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Sample records for bacterial antigen detection

  1. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  2. Preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens and their use for bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Lev A; Staroverov, Sergei A; Guliy, Olga I; Ignatov, Oleg V; Fomin, Alexander S; Vidyasheva, Irina V; Karavaeva, Olga A; Bunin, Viktor D; Burygin, Gennady L

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the first preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens by using a combinatorial phage library of sheep antibodies. The prepared phage antibodies were used for the first time for lipopolysaccharide and flagellin detection by dot assay, electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions, and transmission electron microscopy. Interaction of A. brasilense Sp245 with antilipopolysaccharide and antiflagellin phage-displayed miniantibodies caused the magnitude of the electro-optical signal to change considerably. The electro-optical results were in good agreement with the electron microscopic data. This is the first reported possibility of employing phage-displayed miniantibodies in bacterial detection aided by electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions.

  3. An improved haemolytic plaque assay for the detection of cells secreting antibody to bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines for human use have stimulated interest in the use of assays detecting antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) with specificity for bacterial antigens. Here we present improved haemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays detecting Ab......SC with specificity for tetanus and diphtheria toxoid as well as for Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides. These assays were found to be less time consuming, more economical and yielded 1.9-3.4-fold higher plaque numbers than traditional Jerne-type PFC assays. In the case of anti......-polysaccharide AbSC of the IgG isotype, the increase was as high as 7.4-11.8 times. Evidence is presented that the pronounced improvement in the detection of the latter is due to the presence of aggregating anti-IgG antibody from the beginning of the assay. It is proposed that in the case of low affinity of anti...

  4. Antigenic Variation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-02-01

    Antigenic variation is a strategy used by a broad diversity of microbial pathogens to persist within the mammalian host. Whereas viruses make use of a minimal proofreading capacity combined with large amounts of progeny to use random mutation for variant generation, antigenically variant bacteria have evolved mechanisms which use a stable genome, which aids in protecting the fitness of the progeny. Here, three well-characterized and highly antigenically variant bacterial pathogens are discussed: Anaplasma, Borrelia, and Neisseria. These three pathogens display a variety of mechanisms used to create the structural and antigenic variation needed for immune escape and long-term persistence. Intrahost antigenic variation is the focus; however, the role of these immune escape mechanisms at the population level is also presented.

  5. Improvement of immunodetection of bacterial spore antigen by ultrasonic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Kathryn A J; Love, Tracey E; McDonnell, Martin B; Coakley, W Terence

    2005-11-15

    Ultrasonic cavitation was employed to enhance sensitivity of bacterial spore immunoassay detection, specifically, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and resonant mirror (RM) sensing. Bacillus spore suspensions were exposed to high-power ultrasound in a tubular sonicator operated at 267 kHz in both batch and flow modes. The sonicator was designed to deliver high output power and is in a form that can be cooled efficiently to avoid thermal denaturation of antigen. The 30-s batch and cooled flow (0.3 mL/min) sonication achieved an approximately 20-fold increase in ELISA sensitivity compared to unsonicated spores by ELISA. RM sensing of sonicated spores achieved detection sensitivity of approximately 10(6) spores/mL, whereas unsonicated spores were undetectable at the highest concentration tested. Improvements in detection were associated with antigen released from the spores. Equilibrium temperature increase in the tubular sonicator was limited to 14 K after 30 min and was maintained for 6 h with cooling and flow (0.3 mL/min). The work described here demonstrates the utility of the tubular sonicator for the improvement in the sensitivity of the detection of spores and its suitability as an in-line component of a rapid detection system.

  6. Bacterial phospholipide antigens and their taxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalnik, B V; Razbash, M P; Akhmetova, E A

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of interrelationships between the phospholipides of various microorganisms (33 strains of corynebacteria, mycobacteria and staphylococci) using crossed antibody neutralization reactions with phospholipide antigenic erythrocyte diagnostic was used for the assessment of the degree of antigenic propinquity and antigenic differences between the phospholipides of bacteria of the same species, genus, and of different genera. The role of the determinants of the corresponding (their own) and "foreign" genera in the antigenic differences between the phospholipides of the microorganisms investigated was established. On the basis of the results obtained the conclusion has been drawn that the method of assessment of antigenic interrelationships between phospholipides can be used for the study of some taxonomic problems.

  7. Responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells to bacterial antigens and autologous antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, I S; Melief, M J; Swaak, T J; Severijnen, A J; Hazenberg, M P

    1993-01-01

    The specificity of T cells in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been the subject of much study. Bacterial antigens are suspect in the aetiology of rheumatic diseases. The responsiveness of the mononuclear cell fraction of peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with RA and of patients with rheumatic diseases other than RA to bacterial antigens such as cell wall fragments of the anaerobic intestinal flora, cell wall fragments of Streptococcus pyogenes, intestinal flora derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide complexes, the 65 kilodalton protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and muramyldipeptide was investigated. No significant difference in response was found to all these bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA compared with the responses in patients with other rheumatic diseases. The highest responsiveness in the synovial fluid of the patients with RA was to the streptococcal cell wall fragments and to the 65 kilodalton protein. Higher responses to several bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA were found compared with peripheral blood from the same patient group. The antigen presenting cell population of the synovial fluid in patients with RA and the patients with other rheumatic diseases was found to be stimulatory for autologous peripheral blood T cells even in the absence of antigen. This suggests an important role for the synovial antigen presenting cell in the aetiology of inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:8447692

  8. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens.... These devices are used for testing specimens from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis...

  9. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b antigens in body fluids, using specific antibody-coated staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksanong, M; Dajani, A S

    1977-01-01

    Protein A-rich staphylococci coated with Haemophilus influenzae type b antiserum agglutinate specifically with homologous bacterial cells or with cell-free supernatant fluids of cultures of the organism. Antibody-coated staphylococci were used to detect soluble antigens in body fluids of patients infected with H. influenzae type b. Cerebrospinal fluid from 36 cases of meningitis caused by this orgainsm showed positive coagglutination tests in 86% of patients prior to initiation of therapy. Antigens could be detected in 46% of sterile cerebrospinal fluid specimens obtained from the same cases 1 to 10 days after therapy. Soluble antigens were also detectable in sera (58%) and urine specimens (67%) of patients with H. influenzae type b septicemia, when such specimens were tested within 10 days of onset of illness. No antigen could be detected in body fluids beyond 10 days. The coagglutination test was positive in 57% of all body fluids examined; contercurrent immunoelectrophoresis (CCIE) was positive in only 27%. All specimens positive by CCIE were also positive by coagglutination. No false-positive reactions were noted by either test in body fluids from controls. The coagglutination test is simple, specific, and more sensitive than the CCIE method and could be a valuable tool for detecting antigens in body fluids of patients with various infections.

  10. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck); selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability); and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts. PMID:26288700

  11. Detection of bacterial antigens and Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology in the central nervous system of BALB/c mice following intranasal infection with a laboratory isolate of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Scott Little

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathology consistent with that observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD has previously been documented following intranasal infection of normal wild-type mice with Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn isolated from an AD brain (96-41. In the current study, BALB/c mice were intranasally infected with a laboratory strain of Cpn, AR-39, and brain and olfactory bulbs were obtained at 1-4 months post-infection (pi. Immunohistochemistry for amyloid beta or Cpn antigens was performed on sections from brains of infected or mock-infected mice. Chlamydia-specific immunolabeling was identified in olfactory bulb tissues and in cerebrum of AR-39 infected mice. The Cpn specific labeling was most prominent at 1 month pi and the greatest burden of amyloid deposition was noted at 2 months pi, whereas both decreased at 3 and 4 months. Viable Cpn was recovered from olfactory bulbs of 3 of 3 experimentally infected mice at 1 and 3 months pi, and in 2 of 3 mice at 4 months pi. In contrast, in cortical tissues of infected mice at 1 and 4 months pi no viable organism was obtained. At 3 months pi, only 1 of 3 mice had a measurable burden of viable Cpn from the cortical tissues. Mock-infected mice (0 of 3 had no detectable Cpn in either olfactory bulbs or cortical tissues. These data indicate that the AR-39 isolate of Cpn establishes a limited infection predominantly in the olfactory bulbs of BALB/c mice. Although infection with the laboratory strain of Cpn promotes deposition of amyloid beta, this appears to resolve following reduction of the Cpn antigen burden over time. Our data suggest that infection with the AR-39 laboratory isolate of Cpn results in a different course of amyloid beta deposition and ultimate resolution than that observed following infection with the human AD-brain Cpn isolate, 96-41. These data further support that there may be differences, possibly in virulence factors, between Cpn isolates in the generation of sustainable AD pathology.

  12. Comparison of E and NS1 antigens capture ELISA to detect dengue viral antigens from mosquitoes

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    Day-Yu Chao

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: With the future potential of antigen capture ELISA to be used in the resource deprived regions, the study showed that E-ELISA has similar sensitivity and antigen stability as NS1 Ag kit to complement the current established virological surveillance in human. The improvement of the sensitivity in detecting DENV-3/4 will be needed to incorporate this method into routine mosquito surveillance system.

  13. Urine antigen detection for the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Yesenia; Rodriguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Brandt, Jef; Van Hul, Anke; Silva, Maria; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Portocarrero, Mylagritos; Melendez, D Paolo; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of seizures and epilepsy. Diagnosis is based on brain imaging, supported by immunodiagnosis in serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Lumbar puncture is invasive and painful. Blood sampling is slightly painful and poorly accepted. Urine antigen detection has been used for other parasites and tried in NCC with suboptimal performance. We used a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to detect Taenia solium antigens in urine from 87 Peruvian neurocysticercosis patients (viable cysts, N = 34; subarachnoid cysticercosis, N = 10; degenerating parasites, N = 7; calcified lesions, N = 36) and 32 volunteers from a non-endemic area of Peru. Overall sensitivity of urine antigen detection for viable parasites was 92%, which decreased to 62.5% in patients with a single cyst. Most patients (30/36, 83%) with only calcified cysticercosis were urine antigen negative. Antigen levels in paired serum/urine samples (evaluated in 19 patients) were strongly correlated. Non-invasive urine testing for T. solium antigens provides a useful alternative for NCC diagnosis.

  14. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  15. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  16. Unique interplay between sugar and lipid in determining the antigenic potency of bacterial antigens for NKT cells.

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    Enrico Girardi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an evolutionary conserved T cell population characterized by features of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Studies have shown that iNKT cells are required for protective responses to Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and that these cells recognize bacterial diacylglycerol antigens presented by CD1d, a non-classical antigen-presenting molecule. The combination of a lipid backbone containing an unusual fatty acid, vaccenic acid, as well as a glucose sugar that is weaker or not stimulatory when linked to other lipids, is required for iNKT cell stimulation by these antigens. Here we have carried out structural and biophysical studies that illuminate the reasons for the stringent requirement for this unique combination. The data indicate that vaccenic acid bound to the CD1d groove orients the protruding glucose sugar for TCR recognition, and it allows for an additional hydrogen bond of the glucose with CD1d when in complex with the TCR. Furthermore, TCR binding causes an induced fit in both the sugar and CD1d, and we have identified the CD1d amino acids important for iNKT TCR recognition and the stability of the ternary complex. The studies show also how hydrogen bonds formed by the glucose sugar can account for the distinct binding kinetics of the TCR for this CD1d-glycolipid complex. Therefore, our studies illuminate the mechanism of glycolipid recognition for antigens from important pathogens.

  17. [Detection of Australia antigen in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyger, E; Micouin, C; Magnin, R

    1975-06-01

    The reverse passive hemaggluatination (RPH) technique for HB ag. detection is presently used at the Grenoble Blood Center; this technique has been slightly modified with a view to lowering the cost. A microtechnique which gave preliminary good results, is also described.

  18. “Nothing is permanent but change”* -- Antigenic variation in persistent bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H.; Bankhead, Troy; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pathogens persist in immunocompetent mammalian hosts using various strategies, including evasion of immune effectors by antigenic variation. Among highly antigenically variant bacteria, gene conversion is used to generate novel expressed variants from otherwise silent donor sequences. Recombination using oligonucleotide segments from multiple donors is a combinatorial mechanism that tremendously expands the variant repertoire, allowing thousands of variants to be generated from a relatively small donor pool. Three bacterial pathogens, each encoded by a small genome (Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE diversity is encoded and expressed on a linear plasmid required for persistence and recent experiments have demonstrated that VlsE recombination is necessary for persistence in the immunocompetent host. In contrast, both Treponema pallidum TprK and Anaplasma marginale Msp2 expression sites and donors are chromosomally encoded. Both T. pallidum and A. marginale generate antigenic variants in vivo in individual hosts and studies at the population level reveal marked strain diversity in the variant repertoire that may underlie pathogen strain structure and the capacity for re-infection and heterologous strain superinfection. Here, we review gene conversion in bacterial antigenic variation and discuss the short- and long-term selective pressures that shape the variant repertoire. PMID:19709057

  19. 'Nothing is permanent but change'- antigenic variation in persistent bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2009-12-01

    Pathogens persist in immunocompetent mammalian hosts using various strategies, including evasion of immune effectors by antigenic variation. Among highly antigenically variant bacteria, gene conversion is used to generate novel expressed variants from otherwise silent donor sequences. Recombination using oligonucleotide segments from multiple donors is a combinatorial mechanism that tremendously expands the variant repertoire, allowing thousands of variants to be generated from a relatively small donor pool. Three bacterial pathogens, each encoded by a small genome (Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE diversity is encoded and expressed on a linear plasmid required for persistence and recent experiments have demonstrated that VlsE recombination is necessary for persistence in the immunocompetent host. In contrast, both Treponema pallidum TprK and Anaplasma marginale Msp2 expression sites and donors are chromosomally encoded. Both T. pallidum and A. marginale generate antigenic variants in vivo in individual hosts and studies at the population level reveal marked strain diversity in the variant repertoire that may underlie pathogen strain structure and the capacity for re-infection and heterologous strain superinfection. Here, we review gene conversion in bacterial antigenic variation and discuss the short- and long-term selective pressures that shape the variant repertoire.

  20. The universal detection of antigens from one skin biopsy specimen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, H.M.J. van der; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Pasch, M.C.; Boer-van Huizen, R.T. de; Lingen, R.G. van; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemistry is an important tool in dermatology but is limited. Certain antigens can only be preserved in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections, while others can only be detected on frozen sections, resulting in situations where two biopsies are needed. We aimed to develop a

  1. Detecting Cortex Fragments During Bacterial Spore Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael B; Sorg, Joseph A

    2016-06-25

    The process of endospore germination in Clostridium difficile, and other Clostridia, increasingly is being found to differ from the model spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Germination is triggered by small molecule germinants and occurs without the need for macromolecular synthesis. Though differences exist between the mechanisms of spore germination in species of Bacillus and Clostridium, a common requirement is the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan-like cortex which allows the spore core to swell and rehydrate. After rehydration, metabolism can begin and this, eventually, leads to outgrowth of a vegetative cell. The detection of hydrolyzed cortex fragments during spore germination can be difficult and the modifications to the previously described assays can be confusing or difficult to reproduce. Thus, based on our recent report using this assay, we detail a step-by-step protocol for the colorimetric detection of cortex fragments during bacterial spore germination.

  2. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  3. Lipid motif of a bacterial antigen mediates immune responses via TLR2 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit A Lugade

    Full Text Available The cross-talk between the innate and the adaptive immune system is facilitated by the initial interaction of antigen with dendritic cells. As DCs express a large array of TLRs, evidence has accumulated that engagement of these molecules contributes to the activation of adaptive immunity. We have evaluated the immunostimulatory role of the highly-conserved outer membrane lipoprotein P6 from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI to determine whether the presence of the lipid motif plays a critical role on its immunogenicity. We undertook a systematic analysis of the role that the lipid motif plays in the activation of DCs and the subsequent stimulation of antigen-specific T and B cells. To facilitate our studies, recombinant P6 protein that lacked the lipid motif was generated. Mice immunized with non-lipidated rP6 were unable to elicit high titers of anti-P6 Ig. Expression of the lipid motif on P6 was also required for proliferation and cytokine secretion by antigen-specific T cells. Upregulation of T cell costimulatory molecules was abrogated in DCs exposed to non-lipidated rP6 and in TLR2(-/- DCs exposed to native P6, thereby resulting in diminished adaptive immune responses. Absence of either the lipid motif on the antigen or TLR2 expression resulted in diminished cytokine production from stimulated DCs. Collectively, our data suggest that the lipid motif of the lipoprotein antigen is essential for triggering TLR2 signaling and effective stimulation of APCs. Our studies establish the pivotal role of a bacterial lipid motif on activating both innate and adaptive immune responses to an otherwise poorly immunogenic protein antigen.

  4. Self-Adjuvanting Bacterial Vectors Expressing Pre-Erythrocytic Antigens Induce Sterile Protection against Malaria

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    Elke eBergmann-Leitner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inactivated, Gram-negative bacteria that express malaria vaccine candidates represent a promising novel self-adjuvanting vaccine approach. Antigens expressed on particulate bacterial carriers not only target directly to antigen-presenting cells but also provide a strong danger signal thus circumventing the requirement for potent extraneous adjuvants. E. coli expressing malarial antigens resulted in the induction of either Th1 or Th2 biased responses that were dependent on both antigen and sub-cellular localization. Some of these constructs induced higher quality humoral responses compared to recombinant protein and most importantly they were able to induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria. In light of these encouraging results, two major Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine targets, the Cell-Traversal protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites (CelTOS fused to the Maltose-binding protein in the periplasmic space and the Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP fused to the Outer membrane protein A in the outer membrane were expressed in a clinically relevant, attenuated Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri 2a. This type of live attenuated vector has previously undergone clinical investigations as a vaccine against shigellosis. Using this novel delivery platform for malaria, we find that vaccination with the whole organism represents an effective vaccination alternative that induces protective efficacy against sporozoite challenge. Shigella GeMI-Vax expressing malaria targets warrant further evaluation to determine their full potential as a dual disease, multivalent, self-adjuvanting vaccine system, against both shigellosis and malaria.

  5. Serological versus antigen detection methods for Giardia duodenalis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M; Farid, A; Rabia, I; Mostafa, B; El Amir, A

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis constitutes an important public health problem in the world. Contamination of the water with fecal materials including viruses and pathogenic protozoa still represents an environmental health hazard, especially in rural areas. The survey study evaluated the relation between seropositivity and some risk factors. Moreover, the study compared between the serological IgG and IgM level and antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of giardiasis. The results indicate that sex distribution and age were the mean risk factors for seroprevelence. In this study, sera samples were employed in sandwich ELISA assay, to detect circulating Giardia antigens. None of the negative control serum samples gave a positive reaction, but cross reaction was encountered with 3 case of Cryptosporidium. The specificity of the assay was 94.830/a. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the Giardia patient's sera was 94.12% which was higher than that of IgG (86.25%) and IgM (87.50%) secretion measurements. In conclusion, antigen detection methods give better and earlier diagnosis for giardiasis can be performed quickly and do not require an experienced and skilled morphologist.

  6. Detection of C. difficile common antigen: comparison of methods

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    Maria Giuliana Brunelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify and define a diagnostic algorithm for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection, a comparative study was carried out at the Microbiology Laboratory of “Maggiore della Carità” Hospital in Novara.We compared the system currently in use in the laboratory “TECHLAB C.difficile Quik Chek Complete (Inverness Medical, USA”, an immunoenzymatic assay for the simultaneous detection of C. difficile common antigen (GDH and Toxins A&B, with the new ImmunoCard Clostridium difficile GDH (Meridian Bioscience, USA, which identifies the C. difficile Common Antigen GDH. The results proved identical between the two assays: of 100 samples, 82 resulted negative with both tests, 18 were GDH positive with both tests. Out of the 18 GDH positives, 9 resulted positive for the Toxins portion of the TechLab test.

  7. High-Sensitivity Detection of Fruit Tree Viruses Using Bacterial Magnetic Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Feng Chen; Ying Li; Zhen-Fang Wang; Ji-Lun Li; Wei Jiang; Shao-Hua Li

    2009-01-01

    Prunus necrotic ring spot virus (PNRSV) and grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) were detected by fluoroimmunoassay using bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs),and a double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA).For the fluoroimmunoassay,fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled anti-PNRSV antibody or anti-GFLV antibody was conjugated onto BMPs of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-I.With this method,a very low minimum antigen concentration (1 x 106 dilution of the original sample concentration) could be detected.Using DAS-ELISA,the minimum antigen detection concentration was the original sample concentration.Thus,comparing these two methods,a BMP-based method could increase the sensitivity up to six orders of magnitude (106) higher than an ELISA-based method of detection PNRSV and GFLV.

  8. Expression of Lewisb blood group antigen in Helicobacterpylori does not interfere with bacterial adhesion property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng; Jiesong Hua; Han-Chung Ng; Khay-Guan Yeoh; Ho Bow

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The finding that some Helicobacterpyloristrains expressLewis b (Leb) blood group antigen casts a doubt on the roleof Leb of human gastric epithelium being a receptor for-H.pylori. The aim of this study was to determine if expressionof Leb in H. Pyloriinterferes with bacterial adhesion property.METHODS: Bacterial adhesion to immobilized Leb onmicrotitre plate was performed in 63-H. Pyloristrains obtainedfrom Singapore using in vitro adherence assay. Expression ofLewis blood group antigens was determined by ELISA assay.RESULTS: Among 63 H. Pyloristrains, 28 expressed Lebantigen. In vitro adhesion assay showed that 78.6 % (22/28) of Leb-positive and 74.3 % (26/35) of Leb-negative-H.pyloriisolates were positive for adhesion to immobilized Lebcoated on microtitre plate (P=0.772). In addition, blockingof H. Pylori Leb by prior incubation with anti-Leb monoclonalantibody did not alter thebinding of the bacteria to solid-phase coated Leb.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that expressionof Leb in H. Pyloridoes not interfere with the bacterialadhesion property. This result supports the notion that Lebpresent on human gastric epithelial cells is capable of beinga receptor for H.pylori.

  9. Immunoliposome-PCR: a generic ultrasensitive quantitative antigen detection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Junkun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accurate quantification of antigens at low concentrations over a wide dynamic range is needed for identifying biomarkers associated with disease and detecting protein interactions in high-throughput microarrays used in proteomics. Here we report the development of an ultrasensitive quantitative assay format called immunoliposome polymerase chain reaction (ILPCR that fulfills these requirements. This method uses a liposome, with reporter DNA encapsulated inside and biotin-labeled polyethylene glycol (PEG phospholipid conjugates incorporated into the outer surface of the liposome, as a detection reagent. The antigenic target is immobilized in the well of a microplate by a capture antibody and the liposome detection reagent is then coupled to a biotin-labeled second antibody through a NeutrAvidin bridge. The liposome is ruptured to release the reporter DNA, which serves as a surrogate to quantify the protein target using real-time PCR. Results A liposome detection reagent was prepared, which consisted of a population of liposomes ~120 nm in diameter with each liposome possessing ~800 accessible biotin receptors and ~220 encapsulated reporters. This liposome detection reagent was used in an assay to quantify the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in human serum. This ILPCR assay exhibited a linear dose–response curve from 10-10 M to 10-16 M CEA. Within this range the assay coefficient of variance was Conclusions The ILPCR assay has several advantages over other immuno-PCR methods. The reporter DNA and biotin-labeled PEG phospholipids spontaneously incorporate into the liposomes as they form, simplifying preparation of the detection reagent. Encapsulation of the reporter inside the liposomes allows nonspecific DNA in the assay medium to be degraded with DNase I prior to quantification of the encapsulated reporter by PCR, which reduces false-positive results and improves quantitative accuracy. The ability to

  10. A novel method for rapid detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kubo, Toru; Ehara, Naomi; Nakano, Reiji; Matsutake, Toyoshi; Ishimatu, Yuji; Tanaka, Yumi; Akamatsu, Suguru; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we used "RAPIRUN(®)Streptococcus pneumoniae HS (otitis media/sinusitis) (RAPIRUN-HS)," a rapid S. pneumoniae antigen detection kit, to investigate methods for detecting S. pneumoniae antigens in blood of 32 bacterial pneumonia patients. We simultaneously performed PCR to detect S. pneumoniae in blood samples. The results of these tests were compared based on pneumonia severity, determined using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) score classification. Four S. pneumoniae PCR-positive patients of the six severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients (PSI risk class IV/V) also tested positive using RAPIRUN-HS. Twenty-four mild to moderate pneumonia patients (PSI risk class I-III) were S. pneumoniae PCR-negative; of these, 21 tested negative using RAPIRUN-HS. The pneumococcal pneumonia patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS had low leukocyte counts and elevated C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, indicating that RAPIRUN-HS results were correlated with pneumonia severity. The time course evaluations of the laboratory tests for severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients showed that RAPIRUN-HS and S. pneumoniae PCR yielded positive results earlier than the changes in procalcitonin and IL-6. Thus, concomitant pneumococcal bacteremia was strongly suspected in patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS. In conclusion, RAPIRUN-HS may be useful for determining whether to admit patients into hospitals and selecting the appropriate antimicrobial agents.

  11. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs.

  12. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  13. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph B Geier

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  14. AgdbNet – antigen sequence database software for bacterial typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiden Martin CJ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial typing schemes based on the sequences of genes encoding surface antigens require databases that provide a uniform, curated, and widely accepted nomenclature of the variants identified. Due to the differences in typing schemes, imposed by the diversity of genes targeted, creating these databases has typically required the writing of one-off code to link the database to a web interface. Here we describe agdbNet, widely applicable web database software that facilitates simultaneous BLAST querying of multiple loci using either nucleotide or peptide sequences. Results Databases are described by XML files that are parsed by a Perl CGI script. Each database can have any number of loci, which may be defined by nucleotide and/or peptide sequences. The software is currently in use on at least five public databases for the typing of Neisseria meningitidis, Campylobacter jejuni and Streptococcus equi and can be set up to query internal isolate tables or suitably-configured external isolate databases, such as those used for multilocus sequence typing. The style of the resulting website can be fully configured by modifying stylesheets and through the use of customised header and footer files that surround the output of the script. Conclusion The software provides a rapid means of setting up customised Internet antigen sequence databases. The flexible configuration options enable typing schemes with differing requirements to be accommodated.

  15. Real-time prostate-specific antigen detection with prostate-specific antigen imprinted capacitive biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertürk, Gizem [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Hedström, Martin [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); CapSenze HB, Medicon Village, SE-223 63 Lund (Sweden); Tümer, M. Aşkın [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Mattiasson, Bo, E-mail: Bo.Mattiasson@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); CapSenze HB, Medicon Village, SE-223 63 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-09-03

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a valuable biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer, the third most common cancer in men. Ultrasensitive detection of PSA is crucial to screen the prostate cancer in an early stage and to detect the recurrence of the disease after treatment. In this report, microcontact-PSA imprinted (PSA-MIP) capacitive biosensor chip was developed for real-time, highly sensitive and selective detection of PSA. PSA-MIP electrodes were prepared in the presence of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker via UV polymerization. Immobilized Anti-PSA antibodies on electrodes (Anti-PSA) for capacitance measurements were also prepared to compare the detection performances of both methods. The electrodes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) and real-time PSA detection was performed with standard PSA solutions in the concentration range of 10 fg mL{sup −1}–100 ng mL{sup −1}. The detection limits were found as 8.0 × 10{sup −5} ng mL{sup −1} (16 × 10{sup −17} M) and 6.0 × 10{sup −4} ng mL{sup −1} (12 × 10{sup −16} M) for PSA-MIP and Anti-PSA electrodes, respectively. Selectivity studies were performed against HSA and IgG and selectivity coefficients were calculated. PSA detection was also carried out from diluted human serum samples and finally, reproducibility of the electrodes was tested. The results are promising and show that when the sensitivity of the capacitive system is combined with the selectivity and reproducibility of the microcontact-imprinting procedure, the resulting system might be used successfully for real-time detection of various analytes even in very low concentrations. - Highlights: • Microcontact imprinting method was used for preparing the sensor chip for capacitive biosensing. • High sensitivity was obtained. • Good selectivity was

  16. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Védy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  17. Changes in the repertoire of natural antibodies caused by immunization with bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, N V; Navakouski, M J; Huflejt, M

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of natural anti-glycan antibodies in naïve chickens and in chickens immunized with bacteria Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Francisella tularensis as well as with peptides from an outer membrane protein of B. pseudomallei was studied. A relatively restricted...... pattern of natural antibodies (first of all IgY against bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragments, L-Rha, and core N-acetyllactosamine) shrank and, moreover, the level of detectable antibodies decreased as a result of immunization....

  18. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis with negative cryptococcal antigen: Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opota, O; Desgraz, B; Kenfak, A; Jaton, K; Cavassini, M; Greub, G; Prod'hom, G; Giulieri, S

    2015-03-01

    Detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid allows cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis within few hours with >90% sensitivity. In an HIV-positive patient with Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, initial antigen detection by immunoagglutination was negative. We thus evaluated a new immunochromatographic detection assay that exhibited a higher sensitivity.

  20. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  1. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen; goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody; finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were applied to the concomitant assay to analyze the feasibility. The first approach applied FITC and Cy3 when both targets were present at the same time, resulting in 50 ng/mL of the antibody detection limit and 10 ng/mL of antigen detection limit in the quantitative measurements of target concentration, taking the consideration of FRET efficiency of 68% between donor and acceptor. The sequential approach tended to lower the signal/noise (S/N ratio and the detection of the model antigen (lower than 1 ng/mL had better sensitivity than the model antibody (lower than 50 ng/mL. This combined antigen/antibody method might be useful for combined detection of antigens and antibodies. It will be helpful to screen for both antigen and antibody particularly in the situations of the multiserotype and high-frequency mutant virus infections.

  2. Illuminating the detection chain of bacterial bioreporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.R. van der; Tropel, D.; Jaspers, M.

    2004-01-01

    Engineering bacteria for measuring chemicals of environmental or toxicological concern (bioreporter bacteria) has grown slowly into a mature research area. Despite many potential advantages, current bioreporters do not perform well enough to comply with environmental detection standards. Basically,

  3. Induction of bacterial antigen-specific colitis by a simplified human microbiota consortium in gnotobiotic interleukin-10-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Wohlgemuth, Steffen; Liu, Bo; Bower, Maureen; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated whether a simplified human microbiota consortium (SIHUMI) induces colitis in germfree (GF) 129S6/SvEv (129) and C57BL/6 (B6) interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice, determined mouse strain effects on colitis and the microbiota, examined the effects of inflammation on relative bacterial composition, and identified immunodominant bacterial species in "humanized" IL-10(-/-) mice. GF wild-type (WT) and IL-10(-/-) 129 and B6 mice were colonized with 7 human-derived inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related intestinal bacteria and maintained under gnotobiotic conditions. Quantification of bacteria in feces, ileal and colonic contents, and tissues was performed using 16S rRNA gene selective quantitative PCR. Colonic segments were scored histologically, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-12p40, and IL-17 levels were measured in supernatants of unstimulated colonic tissue explants and of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells stimulated by lysates of individual or aggregate bacterial strains. Relative bacterial species abundances changed over time and differed between 129 and B6 mice, WT and IL-10(-/-) mice, luminal and mucosal samples, and ileal and colonic or fecal samples. SIHUMI induced colitis in all IL-10(-/-) mice, with more aggressive colitis and MLN cell activation in 129 mice. Escherichia coli LF82 and Ruminococcus gnavus lysates induced dominant effector ex vivo MLN TH1 and TH17 responses, although the bacterial mucosal concentrations were low. In summary, this study shows that a simplified human bacterial consortium induces colitis in ex-GF 129 and B6 IL-10(-/-) mice. Relative concentrations of individual SIHUMI species are determined by host genotype, the presence of inflammation, and anatomical location. A subset of IBD-relevant human enteric bacterial species preferentially stimulates bacterial antigen-specific TH1 and TH17 immune responses in this model, independent of luminal and mucosal bacterial concentrations.

  4. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  5. DETECTION OF PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN IN THE PRESENCE OF PENICILLIN IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOLLOWAY, Y; BOERSMA, WG; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM

    1993-01-01

    Eight strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae were tested in vitro for their ability to produce capsular antigen in the presence of penicillin. It was found that, provided 10(6) to 10(7) pneumococci/ml were present, capsular antigen could be detected during the 72 h in which the experiment was conducted

  6. Development of recombinant antigen array for simultaneous detection of viral antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV, Rubella virus (RV core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs. The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis.

  7. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  8. Bacterial antigen expression is an important component in inducing an immune response to orally administered Salmonella-delivered DNA vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Gahan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression in production of the vaccine antigen. Gene expression in DNA vaccines is commonly under the control of the eukaryotic cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The aim of this study was to identify and disable putative bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter and evaluate the immunogenicity of the resulting DNA vaccine delivered orally by S. typhimurium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results reported here clearly demonstrate the presence of bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter. These promoters have homology to the bacterial consensus sequence and functional activity. To disable prokaryotic expression from the CMV promoter a series of genetic manipulations were performed to remove the two major bacterial promoters and add a bacteria transcription terminator downstream of the CMV promoter. S. typhimurium was used to immunise BALB/c mice orally with a DNA vaccine encoding the C-fragment of tetanus toxin (TT under control of the original or the modified CMV promoter. Although both promoters functioned equally well in eukaryotic cells, as indicated by equivalent immune responses following intramuscular delivery, only the original CMV promoter was able to induce an anti-TT specific response following oral delivery by S. typhimurium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prokaryotic expression of the antigen and co-delivery of this protein by Salmonella are at least partially responsible for the successful

  9. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy for rapid detection and classification of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Miryeong; Himmelsbach, David S; Barton, Franklin E; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2009-11-01

    This study deals with the rapid detection and differentiation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter, which are the most commonly identified commensal and pathogenic bacteria in foods, using fluorescence spectroscopy and multivariate analysis. Each bacterial sample cultured under controlled conditions was diluted in physiologic saline for analysis. Fluorescence spectra were collected over a range of 200-700 nm with 0.5 nm intervals on the PerkinElmer Fluorescence Spectrometer. The synchronous scan technique was employed to find the optimum excitation (lambda(ex)) and emission (lambda(em)) wavelengths for individual bacteria with the wavelength interval (Deltalambda) being varied from 10 to 200 nm. The synchronous spectra and two-dimensional plots showed two maximum lambda(ex) values at 225 nm and 280 nm and one maximum lambda(em) at 335-345 nm (lambda(em) = lambda(ex) + Deltalambda), which correspond to the lambda(ex) = 225 nm, Deltalambda = 110-120 nm, and lambda(ex) = 280 nm, Deltalambda = 60-65 nm. For all three bacterial genera, the same synchronous scan results were obtained. The emission spectra from the three bacteria groups were very similar, creating difficulty in classification. However, the application of principal component analysis (PCA) to the fluorescence spectra resulted in successful classification of the bacteria by their genus as well as determining their concentration. The detection limit was approximately 10(3)-10(4) cells/mL for each bacterial sample. These results demonstrated that fluorescence spectroscopy, when coupled with PCA processing, has the potential to detect and to classify bacterial pathogens in liquids. The methodology is rapid (>10 min), inexpensive, and requires minimal sample preparation compared to standard analytical methods for bacterial detection.

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of Brucella melitensis antigens in cases of naturally occurring abortions in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Fatma; Yener, Zabit

    2008-11-01

    Brucella melitensis, a worldwide zoonotic pathogen, is a significant cause of abortion in sheep and goats in some countries. The present study was carried out to determine, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of B. melitensis antigens in 110 naturally occurring aborted sheep fetuses. Sections of lung, liver, kidney, and spleen of each fetus were stained with immunoperoxidase to detect Brucella antigens. Brucella melitensis antigens were detected in 33 of 110 fetuses (30%). In the 33 positive cases, Brucella antigens were found in lung (25 [22.7%]), liver (21 [19%]), spleen (13 [11.8%]), and kidney (6 [5.4%]). Microscopic studies demonstrated that Brucella antigens were mainly located in the cytoplasm of macrophages and neutrophils of the lung, and in the cytoplasm of macrophages in the portal infiltrates and Kupffer cells of the liver. It was concluded that immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues is a useful tool for the diagnosis of spontaneous ovine abortion caused by B. melitensis.

  12. “Nothing is permanent but change”* -- Antigenic variation in persistent bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Guy H.; Bankhead, Troy; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogens persist in immunocompetent mammalian hosts using various strategies, including evasion of immune effectors by antigenic variation. Among highly antigenically variant bacteria, gene conversion is used to generate novel expressed variants from otherwise silent donor sequences. Recombination using oligonucleotide segments from multiple donors is a combinatorial mechanism that tremendously expands the variant repertoire, allowing thousands of variants to be generated from a relatively s...

  13. Cocktail of Theileria equi antigens for detecting infection in equines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimaa; Abd; El-Salam; El-Sayed; Mohamed; Abdo; Rizk; Mohamed; Alaa; Terkawi; Ahmed; Mousa; El; Said; El; Shirbini; El; Said; Gehad; Elsayed; Mohamed; Fouda; Naoaki; Yokoyama; Ikuo; Igarashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To use two diagnostic antigens belonging to the frequently associated in Theileria domain,Theileria equi(T.equi)protein 82(Te 82)and T.equi 104 k Da microneme-rhoptry antigen precursor(Te 43),to diagnose T.equi infection in horses as compared with equi merozoite antigen-2(EMA-2).Methods:In the current study,we applied a cocktail-ELISA containing two antigens(EMA-2+Te 82)to diagnose T.equi infection either in experimentally infected horses or in field infection.Results:Our findings have revealed that a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 provided a more practical and sensitive diagnostic candidate for diagnosing T.equi infection in horses as compared with Te 82 or Te 43 alone.Conclusions:The ELISA technique using a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 offers a practical and sensitive diagnostic tool for diagnosing T.equi infection in horses and using of this promising cocktail formula will be applicable for epidemiological surveys and will help control the infection in horses.

  14. Cocktail of Theileria equi antigens for detecting infection in equines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimaa Abd El-Salam El-Sayed; Mohamed Abdo Rizk; Mohamed Alaa Terkawi; Ahmed Mousa; El Said El Shirbini El Said; Gehad Elsayed; Mohamed Fouda; Naoaki Yokoyama; Ikuo Igarashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To use two diagnostic antigens belonging to the frequently associated in Theileria domain, Theileria equi (T. equi) protein 82 (Te 82) and T. equi 104 kDa microneme-rhoptry antigen precursor (Te 43), to diagnose T. equi infection in horses as compared with equi merozoite antigen-2 (EMA-2). Methods: In the current study, we applied a cocktail-ELISA containing two antigens (EMA-2+Te 82) to diagnose T. equi infection either in experimentally infected horses or in field infection. Results: Our findings have revealed that a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 provided a more practical and sensitive diagnostic candidate for diagnosing T. equi infection in horses as compared with Te 82 or Te 43 alone. Conclusions: The ELISA technique using a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 offers a practical and sensitive diagnostic tool for diagnosing T. equi infection in horses and using of this promising cocktail formula will be applicable for epidemiological surveys and will help control the infection in horses.

  15. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information.

  16. Detection and Measurement of Antigen-Antibody Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-09-30

    kaolin . With low titer serum, much of the antibody also is removed, so that high titer antibody is made even more necessary. The use of immunodiffusion...increase the antibody titer significantly. In addition, a series of animals has been started on injections of bovine serum albumin with Freund’s... bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been obtained. With this available, a comparison can be made with normal antibody to the same antigen. Since the

  17. Detection of candidal antigens in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, P; Perheentupa, J; Krohn, K J

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS I) is associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. To characterize the antibody responses in this subgroup of Candida albicans infections, we screened a candidal cDNA expression library with patient sera and found four cDNA clones encoding the immunopositive proteins enolase, heat shock protein 90, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase. The reactivity to these antigens was studied further by immunoprecipitation assays with in vitro-tran...

  18. pH6 antigen (PsaA protein) of Yersinia pestis, a novel bacterial Fc-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Abramov, V M; Cherepanov, P G; Spirina, G V; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasiliev, A M; Zav'yalova, G A

    1996-05-01

    It was found that recombinant pH6 antigen (rPsaA protein) forming virulence-associated fimbriae on the surface of Yersinia pestis at pH 6.7 in host macrophage phagolysosomes or extracellularly in abscesses such as buboes, is a novel bacterial Fc-receptor. rPsaA protein displays reactivity with human IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses but does not react with rabbit, mouse and sheep IgG.

  19. Molecular Detection of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sadighian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The clinical diagnosis of meningitis is crucial, particularly in children. The early diagnosis and empiric an­tibi­otic treatments have led to a reduction in morbidity and mortality rates. PCR and the enzymatic digestion of 16SrDNA frag­ment which is produced by universal primers led up fast and sensitive determination. The purpose of this study was to investi­gate a rapid method for detection of common bacterial pathogens causing meningitis."nMethods: According to the gene encoding 16SrDNA found in all bacteria, a pair of primers was designed. Then the univer­sal PCR was performed for bacterial agents of meningitis (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influ­enzae, etc. by employing broad- range DNA extraction method. The ob­tained uni­versal PCR products were digested with restriction enzymes (HaeIII, AluI and MnlI to identify bacterial species. "nResults: By the enzymatic digestion of the universal products of each standard strain of the above bacteria, specific patterns were achieved. These specific patterns may be used for comparison in CSF examination. The analytical sensitivity of the as­say was approximately 1.5´102 CFU/ml of CSF even in samples with high amount of proteins. Conclusion: The universal PCR coupled with enzymatic digestion can be used to detect and identify bacterial pathogens in clini­cal specimens rapidly and accurately. Molecular diagnostic of bacterial meningitis, though expensive and labor-inten­sive, but is valuable and critical in patient management.

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Antigen Detection and Serotyping Lateral Flow Antigen Detection System for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Morioka

    Full Text Available We developed a lateral flow strip using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs which allows for rapid antigen detection and serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. This FMDV serotyping strip was able to detect all 7 serotypes and distinguish serotypes O, A, C and Asia1. Its sensitivities ranged from 10(3 to 10(4 of a 50% tissue culture infectious dose of each FMDV stain; this is equal to those of the commercial product Svanodip (Boehringer Ingelheim Svanova, Uppsala, Sweden, which can detect all seven serotypes of FMDV, but does not distinguish them. Our evaluation of the FMDV serotyping strip using a total of 118 clinical samples (vesicular fluids, vesicular epithelial emulsions and oral and/or nasal swabs showed highly sensitive antigen detection and accuracy in serotyping in accordance with ELISA or RT-PCR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on any FMDV serotyping strip that provides both rapid antigen detection and serotyping of FMDV at the same time on one strip without extra devices. This method will be useful in both FMD-free countries and FMD-infected countries, especially where laboratory diagnosis cannot be carried out.

  2. Discrepancies between Antigen and Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rotavirus and Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    We compared the results of an antigen test (ELISA) with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rotavirus and norovirus in stool specimens. Rotavirus and norovirus antigen-positive stool specimens were collected, and rotavirus and norovirus PCRs were performed on these specimens. Of the 325 rotavirus antigen-positive specimens, 200 were positive for both assays and 125 were PCR negative. Of 286 norovirus antigen-positive specimens, 51 were PCR negative. Comparison of the lower limit of detection showed that rotavirus PCR was 16 times more sensitive and norovirus PCR was over 4,000 times more sensitive than the ELISA. Discrepant results between ELISA and PCR were common, and the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results should be considered with rotavirus and norovirus assays.

  3. Focused specificity of intestinal TH17 cells towards commensal bacterial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Torchinsky, Miriam B; Gobert, Michael; Xiong, Huizhong; Xu, Mo; Linehan, Jonathan L; Alonzo, Francis; Ng, Charles; Chen, Alessandra; Lin, Xiyao; Sczesnak, Andrew; Liao, Jia-Jun; Torres, Victor J; Jenkins, Marc K; Lafaille, Juan J; Littman, Dan R

    2014-06-05

    T-helper-17 (TH17) cells have critical roles in mucosal defence and in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. They are most abundant in the small intestine lamina propria, where their presence requires colonization of mice with microbiota. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are sufficient to induce TH17 cells and to promote TH17-dependent autoimmune disease in animal models. However, the specificity of TH17 cells, the mechanism of their induction by distinct bacteria, and the means by which they foster tissue-specific inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of intestinal TH17 cells in SFB-colonized mice has minimal overlap with that of other intestinal CD4(+) T cells and that most TH17 cells, but not other T cells, recognize antigens encoded by SFB. T cells with antigen receptors specific for SFB-encoded peptides differentiated into RORγt-expressing TH17 cells, even if SFB-colonized mice also harboured a strong TH1 cell inducer, Listeria monocytogenes, in their intestine. The match of T-cell effector function with antigen specificity is thus determined by the type of bacteria that produce the antigen. These findings have significant implications for understanding how commensal microbiota contribute to organ-specific autoimmunity and for developing novel mucosal vaccines.

  4. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Vectored Multi-Antigen Tuberculosis Vaccine Limits Bacterial Proliferation in Mice following a Single Intranasal Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious health problem worldwide, and an urgent need exists to improve or replace the available vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Most vaccination protocols adapt two or three doses to induce long-term lasting immunity. Our previous study showed that the naked DNA encoding the triple-antigen fusion TFP846 (Rv3615c-Mtb10.4-Rv2660c) induced robust T cellular immune responses accompanying four inoculations against mycobacteria infection. However, a number of compliance issues exist in some areas lacking the appropriate medical infrastructure with multiple administrations. In this study, a novel vesicular stomatitis virus expressing TFP846 (VSV-846) was developed and the immune responses elicited by VSV-846 were evaluated. We observed that intranasal delivery of VSV-846 induced a potent antigen-specific T cell response following a single dose and VSV-846 efficiently controlled bacterial growth to levels ~10-fold lower than that observed in the mock group 6 weeks post-infection in BCG-infected mice. Importantly, mice immunized with VSV-846 provided long-term protection against mycobacteria infection compared with those receiving p846 or BCG immunization. Increased memory T cells were also observed in the spleens of VSV-846-vaccinated mice, which could be a potential mechanism associated with long-term protective immune response. These findings supported the use of VSV as an antigen delivery vector with the potential for TB vaccine development. PMID:28224119

  5. Detection of salivary antibodies to crude antigens of Opisthorchis viverrini in opisthorchiasis and cholangiocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Thuwajit, Chanitra; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2011-08-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini (O. viverrini; known as human liver fluke) is a major health problem in the northeastern region of Thailand. Infection with O. viverrini is the cause of hepatobiliary disease and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Previous studies demonstrated specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens in serum from O. viverrini-infected patients. However, no studies have measured specific antibodies to O. viverrini antigens in saliva from patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA. The objective of the study was to detect specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens in saliva from patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA, and to evaluate their use for diagnosis of O. viverrini infection. Saliva samples from 23 control subjects, 30 opisthorchiasis patients, and 38 CCA patients were collected. ELISA was established for detection of salivary IgA and IgG to crude O. viverrini antigens. ANOVA was used to compare salivary IgA and IgG levels among groups. Salivary IgA to crude O. viverrini antigens in CCA patients was significantly higher than controls (p = 0.007). Salivary IgG in CCA patients was significantly higher than opisthorchiasis patients and controls (p = 0.010 and p viverrini infection than salivary IgA. In conclusion, specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens were detected in saliva of patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA. Salivary antibodies reflect serum immune response to O. viverrini infection, and salivary IgG tends to be a good candidate for diagnosis of O. viverrini infection.

  6. Detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens from individual filth flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Pearson, Rachel E G; Miller, Amy K; Ziobro, George C

    2015-02-13

    There is unanimous consensus that insects are important vectors of foodborne pathogens. However, linking insects as vectors of the pathogen causing a particular foodborne illness outbreak has been challenging. This is because insects are not being aseptically collected as part of an environmental sampling program during foodborne outbreak investigations and because there is not a standardized method to detect foodborne bacteria from individual insects. To take a step towards solving this problem, we adapted a protocol from a commercially available PCR-based system that detects foodborne pathogens from food and environmental samples, to detect foodborne pathogens from individual flies.Using this standardized protocol, we surveyed 100 wild-caught flies for the presence of Cronobacter spp., Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes and demonstrated that it was possible to detect and further isolate these pathogens from the body surface and the alimentary canal of a single fly. Twenty-two percent of the alimentary canals and 8% of the body surfaces from collected wild flies were positive for at least one of the three foodborne pathogens. The prevalence of Cronobacter spp. on either body part of the flies was statistically higher (19%) than the prevalence of S. enterica (7%) and L.monocytogenes (4%). No false positives were observed when detecting S. enterica and L. monocytogenes using this PCR-based system because pure bacterial cultures were obtained from all PCR-positive results. However, pure Cronobacter colonies were not obtained from about 50% of PCR-positive samples, suggesting that the PCR-based detection system for this pathogen cross-reacts with other Enterobacteriaceae present among the highly complex microbiota carried by wild flies. The standardized protocol presented here will allow laboratories to detect bacterial foodborne pathogens from aseptically collected insects, thereby giving public health officials another line of evidence to find out how

  7. A comparison of the antigen detection ELISA and parasite detection for diagnosis of Trypanosoma evansi infections in camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitumbi, J N; Nantulya, V M

    1993-09-01

    Two herds of 60 camels each, living in Trypanosoma evansi endemic areas, were selected and studied for a period of 18 months. Animals in one herd were treated prophylactically with quinapyramine prosalt (May and Baker, Dagenham, UK), while those in the other herd were treated individually with quinapyramine dimethylsulphate (May and Baker, Dagenham, UK) when proven parasitaemic. The herd on prophylaxis was sampled for antigen and patent infection monthly. The other herd was sampled weekly for patent infection and fortnightly for antigen. The results obtained could be divided into four categories. The first category comprised cases (52 out of 61) in which the presence of trypanosome antigens could be correlated with parasitological diagnosis. In 80% of these animals the antigens disappeared from the circulation within a period of 30 days following chemotherapy. The second category comprised those animals with parasitologically proven infections but which did not have antigens in their sera. This was observed in nine camels, seven of which were from the herd that was being examined weekly for the presence of trypanosomes. These were considered to be animals in early infection, as the subsequent sera were also negative for anti-trypanosome antibodies and immune complexes. The third category comprised camels which were antigen-positive but aparasitaemic. Sera from these animals were also positive for anti-trypanosome antibodies, indicating that antigen-positivity was a true reflection of trypanosome infections in these animals. The last category comprised pre-weaned camel calves which appeared to have some form of protection against trypanosomiasis, as evidenced by the absence of trypanosomes, antigens and antibodies throughout the early period of their lives. Only occasional antigenaemia was found in a few calves. It is concluded that trypanosome antigen detection may give a more accurate idea of the prevalence of T. evansi infections than does whole parasite

  8. Indirect solid-phase immunosorbent assay for detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.P.; Rezapkin, G.V.; Dzagurova, T.K.; Tkachenko, E.A. (Institute of Poliomyelitis anU Viral Encephalities of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow)

    1984-05-01

    Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) using either enti-human or anti-mouse IgG labelled with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I, respectively, were developed for the detection of Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amapari, Tamiami, Lassa and LCM arenaviruses. Both methods allow high sensitivity detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies.

  9. Novel aptamer-linked nanoconjugate approach for detection of waterborne bacterial pathogens: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Manohar, Murli; Adegoke, Anthony Ayodeji; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-01-01

    The lack of microbiologically safe water in underdeveloped nations is the prime cause of infectious disease outbreaks. The need for the specific identification and detection of microorganisms encourages the development of advanced, rapid, sensitive and highly specific methods for the monitoring of pathogens and management of potential risk to human health. The rapid molecular assays based on detection of specific molecular signatures offer advantages over conventional methods in terms of specificity and sensitivity but require complex instrumentation and skilled personnel. Nanotechnology is an emerging area and provides a robust approach for the identification of pathogenic microorganism utilizing the peculiar properties of nanomaterials, i.e. small size (1-100 nm) and large surface area. This emerging technology promises to fulfill the urgent need of a novel strategy to enhance the bacterial identification and quantitation in the environment. In this context, the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles, their plasmonic shifts, and changes in magnetic properties have been utilized for the simple and cost-effective detection of bacterial nucleic acids, antigens and toxins with quite improved sensitivity. One of the promising leads to develop an advance detection method might be the coupling of nucleic acid aptamers (capable of interacting specifically with bacteria, protozoa, and viruses) with nanomaterials. Such aptamer-nano conjugate can be used for the specific recognition of infectious agents in different environmental matrices. This review summarizes the application of nanotechnology in the area of pathogen detection and discusses the prospects of coupling nucleic acid aptamers with nanoparticles for the specific detection of targeted pathogens.

  10. Detection of serum anti-melanocyte antibodies and identification of related antigens in patients with vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M C; Liu, C G; Wang, D X; Zhan, Z

    2015-12-07

    We detected autoantibodies against melanocytes in serum samples obtained from 50 patients, including 4 with HBV, with vitiligo and identified the associated membrane antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and anti-tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) antibody levels were analyzed. The associated antigens in normal human melanocyte were identified by immunofluorescence. Autoantibodies against melanocyte membrane and cytoplasmic proteins were detected by western blot. Membrane antigens with higher frequencies were identified by protein mass spectrometry. The HSP70 and anti-TRP-1 antibody levels (N = 70; 10 with HBV) were detected by ELISA. The specific antigens were detected in melanocyte cytoplasm and membrane (40/50; 80% incidence; western blot). The autoantibodies reacted with several membrane antigens with approximate molecular weights (Mr) of 86,000, 75,000, 60,000, 52,000, and 44,000 (strip positive rates: 36, 58, 22, 2, and 2%, respectively). Thirty percent of the patients showed the presence of cytoplasmic antigens (Mr: 110,000, 90,000, 75,000, 50,000, and 400,000; strip positive rates: 12, 4, 12, 10, and 2%, respectively). Fifteen and 5% of the healthy subjects showed positive expression of membrane and cytoplasmic antigens, respectively. Protein mass spectrometry predicted membrane proteins with Mr of 86,000 and 75,000 and 60,000 to be Lamin A /C and Vimentin X1, respective. High titers of anti-TRP-1 antibody were detected and showed positive correlation with HSP70 (r = 0. 927, P vitiligo, which might assist future investigations into autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo and formation of autoantibodies. HBV infection was correlated to vitiligo.

  11. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  12. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-11-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria.

  13. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Audrey; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate complex, time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria.

  14. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  15. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of avian leukosis virus p27 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bingling; Li, Delong; Zhu, Haibo; Liu, Wen; Qin, Liting; Liu, Zaisi; Wu, Guan; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against p27 was developed for the detection of the avian leukosis virus (ALV). The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), avian leukosis virus subgroup A (ALV-A), avian leukosis virus subgroup B (ALV-B), avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Fowlpox virus (FPV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian reovirus (ARV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), avian influenza virus (AIV) and Escherichia coli. The only specimens that yielded a strong signal were ALV-J, ALV-A and ALV-B, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of ALV. The limit of detection of this assay was 1.25 ng/ml of rp27 protein and 10(1.79)TCID(50) units of HLJ09MDJ-1 (ALV-J). Moreover, this AC-ELISA can detect ALV in cloacal swabs of chickens experimentally infected as early as 12 days post-infection. The AC-ELISA detected the virus in the albumin and cloacal swabs of naturally infected chickens, and the results were confirmed by PCR, indicating that the AC-ELISA was a suitable method for the detection of ALV. This test is rapid and sensitive and could be convenient for epidemiological studies and eradication programs.

  16. Analyzing titers of antibodies against bacterial and viral antigens, and bacterial toxoids in the intravenous immunoglobulins utilized in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Yu; Wang, Hsiu-Chi; Wang, Kun-Teng; Yang-Chih Shih, Daniel; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wang, Der-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) manufactured from human plasma contains IgG as the primary ingredient, and is used for indications such as immunodeficiency syndrome. Available IVIGs in Taiwan are either manufactured from Taiwanese or North American plasma. The effectiveness of the national immunization program of Taiwan can be evaluated by analyzing and comparing IVIG antibody titers that are induced through the corresponding vaccines (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis, measles, rubella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and varicella). Both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the in vitro neutralization test demonstrated that all IVIGs provide adequate clinical protection against diphtheria and tetanus toxins. ELISA results further revealed that plasma of Taiwanese subjects contains higher levels of pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies, when compared to foreign IVIGs. This may be related to the later adoption of acellular pertussis vaccine in Taiwan. Antibodies titers against measles, rubella, hepatitis A, and varicella-zoster virus were otherwise low. Low titers of hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies are present in Taiwanese plasma IVIG, indicating immune memory decline or loss. In conclusion, our results show that Taiwanese IVIG contains varying titers of vaccine-induced antibodies, and serves as a guide for future amendments to Taiwan's immunization program.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Native Antigens for the Development of Brucellosis Antibody Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Bano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a highly infectious zoonotic disease and an economically important infection of humans and livestock with a worldwide distribution. The main mode of transmission of this disease to humans is through the consumption of infected milk, milk products, and uncooked or raw meat. The present study was designed to prepare few native antigens, that is, sonicated antigen (SA, cell envelope (CE antigen, and freeze and thaw (FT antigen from Brucella abortus S99 culture and to test them in a highly sensitive and specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA in both a microtiter plate and a dot-blot format for the development of field-based diagnosis. All 50 suspected bovine samples were tested by plate as well as in dot ELISA formats for all the three antigens prepared. The CE antigen was found to be more suitable as it had the maximum agreement with the Rose Bengal plate agglutination test results followed by the SA and the least agreement was found with that of the FT antigen. This detection system in microtiter plates and a dot-blot format will be useful for the rapid screening of samples for the disease surveillance and routine diagnosis.

  18. Detection of HIV-1 antigen based on magnetic tunnel junction sensor and magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Zhou, Y; Pong, P W T

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it is evidenced that the individuals newly infected HIV are transmitting the virus prior to knowing their HIV status. Identifying individuals that are early in infection with HIV antibody negative (window period) remains problematic. In the newly infected individuals, HIV antigen p24 is usually present in their serum or plasma 7-10 days before the HIV antibody. After antibody production initiates, the p24 antigen is bound into immune complexes. That means the detectable p24 antigens in serum/plasma are short-lived, and their amount is in the pg/ml range. Thus, a rapid quantitative bio-detection system with high-sensitivity is required to achieve early disease diagnosis. Magnetoresistive (MR) biosensor with ultra-high sensitivity possesses great potential in this area. In this study, a p24 detection assay using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensor and 20-nm magnetic nanoparticles is reported.

  19. Detection and identification of platelet antibodies and antigens in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the unique functional properties of platelets, more-robust methods were required for detection of antibodies raised against them. Immunofluorescence detection by flow cytometry, solid-phase red cell adherence, and antigen capture ELISAs are some of the current tests that have been developed to meet the challenges of platelet antibody detection and identification and antigen phenotyping. Recently developed protein liquid bead arrays are becoming the next-generation platelet antibody tests. Fueled by development of PCR and determination of the molecular basis of the PlA1 human platelet antigen (HPA), serologic platelet typing has now been replaced by genotyping of DNA. Allele-specific PCR, melting curve analysis, and 5'-nuclease assays are now evolving into more high-throughput molecular tests. Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of immune platelet disorders has advanced considerably from its humble beginnings.

  20. Pelacakan Secara Imunohistokimiawi Antigen Virus pada Ayam yang Diinfeksi dengan Virus Penyakit Tetelo (IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETECTION OF VIRAL ANTIGEN IN TISSUE OF CHICKENS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Mirah Adi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the distribution of Newcastle disease virus (NDV following infection, chickenswere experimentally infected with visceretropic velogenic NDV isolate. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbsagainst the NDV LaSota vaccine strain were then produced to detect viral antigen in the infectedorgans. The mAbs were firstly tested for their specificity by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA using NDV and normal allantoic fluids as antigens. Eight mAbs specific against NDVwere isolated and two mAbs were used for immunodetection of NDV antigen in chicken’s tissues.By immunohistochemistry labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB staining NDV–antigen was detectedin paraffin embedded tissues of NDV-infected chickens. NDV antigen was not detected in noninfected chickens. In the infected chickens, high intensity of NDV antigen was detected in thelymphoid tissues, lung and intestine. The NDV antigen with a lesser intensity was detected in thebrain, trachea, liver and myocardium. This study shows that although viscerotropic velogenicNDV isolate can infect almost all organs, the main target of infection are lung, intestine andlymphoids tissues

  1. A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...AND SUBTITLE A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective

  2. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA*

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, L. J.; McGregor, I. A.; Paounova, N.; Lambert, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasit...

  3. Dose-Dependent Changes in the Antigenicity of Bacterial Endotoxin Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    M9lt6 LOS %%ere raised by immtunizing with purilied LOS for the elect rophoret ie blotting of LI’S antigens. LPS were transferred as described before 0 1...Traits- Blot cell. After treating the nitrocellulose membrane with 3%ý Hiomedical. Division of Marine Colloids. Inc.. Rockland. MEF) made tip gelatin in...uthrs han Mis T res Wison or ieroriing107. 137. inimunocfectrophoresis. 19. Land). M.. Johnson, A. G.. Wester , MI. E. and Sagin, J. F. (1955). This work

  4. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  5. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  6. Detection of blood culture bacterial contamination using natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E; Fitzhenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J; Brown, Steven H; Fielstein, Elliot M; Dittus, Robert S; Elkin, Peter L

    2009-11-14

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%.

  7. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  8. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  9. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  10. Haloarchaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles displaying Salmonella SopB antigen reduce bacterial burden when administered with live attenuated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasSarma, Priya; Negi, Vidya Devi; Balakrishnan, Arjun; Karan, Ram; Barnes, Susan; Ekulona, Folasade; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2014-07-31

    Innovative vaccines against typhoid and other Salmonella diseases that are safe, effective, and inexpensive are urgently needed. In order to address this need, buoyant, self-adjuvating gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) from the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were bioengineered to display the highly conserved Salmonella enterica antigen SopB, a secreted inosine phosphate effector protein injected by pathogenic bacteria during infection into the host cell. Two highly conserved sopB gene segments near the 3'-coding region, named sopB4 and B5, were each fused to the gvpC gene, and resulting GVNPs were purified by centrifugally accelerated flotation. Display of SopB4 and B5 antigenic epitopes on GVNPs was established by Western blotting analysis using antisera raised against short synthetic peptides of SopB. Immunostimulatory activities of the SopB4 and B5 nanoparticles were tested by intraperitoneal administration of recombinant GVNPs to BALB/c mice which had been immunized with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028 ΔpmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07), a live attenuated vaccine strain. Proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-9 were significantly induced in mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, consistent with a robust Th1 response. After challenge with virulent S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028, bacterial burden was found to be diminished in spleen of mice boosted with SopB4-GVNPs and absent or significantly diminished in liver, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen of mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, indicating that the C-terminal portions of SopB displayed on GVNPs elicit a protective response to Salmonella infection in mice. SopB antigen-GVNPs were found to be stable at elevated temperatures for extended periods without refrigeration in Halobacterium cells. The results all together show that bioengineered GVNPs are likely to represent a valuable platform for the development of improved vaccines against Salmonella diseases.

  11. Antigen 43-mediated autotransporter display, a versatile bacterial cell surface presentation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Hasman, Henrik; Schembri, Mark;

    2002-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43), a self-recognizing outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, has been converted into an efficient and versatile tool for surface display of foreign protein segments. Ag43 is an autotransporter protein characterized by the feature that all information required for transport...... to the outer membrane and secretion through the cell envelope is contained within the protein itself. Ag43 consists of two subunits (alpha and beta), where the beta-subunit forms an integral outer membrane translocator to which the alpha-subunit is noncovalently attached. The simplicity of the Ag43 system...

  12. An ELISA method using serum derived HDAg for the sorological detection of HDV antigens and antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Granato

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main difficulties related to the detection of the Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV antigen and antibody has been the source of the needed HD antigen since HDV containing human and animal livers are very difficult to obtain and since yield is low. This fact prompted us to try to use the serum of patients in the acute phase of HDV infection as a source of HDAg and turn to enzyme immunoassays (EIA instead of RIA for the sake of easiness and economy in the amount of HDAg needed. The antigen for EIA was obtained from patients during the acute phase of HDV infection and the antibody from patients who have been carriers for many years. For the detection of the antigen, a sandwich type method was employed, whereas for the antibody a competition assay was developed. In order to assess the relative specificity and sensibility of the test, the antibody assay was compared to a commercial RIA (C. RIA, Abbott and to a non-commercial RIA (NC RIA. Forty-two sera were tested by the two methods and only in two cases discrepant results were obtained. Its is concluded that: 1 sera from patients in the acute and chronic phases of HDV infection can be used as source of both antigen and antibody, for immunoassays; 2 EIA and RIA have comparable relative specificity and sensibility and 3 EIA is easier to perform, cheaper, non-hazardous, has a longer shelf-life and saves scarce HDAg.

  13. SPR platform based on image acquisition for HER2 antigen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Johny P.; Predabon, Sheila M.; Bonafé, Elton G.; Martins, Alessandro F.; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Radovanovic, Eduardo; Girotto, Emerson M.

    2017-01-01

    HER2 antigen is a marker used for breast cancer diagnosis and prevention. Its determination has great importance since breast cancer is one of the most insidious types of cancer in women. HER2 antigen assessment in human serum is traditionally achieved by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method), but it has some disadvantages, such as suppressing the thermodynamic-kinetic studies regarding the antibody-antigen interaction, and the use of labeled molecules that can promote false positive responses. Biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are sensitive optical techniques widely applied on bioassays. The plasmonic devices do not operate with labeled molecules, overcoming conventional immunoassay limitations, and enabling a direct detection of target analytes. In this way, a new SPR biosensor to assess HER2 antigen has been proposed, using nanohole arrays on a gold thin film by signal transduction of transmitted light measurements from array image acquisitions. These metallic nanostructures may couple the light directly on surface plasmons using a simple collinear arrangement. The proposed device reached an average sensitivity for refractive index (RI) variation on a metal surface of 4146 intensity units/RIU (RIU = RI units). The device feasibility on biomolecular assessment was evaluated. For this, 3 ng ml-1 known HER2 antigen concentration was efficiently flowed (using a microfluidic system) and detected from aqueous solutions. This outcome shows that the device may be a powerful apparatus for bioassays, particularly toward breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  14. Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis by reagent strip test for detection of circulating cathodic antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van G.J.; Wichers, J.H.; Falcao Ferreira, T.M.; Ghati, D.; Amerongen, van A.; Deelder, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed reagent strip assay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis based on parasite antigen detection in urine of infected individuals was evaluated. The test uses the principle of lateral flow through a nitrocellulose strip of the sample mixed with a colloidal carbon conjugate of a monoclo

  15. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakırcı, Serkan; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  16. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  17. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  18. Rapid Detection of Toxoplasma Gondii Antigen in Experimentally Infected Mice by Dot- ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohebali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide endemic disease. In congenitally infected infants and AIDS patients, toxoplasmosis causes high rates of morbidity and mortality. In these cases antibody detection is difficult; so detection of parasite or its components could be useful tool for early detection and following treatment of the infection.Methods: Sixty-three BALB/c mice were injected intra-peritoneal with 5×103 tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain, nine mice were sacrificed daily for 7 days. Fourteen mice were in­jected with phosphate buffer saline as control group. Dot-ELISA was performed for detection of T.gondii antigen in mice sera and capture - ELISA was done as golden standard assay too.Results : Toxoplasma gondii antigen was detected from day 2 in mice sera ; 22% of mice sera on day 2, 33% on day 3,77% on day 4 and 100% on day 5 till their death on day 7 had shown antigene­mia by dot - ELISA, no positive result was detected in control mice by dot- ELISA.Conclusion: Dot-ELISA is a sensitive method for diagnosis of T. gondii infection in the animal model; also, this technique is more rapid and easy to perform method in comparison with cap­ture-ELISA.

  19. Comparison of excretory-secretory antigen and positive faecal supernatant antigen in the detection of Echinococcus granulosus infection in dogs by CIEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Prathiush

    Full Text Available Coproantigen detection of Echinococcosis in dogs by counter immunoelectrophoresis was standardized. Adult Echinococcus granulosus worms were obtained from intestine of a necropsied positive dog. Excretory-secretory antigen was prepared by culturing adult worms in Medium 199 (pH 7.4. Faeces of positive dog were collected and fecal supernatant was prepared and used for coproantigen detection. CIEP was carried out using tris-borate buffer (pH 8.0 at a constant current of 8mA/slide for 60 minutes. CIEP detected infection with both the antigens. [Vet World 2009; 2(11.000: 421-422

  20. Follow-up of neurocysticercosis patients after treatment using an antigen detection ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguekam

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Seven patients with active neurocysticercosis (NCC received an eight days treatment with albendazole and were followed up using computed tomography (CT-scan and a monoclonal antibody based ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen (Ag-ELISA. Only three patients were cured as was shown by CT-scan and by the disappearance of circulating antigens one month after treatment. After a second course of albendazole therapy, two other patients became seronegative. CT-scan showed the disappearance of viable cysts in all persons who became seronegative whereas patients who were not cured remained seropositive. These preliminary results show that this Ag-ELISA is a promising technique for monitoring the success of treatment of NCC patients because of the excellent correlation between the presence of circulating antigens and of viable brain cysts.

  1. [Immunotherapy by polyvalent bacterial antigen (Broncasma Berna) in the prevention of pneumonia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, K; Adachi, S; Yamamoto, T

    1989-03-01

    Pneumonia in the elderly often occurs repeatedly, and the mortality rate from pneumonia continues to remain high today despite the usual use of antibacterial chemotherapy. Therefore, we conducted immunotherapy using a polyvalent bacterial vaccine (broncasma Berna). We treated 54 elderly patients with Broncasma Berna, containing chief bacterial pathogens responsible for pneumonia in the elderly. Clinical results obtained during 2 years were compared with those of 18 subjects not treated with Broncasma Berna. The survival rate was 64.8% for the group treated with Broncasma Berna and 50% for the group not treated. The frequency of contraction of pneumonia decreased significantly in the group treated. Clinical efficacy was obtained in 63% of the group treated to prevent pneumonia. The death rate from pneumonia was 17.6% for the group treated and 44.4% for the group not treated. Immunologically, reinforcement in humoral and cellular immunities was indicated by immunoglobulin values, positive tuberculin skin tests, and an increase in lymphocyte stimulation index values for Broncasma Berna. Significant pathogens in sputum disappeared or decreased in 6 (54.6%) out of 11 patients. Side effects such as pain or redness at the site of injection were observed in 6 patients. From the above results, it may be concluded that Broncasma Berna can be considered to be effective as a long-term immunoprophylactic agent in the prevention of pneumonia in the elderly.

  2. Target-specific capture enhances sensitivity of electrochemical detection of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayank; Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Halford, Colin; Lewinski, Michael A; Landaw, Elliot M; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2011-12-01

    We report the concentration and purification of bacterial 16S rRNA by the use of a biotinylated DNA target-specific capture (TSC) probe. For both cultivated bacterial and urine specimens from urinary tract infection patients, TSC resulted in a 5- to 8-fold improvement in the sensitivity of bacterial detection in a 16S rRNA electrochemical sensor assay.

  3. Comparison of three antigen preparations to detect Trichinellosis in live swine using IgG-ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Chaisri, Urai; Vongpakorn, Montakan; Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Dekumyoy, Paron

    2011-11-01

    A swine infected with Trichinella spiralis is a source of transmission to human through consumption of raw or improperly cooked pork. Detection of larvae is suitable for carcasses, so that pigs in households or farms can be examined serologically for trichinellosis. This study compared antigens, crude (CAg), excretory-secretory (ESAg) and surface (SAg), for their potential use in IgG-ELISA. Serum samples were collected from 5 experimentally infected swine with T. spiralis (pTs), 147 positive cases of 9 other parasitic infections, 12 mixed infections of other parasites, and 35 normal controls. At the same 100% sensitivity, specificity of tests was in a range of 98-77%. ESAg was the best source of antigen with specificity of 98.3% at cut-off value of 0.439. False positives included coccidiasis (1/86) and mixed infections (2/39). For CAg, trichuriasis (2/11), coccidiasis (5/86), and mixed infections (8/39) gave cross-reactions and some of these samples had OD values far above cut-off value of 0.332. Cross-reactions of SAg were Oesophagostomum spp-like GI-nematode infection (1/1), unidentified GI-nematode infections (2/3), trichuriasis (5/11), coccidiasis (29/86) and mixed infections (4/39). Thus, ESAg has the highest potential in serodiagnosis, with antibody to T. spiralis in pigs being detected at the earliest 16 day post-infection. However, crude antigen demonstrated a good specificity at 91.8%, and this antigen has a potential to be used as a detection of choice for swine trichinellosis, but the antigen preparation must be improved for higher specificity.

  4. Detection and identification of individual antigen molecules in human serum with pulsed semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, M.; Zander, C.; Müller, R.; Ullrich, B.; Drexhage, K. H.; Kaul, S.; Wolfrum, J.

    1997-09-01

    The fluorescence bursts of individual antibody molecules BM-7 (IgG1) labeled with single dye molecules were detected and identified by the characteristic fluorescence lifetimes of the dyes Cy5 (1.5 ns) and JA169 (2.7 ns) directly in neat human serum. Fluorescence excitation was performed by a short-pulse (FWHMmucine (MUC1) was detected in neat human serum by single-molecule events containing both fluorescence lifetimes indicating specific binding of both antibody molecules (Cy5-BM-7 and JA169-BM-7). The sensitivity achieved allows the detection of antigens at concentrations below 10-11 M without separation steps.

  5. Detection and identification of bacterial DNA in serum from patients with acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Madaria, E; Martínez, J; Lozano, B; Sempere, L; Benlloch, S; Such, J; Uceda, F; Francés, R; Pérez-Mateo, M

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Bacterial infections are common complications in patients with acute pancreatitis, and translocation of bacteria from the intestinal lumen is probably the first step in the pathogenesis of these infections. As blood cultures in afebrile patients are usually negative, more sensitive methods to investigate this hypothesis in patients are needed. Our group has recently developed a method to detect the presence of bacterial DNA in biological fluids, and we aimed to detect bacterial DNA in patients with acute pancreatitis, as molecular evidences of bacterial translocation. Methods: Samples of blood were obtained on three consecutive days within the first six days after admission. Bacterial DNA was detected using a polymerase chain reaction based method, and an automated DNA nucleotide sequencing process allowed identification of bacteria species. Results: Thirty one consecutively admitted patients with acute pancreatitis were studied. Bacterial DNA was detected in six patients (19.3%), and the sequencing process allowed identification of Citrobacter freundii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In two patients the same bacteria detected at admission was detected 24 hours later (above 99.9% homology of nucleotide sequence). Basic clinical and biochemical characteristics were similar among patients with or without the presence of bacterial DNA. Conclusion: Detection of gram negative bacteria derived bacterial DNA in our series supports the contention that bacterial translocation is a systemic process in approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis that does not seem to be related to the severity of the episode or immediate development of infection. PMID:16099797

  6. Effective detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a two-step algorithm including tests for antigen and cytotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticehurst, John R; Aird, Deborah Z; Dam, Lisa M; Borek, Anita P; Hargrove, John T; Carroll, Karen C

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were > or = 99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by approximately 75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in CCNA alone had been performed on all 5,887 specimens.

  7. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  8. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renske M A Vroomans

    Full Text Available In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  9. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroomans, Renske M A; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  10. Antigen Detection in the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis: A Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño-Devia, Estefanía; Rodríguez-Echeverri, Carolina; Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth; Gonzalez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of diagnostic data to evaluate the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection tests for diagnosing histoplasmosis. We included all studies involving human subjects that assessed the performance of any antigen detection test for histoplasmosis in urine or serum by carrying out an exhaustive and reproducible search of the literature between 1980 and 2014 from four databases. Quality of the articles was assessed, and meta-analysis was performed under the random effects model, calculating sensitivity, specificity, likelihood and odds ratios, and ROC curve using Meta-DiSc(es). Nine out of a total of 23 studies met strict quality criteria and were therefore included. The overall sensitivity for antigen detection in serum and urine was 81% (95% CI 78-83%), while specificity was 99% (95% CI 98-99%). Sensitivity for antigenuria and antigenemia was 79% (95% CI 76-82%) and 82% (95% CI 79-85%), respectively; specificity values were 99% (95% CI 98-100%) in urine and 97% (95% CI 96-98%) in serum. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 49.5 (95% CI 20.7-118.7) and 0.19 (95% CI 0.14-0.26), respectively, while the diagnostic OR was 362 (95% CI 121.2-1080.3) and area under the curve was 0.99. In conclusion, the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection assay of urine was not significantly different from that of blood, indicating that antigenuria and antigenemia have equal diagnostic value in histoplasmosis.

  11. Design of indirect solid-phase immunosorbent methods for detecting arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.P.; Rezapkin, G.V.; Dzagurova, T.K.; Tkachenko, E.A.

    1984-05-01

    Specifications have been elaborated for formulating indirect solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) methods that employ anti-human and anti-mice G class immunoglobulin (IgG), conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I for detecting the arenaviruses Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amalpari, Tamiami, Lassa, and LCM (lymphocytic choriomeningitis). These methods make it possible to identify with a high degree of sensitivity arenavirus antigens and antibodies in various kinds of material.

  12. Liver dendritic cells present bacterial antigens and produce cytokines upon Salmonella encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Cecilia; Wick, Mary Jo

    2004-02-15

    The capacity of murine liver dendritic cells (DC) to present bacterial Ags and produce cytokines after encounter with Salmonella was studied. Freshly isolated, nonparenchymal liver CD11c(+) cells had heterogeneous expression of MHC class II and CD11b and a low level of CD40 and CD86 expression. Characterization of liver DC subsets revealed that CD8alpha(-)CD4(-) double negative cells constituted the majority of liver CD11c(+) ( approximately 85%) with few cells expressing CD8alpha or CD4. Flow cytometry analysis of freshly isolated CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver and cocultured with Salmonella expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that CD11c(+) MHC class II(high) cells had a greater capacity to internalize Salmonella relative to CD11c(+) MHC class II(low) cells. Moreover, both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) liver DC internalized bacteria with similar efficiency after both in vitro and in vivo infection. CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver could also process Salmonella for peptide presentation on MHC class I and class II to primary, Ag-specific T cells after internalization requiring actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Flow cytometry analysis of liver CD11c(+) cells infected with Salmonella expressing GFP showed that both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) DC produced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha. The majority of cytokine-positive cells did not contain bacteria (GFP(-)) whereas only a minor fraction of cytokine-positive cells were GFP(+). Furthermore, only approximately 30-50% of liver DC containing bacteria (GFP(+)) produced cytokines. Thus, liver DC can internalize and process Salmonella for peptide presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and elicit proinflammatory cytokine production upon Salmonella encounter, suggesting that DC in the liver may contribute to immunity against hepatotropic bacteria.

  13. Rapid detection of hepatitis B virus DNA in liver tissue by in situ hybridisation and its combination with immunohistochemistry for simultaneous detection of HBV antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, J. Y.; Naoumov, N V; Alexander, G J; Williams, R

    1991-01-01

    A rapid technique using a non-radioactive receptor molecule (digoxigenin) for intrahepatic hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection using in situ hybridisation was developed. It can be adapted for use in combination with standard immunohistochemistry for simultaneous detection of both HBV DNA and HBV antigens. The total time required for dual detection of HBV antigens and HBV DNA starting from paraffin wax liver sections was two working days. A good signal to background ratio for the detection o...

  14. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI ANTIGEN IN STOOL BY ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AND COMPARISON WITH CONVENTIONAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori bacteria are ‘slow’ bacterial pathogens and are associated with gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Type (MALT B-cell lymphomas. Several methods, both invasive and noninvasive, are available for detection of H. pylori infection. Invasive methods involve endoscopy and examination of gastric biopsies, e.g. by culture, rapid urease test or histology and are not appropriate for large-scale population studies. Non-invasive methods include the urea breath test, serology and stool antigen test. The latter approach is non-invasive, does not require highly specialized equipment and unlike serology is more likely to provide evidence of active rather than past infection. Furthermore, it may be more appropriate for use in paediatric patients, where techniques such as serology are insensitive and invasive methods are undesirable. Additionally, it may be used for treatment follow-up purposes. Pathogen-specific stool antigen tests are a valid alternative to the Urea Breath Test for non-invasive detection of H. pylori. METHODOLOGY A total of 120 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for various gastrointestinal disturbances like dyspepsia were included in the study. Stool samples were obtained from the patient on the day of endoscopy and stored at – 20oC. Three biopsy samples were collected, two from the gastric antrum and one from the corpus. One biopsy sample from the antrum was used for performing Rapid urease test at the Endoscopy room and the other two samples were placed in 10% formalin and sent to the laboratory for histopathological examination. RESULTS Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ELISA was 100%, 77%, 52% and 100% respectively. CONCLUSION H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA is suitable to use particularly in developing countries and for selection of patients for endoscopy. Detection of HpSA shows high sensitivity

  15. Validation of ELISA for the detection of African horse sickness virus antigens and antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, C; Cubillo, M A; Hooghuis, H; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Diaz-Laviada, M; Plateau, E; Zientara, S; Crucière, C; Hamblin, C

    1998-01-01

    The mortality rate in susceptible populations of horses during an epizootic of African horse sickness (AHS) may be in excess of 90%. Rapid and reliable assays are therefore essential for the confirmation of clinical diagnoses and to enable control strategies to be implemented without undue delay. One of the major objectives of a recent European Union funded project was the validation of newly developed diagnostic assays which are rapid, sensitive, highly reproducible and inexpensive, for the detection of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) antigens and antibodies. The Laboratorio de Sanidad y Produccion Animal (LSPA) in Algete, Spain was charged with the responsibility of co-ordinating and supplying samples of viruses and antisera to the participating laboratories in Spain, France and the United Kingdom. The panels comprised 76 antigen samples for assay by indirect sandwich ELISAs and 53 serum samples for antibody detection by either indirect or competitive ELISAs. Results generated by ELISA for each laboratory were analysed in LSPA in terms of their relative sensitivities and specificities. There was a good agreement between the ELISAs used for either antigen or antibody detection. The participating groups agreed that any field sample giving a doubtful result would always be retested by ELISA and an alternative assay.

  16. Rapid pathogen detection with bacterial-assembled magnetic mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Lee, Jiho; Lee, Hye Sun; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2014-03-15

    We report rapid and accurate pathogen detection by coupling with high efficiency magnetic separation of pathogen by Ni(2+)-heterogeneous magnetic mesoporous silica (Ni-HMMS) and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Ni-HMMS was developed with a significant incorporation of Fe particles within the silica mesopores by programmed thermal hydrogen reaction and functionalized with Ni(2+) ion on the surface by the wet impregnation process. High abundant Ni(2+) ions on the Ni-HMMS surface were able to assemble with cell wall component protein NikA (nickel-binding membrane protein), which contains several pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. NikA protein expression experiment showed the outstanding separation rate of the nikA gene-overexpressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) when comparing with wild-type E. coli (44.5 ± 13%) or not over-expressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) (53.2 ± 2.7%). Moreover, Ni-HMMS showed lower obstacle effect by large reaction volume (10 mL) than spherical core/shell-type silica magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with Ni(2+) (ca. 40 nm-diameters). Finally, the Ni-HMMS was successfully assessed to separate pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and applied to direct and rapid RT-PCR to quantitative detection at ultralow concentration (1 Log10 cfu mL(-1)) in the real samples (milk and Staphylococcus aureus culture broth) without bacterial amplification and DNA extraction step.

  17. Impedance-Based Miniaturized Biosensor for Ultrasensitive and Fast Prostate-Specific Antigen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna Chornokur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the successful fabrication of an impedance-based miniaturized biosensor and its application for ultrasensitive Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA detection in standard and real human plasma solution, spiked with different PSA concentrations. The sensor was fabricated using photolithographic techniques, while monoclonal antibodies specific to human PSA were used as primary capture antibodies. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was employed as a detection technique. The sensor exhibited a detection limit of 1 pg/ml for PSA with minimal nonspecific binding (NSB. This detection limit is an order of magnitude lower than commercial PSA ELISA assays available on the market. The sensor can be easily modified into an array for the detection of other biomolecules of interest, enabling accurate, ultrasensitive, and inexpensive point-of-care sensing technologies.

  18. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of Bacterial O-antigen Chain Length Regulator Proteins Reveals a Conserved Quaternary Structure*

    OpenAIRE

    Larue, Kane; Kimber, Matthew S.; Ford, Robert; Whitfield, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the Gram-negative outer membrane and is an important virulence determinant. The O-antigen polysaccharide of the LPS molecule provides protection from host defenses, and the length of O-antigen chains plays a pivotal role. In the Wzy-dependent O-antigen biosynthesis pathway, the integral inner membrane protein Wzz determines the O-antigen chain length. How these proteins function is currently unknown, but the hypothesis i...

  19. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, A.H.L.; Susi, P.; Toivola, H.; Christensen, A.; Söderlund-Venermo, M.; Hedman, K.; Aatola, H.; Zvirbliene, A.; Koskinen, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  20. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H.L. Bruning

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1 is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days.

  1. Duplex microfluidic SERS detection of pathogen antigens with nanoyeast single-chain variable fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuling; Rauf, Sakandar; Grewal, Yadveer S; Spadafora, Lauren J; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Schlücker, Sebastian; Trau, Matt

    2014-10-07

    Quantitative and accurate detection of multiple biomarkers would allow for the rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases induced by pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies are standard affinity reagents applied for biomarkers detection; however, their production is expensive and labor-intensive. Herein, we report on newly developed nanoyeast single-chain variable fragments (NYscFv) as an attractive alternative to monoclonal antibodies, which offers the unique advantage of a cost-effective production, stability in solution, and target-specificity. By combination of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microspectroscopy using glass-coated, highly purified SERS nanoparticle clusters as labels, with a microfluidic device comprising multiple channels, a robust platform for the sensitive duplex detection of pathogen antigens has been developed. Highly sensitive detection for individual Entamoeba histolytica antigen EHI_115350 (limit of detection = 1 pg/mL, corresponding to 58.8 fM) and EHI_182030 (10 pg/mL, corresponding 453 fM) with high specificity has been achieved, employing the newly developed corresponding NYscFv as probe in combination with SERS microspectroscopy at a single laser excitation wavelength. Our first report on SERS-based immunoassays using the novel NYscFv affinity reagent demonstrates the flexibility of NYscFv fragments as viable alternatives to monoclonal antibodies in a range of bioassay platforms and paves the way for further applications.

  2. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  3. Clinical application and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 antigen detection by ELISA in human serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li; WU Xiao-dong; HUANG De-zhuang; CHEN Hai-lun; HE Li-xiang; WANG Jian; HAN Da-kang

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assays have been produced to exclude infectious donations collected during the preseroconversion window phase (PWP). For the same purpose, we evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of a novel hepatitis C virus NS3 antigen detection immunoassay and the application of this assay in clinical diagnosis.Methods Samples from 77 healthy subjects, 173 anti-HCV positive patients and 3708 hepatitis patients other than HCV positive were tested with the HCV NS3 antigen assay. Some HCV NS3 antigen positive samples were further validated with HCV-RNA, neutralization and immunodot assays. Twenty-five sequential samples from 11 HCV NS3 antigen positive patients were subjected to kinetic study.Results Only 48 (1.3%) of 3708 anti-HCV negative samples were positive for HCV NS3 antigen. Among them, 44 of 3030 samples from patients only infected with HBV were HCV NS3 antigen positive, 4 of the 445 samples from patients infected with other type hepatitis were HCV NS3 antigen positive. In addition, 42 (24.3%) of 173 anti-HCV positive samples were HCV NS3 antigen positive and all 77 samples from healthy subjects were negative to HCV NS3 antigen assay. Of the 15 HCV NS3 antigen positive samples, 9 (60%) were HCV-RNA positive. The neutralization and positive percentage of immunodot assay for 23 HCV NS3 antigen positive sera were 87.0% (20/23) and 69.6% (16/23)respectively. Of the 25 sequential samples from 11 HCV NS3 antigen positive patients, there was a negative correlation between the OD values and the duration of test (r=-0.989, P<0.05), and there were correlations among their HCV NS3 antigen, HCV-RNA and anti-HCV titres. The anti-HCV antibodies of two sera were detected while their OD values of HCV NS3 antigen decreased gradually.Conclusions The HCV NS3 antigen detection assay showed perfect specificity and high sensitivity. Thus, it would be useful and economical as a routine test in laboratories for early diagnosis of HCV infection

  4. Detection of hepatitis C virus core antigen for early diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection in plasma donor in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Qiu Zhang; Shao-Bo Li; Guo-Hua Wang; Kun Chen; Xiao-Guo Song; Xiao-Yan Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of a new hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay developed in China.METHODS: After the determination of HCV infection, 49 serial samples were selected from 11 regular plasma donors in 5 different plasma stations. To compare the performance of HCV core antigen detection and HCV PCR, these samples were genotyped, and each specimen was analyzed by ELISA for the detection of HCV core antigen and by qualitative HCV PCR.RESULTS: Among all of the sequential samples, the original 13 specimens were HCV RNA-negative, and 36 samples were HCV RNA-positive. Twenty-seven samples (75%) were HCV core antigen-positive from these HCV RNA-positive specimens. Conversely, 27 samples (93.1%) were found HCV RNA-positive in HCV core antigen-positive samples. Intervals between HCV RNA and HCV core antigen-positive, as well as between HCV core antigen-positive and HCV antibody-positive were 36.0 and 32.8 d, respectively.CONCLUSION: This HCV core antigen assay, developed in China, is able to detect much of anti-HCV-negative, HCV RNA-positive preseroconversion window period (PWP) plasma donations.

  5. Use of Strep-tag II for rapid detection and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant antigens secreted by Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Julio C; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Anné, Jozef; Vallín, Carlos; Milanés, María T; King-Batsios, Emmanuel; Huygen, Kris; Van Mellaert, Lieve

    2013-09-01

    Recent results with respect to the secretory production of bio-active Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in Streptomyces have stimulated the further exploitation of this host as a bacterial cell factory. However, the rapid isolation of a recombinant protein by conventional procedures can be a restrictive step. A previous attempt to isolate recombinant antigens fused to the widely used 6His-tag was found to be relatively incompatible with secretory production in the Streptomyces host. As an alternative, the eight-residue Strep-tag® II (WSHPQFEK), displaying intrinsic binding affinity towards streptavidin, was evaluated for the secretory production of two M. tuberculosis immunodominant antigens in Streptomyces lividans and their subsequent downstream processing. Therefore, the genes ag85A (Rv3804c, encoding the mycolyl-transferase Ag85A) and Rv2626c (encoding hypoxic response protein 1), were equipped with a 3'-Strep-tag® II-encoding sequence and placed under control of the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi) transcriptional, translational and signal sequences. Strep-tagged Ag85A and Rv2626c proteins were detected in the spent medium of recombinant S. lividans cultures at 48h of growth, and purified using a Strep-Tactin Superflow® matrix. Recombinant Ag85A appeared as a 30-kDa protein of which the N-terminal amino acid sequence was identical to the expected one. Rv2626c was produced in two forms of 17 and 37kDa respectively, both with the same predicted N-terminal sequence, suggesting that the 37-kDa product is an Rv2626c dimer. The obtained results indicate that the Strep-tagII is proteolytically stable in Streptomyces and does not interfere with the membrane translocation of Ag85A and Rv2626c. A comparison of reactivity of serum from tuberculosis patients versus healthy persons by ELISA showed that both S. lividans-derived antigens were recognized by sera of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis, indicating that they remained

  6. Detection of antibodies to variant antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Giha, H A; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naturally induced antibodies binding to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can be detected by direct agglutination of infected erythrocytes or by indirect immunofluorescence on intact, unfixed, infected erythrocytes. Agglutinating antibodies have previously...... been shown to recognise Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). This protein is inserted by the parasite into the host cell membrane and mediates the adhesion to the venular endothelium of the host organism in vivo. METHODS: Erythrocytes infected at high parasitaemias...... with ethidium-bromide-labelled mature forms of P. falciparum parasites were sequentially exposed to immune plasma, goat anti-human immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit anti-goat Ig. Plasma antibodies recognising antigens exposed on the surface of parasitised erythrocytes were...

  7. A new virion precipitation test for oncovirus envelope antigens which detects common antigenic determinants in mammalian type-C viruses and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altstein, A D; Zakharova, L G; Zhdanov, V M

    1979-03-15

    A method for the study of oncovirus envelope antigens was developed, bases on the precipitation of intact virions by a double antibody technique. The amount of precipitated virus was then measured as reverse transcriptase activity. The method was designated the virion precipitation test (VPT). It has been used for titration of antibodies to envelope antigens of oncoviruses. The study of envelop antigens of 11 different oncoviruses permitted their differentiation into the following groups: (1) murine type-C viruses: (2) feline type-C viruses; (3) simian type-C viruses; (4) the RD-114/BEV group; (5) Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV); (6) bovine leukemia virus; (7) avian type-C viruses; (8) mouse mammary tumor virus. No common antigenic determinants were detected in the last three groups. Mammalian type-C viruses (RD-114, NIH-MuLV, G-MuLV) had common antigenic determinants in the envelope, as demonstrated with an anti-RD-114 serum. Mammalian type-C viruses also shared antigenic determinants with M-PMV. The relationship of type-C viruses to M-PMV decreased in the following order: RD-114--NIH-MuLV--G-MuLV. It was also shown that the endogenous xenotropic feline RD-114 virus was more closely related to xenotropic NIH-MuLV than to ecotropic G-MuLV. The nature of the common antigenic determinants, as demonstrated by VPT on the surface of mammalian type-C viruses and M-PMV, and their significance for the concept of oncovirus evolution are discussed.

  8. Dynamic imaging of experimental Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas detects Kupffer cell-restricted antigen presentation to antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Beattie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs represent the major phagocytic population within the liver and provide an intracellular niche for the survival of a number of important human pathogens. Although KCs have been extensively studied in vitro, little is known of their in vivo response to infection and their capacity to directly interact with antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. Here, using a combination of approaches including whole mount and thin section confocal microscopy, adoptive cell transfer and intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that KCs represent the only detectable population of mononuclear phagocytes within granulomas induced by Leishmania donovani infection that are capable of presenting parasite-derived peptide to effector CD8(+ T cells. This restriction of antigen presentation to KCs within the Leishmania granuloma has important implications for the identification of new candidate vaccine antigens and for the design of novel immuno-therapeutic interventions.

  9. Case of rhesus antigen weak D type 4.2. (DAR category detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Golovkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serological methods of Rhesus antigens identification in humans cannot identify D-antigen variants. In this article the serological characteristics of Rhesus antigen D weak type 4.2. (Category DAR are described.

  10. Lymphocyte proliferation to mycobacterial antigens is detectable across a spectrum of HIV-associated tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakari Muhammad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying novel TB diagnostics is a major public health priority. We explored the diagnostic characteristics of antimycobacterial lymphocyte proliferation assays (LPA in HIV-infected subjects with latent or active TB. Methods HIV-infected subjects with bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG scars and CD4 counts ≥ 200 cells/mm3 entering a TB booster vaccine trial in Tanzania had baseline in vivo and in vitro immune tests performed: tuberculin skin tests (TST, LPA and five day assays of interferon gamma (IFN-γ release. Assay antigens were early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6, antigen 85 (Ag85, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole cell lysate (WCL. Subjects were screened for active TB at enrollment by history, exam, sputum smear and culture. We compared antimycobacterial immune responses between subjects with and without latent or active TB at enrollment. Results Among 1885 subjects screened, 635 had latent TB and 13 had active TB. Subjects with latent TB were more likely than subjects without TB to have LPA responses to ESAT-6 (13.2% vs. 5.5%, P Conclusion Lymphoproliferative responses to mycobacteria are detectable during HIV-associated active TB, and are less sensitive but more specific than TST. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00052195.

  11. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of Salmonella serotype typhi antigens in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Crump, John A; Mahoney, Frank J; Nakhla, Isabelle A; Mansour, Adel M; Reyad, Baheia; El Melegi, Dawlat; Sultan, Yehia; Mintz, Eric D; Bibb, William F

    2004-03-01

    We developed and evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies to capture somatic antigen 9 (O9), flagellar antigen d (Hd), and the Vi capsular polysaccharide antigen (Vi) from the urine of persons with and without typhoid fever. Sequential urine samples were collected from 44 patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever and from two control groups. The first control group included patients with brucellosis (n = 12) and those with clinically diagnosed, non-typhoid, acute, febrile illness (n = 27). The second control group was a sample of healthy volunteer laboratory workers (n = 11). When assessed relative to date of fever onset, sensitivity was highest during the first week for all three antigens: Vi was detected in the urine of nine (100%) patients, O9 in 4 (44%) patients, and Hd in 4 (44%) patients. Sequential testing of two urine samples from the same patient improved test sensitivity. Combined testing for Vi with O9 and Hd produced a trend towards increased sensitivity without compromising specificity. The specificity for Vi exceeded 90% when assessed among both febrile and healthy control subjects, but was only 25% when assessed among patients with brucellosis. Detection of urinary Vi antigen with this ELISA shows promise for the diagnosis of typhoid fever, particularly when used within the first week after fever onset. However, positive reactions for Vi antigen in patients with brucellosis must be understood before urinary Vi antigen detection can be developed further as a useful rapid diagnostic test.

  12. Adenovirus respiratory infection: significant increase in diagnosis using PCR comparing with antigen detection and culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Stroparo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV respiratory infections are usually described as being associated with high mortality rates. Laboratory diagnosis is essential for the establishment of the appropriate therapy, and for guiding the implementation of preventive measures in order to prevent the spread of the infection. Aiming to analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the laboratorial diagnosis methods available, we compared antigen detection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IF, and a specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR, to detect AdV in respiratory samples collected from patients admitted to hospital with acute respiratory disease. Positive samples were inoculated into a cell culture to confirm the results. We analyzed 381 samples from the nasopharyngeal aspirates collected during the year 2008; of these, 2.6% tested were positive for adenovirus through IF and 10% through PCR; positive isolation was obtained in 40% and 26% of these cases, respectively. Most infected patients were children under six months of age, and despite of the fact that a significant number of patients required intensive care, the mortality rate was low (5%. In conclusion, molecular methods were found to be useful for rapid diagnosis of adenovirus infections with higher sensitivity than antigen detection; their introduction permitted a significant increase in diagnoses of adenovirus infections.

  13. ANA detected by ELISA using nucleus of egg cell as antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Yue, Ma

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies, ANA, were usually detected with antigen of somatic cell nucleus. It has not been reported to detect ANA with egg cell nucleus as antigen. Enzyme linked immuosorbent assay, ELISA, coated with yolk was developed to detect ANA in our laboratory. A quality control test, cross absorption test, and cross antibody-induced test with yolk were performed. Results showed a good agreement between our method and IFA through measurement of the same samples from patients suspected of having rheumatic connective tissue diseases (Kappa=0.668, P=0.000). The results were not influenced by the RF and different sources of egg. CVs of inter-assay, were less than 10%. The cross absorption test was negative, as well; the ANA to somatic cell nucleus could be induced with egg cell nucleus. It is implied that there were both cross as well as overlapped Egg-ANA and Somatic-ANA. As egg nucleus, its volume was large, its purification was simple, so the better method might be established.

  14. Detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica antigens by an immunoperoxidase technique in pneumonic ovine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziroglu, R; Diker, K S; Turkarslan, J; Gulbahar, M Y

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred twenty pneumonic lungs from lambs were examined for Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica by an immunoperoxidase technique using an extravidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Histologic examination of tissue sections revealed strong positive reactions in 60.9% and 68.3% of the lungs against M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica, respectively. M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica antigens were observed at the surface and/or within the epithelial cells, macrophages, leucocytes, and bronchiolar exudate. The location of M. ovipneumoniae in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells and P. haemolytica in the neutrophils was detected immunohistochemically.

  15. Bacterial spore detection and determination by use of terbium dipicolinate photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, D.L. [Army Research Lab., Adelphi, MD (United States); Sharpless, C.; McGown, L.B. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1997-03-15

    A new method to detect bacterial endospores and determine their concentration was demonstrated by the addition of a solution of terbium chloride to a suspension of bacterial endospores. The terbium chloride reacted with the calcium dipicolinate in the spore case to form terbium(III) dipicolinate anion. Solid particles, including residual bacterial particles, were removed by filtering. The photoluminescence from the solution was measured as a function of excitation wavelength, emission wavelength, and bacterial endospore concentration. The photoluminescence from terbium(III) dipicolinate anion in the solution was easily identified. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  17. Circulating anodic antigen for detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Morshedy, H; Kinosien, B; Barakat, R; Omer, E; Khamis, N; Deelder, A M; Phillips, M

    1996-02-01

    We evaluated the ability of circulating anodic antigen (CAA) to identify infection with Schistosoma mansoni in a prospective cohort study of 257 Egyptian men, 147 with infection diagnosed by repeated Kato thick smears, and 110 without detectable infection. The CAA levels were obtained and the stool examinations were performed two weeks and one, two, four, and six months after praziquantel therapy for infected men. A CAA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was repeated twice on subjects who were otherwise negative for schistosomiasis. Circulating anodic antigen was detected in 117 cases, with an overall test sensitivity before treatment of 0.8. Sensitivity was related to the intensity of infection, ranging from 1.00 with > 400 eggs per gram (epg) of feces to 0.60 for those with or = 4. We conclude that CAA has moderate sensitivity and excellent specificity when used to identify infection with schistosomiasis, as well as to monitor the results of therapy after at least one month after treatment.

  18. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Wei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1 which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33 of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156 of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies.

  19. Effective Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a Two-Step Algorithm Including Tests for Antigen and Cytotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Ticehurst, John R.; Aird, Deborah Z.; Dam, Lisa M.; Borek, Anita P.; Hargrove, John T.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were ≥99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by ≈75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in ≤3 days, we decided that this algorithm would be effective. Over 6 months...

  20. Detection of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Mice by Ultrasound Imaging of Thymocyte Differentiation Antigen 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foygel, Kira; Wang, Huaijun; Machtaler, Steven; Lutz, Amelie M.; Chen, Ru; Pysz, Marybeth; Lowe, Anson W.; Tian, Lu; Carrigan, Tricia; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) allows for surgical resection and increases patient survival times. Imaging agents that bind and amplify the signal of neovascular proteins in neoplasms can be detected by ultrasound, enabling accurate detection of small lesions. We searched for new markers of neovasculature in PDAC and assessed their potential for tumor detection by ultrasound molecular imaging. METHODS Thymocyte Differentiation Antigen 1 (Thy1) was identified as a specific biomarker of PDAC neovasculature by proteomic analysis. Upregulation in PDAC was validated by immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic tissue samples from 28 healthy individuals, 15 with primary chronic pancreatitis tissues, and 196 with PDAC. Binding of Thy1-targeted contrast microbubbles was assessed in cultured cells, in mice with orthotopic PDAC xenograft tumors expressing human Thy1 on the neovasculature, and on the neovasculature of a genetic mouse model of PDAC. RESULTS Based on immunohistochemical analyses, levels of Thy1 were significantly higher in the vascular of human PDAC than chronic pancreatitis (P=.007) or normal tissue samples (P<.0001). In mice, ultrasound imaging accurately detected human Thy1-positive PDAC xenografts, as well as PDACs that express endogenous Thy1 in genetic mouse models of PDAC. CONCLUSION We have identified and validated Thy1 as a marker of PDAC that can be detected by ultrasound molecular imaging in mice. The development of a specific imaging agent and identification of Thy1 as a new biomarker could aid in the diagnosis of this cancer and management of patients. PMID:23791701

  1. Iridium Oxide Film-Enhanced Impedance Immunosensor for Rapid Detection of Carcinoembyronic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING,Yan-Jun; WANG,Hua; JIANG,Jian-Hui; SHEN,Guo-Li; YU,Ru-Qin

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive impedance immunosensor based on iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film for the detection of carcinoembyronic antigen (CEA) in human sera has been proposed. Gold electrode was electrochemically modified with IrOx thin film and simultaneously functionalized with protein A (PA) to bind anti-CEA antibodies in an orientated way. It has been found that the antibody loading amount was dependent on the PA concentration and the deposition time of IrOx matrix. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the electron transfer resistances obtained were linearly related to the CEA concentration ranging from 36.2 to 460.0 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 28.0 ng/mL. Analytical results of clinical samples from cancer patients show that the proposed immunoassay is reasonably comparable with the chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA), indicating the feasibility of using the proposed method for CEA immunoassay in clinical laboratory.

  2. Detection of dengue NS1 antigen using long-range surface plasmon waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wei Ru; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Berini, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    The non-structural 1 (NS1) protein of the dengue virus circulates in infected patients' blood samples and can be used for early diagnosis of dengue infection. In this paper, we present the detection of naturally-occurring dengue NS1 antigen in infected patient blood plasma using straight long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Three commercially-available anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies were used for recognition and their performance was compared and discussed. A similar figure of merit to the one used in conventional dengue NS1 capture using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to our results. In general, the positive patient samples can be clearly differentiated from the negative ones and the results agree with those obtained using ELISA. The largest signal-to-noise ratio observed during the experiments was 356 and the best detection limit observed is estimated as 5.73 pg/mm(2).

  3. Emerging frontiers in detection and control of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seth Yang-En; Chew, Su Chuen; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria form surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. In contrast to free-living cells, bacterial cells within biofilms resist sanitizers and antimicrobials. While building biofilms, cells physiologically adapt to sustain the otherwise lethal impacts of a variety of environmental stress conditions. In this development, the production and embedding of cells in extracellular polymeric substances plays a key role. Biofilm bacteria can cause a range of problems to food processing including reduced heat-cold transfer, clogging water pipelines, food spoilage and they may cause infections among consumers. Recent biofilm investigations with the aim of potential control approaches include a combination of bacterial genetics, systems biology, materials and mechanic engineering and chemical biology.

  4. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L. J.; McGregor, I. A.; Paounova, N.; Lambert, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/106 RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/μl of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples. PMID:7044589

  5. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L J; McGregor, I A; Paounova, N; Lambert, P H

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/10(6) RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/mul of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples.

  6. Detection of specific IgE antibodies to major and minor antigenic determinants in sera of penicillin allergic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永星; 乔海灵

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism (s) of penicillins allergic reaction.Methods The radioallergosorbent test (RAST) was used to detect 9 specific IgE antibodies, including major antigenic determinants: benzylpenicilloyl (BPO), ampicilloyl (APO), amoxicilloyl (AXO), phenoxomethylpenicilloyl (PVO) and flucloxacilloyl (FLUO), and minor antigenic determinants: benzylpenicillanyl (BPA), amoxicillanyl (AXA), 6-aminopenicillanic (APA) and phenoxomethylpenicillany (PVA), in the sera of 32 penicillin allergic patients. The relationship between specific IgE antibodies and penicillins chemical structures was studied by radioallergosorbent inhibition test.Results Nineteen of 32 patients (59.4%) were RAST positive, among whom, five cases were positive only to one or two antigenic minor determinants, and three cases were positive only to one or three major antigenic determinants. The remaining 11 patients were positive not only to major antigenic determinants but also minor antigenic determinants. In 9 specific IgE antibodies, the positive rate of PVA-IgE was the highest (34.38%), followed by BPO-IgE (31.25%). The positive rate of FLUO-IgE was the lowest (15.63%). Of the total patient group, 53.13% were positive to one or more minor antigenic determinants, while 37.5% (12/32) were positive to one or more major antigenic determinants. The percentage of patients with urticarial reactions who were positive to minor antigenic determinants (63.16%) was significantly higher than observed in the anaphylactic shock group (38.5%, P<0.05).Conclusions The minor antigenic determinant was important in allergic reaction. The combining sites of the specific IgE antibodies were likely to be the side-chain of drug or the overwhelming drug molecule.

  7. Screen Printed Carbon Electrode Based Electrochemical Immunosensor for the Detection of Dengue NS1 Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Parkash

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical immunosensor modified with the streptavidin/biotin system on screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs for the detection of the dengue NS1 antigen was developed in this study. Monoclonal anti-NS1 capture antibody was immobilized on streptavidin-modified SPCEs to increase the sensitivity of the assay. Subsequently, a direct sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format was developed and optimized. An anti-NS1 detection antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP and 3,3,5,5'-tetramethybezidine dihydrochloride (TMB/H2O2 was used as an enzyme mediator. Electrochemical detection was conducted using the chronoamperometric technique, and electrochemical responses were generated at −200 mV reduction potential. The calibration curve of the immunosensor showed a linear response between 0.5 µg/mL and 2 µg/mL and a detection limit of 0.03 µg/mL. Incorporation of a streptavidin/biotin system resulted in a well-oriented antibody immobilization of the capture antibody and consequently enhanced the sensitivity of the assay. In conclusion, this immunosensor is a promising technology for the rapid and convenient detection of acute dengue infection in real serum samples.

  8. Designing an ELISA Technique for H.pylori Antibody Detection Using Water Extracted Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Khafri

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available H.pylori infection stimulates immune responses. These responses at the mucosal level are predominantly of IgA types, while circulating antibodies against this microorganism are predominantly IgG classes. IgM antibodies are rarely found and seem to be non-specific for this bacterium. In this research, water extract antigen, from three strains of H.pylori (isolated from patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer and normal human was investigated for the detection of serum IgG antibodies against H.pylori by an indirect ELISA technique. Antibody titers against H.pylori were measured in 72 patients of whom 64 cases were H.pylori positive and 8 cases were H.pylori negative (confirmed by culture and urease tests. In this test, those titers that were more than 1/6400 indicated the rising of IgG titers and serum positive, being in testee, and the titers, which were equal or less than 1/6400 indicated the serum negative, being in individuals. Our ELISA results indicated that between 64 H.pylori positive individuals, 61 cases were serum positive and between 8 H.pylori negative patients, 5 individuals were serum negative; thus, specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the test were, 62.5%, 95.31%, 95.31%, 62.5%, respectively. The high level of sensitivity is because of using 3 different strains for preparing of antigens. But the reasons of low specificity are probably using of semi purified antigen.

  9. Effect of Bacterial Infection on Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression after Partial Splenectomy of Rabbits Using Microwave Coagulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The purpose of this study was to investigate the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression of preserved spleen in rabbits when pneumonia diplococcus suspension was administered after partial splenectomy using microwaver coagulator.

  10. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-03-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects.

  11. Detection of heat stable mycobacterial antigen in cerebrospinal fluid by Dot-Immunobinding assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathai A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimen in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM is infrequent and carries low sensitivity. Thus development of an alternative laboratory diagnostic test is essential for the early diagnosis and treatment of TBM. Objective: A simple, rapid Dot immunobinding assay (Dot-Iba, for the laboratory diagnosis of TBM is devised. This method minimizes the risk of handling infectious material in the laboratory. Method: The Dot-Iba was standardized with heat-inactivated M tuberculosis antigen (PPD. The heat-inactivated CSF from TBM and non-TBM patients was similarly assayed and it can detect antigen upto 1ng/ml in CSF. Result: A positive result was obtained in all the five culture positive patients with TBM and in 20/25 probable TBM. A negative result was obtained in 38/40 CSF from disease control group. The overall sensitivity and specificity of Dot-Iba was 83.3% and 95% respectively. Conclusion: Dot-Iba can be used as an adjunct for the laboratory diagnosis of TBM, particularly in culture negative TBM patients and also in those clinical situations where no laboratory tests are available to distinguish between TBM and partially treated pyogenic meningitis.

  12. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  13. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  14. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial Protein Toxins — A Sensitive, Specific, High-Throughput Tool for Detection and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Kalb

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS is a valuable high-throughput tool for peptide analysis. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (LC-ESI tandem-MS provides sensitive and specific quantification of small molecules and peptides. The high analytic power of MS coupled with high-specificity substrates is ideally suited for detection and quantification of bacterial enzymatic activities. As specific examples of the MS applications in disease diagnosis and select agent detection, we describe recent advances in the analyses of two high profile protein toxin groups, the Bacillus anthracis toxins and the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. The two binary toxins produced by B. anthracis consist of protective antigen (PA which combines with lethal factor (LF and edema factor (EF, forming lethal toxin and edema toxin respectively. LF is a zinc-dependent endoprotease which hydrolyzes specific proteins involved in inflammation and immunity. EF is an adenylyl cyclase which converts ATP to cyclic-AMP. Toxin-specific enzyme activity for a strategically designed substrate, amplifies reaction products which are detected by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Pre-concentration/purification with toxin specific monoclonal antibodies provides additional specificity. These combined technologies have achieved high specificity, ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the anthrax toxins. We also describe potential applications to diseases of high public health impact, including Clostridium difficile glucosylating toxins and the Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase.

  15. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of equine influenza virus nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Liping; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Gang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Guibin; Liu, Cuiyun; Xiang, Wenhua

    2011-07-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) was developed for the detection of the equine influenza virus (EIV), employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the A/equine/Xingjiang/2007 (H3N8) nucleoprotein (NP). Immunoglobulin G antibodies were purified and used as capture or detector antibodies. The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using EIV, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4), equine arteritis virus (EAV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), resulting in only EIV specimens yielding a strong signal. A minimal concentration of 50 ng/ml EIV protein was detected in Nonidet P40-treated virus preparations. Virus from the nasal swabs of equines infected experimentally were detected from days 3 to 7 post-infection using this AC-ELISA, with results confirmed by virus isolation and multi reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Both H3N8 and H7N7 EIV subtypes were AC-ELISA positive, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of all EIV subtypes.

  16. Bacterial regrowth in water reclamation and distribution systems revealed by viable bacterial detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-wen; Li, Dan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; He, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Microbial regrowth needs to be managed during water reclamation and distribution. The aim of present study was to investigate the removal and regrowth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella in water reclamation and distribution system by using membrane integrity assay (PMA-qPCR), reverse transcriptional activity assay (Q-RT-PCR) and culture-based assay, and also to evaluate the relationships among bacterial regrowth, and environmental factors in the distribution system. The results showed that most of the water reclamation processes potentially induced bacteria into VBNC state. The culturable E. coli and Salmonella regrew 1.8 and 0.7 log10 in distribution system, which included reactivation of bacteria in the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state and reproduction of culturable bacteria. The regrowth of culturable E. coli and Salmonella in the distribution system mainly depended on the residual chlorine levels, with correlations (R(2)) of -0.598 and -0.660. The abundances of membrane integrity and reverse transcriptional activity bacteria in reclamation effluents had significant correlations with the culturable bacteria at the end point of the distribution system, demonstrating that PMA-qPCR and Q-RT-PCR are sensitive and accurate tools to determine and predict bacterial regrowth in water distribution systems. This study has improved our understanding of microbial removal and regrowth in reclaimed water treatment and distribution systems. And the results also recommended that more processes should be equipped to remove viable bacteria in water reclamation plants for the sake of inhibition microbial regrowth during water distribution and usages.

  17. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  18. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuschenbach, M.; Dorre, J.; Waterboer, T.; Kopitz, J.; Schneider, M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, E.; Kloor, M.; Knebel Doeberitz, M. von

    2014-01-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for

  19. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

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    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  20. Counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (orbi-group) antigen and antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, P J; Petric, M; Hewitt, C M; Szymanski, M T; Tam, J S

    1976-03-01

    A moderatley sensitive, rapid, and economical test scheme for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (IGV) in stool or antibody in serum has been developed and evaluated. The test scheme with minor modifications was an adaptation of a counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis system we once used for the detection of hepatitis B antigen. Large numbers of stool samples may be screened during half a working day for the presence of IGV using reference antiserum to IGV prepared in guinea-pigs. Serological studies of a diagnostic but not epidemiological nature may also be performed with equal facility by this same test scheme using highly purified IGV antigen derived from stool.

  1. Detection of hepatitis B surface antigen subtype adr in an epidemic of papular acrodermatitis of childhood (Gianotti's disease.

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    Kanzaki,Susumu

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available Papular acrodermatitis of childhood (PAC has recently been reported to be associated with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg subtype ayw. Between September, 1978, and June, 1979, we saw 14 patients with PAC in a small epidemic occurring in Iwakuni City, Japan. HBsAg was detected in sera from all patients. Subtyping of HBsAg in 11 patients showed that 8 had a determinant adr and 3 had no detectable determinant because of low antigen titers. The result suggests that factors other than the specific HBsAg subtype contribute to the development of PAC.

  2. Detection of hepatitis B surface antigen subtype adr in an epidemic of papular acrodermatitis of childhood (Gianotti's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, S; Kanda, S; Terada, K; Nohno, S; Kumano, K; Narahara, K; Hayashi, H; Kimoto, H

    1981-12-01

    Papular acrodermatitis of childhood (PAC) has recently been reported to be associated with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) subtype ayw. Between September, 1978, and June, 1979, we saw 14 patients with PAC in a small epidemic occurring in Iwakuni City, Japan. HBsAg was detected in sera from all patients. Subtyping of HBsAg in 11 patients showed that 8 had a determinant adr and 3 had no detectable determinant because of low antigen titers. The result suggests that factors other than the specific HBsAg subtype contribute to the development of PAC.

  3. Use of the Directigen Latex Agglutination Test for Detection of Haemphilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Meningitis Patients,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reprint: Use of the Directigen Latex Agglutination Test for Detection of Haemphilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae , and Neisseria meningitidis Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Meningitis Patients.

  4. Development of the ECODAB into a relational database for Escherichia coli O-antigens and other bacterial polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Macias, Miguel A; Ståhle, Jonas; Lütteke, Thomas; Widmalm, Göran

    2015-03-01

    Escherichia coli O-antigen database (ECODAB) is a web-based application to support the collection of E. coli O-antigen structures, polymerase and flippase amino acid sequences, NMR chemical shift data of O-antigens as well as information on glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in the assembly of O-antigen polysaccharides. The database content has been compiled from scientific literature. Furthermore, the system has evolved from being a repository to one that can be used for generating novel data on its own. GT specificity is suggested through sequence comparison with GTs whose function is known. The migration of ECODAB to a relational database has allowed the automation of all processes to update, retrieve and present information, thereby, endowing the system with greater flexibility and improved overall performance. ECODAB is freely available at http://www.casper.organ.su.se/ECODAB/. Currently, data on 169 E. coli unique O-antigen entries and 338 GTs is covered. Moreover, the scope of the database has been extended so that polysaccharide structure and related information from other bacteria subsequently can be added, for example, from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  5. Spectrum and inoculum size effect of a rapid antigen detection test for group A streptococcus in children with pharyngitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie F Cohen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stability of the accuracy of a diagnostic test is critical to whether clinicians can rely on its result. We aimed to assess whether the performance of a rapid antigen detection test (RADT for group A streptococcus (GAS is affected by the clinical spectrum and/or bacterial inoculum size. METHODS: Throat swabs were collected from 785 children with pharyngitis in an office-based, prospective, multicenter study (2009-2010. We analysed the effect of clinical spectrum (i.e., the McIsaac score and its components and inoculum size (light or heavy GAS growth on the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values of a RADT, with laboratory throat culture as the reference test. We also evaluated the accuracy of a McIsaac-score-based decision rule. RESULTS: GAS prevalence was 36% (95CI: 33%-40%. The inoculum was heavy for 85% of cases (81%-89%. We found a significant spectrum effect on sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and positive predictive value (p<0.05 but not negative predictive value, which was stable at about 92%. RADT sensitivity was greater for children with heavy than light inoculum (95% vs. 40%, p<0.001. After stratification by inoculum size, the spectrum effect on RADT sensitivity was significant only in patients with light inoculum, on univariate and multivariate analysis. The McIsaac-score-based decision rule had 99% (97%-100% sensitivity and 52% (48%-57% specificity. CONCLUSIONS: Variations in RADT sensitivity only occur in patients with light inocula. Because the spectrum effect does not affect the negative predictive value of the test, clinicians who want to rule out GAS can rely on negative RADT results regardless of clinical features if they accept that about 10% of children with negative RADT results will have a positive throat culture. However, such a policy is more acceptable in populations with very low incidence of complications of GAS infection.

  6. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Antigens in Paraffin-embedded Liver Specimens from the Amazon Region, Brazil

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    Simonetti SRR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic viscerotomy of paraffin-preserved old specimens, collected in the period from 1934 to 1967, were analyzed by immunohistochemical assays to detect hepatitis B, hepatitis D, dengue and yellow fever virus antigens. The material belongs to the Yellow Fever Collection, Department of Pathology, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and the cases were diagnosed at that time according to clinical aspects and histopathological findings reporting viral hepatitis, yellow fever, focal necrosis and hepatic atrophy. From the 79 specimens, 69 were collected at the Labrea Region and the other 10 in different other localities in the Amazon Region. The five micra thick histological slices were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg by immunoperoxidase technique. An immunofluorescence assay was applied to the detection of hepatitis D, yellow fever and dengue virus antigens. Nine (11.4% histological samples were HBsAg reactive and 5 (6.3% were HBcAg reactive. The oldest reactive sample was from 1934. Viral antigens related to the other pathologies were not detected in this study. Our results confirm that the methodology described may be used to elucidate the aetiology of hepatitis diseases even after a long time of conservation of the specimens.

  7. Isothermal rolling circle amplification of virus genomes for rapid antigen detection and typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael D; Cha, Jennifer N

    2015-08-01

    In this work, isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) of the multi-kilobase genome of engineered filamentous bacteriophage is used to report the presence and identification of specific protein analytes in solution. First, bacteriophages were chosen as sensing platforms because peptides or antibodies that bind medically relevant targets can be isolated through phage display or expressed as fusions to their p3 and p8 coat proteins. Second, the circular, single-stranded genome contained within the phage serves as a natural large DNA template for a RCA reaction to rapidly generate exponential amounts of double stranded DNA in a single isothermal step that can be easily detected using low-cost fluorescent nucleic acid stains. Amplifying the entire phage genome also provides high detection sensitivities. Furthermore, since the sequence of the viral DNA can be easily modified with multiple restriction enzyme sites, a simple DNA digest can be applied to detect and identify multiple antigens simultaneously. The methods developed here will lead to protein sensors that are highly scalable to produce, can be run without complex biological equipment and do not require the use of multiple antibodies or high-cost fluorescent DNA probes or nucleotides.

  8. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

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    Crystal Jaing

    Full Text Available Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples.

  9. Comparative detection of bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cells with ELISA, radioactivity and plate count methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Fliss, Ismaïl; Lacroix, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    Different methods are used to study bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, which is an important step in pathogenic infection as well as in probiotic colonization of the intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to compare the ELISA-based method with more conventional plate count and radiolabeling methods for bacterial adhesion detection. An ELISA-based assay was optimized for the detection of Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli O157:H7, which are low and highly adherent bacteria, respectively. In agreement with previous investigations, a percentage of adhesion below 1% was obtained for B. longum with ELISA. However, high nonspecific background and low positive signals were measured due to the use of polyclonal antibodies and the low adhesion capacity with this strain. In contrast, the ELISA-based method developed for E. coli adhesion detected a high adhesion percentage (15%). For this bacterium the three methods tested gave similar results for the highest bacterial concentrations (6.8 Log CFU added bacteria/well). However, differences among methods increased with the addition of decreased bacterial concentration due to different detection thresholds (5.9, 5.6 and 2.9 Log CFU adherent bacteria/well for radioactivity, ELISA and plate count methods, respectively). The ELISA-based method was shown to be a good predictor for bacterial adhesion compared to the radiolabeling method when good quality specific antibodies were used. This technique is convenient and allows handling of numerous samples.

  10. Multiplexed paper test strip for quantitative bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, S M Zakir; Ozimok, Cory; Sicard, Clémence; Aguirre, Sergio D; Ali, M Monsur; Li, Yingfu; Brennan, John D

    2012-06-01

    Rapid, sensitive, on-site detection of bacteria without a need for sophisticated equipment or skilled personnel is extremely important in clinical settings and rapid response scenarios, as well as in resource-limited settings. Here, we report a novel approach for selective and ultra-sensitive multiplexed detection of Escherichia coli (non-pathogenic or pathogenic) using a lab-on-paper test strip (bioactive paper) based on intracellular enzyme (β-galactosidase (B-GAL) or β-glucuronidase (GUS)) activity. The test strip is composed of a paper support (0.5 × 8 cm), onto which either 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D: -glucuronide sodium salt (XG), chlorophenol red β-galactopyranoside (CPRG) or both and FeCl(3) were entrapped using sol-gel-derived silica inks in different zones via an ink-jet printing technique. The sample was lysed and assayed via lateral flow through the FeCl(3) zone to the substrate area to initiate rapid enzyme hydrolysis of the substrate, causing a change from colorless-to-blue (XG hydrolyzed by GUS, indication of nonpathogenic E. coli) and/or yellow to red-magenta (CPRG hydrolyzed by B-GAL, indication of total coliforms). Using immunomagnetic nanoparticles for selective preconcentration, the limit of detection was ~5 colony-forming units (cfu) per milliliter for E. coli O157:H7 and ~20 cfu/mL for E. coli BL21, within 30 min without cell culturing. Thus, these paper test strips could be suitable for detection of viable total coliforms and pathogens in bathing water samples. Moreover, inclusion of a culturing step allows detection of less than 1 cfu in 100 mL within 8 h, making the paper tests strips relevant for detection of multiple pathogens and total coliform bacteria in beverage and food samples.

  11. Field test of a novel detection device for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen in cough

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    Tesfaye Ato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a highly infectious disease that is spread from person to person by infected aerosols emitted by patients with respiratory forms of the disease. We describe a novel device that utilizes immunosensor and bio-optical technology to detect M. tuberculosis antigen (Ag85B in cough and demonstrate its use under field conditions during a pilot study in an area of high TB incidence. Methods The TB Breathalyzer device (Rapid Biosensor Systems Ltd was field tested in the outpatient clinic of Adama Hospital, Ethiopia. Adults seeking diagnosis for respiratory complaints were tested. Following nebulization with 0.9% saline patients were asked to cough into a disposable collection device where cough aerosols were deposited. Devices were then inserted into a portable instrument to assess whether antigen was present in the sample. Demographic and clinical data were recorded and all patients were subjected to chest radiogram and examination of sputum by Ziehl-Nielsen microscopy. In the absence of culture treatment decisions were based on smear microscopy, chest x-ray and clinical assessment. Breathalyzer testing was undertaken by a separate physician to triage and diagnostic assessment. Results Sixty individuals were each subjected to a breathalyzer test. The procedure was well tolerated and for each patient the testing was completed in less than 10 min. Positive breath test results were recorded for 29 (48% patients. Of 31 patients with a diagnosis of tuberculosis 23 (74%; 95% CI 55-87 were found positive for antigen in their breath and 20 (64%; 95% CI 45-80 were smear positive for acid fast bacilli in their sputum. Six patients provided apparent false positive breathalyzer results that did not correlate with a diagnosis of tuberculosis. Conclusions We propose that the breathalyzer device described warrants further investigation as a tool for studying exhalation of M. tuberculosis. The portability, simplicity of use and speed

  12. Evaluation of five different antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of avian pneumovirus antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherchandani, Sunil; Patnayak, Devi P; Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia A; Lauer, Dale; Goyal, Sagar M

    2005-01-01

    Five different antigens were evaluated in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for the detection of avian pneumovirus (APV) antibodies. Two of the 5 antigens were prepared from recent APV isolates from Minnesota. The 2 older isolates were passage 63 of a strain currently used as a live, attenuated vaccine and a Colorado strain isolated for the first time in the United States and currently used in an ELISA test. The fifth antigen is based on an APV recombinant N-protein. Basic parameters and positive-negative threshold of the assays were established for all 5 antigens on the basis of data obtained by testing 46 known negative and 46 known positive serum samples. Subsequently, 449 field samples were tested by all 5 ELISAs. The optical density difference (ODD) was calculated by subtracting optical density of the sample in the negative antigen well from that in the positive antigen well. In the current ELISA test based on the Colorado strain, an ODD of 0.2 is considered to be the cutoff value to classify samples as negative or positive. In this study, however, use of different cutoffs, based on ODD of negative control plus 3 SD or values estimated from Receiver operating characteristic analysis, was considered to be more appropriate for the various antigens used. Overall person-to-person and day-to-day variability was found to be large for all tests using either ODD or sample to positive ratio to report results. In addition, results suggest that antigenicity of the APV isolates in the United States has not changed between 1997 and 2000.

  13. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine.

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    Chanika Worasith

    Full Text Available Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT, which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method.We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+ or a negative test result (LR- were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios were estimated using logistic regression.When urine samples were pre-treated with TCA prior to

  14. Detection of Bacterial Wilt Pathogen and Isolation of Its Bacteriophage from Banana in Lumajang Area, Indonesia

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    Hardian Susilo Addy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt disease on banana is an important disease in Lumajang District and causes severe yield loss. Utilizing bacteriophage as natural enemy of pathogenic bacteria has been widely known as one of the control strategies. This research was aimed at determining the causing agent of bacterial wilt on banana isolated from Lumajang area, to obtain wide-host range bacteriophages against bacterial wilt pathogen and to know the basic characteristic of bacteriophages, particularly its nucleic acid type. Causative agent of bacterial wilt was isolated from symptomatic banana trees from seven districts in Lumajang area on determinative CPG plates followed by rapid detection by PCR technique using specific pair-primer. Bacteriophages were also isolated from soil of infected banana crop in Sukodono District. Morphological observation showed that all bacterial isolates have similar characteristic as common bacterial wilt pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum. In addition, detection of FliC region in all isolates confirmed that all isolates were R. solanacearum according to the presence of 400 bp of FliC DNA fragment. Moreover, two bacteriophages were obtained from this experiment (ϕRSSKD1 and ϕRSSKD2, which were able to infect all nine R. solanacearum isolates. Nucleic acid analysis showed that the nucleic acid of bacteriophages was DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid.

  15. Detection of Only Viable Bacterial Spores Using a Live/Dead Indicator in Mixed Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Stam, Christina N.; Smiley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This method uses a photoaffinity label that recognizes DNA and can be used to distinguish populations of bacterial cells from bacterial spores without the use of heat shocking during conventional culture, and live from dead bacterial spores using molecular-based methods. Biological validation of commercial sterility using traditional and alternative technologies remains challenging. Recovery of viable spores is cumbersome, as the process requires substantial incubation time, and the extended time to results limits the ability to quickly evaluate the efficacy of existing technologies. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) have shown promise for improving time to detection for a wide range of applications. Recent real-time PCR methods are particularly promising, as these methods can be made at least semi-quantitative by correspondence to a standard curve. Nonetheless, PCR-based methods are rarely used for process validation, largely because the DNA from dead bacterial cells is highly stable and hence, DNA-based amplification methods fail to discriminate between live and inactivated microorganisms. Currently, no published method has been shown to effectively distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores. This technology uses a DNA binding photoaffinity label that can be used to distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores with detection limits ranging from 109 to 102 spores/mL. An environmental sample suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead vegetative cells and bacterial endospores is treated with a photoaffinity label. This step will eliminate any vegetative cells (live or dead) and dead endospores present in the sample. To further determine the bacterial spore viability, DNA is extracted from the spores and total population is quantified by real-time PCR. The current NASA standard assay takes 72 hours for results. Part of this procedure requires a heat shock step at 80 degC for 15 minutes before the

  16. STUDIES ON THE DETECTION KIT FOR THE COLORECTAL CARCINOMA ASSOCIATED LARGE EXTERNAL ANTIGEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detecting method and diagnostic value of the tumor marker colorectal carcinoma associated large external antigen (LEA) for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: Monoclonal antibody ND-1, which can recognize LEA, was labeled with biotin aminocaproylhydrazide (BACH) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) respectively. One step sandwich ELISA Kit for detecting LEA in serum was developed by the biotinylated antibody and enzyme conjugation. The validity and reliability of the kit were evaluated by sera selected from clinic. Results: the OD405 of healthy group was 0.056± 0.038, and that of patients was 0.553± 0.441. The difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.01). The cutoff value, which was 0.248, was determined by analysis of ROC. The diagnosis sensitivity, specificity and validity of the kit were 89.29%, 87.5%, 88.54% respectively. The ROC value was 0.95. The intra-CV was less than 5%, and the internal-CV was less than 10%. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the kit and those obtained by pathological diagnosis (P<0.01). The expression of LEA was associated with the differentiated degree of colorectal carcinoma and had no relation to the Dukes' phase of the disease. Conclusion: LEA is practically useful tumor marker for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma. The kit developed can be used for the qualitative diagnosis for the disease.

  17. Detection of chikungunya virus antigen by a novel rapid immunochromatographic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase.

  18. Detection and partial characterization of a midlamina lucida-hemidesmosome-associated antigen (19-DEJ-1) present within human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Jester, J

    1989-01-01

    immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated localization of 19-DEJ-1 to the level of the midlamina lucida, directly underneath hemidesmosomes; absent staining was noted beneath melanocytes. 19-DEJ-1 antigen was detectable in unfixed A431 cells grown on coverslips. After radioincorporation of 35S-methionine into A431...

  19. Use of Novel Recombinant Antigens in the Interferon Gamma Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis Infection in Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection can be detected by measuring antigen specific cell mediated immune responses by the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives...

  20. Use of novel recombinant antigens in the interferon gamma assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, C.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2012-01-01

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection may be detected by measuring antigen specific cell-mediated immune responses by the interferon-gamma (IFN-¿) assay. Available IFN-¿ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives...

  1. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions.

  2. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  4. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, G; Alonso-Sarduy, L; Rio, L Marques; Bizzini, A; Trampuz, A; Notz, J; Dietler, G; Kasas, S

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  5. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food.

  6. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI STOOL ANTIGEN BY NON-INVASIVE ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢盛恺; 林其燧; 宋耀虹; 王树琴

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical utility of a new non-invasive enzyme immunoassay(EIA) for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Methods. Stool specimens of 63 patients were collected and tested by using a commercial kit for detecting Helicobacter pylori stool antigen (HpSA), of which 61 patients also underwent 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT). The tissue samples of 31 patients were obtained endoscopically and were examined with histologic technique (Warthin-Starry silver stain).Regarded 13C-UBT as a golden standard, HpSA test and histologic techniques were evaluated. Using this method,we also investigated the positive rate of H.Pylori infection in children in Beijing.Results.The sensitivity and specificity of HpSA test were 94.7% and 95.1% respectively; the positive and negative predictive values were 97.3% and 91.7% respectively; and the accuracy was 95.1%.The results showed the prevalence of H.pylori infection was 26.0% in children (3~18 years) of district of Xicheng in Beijing. After treatment, HpSA seems to disappear rapidly(3~5 days) from the feces. Conclusion. The detection of HpSA in stool samples by HpSA test is a rapid noninvasive test for detecting H.pylori infection, and has both high sensitivity and high specificity. It is suitable for screening and diagnosis of H.pylori infection, monitoring the treatment efficacy in routine in all hospitals.

  7. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  8. Targeted PCR for Detection of Vaginal Bacteria Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, David N.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:17687006

  9. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang, Wanming Li, Dezheng Yuan, Jindan Song, Jin Fang Department of Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ministry of Public Health, and Key Laboratory of Medical Cell Biology, Ministry of Education, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The large external antigen (LEA is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605 conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05, indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of

  10. Rapid detection of malto-oligosaccharide-forming bacterial amylases by high performance anion-exchange chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Larsen, K. L.; Zimmermann, W.

    2000-01-01

    High performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection was applied for the rapid analysis of malto-oligosaccharides formed by extracellular enzyme preparations from 49 starch-degrading bacterial strains isolated from soil and compost samples. Malto-oligosaccharide-formi...

  11. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  12. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  13. Evaluation of a new lateral flow test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Uldum, Søren A; Sørensen, Jesper F; Skovsted, Ian C; Otte, Sanne; Elverdal, Pernille L

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of the etiologic agent is important in order to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. In this study we evaluated the first commercial combined test for the agents of pneumococcal pneumonia and Legionnaires' disease based on urinary antigen detection, the ImmuView® Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. In this evaluation, the new test had a significantly higher sensitivity than the BinaxNOW® lateral flow tests and the Binax® EIA test. This identifies the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test as a fast and sensitive point of care test for identification of the infectious agent in a major group of patients with pneumonia.

  14. Method to conjugate polysaccharide antigens to surfaces for the detection of antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Lind, Peter; Riber, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    A new generic method for the conjugation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-derived polysaccharide antigens from gram-negative bacteria has been developed using Salmonella as a model. After removal of lipid A from the LPS by mild acidolysis, the polysaccharide antigen was conjugated to polystyrene micro...

  15. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections.

  16. Development of a sandwich Dot-ELISA for detecting bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen with E2 recombinant protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuelan ZHAO; Yuzhu ZUO; Lei ZHANG; Jinghui FAN; Hanchun YANG; Jianhua QIN

    2009-01-01

    The IgG antibodies of rabbit anti-E2 protein of the bovine viral diarrhea virus were prepared by a general method from high efficiency serum immunized by E2 recombinant protein antigen expressed in E. coli prokaryotic expression system and were labeled to make enzymelabeled antibody with the method of NaIO4. A sandwich Dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA) for the detection of BVDV was developed. The optimal reaction conditions of Dot-ELISAwere determined. The results show that optimal coating antibody was 300 μg·mL-1, the working concentration of HRP-labeled antibody was 1:50. The optimal blocking reagent and time were 5% bovine serum and 45 rain. The minimum detection of the content of antigen reached 1.35μg·mL-1. Compared with the routine IDEXX ELISA test kit with the whole virus, its specificity, sensitivity and coincidence rate were 90.48%, 96.55% and 95.24%, respectively. Compared with the sandwich Dot-ELISA with the negative staining electron microscope and RT-PCR, the coincidence rates were 90.9% and 93.1%, respectively. In addition, Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen of 178 samples collected from cow farms in the Hebei Province, China, were detected by the developed Dot-ELISA and the IDEXX BVDV antigen Test Kit simultaneously, BVDV antigen positive rate was 39.89%-41.01%. The result of detecting clinical samples demonstrated that the established method showed its specificity, sensitivity and repeatability, whereas the results were easily interpreted without an ELISA reader.

  17. Self-assembling bacterial pores as components of nanobiosensors for the detection of single peptide molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized bacterial pores were inserted into a lipid membrane as a nanobiosensor for the detection of single peptide molecules. Due to the intrinsic properties of single-channel conductance, the transit of individual molecules through the pore can be studied. The analysis of both the blockage current and duration is able to provide specific structural information and allows the detection of specific peptides in bulk mixtures.

  18. Detection and Identification System of Bacteria and Bacterial Endotoxin Based on Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Elsayeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a global health problem that causes risk of death. In the developing world, about 60 to 80 % of death cases are caused by Sepsis. Rapid methods for detecting its causes, represent one of the major factors that may reduce Sepsis risks. Such methods can provide microbial detection and identification which is critical to determine the right treatment for the patient. Microbial and Pyrogen detection is important for quality control system to ensure the absence of pathogens and Pyrogens in the manufacturing of both medical and food products. Raman spectroscopes represent a q uick and accurate identification and detection method, for bacteria and bacterial endotoxin, which this plays an important role in delivering high quality biomedical products using the power of Raman spectroscopy. It is a rapid method for chemical structure detection that can be used in identifying and classifying bacteria and bacterial endotoxin. Such a method acts as a solution for time and cost effective quality control procedures. This work presents an automatic system based on Raman spectroscopy to detect and identify bacteria and bacterial endotoxin. It uses the frequency properties of Raman scattering through the interaction between organic materials and electromagnetic waves. The scattered intensities are measured and wave number converted into frequency, then the cepstral coefficients are extracted for both the detection and identification. The methodology depends on normalization of Fourier transformed cepstral signal to extract their classification features. Experiments’ results proved effective identification and detection of bacteria and bacterial endotoxin even with concentrations as low as 0.0003 Endotoxin unit (EU/ml and 1 Colony Forming Unit (CFU/ml using signal processing based enhancement technique.

  19. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is ......Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen....... There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte...... responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells....

  20. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Batt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform.

  1. Detection of T- and B-cell Target Antigens of Fowlpox Virus Isolated from Backyard Chickens in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bithi; Joardar, Siddhartha N; Samanta, Indranil; Das, Pradip K; Alam, Sk Sahanawaz; Nandi, Sudip

    2015-06-01

    With the aim of assessing the antigenic characteristics of a circulating pool of fowlpox virus (FPV) that exists in the backyard poultry system in India, one of the field isolates generated was characterized by in vitro immunologic techniques. FPV was isolated from clinically positive fowlpox cases (n  =  10) from the Jhargram (West Midnapur district) and Kakdwip (South 24 Pargana district) areas of West Bengal State, India. Initially, FPV-specific PCR was performed for confirmation of the samples. Isolation of FPV was done using embryonated chicken eggs and the choreoallantoic membrane route. Subsequently, FPV antigen was prepared from chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture-adapted field isolate. Biologic transmission of FPV was performed in Rhode Island red chickens experimentally to assess humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. High level of anti-FPV antibodies were observed in test birds as assessed by indirect ELISA. Seroreactive polypeptides (B-cell antigens) of FPV antigen with molecular weights of 44.5, 66.5, 75, 90.5, and 99 kDa were detected by western blot analysis. Significant increases in CMI responses were observed in inoculated chickens as assessed by lymphocyte proliferation assay, cytotoxicity assay, and T-cell immunoblotting. The predominant T-cell antigen of FPV detected had a molecular weight of 66.5 kDa. The present study revealed the antigenic characteristics of FPV that exists in backyard poultry system in West Bengal for the first time, thus exploring the rationality of designing future T- and B-cell vaccines against fowlpox.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii: Recombinant GRA5 antigen for detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2010-03-01

    In this study, for the first time, the evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii full-length recombinant GRA5 antigen for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis is shown. The recombinant GRA5 antigen as a fusion protein containing His-tag at both terminals was obtained using an Escherichia coli expression system. The usefulness of rGRA5 for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in an ELISA was tested on a total of 189 sera from patients with different stages of the infection and 31 sera from sero-negative individuals, obtained during routine diagnostic tests. Anti-GRA5 IgG antibodies were detected in 70.9% of all seropositive serum samples. This result was comparable to ELISA using a Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA) and six combinations of recombinant antigens. The sensitivity of IgG ELISA calculated from all positive serum samples was similar for TLA (94.2%), rMAG1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (92.6%), rGRA2+rSAG1+rGRA5 (93.1%) and rROP1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (94.2%) cocktails, whereas the sensitivity of cocktails without rGRA5 antigens was lower giving 82.0%, 86.2% and 87.8%, respectively. Thus, the present study showed that the full-length rGRA5 is suitable for use as a component of an antigen cocktail for the detection of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies.

  3. Analysis and PCR detection of antigen compositions of ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁恩雨

    1995-01-01

    Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) was proliferated utilizing sheep foetal lung cells, and the cytopathic effect (CPE) of the virus was investigated. OPPV was purified with a 10%-sucrose cushion and then with 20%-55% discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The structural proteins and antigen compositions of OPPV were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Besides, the OPP proviral cDNAs of the virus-infected cell cultures and the peripheral blood monocytes from sheep infected by the virus were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results show that the CPE of sheep foetal lung cells infected by OPPV is typical of the disease. The purified virions are intact and of high purity when observed with an electron microscope. OPPV proteins consist of 18 polypeptide bands and the molecular weights range from 18 to 120kd. Among these, 3 were glycoproteins (designated by gp120, gp50 and gp47). The appearance and peak time of the p28 antibody from sheep inoculated with OPPV ar

  4. [Validation of a ultramicroELISA for detecting antibodies against hepatitis B surface antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L; Balmaseda, A; Bravo, J; Trujillo, J; Martínez, L; Ochoa, R; Díaz, M; Laferté, J; Ramos, F

    1996-01-01

    The results of a validation study of the ultramicroanalitical assay for the detection of antibodies against the hepatitis B surface antigen (UMELISA anti-HBsAg), which was carried out by comparing the results obtained with the Hepanostika anti-HBsAg, commercial diagnosis kit are presented. For this purpose, sera from the clinical assays of the Cuban recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B were used. With the first sera group (n = 30) it was obtained, 93.1% of sensitivity, 98.5% of specificity and a concordance of 94.3%. The correlation coefficient showed a similar trend of the results (p 0.05). With the second group (n = 100), whose assays were carried out at the "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine (PKI) and at the Immunoassay Center (IAC) simultaneously, it was observed a sensitivity of 96.25% in both centers, a specificity of 75% at the PKI and of 90% at the IAC, and a coincidence of 92% and 95%, respectively. The correlation coefficient presented similar values and there were no significant differences between the TPG obtained by the two methods (p > 0.05). The results attained show in general the validity of the new assay and the feasibility to put it into practice either for following up the infection, or for carrying out clinical assays of vaccine evaluations.

  5. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins.

  6. [Rapid antigen detection tests for group A streptococcus in children with pharyngitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J; Levy, C; Chalumeau, M; Bidet, Ph; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most frequently identified bacterium in children with acute pharyngitis. Clinical signs and symptoms cannot distinguish accurately between viral and GAS pharyngitis. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) can identify GAS by an immunologic reaction within a few minutes. Compared to throat culture, most RADTs have a high specificity (around 95 %), allowing antibiotic prescribing on the basis of a positive RADT result. Similarly, the negative predictive value of RADTs seems sufficiently high (around 95 %) to ensure against the presence of GAS in case of a negative RADT result. Among several factors affecting RADT sensitivity, the training and expertise of the person performing the test and the quality of the throat swab specimen seem to be key determinants. Available evidence suggests that clinical prediction rules for the triage of children who should undergo GAS testing are not sufficiently accurate. Implementing RADTs into clinical practice has an important impact on antibiotic prescription rates, for a reduction of about 30 %. French guidelines that recommend using RADTs in all children above 3 years of age presenting with pharyngitis without backup culture of negative tests seem relevant in this context.

  7. Peritonsillar abscess and cellulitis and their relation to a positive antigen detection test for streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, Stefan; Engfeldt, Peter; Hugosson, Svante

    2010-10-01

    The microbiological cause of peritonsillar abscess and the role of group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) are unclear. We performed a retrospective study at the ear, nose and throat clinic (ENT) of Orebro University Hospital, Sweden, and included 376 events of peritonsillitis between 2002 and 2004. We determined if the patients had visited a primary healthcare centre (PHCC) within 30 days prior to inclusion. The results of the rapid antigen detection test for GAS (Strep A) taken at the PHCC were compared with the occurrence of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) and peritonsillar cellulitis (PTC). A Strep A test was performed in 61% (229/376) of the events studied. Strep A was positive in 22% of PTA events and in 35% of PTC events (p = 0.036). Of 48,000 Strep A tests taken in primary healthcare, mainly for sore throat, 22% were positive. We examined the relationship between age, the incidence of PTA, and positive Strep A tests. We also determined if there was a monthly correlation between number of positive Strep A tests and number of PTA events. We found no significant correlations. In conclusion, our findings indicate that GAS does not play a major role in the development of PTA/PTC.

  8. Detection of bacterial biofilms in different types of chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingzhi; Keyoumu, Youlidusi; Long, Li; Zhang, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities that may be homogeneous or heterogeneous. They play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic nasal sinusitis, chronic tonsillitis, cholesteatomas, and device-related infections. Despite this, few studies have been done that examine the presence of bacterial biofilms in tissues from patients with different types of COM or middle ear cholesteatomas. In the current study, we examined the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from humans with chronic ear infections using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We hypothesize that bacterial biofilms present differently in patients with different types of chronic otitis media. Our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media. A prospective study was conducted in which middle ear tissues were obtained from 38 patients who underwent tympanoplasty and/or tympanomastoid surgery due to chronic ear infections. A total of 50 middle and mastoid tissue samples were processed for SEM analysis. In addition, 38 middle ear secretion specimens were obtained for routine bacterial culture analysis. Bacterial biofilms were present in 85 % (11 of 13) of patients with middle ear cholesteatoma, 92 % (12/13) of patients with chronic otitis suppurative media (CSOM), and 16 % of patients (2/12) with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). Fungal biofilms were found in two cases of cholesteatoma. The positive coincidence rate between bacterial biofilms visualized by SEM and bacteria detected by culture was 82 %. Our findings suggest that bacterial biofilms are very common in CSOM and middle ear cholesteatomas. Positive bacterial cultures imply the presence of biofilm formation in CSOM and cholesteatomas. As such, our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media.

  9. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection.

  10. Improvement of antigen detection efficiency with the use of two-dimensional photonic crystal as a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Terekhin, Vladimir; Vokhmincev, Kirill; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Multiplex detection of different antigens in human serum in order to reveal diseases at the early stage is of interest nowadays. There are a lot of biosensors, which use the fluorescent labels for specific detection of analytes. For instance, common method for detection of antigens in human serum samples is enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One of the most effective ways to improve the sensitivity of this detection method is the use of a substrate that could enhance the fluorescent signal and make it easier to collect. Two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals are very suitable structures for these purposes because of the ability to enhance the luminescent signal, control the light propagation and perform the analysis directly on its surface. In our study we have calculated optimal parameters for 2D-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of the array of silicon nano-rods, fabricated such photonic crystal on a silicon substrate using reactive ion etching and showed the possibility of its efficient application as a substrate for ELISA detection of human cancer antigens.

  11. Serological detection of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and specific antibodies in dogs from central and northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardone, L; Schnyder, M; Macchioni, F; Deplazes, P; Magi, M

    2013-02-18

    The most frequently employed method for the diagnosis of Angiostrongylus vasorum in dogs is the detection of first stage larvae (L1) in faeces. The sensitivity of coproscopy, however, is limited in case of low parasite load, intermittent larval excretion, and during pre-patency. An epidemiological survey on dogs was conducted applying serological methods in two Italian regions where angiostrongylosis is endemic in foxes. 265 dog serum samples from Tuscany (central Italy - site A) and 447 from Liguria (north-western Italy - site B) were tested with a sandwich-ELISA for detection of circulating antigen, and with an ELISA using A. vasorum adult somatic antigen purified by monoclonal antibodies for specific antibody detection. During previous examinations dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum (n=149), Dirofilaria immitis (n=40), Dirofilaria repens (n=30), Acanthocheilonema reconditum (n=27), Crenosoma vulpis (n=1), A. vasorum (n=2), Capillaria aerophila (n=35), Capillaria boehmi (n=3), Toxocara canis (n=68), Toxascaris leonina (n=5), hookworms (n=37) and Trichuris vulpis (n=39) were detected. Sera of these dogs were used to evaluate cross reactions. In site A, 2 dogs (0.8%) were seropositive for antibody and antigen detection and 4 (1.5%) for antibody detection only. From site B, 4 dogs (0.9%) were seropositive for both tests, while other 4 dogs (0.9%) for antigen detection only and 9 dogs (2%) for antibody detection only. Considering a subgroup of 347 dogs from site B which had also been tested with the Baermann technique, 2 (0.6%) were positive for both tests, 4 (1.2%) for antigen detection only and 9 (2.6%) for antibody detection only. The two dogs which were positive for both serological tests were also positive for A. vasorum L1 in the faeces. No significant difference in seropositivities was observed in the group of dogs with other proven parasitic infections. A. vasorum serology presents significant advantages (diagnosis before patency, single serum

  12. Power-free chip enzyme immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel Ahmed, Heba; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-11-15

    A power-free, portable "Chip EIA" was designed to render the popular Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) more suitable for point-of-care testing. A number of microfluidic platforms have enabled miniaturization of the conventional microtitre plate ELISA, however, they require external pumping systems, valves, and electric power supply. The Chip EIA platform has eliminated the need for pumps and valves through utilizing a simple permanent magnet and magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles act as solid support to capture the target and are then moved through chambers harboring different reagents necessary to perform a sandwich ELISA. The use of magnetic nanoparticles increases the volume-to-surface ratio reducing the assay time to 30 min. Changing the color of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate to green indicates a positive result. In addition, a quantitative read-out was obtained through the use of cellphone camera imaging and analyzing the images using Matlab®. Cell phones, including smart ones, are readily available almost everywhere. The Chip EIA device was used to assay total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) in 19 serum samples. The PSA Chip EIA was tested for accuracy, precision, repeatability, and the results were correlated to the commercial Beckman Colter, Hybritech immunoassay® for determination of tPSA in serum samples with a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.96). The lower detection limit of the PSA Chip EIA was 3.2 ng/mL. The assay has 88.9% recovery and good reproducibility (% CV of 6.5). We conclude that the developed Chip EIA can be used for detection of protein biomarkers in biological specimens.

  13. Bacterial Toxin Fusion Proteins Elicit Mucosal Immunity against a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Antigen When Administered Intranasally to Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreerupa Challa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides corresponding to the foot-and-mouth disease virus VP1 G-H loop are capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies in some species but are considered relatively poor immunogens, especially at mucosal surfaces. However, intranasal administration of antigens along with the appropriate delivery vehicle/adjuvant has been shown to induce mucosal immune responses, and bacterial enterotoxins have long been known to be effective in this regard. In the current study, two different carrier/adjuvant approaches were used to augment mucosal immunity to the FMDV O1 BFS G-H loop epitope, in which the G-H loop was genetically coupled to the E. coli LT-B subunit and coexpressed with the LTA2 fragment (LTA2B-GH, or the nontoxic pseudomonas exotoxin A (ntPE was fused to LTA2B-GH at LT-A2 to enhance receptor targeting. Only guinea pigs that were inoculated intranasally with ntPE-LTA2B-GH and LTA2B-GH induced significant anti-G-H loop IgA antibodies in nasal washes at weeks 4 and 6 when compared to ovalbumin or G-H loop immunized animals. These were also the only groups that exhibited G-H loop-specific antigen-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa. These data demonstrate that fusion of nonreplicating antigens to LTA2B and ntPE-LTA2B has the potential to be used as carriers/adjuvants to induce mucosal immune responses against infectious diseases.

  14. Detection of Pathogenic Biofilms with Bacterial Amyloid Targeting Fluorescent Probe, CDy11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun-Young, Kim; Srikanta, Sahu; Yin-Hoe, Yau

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for a wide range of persistent infections. In the clinic, diagnosis of biofilm-associated infections relies heavily on culturing methods, which fail to detect nonculturable bacteria. Identification of novel fluorescent probes for biofilm imaging will greatly...... facilitate diagnosis of pathogenic bacterial infection. Herein, we report a novel fluorescent probe, CDy11 (compound of designation yellow 11), which targets amyloid in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix through a diversity oriented fluorescent library approach (DOFLA). CDy11 was further demonstrated...... for in vivo imaging of P. aeruginosa in implant and corneal infection mice models....

  15. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. METHODS: Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. RESULTS: B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. CONCLUSIONS: B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to

  16. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection.

  17. Mass-sensing BioCD Protein Array towards Clinical Application: Prostate Specific Antigen Detection in Patient Sera

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xuefeng; Nolte, David D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2009-01-01

    Mass-sensing biosensor arrays for protein detection require no fluorophores or enzyme labels. However, few mass biosensor protein arrays have demonstrated successful application in high background samples, such as serum. In this paper, we test the BioCD as a mass biosensor based on optical interferometry of antibodies covalently attached through Schiff-base reduction. We use the BioCD to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA, a biomarker of prostate cancer) in patient sera in a 96-well anti-PSA microarray. We have attained a 4 ng/ml detection limit in full serum and have measured PSA concentrations in three patient sera.

  18. Protein L: a novel reagent for the detection of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR expression by flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhili

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been significant progress in the last two decades on the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. Structurally CARs consist of a single chain antibody fragment directed against a tumor-associated antigen fused to an extracellular spacer and transmembrane domain followed by T cell cytoplasmic signaling moieties. Currently several clinical trials are underway using gene modified peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL with CARs directed against a variety of tumor associated antigens. Despite the improvements in the design of CARs and expansion of the number of target antigens, there is no universal flow cytometric method available to detect the expression of CARs on the surface of transduced lymphocytes. Methods Currently anti-fragment antigen binding (Fab conjugates are most widely used to determine the expression of CARs on gene-modified lymphocytes by flow cytometry. The limitations of these reagents are that many of them are not commercially available, generally they are polyclonal antibodies and often the results are inconsistent. In an effort to develop a simple universal flow cytometric method to detect the expression of CARs, we employed protein L to determine the expression of CARs on transduced lymphocytes. Protein L is an immunoglobulin (Ig-binding protein that binds to the variable light chains (kappa chain of Ig without interfering with antigen binding site. Protein L binds to most classes of Ig and also binds to single-chain antibody fragments (scFv and Fab fragments. Results We used CARs derived from both human and murine antibodies to validate this novel protein L based flow cytometric method and the results correlated well with other established methods. Activated human PBLs were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing two human antibody based CARs (anti-EGFRvIII, and anti-VEGFR2, two murine antibody derived CARs (anti-CSPG4, and anti

  19. Detection of Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Using Quantum-Dot-Based Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Larré; Yuan Ruan; Weimin Yu; Fan Cheng; Xiaobin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a new class of fluorescent labeling for biological and biomedical applications. In this study, we detected prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) expression correlated with tumor grade and stage in human prostate cancer by QDs-based immunolabeling and conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC), and evaluated the sensitivity and stability of QDs-based immunolabeling in comparison with IHC. Our data revealed that increasing levels of PSCA expression accompanied advanced tumor gra...

  20. Evaluation of bacterial aerotaxis for its potential use in detecting the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashiro, Maiko; Kato, Junichi; Fukumura, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    2003-02-27

    Bacterial aerotaxis (the movement of a cell toward oxygen) was evaluated for its potential use in detecting the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms. The level of toxicity was determined by the concentration of test chemicals resulting in a 50% inhibition of aerotaxis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 after 40 min of exposure. The aerotactic responses of P. aeruginosa were measured by using chemotaxis well chambers. Each clear acrylic chamber had a lower and upper well separated by a polycarbonate filter with a uniform pore size of 8.0 microm. To automatically detect bacterial cells that crossed the filter in response to a gradient of oxygen, P. aeruginosa PAO1 was marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the GFP fluorescence intensity in the upper well was continuously monitored by using a fluorescence spectrometer. By using this technique, volatile chlorinated aliphatic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene, were found to be inhibitory to bacterial aerotaxis, suggesting their possible toxicity to microorganisms. We also examined more than 20 potential toxicants for their ability to inhibit the aerotaxis of P. aeruginosa. Based on these experimental results, we concluded that bacterial aerotaxis has potential for use as a fast and reliable indicator in assessing the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms.

  1. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, C J; Davey, M E; Bakaletz, L O; Goodman, S D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that whereas antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity.

  2. Detection of Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica common and uncommon antigens, using rabbit hyper immune serum raised against their excretory-secretory and somatic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahi Khabisi, S; Sarkari, B

    2016-12-01

    Fasciolosis is an important neglected helminth disease caused by two liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The two species of Fasciola are usually different in their morphological and molecular features. They have also common and uncommon antigens in both their somatic and excretory secretory metabolites. In this study, we compared somatic and excretory-secretory (ES) antigens of F. hepatica and F. gigantica, by using rabbit hyper immune serum raised against these antigens. Adult worms were collected from bile ducts of infected animals and species of the fluke was confirmed by RFLP-PCR. ES and somatic antigens of both species were prepared. Rabbits were subcutaneously immunized with either ES or somatic antigens to produce antibodies against these antigens. SDS-PAGE pattern of F. hepatica and F. gigantica somatic antigens was similar and both of them revealed 30 protein bands, ranging from 18 to 180 kDa. In contrast, SDS-PAGE pattern of ES antigen of the two species was different. While protein bands with molecular weight of 18, 27, 29, 48, and 62 kDa were common in both species, bands of 19, 45, 55 and 58 kDa were only noticed in F. hepatica ES antigen. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies, raised against F. hepatica and F. gigantica ES antigen, reacted with main five protein bands, 25, 27, 29, 62 and 67 kDa and polyclonal antibodies raised against somatic antigens of both species reacted with three protein bands, 25, 27 and 72 kDa. Thus, the 25, 27 and 29 kDa protein bands may serve as immunodominant antigens, which might be considered for serodiagnosis of fasciolosis. Moreover, bands of 62 and 67 kDa in ES antigen and 72 kDa in somatic antigens of both species were immunodominant and might be suitable candidate for development of serological assays for diagnosis of fasciolosis.

  3. Detection of Leptospira interrogans DNA and antigen in fixed equine eyes affected with end-stage equine recurrent uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Jacqueline W; Galle, Laurence E; Kleiboeker, Steve B; Turk, James R; Schommer, Susan K; Dubielizig, Richard R; Mitchell, William J; Moore, Cecil P; Giuliano, Elizabeth A

    2007-11-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is the most frequent cause of blindness in horses worldwide. Leptospira has been implicated as an etiologic agent in some cases of ERU and has been detected in fresh ocular tissues of affected horses. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of Leptospira antigen and DNA in fixed equine ocular tissues affected with end-stage ERU. Sections of eyes from 30 horses were obtained. Controls included 1) 10 normal equine eyes and 2) 10 equine eyes with a nonrecurrent form of uveitis. The experimental group consisted of 10 eyes diagnosed with ERU based on clinical signs and histologic lesions. Sections were subjected to immunohistochemical staining with an array of rabbit anti-Leptospira polyclonal antibodies. DNA extractions were performed by using a commercial kit designed for fixed tissue. Real-time PCR analysis was completed on extracted DNA. The target sequence for PCR was designed from alignments of available Leptospira 16S rDNA partial sequences obtained from GenBank. Two of 10 test samples were positive for Leptospira antigen by immunohistochemical assay. Zero of 20 controls were positive for Leptospira antigen. All test samples and controls were negative for Leptospira DNA by real-time PCR analysis. Leptospira was detected at a lower frequency than that previously reported for fresh ERU-affected aqueous humor and vitreous samples. Leptospira is not frequently detectable in fixed ocular tissues of horses affected with ERU when using traditional immunohistochemical and real-time PCR techniques.

  4. Combination of DNA-based and conventional methods to detect human leukocyte antigen polymorphism and its use for paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturya, László; Rajczya, Katalin; Lászikb, András; Gyódia, Eva; Pénzes, Mária; Falus, András; Petrányia, Gyõzõ G

    2002-03-01

    In cases of disputed paternity, the scientific goal is to promote either the exclusion of a falsely accused man or the affiliation of the alleged father. Until now, in addition to anthropologic characteristics, the determination of genetic markers included human leukocyte antigen gene variants; erythrocyte antigens and serum proteins were used for that reason. Recombinant DNA techniques provided a new set of highly variable genetic markers based on DNA nucleotide sequence polymorphism. From the practical standpoint, the application of these techniques to paternity testing provides greater versatility than do conventional genetic marker systems. The use of methods to detect the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigen loci significantly increases the chance of validation of ambiguous results in paternity testing. The outcome of 2384 paternity cases investigated by serologic and/or DNA-based human leukocyte antigen typing was statistically analyzed. Different cases solved by DNA typing are presented involving cases with one or two accused men, exclusions and nonexclusions, and tests of the paternity of a deceased man. The results provide evidence for the advantage of the combined application of various techniques in forensic diagnostics and emphasizes the outstanding possibilities of DNA-based assays. Representative examples demonstrate the strength of combined techniques in paternity testing.

  5. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  6. Detection antigen virus den on monocyts by streptavidin biotin test as early diagnostic for dengue fever hemorrhagic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y NINING SRI WURYANINGSIH

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropical and sub-tropical countries of the world. Clinically it may manifest as asymtomastic,undifferentiated fever,dengue ever,dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome cases. The mechanism underlying the disease with severe complication is not clear yet,however it has been previosus reported that primary and secondary infections of dengue virus play an important role in the patogenesis of this diseases. Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection has a great contribution for appropriate management of the disease, especialy for the prognosis of the patient. Laboratory investigations for such cases will be methods on serological investigation as well as virus isolation and identification.of dengue virus infection could be made by detection of specific virus ,viral antigen,genomic sequence and or detection of antibodies. These methods are sensitive and precise for detecting dengue virus infection,but there need special equipment,costly and detection of IgM and IgG often positive or negative false the dengue virus in the blood stream There for, this study was performed in order to develop a method to detect dengue virus antigen on the monocytes using Streptavidin biotin technique. The result of Streptavidin biotin study demonstrated that 32 sera from patient suspected with DHF 78,1% were positive DHF,and 21,9% were negative DHF. These results are consistent with the result from WHO criteria as standard .The Chi Square analysis showed that the presentage of sensitivity and specificity of Streptavidin biotin methode were 88% and 87,7% respectively. In conclusions, immunocytochemistry method using streptavidin biotin technique could be used as a method to detect antigen dengue virus on monocytes in the serum patient suspected with DHF. This technique has high sensitivity and specivicity and consistent with the clinical WHO criteria for DHF.

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the tissue detection of bacterial pathogens associated with porcine infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    sequences within intact cells. FISH allows direct histological localization of the bacteria in the tissue and thereby a correlation between the infection and the histopathological changes present. This chapter presents protocols for FISH identification of bacterial pathogens in fixed deparaffinized tissue......Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an efficient technique for the identification of specific bacteria in tissue of both experimental and spontaneous infections. The method detects specific sequences of nucleic acids by hybridization of fluorescently labeled probes to complementary target...

  8. Phage-free peptide ELISA for ochratoxin A detection based on biotinylated mimotope as a competing antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuqiang; Chen, Chaochao; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Xuelan; Wang, Lv; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    To perform the biopanning of a mimotope peptide with reduced affinity to anti-ochratoxin A (OTA) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we executed two improved biopanning approaches with a commercial 7-mer peptide library. In the first approach, anti-mouse IgG antibodies were used to erect the anti-OTA mAbs; in the second approach, an ultralow OTA concentration (0.1 ng/mL) was used to perform the competitive elution of phage particles. After the fourth round of biopanning was completed, 30 identified clones were positive phage particles; of these phage particles, 16 exhibited strong competitive inhibition with a low OTA concentration of 0.1 ng/mL. DNA sequencing results revealed that the 16 phage particles represented six different peptide sequences. Among these particles, the phage particle with a peptide sequence of "GMVQTIF" showed the highest sensitivity to OTA detection. The biotinylated 12-mer peptide "GMVQTIF-GGGSK-biotin" was designed as a competing antigen to develop a competitive peptide ELISA. Under the optimal parameters, the proposed peptide ELISA with the biotinylated 12-mer peptide as a competing antigen exhibited good dynamic linear detection for OTA in the range of 0.005 ng/mL-0.2 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.001 ng/mL. The median inhibition concentration of OTA was 0.024 ng/mL (n=6), which is approximately fivefold more efficient as a competing antigen than the OTA-HRP conjugates. Reaction kinetics revealed that the biotinylated 12-mer peptide exhibited lower affinity to anti-OTA mAbs than the conventional chemical OTA antigen. The practicality of the proposed peptide ELISA was compared with a conventional ELISA method. In summary, this study demonstrated a novel concept of the development of phage-free peptide ELISA for the detection of OTA by using a biotinylated mimotope peptide as a competing antigen. This novel strategy can be applied to sensitively detect other toxic small molecules during food safety monitoring.

  9. From pro-prostate specific antigen, [-2]pro-prostate specific antigen to Beckman Coulter phi: the evolution of new biomarkers for early detection of prostatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-zhi; LU Yi-ping

    2012-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) has a wide clinical use for the early detection of prostatic carcinoma (PCa); however,it has never been a perfect marker due to its low specificity and low positive predictive value which ranges between 4 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml.The discovery of different PSA molecular forms in serum in the early 1990s brought insight into searching for more specific markers.Since then free PSA (fPSA) has been used routinely to increase the specificity for PCa and to reduce unnecessary biopsies.More recently,promising data is emerging regarding one proenzyme molecular form of free PSA,proPSA,and a few truncated proPSA isoforms.The purpose of this article is to review the recent studies on clinical utility of proPSA,especially [-2]pPSA,an isoform of proPSA,and parameters involving [-2]pPSA as well as other PSA derivatives in early detection of PCa.

  10. Combination of Culture, Antigen and Toxin Detection, and Cytotoxin Neutralization Assay for Optimal Clostridium difficile Diagnostic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Alfa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been a growing interest in developing an appropriate laboratory diagnostic algorithm for Clostridium difficile, mainly as a result of increases in both the number and severity of cases of C difficile infection in the past decade. A C difficile diagnostic algorithm is necessary because diagnostic kits, mostly for the detection of toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH antigen, are not sufficient as stand-alone assays for optimal diagnosis of C difficile infection. In addition, conventional reference methods for C difficile detection (eg, toxigenic culture and cytotoxin neutralization [CTN] assays are not routinely practiced in diagnostic laboratory settings.

  11. Immunofluorescence detection of new antigen-antibody system (delta/anti-delta) associated to hepatitis B virus in liver and in serum of HBsAg carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetto, M; Canese, M G; Aricò, S; Crivelli, O; Trepo, C; Bonino, F; Verme, G

    1977-01-01

    A new antigen-antibody system associated with the hepatitis B virus and immunologically distinct from the HB surface, core, and e systems is reported. The new antigen, termed delta, was detected by direct immunofluorescence only in the liver cell nuclei of patients with HBsAg positive chronic liver disease. At present, the intrahepatic expression of HBcAg and delta antigen appears to be mutually exclusive. No ultrastructural aspect corresponding to the delta antigen could be identified under the electron microscope. delta antibody was found in the serum of chronic HBsAg carriers, with a higher prevalence in patients with liver damage. The nuclear fluorescence patterns of HBcAg and delta antigen were similar; it is only possible to discriminate between the two antigens by using the respective specific antisera. Images Figure PMID:75123

  12. Dynamic laser speckle to detect motile bacterial response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra, H [Laboratorio de Laser. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Murialdo, S [Grupo de Ingenieria BioquImica. Departamento de Quimica. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Passoni, L [Laboratorio de BioingenierIa. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This proposal deals with the technique for detection of motile response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle as an alternative method. The study of bacterial displacement plays an essential role in biocatalysts processes and biodegradation. Hence, some biodegrading enzymes are benign catalytic that could be used for the production of industrially useful compounds as well as in wastewater treatments. This work presents an experimental set up and a computational process using frame sequences of dynamic laser speckle as a novel application. The objective was the detection of different levels of motility in bacteria. The encouraging results were achieved through a direct and non invasive observation method of the phenomenon.

  13. Dynamic laser speckle to detect motile bacterial response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, H.; Murialdo, S.; Passoni, L.

    2007-11-01

    This proposal deals with the technique for detection of motile response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle as an alternative method. The study of bacterial displacement plays an essential role in biocatalysts processes and biodegradation. Hence, some biodegrading enzymes are benign catalytic that could be used for the production of industrially useful compounds as well as in wastewater treatments. This work presents an experimental set up and a computational process using frame sequences of dynamic laser speckle as a novel application. The objective was the detection of different levels of motility in bacteria. The encouraging results were achieved through a direct and non invasive observation method of the phenomenon.

  14. An Enhanced ELISPOT Assay for Sensitive Detection of Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried H. Kellermann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lyme Borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi that is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks. Both B cell-mediated humoral immunity and T cell immunity develop during natural Borrelia infection. However, compared with humoral immunity, the T cell response to Borrelia infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, a novel T cell-based assay was developed and validated for the sensitive detection of antigen-specific T cell response to B. burgdorferi. Using interferon-g as a biomarker, we developed a new enzyme-linked immunospot method (iSpot Lyme™ to detect Borrelia antigen-specific effector/memory T cells that were activated in vivo by exposing them to recombinant Borrelia antigens ex vivo. To test this new method as a potential laboratory diagnostic tool, we performed a clinical study with a cohort of Borrelia positive patients and healthy controls. We demonstrated that the iSpot Lyme assay has a significantly higher specificity and sensitivity compared with the Western Blot assay that is currently used as a diagnostic measure. A comprehensive evaluation of the T cell response to Borrelia infection should, therefore, provide new insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Lyme disease.

  15. Clinical value of Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test, ImmunoCard STAT HpSA, for detecting H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Hui Li; Hong Guo; Peng-Bin Zhang; Xiao-Yan Zhao; Si-Ping Da

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the reliability of the Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test, ImmunoCard STAT HpSA, for detecting H pylori infection.METHODS: Stool specimens were collected from 53 patients who received upper endoscopy examination due to gastrointestinal symptoms. ImmunoCard STAT HpSA wasused to detect H pylori stool antigens. H pyloriinfection wasdetected based on three different tests: the urease test, Warthin-Starry staining and culture. H pylori status wasdefined as positive when both the urease test and histology or culture alone was positive.RESULTS: Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values and the total accuracy of ImmunoCard STAT HpSA for the diagnosis of H pylorinfection were 92.6% (25/27), 88.5% (23/26), 89.3% (25/28), 92%(23/25) and 90.6% (48/53), respectively.CONCLUSION: The stool antigen test, ImmunoCard STAT HpSA, is a simple noninvasive and accurate test for the diagnosis of H pyloriinfection.

  16. Mtp-40 and alpha antigen gene fragment amplification for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Colombian clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Alfonso

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the use of Mtp-40 and alpha antigen polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification fragments for the precise tuberculosis (TB diagnosis was evaluated. One hundred and ninety two different samples were obtained from 113 patients with suspected TB. Mtp-40 and alpha antigen protein genes were amplified by the PCR technique and compared to both the "gold standard" (culture test, as well as the clinical parameters (including a clinical record and X-ray film exam in 113 patients. Thirty-eight of the 113 patients had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of TB; 74% being detected by PCR technique, 58% by culture and 44% by direct microscopic visualization. Weconclude that it is possible to use PCR as a suitable technique for the detection of any mycobacteria by means of the alpha antigen product, or the specific infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by means of the mtp-40 gene. This might be a good supporting tool in difficult clinical TB diagnosis and pauci-bacillary cases.

  17. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  18. One step biofunctionalized electrospun multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded zinc oxide nanowire interface for highly sensitive detection of carcinoma antigen-125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, K Brince; Singh, Vikrant; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna; Singh, Shiv Govind

    2017-02-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most leading cause of cancer-related death in women . The carcinoma antigen-125, which is found on the surface of many ovarian cancer cells is known to be a gold standard clinical biomarker associated with life-threatening gynecological malignancy. In this work, we demonstrate a novel biosensor platform based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded zinc oxide nanowire for the ultrasensitive detection of carcinoma antigen-125. Label free detection of the carcinoma antigen-125 was accomplished by differential voltammetry technique that demonstrated excellent sensitivity (90.14µA/(U/mL)/cm(2)) with a detection limit of 0.00113UmL(-1) concentration. The fabricated immunosensor exhibits good performance with wider detection range (0.001UmL(-1)-1kUmL(-1)), reproducibility, selectivity, acceptable stability, and thus is a potential cost-effective methodology for point-of-care diagnosis. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded highly oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were synthesized by simple, low cost electrospinning technique. Compared to pure ZnO nanowires, electrochemical activity of MWCNTs embedded ZnO nanowires was found to be much higher. The calcination temperature was optimized to avoid any decomposition of the CNTs and to obtain multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded highly crystalline ZnO nanowires. The salient feature of this biosensing platform is that one step calcination process is enough to create the functional groups on MWCNT-ZnO nanowire surface that are effective for the covalent conjugation of antibody without further surface modification. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on MWCNT-ZnO nanowire based immunosensor explored for the detection of cancer biomarker.

  19. New skin test for detection of bovine tuberculosis on the basis of antigen-displaying polyester inclusions produced by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxiong; Parlane, Natalie A; Lee, Jason; Wedlock, D Neil; Buddle, Bryce M; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-04-01

    The tuberculin skin test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cattle lacks specificity if animals are sensitized to environmental mycobacteria, as some antigens in purified protein derivative (PPD) prepared from Mycobacterium bovis are present in nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Three immunodominant TB antigens, ESAT6, CFP10, and Rv3615c, are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but absent from the majority of environmental mycobacteria. These TB antigens have the potential to enhance skin test specificity. To increase their immunogenicity, these antigens were displayed on polyester beads by translationally fusing them to a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase which mediated formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. The most common form of these inclusions is poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB). The respective fusion proteins displayed on these PHB inclusions (beads) were identified using tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The surface exposure and accessibility of antigens were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polyester beads displaying all three TB antigens showed greater reactivity with TB antigen-specific antibody than did beads displaying only one TB antigen. This was neither due to cross-reactivity of antibodies with the other two antigens nor due to differences in protein expression levels between beads displaying single or three TB antigens. The triple-antigen-displaying polyester beads were used for skin testing of cattle and detected all cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis with no false-positive reactions observed in those sensitized to environmental mycobacteria. The results suggested applicability of TB antigen-displaying polyester inclusions as diagnostic reagents for distinguishing TB-infected from noninfected animals.

  20. Immunonucleochemistry: a new method for in situ detection of antigens in the nucleus of cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Il Soo; Lee, Hyunsook; Park, Sung Dong; Seog, Dae-Hyun

    2010-04-01

    The advancement of immunocytochemistry (ICC) allows one to observe detailed spatial distribution of cellular antigens, but, with some limitations. Using conventional ICC, it is difficult to distinguish the nuclear localization from cytoplasm, as two large subcellular compartments overlap on the z-axis. In this study, we have investigated whether in situ immunostaining of 'naked' nuclei could provide an unambiguous method for detection of nuclear antigens. We have designed a protocol that efficiently lyses plasmalemma, while keeping the nuclear envelope intact. The optimal condition for lysing the plasmalemma was 0.5% Nonidet P-40 for 5 min in both neuronal and non-neuronal cultured cells. Using this protocol, we could unambiguously isolate nuclear from cytoplasmic ICC signals. Since the present protocol has been designed for immunostaining of 'naked' nuclei from cultured or isolated cells, we have coined a new term to refer to this procedure as 'immunonucleochemistry' ('INC' for abbreviation).

  1. Detection and localization of rabbit hepatitis e virus and antigen in systemic tissues from experimentally intraperitoneally infected rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingjing; Zhao, Yue; She, Ruiping; Cao, Binbin; Xiao, Peng; Wu, Qiaoxing; Guo, Zhaojie; Ma, Longhuan; Soomro, Majid Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a novel genotype of HEV, and is considered to pose a risk of zoonotic transmission. Research into the systemic distribution of rabbit HEV in rabbits during different periods of infection has rarely been reported. To better understand this virus, we infected rabbits with second-passage rabbit HEV via an intraperitoneal route. After inoculation, the infection showed two types, temporary and constant infection. The detection of HEV RNA in the feces varied with time, and serum antigen correlated with fecal HEV RNA. Viremia only appeared 72 days after inoculation. The rabbits remained antibody negative throughout the experimental period. When HEV was localized, several organs besides the liver were HEV RNA positive. Tissue antigen was observed immunohistochemically in the different cells of various organs, especially in parts of the small intestine and the characteristic rabbit gut-associated lymphoid tissue. These data provide valuable information for future research into the pathogenesis of HEV.

  2. Detection of liver HBc antigen and its antibody in sera from viral hepatitis by the immunofluorescent complement technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuji,Takao

    1976-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B core antigen (HBc Ag and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag were detected in the liver tissue of a patient with chronic aggressive hepatitis by the immunofluorescent complement technique. The presence of anti-HBc was examined by the same method in 67 human sera previously tested for HBs Ag, anti-HBs and s-GPT levels. HBc Ag was localized mainly in the nucleus and sometimes in the cytoplasm of the hepatic cells. HBs Ag was found only in the cytoplasm. The focal area of HBc Ag positive hepatic cells seemed to correspond to the HBs Ag positive cells. Double staining demonstrated the simultaneous presence of HBs Ag and HBc Ag in individual cells. Anti-HBc positive serum was found in 46 (68.7% cases. Forty-eight (71.6% indicated a combination of HBs Ag and anti-HBc.

  3. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Razzauti

    Full Text Available Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations.We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq. In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454. In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles.We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each individual reservoir, with subsequent derivation of

  4. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  5. MHC-based detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of adaptive immunity is its ability to recognise a wide range of antigens and technologies that capture this diversity are therefore of substantial interest. New methods have recently been developed that allow the parallel analysis of T cell reactivity against vast numbers of differe...

  6. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band.

  7. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte subsets.The carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) method described in this chapter has been adapted to chicken cells. In this test, cells of interest are stained with CFSE. The succinimidyl ester group covalently binds to cellular amines forming fluorescent conjugates that are retained in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells.

  8. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  9. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  10. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  11. Collection of corneal impression cytology directly on a sterile glass slide for the detection of viral antigen: An inexpensive and simple technique for the diagnosis of HSV epithelial keratitis – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapally Sesha

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK is a sight threatening ocular infection and occurs worldwide. A prompt laboratory diagnosis is often very useful. Conventional virology techniques are often expensive and time consuming. We describe here a highly economical, simple, rapid and sensitive technique for the collection of impression cytology, for the laboratory diagnosis of HSK. Methods Fifteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK (either dendritic or geographic ulcers and five patients with other corneal infections (Mycotic keratitis, n = 3, Bacterial keratitis, n = 2 were included in the study. Corneal impression cytology specimens were collected using a sterile glass slide with polished edges instead of a membrane, by pressing the surface of one end of the slide firmly, but gently on the corneal lesion. Additionally, corneal scrapings were collected following the impression cytology procedure. Impression cytology and corneal scrapings were stained by an immunoperoxidase or immunofluorescence assay for the detection of HSV-1 antigen using a polyclonal antibody to HSV-1. Corneal scrapings were processed for viral cultures by employing a shell vial assay. Results This simple technique allowed the collection of adequate corneal epithelial cells for the detection of HSV-1 antigen in a majority of the patients. HSV-1 antigen was detected in 12/15 (80% cases while virus was isolated from 5/15 (33.3% patients with HSK. All the patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK (n = 15 were confirmed by virological investigations (viral antigen detection and/or viral cultures. HSV-1 antigen was detected in the impression cytology smears and corneal scrapings in 11/15 (73.3% and 12/15 (80% of the patients, respectively (P = 1.00. None of the patients in the control group were positive for viral antigen or virus isolation. Minimal background staining was seen in impression cytology smears, while there was some background staining in corneal

  12. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures.

  13. Antigen detection in vivo after immunization with different presentation forms of rabies virus antigen: Involvement of marginal metallophilic macrophages in the uptake of immune-stimulating complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, I.J.T.M.; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Claassen, E.

    1995-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain the relatively high immunogenicity of antigens presented in immune-stimulating complexes (iscom). Their potency can in part be explained by the specific targeting of these structures to cells presenting antigens to the immune system. However, until

  14. Antigenic and genetic characterization of Bordetella pertussis recovered from Quebec, Canada, 2002-2014: detection of a genetic shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuel, Michelle; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Whyte, Kathleen; Hayden, Kristy; De Serres, Gaston; Brousseau, Nicholas; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2016-05-01

    Despite vaccination, cyclical peaks of Bordetella pertussis incidence rates are still observed in Canada and other developed countries, making pertussis one of the most prevalent vaccine preventable bacterial diseases. In the postacellular vaccine era, evolution of bacterial strains has resulted in strains with altered vaccine antigens. Previous Canadian studies have focused on isolates mainly from the provinces of Ontario and Alberta, with only small numbers of isolates from other provinces. Therefore, in this study, we examined a larger sample (n = 52) of isolates from Quebec, Canada, between 2002 and 2014. Isolates were characterized by serotype, sequence type, and prevalence of pertactin deficiency. The Quebec isolates shared characteristics similar to other Canadian isolates and to isolates circulating globally. Although pertactin-deficient isolates were not present, a significant shift in sequence type was observed in more recent years. This study highlights the importance of continually monitoring disease-causing isolates to track evolutionary trends and gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of pertussis in Canada.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis and its association with HLA-DR antigens. II. Antibodies to native connective tissue antigens detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesoa, S A; Vullo, C M; Onetti, C M; Riera, C M

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of frequencies of HLA-DR alloantigens in HLA-DR4 negative subjects was determined in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and normal individuals. An increased incidence of HLA-DR1 alloantigen in DR4 negative RA patients (45.9%) compared with DR4 negative healthy controls (23.6%) was found. The difference became significant when the incidence of DR1 was compared between patients with severe disease stages (III-IV) (75%) in contrast to 32% of incidence in patients of the milder stages (I-II) (p less than 0.05). Using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay we have determined the incidence of serum antibodies to native bovine type I and type II collagens and proteoglycans in patients with RA. Presence of serum antibodies to native type I collagen was detected in 59% of patients with RA, 60% of sera exhibited reactivity to type II collagen and 12% had antibodies to proteoglycans. There was no correlation between the presence of antibodies to type I and II collagens and disease stages, however, the incidence of serum antibodies to proteoglycans was increased in severe disease stages. On the other hand, the presence of high levels of antibodies to type I collagen was associated to HLA-DR1 antigen, (p less than 0.05).

  16. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis 87-kilodalton antigen, a heat shock protein useful in diagnosis: characterization, purification, and detection in biopsy material via immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Soraya; Gómez, Beatriz L; Restrepo, Angela; Hay, Rod J; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2002-02-01

    The 87-kDa antigen derived from the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis can be detected in the sera of infected patients, and its levels have been shown to correlate well with response to treatment and with clinical cure. Despite its potential importance, the antigen has been poorly characterized. The 87-kDa antigen was purified to homogeneity via preparative gel electrophoresis; N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed substantial homology with heat shock proteins (hsps) from a variety of organisms. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against a Histoplasma capsulatum 80-kDa hsp showed cross-reactivity to the purified 87-kDa antigen via Western blotting, and the 87-kDa-specific MAb P1B demonstrated that the antigen was expressed at higher levels in yeast than in mycelia by the same technique. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence reactivity using P1B confirmed increased expression of the 87-kDa antigen during the temperature-induced transformation of mycelia to yeast. Yeast-to-mycelium transformation was accompanied by a fall in expression, although the 87-kDa antigen was clearly constitutively expressed in both phases. Immunochemical staining of tissues from patients with MAb P1B who were infected with P. brasiliensis confirmed in vivo expression of the 87-kDa antigen by yeasts, and identification of this antigen via this method appears to be a useful adjunct to other methods used to diagnose paracoccidioidomycosis.

  17. A major Sm epitope anchored to sequential oligopeptide carriers is a suitable antigenic substrate to detect anti-Sm antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovas, C J; Vlachoyiannopoulos, P G; Tzioufas, A G; Alexopoulos, C; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, M; Sakarellos, C; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1998-11-01

    A sensitive, highly reproducible, solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (ELISA), was developed in order to investigate whether the synthetic heptapeptide PPGMRPP-a major epitope of the Sm autoantigen-anchored in five copies to a sequential oligopeptide carrier (SOC), [(PPGMRPP)5-SOC5] is a suitable antigenic substrate to identify anti-Sm/antibodies. Sera with different autoantibody specificities [45 anti-Sm, 40 anti-U1RNP, 40 anti-Ro (SSA)/La(SSB) positive, 21 Antinuclear antibody positive, but negative for antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ANA + /ENA - ) and 75 normal human sera, ANA negative] and 75 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were tested for anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 reactivity in order to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the method to detect anti-Sm antibodies. RNA immunoprecipitation assays for the detection of anti-Sm and anti-U1RNP antibodies and counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) for the detection of anti-Ro(SSA) and anti-La(SSB) antibodies were used as reference techniques. The sensitivity of the method was 98% and the specificity was 68% for the determination of anti-Sm antibodies, while for the determination of anti-Sm and/or anti-U1RNP reactivity (antibodies to snRNPs) the corresponding values were 82% and 86%, respectively. In a comparison of the above assay with an ELISA, using Sm/U1RNP purified complex as immobilized antigen it was shown that the sensitivity of the anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA in detecting anti-snRNPs was 74%; in addition sera with anti-Sm antibodies gave higher binding in the anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 ELISA compared with anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA. Intra- and inter-assay precision was measured on four sera with reactivities extending into a wide range of absorbance values showed that the intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV%) ranged from 2.7 to 6 and the inter-assay CV% ranged from 9 to 14.5. These results indicate that the PPGMRPP peptide anchored to a pentameric SOC as a carrier is a suitable antigen for

  18. [Comparative research into sensitivity and specificity of immune-enzyme analysis with chemiluminescence and colorimetric detection for detecting antigens and antibodies to avian influenza viruses and newcastle disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkova, O N; Kapustina, T P; Mikhailova, V V; Safonov, G A; Vlasova, N N; Belousova, R V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the results of the development of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent tests with chemiluminescence detection and colorimetric detection of specific viral antigens and antibodies for identifying the avian influenza and the Newcastle disease viruses: high sensitivity and specificity of the immuno- chemiluminescence assay, which are 10-50 times higher than those of the ELISA colorimetric method. The high effectiveness of the results and the automation of the process of laboratory testing (using a luminometer) allow these methods to be recommended for including in primary screening tests for these infectious diseases.

  19. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  20. Rapid Methods for the Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens: Principles, Applications, Advantages and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law eJodi Woan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  1. DETECTION OF CYTOMEGALOVIRUS(CMV) IMMEDIATE EARLY ANTIGEN IN KIDNEY BIOPSIES AND TRANSPLANT NEPHRECTOMIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕航; 薛武军; 田普训; 郭奇; 何晓丽

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between CMV infection and renal allograft rejection. Methods 39 kidney biopsies and transplant nephrectomies were collected and investigated for CMV immediate early antigen by immunohistochemistry. Results In 14 out of 39 tissue specimens CMV immediate early antigen were found. 8 biopsies from normal donor kidneys were negative; only 1 (10%) in 10 tissue specimens with early stage acute rejection was positive; 5(55.6%) in 9 biopsies with late stage acute rejection and 8 (66.7%) in 12 tissue blocks with chronic rejection were positive. Compared with normal kidney tissues, the infections in tissues with early stage acute rejection didn't increase obviously, but increased obviously in kidney tissue specimens with late stage rejection and with chronic rejection (P<0.05). Conclusion CMV infection appears to contribute to late stage acute rejection and chronic rejection after renal transplantation.

  2. Detection of the CS20 Colonization Factor Antigen in Diffuse-Adhering Escherichia coli Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    identified using molecular methods. FEMS lmmunol Med Microbioi&O (2010) 186-189 FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology co 2010 Federation of European...of the gene encoding coli surface antigen 20 of FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology co 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies...20 1 0) 186-189 FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology <.e 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works

  3. PENENTUAN Streptococcus Group A PENYEBAB FARINGITIS PADA ANAK MENGGUNAKAN McIsaac SCORE DAN RAPID ANTIGEN DETECTION TEST (RADT DALAM UPAYA PENGGUNAAN ANTIBIOTIKA SECARA BIJAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Agustia Sinta Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharyngitis can be caused by viruses and bacteria. The bacteria that most commonly causes pharyngitis is Streptococcus Group A. In the treatment of pharyngitis, it is very important to ensure the cause for determining the appropriate treatments, therefore unnecessary use of antibiotics can be avoided. Antibiotics should be prescribed in patients with pharyngitis caused by bacteria. Diagnostic test that can be applied to determine the causes of pharyngitis are McIsaac score and Rapid Antigen Detection Test (RADT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of Streptococcus Group A as the cause of pharyngitis applying McIsaac scores and the RADT. This study was cross-sectional. Patients with the inclusion and exclusion criteria were given an initial assessment using the McIsaac score, subsequently tested with the RADT. The results gained from the McIsaac scores and subsequent RADT were compared.  It was found that as many as 124 patients suspected of having bacterial pharyngitis. Forty two of them were scored 3; 55 patients scored 4, and  27 patients scored 5. All patients tested with the RADT, only 18 patients gave positive results. Out of those 18 patients positively tested, 6 patients scored 3; 8 patients scored 4, and 4 patients scored 5. In was concluded that the use of RADT was better than McIsaac scores in determining pharyngitis caused by Streptococcus Group A.

  4. T cell responses to hepatitis B surface antigen are detectable in non-vaccinated individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin R Weihrauch; Michael von Bergwelt-Baildon; Milos Kandic; Martin Weskott; Winfried Klamp; Joachim R(o)sier; Joachim L Schultze

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate, whether humoral hepatitis-B-vaccine non-responders also fail to mount a T cell response and to compare these results to normal vaccinees.METHODS: Fourty-seven health care employees were enrolled in this study including all available nonresponders (n = 13) with an anti-HBsAg titer 1000 kU/L as controls.PBMC from all subjects were analyzed by IFN-γ and IL-4 ELISPOT assays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) reactive T cells.RESULTS: Non-responders and low-responders had no or only very limited T cell responses, respectively.Individuals responding to vaccination with the induction of a high anti-HBsAg titer showed a strong T cell response after the third vaccination.Surprisingly, these individuals showed response even before the first vaccination.T cell response to control antigens and mitogens was similar in all groups.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that there is no general immune deficiency in non-/low-responders.Thus,we hypothesize that the induction of anti-HBsAg responses by vaccination is significantly dependent on the pre-existing T cell repertoire against the specific antigen rather than the presence of a general T cell defect.

  5. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-02-29

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (Ppoultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry.

  6. Use of an immunodominant p17 antigenic fraction of Neospora caninum in detection of antibody response in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Álvarez García

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A Neospora caninum 17 kDa protein fraction (p17 has been described as an immunodominant antigen (IDA under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic utility of p17 in cattle. In order to achieve this, p17 was purified by electroelution from whole N. caninum tachyzoite soluble extract and a p17-based Western blot (WB-p17 was developed. The p17 recognition was measured by densitometry and expressed as OD values to check the validity of the WB-p17. A total of 131 sera including sequential samples from naturally- and experimentally-infected calves and breeding cattle were analysed by WB-p17 and compared with IFAT using whole formalin-fixed tachyzoites as a reference test. The results obtained highlight the feasibility of using the N. caninum p17 in a diagnostic test in cattle. Firstly, the assay based on the p-17 antigen discriminated between known positive and negative sera from different cattle populations, breeding cattle and calves. Secondly, the p17 antigen detected fluctuations in the antibody levels and seroconversion in naturally- and experimentally-infected cattle. Significant differences in p-17 antigen recognition were observed between naturally infected aborting and non-aborting cattle, as well as significant antibody fluctuations over time in experimentally infected cattle, which varied between groups. Furthermore, the results obtained with WB-p17 are in accordance with the results obtained with the IFAT, as high agreement values were obtained when all bovine subpopulations were included (kappa = 0.86.

  7. Development and evaluation of an immunochromatographic strip for rapid detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Liang, You-zhi; Yin, Li-ping; Shao, Hong-xia; Ye, Jian-qiang; Qin, Ai-jian

    2015-09-01

    A rapid immunochromatographic strip for detecting capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus was successfully developed based on two high-affinity monoclonal antibodies. The test strip could detect not only 600pg purified recombinant p27 protein but also quantified avian leukosis virus as low as 70 TCID50, which has comparative sensitivity to the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. For the evaluation of this test strip, 1100 samples consisting of cloacal swabs, meconium collected from the earliest stool of one day old chicken and virus isolates were assessed both by the strip and by the commercial ELISA kit. The agreement between these two tests was 93.91%, 93.42% and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the strip were also calculated by using the ELISA kit as the standard. This immunochromatographic strip provides advantages of rapid and simple detection of capsid protein antigen p27 of avian leukosis virus, which could be applied as an on-site testing assay and used for control and eradication programs of avian leukosis disease.

  8. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection of cattle can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test. Available IFN-γ tests are using purified protein derivatives of MAP (PPDj) which are crude products...... on the same 30 heifers from a known MAP infected herd. Determination of cut-off for each antigen was based on samples from a non-infected herd, including 60 heifers. Based on PPDj stimulations, more than 50% of the heifers tested MAP positive at the first two samplings, whereas only 20% tested positive...

  9. Detection of Thyroid Carcinoma Antigen with Quantum Dots and Monoclonal IgM Antibody (JT-95 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Fujioka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High-intensity fluorescent nanoparticles, quantum dots (QDs, have been applied to a wide range of biological studies and medical studies by taking advantage of their fluorescent properties. On the other hand, we have reported the specificity of JT-95 monoclonal IgM antibody, which recognizes the antigen of thyroid carcinomas. Here we show that the combination of QDs and JT-95 monoclonal antibody was applicable to Western blotting analysis, ELISA-like system, and fluorescent microscopic analysis of SW1736 thyroid carcinoma cell line. We have opened up the possibility that antibodies for higher specific recognition, even IgM, are applicable to the detection system with QDs.

  10. Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Particle Swarm Optimization for detecting Bundle Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kora, Padmavathi; Kalva, Sri Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal cardiac beat identification is a key process in the detection of heart diseases. Our present study describes a procedure for the detection of left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) Electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns. The electrical impulses that control the cardiac beat face difficulty in moving inside the heart. This problem is termed as bundle branch block (BBB). BBB makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively through the heart circulatory system. ECG feature extraction is a key process in detecting heart ailments. Our present study comes up with a hybrid method combining two heuristic optimization methods: Bacterial Forging Optimization (BFO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for the feature selection of ECG signals. One of the major controlling forces of BFO algorithm is the chemotactic movement of a bacterium that models a test solution. The chemotaxis process of the BFO depends on random search directions which may lead to a delay in achieving the global optimum solution. The hybrid technique: Bacterial Forging-Particle Swarm Optimization (BFPSO) incorporates the concepts from BFO and PSO and it creates individuals in a new generation. This BFPSO method performs local search through the chemotactic movement of BFO and the global search over the entire search domain is accomplished by a PSO operator. The BFPSO feature values are given as the input for the Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network classifier.

  11. Research of waste dump water mutagenicity of bacterial detection system SOS chromotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtková, H; Janáková, I

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with a possible use of the bacterial detection system of SOS chromotest to test mutagenicity of waste dump water checking the mutagenicity degree on real samples from Praksice waste dump, which is a controlled waste dump with mixed industrial, municipal and inert wastes. The waste dump surface water samples were taken from a no-name influent stream springing below the waste dump body between 2005 and 2009. After metabolic activation by microsomal fraction in vitro, medium to high mutagenicity was registered in all the samples. The SOS chromotest is assessed as an effective and economically acceptable method to check and determine the mutagenicity degree of contaminated water.

  12. Disposable bioluminescence-based biosensor for detection of bacterial count in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Tian, Qing; Yue, Weiwei; Zeng, Jing; Chen, Guangquan; Cai, Xinxia

    2009-11-01

    A biosensor for rapid detection of bacterial count based on adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence has been developed. The biosensor is composed of a key sensitive element and a photomultiplier tube used as a detector element. The disposable sensitive element consists of a sampler, a cartridge where intracellular ATP is chemically extracted from bacteria, and a microtube where the extracted ATP reacts with the luciferin-luciferase reagent to produce bioluminescence. The bioluminescence signal is transformed into relevant electrical signal by the detector and further measured with a homemade luminometer. Parameters affecting the amount of the extracted ATP, including the types of ATP extractants, the concentrations of ATP extractant, and the relevant neutralizing reagent, were optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the biosensor showed a linear response to standard bacteria in a concentration range from 10(3) to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter with a correlation coefficient of 0.925 (n=22) within 5min. Moreover, the bacterial count of real food samples obtained by the biosensor correlated well with those by the conventional plate count method. The proposed biosensor, with characteristics of low cost, easy operation, and fast response, provides potential application to rapid evaluation of bacterial contamination in the food industry, environment monitoring, and other fields.

  13. The detection of infectious bronchitis viral antigen by means of immunohistochemical technique in broiler chicken infected with I-269 IB isolate or injected with H-120 live vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Damayanti

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to detect the antigen of infectious bronchitis vius (IBV in broiler chicken by means of immunohistochemical technique. A total of 150 - fourteen days old broiler chicken were divided into three groups i.e. 50 chicken were infected with an IB isolate of I-269, 50 chicken were injected with H-120 life vaccine, and 50 chicken served as un-treated control. Clinical signs and gross pathological changes were observed. Each of five chicken of each group were necropsied at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, and 35 day(s post infection/vaccination. The antigen could be detected at one day through 35 days post vaccination/infection. In the vaccinated group, histopathological lesions and the detected antigen were minimal. In contrast, the infected chicken showed varied histolopathological lesion in accordance with the numerous antigens. The antigen were observed in the lymphocytes/macrophages in the trachea, lungs and kidney, and in the epithelium of trachea, alveoli, broncheolus and tubular sitoplasm of the kidney of both vaccinated and infected groups. In the infected group, antigen was also detected in the lymphocytes and macrophages of the affected organs.

  14. Development of a bacterial bioassay for atrazine and cyanuric acid detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eHUA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The s-triazine herbicides are compounds which can disseminate into soils and water. Due to their toxic effects on living organisms, their concentrations in drinking water are legislated by WHO recommendations. Here we have developed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, an alternative method for physicochemical quantification using two bioluminescent bacterial biosensors: E. coli SM003 for cyanuric acid detection and E. coli SM004 for both atrazine and cyanuric acid detection. The concentration of cyanuric acid detection for E. coli SM003 ranges from 7.83 µM to 2.89 mM, and for E. coli SM004 ranges from 0.22 µM to 15 µM. Moreover, atrazine detection by E. coli SM004 ranges from 1.08 µM to 15 µM. According to WHO recommendations, the cyanuric acid detection range is sensitive enough to discriminate between polluted and drinking water. Nevertheless, the detection of atrazine by E. coli SM004 is only applicable for high concentrations of contaminants.

  15. Flow cytometry-based methods for assessing soluble scFv activities and detecting pathogen antigens in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Sean; Weigel, Kris M.; Miller, Keith D.; Ndung' u, Joseph; Buscher, Philippe; Tran, Thao N.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2010-04-01

    Novel methods are reported for evaluating and utilizing single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies derived from yeast-display libraries. Yeast-display was used to select scFv specific to invariant surface glycoproteins (ISG) of Trypanosoma brucei. A limiting step in the isolation of scFv from nonimmune libraries is the conversion of highly active yeast-displayed scFv into soluble antibodies that can be used in standard immunoassays. Challenges include limited solubility or activity following secretion and purification of scFv. For this reason, few scFv derived from yeast-display platforms have moved into development and implementation as diagnostic reagents. To address this problem, assays were developed that employ both yeastdisplayed and secreted scFv as analytical reagents. The first is a competitive inhibition flow cytometry (CIFC) assay that detects secreted scFv by virtue of its ability to competitively inhibit the binding of biotinylated antigen to yeast-displayed scFv. The second is an epitope binning assay that uses secreted scFv toidentify additional yeast-displayed scFv that bind nonoverlapping or noncompeting epitopes on an antigen. The epitope binning assay was used not only to identify sandwich assay pairs with yeast-displayed scFv, but also to identify active soluble scFv present in low concentration in a crude expression extract. Finally, a CIFC assay was developed that bypasses entirely the need for soluble scFv expression, by using yeast displayed scFv to detect unlabeled antigen in samples. These methods will facilitate the continued development and practical implementation of scFv derived from yeast-display libraries.

  16. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  17. Decreasing trend in prostate cancer with high serum prostate-specific antigen levels detected at first prostate-specific antigen-based population screening in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Kitagawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the recent trends in prostate-specific antigen (PSA distribution in men in Japan, we analyzed the PSA distributions of men undergoing PSA-based population screening. We summarized the annual individual data of PSA-based population screening in Kanazawa, Japan, from 2000 to 2011, and analyzed baseline serum PSA values of the participants at the first population screening. Serum PSA distributions were estimated in all participants and those excluding prostate cancer patients according to age. From 2000 to 2011, 19 620 men participated aged 54-69 years old in this screening program. Mean baseline serum PSA level of all participants at the first screening was 2.64 ng ml−1 in 2000, and gradually decreased to approximately 1.30 ng ml−1 in 2006. That of participants excluding prostate cancer patients was 1.46 ng ml−1 in 2000, and there was no remarkable change during the study period. The 95 th percentiles in the participants excluding prostate cancer patients detected at the first population screening of men aged 54-59, 60-64, and 65-69 years old were 2.90, 3.60, and 4.50 ng ml−1 , respectively. After the commencement of population screening, the proportion of prostate cancer patients with high serum PSA levels decreased. However, there were no changes in serum PSA levels in men without prostate cancer. Age-specific PSA reference level of men without prostate cancer in Japan was similar to that in China and Korea.

  18. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  19. Detection of soluble antigen and DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi in urine is independent of renal injury in the guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Gilman, Robert H; Yauri, Verónica; Cok, Jaime; Angulo, Noelia; Escalante, Hermes; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Chagas disease in humans is generally limited to the detection of specific antibodies. Detection of T. cruzi antigens in urine has been reported previously, but is not used in the diagnosis. In this study, soluble T. cruzi antigens and DNA were detected in urine samples and were associated with kidney injury and systemic detection of the parasite. We used 72 guinea pigs infected with T. cruzi Y strain and 18 non-infected guinea pigs. Blood, kidney, heart and urine samples were collected during the acute phase and chronic phase. Urine samples were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Antigens were detected by Western Blot using a polyclonal antibody against trypomastigote excretory-secretory antigen (TESA). T. cruzi DNA was detected by PCR using primers 121/122 and TcZ1/TcZ2. Levels of T. cruzi DNA in blood, heart and kidney were determined by quantitative PCR. T. cruzi antigens (75 kDa, 80 kDa, 120 kDa, 150 kDa) were detected in the acute phase (67.5%) and the chronic phase (45%). Parasite DNA in urine was detected only in the acute phase (45%). Kidney injury was characterized by high levels of proteinuria, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and urea, and some histopathological changes such as inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis and scarce parasites. The detection of antigens and DNA in urine was associated with the presence of parasite DNA in blood and heart and with high levels of parasite DNA in blood, but not with the presence of parasite in kidney or kidney injury. These results suggest that the detection of T. cruzi in urine could be improved to be a valuable method for the diagnosis of Chagas disease, particularly in congenital Chagas disease and in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Detection of soluble antigen and DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi in urine is independent of renal injury in the guinea pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagahira E Castro-Sesquen

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Chagas disease in humans is generally limited to the detection of specific antibodies. Detection of T. cruzi antigens in urine has been reported previously, but is not used in the diagnosis. In this study, soluble T. cruzi antigens and DNA were detected in urine samples and were associated with kidney injury and systemic detection of the parasite. We used 72 guinea pigs infected with T. cruzi Y strain and 18 non-infected guinea pigs. Blood, kidney, heart and urine samples were collected during the acute phase and chronic phase. Urine samples were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Antigens were detected by Western Blot using a polyclonal antibody against trypomastigote excretory-secretory antigen (TESA. T. cruzi DNA was detected by PCR using primers 121/122 and TcZ1/TcZ2. Levels of T. cruzi DNA in blood, heart and kidney were determined by quantitative PCR. T. cruzi antigens (75 kDa, 80 kDa, 120 kDa, 150 kDa were detected in the acute phase (67.5% and the chronic phase (45%. Parasite DNA in urine was detected only in the acute phase (45%. Kidney injury was characterized by high levels of proteinuria, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 and urea, and some histopathological changes such as inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis and scarce parasites. The detection of antigens and DNA in urine was associated with the presence of parasite DNA in blood and heart and with high levels of parasite DNA in blood, but not with the presence of parasite in kidney or kidney injury. These results suggest that the detection of T. cruzi in urine could be improved to be a valuable method for the diagnosis of Chagas disease, particularly in congenital Chagas disease and in immunocompromised patients.

  1. Characterization of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to bovine enteric coronavirus: establishment of an efficient ELISA for antigen detection in feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, C P; Eichhorn, W

    1989-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to bovine enteric coronavirus (BEC) were produced. Additionally, polyclonal antibodies were made in rabbits and guinea pigs and extracted from the yolk of immunized hens. The antibodies were characterized by neutralization test, hemagglutination inhibition test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibody titers of polyclonal antisera ranged from 1:1280 to 1:40,000. Only one out of 908 hybridoma colonies tested secreted antibodies with neutralizing activity. By ELISA, polyclonal sera exhibited high background reactions that could be significantly reduced by treatment with kaolin in the case of rabbit sera. Attempts to establish an ELISA for BEC antigen detection based on polyclonal sera failed due to low sensitivity and specificity. Optimal results were achieved when a mixture of two monoclonal antibodies was coated onto microplates for antigen capture, while rabbit hyperimmune serum served as detecting antibodies in an indirect assay. The combination of the two monoclonal antibodies did not increase sensitivity synergistically, but in a compensatory fashion, probably because of epitope differences between BEC field strains.

  2. Development of an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibodies for detecting H6 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Tung; Tsao, Zak; Chang, Shu-Ting; Juang, Ron-Huay; Wang, Lih-Chiann; Chang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2012-06-01

    The H6 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) infection occurs frequently in wild and domestic birds. AIV antigen detection is preferred for controlling AIV as birds are infected before they produce antibodies. The purpose of this study was to develop an early diagnostic method for AIV detection. Six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) developed from a field H6N1 AIV strain were tested for their ability to bind to viruses. The two that showed the greatest binding ability to AIVs were used for antigen detection. An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect H6 AIVs was developed using these mAbs. One mAb was coated onto an ELISA plate as the capture antibody. The other mAb was used as the detector antibody after labeling with horseradish peroxidase. The antigen-capture ELISA detected H6N1 AIVs but not H5 AIVs, human H1N1, H3N2 influenza or other viruses. This antigen-capture ELISA could be used to specifically detect H6N1 AIV.

  3. 弓形虫感染免疫诊断抗原研究进展%Development of immunological antigen for detecting Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢致民

    2011-01-01

    The detection of toxoplasmosis has been focused on immunological antigen of Toxoplasma gondii. With the advance of molecular biotechnology, the component and recombiantent antigen, which gradually instead of initial crude antigen, has dominated for detecting Toxoplasma gondii. This paper reviews the status and development of Toxoplasma gondii diagnostic antigen.%诊断抗原历来是弓形虫病免疫诊断研究的重点.随着分子生物学技术的发展,弓形虫诊断抗原由最初的粗抗原发展成为组分抗原以及重组抗原.本文综述了近年来弓形虫病诊断抗原的研究现状与进展.

  4. Atypical sensors for direct and rapid neuronal detection of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Yeon; Choi, Seung-In; Choi, Geunyeol; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2016-03-09

    Bacterial infection can threaten the normal biological functions of a host, often leading to a disease. Hosts have developed complex immune systems to cope with the danger. Preceding the elimination of pathogens, selective recognition of the non-self invaders is necessary. At the forefront of the body's defenses are the innate immune cells, which are equipped with particular sensor molecules that can detect common exterior patterns of invading pathogens and their secreting toxins as well as with phagocytic machinery. Inflammatory mediators and cytokines released from these innate immune cells and infected tissues can boost the inflammatory cascade and further recruit adaptive immune cells to maximize the elimination and resolution. The nervous system also seems to interact with this process, mostly known to be affected by the inflammatory mediators through the binding of neuronal receptors, consequently activating neural circuits that tune the local and systemic inflammatory states. Recent research has suggested new contact points: direct interactions of sensory neurons with pathogens. Latest findings demonstrated that the sensory neurons not only share pattern recognition mechanisms with innate immune cells, but also utilize endogenous and exogenous electrogenic components for bacterial pathogen detection, by which the electrical firing prompts faster information flow than what could be achieved when the immune system is solely involved. As a result, rapid pain generation and active accommodation of the immune status occur. Here we introduced the sensory neuron-specific detector molecules for directly responding to bacterial pathogens and their signaling mechanisms. We also discussed extended issues that need to be explored in the future.

  5. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  6. Bacterial and viral pathogens detected in sea turtles stranded along the coast of Tuscany, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Cersini, A; Mancusi, C; Guarducci, M; Di Guardo, G; Terracciano, G

    2016-03-15

    During 2014, six loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta and one green turtle, Chelonia mydas, found stranded on the Tuscany coast of Italy, were examined for the presence of specific bacterial and viral agents, along with their role as carriers of fish and human pathogens. Thirteen different species of bacteria, 10 Gram negative and 3 Gram positive, were identified. Among them, two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and one strain of Lactococcus garviae were recovered and confirmed by specific PCR protocols. No trh and tdh genes were detected in V. parahaemolyticus. The first isolation of L. garviae and the first detection of Betanodavirus in sea turtles indicate the possibility for sea turtles to act as carriers of fish pathogens. Furthermore, the isolation of two strains of V. parahaemolyticus highlights the possible role of these animals in human pathogens' diffusion.

  7. [Advancement in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid in molecular diagnosis of sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Ren, Hui; Peng, Dai-zhi

    2013-04-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis helps make effective clinical decisions and improve the survival rate of patients with severe infection. However, the timely and accurate diagnosis of sepsis is still a great challenge in clinic. In order to settle the very problem, the scientists in the world have made a lot of exploration and research in the field of rapid molecular identification of pathogens. Nowadays, the nucleic acid detection of sepsis is mainly composed of 3 types of methodological strategies, either based on positive blood culture, single colonies, or directly on blood specimens. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of advances in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid as molecular diagnosis of sepsis.

  8. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguti, Natália; Bahls, Larissa Danielle; Uchimura, Nelson Shozo; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs) related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs) 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR) were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%), and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future.

  9. Bacterial fermentation of recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 using oxygen limiting growth conditions improves yield and quality of inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kischnick, Stefanie; Weber, Bernhard; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Sanders, Ernst A; Anspach, F Birger; Fiebig, Helmut; Cromwell, Oliver; Suck, Roland

    2006-06-01

    A process for bacterial expression and purification of the recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 (Ves v 5) was developed to produce protein for diagnostic and therapeutic applications for type 1 allergic diseases. Special attention was focused on medium selection, fermentation conditions, and efficient refolding procedures. A soy based medium was used for fermentation to avoid peptone from animal origin. Animal-derived peptone required the use of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for the induction of expression. In the case of soy peptone, a constitutive expression was observed, suggesting the presence of a component that mimics IPTG. Batch cultivation at reduced stirrer speed caused a reduced biomass due to oxygen limitation. However, subsequent purification and processing of inclusion bodies yielded significantly higher amount of product. Furthermore, the protein composition of the inclusion bodies differed. Inclusion bodies were denatured and subjected to diafiltration. Detailed monitoring of diafiltration enabled the determination of the transition point. Final purification was conducted using cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified recombinant Ves v 5 was analyzed by RP-HPLC, CD-spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and quantification ELISA. Up to 15 mg highly purified Ves v 5 per litre bioreactor volume were obtained, with endotoxin concentrations less than 20 EU mg(-1) protein and high comparability to the natural counterpart. Analytical results confirm the suitability of the recombinant protein for diagnostic and clinical applications. The results clearly demonstrate that not only biomass, but especially growth conditions play a key role in the production of recombinant Ves v 5. This has an influence on inclusion body formation, which in turn influences the renaturation rate and absolute product yield. This might also be true for other recombinant proteins that accumulate as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

  10. Serodiagnosis of bovine cysticercosis by detecting live Taenia saginata cysts using a monoclonal antibody-based antigen-ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wanzala

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available An ante mortem antigen-ELISA-based diagnosis of Taenia saginata cysticercosis was studied in artificially (n = 24 and naturally (n = 25 infected cattle with the objective of further validating the assay as a field diagnostic test. Based on total dissection as the definitive method of validity, the assay minimally detected 14 live cysticerci in artificially infected calves and 2 in naturally infected steers. In natural infections, the minimum number of live cysticerci consistently detected by Ag-ELISA was 5 while in artificial infections it was above 14. However, other animals with 12 and 17 live cysticerci in artificially infected calves, and 1 and 2 live cysticerci in naturally infected steers, escaped detection for unknown reasons. Animals harbouring dead cysticerci gave negative reactions in the assay as was the case in non-infected experimental control calves. There was a statistically significant positive linear correlation between Ag-ELISA optical density values and burdens of live cysticerci as obtained by total dissection of both artificially infected calves (r = 0.798, n = 24 ; P < 0.05 and naturally infected steers (r = 0.631, n = 25 ; P < 0.05. These results clearly show the potential effectiveness of ante mortem monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection ELISA in the diagnosis of bovine cysticercosis in cattle. Its value lies in the diagnosis of infection in cattle as a screening test in a herd, rather than as a diagnostic test at the individual level, due to false positive and negative reactions. In a herd of heavily infected cattle, the assay may, however, provide for individual diagnosis. Nevertheless, more work is recommended to increase its sensitivity so as to be able to diagnose light infections consistently in the field.

  11. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  12. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on monoclonal antibodies for the serology and antigen detection in canine parvovirus infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); N. Juntti; B. Klingeborn; J. Groen (Jan); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed for the detection of canine parvovirus (CPV) or CPV antigen in dog faeces and two other ELISA systems were developed for the detection of CPV-specific antibodies in dog sera. The ELISA's were based on the use of CPV-specif

  13. A novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen based on carbon quantum dots and signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nian-Lu; Jia, Li-Ping; Ma, Rong-Na; Jia, Wen-Li; Lu, Yi-Yang; Shi, Sha-Shan; Wang, Huai-Sheng

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed. The nanocomposite of polydopamine and Ag nanoparticles (PDA-AgNPs) was prepared by the redox reaction between Ag(+) and dopamine. This nanocomposite not only provided an effective matrix for the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1) but also enhanced the conductivity of the electrode. Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were immobilized on the poly(ethylenimine) functionalized graphene oxide (PEI-GO) through amido-bond. Then Au nanoparticles were decorated on the CQDs modified PEI-GO matrix, and the resulted complex AuNPs/CQDs-PEI-GO was introduced to link secondary antibody (Ab2). The CQDs can be connected to the electrode surface through the combination of CEA with Ab1 and Ab2, and then the amplified electrochemiluminescence signal of CQDs was obtained with the synergistic effect of AgNPs, polydopamine, AuNPs and PEI-GO. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL intensity was proportional to the logarithm value of CEA concentration in the linear range from 5pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.67pgmL(-1) for CEA detection. The immunosensor was applied for the CEA detection in real samples with satisfactory results. The proposed ECL immunosensor showed good performance with high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, stability and will be potential in clinical detection.

  14. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Song Zhang; Jun Xu; Guang-Hua Luo; Rong-Chao Wang; Jiang Zhu; Xiao-Ying Zhang; Peter Nilsson-Ehle; Ning Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more sensitive method for detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients during surgery and to evaluate its clinical significance.METHODS: The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA levels in peritoneal washes from 65 cases of gastric cancer were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Peritoneal lavage cytology (PLC) was applied simultaneously to detection of free cancer cells. Negative controls included peritoneal washes from 5 cases of benign gastric disease and blood samples from 5 adult healthy volunteers.RESULTS: There was no CEA mRNA in peritoneal washes from benign gastric disease patients and in blood of adult healthy volunteers. The positive percentage of free cancer cells detected by real-time RT-PCR was 47.7% and only 12.3% by PLC. The positive rate of CEA mRNA was significantly related with serosa invasion between peritoneal metastasis and stage of gastric cancer.CONCLUSION: Real-time RT-PCR is a sensitive and rapid method for the detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes. The presence of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes is related to the pathologic stage of gastric cancer.

  15. [Prokaryotic expression for fusion protein of human metapneumovirus and its preliminary application as an antigen for antibody detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ru-nan; Qian, Yuan; Zhao, Lin-qing; Sun, Yu; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang

    2011-03-01

    To understand the effectiveness of prokaryotic expression of fusion protein (F) of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and its application as antigen, F proteins from different genotypes of hMPV were expressed in prokaryotic expression system and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography column. According to the hydrophobicity, antigen index and surface probability of F protein, the subunit 1 (F1) region of F protein was generated and expressed in E. Coil. BL21(DE3). The 6-His-F1 proteins with molecular weight of approximately 37 kD generated from hMPV of two genotypes were expressed efficiently mainly in inclusion body. The antigenicity and specificity of the expressed proteins were tested and confirmed by Western Blot using polyclonal antibody against hMPV and one serum specimen from a patient with confirmed hMPV acute infection,and polyclonal antibodies against human respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 2 and 3. The results of preliminary use of the expressed proteins for detecting antibodies against hMPV in 457 serum specimens collected from different age groups in Beijing indicated that 66%-67% of sera in all age groups were positive. The positive rate of antibodies declined in children in age groups from birth to 2-year-old and then rose along with the increase in age, in which the lowest was in age group from 1 to 2-year-old and the highest in newborn and people older than 60 years. The data indicated the existence of maternal transferred antibodies against hMPV in infants and the risk of hMPV infections in children younger than 2 years old.

  16. Detection rate of prostate cancer using prostate specific antigen in patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavan P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Need for undertaking prostate biopsies for detection of prostate cancer is often decided on the basis of serum levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA. Aim: To evaluate the case detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS on the basis of PSA levels and to assess the scope of prostate biopsy in these patients. Setting and Design: A retrospective study from a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The clinical and histopathological data of 922 patients presenting with LUTS in the last five years was obtained from the medical record section. They had been screened for prostate cancer using PSA and /or digital rectal examination examination followed by confirmation with prostate biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used: Detection rate and receiver operating characteristic curve were performed using SPSS 16 and Medcalc softwares. Results: The detection rate of prostate cancer according to the PSA levels was 0.6%, 2.3%, 2.5%, 34.1% and 54.9% in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10, 10-20, 20-50 and> 50 ng/ml, respectively. Maximum prostate cancer cases were detected beyond a PSA value of 20 ng/ml whereas no significant difference in the detection rate was observed in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10 and 10-20 ng/ml. Conclusion: A low detection rate of prostate cancer observed in the PSA range of 4-20 ng/ml in LUTS patients indicates the need for use of higher cutoff values of PSA in such cases. Therefore we recommend a cutoff of 20 ng/ml of PSA for evaluation of detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with LUTS.

  17. Evaluation of vaginal pH for detection of bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Hemalatha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Bacterial vaginosis (BV is highly prevalent among women in reproductive age group. Little information exists on routine vaginal p H measurement in women with BV. We undertook this study to assess the utility of vaginal p H determination for initial evaluation of bacterial vaginosis. Methods : In this cross-sectional study vaginal swabs were collected from women with complaints of white discharge, back ache and pain abdomen attending a government hospital and a community health clinic, and subjected to vaginal p H determination, Gram stain, wet mount and whiff test. Nugent score and Amsel criteria were used for BV confirmation. Results : Of the 270 women included in the analysis, 154 had BV based on Nugents′ score. The mean vaginal p H in women with BV measured by p H strips and p H glove was 5 and 4.9, respectively. The vaginal p H was significantly higher in women with BV. Vaginal discharge was prevalent in 84.8 per cent women, however, only 56.8 per cent of these actually had BV by Nugent score (NS. Presence of clue cells and positive whiff test were significant for BV. Vaginal p H >4.5 by p H strips and p H Glove had a sensitivity of 72 and 79 per cent and specificity of 60 and 53 per cent, respectively to detect BV. Among the combination criteria, clue cells and glove p H >4.5 had highest sensitivity and specificity to detect BV. Interpretation & conclusions : Vaginal p H determination is relatively sensitive, but less specific in detecting women with BV. Inclusion of whiff test along with p H test reduced the sensitivity, but improved specificity. Both, the p H strip and p H glove are equally suitable for screening women with BV on outpatient basis.

  18. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-K; Jeun, M; Jang, H-J; Cho, W-J; Lee, K H

    2015-10-28

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL(-1)) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.

  19. Label- and amplification-free electrochemical detection of bacterial ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henihan, Grace; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Hardie, Alison; Campbell, Colin J; Walton, Anthony J; Crain, Jason; Pethig, Ronald; Templeton, Kate E; Mount, Andrew R; Bachmann, Till T

    2016-07-15

    Current approaches to molecular diagnostics rely heavily on PCR amplification and optical detection methods which have restrictions when applied to point of care (POC) applications. Herein we describe the development of a label-free and amplification-free method of pathogen detection applied to Escherichia coli which overcomes the bottleneck of complex sample preparation and has the potential to be implemented as a rapid, cost effective test suitable for point of care use. Ribosomal RNA is naturally amplified in bacterial cells, which makes it a promising target for sensitive detection without the necessity for prior in vitro amplification. Using fluorescent microarray methods with rRNA targets from a range of pathogens, an optimal probe was selected from a pool of probe candidates identified in silico. The specificity of probes was investigated on DNA microarray using fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA target. The probe yielding highest specificity performance was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and a LOD of 20 pM was achieved on fluorescent glass microarray. This probe was transferred to an EIS end point format and specificity which correlated to microarray data was demonstrated. Excellent sensitivity was facilitated by the use of uncharged PNA probes and large 16S rRNA target and investigations resulted in an LOD of 50 pM. An alternative kinetic EIS assay format was demonstrated with which rRNA could be detected in a species specific manner within 10-40min at room temperature without wash steps.

  20. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Carvalho, Lucas P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  1. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  2. Application of an indirect immunofluorescent staining method for detection of Salmonella enteritidis in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Yan; An-Chun Cheng; Ming-Shu Wang; Shu-Xuan Deng; Zhen-Hua Zhang; Nian-Chun Yin; Ping Cao; Sheng-Yan Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To detect Salmonella enteritidis (S.enteritidis)in paraffin slices and antigen location in infected duck tissues.METHODS:The rabbits were immunized with purified bacillus to obtain S.enteritidis-specific antibody,which were then extracted by the caprylic-ammonium sulphate method,purified through High-Q columns.An indirect immuno-fluorescent staining method (IFA) was established to detect the S.enteritidis antigen in paraffin slices.Detected S.enteritidis in each organ tissue of ducklings experimentally infected with S.enteritidis.RESULTS:The gland of Garder,heart,kidney,spleen,liver,brain,ileum,jejunum,bursa of Fabricius from S.enteritidis experimentally infected ducklings were positive or strongly positive,and the S.enteritidis antigen mainly distributed in the infected cell cytoplasm.CONCLUSION:IFA is an intuitioni/st,sensitive and specific method in detecting S.enteritidis antigen in paraffin wax slices,and it is a good method in diagnosis and antigen location of S.enteritidis.We also conclude that the gland of Garder,heart,kidney,spleen,liver,ileum,jejunum are target organs in S.enteritidis infections of duck,and S.enteritidis is an intracellular parasitic bacterium.

  3. Nile red detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones in a high-throughput format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Aukema, Kelly G; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2011-01-01

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones.

  4. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and dynamic laser speckle for detecting chemotactic responses at low bacterial concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenbaum, Melina; Sendra, Gonzalo Hernán; Gilbert, Gastón Alfredo Cerdá; Scagliola, Marcelo; González, Jorge Froilán; Murialdo, Silvia Elena

    2013-03-01

    We report on the biodegradation of pure hydrocarbons and chemotaxis towards these compounds by an isolated chlorophenol degrader, Pseudomonas strain H. The biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence identified Pseudomonas strain H as having 99.56% similarity with P. aeruginosa PA01. This strain was able to degrade n-hexadecane, 1-undecene, 1-nonene, 1-decene, 1-dodecene and kerosene. It grew in the presence of 1-octene, while this hydrocarbons is toxic to other hydrocarbons degraders. Pseudomonas strain H was also chemotactic towards n-hexadecane, kerosene, 1-undecene and 1-dodecene. These results show that this Pseudomonas strain H is an attractive candidate for hydrocarbon-containing wastewater bioremediation in controlled environments. Since the classical standard techniques for detecting chemotaxis are not efficient at low bacterial concentrations, we demonstrate the use of the dynamic speckle laser method, which is simple and inexpensive, to confirm bacterial chemotaxis at low cell concentrations (less than 10(5) colony-forming unit per millilitre (CFU/mL)) when hydrocarbons are the attractants.

  5. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and dynamic laser speckle for detecting chemotactic responses at low bacterial concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melina Nisenbaum; Gonzalo Hernán Sendra; Gastón Alfredo Cerdá Gilbert; Marcelo Scagliola; Jorge Froilán González; Silvia Elena Murialdo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the biodegradation of pure hydrocarbons and chemotaxis towards these compounds by an isolated chlorophenol degrader,Pseudomonas strain H.The biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence identified Pseudomonas strain H as having 99.56% similarity with P.aeruginosa PA01.This strain was able to degrade n-hexadecane,1-undecene,1-nonene,1-decene,1-dodecene and kerosene.It grew in the presence of 1-octene,while this hydrocarbons is toxic to other hydrocarbons degraders.Pseudomonas strain H was also chemotactic towards n-hexadecane,kerosene,1-undecene and 1-dodecene.These results show that this Pseudomonas strain H is an attractive candidate for hydrocarbon-containing wastewater bioremediation in controlled environments.Since the classical standard techniques for detecting chemotaxis are not efficient at low bacterial concentrations,we demonstrate the use of the dynamic speckle laser method,which is simple and inexpensive,to confirm bacterial chemotaxis at low cell concentrations (less than 105 colony-forming unit per millilitre (CFU/mL)) when hydrocarbons are the attractants.

  6. Beetroot-pigment-derived colorimetric sensor for detection of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Christina Pires Gonçalves

    Full Text Available In this proof-of-concept study, we describe the use of the main red beet pigment betanin for the quantification of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores, including Bacillus anthracis. In the presence of europium(III ions, betanin is converted to a water-soluble, non-luminescent orange 1∶1 complex with a stability constant of 1.4 × 10(5 L mol(-1. The addition of calcium dipicolinate, largely found in bacterial spores, changes the color of the aqueous solution of [Eu(Bn(+] from orange to magenta. The limit of detection (LOD of calcium dipicolinate is around 2.0 × 10(-6 mol L(-1 and the LOD determined for both spores, B. cereus and B. anthracis, is (1.1 ± 0.3× 10(6 spores mL(-1. This simple, green, fast and low cost colorimetric assay was selective for calcium dipicolinate when compared to several analogous compounds. The importance of this work relies on the potential use of betalains, raw natural pigments, as colorimetric sensors for biological applications.

  7. Recent Developments in Antibody-Based Assays for the Detection of Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv, as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube, for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC, which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT, will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  8. Recent developments in antibody-based assays for the detection of bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  9. Utility of Aspergillus antigen detection in specimens other than serum specimens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klont, R.R.; Mennink-Kersten, M.A.S.H.; Verweij, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The detection of circulating galactomannan in serum is an important tool for the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. A commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Platelia Aspergillus; BioRad) was shown to be both highly sensitive and specific for detection of galactomannan in serum samples

  10. Mini-Array of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens to Enhance Autoantibody Detection for Immunodiagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Liver cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is particularly prevalent in Africa and Asia. HCC affects the Hispanic population of the United States at a rate double that of the white population. The majority of people with HCC will die within 1 year of its detection. This high case-fatality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. How to establish a methodology to identify the high-risk individuals for HCC remains to be investigated. The multi-factorial and multi-step nature in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies to identify markers which will be useful for early detection of cancer. Our recent studies demonstrated that a mini-array of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) might enhance autoantibody detection for diagnosis of HCC, especially for the alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-negative cases. It also suggested that different types of cancer might require different panels of TAAs to achieve the sensitivity and specificity required to make immunodiagnosis a feasible adjunct to tumor diagnosis. PMID:17289549

  11. Detection of DR antigen on leukemic cells from a patient suffering from adult T-cell leukemia and progressive systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizushima,Keiichi

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available This report concerns an unusual case of adult T cell leukemia (ATL complicated with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS. The surface markers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM and lymph node cells, both of which mainly consisted of leukemic cells, were examined. The effect of these cells on the pokeweed mitogen (PWM-induced IgG synthesis by normal PBM also was studied. The leukemic cells formed rosettes with sheep red blood cells (SRBC; E and expressed T cell antigen, Leu-1, and DR antigen. The detection of cell surface antigens was carried out by employing monoclonal antibodies against these antigens. We diagnosed this case as DR positive ATL. In terms of the immunoregulatory function of these leukemic cells, the co-culture experiments showed that these cells had some suppressive effect on the PWM-induced IgG production by allogeneic normal PBM.

  12. Profiling and quantitation of bacterial carotenoids by liquid chromatography and photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelis, H J; De Leenheer, A P

    1989-12-01

    An analytical method for the profiling and quantitative determination of carotenoids in bacteria is described. Exhaustive extraction of the pigments from four selected bacterial strains required treatment of the cells with potassium hydroxide or liquefied phenol or both before the addition of the extracting solvent (methanol or diethyl ether). The carotenoids in the extracts were separated by nonaqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography in conjunction with photodiode array absorption detection. The identity of a peak was considered definitive only when both its retention time and absorption spectrum, before and after chemical reactions, matched those of a reference component. In the absence of the latter, most peaks could be tentatively identified. Two examples illustrate how in the analysis of pigmented bacteria errors may result from using nonchromatographic procedures or liquid chromatographic methods lacking sufficient criteria for peak identification. Carotenoids of interest were determined quantitatively when the authentic reference substance was available or, alternatively, were determined semiquantitatively.

  13. Immunofluorescent Staining for the Detection of the Hepatitis B Core Antigen in Frozen Liver Sections of Human Liver Chimeric Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allweiss, Lena; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Dandri, Maura

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the causative agent for chronic hepatitis B infection, which affects an estimate of 240 million people worldwide and puts them at risk of developing terminal liver disease. The life cycle of the virus and its interactions with the host immune system are still incompletely understood, and currently available treatment options rarely achieve a cure. Therefore, basic research and new drug development are needed. One parameter for measuring the intrahepatic activity of the virus is monitoring the production of the HBV core antigen (HBcAg), which not only serves as the main structural protein of its nucleocapsid but is also recruited to the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the nuclear HBV genome responsible for infection persistence. Here, we report a sensitive immunofluorescence staining method to detect HBcAg in cryopreserved liver sections. The method combines conventional immunofluorescence staining procedures with the Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) system.

  14. Detection of Antibodies against Hydatid Cyst Fluid Antigens Using Immunoblot Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Jalosian

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immunoblot is recognized as a sensitive and specific serological method for diagnosis of human hydatidosis. To analyze the reactivity of hydatid patients sera with the subunits of 2 major hydatid cyst fluid antigens, ( 5 and B immunoblot method was used. Material & Methods:In this regard, 100 sera ,of which 40 sera from patients with surgically diagnosed hydatidosis, 20 sera from patients with parasitic disease other than hydatidosis, 20 sera from patients other than parasitic disease, and 20 sera from healthy controls were examined. Results: For 3 subunits of Ag B (12, 16, 20 kD the sensitivities were 92.5%, 84.5% and 87.5% respectively and their specificity for all of the 3 subunits was 100%. For 2 subunits of Ag 5, (55, 65 kD the sensitivity was 100% and the specificities were 100% and 90% respectively . Conclusion: The results indicated that the best subunit for hydatidosis diagnosis is the 55 kD subunit of Ag 5. Meanwhile, a lower reactivity (84.5% of all hydatid sera was observed with 16 kD subunits of Ag B.

  15. Detection of human leukocyte antigen compatibility and antibodies in liver transplantation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Qin Meng; Xuan Zhang; Jun Fan; Lin Zhou; Bing Hao; Xiao-Ming Chen; Wei-Hang Ma; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The exact roles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in acute rejection of liver transplants are not clear. Moreover, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, one of the most common infections after transplantation, is related to HLA genotype and the incidence of acute rejection. METHODS: Since there are controversial reports, we analyzed the impact of HLA matching, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in 38 liver transplant recipients in China, and assessed the association of CMV infection and HLA compatibility. RESULTS: The frequency of no HLA compatibility was high in patients without antigenemia (P=0.019). All 17 patients with HLA-A matching developed antigenemia (P0.05). In patients with acute rejection, no differences were found in the incidence of acute rejection in transplants for hepatitis B, tumors, or combined hepatitis B and tumors (P>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: There are fewer acute rejections in transplants with more HLA compatibilities. Speciifc investigations of underlying diseases and HLA typing may be necessary in liver transplantation. The mechanisms of CMV infection and HLA matching should be further studied. HLA before transplantation should be examined for the prevention of acute rejection and CMV infection.

  16. Airborne bacterial spore counts by terbium-enhanced luminescence detection: pitfalls and real values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyang; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Temkins, Henry K

    2008-04-15

    Bacterial spore determination by terbium(III)-dipicolinate luminescence has been reported by several investigators. We collected spore samples with a cyclone and extracted dipicolinic acid (DPA) in-line with hot aqueous dodecylamine, added Tb(III) in a continuous-flow system and detected the Tb(III)-DPA with a gated liquid core waveguide fluorescence detector with a flashlamp excitation source. The absolute limit of detection (LOD) for the system was equivalent to 540 B. subtilis spores (for a 1.8 m3 sample volume (t = 2 h, Q = 15 L/min), concentration LOD is 0.3 spores/L air). Extant literature suggests that, from office to home settings, viable spore concentrations range from 0.1 to 10 spores/L; however, these data have never been validated. Previously reported semiautomated instrumentation had an LOD of 50 spores/L. The present system was tested at five different location settings in Lubbock, Texas. The apparent bacterial spore concentrations ranged from 9 to 700 spores/L and only occasionally exhibited the same trend as the simultaneously monitored total optical particle counts in the > or = 0.5 microm size fraction. However, because the apparent spore counts sometimes were very large relative to the 0.5+ microm size particle counts, we investigated potential positive interferences. We show that aromatic acids are very likely large interferents. This interference typically constitutes approximately 70% of the signal and can be as high as 95%. It can be completely removed by prewashing the particles.

  17. Construction and application of riboswitch-based sensors that detect metabolites within bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Casey C; Li, Yingfu

    2014-01-01

    A riboswitch is an RNA element that detects the level of a specific metabolite within the cell and regulates the expression of co-transcribed genes. By fusing a riboswitch to a reporter protein in a carefully designed and tested construct, this ability can be exploited to create an intracellular sensor that detects the level of a particular small molecule within live bacterial cells. There is a great deal of flexibility in the design of such a sensor and factors such as the molecule to be detected and the downstream experiments in which the sensor will be applied should guide the specific blueprint of the final construct. The completed sensor plasmid needs to be rigorously tested with appropriate controls to ensure that its dynamic range, signal strength, sensitivity and specificity are suitable for its intended applications. In this chapter, methods for the design, assessment and use of riboswitch sensors are provided along with those for one example application for which riboswitch sensors are ideally suited.

  18. Preparation of Pd/Bacterial Cellulose Hybrid Nanofibers for Dopamine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Palladium nanoparticle-bacterial cellulose (PdBC hybrid nanofibers were synthesized by in-situ chemical reduction method. The obtained PdBC nanofibers were characterized by a series of analytical techniques. The results revealed that Pd nanoparticles were evenly dispersed on the surfaces of BC nanofibers. Then, the as-prepared PdBC nanofibers were mixed with laccase (Lac and Nafion to obtain mixture suspension, which was further modified on electrode surface to construct novel biosensing platform. Finally, the prepared electrochemical biosensor was employed to detect dopamine. The analysis result was satisfactory, the sensor showed excellent electrocatalysis towards dopamine with high sensitivity (38.4 µA·mM−1, low detection limit (1.26 µM, and wide linear range (5–167 µM. Moreover, the biosensor also showed good repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and stability and was successfully used in the detection of dopamine in human urine, thus providing a promising method for dopamine analysis in clinical application.

  19. Comparison of Two Suspension Arrays for Simultaneous Detection of Five Biothreat Bacterial in Powder Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic “write powder” samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples.

  20. Miniaturized bacterial biosensor system for arsenic detection holds great promise for making integrated measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffi, Nina; Merulla, Davide; Beutier, Julien; Barbaud, Fanny; Beggah, Siham; van Lintel, Harald; Renaud, Philippe; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2011-01-01

    Combining bacterial bioreporters with microfluidics systems holds great promise for in-field detection of chemical or toxicity targets. Recently we showed how Escherichia coli cells engineered to produce a variant of green fluorescent protein after contact to arsenite and arsenate can be encapsulated in agarose beads and incorporated into a microfluidic chip to create a device for in-field detection of arsenic, a contaminant of well known toxicity and carcinogenicity in potable water both in industrialized and developing countries. Cell-beads stored in the microfluidics chip at -20°C retained inducibility up to one month and we were able to reproducibly discriminate concentrations of 10 and 50 μg arsenite per L (the drinking water standards for European countries and the United States, and for the developing countries, respectively) from the blank in less than 200 minutes. We discuss here the reasons for decreasing bioreporter signal development upon increased storage of cell beads but also show how this decrease can be reduced, leading to a faster detection and a longer lifetime of the device.

  1. Evaluation of dengue NS1 antigen detection for diagnosis in public health laboratories, São Paulo State, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivani Bisordi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of detection of Dengue NS1 antigen employing two NS1 assays, an immunochromatographic assay and ELISA, in the diagnostic routine of Public Health laboratories. The results obtained with NS1 assay were compared with virus isolation and, in a subpopulation of cases, they were compared with the IgM-ELISA results obtained with convalescent samples. A total of 2,321 sera samples were analyzed by one of two NS1 techniques from March to October 2009. The samples were divided into five groups: groups I, II and III included samples tested by NS1 and virus isolation, and groups IV and V included patients with a first sample tested by NS1 and a second sample tested by IgM-ELISA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, Kappa Index and Kappa Concordance were calculated. The results showed that NS1 testing in groups I, II and III had high sensitivity (98.0%, 99.5% and 99.3%, and predictive values and Kappa index between 0.9 - 1.0. Groups IV and V only had Kappa Concordance calculated, since the samples were analyzed according to the presence of NS1 antigen or IgM antibody. Concordance of 92.1% was observed when comparing the results of NS1-negative samples with IgM-ELISA. Based on the findings, it is possible to suggest that the tests for NS1 detection may be important tools for monitoring the introduction and spread of Dengue serotypes.

  2. Specific Antibodies for the Detection of Alternaria Allergens and the Identification of Cross-Reactive Antigens in Other Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twaroch, Teresa E.; Curin, Mirela; Sterflinger, Katja; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Swoboda, Ines; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Background The mould Alternaria alternata is an important source of respiratory allergens. A. alternata extracts show great variations regarding allergenic potency. The aim of this study was to generate antibody probes specific for important Alternaria allergens and to use them to study allergen expression, depending on different culture conditions, as well as to search for cross-reactive allergens in other mould species. Methods Synthetic peptides from antigenic regions of A. alternata allergens (Alt a 1, Alt a 2, Alt a 3, Alt a 6 and Alt a 8) were used to raise highly specific rabbit antibodies. These antibodies and IgE from allergic patients were used to detect allergens by immunoblotting in extracts of 4 A. alternata strains grown under varying culturing conditions, in commercial skin-prick extracts and in closely (Cladosporium herbarum and Aureobasidium pullulans) or distantly related (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum) mould species. Results There was a wide variation of expression of the individual A. Alternata allergens, depending on the strain and culture conditions, but the antibody probes allowed us to distinguish strains and culture conditions with low and high allergen expression. In the commercial skin-prick solutions, varying levels of Alt a 1 were found, but no other allergens were detectable. Alt a 1 was identified as species-specific A. Alternata allergen, whereas Alt a 3, 6- and Alt a 8-cross-reactive antigens were found in C. herbarum and/or A. pullulans. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Peptide-specific antibodies are useful to analyze diagnostic and therapeutic mould extracts, to study the presence of A. Alternata allergens in biological samples and to search for cross-reactive allergens in other mould species. PMID:27780168

  3. Immunohistochemical detection of SWC3, CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD8 antigens in paraformaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded porcine lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tingstedt, Jens Erik; Tornehave, Ditte; Lind, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    porcine tissue sections using the highly sensitive tyramide signal amplification system. Combining this method with different antigen retrieval techniques enabled us to detect CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8 and SWC3 antigen expressing cells in porcine lymphoid tissue. Thus, we describe herein methods......Identification of the different cell types of the immune system is important for in situ studies on the pathogenesis of infectious diseases in various animals, including the pig. Unfortunately, many monoclonal anti-leukocyte antibodies are only useful for staining frozen tissue sections...... for the detection of several major cell types of the porcine immune system in fixed tissue with optimal preservation of histological details....

  4. Comparative study of methods of detection of hepatitis ′B′ surface antigen (HBsAg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parab V

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available The serum samples were collected from 52 patients of acute viral hepatitis and 235 hospital staff from Kasturba Hospital for Infectious Diseases. HBsAg was detected in their sera by counter-immuno-electrophoresis (CIEP, reverse passive hemogglutination (RPHA and by micro-enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique. Among the patients, HBsAg was detected in 12 cases (23% by CIEP, in 18 cases (34% by RPHA and in 23 patients (45% by ELISA. In the hospital staff, HBsAg was detected in 4 samples (1.7% by CIEP, in 8 samples (3.5% by RPHA and in 32 samples (13.5% by ELISA. Thus ELISA was found to be the most sensitive technique in detecting HBsAg.

  5. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  6. Antigens of worms and eggs showed a differentiated detection of specific IgG according to the time of Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Fortini Queiroz Grenfell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The correlation between the immunological assay and the antibody titer can offer a tool for the experimental analysis of different phases of the disease. METHODS: Two simple immunological assays for Schistosoma mansoni in mice sera samples based on specific IgG detection for worms soluble antigens and eggs soluble antigens were standardized and evaluated in our laboratory. Fifty mice were used in negative and positive groups and the results obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA assays were compared with the number of worms counted and the IgG titers at different times of infection. RESULTS: Data showed that ELISA using adult worm antigens (ELISA-SWAP presented a satisfactory correlation between the absorbance value of IgG titers and the individual number of worms counted after perfusion technique (R²=0.62. In addition, ELISA-SWAP differentially detected positive samples with 30 and 60 days post infection (p=0.011 and 0.003, respectively, whereas ELISA using egg antigens (ELISA-SEA detected samples after 140 days (p=0.03. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that the use of different antigens in immunological methods can be used as potential tools for the analysis of the chronological evolution of S. mansoni infection in murine schistosomiasis. Correlations with human schistosomiasis are discussed.

  7. DETECTION OF HELICOBACTER ANTIGEN IN STOOL SAMPLES AND ITS RELATION TO H. PYLORI POSITIVE CHOLECYSTITIS IN EGYPTIAN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CALCULAR CHOLECYSTITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ehsan H; Gerges, Shawkat S; Ahmed, Rehab; Mostafa, Zeinab M; Al-Hamid, Hager Abd; Abd El-Galil, Heba; Thabet, Suzan

    2015-12-01

    Evidences supporting the association between H. pylori infection and chronic cholecystitis could be found by using direct culture or staining of H. pylori in gallbladder tissues as well as indirect techniques. Stool antigen test has been widely used due to its noninvasive nature. Various stool antigen tests were developed to detect H. pylori using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) based on monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies This study evaluated the frequency of H. pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis as regard gall bladder histopathological changes. Fifty patients were included presented with symptomatic qholecystolithiasis recruited from the outpatient clinic of National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute during 2014-2015. Full history and clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography were performed. Stool samples were collected, prepared and examined for detection of H. pylori antigen. Cholecystectomy was done for all patients; 45 patients (90%) by laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and 5 patients (10%) by open surgery and removed gallbladders were submitted to pathology department for detection of H. pylori in tissue under microscope using Giemsa stain. The results showed that (82%) were females with mean age (42.6 +/- 1 years). The mean BMI was (29 + 7.2) H. pylori-specific antigen in stool samples was detected in 40% of patients and 38% were detected in patients; tissue, with significant correlation between H. pylori-specific antigen in stool and in tissue. Histopathological pictures infection in tissue were 68.4% mucosal erosions, 63.2% mucosal atrophy, 57.9% mucosal hyperplasia, 26.3% metaplasia, 42.1% musculosa hypertrophy, 26.3% fibrosis, but lymphoid aggregates were in 42.1% of cases.

  8. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Kailash P; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L; Rolán, Hortensia G; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Tsolis, Renee M; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases.

  9. Detection of Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Using Quantum-Dot-Based Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Larré

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are a new class of fluorescent labeling for biological and biomedical applications. In this study, we detected prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA expression correlated with tumor grade and stage in human prostate cancer by QDs-based immunolabeling and conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC, and evaluated the sensitivity and stability of QDs-based immunolabeling in comparison with IHC. Our data revealed that increasing levels of PSCA expression accompanied advanced tumor grade (QDs labeling, r = 0.732, p < 0.001; IHC, r = 0.683, p < 0.001 and stage (QDs labeling, r = 0.514, p = 0.001; IHC, r = 0.432, p = 0.005, and the similar tendency was detected by the two methods. In addition, by comparison between the two methods, QDs labeling was consistent with IHC in detecting the expression of PSCA in human prostate tissue correlated with different pathological types (K = 0.845, p < 0.001. During the observation time, QDs exhibited superior stability. The intensity of QDs fluorescence remained stable for two weeks (p = 0.083 after conjugation to the PSCA protein, and nearly 93% of positive expression with their fluorescence still could be seen after four weeks.

  10. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changhua; Mao, Mao [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Yuan, Hang [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Shen, Huaibin [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Wu, Feng; Ma, Lan, E-mail: malan@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46-103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 Degree-Sign C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

  11. An easy and sensitive sandwich assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using quantum dots and gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Eun Bee; Lee, Seung Woo; Cheon, Seon Ah; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jaebeom; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ko, Sungho; Park, Tae Jung

    2017-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a serious global infectious pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). The development of an easy and sensitive method for the detection of M. tuberculosis is in urgent need due to complex and low specificity of the current assays. Herein, we present a novel method for M. tuberculosis detection based on a sandwich assay via antigen-antibody interaction using silica-coated quantum dots (SiQDs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs). A genetically engineered recombinant antibody (GBP-50B14 and SiBP-8B3) was bound to surfaces of AuNRs and SiQDs respectively, without any surface modification. The antigen-antibody interaction was revealed using M. tuberculosis-specific secretory antigen, Ag85B. Two biocomplexes showed a quenching effect in the presence of the target antigen through a sandwich assay. The assay response was in the range of 1×10(-3)-1×10(-10)μgmL(-1) (R=0.969) and the limit of detection for Ag85B was 13.0pgmL(-1). The Ag85B was selectively detected using three different proteins (CFP10, and BSA), and further specifically confirmed by the use of spiked samples. Compared with existing methods, a highly sensitive and selective method for Ag85B-expressing M. tuberculosis detection has been developed for better diagnosis of TB.

  12. Detection of nuclear and membrane antigens by liquid-based cytology following long-term storage of d1 cells, karpas cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Aiello, Francesca B; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Procopio, Antonio D; Durum, Scott K; Conti, Pio; Rosini, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is the most frequently utilized technique to analyze protein expression. Fixed immunofluorescent cell suspensions, however, can only be stored for a week. We investigated whether liquid-based cytology could be used to detect antigens in cultured cells after a long storage period. Murine and human cells were fixed in PreservCyt solution, stored for various periods, and then used to perform an automated immunocytochemical analysis. Phosphorylation of the nuclear transcription factor Stat-5 induced by IL-7 was detected up to 4 months after IL-7 stimulation. Simultaneous nuclear positivity for the proliferation index MIB-1 and membrane positivity for the CD30 antigen were evident three months after fixation. Liquid-based cytology thus ensures long-lasting nuclear and membrane antigen immunoreactivity and permits the storage of cells from laborious experiments at room temperature for future analyses.

  13. Rapid detection and identification of bacterial pathogens by using an ATP bioluminescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Dawn M; Lim, Daniel V

    2010-04-01

    Rapid identification of viable bacterial contaminants in food products is important because of their potential to cause disease. This study examined a method for microbial detection by using a combined ATP bioluminescence immunoassay. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were selected as target organisms because of their implication in foodborne illness. Various matrices containing the target cells were examined, including ground beef homogenate, apple juice, milk, and phosphate-buffered saline. Specific antibodies were immobilized on the surface of 96-well plates, and then the sample matrices containing target cells in the wells were incubated. Sample matrix (no cells) was used to establish background. The plates were washed, and the wells were incubated with BacTiter-Glo reagent in Mueller-Hinton II broth. Bioluminescent output was measured with the GloMax 96 luminometer. Signal-to-noise ratios were calculated, resulting in a limit of detection of 10(4) CFU/ml for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. The limit of detection for both species was not affected by the presence of nontarget cells. The various sample matrices did not affect signal-to-noise ratios when E. coli O157:H7 was the target. A weak matrix effect was observed when Salmonella Typhimurium was the target. A strong linear correlation was observed between the number of cells and luminescent output over 4 orders of magnitude for both species. This method provides a means of simultaneously detecting and identifying viable pathogens in complex matrices, and could have wider application in food microbiology.

  14. Detection of antigen in sera of patients with invasive aspergillosis : Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, PE; Erjavec, Z; Sluiters, W; Goessens, W; Rozenberg-Arska, M; Debets-Ossenkopp, YJ; Guiot, HFL; Meis, JFGM

    1998-01-01

    The intra-and interlaboratory reproducibilities of a commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Aspergillus galactomannan in serum (Platelia Aspergillus; Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur, Marnes-La-Coquette, France) were evaluated in six laboratories of university h

  15. Parallel detection of antigen-specific T-cell responses by multidimensional encoding of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Bakker, Arnold H; Shu, Chengyi J

    2009-01-01

    The use of fluorescently labeled major histocompatibility complex multimers has become an essential technique for analyzing disease- and therapy-induced T-cell immunity. Whereas classical major histocompatibility complex multimer analyses are well-suited for the detection of immune responses to a...

  16. Parallel detection of antigen-specific T cell responses by combinatorial encoding of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Kvistborg, Pia; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch;

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional combinatorial matrix, these eight fluorochromes are combined to generate 28 unique two-color codes. By the use of combinatorial encoding, a large number of different T cell populations can be detected in a single sample. The method can be used for T cell epitope mapping, and also for the monitoring of CD8...

  17. Detection of soluble tumor-associated antigens in sera and effusions using novel monoclonal antibodies, KL-3 and KL-6, against lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, N; Akiyama, M; Kyoizumi, S; Hakoda, M; Kobuke, K; Yamakido, M

    1988-09-01

    Two novel monoclonal antibodies, KL-3 (IgM) and KL-6 (IgG1), which can detect soluble antigens in sera and effusions (molecular weights greater than 1,000 K) were produced against human pulmonary adenocarcinoma VMRC-LCR cells. KL-3 and KL-6 antibodies reacted with asialo- and sialo-carbohydrate antigenic determinants, respectively. Both carbohydrate epitopes appear, from competitive inhibition studies, to be different from Lex, Ley, sialyl Lea and sialyl Lexi which were recognized with FH2, AH6, NS19-9 and FH6 antibodies, respectively. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, elevated KL-6 antigen levels were frequently observed in the sera of patients with lung adenocarcinoma [52% (17/33)], pancreatic cancer [44% (4/9)] and breast cancer [40% (8/20)], but infrequently in the sera of patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma [18% (4/22)], lung small cell carcinoma [8% (1/13)], gastric cancer [0% (0/19)], colorectal cancer [0% (0/8)] and hepatocellular cancer [13% (1/8)]. The levels and positive rates of serum KL-6 antigen increased with the progression of clinical stage of lung adenocarcinoma. In pleural effusions, the prevalences of lung adenocarcinoma cases with elevated levels of KL-3 and KL-6 antigens were 76% (13/17) and 82% (14/17), respectively. These monoclonal antibodies can define novel soluble antigens in sera and effusions which could be useful in tumor diagnoses and for monitoring tumor progression.

  18. Study on immunopathogenic effect of bacterial protein antigen and the cytolytic toxin antigen of vibrio vulnificus in BALB / c Mice%创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原对BALB/c小鼠的免疫病理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵明; 钟碧玲; 陈艳宇; 李亦明; 申洪

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原对Vv感染小鼠的免疫保护作用,以期为Vv防治提供实验数据.方法 制作创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原,免疫BALB/c小鼠后观察免疫状态改变及其对Vv感染小鼠的免疫保护效应.结果 免疫后小鼠实验组CD19+B淋巴细胞百分比高于对照组,并产生相应特异性抗体,效价最高达1∶25600,创伤弧菌攻击实验实验组小鼠存活率为100%,显著高于对照组的13.33%.结论 创伤弧菌菌体抗原及溶细胞毒素蛋白抗原主动免疫能产生特异性抗体,能够有效对抗创伤弧菌感染,并明显提高小鼠的存活率.%Objective To investigate whether Vibrio vulnificus bacterial protein antigen and the cytolytic toxin antigen can induce the effective immune protection against Vibrio vulnificus infection.Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with bacterial cytolytic toxin antigen protein antigen of Vibrio vulnificus to evaluate its ability to stimulate immune response.The protective efficacy of immunized mice was evaluated by active immunization and intraperitoneal challenge with V.vulnificus in mice.Results The immunized mice produced higher percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes and high level specific antibodies (titers up to 1∶25600).All immunized mice survived from lethal challenge with V.vulnificus,while only 13.33% of mice in control group survived at the end of challenged experiment.Conclusions The bacterial protein antigen and cytolytic toxin antigen of Vibrio vulnificus are capable of inducing specific antibody response in mice to confer effective protection against lethal challenge with V.vulnificus.

  19. Detection of NASBA amplified bacterial tmRNA molecules on SLICSel designed microarray probes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scheler, Ott

    2011-02-28

    Abstract Background We present a comprehensive technological solution for bacterial diagnostics using tmRNA as a marker molecule. A robust probe design algorithm for microbial detection microarray is implemented. The probes were evaluated for specificity and, combined with NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification) amplification, for sensitivity. Results We developed a new web-based program SLICSel for the design of hybridization probes, based on nearest-neighbor thermodynamic modeling. A SLICSel minimum binding energy difference criterion of 4 kcal\\/mol was sufficient to design of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA specific microarray probes. With lower binding energy difference criteria, additional hybridization specificity tests on the microarray were needed to eliminate non-specific probes. Using SLICSel designed microarray probes and NASBA we were able to detect S. pneumoniae tmRNA from a series of total RNA dilutions equivalent to the RNA content of 0.1-10 CFU. Conclusions The described technological solution and both its separate components SLICSel and NASBA-microarray technology independently are applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics.

  20. Hexokinase Is an Innate Immune Receptor for the Detection of Bacterial Peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrea J; Reyes, Christopher N; Liang, Wenbin; Becker, Courtney; Shimada, Kenichi; Wheeler, Matthew L; Cho, Hee Cheol; Popescu, Narcis I; Coggeshall, K Mark; Arditi, Moshe; Underhill, David M

    2016-07-28

    Degradation of Gram-positive bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in macrophage and dendritic cell phagosomes leads to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex that regulates processing and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. While many inflammatory responses to peptidoglycan are mediated by detection of its muramyl dipeptide component in the cytosol by NOD2, we report here that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is caused by release of N-acetylglucosamine that is detected in the cytosol by the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase. Inhibition of hexokinase by N-acetylglucosamine causes its dissociation from mitochondria outer membranes, and we found that this is sufficient to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, we observed that glycolytic inhibitors and metabolic conditions affecting hexokinase function and localization induce inflammasome activation. While previous studies have demonstrated that signaling by pattern recognition receptors can regulate metabolic processes, this study shows that a metabolic enzyme can act as a pattern recognition receptor. PAPERCLIP.

  1. Detection and identification of putative bacterial endosymbionts and endogenous viruses in tick cell lines☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, M. Pilar; Dalby, Matthew J.; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    As well as being vectors of many viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, ticks harbour a variety of microorganisms which are not known to be pathogenic for vertebrate hosts. Continuous cell lines established from ixodid and argasid ticks could be infected with such endosymbiotic bacteria and endogenous viruses, but to date very few cell lines have been examined for their presence. DNA and RNA extracted from over 50 tick cell lines deposited in the Roslin Wellcome Trust Tick Cell Biobank (http://tickcells.roslin.ac.uk) were screened for presence of bacteria and RNA viruses, respectively. Sequencing of PCR products amplified using pan-16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of DNA sequences from bacterial endosymbionts in several cell lines derived from Amblyomma and Dermacentor spp. ticks. Identification to species level was attempted using Rickettsia- and Francisella-specific primers. Pan-Nairovirus primers amplified PCR products of uncertain specificity in cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma, Ixodes, Carios, and Ornithodoros spp. ticks. Further characterisation attempted with primers specific for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus segments confirmed the absence of this arbovirus in the cells. A set of pan-Flavivirus primers did not detect endogenous viruses in any of the cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of endogenous reovirus-like viruses in many of the cell lines; only 4 of these lines gave positive results with primers specific for the tick Orbivirus St Croix River virus, indicating that there may be additional, as yet undescribed ‘tick-only’ viruses inhabiting tick cell lines. PMID:22743047

  2. Detection and identification of putative bacterial endosymbionts and endogenous viruses in tick cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, M Pilar; Dalby, Matthew J; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Fazakerley, John K; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-06-01

    As well as being vectors of many viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, ticks harbour a variety of microorganisms which are not known to be pathogenic for vertebrate hosts. Continuous cell lines established from ixodid and argasid ticks could be infected with such endosymbiotic bacteria and endogenous viruses, but to date very few cell lines have been examined for their presence. DNA and RNA extracted from over 50 tick cell lines deposited in the Roslin Wellcome Trust Tick Cell Biobank (http://tickcells.roslin.ac.uk) were screened for presence of bacteria and RNA viruses, respectively. Sequencing of PCR products amplified using pan-16S rRNA primers revealed the presence of DNA sequences from bacterial endosymbionts in several cell lines derived from Amblyomma and Dermacentor spp. ticks. Identification to species level was attempted using Rickettsia- and Francisella-specific primers. Pan-Nairovirus primers amplified PCR products of uncertain specificity in cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma, Ixodes, Carios, and Ornithodoros spp. ticks. Further characterisation attempted with primers specific for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus segments confirmed the absence of this arbovirus in the cells. A set of pan-Flavivirus primers did not detect endogenous viruses in any of the cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of endogenous reovirus-like viruses in many of the cell lines; only 4 of these lines gave positive results with primers specific for the tick Orbivirus St Croix River virus, indicating that there may be additional, as yet undescribed 'tick-only' viruses inhabiting tick cell lines.

  3. Electrochemical Detecting Lung Cancer-Associated Antigen Based on Graphene-Gold Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a Au nanoparticle/reduced graphene oxide composite (AuNP-RGO, a signal-enhanced electrochemical immunosensor without label was created to detect neuron-specific enolase (NSE. Furthermore, an environmentally-friendly method was developed to prepare AuNP-RGO by employing chitosan (CS, which served as reducing and stabilizing agent. We showed that the sensitivity of the immunosensor designed in this report was remarkably enhanced because of the numerous active sites in the sensor provided by the AuNP-RGO nanostructure. For the quantification of NSE, the immunosensor exhibited a positive linear relationship with the concentration in the range of 0.1 to 2000 ng/mL, where the limit of the detection was 0.05 ng/mL.

  4. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    Damage of target cells by cytotoxicity, either mediated by specific lymphocytes or via antibody-dependent reactions, may play a decisive role in causing the central nervous system (CNS) lesions seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Relevant epitopes, antibodies towards these epitopes and a reliable...... assay are all mandatory parts in detection and evaluation of the pertinence of such cytotoxicity reactions. We have adapted a flow cytometry assay detecting CD107a expression on the surface of cytotoxic effector cells to be applicable for analyses of the effect on target cells from MS patients...... on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env- and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) -assays. Rituximab® (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used...

  5. Evaluation of alpha-tubulin as an antigenic and molecular probe to detect Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Shin, Myeong Heon; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Park, Soon-Jung

    2009-09-01

    The alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimer is the basic subunit of microtubules in eukaryotes. Polyclonal antibodies specific to recombinant alpha-tubulin of Giardia lamblia were made, and found effective as a probe to specifically detect G. lamblia by immunofluorescence assays. Nucleotide sequences of alpha-tubulin genes were compared between G. lamblia WB and GS strains, prototypes of assemblage A and assemblage B, respectively. A set of primers was designed and used to amplify a portion of the alpha-tubulin gene from G. lamblia. PCR-RFLP analysis of this alpha-tubulin PCR product successfully differentiated G. lamblia into 2 distinct groups, assemblages A and B. The results indicate that alpha-tubulin can be used as a molecular probe to detect G. lamblia.

  6. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    CYP1B1 ), each overexpressed in >90% of invasive breast cancers but rarely found in normal tissue -- may fill this gap. Such targets, if found at...hTERT and CYP1B1 provide an opportunity for both early detection and cancer vaccination. Objective/Hypothesis: We hypothesize that immunologic responses...in ductal lavage fluid from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers The last year has been spent studying genetic polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  7. Value of carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratins for the detection of recurrent disease following curative resection of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luís C Fernandes; Su B Kim; Sarhan S Saad; Delcio Matos

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative serial assay of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratins for the detection of recurrent disease in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma after radical surgery.METHODS: Between 1993 and 2000, 120 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent radical surgery in the Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Federal University of Sao Paulo-Escola Paulista de Medicina,Sao Paulo, Brazil. Periodic postoperative evaluation was performed by assaying markers in peripheral serum,colonoscopy and imaging examination. Presence of CEA was detected using the Delfia(R) method with 5 μg/L threshold, and cytokeratins using the LIA-mat(R) TPA-M Prolifigen(R) method with 72 U/L threshold.RESULTS: In the first postoperative year, patients without recurrent disease had normal levels of CEA (1.5 ± 0.9 μg/L) and monoclonal tissue polypeptide antigen-M (TPA-M, 64.4 ± 47.8 U/L), while patients with recurrences had high levels of CEA (6.9 ± 9.8 μg/L,P < 0.01) and TPA-M (192.2 ± 328.8 U/L, P < 0.05).During the second postoperative year, patients without tumor recurrence had normal levels of CEA (2.0 ± 1.8μg/L) and TPA-M (50.8 ± 38.4 U/L), while patients with recurrence had high levels of CEA (66.3 ± 130.8 μg/L, P < 0.01) and TPA-M (442.7 ± 652.8 U/L, P < 0.05). The mean follow-up time was 22.3 mo. There was recurrence in 23 cases. Five reoperations were performed without achieving radical excision. Rises in tumor marker levels preceded identification of recurrences: CEA in seven (30%) and TPA-M in eleven individuals (48%).CONCLUSION: Intensive follow-up by serial assay of CEA and cytokeratins allows early detection of colorectal neoplasm recurrence.

  8. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Methods: Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Results: The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%), followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%). The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. Conclusion: The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration. PMID:27736910

  9. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia – a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Jensen, JS; Dohn, G

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  10. Multiplex detection and identification of bacterial pathogens causing potato blackleg and soft rot in Europe, using padlock probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slawiak, M.; Doorn, van R.; Szemes, M.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Waleron, M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Lojkowska, E.; Schoen, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex detection and identification protocol for bacterial soft rot coliforms, namely Pectobacterium wasabiae (Pw), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) and Dickeya spp., responsible for potato blackleg and tuber soft rot. The procedures were derived from

  11. The diagnostic and prognostic value of dengue non-structural 1 antigen detection in a hyper-endemic region in indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosasih, H.; Alisjahbana, B.; Widjaja, S.; Nurhayati, .; Mast, Q. de; Parwati, I.; Blair, P.J.; Burgess, T.H.; Ven, A. van der; Williams, M.

    2013-01-01

    As dengue fever is undifferentiated from other febrile illnesses in the tropics and the clinical course is unpredictable, early diagnosis is important. Several commercial assays to detect dengue NS1 antigen have been developed; however, their performances vary and data is lacking from hyper-endemic

  12. Locus-specific detection of HLA-DQ and -DR antigens by antibodies against synthetic N-terminal octapeptides of the beta chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deufel, T; Grove, A; Kofod, Hans

    1985-01-01

    detected a 29 kDa component in immunoblots of Raji and AL-34 cell plasma membrane proteins separated by SDS gel electrophoresis. The binding of either N-terminal peptide antiserum was selectively inhibited only by the peptide used as antigen. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis by flow cytofluorometry...

  13. Comparison of dengue infection in human mononuclear leukocytes with mosquito C6/36 and mammalian Vero cells using flow cytometry to detect virus antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydow Farid FO von

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS analysis is useful for the detection of cellular surface antigens and intracellular proteins. We used this methodology in order to detect and quantify dengue antigens in highly susceptible cells such as clone C6/36 (Aedes albopictus and Vero cells (green monkey kidney. Additionally, we analyzed the infection in vitro of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML. FACS analysis turned out to be a reliable technique to quantify virus growth in traditional cell cultures of C6/36 as well as Vero cells. High rates of infection were achieved with a good statistical correlation between the virus amount used in infection and the percentage of dengue antigen containing cells detected in infected cultures. We also showed that human monocytes (CD14+ are preferred target cells for in vitro dengue infection among PBML. Monocytes were much less susceptible to virus infection than cell lines but they displayed dengue antigens detected by FACS five days after infection. In contrast, lymphocytes showed no differences in their profile for dengue specific immunofluorescence. Without an animal model to reproduce dengue disease, alternative assays have been sought to correlate viral virulence with clinical manifestations and disease severity. Study of in vitro interaction of virus and host cells may highlight this relationship.

  14. Construction and comparison of fluorescence and bioluminescence bacterial biosensors for the detection of bioavailable toluene and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.-F. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, F.-Y. [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, C.-L. [Division of Wood Cellulose, Taiwan Forestry Research Institute, 53 Nanhai Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Liao, V.H.-C. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: vivianliao@ntu.edu.tw

    2008-03-15

    Environmental pollution with petroleum products such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) has garnered increasing awareness because of its serious consequences for human health and the environment. We have constructed toluene bacterial biosensors comprised of two reporter genes, gfp and luxCDABE, characterized by green fluorescence and luminescence, respectively, and compared their abilities to detect bioavailable toluene and related compounds. The bacterial luminescence biosensor allowed faster and more-sensitive detection of toluene; the fluorescence biosensor strain was much more stable and thus more applicable for long-term exposure. Both luminescence and fluorescence biosensors were field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of BTEX in contaminated groundwater and soil samples. The estimated BTEX concentrations determined by the luminescence and fluorescence bacterial biosensors were closely comparable to each other. Our results demonstrate that both bacterial luminescence and fluorescence biosensors are useful in determining the presence and the bioavailable fractions of BTEX in the environment. - The choice of reporter genes for toluene bacterial biosensors to determine BTEX bioavailability is case-specific.

  15. The diagnostic accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen to detect colorectal cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Caspar G; Karlsson, William K; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian;

    2016-01-01

    was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of CEA in detecting recurrence after intended curative surgery for primary colorectal cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, and articles were chosen based on predefined inclusion criteria. Reference lists...... from included articles were manually searched for additional publications of relevance. RESULTS: Forty-two original studies with generally representative populations and long follow-up were included. Data were reported on outcomes from 9,834 CEA tests during follow-up. Reporting on the reference...

  16. Detection of cell-associated or soluble antigens of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei by staphylococcal coagglutination tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, H W; Fikes, B J

    1981-01-01

    Current methods used for the detection of whole-cell isolates of Legionella or for the detection of Legionella soluble antigens are technically impractical for many clinical laboratories. The purpose of this study was to explore practical alternatives. The results showed that whole cell isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei were identified specifically by a simple slide agglutination test o...

  17. Validation of Serological Antibody Profiles Against Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Antigens as Markers for Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Piña, Dolores Azucena; Pedroza-Saavedra, Adolfo; Cruz-Valdez, Aurelio; Ortiz-Panozo, Eduardo; Maldonado-Gama, Minerva; Chihu-Amparan, Lilia; Rodriguez-Ocampo, Angelica Nallelhy; Orozco-Fararoni, Emilia; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, Lourdes

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most frequent neoplasia among women worldwide. Cancer prevention programs around the world have used the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear as the primary diagnostic test to reduce the burden of CC. Nevertheless, such programs have not been effective in developing countries, thus leading to research on alternative tests for CC screening. During the virus life cycle and in the process toward malignancy, different human papillomavirus (HPV) proteins are expressed, and they induce a host humoral immune response that can be used as a potential marker for different stages of the disease. We present a new Slot blot assay to detect serum antibodies against HPV16 E4, E7, and VLPs-L1 antigens. The system was validated with sera from a female population (n = 485) aged 18 to 64 years referred to the dysplasia clinic at the General Hospital in Cuautla, Morelos, Mexico. To evaluate the clinical performance of the serological markers, the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values and receiver-operating characteristic curves (for antibodies alone or in combination) were calculated in groups of lesions of increasing severity. The results showed high prevalence of anti-E4 (73%) and anti-E7 (80%) antibodies in the CC group. Seropositivity to 1, 2, or 3 antigens showed associations of increasing magnitude with CC (odds ratio [OR] = 12.6, 19.9, and 58.5, respectively). The highest association with CC was observed when the analysis was restricted to only anti-E4+E7 antibodies (OR = 187.7). The best clinical performance to discriminate CC from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 to 3 was the one for the combination of anti-E4 and/or anti-E7 antibodies, which displayed high sensitivity (93.3%) and moderate specificity (64.1%), followed by anti-E4 and anti-E7 antibodies (73.3% and 80%; 89.6% and 66%, respectively). In addition, the sensitivity of anti-E4 and/or anti-E7 antibodies is high at any time of sexual activity (TSA

  18. Bedside diagnosis of imported malaria using the Binax Now malaria antigen detection test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Bruun, Brita; Baek, Leif

    2006-01-01

    a period of 14 months. The Binax Now Malaria rapid test was used at the bedside and in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The training of clinical staff was monitored and their experience with the use of the test was recorded. 542 patients were included, 80 of whom had malaria diagnosed by microscopy....... The rapid test used at the bedside had a sensitivity of 88% for the detection of P. falciparum compared to 95% when the test was performed in the microbiology laboratory. The risk of technical problems and invalid tests was highest when the test was used at the bedside. The rapid diagnostic test may...... be useful for the diagnosis of P. falciparum malaria when used by routine laboratory staff, but could lead to misdiagnoses when used at the bedside. Microscopy is still essential in order to identify the few missed diagnoses, to determine the degree of parasitaemia, and to ensure species diagnosis...

  19. Combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A for improved detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Xu, Yi-Wei; Qiu, Si-Qi; Hong, Chao-Qun; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Southern China and Southeast Asia, and early detection remains a challenge. Autoantibodies have been found to precede the manifestations of symptomatic cancer by several months to years, making their identification of particular relevance for early detection. In the present study, the diagnostic value of serum autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 in NPC patients was evaluated. The study included 112 patients with NPC and 138 normal controls. Serum levels of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and classical Epstein-Barr virus marker, viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A (VCA-IgA), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Measurement of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 42.9/94.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33.7-52.6/89.4-97.8%] and 55.4/95.7% (95% CI, 45.7-64.7/90.4-98.2%), respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 (0.821; 95% CI, 0.771-0.871) was marginally lower than that for VCA-IgA (0.860; 95% CI, 0.810-0.910) in NPC. The combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA yielded an enhanced sensitivity of 80.4% (95% CI, 71.6-87.0%) and a specificity of 90.6% (95% CI, 84.1-94.7%). Moreover, detection of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 could differentiate early-stage NPC patients from normal controls. Our results suggest that autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 may serve as a potential biomarker, as a supplement to VCA-IgA, for the screening and diagnosis of NPC.

  20. Comparison of real-time PCR and antigen assays for detection of hepatitis E virus in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is recognized as an emerging and often undiagnosed disease in industrialized countries, with asymptomatic infections actually occurring in blood donors. Sensitive detection of HEV-RNA is crucial for diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression. We evaluated the analytical sensitivity and performance of three HEV RT-PCR assays (RealStar HEV reverse transcription-PCR [RT-PCR], hepatitis@ceeramTools, and ampliCube HEV RT-PCR) for screening of individuals for HEV infections (ID-nucleic acid amplification technology [ID-NAT]) and for blood donor pool screening (minipool-NAT [MP-NAT]). RNA was extracted using NucliSens easyMAG (ID-NAT) and a high-volume extraction protocol (4.8 ml, chemagic Viral 5K, MP-NAT). Three NAT assays were evaluated for ID-NAT but only two assays for MP-NAT due to inhibition of the ampliCube HEV RT-PCR kit using the corresponding RNA extract. Assays provided good analytical sensitivity, ranging from 37.8 to 180.1 IU/ml (ID-NAT) and from 4.7 to 91.2 IU/ml (MP-NAT). The applicability of HEV antigen (HEV-Ag) screening was compared to that of RT-PCR screening and detection of HEV-IgM antibodies using seroconversion panels of 10 HEV genotype 3-infected individuals. Four individuals revealed a positive HEV-Ag detection result, with corresponding viremias ranging from 1.92 E + 03 to 2.19 E + 05 IU/ml, while the progression of HEV-Ag followed that of HEV viremia. The other six individuals showed no presence of HEV-Ag although the corresponding viremias were also in the range of >1.0 E + 03. Anti-HEV-IgM antibodies were detectable in seven donors; one donor presented parallel positivities of HEV-Ag and anti-HEV IgM. The evaluated NAT methods present powerful tools providing sensitive HEV detection. Application of HEV-Ag or anti-HEV IgM screening is currently inferior for the early detection of HEV infection due to the decreased sensitivity compared to NAT methods.

  1. Simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes: more reliable method of Helicobacter pylori detection in microbial rich dental plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saima; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) assay is considered superior to other methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity; however, it also has limitations when sample under study is microbial rich dental plaque. The type of gene targeted and number of primers used for bacterial detection in dental plaque samples can have a significant effect on the results obtained as there are a number of closely related bacterial species residing in plaque biofilm. Also due to high recombination rate of H. pylori some of the genes might be down regulated or absent. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of H. pylori colonization of dental plaque by simultaneously amplifying two genes of the bacterium. One hundred dental plaque specimens were collected from dyspeptic patients before their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presence of H. pylori was determined through PCR assay using primers targeting two different genes of the bacterium. Eighty-nine of the 100 samples were included in final analysis. With simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes 51.6% of the dental plaque samples were positive for H. pylori while this prevalence increased to 73% when only one gene amplification was used for bacterial identification. Detection of H. pylori in dental plaque samples is more reliable when two genes of the bacterium are simultaneously amplified as compared to one gene amplification only.

  2. Development of Simple Bacterial Biosensor for Phenol Detection in Water at Medium Concentration using Glass Microelectrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyawan Purnomo Sakti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is one of the most fundamental natural resources in earth. The availability of clean water becomes a global interest. Many human activities result in water pollution. One from many pollution substances in water is phenol. Phenol is a very common residual compound in industrial activity. Extensive use of phenol in industry degrades water quality. Regulation has been set in many countries to prevent further damage to the water resource caused by phenol and limiting phenol concentration in water before released into the environment. Therefor it is importance to develop a sensor which can detect phenol concentration in water to be used as a wastewater quality control system. This paper presents a development of bacterial biosensor using Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens as a biological sensitive material. The sensor was made from glass micro electrode using Ag/AgCl electrode as reference electrode, silver electrode and cellulose ester. The Pseudomonas putida was entrapped inside the nutrient solution and separated by cellulose ester membrane from water containing phenol. It was found that the Pseudomonas putida in used must be growth in 10 hours to reach its optimum growth condition. Linear relationship between biosensor output voltages to phenol concentration was measured for phenol concentration below 200 ppm. The sensitivity of the developed biosensor was 72mV/ppm for Pseudomonas putida and 68.8 mV/ppm for Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  3. Chemical polyglycosylation and nanolitre detection enables single-molecule recapitulation of bacterial sugar export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbing; Almond, Andrew; Bayley, Hagan; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-05-01

    The outermost protective layer of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is composed of bacterial capsular polysaccharides. Insights into the interactions between the capsular polysaccharide and its transporter and the mechanism of sugar export would not only increase our understanding of this key process, but would also help in the design of novel therapeutics to block capsular polysaccharide export. Here, we report a nanolitre detection system that makes use of the bilayer interface between two droplets, and we use this system to study single-molecule recapitulation of sugar export. A synthetic strategy of polyglycosylation based on tetrasaccharide monomers enables ready synthetic access to extended fragments of K30 oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Examination of the interactions between the Escherichia coli sugar transporter Wza and very small amounts of fragments of the K30 capsular polysaccharide substrate reveal the translocation of smaller but not larger fragments. We also observe capture events that occur only on the intracellular side of Wza, which would complement coordinated feeding by adjunct biosynthetic machinery.

  4. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Cathrine Holm; Brahimi, Karima; Vandahl, Brian;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In endemic regions naturally acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum develops as a function of age and exposure to parasite infections and is known to be mediated by IgG. The targets of protective antibodies remain to be fully defined. Several immunoepidemiological...... then gradually develop into protective response dominated by cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies. METHODS: Naturally occurring IgG antibodies against P. falciparum blood-stage antigens were analysed from plasma samples collected from four groups of individuals differing in age and level of exposure to P....... falciparum infections. Western Blot profiling of blood-stage parasite antigens displaying reactivity with individual plasma samples in terms of their subclass specificities was conducted. Parasite antigens detected by IgG were grouped based on their apparent molecular sizes resolved by SDS-PAGE as high...

  5. Use of serology and urine antigen detection to estimate the proportion of adult community-acquired pneumonia attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J P; Moïsi, J C; Donaldson, R L A; Reid, R; Ferro, S; Whitney, C G; Santosham, M; O'Brien, K L

    2010-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) but existing diagnostic tools have limited sensitivity and specificity. We enrolled adults undergoing chest radiography at three Indian Health Service clinics in the Southwestern United States and collected acute and convalescent serum for measurement of PsaA and PspA titres and urine for pneumococcal antigen detection. Blood and sputum cultures were obtained at the discretion of treating physicians. We compared findings in clinical and radiographic CAP patients to those in controls without CAP. Urine antigen testing showed the largest differential between CAP patients and controls (clinical CAP 13%, radiographic CAP 17%, control groups 2%). Serological results were mixed, with significant differences between CAP patients and controls for some, but not all changes in titre. Based on urine antigen and blood culture results, we estimated that 11% of clinical and 15% of radiographic CAP cases were due to pneumococcus in this population.

  6. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Boyer, Anne E; Barr, John R

    2015-08-31

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  7. Detection and quantification of bacterial autofluorescence at the single-cell level by a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Yingxing; Zhu, Shaobin; Huang, Tianxun; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2012-02-07

    Cellular autofluorescence can affect the sensitivity of fluorescence microscopic or flow cytometric assays by interfering with or even precluding the detection of low-level specific fluorescence. Here we developed a method to detect and quantify bacterial autofluorescence in the green region of the spectrum at the single-cell level using a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). The detection of the very weak bacterial autofluorescence was confirmed by analyzing polystyrene beads of comparable and larger size than bacteria in parallel. Dithionite reduction and air re-exposure experiments verified that the green autofluorescence mainly originates from endogenous flavins. Bacterial autofluorescence was quantified by calibrating the fluorescence intensity of nanospheres with known FITC equivalents, and autofluorescence distribution was generated by analyzing thousands of bacterial cells in 1 min. Among the eight bacterial strains tested, it was found that bacterial autofluorescence can vary from 80 to 1400 FITC equivalents per cell, depending on the bacterial species, and a relatively large cell-to-cell variation in autofluorescence intensity was observed. Quantitative measurements of bacterial autofluorescence provide a reference for the background signals that can be expected with bacteria, which is important in guiding studies of low-level gene expression and for the detection of low-abundance biological molecules in individual bacterial cells. This paper presents the first quantification of bacterial autofluorescence in FITC equivalents.

  8. Diversity of bacterial endophytes in roots of Mexican husk tomato plants (Physalis ixocarpa) and their detection in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Santacruz, H A; Hernandez-Leon, R; Orozco-Mosqueda, M C; Velazquez-Sepulveda, I; Santoyo, G

    2010-12-07

    Endophytic bacterial diversity was estimated in Mexican husk tomato plant roots by amplified rDNA restriction analysis and sequence homology comparison of the 16S rDNA genes. Sixteen operational taxonomic units from the 16S rDNA root library were identified based on sequence analysis, including the classes Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacilli. The predominant genera were Stenotrophomonas (21.9%), Microbacterium (17.1%), Burkholderia (14.3%), Bacillus (14.3%), and Pseudomonas (10.5%). In a 16S rDNA gene library of the same plant species' rhizosphere, only common soil bacteria, including Stenotrophomonas, Burkholderia, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were detected. We suggest that the endophytic bacterial diversity within the roots of Mexican husk tomato plants is a subset of the rhizosphere bacterial population, dominated by a few genera.

  9. Grafting of a peptide probe for Prostate-Specific Antigen detection using diazonium electroreduction and click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzemińska, I; Sainte Rose Fanchine, S; Anquetin, G; Reisberg, S; Noël, V; Pham, M C; Piro, B

    2016-07-15

    The main objective of this work was to validate a label-free electrochemical method of protein detection using peptides as capture probes. As a proof-of-concept, we used a 7 amino acids sequence (HSSKLQL) specific for Prostate Specific Antigen. We investigated various electrografting conditions of two anilines (2-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfanyl]-8-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 4-azidoaniline) further converted in situ into their corresponding diazonium salts on glassy carbon electrodes. It was demonstrated that the best method to obtain a mixed layer is the simultaneous electroreduction of the two diazonium salts. 4-azidoaniline was used to covalently immobilize the ethynyl-functionalized peptide probe by click coupling, and the hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative plays the role of electrochemical transducer of the peptide-protein recognition. The proteolytic activity of PSA towards a small peptide substrate carrying streptavidin at its distal end was also investigated to design an original sensing architecture leading to a reagentless, label free, and "signal-on" PSA sensor. Without optimization, the limit of quantification can be estimated in the nM to pM range.

  10. Combined measurement and significance of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in detection of human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, D D; Picken, J; Pritchard, J

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) as a "tumor marker" and assessed individual and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cancer patients. Serum LSA and CEA concentrations were measured by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction, and by Abbott enzyme immunoassay procedures, respectively. Results indicate that the frequency of elevation and mean LSA values were highest in patients with lung cancer (318 mg/liter), intermediate in miscellaneous (210 mg/liter) and colorectal cancers (200 mg/liter), and lowest in breast cancer (175 mg/liter); while mean CEA values were highest in colorectal cancer (162.5 micrograms/liter), followed by lung (33.8 micrograms/liter), miscellaneous (30.3 micrograms/liter), and breast cancers (11.6 micrograms/liter). Statistically, LSA and CEA values for cancer patients were significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than for normal subjects. The combined measurement of LSA and CEA in serum provides better detection potential for cancer patients than either of the two markers alone.

  11. Detection of antigens using a protein-DNA chimera developed by enzymatic covalent bonding with phiX gene A*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Farhima; Mie, Masayasu; Grimm, Sebastian; Nygren, Per-Åke; Kobatake, Eiry

    2012-06-01

    The chemical reactions used to make antibody-DNA conjugates in many immunoassays diminish antigen-binding activity and yield heterogeneous products. Here, we address these issues by developing an antibody-based rolling circle amplification (RCA) strategy using a fusion of φX174 gene A* protein and Z(mab25) (A*-Zmab). The φX174 gene A* protein is an enzyme that can covalently link with DNA, while the Z(mab25) protein moiety can bind to specific species of antibodies. The DNA in an A*-Zmab conjugate was attached to the A* protein at a site chosen to not interfere with protein function, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gel mobility shift analysis. The novel A*-Zmab-DNA conjugate retained its binding capabilities to a specific class of murine immunoglobulin γ1 (IgG1) but not to rabbit IgG. This indicates the generality of the A*-Zmab-based immuno-RCA assay that can be used in-sandwich ELISA format. Moreover, the enzymatic covalent method dramatically increased the yields of A*-Zmab-DNA conjugates up to 80% after a 15 min reaction. Finally, sensitive detection of human interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was achieved by immuno-RCA using our fusion protein in sandwich ELISA format. This new approach of the use of site-specific enzymatic DNA conjugation to proteins should be applicable to fabrication of novel immunoassays for biosensing.

  12. Detection of respiratory virus antigens in nasopharyngeal secretions from patients with acute respiratory disease by radio-immunoassay and tissue culture isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlicher, L; Hoffmann, H G; Habermehl, K O

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of the sensitivity and specificity of four-layer radio-immunoassays (RIA) in the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus types A and B, as well as para-influenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 from nasopharyngeal aspirates of 146 patients with acute respiratory disease. The sensitivity of RIA was comparable with that of tissue culture isolation if the total number of positives is considered. The difference may have been caused both by a higher efficiency of the RIA for detection of inactivated or non-cultivable agents and by a higher efficiency of tissue culture methods if the samples contained only small amounts of antigen. Differences between the two antigen detection systems were found in particular with respiratory syncytial virus and influenza B virus. At present, the use of tissue culture isolation together with RIA is the optimal routine laboratory procedure for the diagnosis of respiratory infections.

  13. Sensitive non-isotopic DNA hybridisation assay or immediate-early antigen detection for rapid identification of human cytomegalovirus in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, C P; Morris, D J; Corbitt, G

    1991-04-01

    A sensitive non-radioactive DNA hybridisation assay employing digoxigenin-labelled probes was compared with immediate-early antigen detection and conventional virus isolation for the identification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in 249 urine samples. Of 44 specimens yielding HCMV by virus isolation, more were positive by DNA hybridisation (32; 73%) than by immediate-early antigen detection (25; 52%) (P = 0.05). The specificity of the hybridisation assay in 45 apparently falsely positive specimens was supported by detection of HCMV DNA in 40 of these specimens using the polymerase chain reaction. Many urine specimens may thus contain large amounts of non-viable virus or free viral DNA. Evaluation of various protocols for the extraction and denaturation of virus DNA prior to hybridisation showed that proteinase K digestion with phenol/chloroform extraction was the most sensitive and reliable procedure. We conclude that the non-radioactive DNA hybridisation assay described is a potentially valuable routine diagnostic test.

  14. Detection of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles as candidate markers for clinical mastitis resistance in Holstein x Zebu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangjinda, M; Buayai, D; Pattarajinda, V; Phasuk, Y; Katawatin, S; Vongpralub, T; Chaiyotvittayakul, A

    2009-02-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles from Holstein x Zebu crossbred dairy cows (n = 409) were analyzed using the PCR-RFLP technique. Exon II of DRB3 was amplified using locus-specific primers (HLO30/HLO32), followed by digestion with 3 restriction enzymes (RsaI, BstyI, and HaeIII). Forty alleles were found with frequency ranging from 0.005 to 0.139. The most frequently detected alleles of Holstein x Zebu were DRB3*16, *51, *23, *11, *8, and *1, accounting for 61.12% of the alleles in the population. Detection of candidate alleles for clinical mastitis occurrence was performed by logistic regression. It was found that percentage of Holstein fraction in crossbred cows had a nonsignificant effect (P > 0.05). However, parity had a significant effect on mastitis occurrence. In addition, DRB3*1 and *52 were the most associated with the occurrence of clinical mastitis, whereas *15, *51, and *22 were associated with resistance in crossbred populations. This is the first report of association of DRB3*15 and *51 with mastitis resistance. The association was validated by examining the candidate alleles in another commercial population. Highly susceptible (n = 43) and resistant (n = 42) groups of Holstein x Zebu cows were investigated. The result confirmed that DRB3*1 and *52 could be considered as susceptibility alleles, whereas *15, *51, and *22 could be considered as resistant alleles in Holstein x Zebu raised under tropical conditions. In addition, allele effects on 305-d milk production were estimated by BLUP. It was shown that most alleles associated with high clinical mastitis occurrence were related to increased milk yield. This study revealed that allele DRB3*10 had the greatest effect on increasing milk yield with moderate resistance to clinical mastitis, which could be used as a potential marker for selection in dairy genetic evaluation.

  15. Development of an FPW Biosensor with Low Insertion Loss and High Fabrication Yield for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Wei Lan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, various flexural plate-wave (FPW-based biosensors with low phase velocity, low operation frequency, high sensitivity, and short response time, have been developed. However, conventional FPW transducers have low fabrication yield because controlling the thickness of silicon/isolation/metal/piezoelectric multilayer floating thin-plate is difficult. Additionally, conventional FPW devices usually have high insertion loss because of wave energy dissipation to the silicon substrate or outside area of the output interdigital transducers (IDTs. These two disadvantages hinder the application of FPW devices. To reduce the high insertion loss of FPW devices, we designed two focus-type IDTs (fan-shaped and circular, respectively that can effectively confine the launched wave energy, and adopted a focus-type silicon-grooved reflective grating structure (RGS that can reduce the wave propagation loss. To accurately control the thickness of the silicon thin-plate and substantially improve the fabrication yield of FPW transducers, a 60 °C/27 °C two-step anisotropic wet etching process was developed. Compared with conventional FPW devices (with parallel-type IDTs and without RGS, the proposed FPW devices have lower insertion loss (36.04 dB and higher fabrication yield (63.88%. Furthermore, by using cystamine-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM nanotechnology, we used the improved FPW device to develop a novel FPW-based carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA biosensor for detection of colorectal cancer, and this FPW-CEA biosensor has a low detection limit (5 ng/mL, short response time (<10 min, high sensitivity (60.16–70.06 cm2/g, and high sensing linearity (R-square = 0.859–0.980.

  16. Evaluation of bacterial contamination rate of the anterior chamber during phacoemulsification surgery using an automated microbial detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim; Kocak; Funda; Kocak; Bahri; Teker; Ali; Aydin; Faruk; Kaya; Hakan; Baybora

    2014-01-01

    ·AIM: To assess the incidence of anterior chamber bacterial contamination during phacoemulsification surgery using an automated microbial detection system(BacT/Alert).·METHODS: Sixty-nine eyes of 60 patients who had uneventful phacoemulsification surgery, enrolled in this prospective study. No prophylactic topical or systemic antibiotics were used before surgery. After antisepsis with povidone-iodine, two intraoperative anterior chamber aqueous samples were obtained, the first whilst entering anterior chamber, and the second at the end of surgery. BacT/Alert culture system was used to detect bacterial contamination in the aqueous samples.·RESULTS: Neither aqueous samples obtained at the beginning nor conclusion of the surgery was positive for microorganisms on BacT/Alert culture system. The rate of bacterial contamination during surgery was 0%. None of the eyes developed acute-onset endophthalmitis after surgery.· CONCLUSION: In this study, no bacterial contamination of anterior chamber was observed during cataract surgery. This result shows that meticulous surgical preparation and technique can prevent anterior chamber contamination during phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

  17. Development and application of a double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to porcine circovirus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Meng; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Daliang; Li, Runcheng; Zhao, Wenwei; Chen, Guoliang; Yang, Xingdong; Yu, Xinglong

    2012-09-01

    A double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described for detection of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) antibodies using the well-characterized recombinant PCV2 capsid protein. In a comparative test of 394 pig sera against an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test and a commercial ELISA kit (also based on the recombinant PCV2 capsid protein), the results showed that the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the assay were, respectively, 90.61, 94.02, and 91.62% compared with IIF and 94.38, 95.28, and 94.67% compared with the commercial ELISA kit. Assay of 12 PCV-free pigs over a 5-week period produced only PCV2-negative titers by all 3 methods. These results and the seroprofiles of 4 pig farms obtained by both the commercial ELISA kit and the double-antigen sandwich ELISA indicate that the sandwich ELISA is a reliable method for detection of antibodies to PCV2. Additionally, the method described here permits the use of undiluted test serum samples simultaneously loaded with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antigen into the test well, and the complete test procedure can be performed in less than 90 min. This double-antigen sandwich ELISA should be a useful tool to aid swine industry professionals in deciding the intervention strategies for the control of PCV2-associated diseases.

  18. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BLYES Expressing Bacterial Bioluminescence for Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Estrogenic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseverino, John; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Layton, Alice C.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven A.; Saidak, Leslie; Simpson, Michael L.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    An estrogen-inducible bacterial lux-based bioluminescent reporter was developed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for applications in chemical sensing and environmental assessment of estrogen disruptor activity. The strain, designated S. cerevisiae BLYES, was constructed by inserting tandem estrogen response elements between divergent yeast promoters GPD and ADH1 on pUTK401 (formerly pUA12B7) that constitutively express luxA and luxB to create pUTK407. Cotransformation of this plasmid with a second plasmid (pUTK404) containing the genes required for aldehyde synthesis (luxCDE) and FMN reduction (frp) yielded a bioluminescent bioreporter responsive to estrogen-disrupting compounds. For validation purposes, results with strain BLYES were compared to the colorimetric-based estrogenic assay that uses the yeast lacZ reporter strain (YES). Strains BLYES and YES were exposed to 17β-estradiol over the concentration range of 1.2 × 10−8 through 5.6 × 10−12 M. Calculated 50% effective concentration values from the colorimetric and bioluminescence assays (n = 7) were similar at (4.4 ± 1.1) × 10−10 and (2.4 ± 1.0) × 10−10 M, respectively. The lower and upper limits of detection for each assay were also similar and were approximately 4.5 × 10−11 to 2.8 × 10−9 M. Bioluminescence was observed in as little as 1 h and reached its maximum in 6 h. In comparison, the YES assay required a minimum of 3 days for results. Strain BLYES fills the niche for rapid, high-throughput screening of estrogenic compounds and has the ability to be used for remote, near-real-time monitoring of estrogen-disrupting chemicals in the environment. PMID:16085836

  19. One-day workflow scheme for bacterial pathogen detection and antimicrobial resistance testing from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wendy L J; Beuving, Judith; Verbon, Annelies; Wolffs, Petra F G

    2012-07-09

    Bloodstream infections are associated with high mortality rates because of the probable manifestation of sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock(1). Therefore, rapid administration of adequate antibiotic therapy is of foremost importance in the treatment of bloodstream infections. The critical element in this process is timing, heavily dependent on the results of bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Both of these parameters are routinely obtained by culture-based testing, which is time-consuming and takes on average 24-48 hours(2, 4). The aim of the study was to develop DNA-based assays for rapid identification of bloodstream infections, as well as rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The first assay is a eubacterial 16S rDNA-based real-time PCR assay complemented with species- or genus-specific probes(5). Using these probes, Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli as well as Gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Streptococcus pneumoniae could be distinguished. Using this multiprobe assay, a first identification of the causative micro-organism was given after 2 h. Secondly, we developed a semi-molecular assay for antibiotic susceptibility testing of S. aureus, Enterococcus spp. and (facultative) aerobe Gram-negative rods(6). This assay was based on a study in which PCR was used to measure the growth of bacteria(7). Bacteria harvested directly from blood cultures are incubated for 6 h with a selection of antibiotics, and following a Sybr Green-based real-time PCR assay determines inhibition of growth. The combination of these two methods could direct the choice of a suitable antibiotic therapy on the same day (Figure 1). In conclusion, molecular analysis of both identification and antibiotic susceptibility offers a faster alternative for pathogen detection and could improve the diagnosis of

  20. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  1. Detection of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen at Picomolar Levels Using Biocatalysis Coupled to Assisted Ion Transfer Voltammetry at a Liquid-Organogel Microinterface Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Rashida; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2016-12-06

    A label-free electrochemical strategy for the detection of a cancer biomarker, prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), at picomolar concentrations without the use of antibodies, was investigated. The approach is based on the assisted ion transfer of protons, generated by a series of enzymatic reactions, at an array of microinterfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (μ-ITIES). This nonredox electrochemical approach based on biocatalysis-coupled proton transfer at the μ-ITIES array opens a new way to detect the prostate cancer biomarker, with detection capability achieved at concentrations below those indicative of disease presence. The strategy is expected to contribute to cancer diagnostics, recurrence monitoring, and therapeutic treatment efficacy.

  2. Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2 as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC, to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. CONCLUSION: Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

  3. Primary characterization and assessment of a T. spiralis antigen for the detection of Trichinella infection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocevic, Aleksandar; Lacour, Sandrine A; Mace, Pauline; Giovani, Baldissera; Grasset-Chevillot, Aurelie; Vallee, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal

    2014-10-15

    A clone, designated L20h-Ts3, was selected by immunoscreening of cDNA libraries of Trichinella spiralis worms collected 14h, 20h and 48h post-infection (p.i.) from mice intestines. L20h-Ts3 encodes the full-length of a conserved hypothetical protein of 13.1kDa involving putative interaction with the immune system. PCR analysis showed that L20h-Ts3 mRNA is constitutively expressed throughout T. spiralis life cycle and not restricted to intestinal stages. The L20h-Ts3 fusion protein was obtained in an Escherichia coli expression system and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography before inoculation into mice in order to produce polyclonal antibodies. Then, immunohistochemical study and Western blot analysis revealed its presence within the stichosome of T. spiralis and in excretory/secretory products strengthening a putative fundamental role for the parasite's survival such as host tissue invasion or modification of the host muscular cell phenotype. L20h-Ts3 fusion protein was recognized in Western blot as soon as 15-20 days p.i. by sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 muscle larvae (ML) of T. spiralis. Thus, an indirect L20h-Ts3 ELISA was designed and evaluated using sera from experimentally infected pigs by comparison with the only ELISA currently available for trichinellosis purposes. A gain of precocity from 7 up to 14 days and detection up to 25 weeks p.i. was possible with the L20h-Ts3 ELISA offering a large window for trichinellosis detection. The L20h-Ts3 ELISA was less effective in the case of low infections in pigs. Nevertheless, these results show that the L20h-Ts3 ELISA has a real interest due to its precocity and stability of detection in time. The association of the L20h-Ts3 fusion protein with other antigenic proteins identified previously could appreciably improve the serological test and facilitate its standardization.

  4. Detection of a pathogen shift among the pectolytic bacterial pathogens of potato in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial tuber soft rot, aerial stem rot and blackleg are significant diseases of potatoes in Washington State. These diseases are caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, and Dickeya chrysanthemi, all characterized by the ability to produce pectolytic ...

  5. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  6. Isolation of Bacterial Agents from the Lungs of Cattle with Pneumonia and Detection of Pasteurella Spp. by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    KILIÇ, Ayşe; MUZ, Adile

    2004-01-01

    Lungs from 8222 cattle slaughtered at an abattoir in Elazığ were examined macroscopically, and pneumonia was detected in 500 (6.1%) lungs. These samples were inoculated onto blood agar supplemented with 7% sheep blood for isolation of bacterial agents. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based upon the use of species-specific primers was carried out on DNA samples extracted from suspected Pasteurella spp. isolates. In addition, a mouse inoculation test was carried out on suspected Pasteurella m...

  7. Detection of Lassa virus antigens and Lassa virus-specific immunoglobulins G and M by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Niklasson, B S; Jahrling, P B; Peters, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Lassa fever is desirable for the timely therapeutic intervention and implementation of strict quarantine procedures both in West Africa field hospitals where the disease is endemic and at international crossroads. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure Lassa virus antigens in viremic sera was developed in which experimentally infected monkeys were used as a model for the human disease. In this test, Lassa virus antigens in test sera were captured in wells o...

  8. Detection of Rare Antigen Presenting Cells through T cell-intrinsic meandering motility, mediated by Myo1g

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard, Audrey; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Beemiller, Peter; Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Liu, Yin; Totah, Fadi J.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Shaw, Stephen; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    To mount an immune response, T lymphocytes must successfully search for foreign material bound to the surface of antigen-presenting cells. How T cells optimize their chances of encountering and responding to these antigens is unknown. T cell motility in tissues resembles a random or Levy walk and is regulated in part by external factors including chemokines and lymph node topology, but motility parameters such as speed and propensity to turn may also be cell-intrinsic. Here we found that the ...

  9. Amplification of Surface Antigen P43 Gene and Its Application in Detection of Toxoplasma Gondii in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUYongan; YUXinbing; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To establish a rapid,specific and sensitive diagnostic technique for the human Toxoplasma gondii infection in the recipi-ents with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and discuss its clinical significance.Methods:30 patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were detected by using ELISA and PCR.Results:Among 30 recipients undergiong allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation,3 were positive for Toxoplasma gondiii antigen and 5 for surface antigen p43 gene with the positive rate being 13.3% and 16.67% respectively.20 healthy people(negative for anti-Tox antibody)were also tested by using ELISA and PCR.Conclusion:PCR is an accurate,relatively rapid,sensitive and specific method for detecting P43 gene of Toxoplasma gondii.Be-canuse PCR can be applied to a variety of different clinical samples,it can be considered as a valuable additional tool for identification of Toxoplasma gondii infections.

  10. Western blotting using Strongyloides ratti antigen for the detection of IgG antibodies as confirmatory test in human strongyloidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira Silva

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of antigenic components recognized by serum IgG antibodies in Western blotting (WB using a Strongyloides ratti larval extract for the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. In addition, the WB results were compared to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT results. Serum samples of 180 individuals were analyzed (80 with strongyloidiasis, 60 with other intestinal parasitoses, and 40 healthy individuals. S. ratti was obtained from fecal culture of experimentally infected Rattus rattus. For IFAT, S. ratti larvae were used as antigen and S. ratti larval antigenic extracts were employed in WB and ELISA. Eleven S. ratti antigenic components were predominantly recognized by IgG antibodies in sera of patients with strongyloidiasis. There was a positive concordance for the three tests in 87.5% of the cases of strongyloidiasis. The negative concordance in the three tests was 94% and 97.5%, in patients with other intestinal parasitoses and healthy individuals, respectively. In cases of positive ELISA and negative IFAT results, diagnosis could be confirmed by WB. ELISA, IFAT, and WB using S. ratti antigens showed a high rate of sensitivity and specificity. In conclusion, WB using S. ratti larval extract was able to recognize 11 immunodominant antigenic components, showing to be a useful tool to define the diagnosis in cases of equivocal serology.

  11. Detecting the dormant: a review of recent advances in molecular techniques for assessing the viability of bacterial endospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Bidyut R; La Duc, Myron T

    2013-09-01

    Due to their contribution to gastrointestinal and pulmonary disease, their ability to produce various deadly exotoxins, and their resistance to extreme temperature, pressure, radiation, and common chemical disinfecting agents, bacterial endospores of the Firmicutes phylum are a major concern for public and environmental health. In addition, the hardy and dormant nature of endospores renders them a particularly significant threat to the integrity of robotic extraterrestrial life-detection investigations. To prevent the contamination of critical surfaces with seemingly ubiquitous bacterial endospores, clean rooms maintained at exceedingly stringent cleanliness levels (i.e., fewer than 100,000 airborne particles per ft(3)) are used for surgical procedures, pharmaceutical processing and packaging, and fabrication and assembly of medical devices and spacecraft components. However, numerous spore-forming bacterial species have been reported to withstand typical clean room bioreduction strategies (e.g., UV lights, maintained humidity, paucity of available nutrients), which highlights the need for rapid and reliable molecular methods for detecting, enumerating, and monitoring the incidence of viable endospores. Robust means of evaluating and tracking spore burden not only provide much needed information pertaining to endospore ecophysiology in different environmental niches but also empower decontamination and bioreduction strategies aimed at sustaining the reliability and integrity of clean room environments. An overview of recent molecular advances in detecting and enumerating viable endospores, as well as the expanding phylogenetic diversity of pathogenic and clean room-associated spore-forming bacteria, ensues.

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma. A study of 50 autopsy cases with detection of hepatitis B surface antigen in fixed tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Barrios, A; Colina-Ruizdelgado, F; Gallego, I; Martinez-Tello, F J

    1983-03-01

    Fifty patients who died of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were autopsied at the Ciudad Sanitaria "1 degree de Octubre" and the Hospital de la Cruz Roja (Madrid) from 1974 to 1980. Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded autopsy tissue of liver and tumor from the 50 HCC and liver tissue from 50 liver cirrhosis (LC) and from 50 autopsy of non cirrhotic control cases were examined for the presence of cytoplasmic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The study was carried out using orcein staining, immunoperoxidase technique (IP) and indirect immunofluorescence (IF). In livers with HCC the HBsAg was detected in the cytoplasm of the hepatocytes in 10 cases (20%) with the orcein staining and in 11 (22%) with the IP and IF techniques. In one case (2%) HBsAg was found in the cytoplasm of tumor cells with the three methods--In four cases (8%) of LC and 2 (4%) control cases cytoplasmic positive cells were found. In 41 patients with HCC HBsAg was studied in the serum by radio-immunoassay (RIA) (13 cases) and immunodiffussion (28 cases). 5 patients (12,1%) were positive and 36 (72%) were negative. In the 5 serum positive HBsAg HCC the staining methods for cytoplasmic HBsAg were positive (100%). In 36 serum negative HBsAg HCC the staining method were positive in 2 cases. The results let us to conclude that HBV is a probable important etiologic factor of HCC in our milieu. 54% of the patients with HCC had a previous history of alcohol abuse; however, histologic features compatible with an alcoholic etiology were found in only 5 cases. Nevertheless we consider that the described histopathologic findings do not exclude excess alcohol consumption as a possible etiologic factor for HCC in our series.

  13. 志贺菌检测用抗原研究进展%Advance in research on the antigens for detection of Shigella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧莹; 端青

    2011-01-01

    志贺菌是细菌性痢疾的病原体,目前检测手段主要为常规生化法、免疫学及分子生物学方法,其中免疫学方法快速、便捷,实用性较强.本文综述了志贺茵免疫学检测用抗原的研究进展.%Shigella are the pathogens of bacillary dysentery. Major methods of detection are routine biochemistry detection, immunology detection and molecular biology detection . The immunology detection is rapid, simple and practical. Researches on antigens for detection of Shigella are reviewed.

  14. An ELISA for sensitive and specific detection of circulating antigen of Angiostrongylus vasorum in serum samples of naturally and experimentally infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, M; Tanner, I; Webster, P; Barutzki, D; Deplazes, P

    2011-06-30

    Canine angiostrongylosis is an emerging cardiopulmonary disease in Europe which can be fatal if left untreated. We developed a sandwich-ELISA based on a monoclonal antibody (mAb Av 56/1/2) and on polyclonal rabbit antibodies directed against Angiostrongylus vasorum adult excretory/secretory - antigen for the detection of circulating serum antigen of A. vasorum. The sensitivity of the test was 95.7% (78.1-99.9, 95% CI) as determined with sera of 23 dogs naturally infected with A. vasorum. The specificity was 94.0% (83.5-98.7, 95% CI) using 50 dog sera (control group) submitted for reasons other than parasitic infections. Potential cross-reactions were investigated with sera of a group of totally 61 dogs with proven infections with Dirofilaria immitis (n=23), Crenosoma vulpis (n=14), Ancylostoma caninum (n=4) or Toxocara canis (n=20). No significant difference was observed concerning the proportion of positive reactions between the control group and the group with proven helminth infections other than A. vasorum. In experimentally inoculated dogs with proven worm burdens of A. vasorum, the proportion of seropositive dogs increased over the first 3 months of infection, starting from 35 days post inoculation (dpi) which was before the onset of larval excretion. Ten weeks post inoculation, 98.6% of the dogs were seropositive, and circulating antigen persisted in two dogs with long-term follow-up over 286 and 356 days, respectively. In contrast, in dogs with a single treatment with imidacloprid/moxidectin at four or 32 dpi, no circulating antigen was observed, while in dogs treated at 88-92 dpi, OD values decreased within 13-34 days. The specific detection of circulating A. vasorum antigen by ELISA represents a valid alternative for reliable diagnosis and for follow-up investigations after anthelmintic treatment. Moreover, the test can be used for mass screening in large epidemiological investigations.

  15. Enhanced target-specific signal detection using an Escherichia coli lysate in multiplex microbead immunoassays with E. coli-derived recombinant antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Sandra; Leitolis, Amanda; Lima, Lucianna Freitas Oliveira; Krieger, Marco A; Foti, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Diverse techniques have been developed to analyze antibody-mediated responses to infections. However, the most common tests, i.e., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, require separate reactions for each antigen and consequently necessitate large sample volumes. Luminex technology allows the detection of multiple antibodies in a single experiment, but nonspecific binding can impair the results. Therefore, we examined the use of Escherichia coli lysates to reduce nonspecific binding and improve the results of liquid microarrays based on Luminex technology. Anti-bacteria antibodies were detected in human serum samples, as evidenced by high median fluorescence intensity (MFI) in assays performed with paramagnetic microspheres coupled with E. coli lysates. Moreover, the addition of an E. coli lysate as a blocker reduced the nonspecific binding of antigens produced by E. coli in a concentration-dependent manner. Tris-HCl reduced MFI values in negative samples, but did not affect MFI for positive samples. For microspheres coupled with different antigens, an E. coli lysate blocker significantly improved the fluorescence signals from positive samples. The addition of Tris-HCl and the E. coli lysate induced antigen-specific differences in MFI. This combination of the E. coli lysate blocker and Tris-HCl yielded a statistically significant improvement in MFI in the assays for Chagas disease and hepatitis C virus samples. However, for the Treponema pallidum p47 antigen improvement in MFI was only observed for the preparation with the E. coli blocker at a concentration of 3%. In conclusion, the addition of an E. coli lysate and Tris-HCl to the microarray assay reduced the nonspecific binding of human anti-bacteria antibodies and, therefore, increased the specific MFI.

  16. Combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody detection assay does not improve diagnosis for seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Juan A; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Carreño, Vicente

    2006-12-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  17. Combined Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Antigen-Antibody Detection Assay Does Not Improve Diagnosis for Seronegative Individuals with Occult HCV Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga, Juan A.; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; CARREÑO, VICENTE

    2006-01-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  18. Nano-yeast-scFv probes on screen-printed gold electrodes for detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in a biological matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Yadveer S; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Spadafora, Lauren J; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Trau, Matt

    2014-05-15

    The time and costs associated with monoclonal antibody production limit the potential for portable diagnostic devices to penetrate the market. Replacing the antibody with a low-cost alternate affinity reagent would reduce the costs of diagnostic development and use, and lead to new portable diagnostic devices towards many diseases. Herein, we present low-cost affinity reagents, nano-yeast-scFv, on commercially available, inexpensive, and portable screen-printed electrodes for the label-free electrochemical detection of Entamoeba histolytica cyst antigens. The biosensor was able to detect antigen at concentrations down to 10 pg mL(-1) in buffer with an inter-assay reproducibility of (% RSD, n=3) 4.1%. The applicability of two differently engineered nano-yeast-scFv to each specifically detect their cognant E. histolytica cyst antigens was demonstrated in a biological matrix derived from human stool. Because of the simple, inexpensive, and sensitive nature of this methodology, it may offer a low-cost alternative to immunosensors based on antibody-target recognition.

  19. Detection of microbial antigenic components of circulating immune complexes in HIV patients:Involvement in CD4+ T lymphocyte count depletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ezeani Michael Chukwudi; Okafor UU; Onyenekwe CC; Wachukwu CK; Anyiam DCD; Meludu SC; Ukibe RN; Ifeanyichukwu M; Onochie A; Anahalu I

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of microbial antigenic components of circulating immune complexes amongst grades ofCD4 T lymphocyte counts inHIV sero positive and sero-negative participants.Methods: Polyethelene glycol(PEG-600) and buffering methods of precipitation and dissociation of immune complexes was used to generate immune solution from sera of100 HIV sero-positive and100 HIV sero-negative participants. These were categorized into 3 grades based onCD4 count:> 500 cell/mm3,200-499 cell/mm3 and<200 cell/mm3. The immune solutions were assayed using membrane based immunoassay and antibody titration, along side its unprocessed serum for detection of various microbial antigens and or antibodies. CD4 T cell counts were estimated using Patec Cyflow SL-3Germany.Results: Antigenic component of immune complexes of various infectious agents was detected in99 and70 HIV sero-positive andHIV sero-negative participants, respectively. In group A, there were10 HIV positive participants, including4 (40.0%)had circulating immune complexes(CICs) due toSalmonella species only;1(10.0%) due toSalmonella-Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum),Salmonella-P. falciparum-HCV andP. falciparum antigens, respectively. In group B,45(45.4%) HIVsero-positive participants withCICs hadCD4 T lymphocyte count between200-499 cells/mm3. Out of these,20(44.4%) hadCICs due to Salmonella species only; 9(20%) due toSalmonella-P. falciparum. In groupC, there were44(44.4%) HIVsero-positive participants, including3(6.8%) due toSalmonella species only;24(54.4%) due toSalmonella-P. falciparum;2(4.5%) due toP. falciparum only.Conclusions:InHIV sero-positive participants, presence of heterogeneity of Salmonella species-P. falciparum antigens was highly incriminated inCD4 count depletion but not homogeneity of malaria parasites antigens. Malaria parasites antigens only were incriminated inCD4+ count depletion amongstHIV sero-negative participants. Before taking any decision on the management ofHIV-1

  20. The relevance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen as an indicator of brain metastasis detection in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Sil; Jung, So-Lyoung; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Park, Sarah; Kim, Young-Kyoon; Yoo, Ie-Ryung; Choi, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hong-Seok; Yoon, Sei-Chul

    2012-08-01

    Although many biomarkers have emerged in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predictive value of site-specific spread is not fully defined. We designed this study to determine if there is an association between serum biomarkers and brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. We evaluated 227 eligible advanced NSCLC patients between May 2005 and March 2010. Patients who had been newly diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC but had not received treatment previously, and had available information on at least one of the following pretreatment serum biomarkers were enrolled: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9, and squamous cancer cell antigen. Whole body imaging studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were reviewed, and the total number of metastatic regions was scored. Brain metastasis was detected in 66 (29.1%) patients. Although serum CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA 125 levels were significantly different between low total metastatic score group (score 1-3) and high total metastatic score group (score 4-7), only CEA level was significantly different between patients with brain metastasis and those without brain metastasis (p present study demonstrated that the pretreatment serum CEA level was significantly correlated with brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. These findings suggested the possible role of CEA in the pathogenesis of brain invasion. More vigilant surveillance would be warranted in the high-risk group of patients with high serum CEA level and multiple synchronous metastasis.

  1. Semi-automated bacterial spore detection system with micro-fluidic chips for aerosol collection, spore treatment and ICAN DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Hisao; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Matsuzawa, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Yasuhiko; Togashi, Shigenori; Komano, Asuka; Seto, Yasuo

    2009-07-15

    A semi-automated bacterial spore detection system (BSDS) was developed to detect biological threat agents (e.g., Bacillus anthracis) on-site. The system comprised an aerosol sampler, micro-fluidic chip-A (for spore germination and cell lysis), micro-fluidic chip-B (for extraction and detection of genomic DNA) and an analyzer. An aerosol with bacterial spores was first collected in the collection chamber of chip-A with a velocity of 300 l/min, and the chip-A was taken off from the aerosol sampler and loaded into the analyzer. Reagents packaged in the chip-A were sequentially applied into the chamber. The genomic DNA extract from spore lyzate was manually transferred from chip-A to chip-B and loaded into the analyzer. Genomic DNA in chip-B was first trapped on a glass bead column, washed with various reagents, and eluted to the detection chamber by sequential auto-dispensing. Isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) with fluorescent measurement was adopted to amplify and detect target DNA. Bacillus subtilis was the stimulant of biological warfare agent in this experiment. Pretreatment conditions were optimized by examining bacterial target DNA recovery in the respective steps (aerosol collection, spore germination, cell lysis, and DNA extraction), by an off-chip experiment using a real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification method. Without the germination step, B. subtilis spores did not demonstrate amplification of target DNA. The detection of 10(4) spores was achieved within 2h throughout the micro-fluidic process.

  2. Development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA) for the sensitive detection of HPA-1a alloantibodies using tag-engineered recombinant soluble β3 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaik, Younis; Battermann, Anja; Hiller, Oliver; Meyer, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Salama, Abdulgabar; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-05-31

    Timely and accurate testing for human platelet antigen 1a (HPA-1a) alloantibodies is vital for clinical diagnosis of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). Current antigen-specific assays used for the detection of HPA-1 alloantibodies are technically very complex and cumbersome for most diagnostic laboratories. Hence, we designed and applied recombinant soluble (rs) β3 integrins displaying HPA-1a or HPA-1b epitopes for the development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA). Soluble HPA-1a and HPA-1b were produced recombinantly in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and differentially tagged. The recombinant soluble proteins were then immobilized onto paramagnetic beads and used for analysis of HPA-1 alloantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HPA-1a serum samples (n=7) from NAIT patients, inert sera and sera containing non-HPA-1a antibodies were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the SAMBA. Fusion of V5-His or GS-SBP-His tags to the rsβ3 integrins resulted in high-yield expression. SAMBA was able to detect all HPA-1a and -1b alloantibodies recognized by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens assay (MAIPA). No cross-reactions between the sera were observed. Two out of seven of the HPA-1a alloantibody-containing sera demonstrated weak to moderate reactivity in MAIPA but strong signals in SAMBA. SAMBA provides a very reliable method for the detection of HPA-1 antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity. This simple and rapid assay can be adapted for use in any routine laboratory and can be potentially adapted for use on automated systems.

  3. Molecular detection of marine bacterial populations on beaches contaminated by the Nakhodka tanker oil-spill accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Y.; Kishira, H.; Syutsubo, K.; Harayama, S.

    2001-04-01

    In January 1997, the tanker Nakhodka sank in the Japan Sea, and more than 5000 tons of heavy oil leaked. The released oil contaminated more than 500 km of the coastline, and some still remained even by June 1999. To investigate the long-term influence of the Nakhodka oil spill on marine bacterial populations, sea water and residual oil were sampled from the oil-contaminated zones 10, 18, 22 and 29 months after the accident, and the bacterial populations in these samples were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments. The dominant DGGE bands were sequenced, and the sequences were compared with those in DNA sequence libraries. Most of the bacteria in the sea water samples were classified as the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, {alpha}-Proteobacteria or cyanobacteria. The bacteria detected in the oil paste samples were different from those detected in the sea water samples; they were types related to hydrocarbon degraders, exemplified by strains closely related to Sphingomonas subarctica and Alcanivorax borkumensis. The sizes of the major bacterial populations in the oil paste samples ranged from 3.4 x 10{sup 5} to 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bacteria per gram of oil paste, these low numbers explaining the slow rate of natural attenuation. (Author)

  4. Molecular detection of marine bacterial populations on beaches contaminated by the Nakhodka tanker oil-spill accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Y; Kishira, H; Syutsubo, K; Harayama, S

    2001-04-01

    In January 1997, the tanker Nakhodka sank in the Japan Sea, and more than 5000 tons of heavy oil leaked. The released oil contaminated more than 500 km of the coastline, and some still remained even by June 1999. To investigate the long-term influence of the Nakhodka oil spill on marine bacterial populations, sea water and residual oil were sampled from the oil-contaminated zones 10, 18, 22 and 29 months after the accident, and the bacterial populations in these samples were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments. The dominant DGGE bands were sequenced, and the sequences were compared with those in DNA sequence libraries. Most of the bacteria in the sea water samples were classified as the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, alpha-Proteobacteria or cyanobacteria. The bacteria detected in the oil paste samples were different from those detected in the sea water samples; they were types related to hydrocarbon degraders, exemplified by strains closely related to Sphingomonas subarctica and Alcanivorax borkumensis. The sizes of the major bacterial populations in the oil paste samples ranged from 3.4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6) bacteria per gram of oil paste, these low numbers explaining the slow rate of natural attenuation.

  5. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Versus Bacterial Culture in Detection of Organisms in Otitis Media with Effusion (OME) in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Balegh H; Hamad, Mostafa S; Mohey, Mervat; Amen, Sameh

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare between polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bacterial culture in detection of Streptococcus Pneumonia and M. Catarrhalis in otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. Fifty patients having OME were included in this study between 2003 and 2008. Myringotomy and tympanostomy tube insertion were done in every patient and the middle ear effusion samples were aspirated. The samples were subjected to bacteriological study in the form of culture and molecular study in the form of PCR using JM201/202-204 primer probe set for both S. pneumonia and M. catarrhalis. The results of Bacterial cultures are as follows: five cases (10%) were culture positive for S. pneumonia. Six cases (12%) were culture positive for M. catarrhalis. Only one case (2%) showed positively for both S. pneumonia and M. catarrhalis. Polymerase chain reaction test shows that 18 cases (36%) were positive for S. pneumonia, 22 cases (44%) were positive for M. catarrhalis, 6 cases (12%) were positive for both organism and 4 cases (8%) were negative. The difference between the proportion of culture positive and PCR positive specimens for both organisms individually and collectively was significant (P PCR is more accurate than bacterial culture in detection of organisms in middle ear fluid in OME and that M. catarrhalis plays a significant rule in OME as it is the sole organism identified more than the other one by PCR.

  6. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Fusion VP2332-452 Antigen for Detecting Antibodies against Aleutian Mink Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Song, Cailing; Liu, Yun; Qu, Liandong; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    For detection of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using the recombinant VP2332-452 protein as an antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) was used as a reference test to compare the results of the ELISA and Western blotting (WB); the specificity and sensitivity of the VP2332-452 ELISA were 97.9% and 97.3%, respectively, which were higher than those of WB. Therefore, this VP2332-452 ELISA may be a preferable method for detecting antibodies against AMDV.

  7. Recombinant gp19 as a potential antigen for detecting anti-Ehrlichia canis antibodies in dog sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Silva de Oliveira

    Full Text Available The canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia canis, is endemic in several regions of Brazil. Some serological diagnostic techniques using immunodominant proteins of E. canis as antigens are available, but their specificities and sensitivities are questionable. Based on this, the objective of this study was to test the antigenic potential of the recombinant gp19 protein (rGP19 for subsequent use in diagnostic tests. The rGP19 expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3 C41 was recognized in the sera from experimentally infected dogs using ELISA and Western blotting. Thus, it was possible to obtain a promising antigen with the ability to differentiate between E. canis-positive and -negative animals, even 1 week after infection.

  8. Suitability of antigens PGP 9.5 and neurofilament light as marker proteins for detection of neuronal tissue in processed meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunitz, Christine; Gabert, Jörg; Lücker, Ernst; Seeger, Johannes; Stahl, Tobias

    2009-05-01

    The enforcement of rules for food labeling and quantitative ingredient declaration presupposes appropriate test systems. Additionally, central nervous system (CNS) tissue of ruminants is classified as specified risk material for the transmission of prion diseases, and its detection is needed to support the specified risk material ban. Existing antibody-based test systems are hampered by relatively high limits of detection and susceptibility to food processing conditions. For that reason we tested a broad panel of commercially available monoclonal antibodies to identify marker antigens appropriate for the development of a sensitive test system. Western blot analysis using organ-specific samples from cow, pig, and chicken and differently processed meat products containing defined amounts of CNS tissue revealed neurofilament light (NF-L) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) as suitable antigens for the organ-specific and sensitive detection of porcine and bovine CNS tissue. None of the tested PGP 9.5 antibodies displayed cross-reactivity to chicken tissues. Both antigens could be detected in moderately (F(10)121.1 = 0.84) and strongly (F(10)121.1 = 4.01) heated processed meat products containing 5% (NF-L) or 0.2% (PGP 9.5) CNS tissue, respectively. Further, two monoclonal antibodies (clones 13C4 and 31A3) directed against PGP 9.5 were used for the development of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The limits of detection of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were approximately 2% added CNS tissue in fresh processed meat products and approximately 0.5% for strongly heated processed meat products (F(10)121.1 = 4.01). In conclusion this test system constitutes a valuable supplementation to existing procedures, which could improve enforcement of food safety regulations.

  9. Detection and Composition of Bacterial Communities in Waters using RNA-based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, microbial water quality assessments have shifted from solely relying on pure culture-based methods to monitoring bacterial groups of interest using molecular assays such as PCR and qPCR. Furthermore, coupling next generation sequencing technologies with ribosomal...

  10. A bioinformatic strategy for the detection, classification and analysis of bacterial autotransporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Celik

    Full Text Available Autotransporters are secreted proteins that are assembled into the outer membrane of bacterial cells. The passenger domains of autotransporters are crucial for bacterial pathogenesis, with some remaining attached to the bacterial surface while others are released by proteolysis. An enigma remains as to whether autotransporters should be considered a class of secretion system, or simply a class of substrate with peculiar requirements for their secretion. We sought to establish a sensitive search protocol that could identify and characterize diverse autotransporters from bacterial genome sequence data. The new sequence analysis pipeline identified more than 1500 autotransporter sequences from diverse bacteria, including numerous species of Chlamydiales and Fusobacteria as well as all classes of Proteobacteria. Interrogation of the proteins revealed that there are numerous classes of passenger domains beyond the known proteases, adhesins and esterases. In addition the barrel-domain-a characteristic feature of autotransporters-was found to be composed from seven conserved sequence segments that can be arranged in multiple ways in the tertiary structure of the assembled autotransporter. One of these conserved motifs overlays the targeting information required for autotransporters to reach the outer membrane. Another conserved and diagnostic motif maps to the linker region between the passenger domain and barrel-domain, indicating it as an important feature in the assembly of autotransporters.

  11. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis - Detection, treatment and prophylaxis in patients with liver cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, PLM

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. When a patient with liver cirrhosis and ascites presents with fever and/or abdominal pain, or a tender abdomen on physical examination, or with refractory ascites, an ascitic fluid aspirate

  12. An iron detection system determines bacterial swarming initiation and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Chang, Chih-Jung; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Wu, Tsung-Ru; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Ting-Shu; Lu, Jang-Jih; Horng, Jim-Tong; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M.; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Young, John D.; Andrews, S. C.; Robinson, A. K.; Rodriguez-Quinones, F.; Touati, D.; Yeom, J.; Imlay, J. A.; Park, W.; Marx, J. J.; Braun, V.; Hantke, K.; Cornelis, P.; Wei, Q.; Vinckx, T.; Troxell, B.; Hassan, H. M.; Verstraeten, N.; Lewis, K.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Costerton, J. W.; Stoodley, P.; Kearns, D. B.; Losick, R.; Butler, M. T.; Wang, Q.; Harshey, R. M.; Lai, S.; Tremblay, J.; Deziel, E.; Overhage, J.; Bains, M.; Brazas, M. D.; Hancock, R. E.; Partridge, J. D.; Kim, W.; Surette, M. G.; Givskov, M.; Rather, P. N.; Houdt, R. Van; Michiels, C. W.; Mukherjee, S.; Inoue, T.; Frye, J. G.; McClelland, M.; McCarter, L.; Silverman, M.; Matilla, M. A.; Wu, Y.; Outten, F. W.; Singh, P. K.; Parsek, M. R.; Greenberg, E. P.; Welsh, M. J.; Banin, E.; Vasil, M. L.; Wosten, M. M.; Kox, L. F.; Chamnongpol, S.; Soncini, F. C.; Groisman, E. A.; Laub, M. T.; Goulian, M.; Krell, T.; Lai, H. C.; Lin, C. S.; Soo, P. C.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wei, J. R.; Wyckoff, E. E.; Mey, A. R.; Leimbach, A.; Fisher, C. F.; Payne, S. M.; Livak, K. J.; Schmittgen, T. D.; Clarke, M. B.; Hughes, D. T.; Zhu, C.; Boedeker, E. C.; Sperandio, V.; Stintzi, A.; Clarke-Pearson, M. F.; Brady, S. F.; Drake, E. J.; Gulick, A. M.; Qaisar, U.; Rowland, M. A.; Deeds, E. J.; Garcia, C. A.; Alcaraz, E. S.; Franco, M. A.; Rossi, B. N. Passerini de; Mehi, O.; Skaar, E. P.; Visaggio, D.; Nishino, K.; Dietz, P.; Gerlach, G.; Beier, D.; Bustin, S. A.; Schwyn, B.; Neilands, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Iron availability affects swarming and biofilm formation in various bacterial species. However, how bacteria sense iron and coordinate swarming and biofilm formation remains unclear. Using Serratia marcescens as a model organism, we identify here a stage-specific iron-regulatory machinery comprising

  13. Characteristics of 26 kDa antigen of H. Pylori by Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghahremani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alkylhydroperoxide reductase (AhpC, the 26 kDa antigen is one of the abundant antioxidant enzymes in Helicobacter pylori and seems to have a good potential for use in development of immunoassays to detect H. pylori infection in clinical specimens. This study aimed to investigate some properties of this antigen by the produced monoclonal antibodies. Five established hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori were cultivated and MAbs were purified by affinity chromatography. Subsequently, MAbs were conjugated with biotin, and different combinations of capture and tracer antibodies used in sandwich ELISA. Immunoblotting of bacterial extracts were performed to estimate aggregation status of the antigen. Release of antigen from the cultivated bacteria on solid media was examined by sandwich ELISA, and also, existence of interference in fecal extract was investigated by immunoblotting and sandwich ELISA. Our findings showed that the MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori could recognize three bands of nearly 25 kDa, 50 kDa, and 75 kDa in immunoblotting. This study also indicated presence of more antigens in the culture medium around the bacteria than the bacterial extract itself. The results of sandwich ELISA and immunoblotting on fecal extracts suggest the presence of interfering agents that prevent detection of antigen by antibody in ELISA but not in immunoblotting. In this study the oligomerization of the 26 kDa antigen, presence of interfering agents in stool matrix, and release of antigen to outside of bacteria, were demonstrated.

  14. Development of a T7 Phage Display Library to Detect Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis by a Panel of Novel Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Talwar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease, diagnosed through tissue biopsy of involved organs in the absence of other causes such as tuberculosis (TB. No specific serologic test is available to diagnose and differentiate sarcoidosis from TB. Using a high throughput method, we developed a T7 phage display cDNA library derived from mRNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells and leukocytes of sarcoidosis patients. This complex cDNA library was biopanned to obtain 1152 potential sarcoidosis antigens and a microarray was constructed to immunoscreen two different sets of sera from healthy controls and sarcoidosis. Meta-analysis identified 259 discriminating sarcoidosis antigens, and multivariate analysis identified 32 antigens with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 83% to classify sarcoidosis from healthy controls. Additionally, interrogating the same microarray platform with sera from subjects with TB, we identified 50 clones that distinguish between TB, sarcoidosis and healthy controls. The top 10 sarcoidosis and TB specific clones were sequenced and homologies were searched in the public database revealing unique epitopes and mimotopes in each group. Here, we show for the first time that immunoscreenings of a library derived from sarcoidosis tissue differentiates between sarcoidosis and tuberculosis antigens. These novel biomarkers can improve diagnosis of sarcoidosis and TB, and may aid to develop or evaluate a TB vaccine.

  15. Wide dynamic range of surface-plasmon-resonance-based assay for Hepatitis-B-surface-antigen-antibody optimal detection in comparison with ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Yew Joon; Zeenathul, Nazariah Allaudin; Rezaei, Morvarid Akhavan; Mustafa, Nor Hidayah; Azmi, Mohd Lila Mohd; Bahaman, Abdul Rani; Lo, Sewn Cen; Tan, Joo Shun; Hani, Homayoun; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2016-08-10

    Limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ) and the dynamic range of detection of hepatitis B surface antigen antibody (anti-HBs) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip-based approach with Pichia pastoris derived recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) as recognition element were established through the scouting for optimal conditions for the improvement of immobilization efficiency and in the use of optimal regeneration buffer. Recombinant HBsAg was immobilized onto the sensor surface of CM5 chip at a concentration of 150 mg/L, in sodium acetate buffer at pH 4 with added 0.6% Triton X-100. Regeneration solution of 20 mM HCl was optimally found to effectively unbind analytes from the ligand, thus allowing for multiple screening cycles. A dynamic range of detection of ∼0.00098 to 0.25 mg/L was obtained and a 7-fold higher LOD, as well as a 2-fold increase in coefficient of variance (CV) of the replicated results, were shown as compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Evaluation of the assay for specificity showed no cross-reactivity with other antibodies tested. The ability of SPR chip-based assay and ELISA to detect anti-HBs in human serum was comparable, indicating that the SPR chip-based assay with its multiple screening capacity has greater advantage over ELISA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling bacteriophage amplification as a predictive tool for optimized MALDI-TOF MS-based bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher R; Rees, Jon C; Voorhees, Kent J

    2012-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a valuable tool for rapid bacterial detection and identification but is limited by the need for relatively high cell count samples, which have been grown under strictly controlled conditions. These requirements can be eliminated by the natural infection of a viable bacterial species of interest with a host-specific phage. This produces a rapid increase in phage protein concentrations in comparison to bacterial concentrations, which can in turn be exploited as a method for signal amplification during MALDI-TOF MS. One drawback to this approach is the requirement for repetitive, time-consuming sample preparation and analysis applied over the course of a phage infection to monitor phage concentrations as a function of time to determine the MALDI-TOF MS detection limit. To reduce the requirement for repeated preparation and analysis, a modified phage therapy model was investigated as a means for predicting the time during a given phage infection when a detectable signal would occur. The modified model used a series of three differential equations composed of predetermined experimental parameters including phage burst size and burst time to predict progeny phage concentrations as a function of time. Using Yersinia pestis with plague diagnostic phage φA1122 and Escherichia coli with phage MS2 as two separate, well-characterized model phage-host pairs, we conducted in silico modeling of the infection process and compared it with experimental infections monitored in real time by MALDI-TOF MS. Significant agreement between mathematically calculated phage growth curves and those experimentally obtained by MALDI-TOF MS was observed, thus verifying this method's utility for significant time and labor reduction.

  17. A Two-Tube Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens of Infectious Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea caused by viral and bacterial infections is a major health problem in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a two-tube multiplex PCR assay using automatic electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of 13 diarrhea-causative viruses or bacteria, with an intended application in provincial Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, China. The assay was designed to detect rotavirus A, norovirus genogroups GI and GII, human astrovirus, enteric adenoviruses, and human bocavirus (tube 1, and Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio cholera (tube 2. The analytical specificity was examined with positive controls for each pathogen. The analytical sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial tenfold dilutions of in vitro transcribed RNA, recombinant plasmids, or bacterial culture. A total of 122 stool samples were tested by this two-tube assay and the results were compared with those obtained from reference methods. The two-tube assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 102-103 CFU/mL for bacteria. The clinical performance demonstrated that the two-tube assay had comparable sensitivity and specificity to those of reference methods. In conclusion, the two-tube assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific, and high throughput method for the simultaneous detection of enteric bacteria and virus.

  18. [Qualitative and quantitative detection of bacterial flora in experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, H; Simes, G; Germer, C T; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-08-01

    In the blind loop syndrome bacterial overgrowth--accompanied by an increase in bile acid deconjugation--is thought to be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of the small intestinal mucosa with its concomitant malabsorption syndrome. Since in this chain of events the bacterial overgrowth is of primary importance, we have performed a complete qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the intraluminal flora in rats with surgically created self-filling blind loops. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the aerobic growing genera E. coli and Streptococcus (Enterococcus), and of the anaerobic growing genus Bacteroides, in one single rat also of the genera Lactobacillus/Bifidobacterium. In order to elucidate which strains of bacteria are predominantly responsible for the morphological and functional alterations observed in the stagnant loop syndrome, germ-free rats with self-filling blind loops should be contaminated selectively with bacteria of these genera.

  19. RIG-I detects infection with live Listeria by sensing secreted bacterial nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Schlee, Martin; Roth, Susanne; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Barchet, Winfried; Böttcher, Jan; Hain, Torsten; Geiger, Sergej; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Fritz, Jörg H; Civril, Filiz; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Ruland, Jürgen; Hartmann, Gunther; Chakraborty, Trinad; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-01-01

    Immunity against infection with Listeria monocytogenes is not achieved from innate immune stimulation by contact with killed but requires viable Listeria gaining access to the cytosol of infected cells. It has remained ill-defined how such immune sensing of live Listeria occurs. Here, we report that efficient cytosolic immune sensing requires access of nucleic acids derived from live Listeria to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that Listeria released nucleic acids and that such secreted bacterial RNA/DNA was recognized by the cytosolic sensors RIG-I, MDA5 and STING thereby triggering interferon β production. Secreted Listeria nucleic acids also caused RIG-I-dependent IL-1β-production and inflammasome activation. The signalling molecule CARD9 contributed to IL-1β production in response to secreted nucleic acids. In conclusion, cytosolic recognition of secreted bacterial nucleic acids by RIG-I provides a mechanistic explanation for efficient induction of immunity by live bacteria. PMID:23064150

  20. Identification of common bacterial antigenic markers from bovine digital dermatitis lesions using meta-transcriptomics in combination with high-density peptide-microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Marcatili, Paolo; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    for the development of disease prevention measures. As treponemes from DD lesions are extremely difficult to culture, identification of these antigens is challenging. To circumvent this problem, we studied the in situ gene expression patterns of the microbiome in DD-affected skin lesions and the host antibody......Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is the most important infectious cause of lameness in dairy cattle, and a major contributing factor to welfare problems and economic losses in the dairy cattle industry worldwide. DD is a disease that involves chronic dermal inflammatory processes and destruction...... of collagenous and connective tissues. Multiple Treponema species, many of which are not-yet-cultivable, are strongly implicated in disease progression. Despite the economic and welfare importance of this disease, no effective vaccine is available; and there is presently very little knowledge concerning...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF COMMON BACTERIAL ANTIGENIC MARKERS FROM BOVINE DIGITAL DERMATITIS LESIONS USING META-TRANSCRIPTOMICS IN COMBINATION WITH HIGH-DENSITY PEPTIDE-MICROARRAYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin W.; Marcatili, Paoli; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas

    for the development of disease prevention measures. As treponemes from DD lesions are extremely difficult to culture, identification of these antigens is challenging. To circumvent this problem, we studied the in situ gene expression patterns of the microbiome in DD-affected skin lesions and the host antibody......Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is the most important infectious cause of lameness in dairy cattle, and a major contributing factor to welfare problems and economic losses in the dairy cattle industry worldwide. DD is a disease that involves chronic dermal inflammatory processes and destruction...... of collagenous and connective tissues. Multiple Treponema species, many of which are not-yet-cultivable, are strongly implicated in disease progression. Despite the economic and welfare importance of this disease, no effective vaccine is available; and there is presently very little knowledge concerning...

  2. Bacterial discrimination by means of a universal array approach mediated by LDR (ligase detection reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consolandi Clarissa

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes provides the most comprehensive and flexible means of sampling bacterial communities. Sequence analysis of these cloned fragments can provide a qualitative and quantitative insight of the microbial population under scrutiny although this approach is not suited to large-scale screenings. Other methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, heteroduplex or terminal restriction fragment analysis are rapid and therefore amenable to field-scale experiments. A very recent addition to these analytical tools is represented by microarray technology. Results Here we present our results using a Universal DNA Microarray approach as an analytical tool for bacterial discrimination. The proposed procedure is based on the properties of the DNA ligation reaction and requires the design of two probes specific for each target sequence. One oligo carries a fluorescent label and the other a unique sequence (cZipCode or complementary ZipCode which identifies a ligation product. Ligated fragments, obtained in presence of a proper template (a PCR amplified fragment of the 16s rRNA gene contain either the fluorescent label or the unique sequence and therefore are addressed to the location on the microarray where the ZipCode sequence has been spotted. Such an array is therefore "Universal" being unrelated to a specific molecular analysis. Here we present the design of probes specific for some groups of bacteria and their application to bacterial diagnostics. Conclusions The combined use of selective probes, ligation reaction and the Universal Array approach yielded an analytical procedure with a good power of discrimination among bacteria.

  3. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing.

  4. Profiling and Quantitation of Bacterial Carotenoids by Liquid Chromatography and Photodiode Array Detection

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method for the profiling and quantitative determination of carotenoids in bacteria is described. Exhaustive extraction of the pigments from four selected bacterial strains required treatment of the cells with potassium hydroxide or liquefied phenol or both before the addition of the extracting solvent (methanol or diethyl ether). The carotenoids in the extracts were separated by nonaqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography in conjunction with photodiode array absorption detec...

  5. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  6. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  7. Prostate cancer detection upon transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in relation to digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen level: what to expect in the Chinese population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy YC Teoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prostate cancer detection rates upon transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy in relation to digital rectal examination (DRE and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and risk factors of prostate cancer detection in the Chinese population. Data from all consecutive Chinese men who underwent first TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from year 2000 to 2013 was retrieved from our database. The prostate cancer detection rates with reference to DRE finding and PSA level of 50 ng ml−1 were investigated. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate for potential risk factors of prostate cancer detection. A total of 2606 Chinese men were included. In patients with normal DRE, the cancer detection rates were 8.6%, 13.4%, 21.8%, 41.7% and 85.2% in patients with PSA 50 ng ml−1 respectively. In patients with abnormal DRE, the cancer detection rates were 12.4%, 30.2%, 52.7%, 80.6% and 96.4% in patients with PSA 50 ng ml−1 respectively. Older age, smaller prostate volume, larger number of biopsy cores, presence of abnormal DRE finding and higher PSA level were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer detection upon multivariate logistic regression analyses (P < 0.001. Chinese men appeared to have lower prostate cancer detection rates when compared to the Western population. Taking the different risk factors into account, an individualized approach to the decision of TRUS-guided biopsy can be adopted.

  8. MAP1272c encodes an NlpC/P60 protein, an antigen detected in cattle with Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Lingle, Cari K; Stabel, Judith R; Ramyar, Kasra X; Garcia, Brandon L; Raeber, Alex J; Schacher, Pascal; Kapur, Vivek; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2012-07-01

    The protein encoded by MAP1272c has been shown to be an antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that contains an NlpC/P60 superfamily domain found in lipoproteins or integral membrane proteins. Proteins containing this domain have diverse enzymatic functions that include peptidases, amidases, and acetyltransferases. The NlpC protein was examined in comparison to over 100 recombinant proteins and showed the strongest antigenicity when analyzed with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. To further localize the immunogenicity of NlpC, recombinant proteins representing defined regions were expressed and evaluated with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. The region from amino acids 74 to 279 was shown to be the most immunogenic. This fragment was also evaluated against a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two monoclonal antibodies were produced in mice immunized with the full-length protein, and each recognized a distinct epitope. These antibodies cross-reacted with proteins from other mycobacterial species and demonstrated variable sizes of the proteins expressed from these subspecies. Both antibodies were further analyzed, and their interaction with MAP1272c and MAP1204 was characterized by a solution-based, luminescent binding assay. These tools provide additional means to study a strong antigen of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  9. The use of magnetic resonance and MR angiography in the detection of cerebral infarction: A complication of pediatric bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić-Opinćal Tatjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground. Association of both cerebral infarction and acute bacterial meningitis is more common in younger patients than in the elderly. The rate of mortality and the frequency of sequel are very high inspite of the use of modern antibiotic therapy. In more than 30% of the cases of childhood bacterial meningitis, both arterial and venous infarctions can occur. The aim of this study was to present the role of the use of magnetic resonance (MRI, and MR angiography (MRA in the detection of bacterial meningitis in children complicated with cerebral infarctions. Method. In the Centre for MR, the Clinical Centre of Serbia, 25 patients with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, of which 9 children with cerebral infarction whose clinical conditon deteriorated acutely, despite the antibiotic therapy, underwent MRI and MR angiography examination on a 1T scanner. Examination included the conventional spin-echo techniques with T1-weighted saggital and coronal, and T2- weighted axial and coronal images. Coronal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR and the postcontrast T1-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were also used. The use MR angiography was accomplished by the three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF technique. Results. The findings included: multiple hemorrhagic infarction in 4 patients, multiple infarctions in 3 patients, focal infarction in 1 patient and diffuse infarction (1 patient. Common sites of involvement were: the frontal lobes, temporal lobes and basal ganglia. The majority of infarctions were bilateral. In 3 of the patients empyema was found, and in 1 patient bitemporal abscess was detected. In 8 of the patients MR angiography confirmed inflammatory vasculitis. Conclusion. Infarction is the most common sequel of severe meningitis in children. Since the complication of cerebral infarction influences the prognosis of meningitis, repetitive MRI examinations are very significant for the evaluation of the time course of

  10. LNA probes substantially improve the detection of bacterial endosymbionts in whole mount of insects by fluorescent in-situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Natarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of unculturable bacteria and their localization in the host, by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH, is a powerful technique in the study of host-bacteria interaction. FISH probes are designed to target the 16 s rRNA region of the bacteria to be detected. LNA probes have recently been used in FISH studies and proven to be more efficient. To date no report has employed LNA probes for FISH detection of bacterial endosymbiont in the whole mount tissues. Further, though speculated, bacteriocytes have not been reported from males of Bemisia tabaci. Results In this study, we compared the efficiency in detecting bacteria by fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides versus modified probes containing Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA substitution in their structure. We used the insect Bemisia tabaci as the experimental material since it carried simultaneous infection by two bacteria: one a primary endosymbiont, Portiera (and present in more numbers while the other a secondary endosymbiont Arsenophonus (and present in less numbers. Thus a variation in the abundance of bacteria was expected. While detecting both the bacteria, we found a significant increase in the signal whenever LNA probes were used. However, the difference was more pronounced in detecting the secondary endosymbiont, wherein DNA probes gave weak signals when compared to LNA probes. Also, signal to noise ratio for LNA probes was higher than DNA probes. We found that LNA considerably improved sensitivity of FISH, as compared to the commonly used DNA oligonucleotide probe. Conclusion By employing LNA probes we could detect endosymbiotic bacteria in males, which have never been reported previously. We were able to detect bacteriocytes containing Portiera and Arsenophonus in the males of B. tabaci. Thus, employing LNA probes at optimized conditions will help to significantly improve detection of bacteria at the lowest concentration and may give a comprehensible depiction

  11. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of the p27-CA protein of HERV-K(HML-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Oliver; Mostafa, Saeed; Norley, Stephen; Bannert, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    The detection or quantification of retroviruses is often achieved using an antigen-capture ELISA (AC-ELISA) that targets the Gag capsid (CA) protein. We report here the development of an AC-ELISA specific for the p27-CA protein of HERV-K(HML-2). A monoclonal p27-specific antibody is used for capture and a polyclonal anti-p27-CA immune serum generated in rabbits serves for detection. The assay was shown to be specific for HERV-K(HML-2), showing no evidence of cross reactivity with the human retroviruses HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-1 or with XMRV (as a model non-human gammaretrovirus). Using purified recombinant antigen, the limit of detection was shown to be 130pg/ml. The AC-ELISA can be used to quantify HERV-K(HML-2) expression in teratocarcinoma cell lines and to normalize HERV particles generated by transfecting HEK 293T cells with full-length molecular clones. This novel AC-ELISA also proved useful in studies of virus regulation, for example in demonstrating that HERV-K(HML-2) expression is dramatically enhanced by overexpression of Staufen-1, a binding partner of the HERV-K(HML-2) Rec protein. This specific and sensitive HERV-K(HML-2) AC-ELISA will be a useful tool for investigating many aspects of endogenous retroviruses, from basic research to the role they may play in human diseases or as a surrogate marker for particular diseases.

  12. A Highly Selective and Sensitive Fluorescence Detection Method of Glyphosate Based on an Immune Reaction Strategy of Carbon Dot Labeled Antibody and Antigen Magnetic Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duo; Lin, Bixia; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Yu, Ying

    2016-08-03

    A sensitive fluorescence detection method for glyphosate (GLY) was established based on immune reaction. First, carbon dot labeled antibodies (lgG-CDs) which were able to specifically identify glyphosate were prepared with the environmentally friendly carbon dots (CDs) and glyphosate antibody (lgG). lgG-CDs could be used to in situ visualize the distribution of glyphosate in plant tissues. In order to eliminate the effects of excess lgG-CDs on the determination of GLY, antigen magnetic beads Fe3O4-GLY based on magnetic nanoparticles Fe3O4 and glyphosate were constructed and utilized to couple with the excess lgG-CDs. After magnetic separation to remove antigen magnetic beads, there was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity of lgG-CDs and the logarithmic concentration of glyphosate in the range of 0.01-80 μg/mL with a detection limit of 8 ng/mL. The method was used for the detection of glyphosate in Pearl River water, tea, and soil samples with satisfactory recovery ratio between 87.4% and 103.7%.

  13. Serological cross-reactivity of three commercial in-house immunoassays for detection of Dirofilaria immitis antigens with Spirocerca lupi in dogs with benign esophageal spirocercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroch, Itamar; Rojas, Alicia; Slon, Paul; Lavy, Eran; Segev, Gilad; Baneth, Gad

    2015-07-30

    The nematode Spirocerca lupi infects dogs and is endemic in Israel. It leads to formation of esophageal nodules and neoplasia. Infection is diagnosed by coproscopy, endoscopy and radiography. Dirofilaria immitis causes heartworm disease in dogs, and has a world-wide distribution, but autochthonous infection has never been detected in Israel. Infection is confirmed based on identifying D. immitis microfilariae, in concentrated blood specimens by microscopy (Knott's test or other tests) and serological tests specifically detecting circulating adult worm antigens. In the first part of this study, sera from dogs definitively diagnosed with esophageal spirocercosis by endoscopy were examined using three in-house immunoassays for detecting D. immitis antigen, and were positive in 2/19 (10.5%), 5/35 (14.3%) and 14/48 (29.2%) dogs, in assays 1 to 3, respectively, with no statistical difference between assays (P=0.08). Next, sera from 32 additional dogs with confirmed esophageal spirocercosis, which were confirmed to be negative for D. immitis and Dirofilaria repens DNA using a sensitive high-resolution melt PCR were tested using assay 3 and 8/32 (25%) were positive. These results demonstrate serological cross-reactivity between D. immitis and S. lupi in blood samples of dogs. In areas where the distributions of both nematodes overlap, this cross-reactivity should be considered when dog are screened for heartworm disease.

  14. Rapid detection of S. mutans surface antigen I/II using a sensitive monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Ah; Jeon, Hyun-Soon; Shin, Se-Young; Baik, Byeong-Ju; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Gon

    2013-10-01

    The cell-surface protein antigen I/II (Ag I/II) is expressed in oral streptococci, which are known as the causative agent of a number of diseases including dental caries, endocarditis, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies (MAb) capable of recognizing the streptococcal Ag I/II protein could be a useful tool for the diagnosis and cure of these diseases. In this study, a previously generated monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody, ckAg I/II, was used to detect a small amount of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) surface antigen Ag I/II. The ckAg I/II was proved to be very sensitive and able to detect as little as 1 ng of recombinant Ag I/II protein within 5 min and Ag I/II in saliva within 10 min, as well as native Ag I/II in 20 μL of culture supernatant by ELISA. These results suggest that ckAg I/II can be used as a fast and efficient diagnostic tool to detect Ag I/II.

  15. Development of species-specific primers for detection of Streptococcus mutans in mixed bacterial samples

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhou; Saxena, Deepak; Caufield, Page W.; Ge, Yao; Wang, Minqi; Li, Yihong

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the major microbial pathogen associated with dental caries in children. The objectives of this study were to design and evaluate species-specific primers for the identification of S. mutans. Validation of the best primer set, Sm479F/R, was performed using 7 S. mutans reference strains, 48 ATCC non-S. mutans strains, 92 S. mutans clinical isolates, DNA samples of S. mutans-S. sobrinus or S. mutans-S. sanguinis, and mixed bacterial DNA of saliva samples from 33 18-month-...

  16. Universal Probe Library based real-time PCR for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens from positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Ding-Xia; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chao-Jun; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A set of real-time PCR based assays using the locked nucleic acid probes from Roche Universal ProbeLibrary were developed for rapid detection of eight bacterial species from positive blood culture bottles. Four duplex real-time PCR reactions targeting to one Gram-positive bacterium and one Gram-negative bacterium were optimized for species identification according to Gram stain results. We also included mecA-specific primers and probes in the assays to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The analytical sensitivity was in the range of 1-10 CFU per PCR reaction mixture. The specificity and cross reactivity of the assay was validated by 28 ATCC reference strains and 77 negative blood culture specimens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these samples thus demonstrating 100 % specificity. 72 previously characterized clinical isolates were tested by the real-time PCR assay and validated the accuracy and feasibility of the real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, 55 positive blood culture samples were tested using real-time PCR and 50 (90.9 %) of them were identified as the same species as judged by biochemical analysis. In total, real-time PCR showed 98.2 % consistent to that of traditional methods. Real-time PCR can be used as a supplement for early detection of the frequently-occurred pathogens from the positive blood cultures.

  17. Oxidative stress during bacterial growth characterized through microdialysis sampling coupled with HPLC/fluorescence detection of malondialdehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Keng-Chang; Hsu, Pi-Fu; Chen, Ya-Ching; Lin, Hsin-Chieh; Hung, Chih-Chang; Chen, Po-Chih; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2016-04-15

    Organisms that grow aerobically are routinely exposed to oxidative stress in the form of reactive oxygen species. Monitoring the dynamic variations of oxidative stress allows us to understand its role in basic cellular function and determine mechanisms of antioxidation. In this study, microdialysis (MD) sampling was employed for continuous monitoring of the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in a bacterium-inoculated culture broth. To test the practicality of this approach, oxidative stress was induced by cadmium and then a 60-min interval was selected to collect sufficient amounts of dialysate for high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence (HPLC-FL) detection. After optimization of this simple-to-operate, simultaneous, and continuous method for dynamic monitoring of MDA during periods of bacterial growth, a retrodialysis technique and a no-net-flux method were used to assess the probe recovery and analytical performance of the proposed system. The mean probe recovery of MDA was 78.6 ± 0.9%, with intra- and interday precisions of 2.7-6.1 and 3.5-7.6%, respectively. To evaluate the practicality of this method, the dynamic variations in the concentrations of MDA in standardized bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC(®) 29213™) were monitored continuously for 24h. The analytical results confirmed that this MD sampling technique combined with HPLC-FL detection can be used to accurately and continuously monitor the levels of MDA in microbially inoculated culture broths.

  18. Detection of Fastidious Vaginal Bacteria in Women with HIV Infection and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV using PCR methods. We assessed the prevalence of these bacteria in HIV-1 infected women and their relationship with vaginal pH and shedding of HIV-1 RNA. Methods. 64 cervicovaginal lavage (CVL samples were collected from 51 women. Vaginal microbiota were characterized using 8 bacterium-specific quantitative PCR assays. Results. Women with the fastidious bacteria Bacterial Vaginosis Associated Bacterium (BVAB 1, 2, and 3 showed a trend to increased HIV-1 shedding (OR 2.59–3.07, P=.14–.17. Absence of Lactobacillus crispatus (P<.005 and presence of BVAB2 (P<.001 were associated with elevated vaginal pH. BVAB1, 2, and 3 were highly specific indicators of BV in HIV-infected women, with specificities of 89%–93%. Conclusions. Fastidious bacteria (BVAB 1, 2, and 3 remain specific indicators of BV in HIV-infected women, and BVAB2 may contribute to the elevated vaginal pH that is a hallmark of this syndrome.

  19. Detection of bacterial endotoxin in drinking tap and bottled water in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulraheem, Abdulkareem; Mustafa, Seham; Al-Saffar, Nabeel; Shahjahan, Muhammed

    2012-12-01

    This study was carried out to measure and compare the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in a variety of samples from drinking tap and bottled water available in Kuwait by using the Limulus Amoebocyte lysate test. A total of 29 samples were tested. Samples were collected from a variety of locations throughout the six governorates of Kuwait and 23 brands of local and imported bottled water samples were collected from the local market. The concentration of bacterial endotoxin was measured by using the standard Limulus Amoebocyte lysate test, gel clot method. This study showed that measured endotoxin concentrations in tap drinking water varied from 2.4 to 33.8 EU/ml with the average endotoxin concentration of 14.2 EU/ml. While the results of endotoxin concentrations in the bottled water were bottled water is 13.5 % of the average concentration of endotoxin in tap drinking water. This experimental investigation has proved that drinking bottled water has less endotoxin as compared to tap water in Kuwait. It is also demonstrated that the endotoxin concentration did not exceed the acceptable level in drinking tap water.

  20. A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996. This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis.

  1. Schistosoma mansoni Infections in young children: when are schistosome antigens in urine, eggs in stool and antibodies to eggs first detectable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Russell Stothard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: in uganda, control of intestinal schistosomiasis with preventive chemotherapy is typically focused towards treatment of school-aged children; the needs of younger children are presently being investigated as in lakeshore communities very young children can be infected. In the context of future epidemiological monitoring, we sought to compare the detection thresholds of available diagnostic tools for Schistosoma mansoni and estimate a likely age of first infection for these children. METHODS AND FINDINGS: a total of 242 infants and preschool children (134 boys and 108 girls, mean age 2.9 years, minimum 5 months and maximum 5 years were examined from Bugoigo, a well-known disease endemic village on Lake Albert. Schistosome antigens in urine, eggs in stool and host antibodies to eggs were inspected to reveal a general prevalence of 47.5% (CI(95 41.1-54.0%, as ascertained by a positive criterion from at least one diagnostic method. Although children as young as 6 months old could be found infected, the average age of infected children was between 3¼-3¾ years, when diagnostic techniques became broadly congruent. CONCLUSION: whilst different assays have particular (disadvantages, direct detection of eggs in stool was least sensitive having a temporal lag behind antigen and antibody methods. Setting precisely a general age of first infection is problematic but if present Ugandan policies continue, a large proportion of infected children could wait up to 3-4 years before receiving first medication. To better tailor treatment needs for this younger ageclass, we suggest that the circulating cathodic antigen urine dipstick method to be used as an epidemiological indicator.

  2. The clinical usefulness of the SD Bioline Influenza Antigen Test® for detecting the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Suk; Noh, Ji Yun; Huh, Joong Yeon; Kee, Sae Yoon; Jeong, Hye Won; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2011-07-01

    Though the 2009 worldwide influenza A (H1N1) pandemic has been declared to have ended, the influenza virus is expected to continue to circulate from some years as a seasonal influenza. A rapid antigen test (RAT) can aid in rapid diagnosis and allow for early antiviral treatment. We evaluated the clinical usefulness of RAT using SD Bioline Influenza Antigen Test® kit to detect the influenza virus, considering various factors. From August 1, 2009 to October 10, 2009, a total of 938 patients who visited the outpatient clinic at Korea University Guro Hospital with influenza-like illnesses were enrolled in the study. Throat or nasopharyngeal swab specimens were obtained from each of the patients. Using these specimens, we evaluated the influenza detection rate by rapid antigen test based on the real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) method. In comparison with rRT-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of the RAT were 44.0% and 99.9%, respectively. The cyclic threshold values of RAT negative specimens were higher than RAT positive specimens (30.1±3.1 vs. 28.3±3.9, p=0.031). The sensitivity of the RAT kit was higher in patients who visited clinics within two days of symptom onset (60.4% vs. 11.1%, p=0.026). The results of this study show that the RAT cannot be recommended for general use in all patients with influenza-like illness because of its low sensitivity. The RAT may be used, only in the settings with limited diagnostic resources, for patients who visit a clinic within two days of symptom onse.

  3. Scalable DNA-Based Magnetic Nanoparticle Agglutination Assay for Bacterial Detection in Patient Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezger, Anja; Fock, Jeppe; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins

    2015-01-01

    (MNPs) using low-cost optoelectronic components from Blu-ray drives. We implement a detection approach, which relies on the monomerization of the RCA products, the use of the monomers to link and agglutinate two populations of MNPs functionalized with universal nontarget specific detection probes...... and on the introduction of a magnetic incubation scheme. This enables multiplex detection of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at clinically relevant concentrations, demonstrating a factor of 30 improvement in sensitivity compared to previous MNP-based detection schemes. Thanks...... to the universal probes, the same set of functionalized MNPs can be used to read out products from a multitude of RCA targets, making the approach truly scalable for parallel detection of multiple bacteria in a future integrated point of care molecular diagnostics system....

  4. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase and nitrite strip tests to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagent strips for bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP).METHODS: A total of 63 consecutive patients with cirrhotic ascites (38 male, 25 female) tested between April 2005 and July 2006 were included in the study. Bedside reagent strip testing was performed on ascitic fluid and the results compared to manual cell counting and ascitic fluid culture. SBP was defined as having a olymorphonuclear ascites count of ≥ 250/mm3.RESULTS: Fifteen samples showed SBP. The sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the leukocyte esterase reagent strips were; 93%, 100%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the nitrite reagent strips were 13%, 93%, 40%, and 77%, respectively. The combination of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagents strips did not yield statistically significant effects on diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: Leukocyte esterase reagent strips may provide a rapid, bedside diagnostic test for SBP.

  5. Detection of Bundle Branch Block using Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavthi Kora

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The medical practitioners analyze the electrical activity of the human heart so as to predict various ailments by studying the data collected from the Electrocardiogram (ECG. A Bundle Branch Block (BBB is a type of heart disease which occurs when there is an obstruction along the pathway of an electrical impulse. This abnormality makes the heart beat irregular as there is an obstruction in the branches of heart, this results in pulses to travel slower than the usual. Our current study involved is to diagnose this heart problem using Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization (ABFO Algorithm. The Data collected from MIT/BIH arrhythmia BBB database applied to an ABFO Algorithm for obtaining best(important feature from each ECG beat. These features later fed to Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMNN based classifier. The results show the proposed classification using ABFO is better than some recent algorithms reported in the literature.

  6. A solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the antigenic detection of Legionella pneumophila (serogroup 1): A compliment for the space station diagnostic capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmancik, Kelly E.

    1987-01-01

    It is necessary that an adequate microbiology capability be provided as part of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to support expected microbial disease events and environmental monitoring during long periods of space flight. The application of morphological and biochemical studies to confirm the presence of certain bacterial and fungal disease agents are currently available and under consideration. This confirmation would be facilitated through employment of serological methods to aid in the identification of bacterial, fungal, and viral agents. A number of serological approaches are currently being considered, including the use of Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technology, which could be utilized during microgravity conditions. A solid phase, membrane supported ELISA for the detection of Legionella pneumophila, an expected disease agent, was developed to show a potential model system that would meet the HMF requirements and specifications for the future space station. These studies demonstrate the capability of membrane supported ELISA systems for identification of expected microbial disease agents as part of the HMF.

  7. Identification of Antigenic Proteins of the Nosocomial Pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens and their linear

  8. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

  9. A sensitive, support-vector-machine method for the detection of horizontal gene transfers in viral, archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In earlier work, we introduced and discussed a generalized computational framework for identifying horizontal transfers. This framework relied on a gene's nucleotide composition, obviated the need for knowledge of codon boundaries and database searches, and was shown to perform very well across a wide range of archaeal and bacterial genomes when compared with previously published approaches, such as Codon Adaptation Index and C + G content. Nonetheless, two considerations remained outstanding: we wanted to further increase the sensitivity of detecting horizontal transfers and also to be able to apply the method to increasingly smaller genomes. In the discussion that follows, we present such a method, Wn-SVM, and show that it exhibits a very significant improvement in sensitivity compared with earlier approaches. Wn-SVM uses a one-class support-vector machine and can learn using rather small training sets. This property makes Wn-SVM particularly suitable for studying small-size genomes, similar to those of viruses, as well as the typically larger archaeal and bacterial genomes. We show experimentally that the new method results in a superior performance across a wide range of organisms and that it improves even upon our own earlier method by an average of 10% across all examined genomes. As a small-genome case study, we analyze the genome of the human cytomegalovirus and demonstrate that Wn-SVM correctly identifies regions that are known to be conserved and prototypical of all beta-herpesvirinae, regions that are known to have been acquired horizontally from the human host and, finally, regions that had not up to now been suspected to be horizontally transferred. Atypical region predictions for many eukaryotic viruses, including the alpha-, beta- and gamma-herpesvirinae, and 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, have been made available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT_SVM/.

  10. Detection and confirmation of PPR virus antigen in sheep and goats by sandwich-ELISA and RT-PCR in Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Saritha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild small ruminants. Rapid and accurate laboratory assay are essential to enable the implementation of appropriate control strategies to restrict the spread of PPR. The present study was designed to detect the PPR virus (PPRV antigen (N-gene in nasal swabs and tissue samples. A total of 195 samples comprising of 138 nasal swabs from PPR suspected sheep (n=72 and goats (n=66, and 57 tissue samples comprising of lymph nodes from dead sheep (n=39 and goats (n=18 were collected from certain parts of Andhra Pradesh. The samples were subjected to sandwich-ELISA followed by RT-PCR for confirmatory diagnosis. In this study, PPRV could be detected in 27.53% (n=38/138 nasal swabs and 49.12% (n=28/57 tissue samples. Data showed that PPRV infection is widespread in the Andhra Pradesh, India.

  11. E2 GLYCOPROTEIN OF GENOTYPE Ⅲ CHINESE ISOLATES OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS EXPRESSED IN MAMMALIAN CELL AS ANTIGEN FOR ANTI-E2 ANTIBODY DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝栋; 陶其敏

    1998-01-01

    Expression vector inserted with E2/NS1 gane derived from ganotype Ⅲ Chinese isolates of HCV was transfected into mammalian cells to express E2 glycoprotein. Expressed protein was used as antigen for anti-E2 antibody detection in 19 cases of hepatitis C patients by Western blot. It was first to express E2 glycoprotein of genotype Ⅲ Chinese hepatitis C virus isolates. For anti-E2 detection, 14 cases of patients were positive of antibodies against E2(73.7%). These results indicated that E2 glycoprotein expressed in mammalian cells had good immunoganicity and cross reactivity to serum infected with genotype Ⅱ Chinese hepatitis C virus isolates.

  12. Surface antigens and potential virulence factors from parasites detected by comparative genomics of perfect amino acid repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler Joël

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many parasitic organisms, eukaryotes as well as bacteria, possess surface antigens with amino acid repeats. Making up the interface between host and pathogen such repetitive proteins may be virulence factors involved in immune evasion or cytoadherence. They find immunological applications in serodiagnostics and vaccine development. Here we use proteins which contain perfect repeats as a basis for comparative genomics between parasitic and free-living organisms. Results We have developed Reptile http://reptile.unibe.ch, a program for proteome-wide probabilistic description of perfect repeats in proteins. Parasite proteomes exhibited a large variance regarding the proportion of repeat-containing proteins. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the percentage of highly repetitive proteins and mean protein length in parasite proteomes, but not at all in the proteomes of free-living eukaryotes. Reptile combined with programs for the prediction of transmembrane domains and GPI-anchoring resulted in an effective tool for in silico identification of potential surface antigens and virulence factors from parasites. Conclusion Systemic surveys for perfect amino acid repeats allowed basic comparisons between free-living and parasitic organisms that were directly applicable to predict proteins of serological and parasitological importance. An on-line tool is available at http://genomics.unibe.ch/dora.

  13. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Tissue Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Porcine Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane;

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an efficient technique for the identification of specific bacteria in tissue of both experimental and spontaneous infections. The method detects specific sequences of nucleic acids by hybridization of fluorescently labeled probes to complementary targe...

  14. Co-ordinate action of bacterial adhesins and human carcinoembryonic antigen receptors in enhanced cellular invasion by capsulate serum resistant Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Helen A; Griffiths, Natalie J; Hill, Darryl J; Virji, Mumtaz

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is a human specific opportunistic pathogen that occasionally penetrates mucosal barriers via the action of adhesins and invasins and evades host immune mechanisms during further dissemination via capsule expression. From in vitro studies, the primary adhesion of capsulate bacteria is believed to be mediated by polymeric pili, followed by invasion via outer membrane adhesins such as Opa proteins. As the latter requires the surface capsule to be down-modulated, invading bacteria would be serum sensitive and thus avirulent. However, there is recent evidence that capsulate bacteria may interact via Opa proteins when host cells express high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs), their target receptors. Such a situation may arise following increased circulation of inflammatory cytokines that upregulate certain adhesion molecules on host cells. In this study, using a tetracycline controlled expression system, we have developed cell lines with inducible CEACAM expression to mimic post-inflammation state of target tissues and analysed the interplay between the three surface components capsule, pili and Opa proteins in cellular interactions. With two distinct cell lines, not only the level but also the rate of adhesion of capsulate Opa-expressing Nm increased concurrently with CEACAM density. Moreover, when threshold levels of receptor were reached, cellular invasion ensued in an Opa-dependent manner. In studies with cell lines intrinsically expressing pilus receptors, notable synergism in cellular interactions between pili and Opa of several meningococcal strains was observed and was independent of capsule type. A number of internalized bacteria were shown to express capsule and when directly isolated from host cells, these bacteria were as serum resistant as the inoculated phenotype. Furthermore, we observed that agents that block Opa-CEACAM binding substantially reduced cellular invasion, while maintaining

  15. A locked nucleic acid (LNA-based real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of multiple bacterial antibiotic resistance genes directly from positive blood culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxiang Zhu

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1-10 colony forming units (CFU per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4% were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates.

  16. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurath, A.R. (Lindsley F. Kimbell Research Inst., New York, NY); Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  17. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  18. "DETECTION OF BACTERIAL, METHICILLIN RESISTANCE, AND β-LACTAMASE GENES FOUND IN WOUND SWABS BY MULTIPLEX POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sadeghian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase-positive and coagulase negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci are major causes of serious nosocomial infections and it is very important to have a reliable test to detect these bacteria. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR was used on 100 clinical samples for simultaneous amplification of the universal bacterial, mec-A encoding the penicillin binding protein 2a, which is associated with staphylococcal methicillin resistance and TEM-1 encoding the β-lactamase, which accounts for the majority of all cases of the plasmid β-lactamase resistance worldwide. Out of 100 wound swabs tested, 99% with universal primers, 26% with TEM-1 primers and 6% with mec-A primers were positive. Dot blot Digoxigenin hybridization on the 30 samples was carried out to confirm identified bacteria with specific bacterial probes. Out of 100 wound swabs, 38% were positive with Staphylococcus aureus probe, 23% were positive with enteric bacteria probe, 7% were positive with Streptococcus agalactia probe and 1% were positive with Haemophilus influenza probe. The mPCR method used in this study, was designed to be incorporated into the workflow of the clinical microbiology laboratory and allows for the identification of intrinsic resistance in a timely and reliable manner.

  19. Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascariello Caterina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. As regards human normal bone marrow, detailed characterization of ALDH+ cells has been addressed by one single study (Gentry et al, 2007. The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors. To this aim, we used three kinds of approach: i multidimensional analytical flow cytometry, detecting ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens in normal bone marrow; ii fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation; iii detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients. Results In normal bone marrow, we identified three populations of cells, namely ALDH+CD34+, ALDH-CD34+ and ALDH+CD34- (median percentages were 0.52, 0.53 and 0.57, respectively. As compared to ALDH-CD34+ cells, ALDH+CD34+ cells expressed the phenotypic profile of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells, with brighter expression of CD117 and CD133, accompanied by lower display of CD38 and CD45RA. Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences. First of all, ALDH+CD34- cells showed a CD71bright, CD105+, CD45- phenotype. Secondly, induction of differentiation experiments evidenced a clear-cut expression of glycophorin A (CD235a. Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA. Conclusion Our study, comparing surface antigen expression of

  20. Automated Image Analysis for the Detection of Benthic Crustaceans and Bacterial Mat Coverage Using the VENUS Undersea Cabled Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Aguzzi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and deployment of sensors for undersea cabled observatories is presently biased toward the measurement of habitat variables, while sensor technologies for biological community characterization through species identification and individual counting are less common. The VENUS cabled multisensory network (Vancouver Island, Canada deploys seafloor camera systems at several sites. Our objective in this study was to implement new automated image analysis protocols for the recognition and counting of benthic decapods (i.e., the galatheid squat lobster, Munida quadrispina, as well as for the evaluation of changes in bacterial mat coverage (i.e., Beggiatoa spp., using a camera deployed in Saanich Inlet (103 m depth. For the counting of Munida we remotely acquired 100 digital photos at hourly intervals from 2 to 6 December 2009. In the case of bacterial mat coverage estimation, images were taken from 2 to 8 December 2009 at the same time frequency. The automated image analysis protocols for both study cases were created in MatLab 7.1. Automation for Munida counting incorporated the combination of both filtering and background correction (Median- and Top-Hat Filters with Euclidean Distances (ED on Red-Green-Blue (RGB channels. The Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT features and Fourier Descriptors (FD of tracked objects were then extracted. Animal classifications were carried out with the tools of morphometric multivariate statistic (i.e., Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis; PLSDA on Mean RGB (RGBv value for each object and Fourier Descriptors (RGBv+FD matrices plus SIFT and ED. The SIFT approach returned the better results. Higher percentages of images were correctly classified and lower misclassification errors (an animal is present but not detected occurred. In contrast, RGBv+FD and ED resulted in a high incidence of records being generated for non-present animals. Bacterial mat coverage was estimated in terms of Percent

  1. Automated image analysis for the detection of benthic crustaceans and bacterial mat coverage using the VENUS undersea cabled network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Costa, Corrado; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Antonucci, Francesca; Juniper, S Kim; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The development and deployment of sensors for undersea cabled observatories is presently biased toward the measurement of habitat variables, while sensor technologies for biological community characterization through species identification and individual counting are less common. The VENUS cabled multisensory network (Vancouver Island, Canada) deploys seafloor camera systems at several sites. Our objective in this study was to implement new automated image analysis protocols for the recognition and counting of benthic decapods (i.e., the galatheid squat lobster, Munida quadrispina), as well as for the evaluation of changes in bacterial mat coverage (i.e., Beggiatoa spp.), using a camera deployed in Saanich Inlet (103 m depth). For the counting of Munida we remotely acquired 100 digital photos at hourly intervals from 2 to 6 December 2009. In the case of bacterial mat coverage estimation, images were taken from 2 to 8 December 2009 at the same time frequency. The automated image analysis protocols for both study cases were created in MatLab 7.1. Automation for Munida counting incorporated the combination of both filtering and background correction (Median- and Top-Hat Filters) with Euclidean Distances (ED) on Red-Green-Blue (RGB) channels. The Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features and Fourier Descriptors (FD) of tracked objects were then extracted. Animal classifications were carried out with the tools of morphometric multivariate statistic (i.e., Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis; PLSDA) on Mean RGB (RGBv) value for each object and Fourier Descriptors (RGBv+FD) matrices plus SIFT and ED. The SIFT approach returned the better results. Higher percentages of images were correctly classified and lower misclassification errors (an animal is present but not detected) occurred. In contrast, RGBv+FD and ED resulted in a high incidence of records being generated for non-present animals. Bacterial mat coverage was estimated in terms of Percent Coverage

  2. Comprehensive detection and identification of bacterial DNA in the blood of patients with sepsis and healthy volunteers using next-generation sequencing method - the observation of DNAemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosiewski, T; Ludwig-Galezowska, A H; Huminska, K; Sroka-Oleksiak, A; Radkowski, P; Salamon, D; Wojciechowicz, J; Kus-Slowinska, M; Bulanda, M; Wolkow, P P

    2017-02-01

    Blood is considered to be a sterile microenvironment, in which bacteria appear only periodically. Previously used methods allowed only for the detection of either viable bacteria with low sensitivity or selected species of bacteria. The Next-Generation Sequencing method (NGS) enables the identification of all bacteria in the sample with their taxonomic classification. We used NGS for the analysis of blood samples from healthy volunteers (n = 23) and patients with sepsis (n = 62) to check whether any bacterial DNA exists in the blood of healthy people and to identify bacterial taxonomic profile in the blood of septic patients. The presence of bacterial DNA was found both in septic and healthy subjects; however, bacterial diversity was significantly different (P = 0.002) between the studied groups. Among healthy volunteers, a significant predominance of anaerobic bacteria (76.2 %), of which most were bacteria of the order Bifidobacteriales (73.0 %), was observed. In sepsis, the majority of detected taxa belonged to aerobic or microaerophilic microorganisms (75.1 %). The most striking difference was seen in the case of Actinobacteria phyla, the abundance of which was decreased in sepsis (P detected in the blood of healthy people and that its taxonomic composition is different from the one seen in septic patients. Detection of bacterial DNA in the blood of healthy people may suggest that bacteria continuously translocate into the blood, but not always cause sepsis; this observation can be called DNAemia.

  3. An integrated flow cytometry-based system for real-time, high sensitivity bacterial detection and identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan A Buzatu

    Full Text Available Foodborne illnesses occur in both industrialized and developing countries, and may be increasing due to rapidly evolving food production practices. Yet some primary tools used to assess food safety are decades, if not centuries, old. To improve the time to result for food safety assessment a sensitive flow cytometer based system to detect microbial contamination was developed. By eliminating background fluorescence and improving signal to noise the assays accurately measure bacterial load or specifically identify pathogens. These assays provide results in minutes or, if sensitivity to one cell in a complex matrix is required, after several hours enrichment. Conventional assessments of food safety require 48 to 56 hours. The assays described within are linear over 5 orders of magnitude with results identical to culture plates, and report live and dead microorganisms. This system offers a powerful approach to real-time assessment of food safety, useful for industry self-monitoring and regulatory inspection.

  4. [Review on characteristics and detecting assay of bacterial endotoxin contamination in water environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Lu; Tian, Fang; Yang, Yi; An, Dai-Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharide complexes, are anchored in the outer membrane cell wall of most Gram-negative bacteria and some cyanobacteria. They are continuously released to environment during cell decay. Being common pyrogens and highly immunogenic molecules, endotoxins are related to many human diseases. Due to the tolerances and thermo-stability of endotoxin molecules, they were hard to be removed by common methods. The health risk caused by the endotoxin contamination in drinking water and water environment by various exposure pathways have attracted more and more attention in recent years. In this paper, the physical and chemical properties, biological activities and detection assay of the endotoxin contamination were reviewed, and interfere factors of the main assay, the LAL/TAL (Limulus amebocyte lysate/Tachypleus amebocyte lysate) assay, for detecting endotoxin in water sample were investigated, and the development tendency of the endotoxin detection assay was analyzed.

  5. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten /sup 125/I-L-Ala-..gamma..-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. A new bacterial biosensor for trichloroethylene detection based on a three-dimensional carbon nanotubes bioarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnaien, Mouna; Lagarde, Florence; Bausells, Joan; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2011-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a suspected human carcinogen, is one of the most common volatile groundwater contaminants. Many different methodologies have already been developed for the determination of TCE and its degradation products in water, but most of them are costly, time-consuming and require well-trained operators. In this work, a fast, sensitive and miniaturised whole cell conductometric biosensor was developed for the determination of trichloroethylene. The biosensor assembly was prepared by immobilising Pseudomonas putida F1 bacteria (PpF1) at the surface of gold interdigitated microelectrodes through a three-dimensional alkanethiol self-assembly monolayer/carbon nanotube architecture functionalised with Pseudomonas antibodies. The biosensor response was linear from 0.07 to 100 μM of TCE (9-13,100 μg L(-1)). No significant loss of the enzymatic activity was observed after 5 weeks of storage at 4 °C in the M457 pH 7 defined medium (two or three measurements per week). Ninety-two per cent of the initial signal still remained after 7 weeks. The biosensor response to TCE was not significantly affected by cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride and, in a limited way, by phenol. Toluene was the major interference found. The bacterial biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of TCE in spiked groundwater samples and in six water samples collected in an urban industrial site contaminated with TCE. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of these samples confirmed the biosensor measurements.

  7. TDtest: easy detection of bacterial tolerance and persistence in clinical isolates by a modified disk-diffusion assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Orit; Chekol, Betty; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic tolerance - the ability for prolonged survival under bactericidal treatments - is a potentially clinically significant phenomenon that is commonly overlooked in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Recent in vitro experiments show that high tolerance can evolve under intermittent antibiotic treatments in as little as eight exposures to high doses of antibiotics, suggesting that tolerance may evolve also in patients. However, tests for antibiotic susceptibilities, such as the disk-diffusion assay, evaluate only the concentration at which a bacterial strain stops growing, namely resistance level. High tolerance strains will not be detected using these tests. We present a simple modification of the standard disk-diffusion assay that allows the semi-quantitative evaluation of tolerance levels. This novel method, the “TDtest”, enabled the detection of tolerant and persistent bacteria by promoting the growth of the surviving bacteria in the inhibition zone, once the antibiotic has diffused away. Using the TDtest, we were able to detect different levels of antibiotic tolerance in clinical isolates of E. coli. The TDtest also identified antibiotics that effectively eliminate tolerant bacteria. The additional information on drug susceptibility provided by the TDtest should enable tailoring better treatment regimens for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28145464

  8. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of bacterial colonization in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jun-sheng; LIU Zhong-hui; LI Chu-jun; WU Xiao-bin; DIAO De-chang; DU Yan-ping; CHEN Jun-rong; LI Yun; WANG Hua-she

    2010-01-01

    Background Techniques for the fast and accurate detection of bacterial infection are critical for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of bacterial translocation in clinical severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In this study, the availability of a real-time PCR method in detection of bacterial colonization in SAP rat models was investigated.Methods Samples of blood, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), pancreas and liver from 24 specific pathogen-free rats (8 in a control group, 16 in a SAP group) were detected for bacterial infection rates both by agar plate culture and a real-time PCR method, and the results were made contrast.Results Bacterial infection rates of the blood, MLN, pancreas and liver in the SAP group and the control group by the two different methods were almost the same, which were 5/16, 12/16, 15/16, 12/16 in the SAP group compared with 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 in the control group by agar plate culture, while 5/16, 10/16, 13/16, 12/16 and 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 respectively by a real-time PCR method. Bacterial number was estimated by real-time PCR, which showed that in the same mass of tissues, the pancreas contained more bacteria than the other three kinds of organs in SAP rats (P <0.01), that may be due to the edema, necrosis and hemorrhage existing in the pancreas, making it easier for bacteria to invade and breed.Conclusion Fast and accurate detection of bacterial translocation in SAP rat models could be carried out by a real-time PCR procedure.

  9. Comparison of Digital Rectal Examination and Serum Prostate Specific Antigen in the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Clinical Trial of 6,630 Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalona, William J; Richie, Jerome P; Ahmann, Frederick R; Hudson, M'Liss A; Scardino, Peter T; Flanigan, Robert C; DeKernion, Jean B; Ratliff, Timothy L; Kavoussi, Louis R; Dalkin, Bruce L; Waters, W Bedford; MacFarlane, Michael T; Southwick, Paula C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of digital rectal examination and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer, we conducted a prospective clinical trial at 6 university centers of 6,630 male volunteers 50 years old or older who underwent PSA determination (Hybritech Tandom-E or Tandem-R assays) and digital rectal examination. Quadrant biopsies were performed if the PSA level was greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination was suspicious, even if transrectal ultrasonography revealed no areas suspicious for cancer. The results showed that 15% of the men had a PSA level of greater than 4 μg./l., 15% had a suspicious digital rectal examination and 26% had suspicious findings on either or both tests. Of 1,167 biopsies performed cancer was detected in 264. PSA detected significantly more tumors (82%, 216 of 264 cancers) than digital rectal examination (55%, 146 of 264, p = 0.001). The cancer detection rate was 3.2% for digital rectal examination, 4.6% for PSA and 5.8% for the 2 methods combined. Positive predictive value was 32% for PSA and 21% for digital rectal examination. Of 160 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and pathological staging 114 (71%) had organ confined cancer: PSA detected 85 (75%) and digital rectal examination detected 64 (56%, p = 0.003). Use of the 2 methods in combination increased detection of organ confined disease by 78% (50 of 64 cases) over digital rectal examination alone. If the performance of a biopsy would have required suspicious transrectal ultrasonography findings, nearly 40% of the tumors would have been missed. We conclude that the use of PSA in conjunction with digital rectal examination enhances early prostate cancer detection. Prostatic biopsy should be considered if either the PSA level is greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination is suspicious for cancer, even in the absence of abnormal transrectal ultrasonography findings.

  10. Direct detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in bacterial DNA by SNPtrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Hugo Ahlm; Moen, Birgitte; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fingerprinting of bacteria and higher organisms is the combination of genome-wide screenings with the potential of multiplexing and accurate SNP detection. Single-nucleotide extension by the minisequencing principle represents a technolo...

  11. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles film stabilizing gold nanoparticles as a versatile platform for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Zhang, Rongli; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Ye; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoya; Luo, Jing

    2017-06-15

    In this work, a novel impedimetric immunosensor was developed based on electrophoretic deposition of polymeric self-assembled nanoparticles for the sensitive determination of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles γ-PGA-DA@CS were prepared by self-assembly of chitosan (CS) and dopamine modified poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA-DA) under mild conditions. A dense and nanostructured nanoparticles film was obtained on the electrode surface by electrophoretic deposition of γ-PGA-DA@CS nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were then tightly anchored on γ-PGA-DA@CS film with homogeneous dispersion due to numerous exposed dopamine adhesive dots present on the surface of γ-PGA-DA@CS. The obtained Au/γ-PGA-DA@CS nanocomposite film not only increases the electrode surface area in nanoscale dimension, but also provides a highly stable and biocompatible matrix for the convenient conjugation of antibody, thus providing a high-efficiency immunoassay platform. Monoclonal antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA-Ab) were effectively immobilized on the Au/γ-PGA-DA@CS film and a label-free impedimetric immunosensor was fabricated successfully as the ultimate goal. Under optimal conditions, the resultant immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range from 2.0×10(-14)gmL(-1) to 2.0×10(-8)gmL(-1) for the detection of CEA with a low detection limit of 10fgmL(-1). To the best of our knowledge, this was the lowest detection limit compared with other counterparts of label-free impedimetric immunosensors. Moreover, the immunosensor showed high specificity, good stability and satisfactory reproducibility. As a proof of concept, the proposed strategy provided a promising and versatile platform for clinical immunoassay of other tumor markers and biomolecules.

  12. Bacterial coinfections in children with viral wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, P; Jartti, T; Virkki, R; Vuorinen, T; Leinonen, M; Peltola, V; Ruohola, A; Ruuskanen, O

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial coinfections occur in respiratory viral infections, but the attack rates and the clinical profile are not clear. The aim of this study was to determine bacterial coinfections in children hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing with defined viral etiology. A total of 220 children aged 3 months to 16 years were investigated. The viral etiology of wheezing was confirmed by viral culture, antigen detection, serologic investigation, and/or PCR. Specific antibodies to common respiratory bacteria were measured from acute and convalescent serum samples. All children were examined clinically for acute otitis media, and subgroups of children were examined radiologically for sinusitis and pneumonia. Rhinovirus (32%), respiratory syncytial virus (31%), and enteroviruses (31%) were the most common causative viruses. Serologic evidence of bacterial coinfection was found in 18% of the children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%) were the most common causative bacteria. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 44% of the children. Chest radiographs showed alveolar infiltrates in 10%, and paranasal radiographs and clinical signs showed sinusitis in 17% of the older children studied. Leukocyte counts and serum C-reactive protein levels were low in a great majority of patients. Viral lower respiratory tract infection in children is often associated with bacterial-type upper respiratory tract infections. However, coexisting bacterial lower respiratory tract infections that induce systemic inflammatory response are seldom detected.

  13. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  14. Detection of bacterial species involved in perimplantitis concerned with cultural and RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Gatti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants offer new treatment options for edentulous either partially or completely, now represent a viable alternative to conventional fixed protheses. Dental implants are colonized by a flora dominated by Gram-positive facultative aerobic, while in patients with bone loss and formation of pockets peri-implant diseases was found a significant difference in the composition of microflora, bacteria, Gram-negative anaerobes in particular Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola (Spirochetes, Tannerella forsythensis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia as interim black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, often in high concentrations. Aims. The purpose of this study was to identify those at risk of perimplantitis using 2 techniques: RT-PCR examination of trade and culture. The results were compared taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. Materials and methods.We studied 24 patients (14 women and 10 men, aged, women between 43 and 76 years, with an average of 63.8 + / - 10.9 years, men between 45 and 88 years with a average of 64.3 years + / - 12.5 years. Was performed a double levy of sub-gingival plaque at multiple sites that had an implant CAL (clinical attachment level> 4mm in order to assess the microbiological identification with the two techniques: Examining culture and Real-Time PCR of Commerce ( Gum-Sunstar that identifies 4 bacterial species: A. actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., P.gingivalis (P.g., T.forsythensis (T.f., and T.denticola (T.d.. Results. All patients studied were positive to both tests with charger high: the consideration of tenure, with CFU / ml > 105, was positive in 66.6% of samples by:T.f., and P.g., in 12.5% for A.a., while T.d. not been sought by examining culture, the RT-PCR was positive, with high loads, in 95.8% of samples for T.f., in 79.1% for P.g., in 12.5% for A.a. and 20.8% for T.d.The test crop showed the presence of even P.intermedia in 91

  15. Detection of HbA(1c) by boronate affinity immunoassay using bacterial magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Matsunaga, T

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a boronate affinity immunoassay system using m-aminophenylboronic acid (mAPB) coupling to bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). Homobifunctional crosslinker, Bis-(succcimidyl)suberate (BS3), was employed for preparation of mAPB-BMPs conjugates (mAPB-BMPs). Quantities of HbA(1c) on mAPB-BMPs were evaluated based on luminescence from alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-Hb antibody (ALP-antibody) binding to HbA(1c) on the BMP surface. The binding of HbA(1c) to mAPB-BMPs occurred gradually and was almost completed within 10 mm. The coupling reaction is enhanced due to static electric interaction between the positive charges on HbA(1c) and negative charges on BMPs. The amount of HbA(1c) binding to mAPB-BMPs increased with increasing sodium chloride concentrations in the range of 0-100 mM. However, the amount of Hb binding to mAPB-BMPs also increased in high concentration of sodium chloride. The Hb binding to mAPB-BMPs was detached from mAPB-BMPs when Hb-mAPB-BMPs were washed with low salt buffer. This indicates that Hb is nonspecifically adsorbed onto the surface of mAPB-BMPs in high concentration of sodium chloride. These results suggest that selective separation of HbA(1c) using mAPB-BMPs can be achieved with these conditions. A dose-response curve was obtained between luminescence intensity and HbA(1c) concentration using a fully automated boronate affinity immunoassay. A linear relationship between luminescence intensity and HbA(1c) concentration was obtained in the range of 10-10(4) ng/ml.

  16. Evaluation of Lionex TB kits and mycobacterial antigens for IgG and IgA detection in cerebrospinal fluid from tuberculosis meningitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardella, Isabela Gama; Singh, Mahavir; Kumpfer, Susanne; Heringer, Rafael Ribeiro; Saad, Maria Helena Féres; Sohler, Marzia Puccioni

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate commercial Lionex TB together with four antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MPT-64, MT10.3, 16 kDa and 38 kDa) for IgG and IgA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) detection in the diagnosis of tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) with CSF negative acid-fast bacilli staining, 19 cases of TBM, 64 cases of other infectious meningoencephalitis and 73 cases of other neurological disorders were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. IgA-MPT-64 and IgG Lionex showed the highest sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (63.2%, 47.4%; 95%, 93.7%; 40%, 98% and 28.4%, 97.1%, respectively). However, while grey zone was 12.7% and 6%, respectively, lowering sensitivity but maintains high specificity (>or= 95%). High protein concentration in CSF was associated with antibody positivity CSF/HIV+ which did not influence the sensitivity of both tests. To our knowledge, this is the first description of IgA-MPT-64 and IgG Lionex antibodies in CSF-TBM and, although there is good specificity, adjustments are needed based on antigen composition to enhance sensitivity.

  17. Evaluation of point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assays for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in low-, moderate-, and high-prevalence schools in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Karen T; Blackstock, Anna J; Ochola, Elizabeth A; Matete, Daniel O; Mwinzi, Pauline N M; Montgomery, Susan P; Karanja, Diana M S; Secor, W Evan

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of a point-of-contact circulating cathodic antigen assay (POC-CCA) to detect schistosome infections in primary school children (N = 1,801) living in areas with low, moderate, and high Schistosoma mansoni prevalence in western Kenya. The commercially available assay (CCA-1) and a second, experimental formulation (CCA-2) were compared against Kato-Katz stool examinations and an anti-schistosome enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A latent class model based on the four tests was used to establish "true infection status" in three different zones based on their distance from Lake Victoria. As a screening tool for community treatment according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, the Kato-Katz examination was in closest agreement with the latent class model, followed by the experimental CCA-2, soluble adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) ELISA, and CCA-1, which had high sensitivity compared with the other tests but was consistently the least specific. Our experience suggests that POC-CCA tests offer a field-friendly alternative to Kato-Katz, but need further interpretation for appropriate field use.

  18. Microbial Diagnostic Microarrays for the Detection and Typing of Food- and Water-Borne (Bacterial) Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Tanja; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-10-14

    Reliable and sensitive pathogen detection in clinical and environmental (including food and water) samples is of greatest importance for public health. Standard microbiological methods have several limitations and improved alternatives are needed. Most important requirements for reliable analysis include: (i) specificity; (ii) sensitivity; (iii) multiplexing potential; (iv) robustness; (v) speed; (vi) automation potential; and (vii) low cost. Microarray technology can, through its very nature, fulfill many of these requirements directly and the remaining challenges have been tackled. In this review, we attempt to compare performance characteristics of the microbial diagnostic microarrays developed for the detection and typing of food and water pathogens, and discuss limitations, points still to be addressed and issues specific for the analysis of food, water and environmental samples.

  19. Microbial Diagnostic Microarrays for the Detection and Typing of Food- and Water-Borne (Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kostić

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and sensitive pathogen detection in clinical and environmental (including food and water samples is of greatest importance for public health. Standard microbiological methods have several limitations and improved alternatives are needed. Most important requirements for reliable analysis include: (i specificity; (ii sensitivity; (iii multiplexing potential; (iv robustness; (v speed; (vi automation potential; and (vii low cost. Microarray technology can, through its very nature, fulfill many of these requirements directly and the remaining challenges have been tackled. In this review, we attempt to compare performance characteristics of the microbial diagnostic microarrays developed for the detection and typing of food and water pathogens, and discuss limitations, points still to be addressed and issues specific for the analysis of food, water and environmental samples.

  20. 尿抗原检测法诊断军团菌肺炎的临床价值%The clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋露晰; 陈愉; 夏书月; 马江伟; 赵洪文; 芦烨; 陶丝煦; 赵立

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella,and to describe the clinical characteristics of Legionella pneumonia.Methods Patients with suspected Legionella pneumonia were enrolled from the Respiratory departments of 3 tertiary hospitals in Shenyang during May 2011 to November 2013.Urinary Legionella antigen was detected for all the enrolled patients.Bacterial culture,polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Legionella,and double Legionella antibody detection in sera were performed for each patient whose urinary antigen was positive.Patients confirmed to have Legionella pneumonia were pooled and analyzed.Results Totally 13 cases presenting with pneumonia were positive for Legionella by the urinary antigen method,and in one of them Legionella strain was isolated from the secretion of lower respiratory tract.PCR detection was performed in 8 patients,and 4 of them were positive.Legionella antibody detection was performed in 12 patients,and 7 of them were positive.Nine patients had a history of exposure to Legionella high-risk environments.The characteristics of the cases with Legionella pneumonia were as follows:characteristic orange sputum in 4 patients,digestive symptoms in 6,neurologic disorders in 8,hyponatremia in 10,hypoxia with oxygenation index < 300 mmHg (1 mmHg =0.133 kPa)in 11,and severe pneumonia with PSI of grade Ⅴ (PS