protein synthesis in certain bacteria implies the presence of specific post-translational modification mechanism in these organisms. All of the 725 bacterial genomes analyzed, possess an efp gene

  18. Sae regulator factor impairs the response to photodynamic inactivation mediated by Toluidine blue in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gándara, Lautaro; Mamone, Leandro; Dotto, Cristian; Buzzola, Fernanda; Casas, Adriana

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) involves the combined use of light and a photosensitizer, which, in the presence of oxygen, originates cytotoxic species capable of inactivating bacteria. Since the emergence of multi-resistant bacterial strains is becoming an increasing public health concern, PDI becomes an attractive choice. The aim of this work was to study the differential susceptibility to Toluidine blue (TB) mediated PDI (TB-PDI) of S. aureus mutants (RN6390 and Newman backgrounds) for different key regulators of virulence factors related to some extent to oxidative stress. Complete bacteria eradication of planktonic cultures of RN6390 S. aureus photosensitized with 13μM TB was obtained upon illumination with a low light dose of 4.2J/cm(2) from a non-coherent light source. Similarly, complete cell death was achieved applying 1.3μM TB and 19J/cm(2) light dose, showing that higher light doses can lead to equal cell death employing low photosensitizer concentrations. Interestingly, RN6390 in planktonic culture responded significantly better to TB-PDI than the Newman strain. We showed that deficiencies in rsbU, mgrA (transcription factors related to stress response) or agr (quorum sensing system involved in copper resistance to oxidative stress) did not modify the response of planktonic S. aureus to PDI. On the other hand, the two component system sae impaired the response to TB-PDI through a mechanism not related to the Eap adhesin. More severe conditions were needed to inactivate S. aureus biofilms (0.5mM TB, 157J/cm(2) laser light). In mutant sae biofilms, strain dependant differential susceptibilities are not noticed.

  19. A growth-dependent transcription initiation factor (TIF-IA) interacting with RNA polymerase I regulates mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, A; Pfleiderer, C; Rosenbauer, H; Grummt, I

    1990-09-01

    Control of mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis in response to extracellular signals is mediated by TIF-IA, a regulatory factor whose amount or activity correlates with cell proliferation. Factor TIF-IA interacts with RNA polymerase I (pol I), thus converting it into a transcriptionally active holoenzyme, which is able to initiate specifically at the rDNA promoter in the presence of the other auxiliary transcription initiation factors, designated TIF-IB, TIF-IC and UBF. With regard to several criteria, the growth-dependent factor TIF-IA behaves like a bacterial sigma factor: (i) it associates physically with pol I, (ii) it is required for initiation of transcription, (iii) it is present in limiting amounts and (iv) under certain salt conditions, it is chromatographically separable from the polymerase. In addition, evidence is presented that dephosphorylation of pol I abolishes in vitro transcription initiation from the ribosomal gene promoter without significantly affecting the polymerizing activity of the enzyme at nonspecific templates. The involvement of both a regulatory factor and post-translational modification of the transcribing enzyme provides an efficient and versatile mechanism of rDNA transcription regulation which enables the cell to adapt ribosome synthesis rapidly to a variety of extracellular signals.

  20. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is up-regulated in bacterial endocarditis and binds to components of vegetations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Helmke, Burkhard M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacterial endocarditis is a frequent infectious cardiac disease, especially in patients with congenital or acquired heart defects. It is characterized by bacterial colonization of the heart valves and the appearance of vegetations consisting of fibrin, blood cells, and bacteria. The gl...

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis and Other Vulvovaginitis in a Population of Sexually Active Adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Elizabeth Moreira Mascarenhas; Márcia Sacramento Cunha Machado; Bruno Fernando Borges da Costa e Silva; Rodrigo Fernandes Weyll Pimentel; Tatiana Teixeira Ferreira; Fernanda Maria Silva Leoni; Maria Fernanda Rios Grassi

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and genital candidiasis are considered the main etiologies of vulvovaginitis. Few studies estimate the prevalence of vulvovaginitis among adolescents, especially in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and main risk factors associated with bacterial vaginosis and genital infection by C. albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis among a group of adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. One hundred sexually active adolescents followed at an adolesc...

  2. Neutrophils from p40phox-/- mice exhibit severe defects in NADPH oxidase regulation and oxidant-dependent bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellson, Chris D; Davidson, Keith; Ferguson, G John; O'Connor, Rod; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2006-08-07

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex plays a critical role in the antimicrobial functions of the phagocytic cells of the immune system. The catalytic core of this oxidase consists of a complex between gp91(phox), p22(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), p40(phox), and rac-2. Mutations in each of the phox components, except p40(phox), have been described in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), defining their essential role in oxidase function. We sought to establish the role of p40(phox) by investigating the NADPH oxidase responses of neutrophils isolated from p40(phox-/-) mice. In the absence of p40(phox), the expression of p67(phox) is reduced by approximately 55% and oxidase responses to tumor necrosis factor alpha/fibrinogen, immunoglobulin G latex beads, Staphylococcus aureus, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, and zymosan were reduced by approximately 97, 85, 84, 75, and 30%, respectively. The defect in ROS production by p40(phox-/-) neutrophils in response to S. aureus translated into a severe, CGD-like defect in the killing of this organism both in vitro and in vivo, defining p40(phox) as an essential component in bacterial killing.

  3. Possible interaction between the bacterial transcription factor ArtA and the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Sachiko

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase III (RNAP III) transcribes tRNA genes and short interspersed elements that have internal promoters consisting of A- and B-blocks. The B-block binding subunit of the transcription initiation factor TFIIIC binds to the B-block. The mobile bacterial insertion sequence (IS) 1 contains a RNAP III promoter-like sequence, which stimulates bacterial transcription along with the bacterial ArtA protein. Here, the DNA-binding ability of ArtA was examined in vitro using a simple, newly developed method. Various DNA fragments, including RNAP III promoter fragments, were separately incubated with purified ArtA, and then loaded onto a polyacrylamide gel. Since DNAs bound by ArtA remain in the gel wells during electrophoresis, SDS was added into the wells at the electrophoresis halfway point. It was hypothesized that SDS would dissociate the DNA-ArtA complexes in the wells, and then the DNAs would begin to migrate. In fact, new bands appeared in all of the lanes at similar intensities, indicating that ArtA binds nonspecifically to DNA. Therefore, labeled wild-type RNAP III promoter fragments were incubated with either the unlabeled wild-type or mutant fragments and ArtA, and electrophoresed. The B-block(-like) sequences of IS1, a human Alu element, and an anuran tRNA gene were important for binding to ArtA. Additionally, in silico analyses revealed the presence of the RNAP III promoter-like structures in the IS1 isoforms and the IS3 family elements. These results suggest the presence of parts of the RNAP III transcription machinery in bacteria, and might imply that its prototype existed in the common ancestor.

  4. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Lomada, Santosh Kumar; Tomar, Archana; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-11-01

    Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named Xanthomonas iron binding regulator) of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon's involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in Xanthomonads in

  5. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone.

  6. Bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm lipocalin 2 induce hypoxia inducible factor 1α and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in cultured respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Victoria I; Lenio, Steven; Kuick, Rork; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Shah, Yatrik M; Bachman, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Iron is essential for many cellular processes and is required by bacteria for replication. To acquire iron from the host, pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria secrete siderophores, including enterobactin (Ent). However, Ent is bound by the host protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), preventing bacterial reuptake of aferric or ferric Ent. Furthermore, the combination of Ent and Lcn2 (Ent+Lcn2) leads to enhanced secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to that induced by either stimulus alone. Modified or structurally distinct siderophores, including yersiniabactin (Ybt) and glycosylated Ent (GlyEnt, or salmochelin), deliver iron to bacteria despite the presence of Lcn2. We hypothesized that the robust immune response to Ent and Lcn2 requires iron chelation rather than the Ent+Lcn2 complex itself and also can be stimulated by Lcn2-evasive siderophores. To test this hypothesis, cultured respiratory epithelial cells were stimulated with combinations of purified siderophores and Lcn2 and analyzed by gene expression microarrays, quantitative PCR, and cytokine immunoassays. Ent caused HIF-1α protein stabilization, induced the expression of genes regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and repressed genes involved in cell cycle and DNA replication, whereas Lcn2 induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation by excess Ent or Ybt significantly increased Lcn2-induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6, and CCL20. Stabilization of HIF-1α was sufficient to enhance Lcn2-induced IL-6 secretion. These data indicate that respiratory epithelial cells can respond to bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm Lcn2 binding by increasing proinflammatory cytokine production.

  7. Risk factors and clinical outcomes of bacterial and fungal scleritis at a tertiary eye care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadesh C Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Surgery is a major risk factor for infectious scleritis in our series. Fungus was the most common organism isolated. Thorough debridement and intensive use of medications have improved the outcome.

  8. Uranium isotopic fractionation factors during U(VI) reduction by bacterial isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Sanford, Robert A.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2014-07-01

    We experimentally determined the magnitude of uranium isotopic fractionation induced by U(VI) reduction by metal reducing bacterial isolates. Our results indicate that microbial U(VI) reduction induces isotopic fractionation; heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) partition into the solid U(IV) products. The magnitudes of isotopic fractionation (expressed as ε = 1000‰ * (α-1)) for 238U/235U were 0.68‰ ± 0.05‰ and 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰ for Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and strain IFRC-N, respectively. The ε values for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain FRC-W, strain FRC-R5, a novel Shewanella isolate, and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1 were 0.72‰ ± 0.15‰, 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰, 0.96‰ ± 0.16‰ and 0.86‰ ± 0.06‰, respectively. Our results show that the maximum ε values of ∼1.0‰ were obtained with low biomass (∼107 cells/mL) and low electron donor concentrations (∼500 μM). These results provide an initial assessment of 238U/235U shifts induced by microbially-mediated U(VI) reduction, which is needed as 238U/235U data are increasingly applied as redox indicators in various geochemical settings.

  9. EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-04-30

    Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results.

  10. Aptamers to the sigma factor mimic promoter recognition and inhibit transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-08

    Promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process involving multiple protein-DNA interactions and several structural and kinetic intermediates which remain only partially characterized. We used single-stranded DNA aptamers containing specific promoter motifs to probe the interactions of the Thermus aquaticus RNAP σ(A) subunit with the -10 promoter element in the absence of other parts of the promoter complex. The aptamer binding decreased intrinsic fluorescence of the σ subunit, likely as a result of interactions between the -10 element and conserved tryptophan residues of the σ DNA-binding region 2. By monitoring these changes, we demonstrated that DNA binding proceeds through a single rate-limiting step resulting in formation of very stable complexes. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of the σ(A) subunit increased the rate of aptamer binding while replacement of this domain with an unrelated N-terminal region 1.1 from the Escherichia coli σ(70) subunit restored the original kinetics of σ-aptamer interactions. The results demonstrate that the key step in promoter recognition can be modelled in a simple σ-aptamer system and reveal that highly divergent N-terminal domains similarly modulate the DNA-binding properties of the σ subunit. The aptamers efficiently suppressed promoter-dependent transcription initiation by the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase, suggesting that they may be used for development of novel transcription inhibitors.

  11. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  12. Transcription Factor Families Regulate the Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one member of each of three transcription factor families - MYC, MYB and WD40. These transcription factors form a complex that binds to structural gene promoters, thereby modulating gene expression. Capsicum annuum display...

  13. ATF2, a paradigm of the multifaceted regulation of transcription factors in biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory; Ronai, Ze'ev; Lau, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Stringent transcriptional regulation is crucial for normal cellular biology and organismal development. Perturbations in the proper regulation of transcription factors can result in numerous pathologies, including cancer. Thus, understanding how transcription factors are regulated and how they are dysregulated in disease states is key to the therapeutic targeting of these factors and/or the pathways that they regulate. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) has been studied in a number of developmental and pathological conditions. Recent findings have shed light on the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that influence ATF2 function, and thus, the transcriptional programs coordinated by ATF2. Given our current knowledge of its multiple levels of regulation and function, ATF2 represents a paradigm for the mechanistic complexity that can regulate transcription factor function. Thus, increasing our understanding of the regulation and function of ATF2 will provide insights into fundamental regulatory mechanisms that influence how cells integrate extracellular and intracellular signals into a genomic response through transcription factors. Characterization of ATF2 dysfunction in the context of pathological conditions, particularly in cancer biology and response to therapy, will be important in understanding how pathways controlled by ATF2 or other transcription factors might be therapeutically exploited. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently known upstream regulators and downstream targets of ATF2.

  14. The chloroplast transcription apparatus from mustard (Sinapis alba L.). Evidence for three different transcription factors which resemble bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, K; Eisermann, A; Link, G

    1991-05-23

    A chloroplast protein fraction with sigma-like activity [Bülow, S. & Link, G. (1988) Plant Mol. Biol. 10, 349-357], was further purified and characterized. Chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-300 led to the separation of three sigma-like factors (SLF) polypeptides with Mr 67,000 (SLF67), 52,000 (SLF52) and 29,000 (SLF29). None of these polypeptides bind to DNA itself, but each one confers enhanced binding and transcriptional activity when added to Escherichia coli RNA-polymerase core enzyme and DNA fragments carrying a chloroplast promoter. SLF67, SLF52, and SLF29 differ in their ionic-strength requirements for activity. They each mediate the binding to promoters of the chloroplast genes psbA, trnQ, and rps16, with different efficiencies. It is suggested that chloroplast transcription in vivo might be controlled at least in part by these functionally distinct factors.

  15. Identification of Telomerase Components and Telomerase Regulating Factors in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    required for telomere function. To further explore the mechanism of telomere replication, I identified CDCl3 and EST2 interacting proteins via yeast two...hybrid screens. Characterization of the EST2 interacting proteins may reveal additional telomerase components or regulators. STNl, a high-copy

  16. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor G

  17. Manageable risk factors associated with bacterial and coliform counts in unpasteurized bulk milk in Flemish dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepers, S; Zrimšek, P; Passchyn, P; De Vliegher, S

    2014-01-01

    Associations between herd management practices and both bacterial counts (BC) and coliform counts (CC) from 254 and 242 dairy herds in Flanders (Belgium), respectively, were studied. Data were analyzed using multivariable, multilevel linear regression analysis, allowing variance components analyses. Both BC and CC fluctuated throughout the year, although the milk quality parameters followed an opposite pattern. Bacterial count values decreased with each increase of the cleaning frequency of the cubicles (once per week, once per day, twice per day, or more than twice per day) between January and March. Herds with a conventional milking parlor had substantially lower BC than herds where the cows were milked using an automatic milking system. Lower BC were observed when the milking parlor was equipped with an automatic cluster removal system, when premilking teat disinfection was applied, when the dry cows were supplemented with a mix of minerals and vitamins, and when the teats were prepared either first wet and dried or via an automatic milking system. Milking cows with a high-pipeline milking parlor setup or with an automatic milking system was associated with substantially higher CC values. Herds where prepartum heifers were often treated with antimicrobials before calving had a lower CC than farms where heifers were either not or only rarely treated. Most variation in BC and CC resided at the herd level rather than at the observation level, indicating that management is important in the control of both BC and CC. Still, only a small proportion of the total variance was explained by factors capturing information related to the milking, herd health, and dry cow management, which suggests that the bacteriological milk quality and, in particular, CC is primarily driven by other factors than the ones included in this study.

  18. Jasmonate induction of the monoterpene linalool confers resistance to rice bacterial blight and its biosynthesis is regulated by JAZ protein in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shiduku; Hosokawa-Shinonaga, Yumi; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Yamada, Shoko; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is involved in the regulation of host immunity in plants. Recently, we demonstrated that JA signalling has an important role in resistance to rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) in rice. Here, we report that many volatile compounds accumulate in response to exogenous application of JA, including the monoterpene linalool. Expression of linalool synthase was up-regulated by JA. Vapour treatment with linalool induced resistance to Xoo, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing linalool synthase were more resistance to Xoo, presumably due to the up-regulation of defence-related genes in the absence of any treatment. JA-induced accumulation of linalool was regulated by OsJAZ8, a rice jasmonate ZIM-domain protein involving the JA signalling pathway at the transcriptional level, suggesting that linalool plays an important role in JA-induced resistance to Xoo in rice.

  19. Two functional domains conserved in major and alternate bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragier, P; Parsot, C; Bouvier, J

    1985-07-22

    Sequences of the sigma factors of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were aligned with the sequences of two sigma-like proteins, HtpR, involved in the expression of heat-shock genes in E. coli, and SpoIIG, necessary for endospore formation in B. subtilis. An internal region is highly conserved in the four proteins and is proposed to be involved in binding of sigma factors to core RNA polymerase. The carboxy-terminal part of the four proteins presents the characteristic structure found in several prokaryotic DNA-binding proteins and is proposed to be involved in promoter recognition.

  20. A systematic approach for the assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors linked to biological stability of drinking water in distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, E. I.

    2016-01-06

    A systematic approach is presented for the assessment of (i) bacterial growth-controlling factors in drinking water and (ii) the impact of distribution conditions on the extent of bacterial growth in full-scale distribution systems. The approach combines (i) quantification of changes in autochthonous bacterial cell concentrations in full-scale distribution systems with (ii) laboratoryscale batch bacterial growth potential tests of drinking water samples under defined conditions. The growth potential tests were done by direct incubation of water samples, without modification of the original bacterial flora, and with flow cytometric quantification of bacterial growth. This method was shown to be reproducible (ca. 4% relative standard deviation) and sensitive (detection of bacterial growth down to 5 μg L-1 of added assimilable organic carbon). The principle of step-wise assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors was demonstrated on bottled water, shown to be primarily carbon limited at 133 (±18) × 103 cells mL-1 and secondarily limited by inorganic nutrients at 5,500 (±1,700) × 103 cells mL-1. Analysis of the effluent of a Dutch full-scale drinking water treatment plant showed (1) bacterial growth inhibition as a result of end-point chlorination, (2) organic carbon limitation at 192 (±72) × 103 cells mL-1 and (3) inorganic nutrient limitation at 375 (±31) × 103 cells mL-1. Significantly lower net bacterial growth was measured in the corresponding full-scale distribution system (176 (±25) × 103 cells mL-1) than in the laboratory-scale growth potential test of the same water (294 (±35) × 103 cells mL-1), highlighting the influence of distribution on bacterial growth. The systematic approach described herein provides quantitative information on the effect of drinking water properties and distribution system conditions on biological stability, which can assist water utilities in decision-making on treatment or distribution system improvements to

  1. Oxygen Tension Regulates the Expression of Angiogenesis Factor by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, David R.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Scheuenstuhl, Heinz; Halliday, Betty J.; Werb, Zena; Banda, Michael J.

    1983-09-01

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  2. Oxygen tension regulates the expression angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hyposic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  3. Oxygen tension regulated the expression of angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  4. The zinc finger transcription factor SlZFP2 negatively regulates abscisic acid biosynthesis and fruit ripening in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lin; Zhao, Fangfang; Li, Rong; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong; Xiao, Han

    2015-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant development and adaptation to environmental conditions. Although the ABA biosynthesis pathway in plants has been thoroughly elucidated, how ABA biosynthetic genes are regulated at the molecular level during plant development is less well understood. Here, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) zinc finger transcription factor SlZFP2 is involved in the regulation of ABA biosynthesis during fruit development. Overexpression of SlZFP2 resulted in multiple phenotypic changes, including more branches, early flowering, delayed fruit ripening, lighter seeds, and faster seed germination, whereas down-regulation of its expression caused problematic fruit set, accelerated ripening, and inhibited seed germination. SlZFP2 represses ABA biosynthesis during fruit development through direct suppression of the ABA biosynthetic genes NOTABILIS, SITIENS, and FLACCA and the aldehyde oxidase SlAO1. We also show that SlZFP2 regulates fruit ripening through transcriptional suppression of the ripening regulator COLORLESS NON-RIPENING. Using bacterial one-hybrid screening and a selected amplification and binding assay, we identified the (A/T)(G/C)TT motif as the core binding sequence of SlZFP2. Furthermore, by RNA sequencing profiling, we found that 193 genes containing the SlZFP2-binding motifs in their promoters were differentially expressed in 2 d post anthesis fruits between the SlZFP2 RNA interference line and its nontransgenic sibling. We propose that SlZFP2 functions as a repressor to fine-tune ABA biosynthesis during fruit development and provides a potentially valuable tool for dissecting the role of ABA in fruit ripening.

  5. Predisposing factors for bacterial vaginosis, treatment efficacy and pregnancy outcome among term deliveries; results from a preterm delivery study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsson Tell

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery but little is known about factors that could predict BV. We have analyzed if it is possible to identify a category of pregnant women that should be screened for BV, and if BV would alter the pregnancy outcome at term; we have also studied the treatment efficacy of clindamycin. Methods Prospective BV screening and treatment study of 9025 women in a geographically defined region in southeast Sweden. BV was defined as a modified Nugent score of 6 and above. Data was collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Women allocated to treatment were supplied with vaginal clindamycin cream. The main outcome goals were to identify factors that could predict BV. Results Vaginal smears were consistent with BV criteria in 9.3%. Logistic regression indicates a significant correlation between smoking and BV (p Conclusion BV is more than twice as common among smokers, and there is a higher prevalence in the younger age group. However these two markers for BV do not suffice as a tool for screening, and considering the lack of other risk factors associated with BV, screening of all pregnant women might be a strategy to follow in a program intended to reduce the number of preterm births.

  6. Cardiovascular risk factors regulate the expression of vascular endothelin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Sun, Yang; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    , cigarette smoking and hypertension (both strongly related to arterial wall injury), inflammation and atherosclerosis. The vascular endothelin receptors are a protein family that belongs to the larger family of G-protein coupled receptors. They mediate vascular smooth muscle contraction, proliferation......-activated protein kinase pathways and downstream transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB. Understanding the mechanisms involved in vascular endothelin receptor upregulation during cardiovascular disease may provide novel therapeutic approaches....

  7. Factors Influencing Self-Regulation in E-Learning 2.0: Confirmatory Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The importance of self-regulation in e-learning has been well noted in research. Relevant studies have shown a consistent positive correlation between learners' self-regulation and their success rate in e-learning. Increasing attention has been paid to developing learners' self-regulated abilities in e-learning. For students, what and how to learn…

  8. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  9. Augmentation of bacterial homeostasis by regulating in situ buffer capacity: Significance of total dissolved salts over acidogenic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Srikanth, S; Nikhil, G N

    2017-02-01

    During anaerobic fermentation, consequent accumulation of acidic fermented products leads to the failure of pH homeostasis. The present study aimed to comprehend the changes in buffering capacity with addition of sodium salts of hydroxide, bicarbonate and phosphate. The results showed notable augmentation in buffer capacity and cumulative hydrogen production (CHP) compared to control. The influential factor is the amount of undissociated volatile fatty acids released that affected the cell metabolism and consequently biohydrogen generation. It is inferred that among the tested salts, sodium bicarbonate has substantial buffering capacity (β, 0.035± mol) ensuing maximum CHP (468± mL). Besides, bioelectrochemical analysis revealed variations in redox currents that aligned with biohydrogen production. The study provides valuable information on the role of inorganic dissolved salts that would be required to regulate H2 generation and acidogenesis in the aspects of acid-gas phase system.

  10. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA, peptidoglycan (PGN, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, staphylococcal protein A (SPA, α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1. Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold and HKSA (7.3-fold, in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis.

  11. Influences of environmental factors on bacterial extracellular polymeric substances production in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Peng, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Bioclogging of natural porous media occurs frequently under a wide range of conditions. It may influence the performance of permeable reactive barrier and constructed wetland. It is also one of the factors that determine the effect of artificial groundwater recharge and in situ bioremediation process. In this study, a series of percolation column experiments were conducted to simulate bioclogging process in porous media. The predominant bacteria in porous media which induced clogging were identified to be Methylobacterium, Janthinobacterium, Yersinia, Staphylococcus and Acidovorax, most of which had been shown to effectively produce viscous extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The column in which EPS production was maximized also coincided with the largest reduction in saturated hydraulic conductivity of porous media. In addition, carbon concentration was the most significant factor to affect polysaccharide, protein and EPS secretion, followed by phosphorus concentration and temperature. The coupled effect of carbon and phosphorus concentration was also very important to stimulate polysaccharide and EPS production.

  12. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals.

  13. Role of bacterial and genetic factors in gastric cancer in Costa Rica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergio A Con; Hiroaki Takeuchi; Gil R Con-Chin; Vicky G Con-Chin; Nobufumi Yasuda; Reinaldo Con-Wong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate several risk factors for gastric cancer (GC) in Costa Rican regions with contrasting GC incidence rate (GCIR). METHODS: According to GCIR, 191 Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori)-positive patients were classified into groups A (high GCIR, n = 101) and B (low GCIR, n = 90). Human DNA obtained from biopsy specimens was used in the determination of polymorphisms of the genes coding for interleukin (IL)-1o play a major role in GCIR variability in Costa Rica.

  14. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  15. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  16. Mechanism for regulation of the putrescine utilization pathway by the transcription factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations.

  17. Regulation of mechano growth factor in skeletal muscle and heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottens, M.

    2010-01-01

    The mechano growth factor (MGF) is expressed in mechanically overloaded skeletal muscle. MGF was discovered in 1996 as an alternative splice product of the IGF-1 gene. Since then, its significance has been investigated particularly in skeletal muscle, because the local expression of MGF could provid

  18. New sides of an old factor: TFIIA : function and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoiby, Torill

    2005-01-01

    TFIIA was originally identified as one of the general transcription factors, activating transcription by stabilizing TBP binding to DNA and through functioning as a co-activator and anti-repressor. Its classification as such was recently disputed by observations showing that TFIIA is involved in tra

  19. Enhancement of Methacholine-Evoked Tracheal Contraction Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides Depends on Epithelium and Tumor Necrosis Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Secher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs induce an acute tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α- dependent inflammatory response in the murine airways mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 via the myeloid differentiation MyD88 adaptor protein pathway. However, the contractile response of the bronchial smooth muscle and the role of endogenous TNFα in this process have been elusive. We determined the in vivo respiratory pattern of C57BL/6 mice after intranasal LPS administration with or without the presence of increasing doses of methacholine (MCh. We found that LPS administration altered the basal and MCh-evoked respiratory pattern that peaked at 90 min and decreased thereafter in the next 48 h, reaching basal levels 7 days later. We investigated in controlled ex vivo condition the isometric contraction of isolated tracheal rings in response to MCh cholinergic stimulation. We observed that preincubation of the tracheal rings with LPS for 90 min enhanced the subsequent MCh-induced contractile response (hyperreactivity, which was prevented by prior neutralization of TNFα with a specific antibody. Furthermore, hyperreactivity induced by LPS depended on an intact epithelium, whereas hyperreactivity induced by TNFα was well maintained in the absence of epithelium. Finally, the enhanced contractile response to MCh induced by LPS when compared with control mice was not observed in tracheal rings from TLR4- or TNF- or TNF-receptor-deficient mice. We conclude that bacterial endotoxin-mediated hyperreactivity of isolated tracheal rings to MCh depends upon TLR4 integrity that signals the activation of epithelium, which release endogenous TNFα.

  20. Fibronectin in the ascitic fluid of cirrhotic patients: correlation with biochemical risk factors for the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.A. Mesquita

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhotic patients (23 with alcoholic cirrhosis, 5 with posthepatitic cirrhosis and 2 with cryptogenic cirrhosis with ascites and portal hypertension were studied and divided into two groups corresponding to high or low risk to develop spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP related to the concentration of total protein in the ascitic fluid (A-TP: group I (high risk: A-TP£1.5 g/dl and group II (low risk: A-TP>1.5 g/dl. Fibronectin (FN, C3 and C4 concentrations were measured by radial immunodiffusion while total protein was measured by the biuret method. The mean values (group I vs group II of C3 (12.59 ± 4.72 vs 24.53 ± 15.58 mg/dl, C4 (4.26 ± 3.87 vs 7.26 ± 4.14 mg/dl and FN (50.47 ± 12.49 vs 75.89 ± 24.70 mg/dl in the ascitic fluid were significantly lower (P<0.05 in the group considered to be at high risk for SBP. No significant difference was observed in the plasma/ascites fibronectin ratio (3.91 ± 1.21 vs 3.80 ± 1.26 or gradient (131.46 ± 64.01 vs 196.96 ± 57.38 between groups. Fibronectin in ascites was significantly correlated to C3 (r = 0.76, C4 (r = 0.58, total protein (r = 0.73 and plasma FN (r = 0.58 (P<0.05. The data suggest that the FN concentration in ascites is related to the opsonic capacity of this fluid, and that its concentration in the ascitic fluid may be a biochemical risk factor indicator for the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

  1. Accommodating the bacterial decoding release factor as an alien protein among the RNAs at the active site of the ribosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth S Poole; David J Young; Marjan E Askarian-Amiri; Debbie-Jane G Scarlett; Warren P Tate

    2007-01-01

    The decoding release factor (RF) triggers termination of protein synthesis by functionally mimicking a tRNA to span the decoding centre and the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the ribosome. Structurally, it must fit into a site crafted for a tRNA and surrounded by five other RNAs, namely the adjacent peptidyl tRNA carrying the completed polypeptide, the mRNA and the three rRNAs. This is achieved by extending a structural domain from the body of the protein that results in a critical conformational change allowing it to contact the PTC. A structural model of the bacterial termination complex with the accommodated RF shows that it makes close contact with the first, second and third bases of the stop codon in the mRNA with two separate loops of structure: the anticodon loop and the loop at the tip of helix a5. The anticodon loop also makes contact with the base following the stop codon that is known to strongly influence termination efficiency. It confirms the close contact of domain 3 of the protein with the key RNA structures of the PTC. The mRNA signal for termination includes sequences upstream as well as downstream of the stop codon, and this may reflect structural restrictions for specific combinations of tRNA and RF to be bound onto the ribosome together. An unbiased SELEX approach has been investigated as a tool to identify potential rRNA-binding contacts of the bacterial RF in its different binding conformations within the active centre of the ribosome.

  2. Yamanaka factors critically regulate the developmental signaling network in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong Liu; Jinyan Huang; Taotao Chen; Ying Wang; Shunmei Xin; Jian Li; Gang Pei; Jiuhong Kang

    2008-01-01

    Yamanaka factors (Oct3/4,Sox2,KIf4,c-Myc) are highly expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells,and their overexpression can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells,indicating that these factors regulate the developmental signaling network necessary for ES cell pluripotency.However,systemic analysis of the signaling pathways regulated by Yamanaka factors has not yet been fully described.In this study,we identified the target promoters of endogenous Yamanaka factors on a whole genome scale using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-on-chip in E14.1 mouse ES cells,and we found that these four factors co-occupied 58 promoters.Interestingly,when Oct4 and Sox2 were analyzed as core factors,Kif4 functioned to enhance the core factors for development regulation,whereas c-Myc seemed to play a distinct role in regulating metabolism.The pathway analysis revealed that Yamanaka factors collectively regulate a developmental signaling network composed of 16 developmental signaling pathways,nine of which represent earlier unknown pathways in ES cells,including apoptosis and cellcycle pathways.We further analyzed data from a recent study examining Yamanaka factors in mouse ES cells.Interestingly,this analysis also revealed 16 developmental signaling pathways,of which 14 pathways overlap with the ones revealed by this study,despite that the target genes and the signaling pathways regulated by each individual Yamanaka factor differ significantly between these two datasets.We suggest that Yamanaka factors critically regulate a developmental signaling network composed of approximately a dozen crucial developmental signaling pathways to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells and probably also to induce pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT with concurrent Tc99m scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES, and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p=0.026. Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS.

  4. Differential effects of β-catenin and NF-κB interplay in the regulation of cell proliferation, inflammation and tumorigenesis in response to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathy Chandrakesan

    Full Text Available Both β-catenin and NF-κB have been implicated in our laboratory as candidate factors in driving proliferation in an in vivo model of Citrobacter rodentium (CR-induced colonic crypt hyper-proliferation and hyperplasia. Herein, we test the hypothesis that β-catenin and not necessarily NF-κB regulates colonic crypt hyperplasia or tumorigenesis in response to CR infection. When C57Bl/6 wild type (WT mice were infected with CR, sequential increases in proliferation at days 9 and 12 plateaued off at day 19 and paralleled increases in NF-κB signaling. In Tlr4(-/- (KO mice, a sequential but sustained proliferation which tapered off only marginally at day 19, was associated with TLR4-dependent and independent increases in NF-κB signaling. Similarly, increases in either activated or total β-catenin in the colonic crypts of WT mice as early as day 3 post-infection coincided with cyclinD1 and c-myc expression and associated crypt hyperplasia. In KO mice, a delayed kinetics associated predominantly with increases in non-phosphorylated (active β-catenin coincided with increases in cyclinD1, c-myc and crypt hyperplasia. Interestingly, PKCζ-catalyzed Ser-9 phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β and not loss of wild type APC protein accounted for β-catenin accumulation and nuclear translocation in either strain. In vitro studies with Wnt2b and Wnt5a further validated the interplay between the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, respectively. When WT or KO mice were treated with nanoparticle-encapsulated siRNA to β-catenin (si-β-Cat, almost complete loss of nuclear β-catenin coincided with concomitant decreases in CD44 and crypt hyperplasia without defects in NF-κB signaling. si-β-Cat treatment to Apc(Min/+ mice attenuated CR-induced increases in β-catenin and CD44 that halted the growth of mutated crypts without affecting NF-κB signaling. The predominant β-catenin-induced crypt proliferation was further validated in a Castaneus strain (B6

  5. Fusidic acid targets elongation factor G in several stages of translocation on the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Holm, Mikael; Shiroyama, Ikue; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Pavlov, Michael; Sanyal, Suparna; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-02-06

    The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) targets elongation factor G (EF-G) and inhibits ribosomal peptide elongation and ribosome recycling, but deeper mechanistic aspects of FA action have remained unknown. Using quench flow and stopped flow experiments in a biochemical system for protein synthesis and taking advantage of separate time scales for inhibited (10 s) and uninhibited (100 ms) elongation cycles, a detailed kinetic model of FA action was obtained. FA targets EF-G at an early stage in the translocation process (I), which proceeds unhindered by the presence of the drug to a later stage (II), where the ribosome stalls. Stalling may also occur at a third stage of translocation (III), just before release of EF-G from the post-translocation ribosome. We show that FA is a strong elongation inhibitor (K50% ≈ 1 μm), discuss the identity of the FA targeted states, and place existing cryo-EM and crystal structures in their functional context.

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis and other vulvovaginitis in a population of sexually active adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Rita Elizabeth Moreira; Machado, Márcia Sacramento Cunha; Costa e Silva, Bruno Fernando Borges da; Pimentel, Rodrigo Fernandes Weyll; Ferreira, Tatiana Teixeira; Leoni, Fernanda Maria Silva; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and genital candidiasis are considered the main etiologies of vulvovaginitis. Few studies estimate the prevalence of vulvovaginitis among adolescents, especially in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and main risk factors associated with bacterial vaginosis and genital infection by C. albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis among a group of adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. One hundred sexually active adolescents followed at an adolescent gynecology clinic were included. Endocervical and vaginal samples were obtained during gynecological examination. Nugent criteria were applied for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. For Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis detection, culture in Sabouraud agar plates and Papanicolaou cytology were used, respectively. The mean age of participants was 16.6 ± 1.6 years. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was 20% (95% CI 12-28) and of genital infection by Candida was 22% (95% CI 14-30). Vaginal cytology detected Trichomonas vaginalis in one patient. Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use (P = 0.02) and multiple lifetime partners were statistically related to bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.01). The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and genital candidiasis was similar to other studies carried out among adolescents worldwide.

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis and Other Vulvovaginitis in a Population of Sexually Active Adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Elizabeth Moreira Mascarenhas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and genital candidiasis are considered the main etiologies of vulvovaginitis. Few studies estimate the prevalence of vulvovaginitis among adolescents, especially in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and main risk factors associated with bacterial vaginosis and genital infection by C. albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis among a group of adolescents from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. One hundred sexually active adolescents followed at an adolescent gynecology clinic were included. Endocervical and vaginal samples were obtained during gynecological examination. Nugent criteria were applied for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. For Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis detection, culture in Sabouraud agar plates and Papanicolaou cytology were used, respectively. The mean age of participants was 16.6±1.6 years. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was 20% (95% CI 12–28 and of genital infection by Candida was 22% (95% CI 14–30. Vaginal cytology detected Trichomonas vaginalis in one patient. Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use (P=0.02 and multiple lifetime partners were statistically related to bacterial vaginosis (P=0.01. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and genital candidiasis was similar to other studies carried out among adolescents worldwide.

  8. Effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on peritoneal defense mechanisms and bacterial translocation after administration of systemic chemotherapy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Celal Cerci; Cagri Ergin; Erol Eroglu; Canan Agalar; Fatih Agalar; Sureyya Cerci; Mahmut Bulbul

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on peritoneal defense mechanisms and bacterial translocation after systemic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) administration.METHODS: Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups; the control, 5-FU and 5-FU + G-CSF groups. We measured bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid, phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid, total peritoneal cell counts and cell types of peritoneal washing fluid.Bacterial translocation was quantified by mesenteric lymph node, liver and spleen tissue cultures.RESULTS: Systemic 5-FU reduced total peritoneal cell counts, neutrophils and macrophage numbers. It also altered bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. 5-FU also caused significant increase in frequencies of bacterial translocation at the liver and mesenteric lymph nodes. G-CSF decreased bacterial translocation, it significantly enhanced bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. It also increased total peritoneal cell counts, neutrophils and macrophage numbers.CONCLUSION: Systemic 5-FU administration caused bacterial translocation, decreased the bactericidal activity of peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid. G-CSF increased both bactericidal activity of the peritoneal fluid and phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid, and prevented the bacterial translocation. We conclude that intraperitoneal GCSF administration protects the effects of systemic 5-FU on peritoneal defense mechanisms.

  9. Transcription Factor Substitution during the Evolution of Fungal Ribosome Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hogues, Hervé; Lavoie, Hugo; Sellam, Adnane; Mangos, Maria; Roemer, Terry; Purisima, Enrico; Nantel, André; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Coordinated ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression is crucial for cellular viability, but the transcriptional network controlling this regulon has only been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used whole-genome transcriptional and location profiling to establish that, in Candida albicans, the RP regulon is controlled by the Myb domain protein Tbf1 working in conjunction with Cbf1. These two factors bind both the promoters of RP genes and the rDNA locus; Tbf1 acti...

  10. Crystal structure of the primary piRNA biogenesis factor Zucchini reveals similarity to the bacterial PLD endonuclease Nuc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Franka; Reuter, Michael; Kasaruho, Anisa; Schulz, Eike C; Pillai, Ramesh S; Barabas, Orsolya

    2012-12-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a gonad-specific class of small RNAs that associate with the Piwi clade of Argonaute proteins and play a key role in transposon silencing in animals. Since biogenesis of piRNAs is independent of the double-stranded RNA-processing enzyme Dicer, an alternative nuclease that can process single-stranded RNA transcripts has been long sought. A Phospholipase D-like protein, Zucchini, that is essential for piRNA processing has been proposed to be a nuclease acting in piRNA biogenesis. Here we describe the crystal structure of Zucchini from Drosophila melanogaster and show that it is very similar to the bacterial endonuclease, Nuc. The structure also reveals that homodimerization induces major conformational changes assembling the active site. The active site is situated on the dimer interface at the bottom of a narrow groove that can likely accommodate single-stranded nucleic acid substrates. Furthermore, biophysical analysis identifies protein segments essential for dimerization and provides insights into regulation of Zucchini's activity.

  11. 细菌染色体编码的反义RNA调节系统%The Regulation System of Antisense RNAs Encoded by Bacterial Chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚阳敏; 高宏

    2011-01-01

    The research progress on regulation systems of antisense RNAs in bacteria was reviewed from several aspects, including the attributes of antisense RNAs Regulation systems of antisense RNAs encoded by the chromosomes of Escherichia coli ,cyanobacteria and gram-positive bacteri-a,and ribonucleases III involved in antisense RNA regulation.%从反义RNA的特征、大肠杆菌、蓝细菌和革兰氏阳性菌染色体编码的反义RNA及其调控系统,以及与反义RNA调控相关的核糖核酸酶Ⅲ等方面介绍了细菌染色体编码的反义RNA调控系统.

  12. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of TLR/IL-1R signalling promotes Microbiota dependent resistance to colonization by enteric bacterial pathogens.

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    Ho Pan Sham

    Full Text Available Enteric bacterial pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium target the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC lining the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Despite expressing innate Toll-like receptors (TLRs, IEC are innately hypo-responsive to most bacterial products. This is thought to prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses against commensal bacteria, but it also limits antimicrobial responses by IEC to invading bacterial pathogens, potentially increasing host susceptibility to infection. One reason for the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC is their expression of Single Ig IL-1 Related Receptor (SIGIRR, a negative regulator of interleukin (IL-1 and TLR signaling. To address whether SIGIRR expression and the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC impacts on enteric host defense, Sigirr deficient (-/- mice were infected with the EHEC related pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Sigirr -/- mice responded with accelerated IEC proliferation and strong pro-inflammatory and antimicrobial responses but surprisingly, Sigirr -/- mice proved dramatically more susceptible to infection than wildtype mice. Through haematopoietic transplantation studies, it was determined that SIGIRR expression by non-haematopoietic cells (putative IEC regulated these responses. Moreover, the exaggerated responses were found to be primarily dependent on IL-1R signaling. Whilst exploring the basis for their susceptibility, Sigirr -/- mice were found to be unusually susceptible to intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium colonization, developing enterocolitis without the typical requirement for antibiotic based removal of competing commensal microbes. Strikingly, the exaggerated antimicrobial responses seen in Sigirr -/- mice were found to cause a rapid and dramatic loss of commensal microbes from the infected intestine. This depletion appears to reduce the ability of the microbiota to compete for space and nutrients (colonization resistance with the invading

  13. Role of environmental factors for the vertical distribution (0–1000 m of marine bacterial communities in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goutx

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterioplankton play a central role in energy and matter fluxes at the sea, yet the factors that constrain their variation in the marine systems are still poorly understood. Here we show the explanatory power of multivariate statistical analysis of bacterial community structures coupled with fine measurements of numerous environmental parameters. We gathered and analysed data from a one month sampling period from the surface to 1000 m depth at the JGOFS-DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea. This station is characterized by very poor horizontal advection currents what makes it an ideal model to test hypothesis on the causes of vertical stratification of bacterial communities. Capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP fingerprinting profiles analyzed using multivariate statistical methods demonstrated a vertical zonation of bacterial assemblages in three layers, above, in or just below the chlorophyll maximum and deeper, that remained stable during the entire sampling period. Through the use of direct gradient multivariate ordination analyses we demonstrate that a complex array of biogeochemical parameters is the driving force behinds bacterial community structure shifts in the water column. Physico-chemical parameters such as phosphate, nitrate, salinity and to a lesser extend temperature, oxygen, dissolve organic carbon and photosynthetically active radiation acted in synergy to explain bacterial assemblages changes with depth. Analysis of lipid biomarkers of the organic matter sources and fates suggested that bacterial community structure at the surface layers was in part explained by lipids from chloroplast origin. Further detailed analysis of pigment-based phytoplankton diversity gave evidence of a compartmentalized influence of several phytoplankton groups on bacterial community structure in the first 150 m depth. This study is probably the first example of an analysis employing a complex environmental

  14. Fusidic Acid Targets Elongation Factor G in Several Stages of Translocation on the Bacterial Ribosome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Holm, Mikael; Shiroyama, Ikue; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Pavlov, Michael; Sanyal, Suparna; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) targets elongation factor G (EF-G) and inhibits ribosomal peptide elongation and ribosome recycling, but deeper mechanistic aspects of FA action have remained unknown. Using quench flow and stopped flow experiments in a biochemical system for protein synthesis and taking advantage of separate time scales for inhibited (10 s) and uninhibited (100 ms) elongation cycles, a detailed kinetic model of FA action was obtained. FA targets EF-G at an early stage in the translocation process (I), which proceeds unhindered by the presence of the drug to a later stage (II), where the ribosome stalls. Stalling may also occur at a third stage of translocation (III), just before release of EF-G from the post-translocation ribosome. We show that FA is a strong elongation inhibitor (K50% ≈ 1 μm), discuss the identity of the FA targeted states, and place existing cryo-EM and crystal structures in their functional context. PMID:25451927

  15. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    While stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin 1 (Ucn1), a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous linea...

  16. The Influence of Demographic Risk Factors on Children's Behavioral Regulation in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Shannon B.; McClelland, Megan M.; Tominey, Shauna L.; Acock, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study examined the role of demographic risk factors in the development of children's behavioral regulation. We investigated whether being from a low-income family and being an English language learner (ELL) predicted behavioral regulation between prekindergarten and kindergarten. Results indicated that children from…

  17. JUNGBRUNNEN1, a Reactive Oxygen Species–Responsive NAC Transcription Factor, Regulates Longevity in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, A.; Devi Allu, A.; Garapati, P.; Siddiqui, H.; Dortay, H.; Zanor, M.I.; Amparo Asensi-Fabado, M.; Munne´ -Bosch, S.; Antonio, C.; Tohge, T.; Fernie, A.R.; Kaufmann, K.; Xue, G.P.; Mueller-Roeber, B.; Balazadeh, S.

    2012-01-01

    The transition from juvenility through maturation to senescence is a complex process that involves the regulation of longevity. Here, we identify JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1), a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced NAC transcription factor, as a central longevity regulator in Arabidopsis thaliana. JUB1 overexpre

  18. Age-Related Differences in Emotion Regulation Strategies: Examining the Role of Contextual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirda, Brittney; Valentine, Thomas R.; Aldao, Amelia; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing age is characterized by greater positive affective states. However, there is mixed evidence on the implementation of emotion regulation strategies across the life span. To clarify the discrepancies in the literature, we examined the modulating influence of contextual factors in understanding emotion regulation strategy use in older and…

  19. Transcription factors, sucrose, and sucrose metabolic genes interact to regulate potato phenylpropanoid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Much remains unknown about how transcription factors and sugars regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism in tuber crops like potato (Solanum tuberosum). Based on phylogeny and protein similarity to known regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism, 15 transcription factors were selected and their expression was compared in white, yellow, red, and purple genotypes with contrasting phenolic and anthocyanin profiles. Red and purple genotypes had increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activit...

  20. Aetiology and factors associated with bacterial diarrhoeal diseases amongst urban refugee children in Eastleigh, Kenya: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqo G. Boru

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kenya is home to over 400 000 refugees from neighbouring countries. There is scanty information about diarrhoea amongst urban refugees in Kenya.Objectives: We investigated the enteric bacteria causing diarrhoea amongst urban refugee children and described the associated factors.Method: During the period of August–December 2010, urban refugee children between the ages of two and five who attended Eastleigh County Council Health Centre were enrolled into the study. Diarrhoeal cases were compared with age-matched children with no diarrhoea (controls. Stool specimens were collected and enteric bacteria isolated. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors.Results: A total of 41 cases and 41 controls were enrolled in the study. The age and country of origin were similar for cases and controls. The bacterial isolation rates amongst the cases were: non-pathogenic Escherichia coli 71%, Shigella dysenteriae 2.4%, Shigella flexneri 2.4%, Salmonella paratyphi 5%. For the controls, non-pathogenic E. coli 90% and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC2.4% were amongst the organisms isolated. All isolates were resistant to amoxicillin; resistance to other antibiotics varied by isolate type. Factors associated independently with diarrhoea included children not washing their hands with soap (aOR 5.9, p < 0.05, neighbour(s having diarrhoea (aOR 39.8, p < 0.05, children not exclusively breastfed for their first 6 months (aOR 7.6, p < 0.05 and children eating food cooked the previous day (aOR 23.8, p = 0.002.Conclusions: Shigella species, Salmonella species and ETEC were found to be responsible for diarrhoea amongst the urban refugee children. Measures to control and guide the use of antibiotics are critical for the prevention of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to improve personal and domestic hygiene, including educational campaigns to promote appropriate handwashing, should be encouraged.

  1. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  2. THE ROLE OF BACTERIAL FACTOR AND IMMUNOLOGICAL СHANGES IN NONINFECTIOUS DISEASES OF MICROBIAL ORIGIN

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    Korniychuk O.P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today during the study of the development mechanisms of any somatic disease possible participation of the microorganism as trigger factor or its influence on the course of the disease or development of complications is considered. Microflora participation in the etiopathogenesis of noninfectious diseases allows to divide the latest into the following groups: Naturally, the first aspects of the study of the role of microorganisms in the development of noninfectious diseases are pathological processes developing in the organs and systems of the body, which are natural biotope, particularly gastrointestinal tract. The imbalance in the functioning of the macroorganism (stress, poor diet causes changes in the composition of endogenous microcenosis and therefore dysbiosis. Thus changes in the hormonal homeostasis, immunoreactivity, in the hypothalamic-adrenal system, speed of peristalsis of the intestines are observed, the overgrowth syndrome in the small intestine developes. A classic disease of a group of diseases that are accompanied by the development of erosive conditions are Helicobacter pylori - associated ulcerous disease of 12 duodenal ulcer. Diseases of the colon digestive canal can be divided into 2 groups - ulcerative colitis and tumors. Escherichia are the main representatives of facultative anaerobic microflora of the colon and are involved in the pathogenesis of both ulcerative colitis and cancer. Material and methods. A study in order to compare the inducing impact of Escherichia lipopolysaccharide isolated from patients with nonspecific ulcerative colitis (NUC, N =38, Crohn's disease (CD, N =30 and colon cancer (CC, N =38, on the humoral and cellular (cytokine links of immunity in ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. From the patients in both study groups and individuals from the control group E. coli were isolated from fecal for obtainining LPS. Synthesis induction of TNFα, IL.-8 and IL.-10 was conducted by

  3. Bacterial Factors Associated with Lethal Outcome of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection: Genomic Case-Control Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Donnenberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (tEPEC strains were associated with mortality in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS. Genetic differences in tEPEC strains could underlie some of the variability in clinical outcome.We produced draft genome sequences of all available tEPEC strains from GEMS lethal infections (LIs and of closely matched EPEC strains from GEMS subjects with non-lethal symptomatic infections (NSIs and asymptomatic infections (AIs to identify gene clusters (potential protein encoding sequences sharing ≥90% nucleotide sequence identity associated with lethality.Among 14,412 gene clusters identified, the presence or absence of 392 was associated with clinical outcome. As expected, more gene clusters were associated with LI versus AI than LI versus NSI. The gene clusters more prevalent in strains from LI than those from NSI and AI included those encoding proteins involved in O-antigen biogenesis, while clusters encoding type 3 secretion effectors EspJ and OspB were among those more prevalent in strains from non-lethal infections. One gene cluster encoding a variant of an NleG ubiquitin ligase was associated with LI versus AI, while two other nleG clusters had the opposite association. Similar associations were found for two nleG gene clusters in an additional, larger sample of NSI and AI GEMS strains.Particular genes are associated with lethal tEPEC infections. Further study of these factors holds potential to unravel the mechanisms underlying severe disease and to prevent adverse outcomes.

  4. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  5. Circadian factor BMAL1 in histaminergic neurons regulates sleep architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Chesham, Johanna E; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G; Hastings, Michael H; Franks, Nicholas P; Wisden, William

    2014-12-01

    Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles, it is unclear what local brain clocks do. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN.

  6. Salmonella proteomics under oxidative stress reveals coordinated regulation of antioxidant defense with iron metabolism and bacterial virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiaqi; Qi, Linlu; Hu, Mo; Liu, Yanhua; Yu, Kaiwen; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2017-02-11

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a bacterial pathogen that can cause widespread gastroenteritis. Salmonella encounters reactive oxygen species both under free-living conditions and within their mammalian host during infection. To study its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale proteomic profiling of Salmonella upon exposure to H2O2. Among 1600 detected proteins, 83 proteins showed significantly altered abundance. Interestingly, only a subset of known antioxidants was induced, likely due to distinct regulatory mechanisms. In addition, we found elevation of several Salmonella acquired phage products with potential contribution to DNA repair under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we observed robust induction of iron-uptake systems and disruption of these pathways led to bacterial survival defects under H2O2 challenge. Importantly, this work is the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed the Salmonella type III secretion system (T3SS), reducing its virulence. Biological significance Salmonella, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, encounters reactive oxygen species (ROS) both endogenously and exogenously. To better understand its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale profiling of Salmonella protein expression upon H2O2 treatment. Among 1600 quantified proteins, the abundance of 116 proteins was altered significantly. Notably, iron acquisition systems were induced to promote bacterial survival under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we are the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed Salmonella type III secretion system and hence reduced its virulence. We believe that these findings will not only help us better understand the molecular mechanisms that Salmonella has evolved to counteract ROS but also the global impact of oxidative stress on bacterial physiology.

  7. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  8. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer.

  9. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  10. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  11. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  12. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  13. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P.; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P.; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J.; Smith, David G. E.; Grant, Andrew J.; Everest, Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors. PMID:28281647

  14. GABAergic stimulation regulates the phenotype of hippocampal interneurons through the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, S; Berninger, B; Carroll, P; Thoenen, H

    1996-03-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches from enhancing to repressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA synthesis during the maturation of hippocampal neurons in vitro. Interneurons do not produce BDNF themselves, but BDNF enhances their differentiation. Therefore, the question arose whether hippocampal interneurons regulate their phenotype by regulating BDNF expression and release from adjacent cells. The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol and BDNF increased the size and neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity of hippocampal interneurons. However, GABAergic stimulation failed to increase NPY immunoreactivity in cultures from BDNF knockout embryos. At later developmental stages, when GABA represses BDNF synthesis, treatment with muscimol induced a decrease in cell size and NPY immunoreactivity of interneurons. Interneurons might thus control their phenotype through the regulation of BDNF synthesis in, and release from, their target neurons.

  15. Regulation of the transforming growth factor β pathway by reversible ubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salihi, Mazin A; Herhaus, Lina; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2012-05-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling pathway plays a central role during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It regulates gene transcription through a signalling cascade from cell surface receptors to intracellular SMAD transcription factors and their nuclear cofactors. The extent, duration and potency of signalling in response to TGFβ cytokines are intricately regulated by complex biochemical processes. The corruption of these regulatory processes results in aberrant TGFβ signalling and leads to numerous human diseases, including cancer. Reversible ubiquitylation of pathway components is a key regulatory process that plays a critical role in ensuring a balanced response to TGFβ signals. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms by which various E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the turnover and activity of TGFβ pathway components by ubiquitylation. Moreover, recent studies have shed new light into their regulation by deubiquitylating enzymes. In this report, we provide an overview of current understanding of the regulation of TGFβ signalling by E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases.

  16. In Silico Identification of Co-transcribed Core Cell Cycle Regulators and Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory networks involving transcription factors and core cell cycle regulators are expected to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this report, we describe the identification of two groups of co-transcribed core cell cycle regulators and transcription factors via a two-step in silico screening. The core cell cycle regulators include TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (CYCA1;2), CYCB1;1, CYCB2;1, CDKB1;2, and CDKB2;2 while the transcription factors include CURLY LEAF, AINTEGUMENTA, a MYB protein, two Forkhead-associated domain proteins, and a SCARECROW family protein. Promoter analysis revealed a potential web of cross- and self-regulations among the identified proteins. Because one criterion for screening for these genes is that they are predominantly transcribed in young organs but not in mature organs, these genes are likely to be particularly involved in Arabidopsis organ growth.

  17. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  18. Role of environmental factors for the vertical distribution (0-1000 m) of marine bacterial communities in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglione, J. F.; Palacios, C.; Marty, J. C.; Mével, G.; Labrune, C.; Conan, P.; Pujo-Pay, M.; Garcia, N.; Goutx, M.

    2008-12-01

    Bacterioplankton plays a central role in energy and matter fluxes in the sea, yet the factors that constrain its variation in marine systems are still poorly understood. Here we use the explanatory power of direct multivariate gradient analysis to evaluate the driving forces exerted by environmental parameters on bacterial community distribution in the water column. We gathered and analysed data from a one month sampling period from the surface to 1000 m depth at the JGOFS-DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea). This station is characterized by very poor horizontal advection currents which makes it an ideal model to test hypotheses on the causes of vertical stratification of bacterial communities. Capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) fingerprinting profiles analyzed using multivariate statistical methods demonstrated a vertical zonation of bacterial assemblages in three layers, above, in or just below the chlorophyll maximum and deeper, that remained stable during the entire sampling period. Through the use of direct gradient multivariate ordination analyses we demonstrate that a complex array of biogeochemical parameters is the driving force behind bacterial community structure shifts in the water column. Physico-chemical parameters such as phosphate, nitrate, salinity and to a lesser extent temperature, oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and photosynthetically active radiation acted in synergy to explain bacterial assemblages changes with depth. Analysis of lipid biomarkers of organic matter sources and fates suggested that bacterial community structure in the surface layers was in part explained by lipids of chloroplast origin. Further detailed analysis of pigment-based phytoplankton diversity gave evidence of a compartmentalized influence of several phytoplankton groups on bacterial community structure in the first 150 m depth.

  19. Role of environmental factors for the vertical distribution (0–1000 m of marine bacterial communities in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Ghiglione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterioplankton plays a central role in energy and matter fluxes in the sea, yet the factors that constrain its variation in marine systems are still poorly understood. Here we use the explanatory power of direct multivariate gradient analysis to evaluate the driving forces exerted by environmental parameters on bacterial community distribution in the water column. We gathered and analysed data from a one month sampling period from the surface to 1000 m depth at the JGOFS-DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea. This station is characterized by very poor horizontal advection currents which makes it an ideal model to test hypotheses on the causes of vertical stratification of bacterial communities. Capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP fingerprinting profiles analyzed using multivariate statistical methods demonstrated a vertical zonation of bacterial assemblages in three layers, above, in or just below the chlorophyll maximum and deeper, that remained stable during the entire sampling period. Through the use of direct gradient multivariate ordination analyses we demonstrate that a complex array of biogeochemical parameters is the driving force behind bacterial community structure shifts in the water column. Physico-chemical parameters such as phosphate, nitrate, salinity and to a lesser extent temperature, oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and photosynthetically active radiation acted in synergy to explain bacterial assemblages changes with depth. Analysis of lipid biomarkers of organic matter sources and fates suggested that bacterial community structure in the surface layers was in part explained by lipids of chloroplast origin. Further detailed analysis of pigment-based phytoplankton diversity gave evidence of a compartmentalized influence of several phytoplankton groups on bacterial community structure in the first 150 m depth.

  20. Quieting cross talk-the quorum sensing regulator LsrR as a possible target for fighting bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher M Byrd; William E Bentley

    2009-01-01

    @@ Antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to emerge at alarming rates and all aspects of the infection process are being re-examined so that new procedures for prevention,diagnosis,and treatment of bacterial infections can be developed that reduce their occurrence and severity as well as the economic impact on health care systems.One of the most problematic pathogens is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA).

  1. Factors regulating Hb F synthesis in thalassemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerone Maria

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thalassemic syndromes originate from mutations of the globin genes that cause, besides the characteristic clinical picture, also an increased Hb F amount. It is not yet clear if there are more factors, besides the beta globin genotype, determining the Hb F production. We have tried to find out if there are relations between total Hb and Hb F, between erythropoietin (Epo and Hb F, between Hb F and point mutations of the gamma gene promoters. Materials and Methods Hematologic parameters, iron status, alpha/non-alpha globin ratio, Epo level, and thalassemic defects of the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globin genes were explored using standard methods in patients affected by thalassemic diseases. Ninety-five non thalassemic individuals have been examined as controls. Results Two clinical variants of beta-thalassemia intermedia referred to as beta-thal int sub-silent and evident are associated with distinct sets of mutations of the beta-globin gene. Silent beta thal mutations are invariably associated with sub-silent beta thal int; beta° or severe beta+ thal mutations are associated with evident beta thal int (88% and almost invariably (98% with thalassemia major. A positive correlation was observed between the severity of the disease and the Hb F level, but no correlation was found between the Hb F and erythropoietin (Epo level. The mutation Ggamma -158 C→T was detected in 26.9% of patients affected by beta-thal int sub-silent and evident, respectively, but only in 2% of patients with thalassemia major. Conclusions The severity of beta-thal int and the increased Hb F level are strictly dependent from the type of beta-globin gene mutations. No relation is found between Hb F synthesis and Epo secretion. The mutation Ggamma -158 C→T, common among patients affected by beta-thal int and very rare in thal major patients, does not seem, in this study, to influence the Hb F content in beta thal int patients.

  2. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-11-30

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator.

  3. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Cai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator.

  4. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

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    Chao-Chih Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED, since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods: We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results: Viruses (41.3% were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2% being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8% and Giardia lamblia (12.4%. Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53, household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96, attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20, dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54, and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94 were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05, those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62, or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62 or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77 were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41, abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41, and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98 were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05, winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74, frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83, and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23 were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63. Conclusions: Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with

  5. Integration of the Transcription Factor-Regulated and Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Control of Keratinocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements. Epigenetic regulators exhibit both activating and repressive effects on chromatin in keratinocytes (KCs): whereas some of them promote terminal differentiation, the others stimulate proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as inhibit premature activation of terminal differentiation-associated genes. Transcription factor-regulated and epigenetic mechanisms are highly connected, and the p63 transcription factor has an important role in the higher-order chromatin remodeling of the KC-specific gene loci via direct control of the genome organizer Satb1 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Brg1. However, additional efforts are required to fully understand the complexity of interactions between distinct transcription factors and epigenetic regulators in the control of KC differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and their alterations in different pathological skin conditions will help to progress toward the development of novel approaches for the treatment of skin disorders by targeting epigenetic regulators and modulating chromatin organization in KCs. PMID:26551942

  6. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuoGui-cheng; YangLi-jie; 等

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demonstrated in vitro.Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo.In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments:(1)control;(2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1);(3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2).In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment diets:(1)contro,1:(2) 0.1% P4-supplemented;(3)0.5% P4-supplemented;(4)0.1% P7-supplemented;(5)0.5% P7-supplemented.The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E.9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7.After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant.the animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11.1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control.the small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control(P<0.05).The stomach(26.4 and 24%,p=0.198) and cecum (21.9 and 9.4%,p=0.114) also showed the same pattern.The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and efficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs.Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%.The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soybeans.

  7. Activity Of Bacterial Proteolytic Enzymes on Antinutritional Factors in Soybeans and the Effect on Growth and Organ Weights of Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A significant reduction of trypsin inhibitory activity by selected bacterial proteolytic enzymes was demon- strated in vitro. Two trials were conducted to examine the capacity of the tested enzymes to inactivate soybean ANFs in vivo. In trial I,twenty-four piglets weaned at four weeks of age were assigned in replicate groups of 4 piglets per pen to one of three dietary treatments: (1)control; (2)Enzyme 1-supplemented(E1); (3)Enzyme 2-supplemented (E2). In trial II,twenty piglets weaned at five weeks of age were alloted to five treatment di- ets:(1)contro,l: (2)0. 1% P4-supplemented; (3)0. 5% P4-supplemented; (4)0. 1% P7-supplemented; (5)0. 5% P7-supplemented. The optimum pH for hydrolysis was 8 for E,9-11 for E2,8.5 for P4 and nuctral for P7. After 17 days of the trial,daily gain of piglets on enzymes E1 and E2 was 36% and 18% more than that in the control group,although the difference was not significant. The animals on the treated groups had a tendency to have lighter heart(7.8 and 5.9%),spleen(11. 1 and 7.4%) and pancreas(16.7 and 12.5% for E1 and E2 respectively)in relation to empty body weight than those in the control. The small intestine of pigs on the treated groups was significantly lighter(18.9 for E1 and 7.7% for E2) than that in the control( P < 0.05 ). The stomach (26.4 and 24%,p=0. 198) and cecum(21.9and 9.4%,p=0. 114) also showed the same pat- tern. The growth depression was attributed to reduced feed intake caused by antinutritional factors in soy beans. It is concluded that supplements of proteolytic enzymes E1 or E2 had a positive effect on growth and ef- ficiency and caused much less reaction in the gut as manifested by the weight of the tract and of its accessory organs. Dietary saupplements of P4 or P7 had no significant effect on growth,but reduced reaction of soybean antinutritional factors in the gut,especialy P4 in dose of 0.5%. The growth depression was attributed to low feed intake caused by antinutritional

  8. Characteristics and Predisposing Factors of Bacterial Corneal Ulcer in the National Eye Center, Cicendo Eye Hospital, Bandung from January to December 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Maharani Putri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Corneal ulcer is an emergency condition in ophthalmology, causing visual impairment, mostly by bacterial infection with rapid pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to discover the characteristics of bacterial corneal ulcer patients in the National Eye Center, Cicendo Eye Hospital, Bandung. Methods: A total of 99 medical records consisted of patients diagnosed with bacterial corneal ulcer were selected in this descriptive study. The clinical patterns and predisposing factors of the patients were analyzed. The study also identified the pathogenic bacteria of the cases. This study was carried out in the National Eye Center, Cicendo Eye Hospital, Bandung from January to December 2011 Clinical patterns. The collected data were analyzed and presented in frequency tabulation. Results: The male to female ratio was 2:1, with the average age of 44.4 years. The most common presenting symptom was eye pain (70.7%. Most patients came with decreased visual acuity that was categorized as (near- blindness (78.8% and the location of the ulcer was in central area of the cornea (56.5%. The most common predisposing factor was ocular trauma (74.7% that was caused by exposed to plants. Single-bacterial infection (67.7% was predominant, with 56 cases (56.6% of Gram-positive cocci infection. Conclusions: Bacterial corneal ulcer contributes to 48.8% of all microbial corneal ulcers. Most patients came with mild condition, centralized location, and poor visual function. The common predisposing factor was trauma associated with exposed to plants.

  9. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehara Tadamichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. Results We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2–12 h, P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24–36 h the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. Conclusion The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  10. Influence of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) on bacterial virulence and transcriptional regulation of allS by CRP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jian; Tan, Bin; Yang, Shiya; Luo, Mei; Xia, Huiming; Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Xipeng; Yang, Xianxian; Yang, Ruifu; Li, Yingli; Qiu, Jingfu

    2016-11-15

    cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is one of the most important transcriptional regulators, which can regulate large quantities of operons in different bacteria. The gene allS was well-known as allantoin-utilizing capability and involving in bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The specific DNA recognition motif of transcription regulator CRP was found in allS promoter region. Therefore, this study is aimed to investigate the function of CRP on virulence and its transcriptional regulation mechanism to gene allS in K. pneumoniae. The wild-type (WT) K. pneumoniae NTUH-2044, crp knockout (Kp-Δcrp) and the complemented knockout (KpC-Δcrp) strains were used to determine the function of crp gene. The lacZ fusion, qRT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays were performed to study the transcriptional regulation of CRP on allS. The result showed a decreased virulence in crp knockout strain. Complement through supplementing crp fragment in expression plasmid partially restore virulence of knockout bacteria. The CRP could bind to the allS promoter-proximal region and the binding site was further refined to be located from 60bp to 94bp upstream of the allS promoter. Based on these results, we proposed that CRP is an essential virulence regulator and knock out of crp gene will result in reduced virulence in K. pneumoniae. In the meantime, the transcription of gene allS is positively regulated by CRP via directly binding to upstream of allS promoter.

  11. Understanding Transcription Factor Regulation by Integrating Gene Expression and DNase I Hypersensitive Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to DNA sequences to regulate gene transcription. The transcription factor binding sites are short DNA sequences (5–20 bp long specifically bound by one or more transcription factors. The identification of transcription factor binding sites and prediction of their function continue to be challenging problems in computational biology. In this study, by integrating the DNase I hypersensitive sites with known position weight matrices in the TRANSFAC database, the transcription factor binding sites in gene regulatory region are identified. Based on the global gene expression patterns in cervical cancer HeLaS3 cell and HelaS3-ifnα4h cell (interferon treatment on HeLaS3 cell for 4 hours, we present a model-based computational approach to predict a set of transcription factors that potentially cause such differential gene expression. Significantly, 6 out 10 predicted functional factors, including IRF, IRF-2, IRF-9, IRF-1 and IRF-3, ICSBP, belong to interferon regulatory factor family and upregulate the gene expression levels responding to the interferon treatment. Another factor, ISGF-3, is also a transcriptional activator induced by interferon alpha. Using the different transcription factor binding sites selected criteria, the prediction result of our model is consistent. Our model demonstrated the potential to computationally identify the functional transcription factors in gene regulation.

  12. Environmental Contaminants and microRNA Regulation: Transcription Factors as Regulators of Toxicant-Altered microRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollome, James; Martin, Elizabeth; Sethupathy, Praveen; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding mRNA transcripts and inhibiting translation and/or inducing degradation of the associated transcripts. Expression levels of miRNAs have been shown to be altered in response to environmental toxicants, thus impacting cellular function and influencing disease risk. Transcription factors (TFs) are known to be altered in response to environmental toxicants and play a critical role in the regulation of miRNA expression. To date, environmentally-responsive TFs that are important for regulating miRNAs remain understudied. In a state-of-the-art analysis, we utilized in silico bioinformatic analysis to characterize potential transcriptional regulators of environmentally-responsive miRNAs. Using the miRStart database, genomic sequences of promoter regions for all available human miRNAs (n=847) were identified and promoter regions were defined as −1000/+500 base pairs from the transcription start site. Subsequently, the promoter region sequences of environmentally-responsive miRNAs (n=128) were analyzed using enrichment analysis to determine overrepresented TF binding sites (TFBS). While most (56/73) TFs differed across environmental contaminants, a set of 17 TFs was enriched for promoter binding among miRNAs responsive to numerous environmental contaminants. Of these, one TF was common to miRNAs altered by the majority of environmental contaminants, namely SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A, member 3 (SMARCA3). These identified TFs represent candidate common transcriptional regulators of miRNAs perturbed by environmental toxicants. PMID:27292125

  13. Serum response factor play a regulative role in the gene expression in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia WU; Guang ZHI; Tao WAN; Jiajin WU

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between transcription factor and the change of protein expression levels in heart failure. Methods Bioinformatic method was used to analyze the data of binding-sites on the 5 ' flaking regions of four genes whose mRNA level changed in failing heart from three databases about nucleic acid-EMBL, transcriptional regulation factor-TRANSFAC and protein-SWISS-PORT.The expression level of selected transcription factor was determined by immunohischemical method.Results Nine transcription factors were inferred to influence the proteins' levels in occurrence and development of heart failure.Serum response factor (SRF) was selected from the nine factors and assayed. The results showed that there was a higher level of SRF in healthy group than in chronic heart failure (CHF), and the level was associated with the degree of CHF. It was also found that there was a relative higher level of SRF in the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than that in CHF, but which was lower than the healthy. Conclusion It showed that SRF had a quantitative change in the development of heart failure, and suggested SRF might play an important regulative role in heart failure. The expression changes of proteins related to myocardial function might be regulated by the quantitative change of transcription factor(s).

  14. Exploration of the transcription factors that regulate the expression of the haloacid operon in Burkholderia caribensis MBA4

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liyu; 鄧麗瑜

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial dehalogenase is a key enzyme involved in bioremediation of halogenated organic compounds. A dehalogenase, Deh4a, was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia caribensis MBA4, which can utilize haloacetic acids as carbon source. The haloacid operon in MBA4 was identified and characterized. It is composed of the structural genes forDeh4a and a transporter Deh4p. Transcription of this operon is negatively regulated, but the mechanism and the relevant regulator are still p...

  15. Witnessing Partner Violence in Childhood: Factors Influencing Emotion Regulation Difficulties in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Amatya, Kaushalendra

    2014-01-01

    Witnessing partner violence (WPV) in childhood and adolescence can have significant impact on psychological functioning throughout development. Studies have shown that parenting factors, perceived social support, coping strategies, age at exposure, and gender can influence the relationship between WPV and outcomes. Although WPV can have serious implications towards emotion regulation abilities, empirical research on the link between WPV and emotion regulation is inadequate. The current stu...

  16. Growth factors and the kidney: regulation of epithelial cell movement and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, L G

    1996-12-01

    The control of epithelial cell movement and shape change is complex and requires regulation of a broad range of events including cell-cell adhesion contacts, cell-substratum interactions, and the actin cytoskeleton. Utilizing the hepatocyte growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor, c-met, the present review examines how growth factor receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways, which can then regulate the events necessary for epithelial cells to disassemble their existing structure, undergo extensive shape change and cell body movement, and reassemble into a polarized epithelium. The role of growth factor-mediated activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C-gamma, c-src family members, and ras family members is addressed in relation to integrin-mediated cell-basement membrane contacts, cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  17. The Transcription Factor IRF3 Triggers “Defensive Suicide” Necrosis in Response to Viral and Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C. Di Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular components that execute noninflammatory apoptotic cell death are well defined, molecular pathways that trigger necrotic cell death remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that in response to infection with adenovirus or Listeria monocytogenes, macrophages in vivo undergo rapid proinflammatory necrotic death that is controlled by interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. The transcriptional activity of IRF3 is, surprisingly, not required for the induction of necrosis, and it proceeds normally in mice deficient in all known regulators of necrotic death or IRF3 activation, including RIPK3, caspases 1, 8, or 11, STING, and IPS1/MAVS. Although L. monocytogenes triggers necrosis to promote the infection, IRF3-dependent necrosis is required for reducing pathogen burden in the models of disseminated infection with adenovirus. Therefore, our studies implicate IRF3 as a principal and nonredundant component of a physiologically regulated necrotic cell-death pathway that operates as an effective innate immune mechanism of host protection against disseminated virus infection.

  18. The Campylobacter jejuni MarR-like transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB both influence bacterial responses to oxidative and aerobic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan eGundogdu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the human intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to respond to oxidative stress is central to bacterial survival both in vivo during infection and in the environment. Re-annotation of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome revealed the presence of two MarR-type transcriptional regulators Cj1546 and Cj1556, originally annotated as hypothetical proteins, which we have designated RrpA and RrpB (regulator of response to peroxide respectively. Previously we demonstrated a role for RrpB in both oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress and that RrpB was a DNA binding protein with auto-regulatory activity, typical of MarR-type transcriptional regulators. In this study, we show that RrpA is also a DNA binding protein and that a rrpA mutant in strain 11168H exhibits increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress. Mutation of either rrpA or rrpB reduces catalase (KatA expression. However a rrpAB double mutant exhibits higher levels of resistance to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress, with levels of KatA expression similar to the wild-type strain. Neither the rrpA nor rrpB mutant exhibits any significant difference in sensitivity to either cumene hydroperoxide or menadione oxidative stresses, but both mutants exhibit a reduced ability to survive aerobic (O2 stress, enhanced biofilm formation and reduced virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The rrpAB double mutant exhibits wild-type levels of biofilm formation and wild-type levels of virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Together these data indicate a role for both RrpA and RrpB in the C. jejuni peroxide oxidative and aerobic (O2 stress responses, enhancing bacterial survival in vivo and in the environment.

  19. Factors influencing variation of bulk milk antibiotic residue occurrence, somatic cell count, and total bacterial count in dairy sheep flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, C; Carriedo, J A; García-Jimeno, M C; Pérez-Bilbao, M; de la Fuente, L F

    2010-04-01

    To study the variations of bulk tank milk variables in dairy ewe flocks and to identify the main target practices and flock groups to improve milk quality and safety, a total of 71,228 records of antibiotic residue (AR) and milk yield and 68,781 records of somatic cell count (SCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) were obtained over 5 yr from the same 209 dairy ewe flocks of the Assaf breed belonging to the Consortium for Ovine Promotion of Castilla-León (Spain). Based on a logistic regression model, year, month, semester, SCC, TBC, dry therapy, and milk yield significantly contributed to AR variation. High SCC was associated with increased AR violations. When antibiotic dry therapy was implemented, AR occurrence was higher than when this practice was not used. A polynomial monthly distribution throughout the year was observed for AR occurrence; the highest values were in autumn, coinciding with low milk yields per flock. Yearly occurrences drastically diminished from 2004 (1.36%) to 2008 (0.30%), probably as a result of effective educational programs. The mixed-model ANOVA of factors influencing variation in SCC and TBC indicated that year, month, AR, dry therapy group, milking type, and year interactions were significant variation factors for SCC and TBC; mathematical model accounted for 74.1 and 35.4% of total variance for each variable, respectively. Differences in management and hygiene practice caused significant SCC and TBC variations among flocks and within flocks throughout the 5-yr study. Over time, continuously dry treated flocks showed lower logSCC (5.80) and logTBC (4.92) than untreated (6.10 and 5.18, respectively) or discontinuously dry treated (6.01 and 5.05, respectively) flocks. Continuously dry treated flocks had lower AR occurrences than did discontinuously dry treated flocks. As a whole, AR occurrence and SCC and TBC bulk tank milk variables can be used for monitoring mammary health and milk hygiene and safety in dairy sheep throughout time.

  20. Research on the Influencing Factors of Rural Low-carbon Economic Development and Government Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the main factors causing sluggish development of rural low-carbon economy in China as follows:the rural energy structure is irrational;the infrastructure and technology are relatively backward;system of laws,regulations and policy is not sound;fund-raising mechanism develops slowly;farmers’ low-carbon awareness and ability are limited.On the basis of these unfavorable factors,from the perspective of government regulation,feasible strategies are put forward in line with the actual situation of rural low-carbon economic development in China.

  1. Francisella tularensis elicits IL-10 via a PGE₂-inducible factor, to drive macrophage MARCH1 expression and class II down-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Hunt

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a bacterial pathogen that uses host-derived PGE₂ to subvert the host's adaptive immune responses in multiple ways. Francisella-induced PGE₂ acts directly on CD4 T cells to blunt production of IFN-γ. Francisella-induced PGE₂ can also elicit production of a >10 kDa soluble host factor termed FTMØSN (F. tularensismacrophage supernatant, which acts on IFN-γ pre-activated MØ to down-regulate MHC class II expression via a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism, blocking antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Here, we report that FTMØSN-induced down-regulation of MØ class II is the result of the induction of MARCH1, and that MØ expressing MARCH1 "resistant" class II molecules are resistant to FTMØSN-induced class II down-regulation. Since PGE₂ can induce IL-10 production and IL-10 is the only reported cytokine able to induce MARCH1 expression in monocytes and dendritic cells, these findings suggested that IL-10 is the active factor in FTMØSN. However, use of IL-10 knockout MØ established that IL-10 is not the active factor in FTMØSN, but rather that Francisella-elicited PGE₂ drives production of a >10 kDa host factor distinct from IL-10. This factor then drives MØ IL-10 production to induce MARCH1 expression and the resultant class II down-regulation. Since many human pathogens such as Salmonella typhi, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Legionella pneumophila also induce production of host PGE₂, these results suggest that a yet-to-be-identified PGE₂-inducible host factor capable of inducing IL-10 is central to the immune evasion mechanisms of multiple important human pathogens.

  2. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  3. TRPC3 Regulates Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor From Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vohra, Pawan K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M.; Singh, Brij B.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca2+ signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors suc...

  4. Low- and high-dose hydrogen peroxide regulation of transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Jiao-lin; MO Li-wen; LAI Xi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play both physiological and pathophysiological roles. Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated genes expression and coordinates induction of chemoprotective proteins in response to physical and chemical stresses. The exact role of Nrf2 in cellular responses to different levels of oxidative stresses remains unknown.Methods Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were cultured and treated with 0 mmol/L, 0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L, 1.0 mmol/L and 2.0 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide solution for 2 hours. Nrf2 gene expression was assayed by reverse transcription-PCR, Nrf2-ARE binding activity was assayed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and localization of Nrf2 was detected with immunohistochemistry.Results Low and moderate (0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L) doses hydrogen peroxide exposure of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells led to the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, increased activity of transcription regulation and up-regulation of ARE-medicated gene expression. In contrast, high doses of hydrogen peroxide (1 mmol/L, 2 mmol/L) exposure of the cells led to the nuclear exclusion of Nrf2, decreased activity transcription regulation and down-regulation of ARE-mediated gene expression.Conclusion Low and moderate doses of hydrogen peroxide play protective roles by increasing transcription activity of Nrf2, whereas high- dose hydrogen peroxide plays a deleterious role by decreasing transcription activity of Nrf2.

  5. Structure of an MmyB-like regulator from C. aurantiacus, member of a new transcription factor family linked to antibiotic metabolism in actinomycetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes are important bacterial sources of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. Many antibiotic gene clusters are controlled by pathway-specific activators that act in response to growth conditions. Here we present the crystal structure of an MmyB-like transcription regulator MltR (PDB code 3pxp (Caur_2278 from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, in complex with a fatty acid (myristic acid. MltR is a distant homolog of the methylenomycin activator MmyB and consists of an Xre-type N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding module that is related to the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain. This structure has enabled identification of a new family of bacterial transcription factors that are distributed predominantly in actinomycetes. Bioinformatics analysis of MltR and other characterized family members suggest that they are likely associated with antibiotic and fatty acid metabolism in actinomycetes. Streptomyces coelicolor SCO4944 is a candidate as an ancestral member of the family. Its ortholog in S. griseus, SGR_6891, is induced by A-factor, a γ-butyrolactone that controls antibiotic production and development, and is adjacent to the A-factor synthase gen, afsA. The location of mltR/mmyB homologs, in particular those adjacent to less well-studied antibiotic-related genes, makes them interesting genetic markers for identifying new antibiotic genes. A model for signal-triggered DNA-binding by MltR is proposed.

  6. Distinct and shared transcriptomes are regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoforms in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaee, Amir H; Brandal, Stephanie; Lee, Youl-Nam; Jie, Chunfa; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2007-01-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is an essential basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor for mast cell development. Mice deficient in Mitf harbor a severe mast cell deficiency, and Mitf-mutant mast cells cultured ex vivo display a number of functional defects. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic program regulated by Mitf may provide important insights into mast cell differentiation. Multiple, distinct isoforms of Mitf have been identified in a variety of cell types; we found that Mitf-a, Mitf-e, and Mitf-mc were the major isoforms expressed in mast cells. To determine the physiologic function of Mitf in mast cells, we restored expression of these isoforms in primary mast cells from Mitf(-/-) mice. We found that these isoforms restored granular morphology and integrin-mediated migration. By microarray analysis, proteases, signaling molecules, cell surface receptor, and transporters comprised the largest groups of genes up-regulated by all isoforms. Furthermore, we found that isoforms also regulated distinct genes sets, suggesting separable biological activities. This work defines the transcriptome regulated by Mitf in mast cells and supports its role as master regulator of mast cell differentiation. Expression of multiple isoforms of this transcription factor may provide for redundancy of biological activities while also allowing diversity of function.

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel bacterial virulence factor that shares homology with mammalian Toll/interleukin-1 receptor family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ruchi M; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Godzik, Adam; Reed, John C

    2006-01-01

    Many important bacterial virulence factors act as mimics of mammalian proteins to subvert normal host cell processes. To identify bacterial protein mimics of components of the innate immune signaling pathway, we searched the bacterial genome database for proteins with homology to the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of the mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptor proteins. A previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named tlpA (for TIR-like protein A), was identified in the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis genome that is predicted to encode a protein resembling mammalian TIR domains, We show that overexpression of TlpA in mammalian cells suppresses the ability of mammalian TIR-containing proteins TLR4, IL-1 receptor, and MyD88 to induce the transactivation and DNA-binding activities of NF-kappaB, a downstream target of the TIR signaling pathway. In addition, TlpA mimics the previously characterized Salmonella virulence factor SipB in its ability to induce activation of caspase-1 in a mammalian cell transfection model. Disruption of the chromosomal tlpA gene rendered a virulent serovar Enteritidis strain defective in intracellular survival and IL-1beta secretion in a cell culture infection model using human THP1 macrophages. Bacteria with disrupted tlpA also displayed reduced lethality in mice, further confirming an important role for this factor in pathogenesis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the bacterial TIR-like protein TlpA is a novel prokaryotic modulator of NF-kappaB activity and IL-1beta secretion that contributes to serovar Enteritidis virulence.

  8. Genome-Wide Association between Transcription Factor Expression and Chromatin Accessibility Reveals Regulators of Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueedi, Rico

    2017-01-01

    To better understand genome regulation, it is important to uncover the role of transcription factors in the process of chromatin structure establishment and maintenance. Here we present a data-driven approach to systematically characterise transcription factors that are relevant for this process. Our method uses a linear mixed modelling approach to combine datasets of transcription factor binding motif enrichments in open chromatin and gene expression across the same set of cell lines. Applying this approach to the ENCODE dataset, we confirm already known and imply numerous novel transcription factors that play a role in the establishment or maintenance of open chromatin. In particular, our approach rediscovers many factors that have been annotated as pioneer factors. PMID:28118358

  9. Internalization and down-regulation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor are regulated by the carboxyl-terminal tyrosines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Beguinot, L

    1991-01-01

    with receptors in which 1, 2, or all 3 tyrosines were changed to phenylalanines. The triple point mutant EGF-R, expressed in NIH-3T3, exhibited low autophosphorylation in vivo, low biological and reduced kinase activities. Single and double point mutants were down-regulated, as well as wild type EGF-R......The C terminus of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) contains three tyrosines (Y1068, Y1148, and Y1173) which correspond to the major autophosphorylation sites. To investigate the role of the tyrosines in internalization and down-regulation of the EGF-R, mutational analysis was performed...... in response to EGF showing a half-life of about 1 h. Degradation of the triple point mutant, however, was impaired and resulted in a half-life of 4 h in the presence of EGF. EGF-dependent down-regulation of surface receptors was decreased in the triple point mutant EGF-R as was internalization and degradation...

  10. MiRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Hua

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of 20-24 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily through post-transcriptional repression or mRNA degradation in a sequence-specific manner. The roles of miRNAs are just beginning to be understood, but the study of miRNA function has been limited by poor understanding of the general principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Here we used CNE cells from a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line as a cellular system to investigate miRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia, and to explore the principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Through computational analysis, 96 miRNAs were predicted as putative regulators of VEGF. But when we analyzed the miRNA expression profile of CNE and four other VEGF-expressing cell lines, we found that only some of these miRNAs could be involved in VEGF regulation, and that VEGF may be regulated by different miRNAs that were differentially chosen from 96 putative regulatory miRNAs of VEGF in different cells. Some of these miRNAs also co-regulate other angiogenic factors (differential regulation and co-regulation principle. We also found that VEGF was regulated by multiple miRNAs using different combinations, including both coordinate and competitive interactions. The coordinate principle states that miRNAs with independent binding sites in a gene can produce coordinate action to increase the repressive effect of miRNAs on this gene. By contrast, the competitive principle states when multiple miRNAs compete with each other for a common binding site, or when a functional miRNA competes with a false positive miRNA for the same binding site, the repressive effects of miRNAs may be decreased. Through the competitive principle, false positive miRNAs, which cannot directly repress gene expression, can sometimes play a role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. The competitive principle, differential regulation, multi-miRNA binding sites, and false

  11. Use of bacterial two-hybrid system to investigate the molecular interaction between the regulators NifA and NifL of Enterobacter cloacae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖贡献; 俞冠翘; 沈善炯; 朱家璧

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the nitrogen fixation (nif ) genes is tightly regulated by two proteins NifA and NifL in the (-subdivision of the proteobacteria. NifA is a transcriptional activator, which can be inactivated by NifL in the presence of oxygen or excess fixed nitrogen. A direct interaction between E. cloacae NifL and NifA was detected using the bacterial two-hybrid system. This interaction was accelerated in the presence of fixed nitrogen, while oxygen had no effect. NifL proteins, with their C-terminus being deleted, completely lost the ability to interact with NifA. The data suggest that the C-terminal domain of NifL acts as a sensor of the nitrogen status of the cell and mediates interaction with NifA.

  12. The post-transcriptional regulator CsrA plays a central role in the adaptation of bacterial pathogens to different stages of infection in animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Burrowes, Elizabeth; Baysse, Christine; Ermel, Gwennola

    2008-01-01

    The importance of Csr post-transcriptional systems is gradually emerging; these systems control a variety of virulence-linked physiological traits in many pathogenic bacteria. This review focuses on the central role that Csr systems play in the pathogenesis of certain bacteria and in the establishment of successful infections in animal hosts. Csr systems appear to control the 'switch' between different physiological states in the infection process; for example switching pathogens from a colonization state to a persistence state. Csr systems are controlled by two-component sensor/regulator systems and by non-coding RNAs. In addition, recent findings suggest that the RNA chaperone Hfq may play an integral role in Csr-mediated bacterial adaptation to the host environment.

  13. Direct regulation of rRNA transcription by fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhi; Liang, Yanping; Lin, Chih-Yin; Comai, Lucio; Chirico, William J

    2005-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which is highly expressed in developing tissues and malignant cells, regulates cell growth, differentiation, and migration. Five isoforms (18 to approximately 34 kDa) of FGF-2 are derived from alternative initiation codons of a single mRNA. The 18-kDa FGF-2 isoform is released from cells by a nonclassical secretory pathway and regulates gene expression by binding to cell surface receptors. This isoform also localizes to the nucleolus, raising the possibility that it may directly regulate ribosome biogenesis, a rate-limiting process in cell growth. Although several growth factors have been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus, their function and mechanism of action remain unclear. Here we show that 18-kDa FGF-2 interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF), an architectural transcription factor essential for rRNA transcription. The maximal activation of rRNA transcription in vitro by 18-kDa FGF-2 requires UBF. The 18-kDa FGF-2 localizes to rRNA genes and is necessary for the full activation of pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo. Our results demonstrate that 18-kDa FGF-2 directly regulates rRNA transcription.

  14. Differential Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts during the Consolidation of Fear Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J.; Rattiner, Lisa M.; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated as a molecular mediator of learning and memory. The BDNF gene contains four differentially regulated promoters that generate four distinct mRNA transcripts, each containing a unique noncoding 5[prime]-exon and a common 3[prime]-coding exon. This study describes novel evidence for the…

  15. Undifferentiated Embryonic Cell Transcription Factor 1 Regulates ESC Chromatin Organization and Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Susanne M.; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Johannes, Frank; Wardenaar, Rene; Tesson, Bruno M.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; de Haan, Gerald; Eggen, Bart J. L.; O’Neill, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES ce

  16. C/EBPβ regulates transcription factors critical for proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rekha; Janz, Martin; Galson, Deborah L.; Gries, Margarete; Li, Shirong; Jöhrens, Korinna; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Dörken, Bernd; Mapara, Markus Y.; Borghesi, Lisa; Kardava, Lela; Roodman, G. David; Milcarek, Christine

    2009-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ), also known as nuclear factor–interleukin-6 (NF-IL6), is a transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of myeloid and lymphoid cells. Mice deficient in C/EBPβ show impaired generation of B lymphocytes. We show that C/EBPβ regulates transcription factors critical for proliferation and survival in multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary multiple myeloma cells strongly expressed C/EBPβ, whereas normal B cells and plasma cells had little or no detectable levels of C/EBPβ. Silencing of C/EBPβ led to down-regulation of transcription factors such as IRF4, XBP1, and BLIMP1 accompanied by a strong inhibition of proliferation. Further, silencing of C/EBPβ led to a complete down-regulation of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, C/EBPβ directly bound to the promoter region of IRF4, BLIMP1, and BCL2. Our data indicate that C/EBPβ is involved in the regulatory network of transcription factors that are critical for plasma cell differentiation and survival. Targeting C/EBPβ may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:19717648

  17. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  18. The plant heat stress transcription factors (HSFs: structure, regulation and function in response to abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity and drought adversely affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs, including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs. HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps. In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  19. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  20. Interkingdom Responses to Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signals Regulate Frequency and Rate of Nodulation in Legume-Rhizobia Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andrew G; Mukherjee, Arijit; Stacy, Danielle M; Lazar, Stephen; Ané, Jean-Michel; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-11-17

    Density-dependent phenotypic switching in bacteria, the phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS), is instrumental in many pathogenic and mutualistic behaviors. In many Gram-negative bacteria, QS is regulated by N-acylated-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Synthetic analogues of these AHLs hold significant promise for regulating QS at the host-symbiont interface. Regulation depends on refined temporal and spatial models of quorums under native conditions. Critical to this is an understanding of how the presence of these signals may affect a prospective host. We screened a library of AHL analogues for their ability to regulate the legume-rhizobia mutualistic symbiosis (nodulation) between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti. Using an established QS-reporter line of S. meliloti and nodulation assays with wild-type bacteria, we identified compounds capable of increasing either the rate of nodule formation or total nodule number. Most importantly, we identified compounds with activity exclusive to either host or pathogen, underscoring the potential to generate QS modulators selective to bacteria with limited effects on a prospective host.

  1. Regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in sciatic motor neurons following axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, A J; Devlin, B K; Neitzel, K L; McLaurin, D L; Anderson, K J; Lee, N

    1999-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons are one of the few classes of neurons capable of regenerating axons following axotomy. Injury-induced expression of neurotrophic factors and corresponding receptors may play an important role in this rare ability. A wide variety of indirect data suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha may critically contribute to the regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons. We used immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and retrograde tracing techniques to study the regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in axotomized sciatic motor neurons. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha immunoreactivity, detected with two independent antisera, is increased in a subpopulation of caudal sciatic motor neuron soma one, two and six weeks after sciatic nerve transection and reattachment, while no changes are detected at one day and 15 weeks post-lesion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA levels are augmented in the same classes of neurons following an identical lesion, suggesting that increased synthesis contributes, at least in part, to the additional ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein. Separating the proximal and distal nerve stumps with a plastic barrier does not noticeably affect the injury-induced change in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha regulation, thereby indicating that this injury response is not dependent on signals distal to the lesion traveling retrogradely through the nerve or signals generated by axonal growth through the distal nerve. The prolonged increases in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein and messenger RNA found in regenerating sciatic motor neurons contrast with the responses of non-regenerating central neurons, which are reported to display, at most, a short-lived increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA expression following injury. The present data are the first to demonstrate, in vivo, neuronal regulation of

  2. Interaction between host genotype and environmental conditions affects bacterial density in Wolbachia symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mouton, Laurence; Henri, Hélène; Charif, Delphine; Boulétreau, Michel; Vavre, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of microbial population density is a necessity in stable symbiotic interactions. In Wolbachia symbiosis, both bacterial and host genotypes are involved in density regulation, but environmental factors may also affect bacterial population density. Here, we studied the interaction between three strains of Wolbachia in two divergent homozygous lines of the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma at two different temperatures. Wolbachia density varied between the two host genotypes at only one tem...

  3. Endothelial heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfation levels regulate angiogenic responses of endothelial cells to fibroblast growth factor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreras, C.; Rushton, G.; Cole, C.L.; Babur, Muhammad; Telfer, B.A.; Kuppevelt, A.H. van; Gardiner, J.M.; Williams, K.J.; Jayson, G.C.; Avizienyte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) are potent pro-angiogenic growth factors that play a pivotal role in tumor angiogenesis. The activity of these growth factors is regulated by heparan sulfate (HS), which is essential for the formation of FGF2/FG

  4. Sox2, a key factor in the regulation of pluripotency and neural differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuchen; Zhang; Wei; Cui

    2014-01-01

    Sex determining region Y-box 2(Sox2), a member of the SoxB1 transcription factor family, is an important transcriptional regulator in pluripotent stem cells(PSCs). Together with octamer-binding transcription factor 4 and Nanog, they co-operatively control gene expression in PSCs and maintain their pluripotency. Furthermore, Sox2 plays an essential role in somatic cell reprogram-ming, reversing the epigenetic configuration of differ-entiated cells back to a pluripotent embryonic state. In addition to its role in regulation of pluripotency, Sox2 is also a critical factor for directing the differentiation of PSCs to neural progenitors and for maintaining the properties of neural progenitor stem cells. Here, we review recent findings concerning the involvement of Sox2 in pluripotency, somatic cell reprogramming and neural differentiation as well as the molecular mecha-nisms underlying these roles.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Xander M.; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallström, Björn M.; Li, Shangzhong; Voldborg, Bjørn G.; Meng, Brandon X.; McKee, Karen K.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand the role of glycosaminoglycans in bacterial cellular invasion, xylosyltransferase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-cas9) gene targeting. When these mutants were compared to the pgsA745 cell line, a CHO xylosyltransferase mutant generated previously using chemical mutagenesis, an unexpected result was obtained. Bacterial invasion of pgsA745 cells by group B Streptococcus (GBS), group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus was markedly reduced compared to the invasion of wild-type cells, but newly generated CRISPR-cas9 mutants were only resistant to GBS. Invasion of pgsA745 cells was not restored by transfection with xylosyltransferase, suggesting that an additional mutation conferring panresistance to multiple bacteria was present in pgsA745 cells. Whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) uncovered a deletion in the gene encoding the laminin subunit α2 (Lama2) that eliminated much of domain L4a. Silencing of the long Lama2 isoform in wild-type cells strongly reduced bacterial invasion, whereas transfection with human LAMA2 cDNA significantly enhanced invasion in pgsA745 cells. The addition of exogenous laminin-α2β1γ1/laminin-α2β2γ1 strongly increased bacterial invasion in CHO cells, as well as in human alveolar basal epithelial and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, the L4a domain in laminin α2 is important for cellular invasion by a number of bacterial pathogens. PMID:28074024

  6. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  7. Effects of interactions of auxin-producing bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes on regulation of peanut growths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil.

  8. Tetracyclines in Food and Feedingstuffs: From Regulation to Analytical Methods, Bacterial Resistance, and Environmental and Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Granados-Chinchilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are widely used as growth promoters in animal husbandry; among them, the tetracyclines are a chemical group of relevance, due to their wide use in agriculture, surpassing in quantities applied almost every other antibiotic family. Seeing the considerable amounts of tetracyclines used worldwide, monitoring of these antibiotics is paramount. Advances must be made in the analysis of antibiotics to assess correct usage and dosage of tetracyclines in food and feedstuffs and possible residues in pertinent environmental samples. The tetracyclines are still considered a clinically relevant group of antibiotics, though dissemination of tolerance and resistance determinants have limited their use. This review focuses on four different aspects: (i tetracyclines, usage, dosages, and regulatory issues that govern their food-related application, with particular attention to the prohibitions and restrictions that several countries have enforced in recent years by agencies from both the United States and the European Union, (ii analytical methods for tetracyclines, determination, and residues thereof in feedstuffs and related matrices with an emphasis on the most relevant and novel techniques, including both screening and confirmatory methods, (iii tetracycline resistance and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in feedstuff, and (iv environmental and health risks accompanying the use of tetracyclines in animal nutrition. In the last two cases, we discuss the more relevant undesirable effects that tetracyclines exert over bacterial communities and nontarget species including unwanted effects in farmers.

  9. Tetracyclines in Food and Feedingstuffs: From Regulation to Analytical Methods, Bacterial Resistance, and Environmental and Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Chinchilla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are widely used as growth promoters in animal husbandry; among them, the tetracyclines are a chemical group of relevance, due to their wide use in agriculture, surpassing in quantities applied almost every other antibiotic family. Seeing the considerable amounts of tetracyclines used worldwide, monitoring of these antibiotics is paramount. Advances must be made in the analysis of antibiotics to assess correct usage and dosage of tetracyclines in food and feedstuffs and possible residues in pertinent environmental samples. The tetracyclines are still considered a clinically relevant group of antibiotics, though dissemination of tolerance and resistance determinants have limited their use. This review focuses on four different aspects: (i) tetracyclines, usage, dosages, and regulatory issues that govern their food-related application, with particular attention to the prohibitions and restrictions that several countries have enforced in recent years by agencies from both the United States and the European Union, (ii) analytical methods for tetracyclines, determination, and residues thereof in feedstuffs and related matrices with an emphasis on the most relevant and novel techniques, including both screening and confirmatory methods, (iii) tetracycline resistance and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in feedstuff, and (iv) environmental and health risks accompanying the use of tetracyclines in animal nutrition. In the last two cases, we discuss the more relevant undesirable effects that tetracyclines exert over bacterial communities and nontarget species including unwanted effects in farmers. PMID:28168081

  10. Wound induced tanscriptional regulation of benzylisoquinoline pathway and characterization of wound inducible PsWRKY transcription factor from Papaver somniferum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Mishra

    Full Text Available Wounding is required to be made in the walls of the green seed pod of Opium poppy prior exudation of latex. To withstand this kind of trauma plants regulate expression of some metabolites through an induced transcript level. 167 unique wound-inducible ESTs were identified by a repetitive round of cDNA subtraction after 5 hours of wounding in Papaver somniferum seedlings. Further repetitive reverse northern analysis of these ESTs revealed 80 transcripts showing more than two fold induction, validated through semi-quantitative RT-PCR & real time expression analysis. One of the major classified categories among identified ESTs belonged to benzylisoquinoline transcripts. Tissue specific metabolite analysis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs in response to wounding revealed increased accumulation of narcotine and papaverine. Promoter analysis of seven transcripts of BIAs pathway showed the presence of W-box cis-element with the consensus sequence of TGAC, which is the proposed binding site for WRKY type transcription factors. One of the Wound inducible 'WRKY' EST isolated from our subtracted library was made full-length and named as 'PsWRKY'. Bacterially expressed PsWRKY interacted with the W-box element having consensus sequence TTGACT/C present in the promoter region of BIAs biosynthetic pathway genes. PsWRKY further activated the TYDC promoter in yeast and transiently in tobacco BY2 cells. Preferential expression of PsWRKY in straw and capsule and its interaction with consensus W-box element present in BIAs pathway gene transcripts suggest its possible involvement in the wound induced regulation of BIAs pathway.

  11. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa SoxR does not conform to the archetypal paradigm for SoxR-dependent regulation of the bacterial oxidative stress adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Marco; Zurita, Juan; Ferreras, Julian A; Worgall, Stefan; Larone, Davise H; Shi, Lei; Campagne, Fabien; Quadri, Luis E N

    2005-05-01

    SoxR is a transcriptional regulator that controls an oxidative stress response in Escherichia coli. The regulator is primarily activated by superoxide anion-dependent oxidation. Activated SoxR turns on transcription of a single gene, soxS, which encodes a transcriptional regulator that activates a regulon that includes dozens of oxidative stress response genes. SoxR homologues have been identified in many bacterial species, including the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the expected SoxR partner, SoxS, has not been found in P. aeruginosa. Thus, the primary gene target(s) of P. aeruginosa SoxR is unknown and the involvement of this regulator in the oxidative stress response of the bacterium remains unclear. We utilized transcriptome profiling to identify the P. aeruginosa SoxR regulon and constructed and characterized an unmarked P. aeruginosa DeltasoxR mutant. We provide evidence indicating that P. aeruginosa SoxR activates a six-gene regulon in response to O(2)(.-)-induced stress. The regulon includes three transcriptional units: (i) the recently identified mexGHI-ompD four-gene operon, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump system involved in quorum-sensing signal homeostasis; (ii) gene PA3718, encoding a probable efflux pump; and (iii) gene PA2274, encoding a probable monooxygenase. We also demonstrate that P. aeruginosa SoxR is not a key regulatory player in the oxidative stress response. Finally, we show that P. aeruginosa SoxR is required for virulence in a mouse model of intrapulmonary infection. These results demonstrate that the E. coli-based SoxRS paradigm does not hold in P. aeruginosa and foster new hypotheses for the possible physiological role of P. aeruginosa SoxR.

  13. Regulation of Virulence of Entamoeba histolytica by the URE3-BP Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Moore, Ellyn S; Zhang, Yan; Bousquet, Christina B; Lannigan, Joanne A; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2010-05-18

    It is not understood why only some infections with Entamoeba histolytica result in disease. The calcium-regulated transcription factor upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) was initially identified by virtue of its role in regulating the expression of two amebic virulence genes, the Gal/GalNac lectin and ferredoxin. Here we tested whether this transcription factor has a broader role in regulating virulence. A comparison of in vivo to in vitro parasite gene expression demonstrated that 39% of in vivo regulated transcripts contained the URE3 motif recognized by URE3-BP, compared to 23% of all promoters (P < 0.0001). Amebae induced to express a dominant positive mutant form of URE3-BP had an increase in an elongated morphology (30% +/- 6% versus 14% +/- 5%; P = 0.001), a 2-fold competitive advantage at invading the intestinal epithelium (P = 0.017), and a 3-fold increase in liver abscess size (0.1 +/- 0.1 g versus 0.036 +/- 0.1 g; P = 0.03). These results support a role for URE3-BP in virulence regulation.

  14. Transcription factor ICBP90 regulates the MIF promoter and immune susceptibility locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Leng, Lin; Sauler, Maor; Fu, Weiling; Zheng, Junsong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lee, Patty; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus that is linked to the susceptibility of autoimmune and infectious diseases. The MIF promoter contains a 4-nucleotide microsatellite polymorphism (-794 CATT) that repeats 5 to 8 times in the locus, with greater numbers of repeats associated with higher mRNA levels. Because there is no information about the transcriptional regulation of these common alleles, we used oligonucleotide affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify nuclear proteins that interact with the -794 CATT5-8 site. An analysis of monocyte nuclear lysates revealed that the transcription factor ICBP90 (also known as UHRF1) is the major protein interacting with the MIF microsatellite. We found that ICBP90 is essential for MIF transcription from monocytes/macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, and synovial fibroblasts, and TLR-induced MIF transcription is regulated in an ICBP90- and -794 CATT5-8 length-dependent manner. Whole-genome transcription analysis of ICBP90 shRNA-treated rheumatoid synoviocytes uncovered a subset of proinflammatory and immune response genes that overlapped with those regulated by MIF shRNA. In addition, the expression levels of ICBP90 and MIF were correlated in joint synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings identify ICBP90 as a key regulator of MIF transcription and provide functional insight into the regulation of the polymorphic MIF locus.

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α is an essential catabolic regulator of inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hwang Ryu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disorder that manifests as chronic inflammation and joint tissue destruction. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of RA have not been fully elucidated. Here, we explored the role of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, HIF-1α (encoded by HIF1A and HIF-2α (encoded by EPAS1. HIF-2α was markedly up-regulated in the intimal lining of RA synovium, whereas HIF-1α was detected in a few cells in the sublining and deep layer of RA synovium. Overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues caused an RA-like phenotype, whereas HIF-1α did not affect joint architecture. Moreover, a HIF-2α deficiency in mice blunted the development of experimental RA. HIF-2α was expressed mainly in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS of RA synovium and regulated their proliferation, expression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and various catabolic factors, and osteoclastogenic potential. Moreover, HIF-2α-dependent up-regulation of interleukin (IL-6 in FLS stimulated differentiation of TH17 cells-crucial effectors of RA pathogenesis. Additionally, in the absence of IL-6 (Il6-/- mice, overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues did not cause an RA phenotype. Thus, our results collectively suggest that HIF-2α plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of RA by regulating FLS functions, independent of HIF-1α.

  16. Regulation of Steroidogenesis, Development, and Cell Differentiation by Steroidogenic Factor-1 and Liver Receptor Homolog-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Takashi; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Kaoru; Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Umezawa, Akihiro; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2015-08-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) and liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are categorized as orphan receptors. In addition to other nuclear receptors, these play roles in various physiological phenomena by regulating the transcription of target genes. Both factors share very similar structures and exhibit common functions. Of these, the roles of SF-1 and LRH-1 in steroidogenesis are the most important, especially that of SF-1, which was originally discovered and named to reflect such roles. SF-1 and LRH-1 are essential for steroid hormone production in gonads and adrenal glands through the regulation of various steroidogenesis-related genes. As SF-1 is also necessary for the development of gonads and adrenal glands, it is also considered a master regulator of steroidogenesis. Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that LRH-1 also represents another master regulator of steroidogenesis, which similarly to SF-1, can induce differentiation of non-steroidogenic stem cells into steroidogenic cells. Here, we review the functions of both factors in these steroidogenesis-related phenomena.

  17. Krüppel-like factor 4, a novel transcription factor regulates microglial activation and subsequent neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sulagna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS, is the hallmark of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases and other pathological conditions associated with CNS infection. The activation of microglia is often associated with bystander neuronal death. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is one of the important transcription factors known to be associated with microglial activation which upregulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have focused on the role of Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4, one of the zinc-finger transcription factors, in mediating inflammation. However, these studies were limited to peripheral system and its role in CNS is not understood. Our studies focused on the possible role of Klf4 in mediating CNS inflammation. Methods For in vitro studies, mouse microglial BV-2 cell lines were treated with 500 ng/ml Salmonella enterica lipopolysacchride (LPS. Brain tissues were isolated from BALB/c mice administered with 5 mg/kg body weight of LPS. Expressions of Klf4, Cox-2, iNOS and pNF-κB were evaluated using western blotting, quantitative real time PCR, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Klf4 knockdown was carried out using SiRNA specific for Klf4 mRNA and luciferase assays and electromobility shift assay (EMSA were performed to study the interaction of Klf4 to iNOS promoter elements in vitro. Co-immunoprecipitation of Klf4 and pNF-κB was done in order to study a possible interaction between the two transcription factors. Results LPS stimulation increased Klf4 expression in microglial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of Klf4 resulted in decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-6, along with a significant decrease in iNOS and Cox-2 expression. NO production also decreased as a result of Klf4 knockdown

  18. Transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of CSLA9 encoding mannan synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Chan; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kim, Yongsig; Park, Sunchung; Thomashow, Michael F; Keegstra, Kenneth; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have a structural role and serve as storage reserves during plant growth and development. Previous studies led to the conclusion that mannan synthase enzymes in several plant species are encoded by members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) gene family. Arabidopsis has nine members of the CSLA gene family. Earlier work has shown that CSLA9 is responsible for the majority of glucomannan synthesis in both primary and secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. Little is known about how expression of the CLSA9 gene is regulated. Sequence analysis of the CSLA9 promoter region revealed the presence of multiple copies of a cis-regulatory motif (M46RE) recognized by transcription factor MYB46, leading to the hypothesis that MYB46 (At5g12870) is a direct regulator of the mannan synthase CLSA9. We obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. First, the expression of CSLA9 was substantially upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. Second, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to demonstrate the direct binding of MYB46 to the promoter of CSLA9 in vitro. This interaction was further confirmed in vivo by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, over-expression of MYB46 resulted in a significant increase in mannan content. Considering the multifaceted nature of MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, we reasoned that additional transcription factors are involved in the CSLA9 regulation. This hypothesis was tested by carrying out yeast-one hybrid screening, which identified ANAC041 and bZIP1 as direct regulators of CSLA9. Transcriptional activation assays and EMSA were used to confirm the yeast-one hybrid results. Taken together, we report that transcription factors ANAC041, bZIP1 and MYB46 directly regulate the expression of CSLA9.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. (Univ. of Freiburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  20. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Orazi Gabriella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2 plays an essential role in restraining tumor progression as it may regulate, by itself or within multiprotein complexes, many proteins (mainly transcription factors involved in cell growth and apoptosis. This study takes advantage of the recent finding that HIPK2 may repress the β-catenin transcription activity. Thus, we investigated whether HIPK2 overexpression may down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels (a β-catenin target gene and the role of β-catenin in this regulation, in order to consider HIPK2 as a tool for novel anti-tumoral therapeutical approaches. Methods The regulation of VEGF expression by HIPK2 was evaluated by using luciferase assay with VEGF reporter construct, after overexpression of the β-catenin transcription factor. Relative quantification of VEGF and β-catenin mRNAs were assessed by reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analyses, following HIPK2 overexpression, while β-catenin protein levels were evaluated by western immunoblotting. Results HIPK2 overexpression in tumor cells downregulated VEGF mRNA levels and VEGF promoter activity. The VEGF downregulation was partly depending on HIPK2-mediated β-catenin regulation. Thus, HIPK2 could induce β-catenin protein degradation that was prevented by cell treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. The β-catenin degradation was dependent on HIPK2 catalytic activity and independent of p53 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β activities. Conclusion These results suggest that VEGF might be a target of HIPK2, at least in part, through regulation of β-catenin activity. These findings support the function of HIPK2 as tumor suppressor and hypothesise a role for HIPK2 as antiangiogenic tool in tumor therapy approaches.

  1. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  2. Pleiohomeotic interacts with the core transcription elongation factor Spt5 to regulate gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harvey

    Full Text Available The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho, and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner.

  3. Direct Regulation of rRNA Transcription by Fibroblast Growth Factor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Zhi; Liang, Yanping; Lin, Chih-Yin; Comai, Lucio; Chirico, William J

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which is highly expressed in developing tissues and malignant cells, regulates cell growth, differentiation, and migration. Five isoforms (18 to ∼34 kDa) of FGF-2 are derived from alternative initiation codons of a single mRNA. The 18-kDa FGF-2 isoform is released from cells by a nonclassical secretory pathway and regulates gene expression by binding to cell surface receptors. This isoform also localizes to the nucleolus, raising the possibility that it may...

  4. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  5. Situational Awareness: Regulation of the Myb Transcription Factor in Differentiation, the Cell Cycle and Oncogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Olivia L.; Ness, Scott A., E-mail: sness@salud.unm.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Molecular Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, MSC07 4025-CRF 121, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    This review summarizes the mechanisms that control the activity of the c-Myb transcription factor in normal cells and tumors, and discusses how c-Myb plays a role in the regulation of the cell cycle. Oncogenic versions of c-Myb contribute to the development of leukemias and solid tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, breast cancer and colon cancer. The activity and specificity of the c-Myb protein seems to be controlled through changes in protein-protein interactions, so understanding how it is regulated could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan isoforms of the CD44 hyaluronan receptor induced in human inflammatory macrophages can function as paracrine regulators of fibroblast growth factor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Tussey, L; Athanasou, N; Jackson, D G

    2000-03-17

    The CD44 glycoprotein is expressed in multiple isoforms on a variety of cell types where it functions as a receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility. Recently, interest has centered on CD44 heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) isoforms because of their potential to sequester heparin-binding growth factors and chemokines. Expression of these isoforms on ectodermal cells has recently been shown to regulate limb morphogenesis via presentation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 4/FGF 8 while expression on tumor cells was shown to sequester hepatocyte growth factor and promote tumor dissemination. To date, however, CD44 HSPG expression in tissue macrophages and lymphocytes has not been adequately investigated, despite the fact these cells actively synthesize growth factors and chemokines and indirect evidence that monocyte CD44 sequesters macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta. Here we show primary human monocytes rather than lymphocytes express CD44 HSPGs, but only following in vitro differentiation to macrophages or activation with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1alpha or bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, we show these isoforms are preferentially modified with heparan rather than chondroitin sulfate, bind the macrophage-derived growth factors FGF-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with varying affinities (K(d) 25-330 nM) and in the case of FGF-2, can stimulate productive binding to the high affinity tyrosine kinase FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1). In contrast, we find no evidence for significant binding to C-C chemokines. Last, we confirm by immunofluorescent antibody staining that inflamed synovial membrane macrophages express CD44 HSPGs and that expression is greatest in cells containing high FGF-2 levels. These results suggest a paracrine role for macrophage CD44 HSPG isoforms in the regulation of growth factor action during inflammation.

  7. A multi-scale model of hepcidin promoter regulation reveals factors controlling systemic iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Casanovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic iron homeostasis involves a negative feedback circuit in which the expression level of the peptide hormone hepcidin depends on and controls the iron blood levels. Hepcidin expression is regulated by the BMP6/SMAD and IL6/STAT signaling cascades. Deregulation of either pathway causes iron-related diseases such as hemochromatosis or anemia of inflammation. We quantitatively analyzed how BMP6 and IL6 control hepcidin expression. Transcription factor (TF phosphorylation and reporter gene expression were measured under co-stimulation conditions, and the promoter was perturbed by mutagenesis. Using mathematical modeling, we systematically analyzed potential mechanisms of cooperative and competitive promoter regulation by the transcription factors, and experimentally validated the model predictions. Our results reveal that hepcidin cross-regulation primarily occurs by combinatorial transcription factor binding to the promoter, whereas signaling crosstalk is insignificant. We find that the presence of two BMP-responsive elements enhances the steepness of the promoter response towards the iron-sensing BMP signaling axis, which promotes iron homeostasis in vivo. IL6 co-stimulation reduces the promoter sensitivity towards the BMP signal, because the SMAD and STAT transcription factors compete for recruiting RNA polymerase to the transcription start site. This may explain why inflammatory signals disturb iron homeostasis in anemia of inflammation. Taken together, our results reveal why the iron homeostasis circuit is sensitive to perturbations implicated in disease.

  8. PAK1 negatively regulates the activity of the Rho exchange factor NET1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Arthur S; Qin, Huajun; Carr, Heather S; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2005-04-01

    Rho family small G-protein activity is controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange factors that stimulate the release of GDP, thus allowing GTP binding. Once activated, Rho proteins control cell signaling through interactions with downstream effector proteins, leading to changes in cytoskeletal organization and gene expression. The ability of Rho family members to modulate the activity of other Rho proteins is also intrinsic to these processes. In this work we show that the Rac/Cdc42hs-regulated protein kinase PAK1 down-regulates the activity of the RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor NET1. Specifically, PAK1 phosphorylates NET1 on three sites in vitro: serines 152, 153, and 538. Replacement of serines 152 and 153 with glutamate residues down-regulates the activity of NET1 as an exchange factor in vitro and its ability to stimulate actin stress fiber formation in cells. Using a phospho-specific antibody that recognizes NET1 phosphorylated on serine 152, we show that PAK1 phosphorylates NET1 on this site in cells and that Rac1 stimulates serine 152 phosphorylation in a PAK1-dependent manner. Furthermore, coexpression of constitutively active PAK1 inhibits the ability of NET1 to stimulate actin polymerization only when serines 152 and 153 are present. These data provide a novel mechanism for the control of RhoA activity by Rac1 through the PAK-dependent phosphorylation of NET1 to reduce its activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

  9. Molecular cloning and expression of a hexameric Drosophila heat shock factor subject to negative regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clos, J; Westwood, J T; Becker, P B; Wilson, S; Lambert, K; Wu, C

    1990-11-30

    We report the cloning of the transcriptional activator of heat shock genes, HSF, from Drosophila. The predicted sequence of Drosophila HSF protein is surprisingly divergent from that of yeast HSF, except in regions important for DNA binding and oligomerization. A segment of the DNA binding domain of HSF bears an intriguing similarity to the putative DNA recognition helix of bacterial sigma factors, while the oligomerization domain contains an unusual arrangement of conserved hydrophobic heptad repeats. Drosophila HSF produced in E. coli under nonshock conditions forms a hexamer that binds specifically to DNA with high affinity and activates transcription from a heat shock promoter in vitro. In contrast, when HSF is expressed in Xenopus oocytes, maximal DNA binding affinity is observed only after heat shock induction. These results suggest that Drosophila HSF has an intrinsic affinity for DNA, which is repressed under nonshock conditions in vivo.

  10. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  11. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the cold stress response by slowing translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Jackson, Thomas J; Utami, Wahyu; Barrett, David A; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2015-01-15

    Cells respond to external stress conditions by controlling gene expression, a process which occurs rapidly via post-transcriptional regulation at the level of protein synthesis. Global control of translation is mediated by modification of translation factors to allow reprogramming of the translatome and synthesis of specific proteins that are required for stress protection or initiation of apoptosis. In the present study, we have investigated how global protein synthesis rates are regulated upon mild cooling. We demonstrate that although there are changes to the factors that control initiation, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) on the α-subunit, the reduction in the global translation rate is mediated by regulation of elongation via phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) by its specific kinase, eEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase). The AMP/ATP ratio increases following cooling, consistent with a reduction in metabolic rates, giving rise to activation of AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase), which is upstream of eEF2K. However, our data show that the major trigger for activation of eEF2K upon mild cooling is the release of Ca2+ ions from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and, importantly, that it is possible to restore protein synthesis rates in cooled cells by inhibition of this pathway at multiple points. As cooling has both therapeutic and industrial applications, our data provide important new insights into how the cellular responses to this stress are regulated, opening up new possibilities to modulate these responses for medical or industrial use at physiological or cooler temperatures.

  12. Biocorrosion: pH regulation by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Biocorrosion: regulation du pH par les bacteries sulfato-reductrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crolet, J.L. (Societe Nationale des Petroles d' Aquitaine (SNPA), 64 - Pau (France)); Daumas, S. (GRAM, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)); Magot, M. (Sanofi Elf Bio Recherches, 31 - Labege (France))

    1992-01-01

    Association between microbiology bacteria metabolisms knowledge and water chemistry corrosion in presence of acid gases CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S leads to the conclusion that sulfate reducing bacteria regulate their environment pH around a value corresponding to a no acid production. Experimental results of the proposed model are presented with explanation of pitting corrosion, with a theoretical sorting of the most dangerous strains, and for petroleum exploitation: the potential link between the most severe bacteria corrosion and oxygen entrances, thiosulfates presence and other intermediate oxidation compounds of sulfur. (A.B.). 17 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Inter- and intra-combinatorial regulation by transcription factors and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joseph T

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a novel class of non-coding small RNAs. In mammalian cells, miRNAs repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs or degrade mRNAs. miRNAs play important roles in development and differentiation, and they are also implicated in aging, and oncogenesis. Predictions of targets of miRNAs suggest that they may regulate more than one-third of all genes. The overall functions of mammalian miRNAs remain unclear. Combinatorial regulation by transcription factors alone or miRNAs alone offers a wide range of regulatory programs. However, joining transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms enables higher complexity regulatory programs that in turn could give cells evolutionary advantages. Investigating coordinated regulation of genes by miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs from a statistical standpoint is a first step that may elucidate some of their roles in various biological processes. Results Here, we studied the nature and scope of coordination among regulators from the transcriptional and miRNA regulatory layers in the human genome. Our findings are based on genome wide statistical assessment of regulatory associations ("interactions" among the sets of predicted targets of miRNAs and sets of putative targets of transcription factors. We found that combinatorial regulation by transcription factor pairs and miRNA pairs is much more abundant than the combinatorial regulation by TF-miRNA pairs. In addition, many of the strongly interacting TF-miRNA pairs involve a subset of master TF regulators that co-regulate genes in coordination with almost any miRNA. Application of standard measures for evaluating the degree of interaction between pairs of regulators show that strongly interacting TF-miRNA, TF-TF or miRNA-miRNA pairs tend to include TFs or miRNAs that regulate very large numbers of genes. To correct for this potential bias we introduced an additional Bayesian measure that incorporates

  14. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, David J. van; Lee Van Horn, M.; Barrett, John E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Altrichter, Adam E; Geyer, Kevin M; Lydia H Zeglin; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between ...

  15. Soil factors involved in the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, B B; Montes-Borrego, M; Aranda, S; Soriano, M A; Gómez, J A; Navas-Cortés, J A

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency in olive production systems to reduce tillage or keep a vegetative cover to reduce soil erosion and degradation. However, there is scarce information on the effects of different soil management systems (SMS) in soil bacterial community composition of olive groves. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of soil type and different SMS implemented to control weeds in the structure and diversity of bacterial communities of 58 soils in the two geographic areas that best represent the organic olive production systems in Spain. Bacterial community composition assessed by frequency and intensity of occurrence of terminal restriction profiles (TRFs) derived from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of amplified 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid were strongly correlated with soil type/field site (Eutric/Calcaric) that differed mainly in soil particle size distribution and soil pH, followed by a strong effect of SMS, in that order. Canonical discriminant (CD) analysis of TRFs properly classified all of the olive orchard soils as belonging to their respective soil type or SMS. Furthermore, only a small set of TRFs were enough to clearly and significantly differentiate soil samples according to soil type or SMS. Those specific TRFs could be used as bioindicators to assess the effect of changes in SMS aimed to enhance soil quality in olive production systems.

  16. An Optimal Free Energy Dissipation Strategy of the MinCDE Oscillator in Regulating Symmetric Bacterial Cell Division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Xiong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustained molecular oscillations are ubiquitous in biology. The obtained oscillatory patterns provide vital functions as timekeepers, pacemakers and spacemarkers. Models based on control theory have been introduced to explain how specific oscillatory behaviors stem from protein interaction feedbacks, whereas the energy dissipation through the oscillating processes and its role in the regulatory function remain unexplored. Here we developed a general framework to assess an oscillator's regulation performance at different dissipation levels. Using the Escherichia coli MinCDE oscillator as a model system, we showed that a sufficient amount of energy dissipation is needed to switch on the oscillation, which is tightly coupled to the system's regulatory performance. Once the dissipation level is beyond this threshold, unlike stationary regulators' monotonic performance-to-cost relation, excess dissipation at certain steps in the oscillating process damages the oscillator's regulatory performance. We further discovered that the chemical free energy from ATP hydrolysis has to be strategically assigned to the MinE-aided MinD release and the MinD immobilization steps for optimal performance, and a higher energy budget improves the robustness of the oscillator. These results unfold a novel mode by which living systems trade energy for regulatory function.

  17. Blocking transforming growth factor- receptor signaling down-regulates transforming growth factor-β1 autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 蔡泽浩; 王丹茹; 武小莉; 崔磊; 商庆新; 钱云良; 曹谊林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts and theregulation effect of blocking TGF-β intracellular signalingon rhTGF-β1 autoproduction.Methods: Keloid fibroblasts cultured in vitro weretreated with either rhTGF-β1 (5 ng/ml ) or recombinantadenovirus containing a truncated type II TGF-β receptorgene (50 pfu/cell ). Their effects of regulating geneexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I and II wereobserved with Northern blot.Results: rhTGF-β1 up-regulated the gene expressionof TGF-β1 and receptor I, but not receptor II. Over-expression of the truncated receptor II down-regulated thegene expression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I, but notreceptor II.Conclusions: TGF-β1 autoproduction was observed inkeloid fibroblasts. Over-expression of the truncated TGF-βreceptor H decreased TGF-β1 autoproduction via blockingTGF-β receptor signaling.

  18. Antiproliferative factor regulates connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matika, Christina A.; Wasilewski, Melissa; Arnott, John A.; Planey, Sonia Lobo

    2012-01-01

    Antiproliferative factor (APF) is a sialoglycopeptide elevated in the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis (IC)—a chronic, painful bladder disease of unknown etiology. APF inhibits the proliferation of normal bladder epithelial and T24 bladder carcinoma cells in vitro by binding to cytoskeleton-associated protein 4 (CKAP4) and altering the transcription of genes involved in proliferation, cellular adhesion, and tumorigenesis; however, specific molecular mechanisms and effector genes that control APF's antiproliferative effects are unknown. In this study, we found that there was a 7.5-fold up-regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells treated with APF. Western blot revealed a dose-dependent increase in CCN2 protein levels, with secretion into the culture medium after APF treatment. CCN2 overexpression enhanced APF's antiproliferative activity, whereas CCN2 knockdown diminished APF-induced p53 expression. Using a luciferase reporter construct, we found that APF treatment resulted in fivefold activation of the CCN2 proximal promoter and, of importance, that small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CKAP4 inhibited CCN2 upregulation. In addition, we demonstrate that CKAP4 translocates to the nucleus and binds to the CCN2 proximal promoter in an APF-dependent manner, providing evidence that CCN2 regulation by APF involves CKAP4 nuclear translocation and binding to the CCN2 promoter. PMID:22438586

  19. 拟核结合蛋白与细菌基因的表达调控%Nucleoid-associated Proteins and Their Roles in the Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊祥宇; 王洪海; 谢建平

    2011-01-01

    拟核结合蛋白是细菌遗传物质组织和基因表达调控的关键.细茵基因组压缩为致密的拟核必需有拟核结合蛋白的支撑.拟核结合蛋白、DNA超螺旋和大分子簇在拟核的结构形成中起到重要作用,其中拟核结合蛋白最重要.拟核结合蛋白还影响细茵DNA的复制、重组、转录和修复等多个重要生理过程.作为全局调控因子,拟核结合蛋白是调控细菌适应环境变化所需基因表达的关键.本文总结拟核结合蛋白的结构、功能和调控,特别是其在致病与非致病分枝杆菌中的差别,为寻找新药物靶标提供线索.%One hallmark of bacterial genome is the compact structure called the nucleoid. However, this dense structure poses special challenges for bacteria. The formation of this compressed structure and disentanglement upon particular gene expression requires multiple factors, such as molecular crowding,DNA supercoils and nucleoid-associated proteins (NAP). NAPs are believed to be the most important factors underlying above intricate process. There are many molecules belonging to NAPs, which associate with the chromosomal DNA and facilitate the latter to fold into a compact structure by bridging, bending or wrapping DNA. NAPs are versatile. They also involved in a plethora essential biological processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, DNA recombination and DNA replication. As a global regulator, NAP is pivotal in coordinating the bacterial gene expression to adapt to the environmental fluctuation. The fundamental structure, function and regulation of NAPs are summarized in this paper with particular emphasis on the NAPs difference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria. The prospect of employing these differences to find novel drug targets against tuberculosis is also discussed.

  20. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W.; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D.; Kim, Kwang S.; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-01

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  1. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  2. Ion channels, guidance molecules, intracellular signaling and transcription factors regulating nervous and vascular system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tenpei; Kumada, Tatsuro; Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Egea, Joaquim; Yamagishi, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Our sophisticated thoughts and behaviors are based on the miraculous development of our complex nervous network system, in which many different types of proteins and signaling cascades are regulated in a temporally and spatially ordered manner. Here we review our recent attempts to grasp the principles of nervous system development in terms of general cellular phenomena and molecules, such as volume-regulated anion channels, intracellular Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling, the Npas4 transcription factor and the FLRT family of axon guidance molecules. We also present an example illustrating that the same FLRT family may regulate the development of vascular networks as well. The aim of this review is to open up new vistas for understanding the intricacy of nervous and vascular system development.

  3. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues > Conditions > Sexually Transmitted > Bacterial Vaginosis Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by ...

  4. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  5. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  6. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 expression is regulated by insulin and glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Jose Barrera Roa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. They are classified into three groups: the gastric peptides (TFF1, spasmolytic peptide (TFF2 and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3. Previous studies have shown that trefoil factors are located and expressed in human endocrine pancreas suggesting that TFF3 play a role in: a pancreatic cells migration, b β-cell mitosis, and c pancreatic cells regeneration. We speculated that the presence of TFF3 in pancreas, could be associated to a possible regulation mechanism by insulin and glucose. To date, there are not reports whether the unbalance in carbohydrate metabolism observed in diabetes could affect the production or expression of TFF3.Methods: We determined the TFF3 levels and expression by immunoassay (ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique respectively, of intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29 treated with glucose and insulin. Also,Real Time-PCR (RTq-PCR was done.Results: Increasing concentrations of glucose improved TFF3 expression and these levels were further elevated after insulin treatment. Insulin treatment also led to the up-regulation of human sodium/glucose transporter 1 (hSGLT1, which further increases intracellular glucose levels. Finally, we investigated theTFF3 levels in serum of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM and healthy patients. Here we shown that serum TFF3 levels were down-regulated in T1DM and this levels were up-regulated after insulin treatment. Also, the TFF3 levels of healthy donors were up-regulated 2 h after breakfast.Conclusion: Our fi ndings suggest for the fi rst time that insulin signaling is important for TFF3 optimal expression in serum and intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming.

  8. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis.

  9. Low fucose containing bacterial polysaccharide facilitate mitochondria-dependent ROS-induced apoptosis of human lung epithelial carcinoma via controlled regulation of MAPKs-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 homeostasis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sen, Ramkrishna; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), the key mediators of cellular oxidative stress and redox dysregulation involved in cancer initiation and progression, have recently emerged as promising targets for anticancer drug discovery. Continuous free radical assault upsets homeostasis in cellular redox system and regulates the associated signaling pathways to mediate stress-induced cell death. This study investigates the dose-specific pro-oxidative behavior of a bacterial fucose polysaccharide, which attenuated proliferation of different cancer cells. In the fermentation process, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 [GenBank Accession Number HM371417] was found to biosynthesize a polysaccharide with low-fucose content (4.9%), which conferred the maximum anti-proliferative activity (750 µg/mL) against human lung cancer epithelial cells (A549) during preliminary screening. Structural elucidation and morphological characterization of the duly purified polysaccharide was done using HPLC, GC-MS, (1)H/(13)C NMR, and microscopy. The polysaccharide exhibited concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effects against A549 cells by inducing intracellular ROS level and regulating the mitochondrial membrane-permeability following the apoptotic pathway. This process encompasses activation of caspase-8/9/3/7, increase in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2 ratio, translocation of Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytochrome c, decrease in expression of anti-apoptotic members of Bcl2 family, and phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Apoptosis was attenuated upon pretreatment with specific caspase-inhibitors. Simultaneously, during apoptosis, the ROS-mediated stress as well as activated MAPKs triggered nuclear translocation of transcription factors like nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) and promoted further transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes, which somehow perturbed the chemotherapeutic efficacy of the polysaccharide, although using CuPP, a chemical

  10. Protamine sulfate down-regulates thrombin generation by inhibiting factor V activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Ainle, Fionnuala

    2009-08-20

    Protamine sulfate is a positively charged polypeptide widely used to reverse heparin-induced anticoagulation. Paradoxically, prospective randomized trials have shown that protamine administration for heparin neutralization is associated with increased bleeding, particularly after cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The molecular mechanism(s) through which protamine mediates this anticoagulant effect has not been defined. In vivo administration of pharmacologic doses of protamine to BALB\\/c mice significantly reduced plasma thrombin generation and prolonged tail-bleeding time (from 120 to 199 seconds). Similarly, in pooled normal human plasma, protamine caused significant dose-dependent prolongations of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Protamine also markedly attenuated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation in human plasma, causing a significant decrease in endogenous thrombin potential (41% +\\/- 7%). As expected, low-dose protamine effectively reversed the anticoagulant activity of unfractionated heparin in plasma. However, elevated protamine concentrations were associated with progressive dose-dependent reduction in thrombin generation. To assess the mechanism by which protamine mediates down-regulation of thrombin generation, the effect of protamine on factor V activation was assessed. Protamine was found to significantly reduce the rate of factor V activation by both thrombin and factor Xa. Protamine mediates its anticoagulant activity in plasma by down-regulation of thrombin generation via a novel mechanism, specifically inhibition of factor V activation.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4-hydroxylases regulating erythropoiesis, and hypoxia-inducible lysyl oxidase regulating skeletal muscle development during embryogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Laitala, A. (Anu)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Erythropoiesis is the process of red blood cell production. The main regulator is the erythropoietin (EPO) hormone, which is strongly upregulated in low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in cells via the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF. The stability of HIF is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner by three HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases, all of which are known to participate in the regulation of erythropoiesis. A role in erythropoiesis of a fourth prolyl 4-hydroxylase, P4H-TM...

  12. The carboxyl terminus of RAP30 is similar in sequence to region 4 of bacterial sigma factors and is required for function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, K P; Serizawa, H; Hanley, J P; Bradsher, J N; Tsuboi, A; Arai, N; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1992-11-25

    Transcription factor beta gamma (RAP30/74) from rat liver was previously shown in biochemical studies to control the binding of RNA polymerase II to promoters by a mechanism analogous to that utilized by bacterial sigma factors, by decreasing the affinity of polymerase for nonpromoter sites on DNA and by increasing the affinity of the enzyme for the preinitiation complex (Conaway, R. C., Garrett, K. P., Hanley, J. P., and Conaway, J. W. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 6205-6209). By constructing and analyzing mutants of beta gamma, we have identified a novel functional domain located in the carboxyl terminus of the gamma (RAP30) subunit. This domain shares sequence similarity with region 4 of bacterial sigma factors; in particular, it exhibits striking similarity to the carboxyl-terminal regions 4.1 and 4.2 of SpoIIIC (Bacillus subtilis sigma k). Evidence from biochemical studies argues that a mutant gamma (RAP30), lacking amino acid sequences similar to sigma homology region 4.2, is able to assemble with the beta (RAP74) subunit to form a mutant beta gamma (RAP30/74) with impaired ability to interact with RNA polymerase II.

  13. An R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulates carotenoid pigmentation in Mimulus lewisii flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Janelle M; Stanley, Lauren E; LaFountain, Amy M; Frank, Harry A; Liu, Chang; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-02-01

    Carotenoids are yellow, orange, and red pigments that contribute to the beautiful colors and nutritive value of many flowers and fruits. The structural genes in the highly conserved carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been well characterized in multiple plant systems, but little is known about the transcription factors that control the expression of these structural genes. By analyzing a chemically induced mutant of Mimulus lewisii through bulk segregant analysis and transgenic experiments, we have identified an R2R3-MYB, Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), as the first transcription factor that positively regulates carotenoid biosynthesis during flower development. Loss-of-function mutations in RCP1 lead to down-regulation of all carotenoid biosynthetic genes and reduced carotenoid content in M. lewisii flowers, a phenotype recapitulated by RNA interference in the wild-type background. Overexpression of this gene in the rcp1 mutant background restores carotenoid production and, unexpectedly, results in simultaneous decrease of anthocyanin production in some transgenic lines by down-regulating the expression of an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Identification of transcriptional regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis provides the 'toolbox' genes for understanding the molecular basis of flower color diversification in nature and for potential enhancement of carotenoid production in crop plants via genetic engineering.

  14. What Factors Influence the Relationship Between Feedback on Cognitive Performance and Subsequent Driving Self-Regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michelle L; Vance, David E; Ball, Karlene K

    2016-06-01

    Recent research indicates that providing feedback about cognitive abilities (i.e., UFOV® test performance) may change driving self-regulation; however, 42% of participants who received negative feedback failed to increase driving self-regulation (Ackerman, Ball, Crowe, Owsley, Vance, & Wadley, 2011). The current study extends those findings, using the same sample (N = 129) to investigate factors that may influence the relationship between feedback regarding cognitive abilities and driving self-regulation. Feedback by age and feedback by number of eye conditions showed significant interactions, and feedback by baseline driving exposure interaction approached significance. Older participants (80-94; n = 38) who received negative feedback significantly increased subsequent avoidance of challenging driving conditions relative to baseline. Participants with no reported eye conditions (n = 36) who received negative feedback significantly increased subsequent driving avoidance, and participants below median baseline driving exposure (n = 66) tended to increase subsequent driving avoidance. These results identify individual level factors that may influence the relationship between feedback regarding cognitive abilities and self-regulation and have implications for encouraging older adults to make informed decisions about appropriate driving behavior.

  15. Quantitative Population Epigenetics in Screening and Development of Regulator-Active Factors of the Farming System

    OpenAIRE

    Stauss, R.

    2013-01-01

    Likewise, index selection based on statistical genetic theory in plant and animal breeding the methodology "Quantitative Population Epigenetics" can be appropriated to improve efficiency in screening and development of regulator-active factors of the farming system for potential to enhance quantitative characters such as yield, standability and resistance to unfavorable environmental influences (e.g., water stress, cold temperatures, disease resistance). For example, as was shown for an ef...

  16. Risk factors for otitis media in children with special emphasis on the role of colonization with bacterial airway pathogens: the Generation R study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labout, Joost A M; Duijts, Liesbeth; Lebon, Ankie; de Groot, Ronald; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent V W; Verbrugh, Henri A; Hermans, Peter W M; Moll, Henriëtte A

    2011-01-01

    Acute otitis media is the most frequent diagnosis in children visiting physicians' offices. Risk factors for otitis media have been widely studied. Yet, the correlation between bacterial carriage and the development of otitis media is not entirely clear. Our aim was to study in a population-based prospective cohort the risk factors for otitis media in the second year of life with special emphasis on the role of colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. The study was embedded in the Generation R Study. Data on risk factors and doctor-diagnosed otitis media were obtained by midwives, hospital registries and postal questionnaires in the whole cohort (n = 7,295). Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained at the age of 1.5, 6 and 14 months in the focus cohort (n = 1,079). Of these children, 2,515 (47.2%) suffered at least one period of otitis media in their second year of life. The occurrence of otitis media during the follow-up period in the first 6 months of life and between 6 and 12 months of age was associated with the risk of otitis media in the second year of life (aOR, 1.83 95% CI 1.24-2.71 and aOR 2.72, 95% CI 2.18-3.38, respectively). Having siblings was associated with an increased risk for otitis media in the second year of life (aOR 1.42, 95% CI 1.13-1.79). No associations were found between bacterial carriage in the first year of life and otitis media in the second year of life. In our study, otitis media in the first year of life is an independent risk factor for otitis media in the second year of life. Surprisingly, bacterial carriage in the first year of life did not add to this risk. Moreover, no association was observed between bacterial carriage in the first year of life and otitis in the second year of life.

  17. DMPD: Nuclear factor-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptorsignaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17349209 Nuclear factor-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptor...signaling. Carmody RJ, Chen YH. Cell Mol Immunol. 2007 Feb;4(1):31-41. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear... factor-kappaB: activation and regulation during toll-like receptorsignaling. PubmedID 17349209 Title Nuclear

  18. An NAC transcription factor controls ethylene-regulated cell expansion in flower petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan; Tian, Ji; Luo, Jing; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping

    2013-10-01

    Cell expansion is crucial for plant growth. It is well known that the phytohormone ethylene functions in plant development as a key modulator of cell expansion. However, the role of ethylene in the regulation of this process remains unclear. In this study, 2,189 ethylene-responsive transcripts were identified in rose (Rosa hybrida) petals using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis. Among these transcripts, an NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor gene, RhNAC100, was rapidly and dramatically induced by ethylene in the petals. Interestingly, accumulation of the RhNAC100 transcript was modulated by ethylene via microRNA164-dependent posttranscriptional regulation. Overexpression of RhNAC100 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) substantially reduced the petal size by repressing petal cell expansion. By contrast, silencing of RhNAC100 in rose petals using virus-induced gene silencing significantly increased petal size and promoted cell expansion in the petal abaxial subepidermis (P cellulose synthase and two aquaporin genes (Rosa hybrida Cellulose Synthase2 and R. hybrida Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein1;1/2;1) were identified as targets of RhNAC100. Our results suggest that ethylene regulates cell expansion by fine-tuning the microRNA164/RhNAC100 module and also provide new insights into the function of NAC transcription factors.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  20. Mechanism of Excretion of a Bacterial Proteinase: Factors Controlling Accumulation of the Extracellular Proteinase of a Sarcina Strain (Coccus P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BISSELL, MINA J.; TOSI, ROBERTO; GORINI, LUIGI

    1970-06-29

    It has been known that the extracellular proteinase of Coccus P is found only in cultures grown in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. It is now shown that this cation is required neither for synthesis, excretion, or activation of a zymogen nor as a prosthetic factor necessary for enzymatic activity. The only function of Ca{sup 2+} is to stabilize the active structure of the enzyme molecule, presumably by substituting for absence of S-S bridges. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+} , the excreted proteinase undergoes rapid autodigestion and, instead of the active protein, its hydrolytic products are accumulated in the culture fluid. In minimal medium and under conditions of enzyme stability [presence of Ca{sup 2+} and Ficoll (Pharmacia)], Coccus P accumulates the proteinase at a gradually reduced speed although the rate of cultural growth remains constant. It is shown that this decline in rate of accumulation is caused by the excreted proteinase itself, possibly acting on its own precursor emerging from the cell in a form susceptible to proteolytic attack and not amenable to Ca{sup 2+} protection. A proteinase precursor is actually demonstrable in a calciumless culture at the onset of the enzyme accumulation which follows Ca{sup 2+} addition. It is suggested that excreted proteins require an unfolded (or incompletely folded) structure to cross the cell envelope. The proteinase excreted by a Sarcina strain (Coccus P) is found only in cultures containing Ca{sup 2+} ions (1), a feature common to proteinases of other bacteria (4, 12, 18) and to other excreted enzymes (14). Among the nontoxic divalent cations, Ca{sup 2+} is rather specific in this effect. Other ions such as Mn{sup 2+} or Mg{sup 2+}, the latter being present in all media as an indispensible growth factor, are ineffective. Addition of Ca{sup 2+} to the proteolytically inactive supernatant fluid of a calcium- free culture does not result in the appearance of the missing enzyme activity. The early assumption that Ca{sup 2

  1. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  2. Regulation of Nox enzymes expression in vascular pathophysiology: Focusing on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona-Adriana Manea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (Nox represent a family of hetero-oligomeric enzymes whose exclusive biological function is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Nox-derived ROS are essential modulators of signal transduction pathways that control key physiological activities such as cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis, immune responses, and biochemical pathways. Enhanced formation of Nox-derived ROS, which is generally associated with the up-regulation of different Nox subtypes, has been established in various pathologies, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The detrimental effects of Nox-derived ROS are related to alterations in cell signalling and/or direct irreversible oxidative damage of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Thus, understanding of transcriptional regulation mechanisms of Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in an attempt to find ways to counteract the excessive formation of Nox-derived ROS in various pathological states. Despite the numerous existing data, the molecular pathways responsible for Nox up-regulation are not completely understood. This review article summarizes some of the recent advances and concepts related to the regulation of Nox expression in the vascular pathophysiology. It highlights the role of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms in this process. Identification of the signalling molecules involved in Nox up-regulation, which is associated with the onset and development of cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Regulation of Nox enzymes expression in vascular pathophysiology: Focusing on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Simona-Adriana; Constantin, Alina; Manda, Gina; Sasson, Shlomo; Manea, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) represent a family of hetero-oligomeric enzymes whose exclusive biological function is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nox-derived ROS are essential modulators of signal transduction pathways that control key physiological activities such as cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis, immune responses, and biochemical pathways. Enhanced formation of Nox-derived ROS, which is generally associated with the up-regulation of different Nox subtypes, has been established in various pathologies, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The detrimental effects of Nox-derived ROS are related to alterations in cell signalling and/or direct irreversible oxidative damage of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Thus, understanding of transcriptional regulation mechanisms of Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in an attempt to find ways to counteract the excessive formation of Nox-derived ROS in various pathological states. Despite the numerous existing data, the molecular pathways responsible for Nox up-regulation are not completely understood. This review article summarizes some of the recent advances and concepts related to the regulation of Nox expression in the vascular pathophysiology. It highlights the role of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms in this process. Identification of the signalling molecules involved in Nox up-regulation, which is associated with the onset and development of cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. MicroRNA-24 Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation via Targeting T-Cell Factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigong Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been reported to have diverse biological roles in regulating many biological processes, including osteogenic differentiation. In the present study, we identified that miR-24 was a critical regulator during osteogenic differentiation. We found that overexpression of miR-24 significantly inhibited osteogenic differentiation, which decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, matrix mineralization and the expression of osteogenic differentiation markers. In contrast, inhibition of miR-24 exhibited an opposite effect. Furthermore, we delineated that miR-24 regulates post-transcriptionals of T-cell factor-1 (Tcf-1 via targeting the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Tcf-1 mRNA. MiR-24 was further found to regulate the protein expression of Tcf-1 in the murine osteoprogenitors cells and bone mesenchymal stem cells. Additionally, the positive effect of miR-24 suppression on osteoblast differentiation was apparently abrogated by Tcf-1 silencing. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-24 participates in osteogenic differentiation by targeting and regulating Tcf-1 expression in osteoblastic cells.

  5. Myogenic factors that regulate expression of muscle-specific microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prakash K; Kumar, Roshan M; Farkhondeh, Mina; Baskerville, Scott; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-06-01

    Since their discovery as key regulators of early animal development, microRNAs now are recognized as widespread regulators of gene expression. Despite their abundance, little is known regarding the regulation of microRNA biogenesis. We show that three highly conserved muscle-specific microRNAs, miR-1, miR-133 and miR-206, are robustly induced during the myoblast-myotube transition, both in primary human myoblasts and in the mouse mesenchymal C2C12 stem cell line. These microRNAs were not induced during osteogenic conversion of C2C12 cells. Moreover, both loci encoding miR-1, miR-1-1, and miR-1-2, and two of the three encoding miR-133, miR-133a-1 and miR-133a-2, are strongly induced during myogenesis. Some of the induced microRNAs are in intergenic regions, whereas two are transcribed in the opposite direction to the nonmuscle-specific gene in which they are embedded. By using CHIP analysis, we demonstrate that the myogenic factors Myogenin and MyoD bind to regions upstream of these microRNAs and, therefore, are likely to regulate their expression. Because miR-1 and miR-206 are predicted to repress similar mRNA targets, our work suggests that induction of these microRNAs is important in regulating the expression of muscle-specific proteins.

  6. The transcription factor p8 regulates autophagy during diapause embryo formation in Artemia parthenogenetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Fan; Jia, Wen-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process by which cytoplasmic components, including macromolecules and organelles, are degraded by lysosome. Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play key roles in the regulation of autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy in quiescent cells remains unclear, despite the fact that autophagy is known to be critical for normal development, regeneration, and degenerative diseases. Here, crustacean Artemia parthenogenetica was used as a model system because they produced and released encysted embryos that enter a state of obligate dormancy in cell quiescence to withstand various environmental threats. We observed that autophagy was increased before diapause stage but dropped to extremely low level in diapause cysts in Artemia. Western blot analyses indicated that the regulation of autophagy was AMPK/TOR independent during diapause embryo formation. Importantly, the level of p8 (Ar-p8), a stress-inducible transcription cofactor, was elevated at the stage just before diapause and was absent in encysted embryos, indicating that Ar-p8 may regulate autophagy. The results of Ar-p8 knockdown revealed that Ar-p8 regulated autophagy during diapause formation in Artemia. Moreover, we observed that activating transcription factors 4 and 6 (ATF4 and ATF6) responded to Ar-p8-regulated autophagy, indicating that autophagy targeted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during diapause formation in Artemia. Additionally, AMPK/TOR-independent autophagy was validated in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells overexpressing Ar-p8. The findings presented here may provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy in quiescent cells.

  7. The transcription factor AREB1 regulates primary metabolic pathways in tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Adriana; Yañez, Mónica; Osorio, Sonia; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Fernie, Alisdair R; Casaretto, José A

    2014-06-01

    Tomato fruit development is regulated both by the action of plant hormones and by tight genetic control. Recent studies suggest that abscisic acid (ABA) signalling may affect different aspects of fruit maturation. Previously, it was shown that SlAREB1, an ABA-regulated transcription factor involved in stress-induced responses, is expressed in seeds and in fruit tissues in tomato. Here, the role of SlAREB1 in regulating the expression of genes relevant for primary metabolic pathways and affecting the metabolic profile of the fruit was investigated using transgenic tomato lines. Metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on pericarp tissue from fruits harvested at three stages of fruit development. Principal component analysis of the data could distinguish the metabolite profiles of non-transgenic fruits from those that overexpress and down-regulate SlAREB1. Overexpression of SlAREB1 resulted in increased content of organic acids, hexoses, hexose-phosphates, and amino acids in immature green, mature green, and red ripe fruits, and these modifications correlated with the up-regulation of enzyme-encoding genes involved in primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. A non-targeted LC-MS analysis indicated that the composition of secondary metabolites is also affected in transgenic lines. In addition, gene expression data revealed that some genes associated with fruit ripening are also up-regulated in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with wild-type and antisense lines. Taken together, the results suggest that SlAREB1 participates in the regulation of the metabolic programming that takes place during fruit ripening and that may explain part of the role of ABA in fruit development in tomato.

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  9. Dual Toxic-Peptide-Coding Staphylococcus aureus RNA under Antisense Regulation Targets Host Cells and Bacterial Rivals Unequally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Pinel-Marie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Produced from the pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates, stable SprG1 RNA encodes two peptides from a single internal reading frame. These two peptides accumulate at the membrane, and inducing their expression triggers S. aureus death. Replacement of the two initiation codons by termination signals reverses this toxicity. During growth, cis-antisense RNA SprF1 is expressed, preventing mortality by reducing SprG1 RNA and peptide levels. The peptides are secreted extracellularly, where they lyse human host erythrocytes, a process performed more efficiently by the longer peptide. The two peptides also inactivate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, with the shorter peptide more effective against S. aureus rivals. Two peptides are secreted from an individual RNA containing two functional initiation codons. Thus, we present an unconventional type I toxin-antitoxin system expressed from a human pathogen producing two hemolytic and antibacterial peptides from a dual-coding RNA, negatively regulated by a dual-acting antisense RNA.

  10. Ubiquitination of the bacterial inositol phosphatase, SopB, regulates its biological activity at the plasma membrane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knodler, Leigh A

    2009-11-01

    The Salmonella type III effector, SopB, is an inositol polyphosphate phosphatase that modulates host cell phospholipids at the plasma membrane and the nascent Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). Translocated SopB persists for many hours after infection and is ubiquitinated but the significance of this covalent modification has not been investigated. Here we identify by mass spectrometry six lysine residues of SopB that are mono-ubiquitinated. Substitution of these six lysine residues with arginine, SopB-K(6)R, almost completely eliminated SopB ubiquitination. We found that ubiquitination does not affect SopB stability or membrane association, or SopB-dependent events in SCV biogenesis. However, two spatially and temporally distinct events are dependent on ubiquitination, downregulation of SopB activity at the plasma membrane and prolonged retention of SopB on the SCV. Activation of the mammalian pro-survival kinase Akt\\/PKB, a downstream target of SopB, was intensified and prolonged after infection with the SopB-K(6)R mutant. At later times, fewer SCV were decorated with SopB-K(6)R compared with SopB. Instead SopB-K(6)R was present as discrete vesicles spread diffusely throughout the cell. Altogether, our data show that ubiquitination of SopB is not related to its intracellular stability but rather regulates its enzymatic activity at the plasma membrane and intracellular localization.

  11. Identification and transcript profiles of citrus growth-regulating factor genes involved in the regulation of leaf and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Ling-Xia; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Tao; Fan, Yu-Hua; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2016-10-01

    Growth-regulating factor (GRF) is an important protein in GA-mediated response, with key roles in plant growth and development. However, it is not known whether or how the GRF proteins in citrus to regulate organ size. In this study, nine citrus GRF genes (CsGRF1-9) were validated from the 'Anliu' sweet orange (AL, Citrus sinensis cv. Anliu) by PCR amplification. They all contain two conserved motifs (QLQ and WRC) and have 3-4 exons. The transcript levels of genes were detected by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis showed that (1) CsGRF 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 expressed predominantly in young leaf, CsGRF 3 and 4 expressed predominantly in fruit immature juice sacs and CsGRF 8 expressed predominantly in root; (2) all citrus GRF genes had significantly higher expression in young leaves than mature leaf; (3) in juice sacs, the transcript levels of CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 increased significantly while the transcript levels of CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 had no significant change from 80 DAF to 100 DAF. Besides, GA3 treatment did not affect the transcript levels of CsGRF5 and CsGRF6 but significantly increased the transcript levels of the other seven CsGRF genes in young leaves. These results suggested that all CsGRF genes involve in the leaf development, CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 act developmentally whilst CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 play fundamental roles in fruit cell enlargement, which may be through GA pathway or GA-independent pathway.

  12. Human factor H-related protein 2 (CFHR2 regulates complement activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes U Eberhardt

    Full Text Available Mutations and deletions within the human CFHR gene cluster on chromosome 1 are associated with diseases, such as dense deposit disease, CFHR nephropathy or age-related macular degeneration. Resulting mutant CFHR proteins can affect complement regulation. Here we identify human CFHR2 as a novel alternative pathway complement regulator that inhibits the C3 alternative pathway convertase and terminal pathway assembly. CFHR2 is composed of four short consensus repeat domains (SCRs. Two CFHR2 molecules form a dimer through their N-terminal SCRs, and each of the two C-terminal ends can bind C3b. C3b bound CFHR2 still allows C3 convertase formation but the CFHR2 bound convertases do not cleave the substrate C3. Interestingly CFHR2 hardly competes off factor H from C3b. Thus CFHR2 likely acts in concert with factor H, as CFHR2 inhibits convertases while simultaneously allowing factor H assisted degradation by factor I.

  13. The stress-regulated transcription factor CHOP promotes hepatic inflammatory gene expression, fibrosis, and oncogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane DeZwaan-McCabe

    Full Text Available Viral hepatitis, obesity, and alcoholism all represent major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Although these conditions also lead to integrated stress response (ISR or unfolded protein response (UPR activation, the extent to which these stress pathways influence the pathogenesis of HCC has not been tested. Here we provide multiple lines of evidence demonstrating that the ISR-regulated transcription factor CHOP promotes liver cancer. We show that CHOP expression is up-regulated in liver tumors in human HCC and two mouse models thereof. Chop-null mice are resistant to chemical hepatocarcinogenesis, and these mice exhibit attenuation of both apoptosis and cellular proliferation. Chop-null mice are also resistant to fibrosis, which is a key risk factor for HCC. Global gene expression profiling suggests that deletion of CHOP reduces the levels of basal inflammatory signaling in the liver. Our results are consistent with a model whereby CHOP contributes to hepatic carcinogenesis by promoting inflammation, fibrosis, cell death, and compensatory proliferation. They implicate CHOP as a common contributing factor in the development of HCC in a variety of chronic liver diseases.

  14. Digital power factor control and reactive power regulation for grid-connected photovoltaic inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassaine, L. [Power Electronics Systems Group, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Hassen Badi, El Harrach, Alger (Algeria); Olias, E.; Quintero, J. [Power Electronics Systems Group, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Haddadi, M. [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Hassen Badi, El Harrach, Alger (Algeria)

    2009-01-15

    The overall efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) systems connected to the grid depends on the efficiency of direct current (DC) of the solar modules to alternate current (AC) inverter conversion. The requirements for inverter connection include: maximum power point, high efficiency, control power injected into the grid, high power factor and low total harmonic distortion of the currents injected into the grid. An approach to power factor control and reactive power regulation for PV systems connected to the grid using field programmable gate array (FPGA) is proposed. According to the grid demands; both the injected active and reactive powers are controlled. In this paper, a new digital control strategy for a single-phase inverter is carried out. This control strategy is based on the phase shift between the inverter output voltage and the grid voltage, and the digital sinusoidal pulse width modulation (DSPWM) patterns, in order to control the power factor for a wide range of the inverter output current and consequently the control and the regulation of the reactive power will be achieved. The advantage of the proposed control strategy is its implementation around simple digital circuits. In this work, a simulation study of this strategy has been realized using Matlab/Simulink and PSIM. In order to validate its performance, this control has been implemented in a FPGA. Experimental tests have been carried out demonstrating the viability of this control in order to control the power factor and the injected power into the grid. (author)

  15. 茶园土壤细菌丰度及其影响因子研究%Bacterial Abundance of Tea Garden Soils and Its Influencing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文炎; 王皖蒙; 郭赟; 杨明臻; 贾仲君

    2013-01-01

      采用 Griffiths 法直接提取土壤微生物基因组 DNA,并通过实时荧光定量 PCR 技术分析土壤微生物16 S rRNA 基因数量,对茶园及其附近森林和菜园土壤的细菌丰度及其影响因素进行了研究。结果表明,茶园土壤细菌丰度在0.01×108~20.32×10816 S rRNA 基因拷贝数/g 之间,平均为3.70×10816 S rRNA 基因拷贝数/g,与酸性森林土壤大致相当,但明显低于中性菜园土壤。土壤细菌丰度与 pH 和微生物量 C 呈极显著正相关(P<0.001),但与施 N 量和茶树种植年限呈极显著负相关(P<0.01),与土壤有机 C 和全 N 含量的相关性不明显。多元回归分析表明,影响土壤细菌丰度最重要的因子是土壤 pH,其他依次为树龄和施氮量。可见,提高茶园土壤细菌数量和微生物多样性的有效办法是适当提高土壤 pH 值,同时避免过量施用氮肥;对于改植换种的老茶园,改良土壤也是必不可少的。%Bacterial abundances in tea garden and their adjacent forest and vegetable soils were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) as well as the factors that may affect the population size of bacterial communities. Soil DNA was extracted by using Griffiths’ method and bacterial abundance was determined by quantifying the copy number of 16S rRNA genes. The results showed that the bacterial abundance of tea garden soils ranged from 0.01×108 to 20.32×108 16 S rRNA gene copies/g (gram dry weight soil) with an average of 3.70×108 16 S rRNA gene copies/g, being similar with that in the forest soil, but far below that in the vegetable soil. The bacterial abundance in the tea garden soils was significantly and positively correlated with the soil pH and microbial biomass C (P<0.001) respectively, but significantly and negatively correlated with N application rate and age of tea plantation (P<0.01) respectively. There was no significant correlation between bacterial abundance and

  16. Regulations of essential amino acids and proteomics of bacterial endophytes Sphingomonas sp. Lk11 during cadmium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Ullah, Ihsan; Hussain, Javid; Kang, Sang-Mo; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-07-01

    Endophytic bacteria have been recently known for their potential to bioaccumulate metal from contaminated mediums. However, little is known about the physiological responses of phytohormone producing (gibberellins and auxins) endophytes during metal stressed environment. Endophytic bacteria Sphingomonas sp. LK11 was assessed for metals bioaccumulation and its physiological responses towards metal stress. The endophyte was grown in cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) contaminated mediums. The results revealed significantly higher endophytic growth potentials in Cd, Cu and Zn contaminations; however, the bio-accumulation rate of Cd was more prolific as compared to Zn and Cu. Interestingly, the SDS-PAGE profile showed increased expressions of proteins in Zn and Cu than in Cd. A similar attenuate response of amino acids was also observed for Cd than in case of Zn and Cu. Only asparagine, glutamate and proline showed significant impact in Cd while Cu and Zn had significantly higher responses of almost all amino acids. Detailed protein profile showed the activation of chaperone, antioxidative and detoxification proteins. Increased regulations of oxidoreductases, superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin, malate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase, and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase were observed. The cellular defense-related protein responses were potent against Cd stress. The results conclude that Sphingomonas sp. LK11 reprogram its amino acids and proteomic expressions and maintain a steady growth during Cd stress. Using such phytohromones producing endophytic bacterium can be ideal approach to increase the phytoextraction potential of metal remediating plants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 887-896, 2016.

  17. The Ets transcription factor EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Denise N; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-11-29

    The cornea is the clear, outermost portion of the eye composed of three layers: an epithelium that provides a protective barrier while allowing transmission of light into the eye, a collagen-rich stroma, and an endothelium monolayer. How cornea development and aging is controlled is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mouse cornea transcriptome from early embryogenesis through aging and compare it with transcriptomes of other epithelial tissues, identifying cornea-enriched genes, pathways, and transcriptional regulators. Additionally, we profiled cornea epithelium and stroma, defining genes enriched in these layers. Over 10,000 genes are differentially regulated in the mouse cornea across the time course, showing dynamic expression during development and modest expression changes in fewer genes during aging. A striking transition time point for gene expression between postnatal days 14 and 28 corresponds with completion of cornea development at the transcriptional level. Clustering classifies co-expressed, and potentially co-regulated, genes into biologically informative categories, including groups that exhibit epithelial or stromal enriched expression. Based on these findings, and through loss of function studies and ChIP-seq, we show that the Ets transcription factor EHF promotes cornea epithelial fate through complementary gene activating and repressing activities. Furthermore, we identify potential interactions between EHF, KLF4, and KLF5 in promoting cornea epithelial differentiation. These data provide insights into the mechanisms underlying epithelial development and aging, identifying EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial identity and pointing to interactions between Ets and KLF factors in promoting epithelial fate. Furthermore, this comprehensive gene expression data set for the cornea is a powerful tool for discovery of novel cornea regulators and pathways.

  18. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Puche, Laura; Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco Javier; Boersma, Maaike; Schuurink, Robert C; López-Vidriero, Irene; Solano, Roberto; Franco-Zorrilla, José-Manuel; Caballero, José Luis; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized an R2R3 MYB transcription factor (emission of benzenoid II [FaEOBII]) that seems to be the orthologous gene of PhEOBII from Petunia hybrida, which contributes to the regulation of eugenol biosynthesis in petals. The expression of FaEOBII was ripening related and fruit receptacle specific, although high expression values were also found in petals. This expression pattern of FaEOBII correlated with eugenol content in both fruit receptacle and petals. The expression of FaEOBII was repressed by auxins and activated by abscisic acid, in parallel to the ripening process. In ripe strawberry receptacles, where the expression of FaEOBII was silenced, the expression of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase1 and FaEGS2, two structural genes involved in eugenol production, was down-regulated. A subsequent decrease in eugenol content in ripe receptacles was also observed, confirming the involvement of FaEOBII in eugenol metabolism. Additionally, the expression of FaEOBII was under the control of FaMYB10, another R2R3 MYB transcription factor that regulates the early and late biosynthetic genes from the flavonoid/phenylpropanoid pathway. In parallel, the amount of eugenol in FaMYB10-silenced receptacles was also diminished. Taken together, these data indicate that FaEOBII plays a regulating role in the volatile phenylpropanoid pathway gene expression that gives rise to eugenol production in ripe strawberry receptacles.

  19. Transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2 is a regulator of macroautophagy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; García-Yagüe, Ángel J.; Escoll, Maribel; de Ceballos, María L.; Van Leuven, Fred; Rábano, Alberto; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Rojo, Ana I.; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly coordinated process that is controlled at several levels including transcriptional regulation. Here, we identify the transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2 (nuclear factor, erythroid 2 like 2) as a regulator of autophagy gene expression and its relevance in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD) that reproduces impaired APP (amyloid β precursor protein) and human (Hs)MAPT/TAU processing, clearance and aggregation. We screened the chromatin immunoprecipitation database ENCODE for 2 proteins, MAFK and BACH1, that bind the NFE2L2-regulated enhancer antioxidant response element (ARE). Using a script generated from the JASPAR's consensus ARE sequence, we identified 27 putative AREs in 16 autophagy-related genes. Twelve of these sequences were validated as NFE2L2 regulated AREs in 9 autophagy genes by additional ChIP assays and quantitative RT-PCR on human and mouse cells after NFE2L2 activation with sulforaphane. Mouse embryo fibroblasts of nfe2l2-knockout mice exhibited reduced expression of autophagy genes, which was rescued by an NFE2L2 expressing lentivirus, and impaired autophagy flux when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. NFE2L2-deficient mice co-expressing HsAPPV717I and HsMAPTP301L, exhibited more intracellular aggregates of these proteins and reduced neuronal levels of SQSTM1/p62, CALCOCO2/NDP52, ULK1, ATG5 and GABARAPL1. Also, colocalization of HsAPPV717I and HsMAPTP301L with the NFE2L2-regulated autophagy marker SQSTM1/p62 was reduced in the absence of NFE2L2. In AD patients, neurons expressing high levels of APP or MAPT also expressed SQSTM1/p62 and nuclear NFE2L2, suggesting their attempt to degrade intraneuronal aggregates through autophagy. This study shows that NFE2L2 modulates autophagy gene expression and suggests a new strategy to combat proteinopathies. PMID:27427974

  20. A Myb transcription factor regulates genes of the phenylalanine pathway in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Pascual, M Belen; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción

    2013-06-01

    During the life cycles of conifer trees, such as maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), large quantities of carbon skeletons are irreversibly immobilized in the wood. In energetic terms this is an expensive process, in which carbon from photosynthesis is channelled through the shikimate pathway for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. This crucial metabolic pathway is finely regulated, primarily through transcriptional control, and because phenylalanine is the precursor for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, the precise regulation of phenylalanine synthesis and use should occur simultaneously. The promoters of three genes encoding the enzymes prephenate aminotransferase (PAT), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and glutamine synthetase (GS1b) contain AC elements involved in the transcriptional activation mediated by R2R3-Myb factors. We have examined the capacity of the R2R3-Myb transcription factors Myb1, Myb4 and Myb8 to co-regulate the expression of PAT, PAL and GS1b. Only Myb8 was able to activate the transcription of the three genes. Moreover, the expression of this transcription factor is higher in lignified tissues, in which a high demand for phenylpropanoids exits. In a gain-of-function experiment, we have shown that Myb8 can specifically bind a well-conserved eight-nucleotide-long AC-II element in the promoter regions of PAT, PAL and GS1b, thereby activating their expression. Our results show that Myb8 regulates the expression of these genes involved in phenylalanine metabolism, which is required for channelling photosynthetic carbon to promote wood formation. The co-localization of PAT, PAL, GS1b and MYB8 transcripts in vascular cells further supports this conclusion.

  1. Bacterial Histidine Kinases as Novel Antibacterial Drug Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, A.E.; Velikova, N.R.; Pellicer, M.T.; Baarlen, van P.; Marina, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) are promising targets for novel antibacterials. Bacterial HKs are part of bacterial two-component systems (TCSs), the main signal transduction pathways in bacteria, regulating various processes including virulence, secretion systems and antibiotic resistance. In thi

  2. NF-κB Regulates B-Cell-Derived Nerve Growth Factor Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Heese; Noriko Inoue; Tohru Sawada

    2006-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, four neurotrophins have been identified: nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). NGF exerts an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several types of immune cells, such as mast cells, lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils, produce,store and release NGF. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data indicate that dysfunctions of NGF and the other neurotrophins may contribute to impaired immune responses and concentration of NGF frequently correlates with disease severity. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the potential signaling mechanisms of cytokineneurotrophins interactions contributing to increased NGF levels. Our data show that the transcription factorNF-κB plays a pivotal role in regulating B-cell-derived NGF expression.

  3. Nuclear Factor-κB: Activation and Regulation during Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruaidhrí J. Carmody; Youhai H. Chen

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize distinct microbial components to initiate the innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR activation culminates in the expression of appropriate pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors to meet pathogenic challenges. The transcription factor NF-κB is the master regulator of all TLR-induced responses and its activation is the pivotal event in TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune response. Many of the key molecular events required for TLR-induced NF-κB activation have been elucidated. However, much remain to be learned about the ability of TLRs to generate pathogen-specific responses using a limited number of transcription factors. This review will focus on our current understanding of NF-κB activation by TLRs and potential mechanisms for achieving a signal-specific response through NF-κB.

  4. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  5. Circadian regulation of chloroplastic f and m thioredoxins through control of the CCA1 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-López, Juan de Dios; Serrato, Antonio Jesus; Cazalis, Roland; Meyer, Yves; Chueca, Ana; Reichheld, Jean Philippe; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2011-03-01

    Chloroplastic thioredoxins f and m (TRX f and TRX m) mediate light regulation of carbon metabolism through the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. The role of TRX f and m in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes is best known among the TRX family. However, the discoveries of new potential targets extend the functions of chloroplastic TRXs to other processes in non-photosynthetic tissues. As occurs with numerous chloroplast proteins, their expression comes under light regulation. Here, the focus is on the light regulation of TRX f and TRX m in pea and Arabidopsis during the day/night cycle that is maintained during the subjective night. In pea (Pisum sativum), TRX f and TRX m1 expression is shown to be governed by a circadian oscillation exerted at both the transcriptional and protein levels. Binding shift assays indicate that this control probably involves the interaction of the CCA1 transcription factor and an evening element (EE) located in the PsTRX f and PsTRX m1 promoters. In Arabidopsis, among the multigene family of TRX f and TRX m, AtTRX f2 and AtTRX m2 mRNA showed similar circadian oscillatory regulation, suggesting that such regulation is conserved in plants. However, this oscillation was disrupted in plants overexpressing CCA1 (cca1-ox) or repressing CCA1 and LHY (cca1-lhy). The physiological role of the oscillatory regulation of chloroplastic TRX f and TRX m in plants during the day/night cycle is discussed.

  6. The highly conserved bacterial RNase YbeY is essential in Vibrio cholerae, playing a critical role in virulence, stress regulation, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W; Arnold, Markus F F; Mekalanos, John J; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Walker, Graham C

    2014-06-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3' end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3' end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes.

  7. Vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3] Differentially Regulates Human Innate Cytokine Responses to Bacterial versus Viral Pattern Recognition Receptor Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Natascha; Becker, Allan B; HayGlass, Kent T

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D plays multiple roles in regulation of protective and maladaptive immunity. Although epidemiologic studies link poor in vivo 25(OH)D status to increased viral respiratory infections, we poorly understand how vitamin D affects viral pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-driven cytokine production. In this study, we hypothesized that the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, inhibits human proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory innate cytokine responses stimulated by representative bacterial or viral PRR ligands. Fresh PBMCs or CD14(+) monocytes were stimulated with TLR4, TLR7/8-selective ligands, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) ± 1,25(OH)2D3. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses resulting from TLR4 stimulation were inhibited ∼50% in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. Conversely, its usage at physiologic through pharmacologic concentrations inhibited neither proinflammatory nor anti-inflammatory responses evoked by viral PRR ligands or infectious RSV. This differential responsiveness was attributed to the finding that TLR7/8, but not TLR4, stimulation markedly inhibited vitamin D receptor mRNA and protein expression, selectively reducing the sensitivity of viral PRR responses to modulation. 1,25(OH)2D3 also enhanced expression of IkBa, a potent negative regulator of NF-κB and cytokine production, in TLR4-stimulated monocytes while not doing so upon TLR7/8 stimulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits both proinflammatory and a broad panel of anti-inflammatory responses elicited by TLR4 stimulation, arguing that the common view of it as an anti-inflammatory immune response modifier is an oversimplification. In viral responses, it consistently fails to modify TLR7/8- or RSV-stimulated innate cytokine production, even at supraphysiologic concentrations. Collectively, the data call into question the rationale for increasingly widespread self-medication with vitamin D supplements.

  8. Amplification of pico-scale DNA mediated by bacterial carrier DNA for small-cell-number transcription factor ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus S; Bagger, Frederik O; Hasemann, Marie S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is used to map transcription factor occupancy and generate epigenetic profiles genome-wide. The requirement of nano-scale ChIP DNA for generation of sequencing libraries has impeded ChIP-seq on in vivo tissues of low...... transcription factor (CEBPA) and histone mark (H3K4me3) ChIP. We further demonstrate that genomic profiles are highly resilient to changes in carrier DNA to ChIP DNA ratios. CONCLUSIONS: This represents a significant advance compared to existing technologies, which involve either complex steps of pre...... cell numbers. RESULTS: We describe a robust, simple and scalable methodology for ChIP-seq of low-abundant cell populations, verified down to 10,000 cells. By employing non-mammalian genome mapping bacterial carrier DNA during amplification, we reliably amplify down to 50 pg of ChIP DNA from...

  9. The bHLH transcription factor POPEYE regulates response to iron deficiency in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Terri A; Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Busch, Wolfgang; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E; Benfey, Philip N

    2010-07-01

    Global population increases and climate change underscore the need for better comprehension of how plants acquire and process nutrients such as iron. Using cell type-specific transcriptional profiling, we identified a pericycle-specific iron deficiency response and a bHLH transcription factor, POPEYE (PYE), that may play an important role in this response. Functional analysis of PYE suggests that it positively regulates growth and development under iron-deficient conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis and transcriptional profiling reveal that PYE helps maintain iron homeostasis by regulating the expression of known iron homeostasis genes and other genes involved in transcription, development, and stress response. PYE interacts with PYE homologs, including IAA-Leu Resistant3 (ILR3), another bHLH transcription factor that is involved in metal ion homeostasis. Moreover, ILR3 interacts with a third protein, BRUTUS (BTS), a putative E3 ligase protein, with metal ion binding and DNA binding domains, which negatively regulates the response to iron deficiency. PYE and BTS expression is also tightly coregulated. We propose that interactions among PYE, PYE homologs, and BTS are important for maintaining iron homeostasis under low iron conditions.

  10. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  11. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor, σ(25), differentially regulates avermectin and oligomycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuai; Sun, Di; Zhu, Jianya; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2014-08-01

    σ(25) is an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor in the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis that plays a differential regulatory role in avermectin and oligomycin biosynthesis. Gene deletion, complementation, and overexpression experiments showed that σ(25) inhibited avermectin production but promoted oligomycin production. σ(25) indirectly inhibited avermectin production by affecting the transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene aveR, whereas it directly activated oligomycin production by initiating transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene olmRI. The divergently transcribed genes smrAB are located upstream of sig25 and encode a putative two-component system (TCS). σ(25) was found to initiate its own transcription, and its expression was directly activated by SmrA. The precise SmrA-binding sites in the region upstream of sig25 were determined by DNase I footprinting assays and identified two direct repeat sequences CTGTGA-n5-CTGTGA, suggesting that SmrA regulates sig25 transcription by binding to these direct repeats. The deletion of smrAB had the similar effect on avermectin and oligomycin A production to the deletion of sig25, indicating that σ(25) and SmrAB function similarly in the regulation of antibiotic production. These findings helpfully clarify the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis by an ECF σ factor-TCS signal transduction system in S. avermitilis.

  12. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  13. Transcription factor p63 bookmarks and regulates dynamic enhancers during epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Oti, Martin; Niehues, Hanna; van Heeringen, Simon J; Schalkwijk, Joost; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-07-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. However, how p63 regulates epidermal genes during differentiation is not yet clear. Using epigenome profiling of differentiating human primary epidermal keratinocytes, we characterized a catalog of dynamically regulated genes and p63-bound regulatory elements that are relevant for epithelial development and related diseases. p63-bound regulatory elements occur as single or clustered enhancers, and remarkably, only a subset is active as defined by the co-presence of the active enhancer mark histone modification H3K27ac in epidermal keratinocytes. We show that the dynamics of gene expression correlates with the activity of p63-bound enhancers rather than with p63 binding itself. The activity of p63-bound enhancers is likely determined by other transcription factors that cooperate with p63. Our data show that inactive p63-bound enhancers in epidermal keratinocytes may be active during the development of other epithelial-related structures such as limbs and suggest that p63 bookmarks genomic loci during the commitment of the epithelial lineage and regulates genes through temporal- and spatial-specific active enhancers.

  14. 细菌纤维素的合成与调控进展%Progress in synthesis and regulation of bacterial cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣; 颜彩玲; 潘凌鸿; 黄建忠

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) was a kind of natural high purity biopolymer compared with the lignocellu-lose, the production and processing of BC was more convenient and environment-friendly, thus it made BC be a promising biomaterial. At present, Quconacetobacter was found to be the highest yield BC-producing strain. In this review, the synthesis and the regulation mechanism of Quconacetobacter BC, the genetical engineering methods and culture methods for higher BC production were discussed.%细菌纤维素是1种天然的高纯度生物多聚物,与木质纤维素相比,其生产和加工过程更为方便和环保,因此已成为1种极有潜力的生物材料.葡糖酸醋杆菌是目前已知的产纤维素能力最高的菌株.综述了葡糖酸醋杆菌的细菌纤维素合成和调控机制以及为提高产量所进行的基因工程手段和培养方法.

  15. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-15

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  16. Trefoil factor 3 peptide regulates migration via a Twist-dependent pathway in gastric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Gao, Jian; Li, Honglin; Guo, Wendong; Mao, Qi; Gao, Enhui; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2013-08-16

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family and essential in regulating cell migration and maintaining mucosal integrity in gastrointestinal tract. However, the role of TFF3 and its downstream regulating mechanisms in cancer cell migration remain unclear. We previously reported that TFF3 prolonged the up-regulation of Twist protein to modulate IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Twist protein in TFF3-induced migration of SGC7901 cells. While Twist was activated by TFF3, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Twist abolished TFF3-induced cell migration. Furthermore, the migration related marker CK-8 as well as ZO-1 and MMP-9 was also regulated by TFF3 via a Twist-dependent mechanism. Our study suggests that Twist, as an important potential downstream effector, plays a key role in TFF3-modulated metastasis in gastric cancer and can be a promising therapeutic target against intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  17. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively.

  18. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, pathogen control using bacteriophages has been explored as a possible alternative treatment. However, the effective use of bacteriophages in pathogen control...... requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage......-resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage...

  19. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Van Horn

    Full Text Available Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between abiotic characteristics and soil bacteria in this unique, microbially dominated environment, and to test the scale dependence of these relationships in a low complexity ecosystem. Samples were collected from dry mineral soils associated with snow patches, which are a significant source of water in this desert environment, at six sites located in the major basins of the Taylor and Wright Valleys. Samples were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, major nutrients and ions, microbial biomass, 16 S rRNA gene richness, and bacterial community structure and composition. Snow patches created local biogeochemical gradients while inter-basin comparisons encompassed landscape scale gradients enabling comparisons of microbial controls at two distinct spatial scales. At the organic carbon rich, mesic, low elevation sites Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were prevalent, while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were dominant at the high elevation, low moisture and biomass sites. Microbial parameters were significantly related with soil water content and edaphic characteristics including soil pH, organic matter, and sulfate. However, the magnitude and even the direction of these relationships varied across basins and the application of mixed effects models revealed evidence of significant contextual effects at local and regional scales. The results highlight the importance of the geographic scale of

  20. Caries-related factors and bacterial composition of supragingival plaques in caries free and caries active Algerian adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amina Hoceini; Nihel Klouche Khelil; Ilhem Ben-Yelles; Amine Mesli; Sara Ziouani; Lotfi Ghellai; Nadia Aissaoui; Fatima Nas; Mounia Arab

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare oral hygiene practices, education and social background, food intake and oral malodor of Algerian adults suffering from dental caries with normal controls, and to determine and compare the bacterial composition of the supragingival plaques from the above-mentioned groups.Methods: Participants completed a questionnaire and were clinically examined for dental caries using decayed, missing and filled teeth index according to the criteria laid down by the World Health Organization. Supragingival plaque samples were collected from 50 caries-free adults(CF) and 50 caries-active adults(CA). Standard procedures of culture and identification of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were used. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test.Results: A total of 117 bacterial strains were isolated from supragingival plaques in CF group subjects, 76(64.96%) of them belonged to 9 aerobic genera, and 41(35.04%) to 9anaerobic genera(P < 0.05). While in the second group, 199 strains were isolated, 119(59.80%) of the strains belonged to 10 aerobic genera and 80(40.20%) to 10 anaerobic bacteria(P < 0.05). Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecium, Aerococcus viridans,Actinomyces meyeri, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Eubacterium limosum showed a significantly higher prevalence in the CA group(P < 0.05). The findings revealed that CA group had a high sugar intake(80%). A significantly higher frequency of tooth brushing(P < 0.000) and a significantly less self-reported oral malodor(P < 0.000) and tooth pain(P < 0.000) were found in CF group, while there was no association of socioeconomic levels and intake of meal snacks with dental caries.Conclusions: This study confirms the association of some aciduric bacteria with caries formation, and a direct association of sugar intake and cultural level with dental caries.Furthermore, oral hygiene practices minimize the prevalence of tooth decay.

  1. [Shifts in metabolism and its regulation under the effect of spaceflight factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, I M; Nichiporuk, I A; Veselova, O M; Vasilieva, G Yu; Popova, I A

    2013-01-01

    The review deals with the results of studying the adaptive changes in metabolism and its neuroendocrine regulation in humans and animals under the effect of spaceflight factors and ground-based simulation of the gravitational unloading. The majority of the investigations were concerned with the water-electrolyte and mineral turnover, as well as protein, lipid and carbohydrates metabolism. Biochemical measurements of the body liquids (blood, urine and saliva) before, in and after space flight or in ground simulation experiments were used as indictors of the status of sympathoadrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal and other systems involved in systemic regulation of metabolism, and also strength of stress-reaction to adversities. The authors generalized data on the interrelation and interaction of the neuroendocrine and psychophysiological status both in the real and simulated conditions of space flight.

  2. COX assembly factor ccdc56 regulates mitochondrial morphology by affecting mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Tomohiro-Takamiya, Shiho; Tani, Motohiro; Baudier, Jacques; Ishihara, Naotada; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-10-07

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that alter their morphology in response to cellular signaling and differentiation through balanced fusion and fission. In this study, we found that the mitochondrial inner membrane ATPase ATAD3A interacted with ccdc56/MITRAC12/COA3, a subunit of the cytochrome oxidase (COX)-assembly complex. Overproduction of ccdc56 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondrial morphology, while mitochondria were highly elongated in ccdc56-repressed cells by the defective recruitment of the fission factor Drp1. We also found that mild and chronic inhibition of COX led to mitochondrial elongation, as seen in ccdc56-repressed cells. These results indicate that ccdc56 positively regulates mitochondrial fission via regulation of COX activity and the mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1, and thus, suggest a novel relationship between COX assembly and mitochondrial morphology.

  3. Transcription factor KLF7 regulates differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cell lineages

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    Caiazzo, Massimiliano, E-mail: caiazzo@igb.cnr.it [Institute of Genetics and Biophysics ' A. Buzzati-Traverso,' CNR, 80131 Naples (Italy); Istituto di diagnosi e cura ' Hermitage Capodimonte,' 80131 Naples (Italy); Colucci-D' Amato, Luca, E-mail: luca.colucci@unina2.it [Institute of Genetics and Biophysics ' A. Buzzati-Traverso,' CNR, 80131 Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Seconda Universita di Napoli, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Esposito, Maria T., E-mail: maria_teresa.esposito@kcl.ac.uk [CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate, 80145 Naples (Italy); Parisi, Silvia, E-mail: parisi@ceinge.unina.it [CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate, 80145 Naples (Italy); Stifani, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.stifani@mcgill.ca [Centre for Neuronal Survival, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4 (Canada); Ramirez, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.ramirez@mssm.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Porzio, Umberto di, E-mail: diporzio@igb.cnr.it [Institute of Genetics and Biophysics ' A. Buzzati-Traverso,' CNR, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Previous gene targeting studies in mice have implicated the nuclear protein Krueppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) in nervous system development while cell culture assays have documented its involvement in cell cycle regulation. By employing short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing, here we demonstrate that murine Klf7 gene expression is required for in vitro differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cells. Specifically, we show a correlation of Klf7 silencing with down-regulation of the neuronal marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and the nerve growth factor (NGF) tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA) using the PC12 neuronal cell line. Similarly, KLF7 inactivation in Klf7-null mice decreases the expression of the neurogenic marker brain lipid-binding protein/fatty acid-binding protein 7 (BLBP/FABP7) in neural stem cells (NSCs). We also report that Klf7 silencing is detrimental to neuronal and cardiomyocytic differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), in addition to altering the adipogenic and osteogenic potential of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Finally, our results suggest that genes that are key for self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs repress Klf7 expression in ESCs. Together with previous findings, these results provide evidence that KLF7 has a broad spectrum of regulatory functions, which reflect the discrete cellular and molecular contexts in which this transcription factor operates.

  4. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

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    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  5. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  6. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  7. B-GATA transcription factors - insights into their structure, regulation and role in plant development

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    Claus eSchwechheimer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available GATA transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulators that recognize promoter elements with a G-A-T-A core sequence. In comparison to animal genomes, the GATA transcription factor family in plants is comparatively large with approximately 30 members. In spite of a long-standing interest of plant molecular biologists in GATA factors, only research conducted in the last years has led to reliable insights into their functions during plant development. Here, we review the current knowledge on B-GATAs, one of four GATA factor subfamilies from Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that B-GATAs can be subdivided based on structural features and their biological function into family members with a C-terminal LLM- (leucine-leucine-methionine domain or an N-terminal HAN- (HANABA TARANU domain. The paralogous GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON-METABOLISM INVOLVED and CGA1/GNL (CYTOKININ-INDUCED GATA1/GNC-LIKE are introduced as LLM-domain containing B-GATAs from Arabidopsis that control germination, greening, senescence and flowering time downstream from several growth regulatory signals including light and the hormones gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin. Arabidopsis HAN and its monocot-specific paralogs from rice (NECK LEAF1, maize (TASSEL SHEATH1, and barley (THIRD OUTER GLUME are HAN-domain-containing B-GATAs with a predominant role in embryo development and floral development. We also review GATA23, a regulator of lateral root initiation from Arabidopsis, that is closely related to GNC and GNL but has a degenerate LLM-domain that is seemingly specific for the Brassicaceae family. The Brassicaceae-specific GATA23 together with the above-mentioned monocot-specific HAN-domain GATAs provide evidence that neofunctionalization of the B-GATAs was used during plant evolution to expand the functional repertoire of these transcription factors.

  8. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

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    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  9. Regulation of coagulation factor XI expression by microRNAs in the human liver.

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    Salam Salloum-Asfar

    Full Text Available High levels of factor XI (FXI increase the risk of thromboembolic disease. However, the genetic and environmental factors regulating FXI expression are still largely unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate the regulation of FXI by microRNAs (miRNAs in the human liver. In silico prediction yielded four miRNA candidates that might regulate FXI expression. HepG2 cells were transfected with miR-181a-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-16-5p and miR-195-5p. We used mir-494, which was not predicted to bind to F11, as a negative control. Only miR-181a-5p caused a significant decrease both in FXI protein and F11 mRNA levels. In addition, transfection with a miR-181a-5p inhibitor in PLC/PRF/5 hepatic cells increased both the levels of F11 mRNA and extracellular FXI. Luciferase assays in human colon cancer cells deficient for Dicer (HCT-DK demonstrated a direct interaction between miR-181a-5p and 3'untranslated region of F11. Additionally, F11 mRNA levels were inversely and significantly correlated with miR-181a-5p levels in 114 healthy livers, but not with miR-494. This study demonstrates that FXI expression is directly regulated by a specific miRNA, miR-181a-5p, in the human liver. Future studies are necessary to further investigate the potential consequences of miRNA dysregulation in pathologies involving FXI.

  10. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis.

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    Amber J Marty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription