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Sample records for bacteria laboratory formation

  1. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 μm. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 μm long and have diameters of 0.5-4 μm. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows

  2. Molecular mechanism of magnet formation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, T; Sakaguchi, T

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic bacteria have an ability to synthesize intracellular ferromagnetic crystalline particles consisting of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) which occur within a specific size range (50-100 nm). Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) can be distinguished by the regular morphology and the presence of an thin organic membrane enveloping crystals from abiologically formed magnetite. The particle is the smallest magnetic crystal that has a regular morphology within the single domain size. Therefore, BMPs have an unfathomable amount of potential value for various technological applications not only scientific interests. However, the molecular and genetic mechanism of magnetite biomineralization is hardly understood although iron oxide formation occurs widely in many higher animals as well as microorganisms. In order to elucidate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization, a magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1, for which gene transfer and transposon mutagenesis techniques had been recently developed, has been used as a model organism. Several findings and information on the BMPs formation process have been obtained within this decade by means of studies with this model organism and its related one. Biomineralization mechanism and potential availability in biotechnology of bacterial magnets have been elucidated through molecular and genetic approach. PMID:16232810

  3. Biological formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid by photosynthetic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-yan; XU Xiang-yang; MA Qing-lan; WU Wei-hong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, 7 stains of Rhodopseudomonas sp. were selected from 36 photosynthetic bacteria stains storied in our laboratory.Rhodopseudomonas sp. strain 99-28 has the highest 5-aminolevulinic acid(ALA) production ability in these 7 strains. Rhodopseudomonas sp. 99-28 strain was mutated using ultraviolet radiation and a mutant strain L-1, which ALA production is higher than wild strain 99-28 about one times, was obtained. The elements affecting ALA formation of strain 99-28 and L-1 were studied. Under the optimal condition(pH 7.5,supplement of ALA dehydratase(ALAD) inhibitor, levulinic acid(LA) and precursors of ALA synthesis, glycine and succinat, 3000 Ix of light density), ALA formation of mutant L-1 was up to 22.15 mg/L. Strain L-1 was used to treat wastewater to remove CODCr and produce ALA. ALA production was 2.819 my/L, 1.531 rog/L, 2.166 mg/L, and 2.424 mg/L in monosodium glutamate wastewater(MGW),succotash wastewater(SW), brewage wastewater(BW), and citric acid wastewater(CAW) respectively. More than 90% of CODCr was removed in four kinds of wastewater. When LA, glycin and succinate were supplied, ALA production was dramatically increased,however, CODCr could hardly be removed.

  4. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  5. Laboratory Studies Of Circumstellar Carbonaceous Grain Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    The study of the formation processes of dust is essential to understand the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar (IS) chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation processes of carbonaceous dust. We report the progress that was recently achieved in this domain using NASA Ames’ COSmIC facility (Contreras & Salama 2013, ApJS, 208, 6). PAHs are important chemical building blocks of IS dust. They are detected in IDPs and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs are an important, ubiquitous component of the ISM. The formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, we have performed laboratory experiments to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation, starting from the smallest hydrocarbon molecules into the formation of larger PAH and further into nanograins. Studies of IS dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory using the COSmIC facility to provide conditions that simulate IS and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the COSmiC chamber through a pulsed discharge nozzle plasma source are detected and characterized with a cavity ringdown spectrometer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. Analysis of solid soot particles was also conducted using scanning electron microscopy at the UCSC/NASA Ames’ MACS facility. The SEM analysis of the deposition of soot from methane and acetylene precursors seeded in argon plasmas provide examples on the types of nanoparticles and micrograins that are produced in these gas mixtures under our experimental conditions. From these measurements, we derive information on

  6. [PERSISTENCE OF BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS BACTERIA AND A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF ITS FORMATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataev, G I; Sinyashina, L N; Medkova, A Yu; Semin, E G

    2015-01-01

    A growth of pertussis morbidity is observed in many countries of the world against the background of mass vaccindtion. Forms of the disease course have changed. Atypical forms of pertussis occur predominately in adolescents and adults. Asymptomatic carriage of the causative agent has been established. Infection of infants with. BordetelIa pertussis bacteria in more than 90% of cases occurs from parents and relatives. A prolonged persistence of the causative agent has been identified. Morbidity increase in developed countries is associated with the use of acellular vaccines, that do not protect from the infection, but reduce severity of the disease. A change of genotypes of the circulating bacteria strains is observed ubiquitously. Formation of a persistent form of B. pertussis is possible due to a reversible integration of IS-elements into bvgAS operon and other virulence genes. The results of studies of invasion and survival of B. pertussis bacteria in eukaryotic cells, a change in B. pertussis bacteria population after experimental infection of laboratory mice and monkeys are presented, accumulation of avirulent insertion Bvg mutants of B. pertussis was detected. The data obtained are in accordance with the results of analysis of causative agent population in patients with typical and atypical forms of pertussis in humans. More than 50% of the population of B. pertussis bacteria in practically healthy carriers was shown to be presented by avirulent insertion Bvg mutants. B. pertussis virulence reducing as a result of inactivation of single or several virulence genes probably provide long-term persistence of bacteria in host organism and formation of apparently healthy vehicles. Follow-up studies on that front would help to formulate new attitudes to preventive measures of pertussis and lead to development of fundamentally new pharmaceuticals (vaccines) preventing formation of bacterial persistence.

  7. [PERSISTENCE OF BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS BACTERIA AND A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF ITS FORMATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataev, G I; Sinyashina, L N; Medkova, A Yu; Semin, E G

    2015-01-01

    A growth of pertussis morbidity is observed in many countries of the world against the background of mass vaccindtion. Forms of the disease course have changed. Atypical forms of pertussis occur predominately in adolescents and adults. Asymptomatic carriage of the causative agent has been established. Infection of infants with. BordetelIa pertussis bacteria in more than 90% of cases occurs from parents and relatives. A prolonged persistence of the causative agent has been identified. Morbidity increase in developed countries is associated with the use of acellular vaccines, that do not protect from the infection, but reduce severity of the disease. A change of genotypes of the circulating bacteria strains is observed ubiquitously. Formation of a persistent form of B. pertussis is possible due to a reversible integration of IS-elements into bvgAS operon and other virulence genes. The results of studies of invasion and survival of B. pertussis bacteria in eukaryotic cells, a change in B. pertussis bacteria population after experimental infection of laboratory mice and monkeys are presented, accumulation of avirulent insertion Bvg mutants of B. pertussis was detected. The data obtained are in accordance with the results of analysis of causative agent population in patients with typical and atypical forms of pertussis in humans. More than 50% of the population of B. pertussis bacteria in practically healthy carriers was shown to be presented by avirulent insertion Bvg mutants. B. pertussis virulence reducing as a result of inactivation of single or several virulence genes probably provide long-term persistence of bacteria in host organism and formation of apparently healthy vehicles. Follow-up studies on that front would help to formulate new attitudes to preventive measures of pertussis and lead to development of fundamentally new pharmaceuticals (vaccines) preventing formation of bacterial persistence. PMID:26951000

  8. Bacteria for improvement of oil recovery: a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behlulgil, K.; Mehmetoglu, M.T.

    2002-05-01

    In microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technique, microorganisms and/or their products (gases, chemicals) are used in the enhancement of oil recovery. In the present study, MEOR is tested for Garzan (26 {sup o} API) crude oil, produced from Southeast Turkey. This work consists of shut-in pressure tests and microbial water flooding experiments. In shut-in pressure tests, the oil is placed in a stainless steel cell and a certain amount of microbial solution (Clostridium acetobutylicum) is introduced. During the soaking period, the pressure increase is monitored. Results of the measurements carried out after this stage show that gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) production by the bacteria decreases the oil viscosity effectively. In microbial flooding experiments, an unconsolidated, preflooded reservoir model is subjected to microbial treatment and then flooded with water under varying conditions. The bacteria used in these experiments were Clostridium acetobutylicum and mixed soil bacteria. When compared with a conventional water flood, the results of microbial runs showed that the residual oil recovery increased more than 100% and the pH of the medium decreased. (author)

  9. Coryneform bacteria in infectious diseases: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, M B; Lipsky, B A

    1990-01-01

    Coryneform isolates from clinical specimens frequently cannot be identified by either reference laboratories or research laboratories. Many of these organisms are skin flora that belong to a large number of taxonomic groups, only 40% of which are in the genus Corynebacterium. This review provides an update on clinical presentations, microbiological features, and pathogenic mechanisms of infections with nondiphtheria Corynebacterium species and other pleomorphic gram-positive rods. The early l...

  10. Interactions of Motile Bacteria with Surfaces Leading to Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Roseanne

    2003-03-01

    Motile bacteria have the ability to swim by the rotation of flagellar filaments that form a coordinated bundle and propel the bacteria from the bulk fluid to a surface. As swimming bacteria approach a surface their swimming speed decreases and the cell body moves laterally along the surface before a secure attachment is formed. Bacterial flagella have been implicated in the attachment of motile bacteria to surfaces due to their physical and chemical properties. To study the initial surface interactions we use a technique known as total internal reflection aqueous fluorescence (TIRAF) microscopy which can resolve distances between bacteria and surfaces to the nanometer scale. Behavior of mutant strains of bacteria with deficiencies in flagella function was observed within 100 nm of the surface to ascertain the role that flagella play in the attachment process. We compared these qualitative observations of behavior to quantitative analysis of attachment and detachment rate constants for bacterial suspensions in parallel plate flow chambers. We also assayed mutant populations for their ability to form a biofilm in order to relate our microscopic studies of individual cells to macroscopic observations of bacterial suspensions.

  11. Biofilm formation and dispersal in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abee, Tjakko; Kovacs, Akos T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van der Veen, Stijn

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria, which are adhered to a surface and embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Since biofilms are very resistant to antimicrobial agents, they are at the basis of a range of problems, including quality and safety issues i

  12. Coliform bacteria in New Jersey domestic wells: influence of geology, laboratory, and method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherholt, Thomas B; Bousenberry, Raymond T; Carter, Gail P; Korn, Leo R; Louis, Judith B; Serfes, Michael E; Waller, Debra A

    2013-01-01

    Following passage of the New Jersey Private Well Testing Act, 50,800 domestic wells were tested between 2002 and 2007 for the presence of total coliform (TC) bacteria. Wells containing TC bacteria were further tested for either fecal coliform or Escherichia coli (FC/E. coli) bacteria. Analysis of the data, generated by 39 laboratories, revealed that the rate of coliform detections in groundwater (GW) was influenced by the laboratory and the method used, and also by geology. Based on one sample per well, TC and FC/E. coli were detected in wells located in bedrock 3 and 3.7 times more frequently, respectively, than in wells located in the unconsolidated strata of the Coastal Plain. In bedrock, detection rates were higher in sedimentary rock than in igneous or metamorphic rock. Ice-age glaciers also influenced detection rates, most likely by removing material in some areas and depositing thick layers of unconsolidated material in other areas. In bedrock, coliform bacteria were detected more often in wells with a pH of 3 to 6 than in wells with a pH of 7 to 10 whereas the reverse was true in the Coastal Plain. TC and FC/E. coli bacteria were detected in 33 and 9.5%, respectively, of sedimentary rock wells with pH 3 to 6. Conversely, for Coastal Plain wells with pH 3 to 6, detection rates were 4.4% for TC and 0.6% for FC/E. coli.

  13. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  14. Corrosion by bacteria of concrete in sewerage systems and inhibitory effects of formates on their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tateo; Aso, Iwao; Togashi, Shunsuke; Tanigawa, Minoru; Shoji, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tsugumichi; Watanabe, Naoki; Maki, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    Not only sulfur-oxidizing bacteria but also an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium (or bacteria) were found in the corroded concrete from several sewerage systems in Japan. The surface pH of concrete test piece exposed to an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide of the concentrations more than 600 ppm in the systems was usually below 2 after a month. This was attributable to ability of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to grow in the thin water layer which contained hydrogen sulfide and covered the piece even when the surface pH of concrete was 12-13. When the sulfuroxidizing bacteria grew in the surface of concrete and produced sulfuric acid, the pH of the inner parts of concrete was lowered where the bacteria were hardly found. Probably, sulfuric acid formed by the bacteria in the surface parts penetrated into the inner parts. The different species of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were found in different sewerage systems. The growth of the sulfur-oxidizing and acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria was completely inhibited by formates, especially by calcium formate of concentrations more than 50 mM. Calcium formate can protect concrete in sewerage systems from bacterial corrosion.

  15. TEM observation of bacteria-induced plagioclase dissolution and secondary mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Nishimiya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Silicate minerals are the most common minerals in the earth's crust. Bacteria are also distributed throughout the earth's surface environment. The silicate minerals are known to be dissolved by organic acids and polysaccharides known as bacteria metabolites. The metabolic activity of bacteria therefore plays an important role in the interaction between dissolution of the silicate minerals and formation of secondary minerals. However, little is known about the secondary mineral formation process associated with the bacterial metabolism. To clarify the bacterial effect on the mineral dissolution and the secondary mineral formation, we closely investigated the effect of bacterial activity on surface texture modification and chemical composition changes of plagioclase which is the most abundant silicate mineral in the earth's crust. The bacteria were isolated from soil and then added in a suitable medium with several plagioclase fragments (Ab100% and An100%). It was incubated for 10 days. Al and Si concentrations in the medium were measured by ICP-AES to monitor the dissolution of the plagioclase. Secondary mineral formation during the incubation was observed by TEM, EDS and SAED methods. The authors will give the experiment results and discuss the effect of bacterial activity on the plagioclase dissolution and the secondary mineral formation in detail.

  16. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide

  17. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  18. A Functional DNase I Coating to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria and the Formation of Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Das, Theerthankar; Sharifi, Shahriar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are detrimental in many industrial and biomedical applications and prevention of biofilm formation has been a prime challenge for decades. Biofilms consist of communities of adhering bacteria, supported and protected by extracellular-polymeric-substances (EPS), the so-called house of biofil

  19. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa F. Castiblanco; George W. Sundin

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extrac-ellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multi-cellular behavior.

  20. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  1. Proteomic insights into intra- and intercellular plant-bacteria symbiotic association during root nodule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin eSalavati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, there have been a large number of studies done on the all aspects of legumes and bacteria which participate in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. The analysis of legume-bacteria interaction is not just a matter of numerical complexity in terms of variants of gene products that can arise from a single gene. Bacteria regulate their quorum-sensing genes to enhance their ability to induce conjugation of plasmids and symbiotic islands, and various protein secretion mechanisms; that can stimulate a collection of chain reactions including species-specific combinations of plant-secretion isoflavonoids, complicated calcium signaling pathways and autoregulation of nodulation mechanisms. Quorum-sensing systems are introduced by the intra- and intercellular organization of gene products lead to protein–protein interactions or targeting of proteins to specific cellular structures. In this study, an attempt has been made to review significant contributions related to nodule formation and development and their impacts on cell proteome for better understanding of plant-bacterium interaction mechanism at protein level. This review would not only provide new insights into the plant-bacteria symbiosis response mechanisms but would also highlights the importance of studying changes in protein abundance inside and outside of cells in response to symbiosis. Furthermore, the application to agriculture programe of plant-bacteria interaction will be discussed.

  2. Technical Note: Enhanced reactivity of nitrogenous organohalogen formation from plant litter to bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on Earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3 dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN, chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH2 and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield was observed with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  3. Oxalate-Degrading Capacities of Gastrointestinal Lactic Acid Bacteria and Urinary Tract Stone Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Kargar; Rouhi Afkari; Sadegh Ghorbani-Dalini

    2013-01-01

    Background: Calcium oxalate is one the most significant causes of human kidney stones. Increasing oxalate uptake results in increased urinary oxalate. Elevated urinary oxalate is one the most important causes of kidney stone formation. This study aims to evaluate oxalate-degrading capacity of lactic acid bacteria and its impact on incidence of kidney stone.Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on serum, urinary, and fecal samples. The research population included a tota...

  4. The influences of fish infusion broth on the biogenic amines formation by lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Esmeray Küley; Fatih Özogul; Esra Balikçi; Mustafa Durmus; Deniz Ayas

    2013-01-01

    The influences of fish infusion decarboxylase broth (IDB) on biogenic amines (BA) formation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated. BA productions by single LAB strains were tested in five different fish (anchovy, mackerel, white shark, sardine and gilthead seabream) IDB. The result of the study showed that significant differences in ammonia (AMN) and BA production were observed among the LAB strains in fish IDB (p < 0.05). The highest AMN and TMA production by LAB strains were obser...

  5. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; Benz, S.; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2008-10-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at -5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about -11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between -7 and -11°C with an ice nucleation (IN) active fraction of the order of 10-4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around -8°C.

  6. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of SnomaxTM were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly spray into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°. At this temperature, about 1% of the SnomaxTM cells induced freezing of the spray droplets before they evaporated in the cloud chamber. The other suspensions of living cells didn't induce any measurable ice concentration during spray formation at −5.7°. The remaining aerosol was exposed to typical cloud activation conditions in subsequent experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets and then eventually acted as ice nuclei to freeze the droplets. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an INA fraction of the order of 10−4. The ice nucleation efficiency of SnomaxTM cells was much larger with an INA fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  7. Laboratory studies of ice formation pathways from ammonium sulfate particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Wise

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are composed of ice particles and their formation pathways have been studied extensively in the laboratory. The ability of ammonium sulfate particles to act as nuclei for cirrus clouds has been of particular importance because of their ubiquitous presence in the upper troposphere. The results of past laboratory experiments of homogeneous ice nucleation from ammonium sulfate particles show a wide range of freezing conditions. In the present study, a flow tube apparatus equipped with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to resolve these discrepancies. It was found that when ammonium sulfate particles were preconditioned at 100% relative humidity (RH prior to experimentation, the particles froze at conditions predicted by the homogeneous ice nucleation model developed by Koop et al. (2000. If the particles were not preconditioned at 100% RH, they froze at warmer temperatures and lower ice saturation ratios than predicted by Koop et al. (2000. In order to determine if a population of effloresced particles affected freezing conditions for particles that were not preconditioned at 100% RH, a series of depositional ice nucleation experiments were carried out on dry ammonium sulfate particles. For freezing temperatures between 215 and 231 K, ice nucleated on the particles at ice saturation ratios (Sice between 1 and 1.05. These conditions are much lower than predicted by Koop et al. (2000 and explain the differences in freezing conditions among preconditioning methods. In similar experiments, Abbatt et al. (2006 hypothesized that a small fraction of effloresced ammonium sulfate particles induced ice nucleation at Sice values lower than expected. The current study confirms the Abbatt et al. (2006 hypothesis and, to our knowledge, is the first study to directly observe ice nucleating onto freely flowing dry ammonium sulfate particles at Sice values approaching unity.

  8. PCR identification of bacteria in blood culture does not fit the daily workflow of a routine microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karumaa, Santra; Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2012-03-01

    We have evaluated the GenoType blood culture assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) for the identification of bacteria in 233 positive blood cultures and assessed its suitability in the workflow of a routine microbiology laboratory. In 68/233 (29.2%) samples, the culture result could not be confirmed by the GenoType assay due to a lack of primers in the test, multiple organisms in the sample, or inconsistency with respect to the identification by culture. Although the GenoType blood culture assay gives satisfactory results for bacteria for which primers are available, there are difficulties in applying the test in the routine microbiology laboratory.

  9. The Formation of Indicators on Engineering Laboratory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Ruhizan M.; Mohamad, Zunuwanas; Rahman, Mohd Nizam Ab.; Hashim, Mohamad Hisyam Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This research is a developmental study of Engineering Laboratory Management indicators. It is formed to assess the level of quality management of the polytechnic level laboratory. The purpose of indicators is to help provide input into the management process of an engineering laboratory. Effectiveness of teaching and learning at technical…

  10. Collective motion and nonequilibrium cluster formation in colonies of gliding bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bar, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.098102

    2013-01-01

    We characterize cell motion in experiments and show that the transition to collective motion in colonies of gliding bacterial cells confined to a monolayer appears through the organization of cells into larger moving clusters. Collective motion by non-equilibrium cluster formation is detected for a critical cell packing fraction around 17%. This transition is characterized by a scale-free power-law cluster size distribution, with an exponent $0.88\\pm0.07$, and the appearance of giant number fluctuations. Our findings are in quantitative agreement with simulations of self-propelled rods. This suggests that the interplay of self-propulsion of bacteria and the rod-shape of bacteria is sufficient to induce collective motion.

  11. Toxic effects exerted on methanogenic, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria by chemicals used in a milk analysis laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Fiuza, J.; Buys, B.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Omil, F.; Mendez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effects caused by the chemicals contained in wastewaters generated by laboratories involved in raw milk analyses were assessed using batch assays. These assays were carried out separately with methanogenic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria. Since sodium azide

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps formation by bacteria causing endometritis in the mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebordão, M R; Carneiro, C; Alexandre-Pires, G; Brito, P; Pereira, C; Nunes, T; Galvão, A; Leitão, A; Vilela, C; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2014-12-01

    Besides the classical functions, neutrophils (PMNs) are able to release DNA in response to infectious stimuli, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and killing pathogens. The pathogenesis of endometritis in the mare is not completely understood. The aim was to evaluate the in vitro capacity of equine PMNs to secrete NETs by chemical activation, or stimulated with Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (Szoo), Escherichia coli (Ecoli) or Staphylococcus capitis (Scap) strains obtained from mares with endometritis. Ex vivo endometrial mucus from mares with bacterial endometritis were evaluated for the presence of NETs. Equine blood PMNs were used either without or with stimulation by phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA), a strong inducer of NETs, for 1-3h. To evaluate PMN ability to produce NETs when phagocytosis was impaired, the phagocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin (Cyt) was added after PMA. After the addition of bacteria, a subsequent 1-h incubation was carried out in seven groups. NETs were visualized by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and anti-histone. Ex vivo samples were immunostained for myeloperoxidase and neutrophil elastase. A 3-h incubation period of PMN + PMA increased NETs (p < 0.05). Bacteria + 25 nM PMA and bacteria + PMA + Cyt increased NETs (p<0.05). Szoo induced fewer NETs than Ecoli or Scap (p < 0.05). Ex vivo NETs were present in mares with endometritis. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spread of NETs formed by smooth fibers and globules that can be aggregated in thick bundles. Formation of NETs and the subsequent entanglement of bacteria suggest that equine NETs might be a complementary mechanism in fighting some of the bacteria causing endometritis in the mare. PMID:25218891

  13. Laboratory and Numerical Modeling of Smoke Characteristics for Superfog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, C.; Lu, V.; Tsui, K.; Princevac, M.; Venkatram, A.; Mahalingam, S.; Achtemeier, G.; Weise, D.

    2011-12-01

    Land management techniques in wildland areas include prescribed fires to promote biodiversity and reduce risk of severe wildfires across the United States. Several fatal car pileups have been associated with smoke-related visibility reduction from prescribed burns. Such events have occurred in year 2000 on the interstate highways I-10 and I-95, 2001 on the I-4, 2006 on the I-95, and 2008 on the I-4 causing numerous fatalities, injuries, and damage to property. In some of the cases visibility reduction caused by smoke and fog combinations traveling over roadways have been reported to be less than 3 meters, defined as superfog. Our research focuses on delineating the conditions that lead to formation of the rare phenomena of superfog and creating a tool to enable land managers to effectively plan prescribed burns and prevent tragic events. It is hypothesized that the water vapor from combustion, live fuels, soil moisture, and ambient air condense onto the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) particles emitted from low intensity smoldering fires. Physical and numerical modeling has been used to investigate these interactions. A physical model in the laboratory has been developed to characterize the properties of smoke resulting from smoldering pine needle litters at the PSW Forest Service in Riverside, CA. Temporal measurements of temperature, relative humidity, sensible heat flux, radiation heat flux, convective heat flux, particulate matter concentrations and visibilities have been measured for specific cases. The size distribution and number concentrations of the fog droplets formed inside the chamber by mixing cool dry and moist warm air masses to produce near superfog visibilities were measured by a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. Thermodynamic modeling of smoke and ambient air was conducted to estimate liquid water contents (LWC) available to condense into droplets and form significant reductions in visibility. The results show that LWC of less than 2 g m-3 can be

  14. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  15. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...

  16. Corrosion of carbon steel by bacteria from North Sea offshore seawater injection systems: laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipanicev, Marko; Turcu, Florin; Esnault, Loïc; Rosas, Omar; Basseguy, Régine; Sztyler, Magdalena; Beech, Iwona B

    2014-06-01

    Influence of sulfidogenic bacteria, from a North Sea seawater injection system, on the corrosion of S235JR carbon steel was studied in a flow bioreactor; operating anaerobically for 100days with either inoculated or filtrated seawater. Deposits formed on steel placed in reactors contained magnesium and calcium minerals plus iron sulfide. The dominant biofilm-forming organism was an anaerobic bacterium, genus Caminicella, known to produce hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. Open Circuit Potentials (OCP) of steel in the reactors was, for nearly the entire test duration, in the range -800corrosion rate, expressed as 1/(Rp/Ω), was lower in the inoculated seawater though they varied significantly on both reactors. Initial and final corrosion rates were virtually identical, namely initial 1/(Rp/Ω)=2×10(-6)±5×10(-7) and final 1/(Rp/Ω)=1.1×10(-5)±2.5×10(-6). Measured data, including electrochemical noise transients and statistical parameters (0.0545), suggested pitting on steel samples within the inoculated environment. However, the actual degree of corrosion could neither be directly correlated with the electrochemical data and nor with the steel corrosion in the filtrated seawater environment. Further laboratory tests are thought to clarify the noticed apparent discrepancies.

  17. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Herschend, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven...... different locations in a meat processing environment and evaluated their biofilm formation capability. A diverse group of bacteria was isolated and most were classified as poor biofilm producers in a Calgary biofilm device assay. Isolates from two sampling sites, the wall and the meat chopper, were further......-culture biofilm production with high relevance for food safety and food production facilities....

  18. Formation of dense, electromagnetically accelerated plasma for laboratory astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adachi K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We proposed tapered pinch discharge as a measure to conduct laboratory astrophysics experiments. Basic behaviors of the plasma have been characterized using a prototype device. Results show that the plasma flux and velocity depend on initial gas density, discharge current and taper geometry. Those behaviors can be illustrated with a simple model considering the pinching dynamics of the current sheet based on a 1 dimensional (1-D equation of motion. Achievable value of the tapered pinch plasma is estimated and compared with required plasma parameters based on scaling parameters for laboratory astrophysics.

  19. Induction of trap formation in nematode-trapping fungi by bacteria-released ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H N; Xu, Y Y; Wang, X; Zhang, K Q; Li, G H

    2016-04-01

    A total of 11 bacterial strains were assayed for bacteria-induced trap formation in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora YMF1·01883 with two-compartmented Petri dish. These strains were identified on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of eight isolates were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and their structures were identified based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At the same time, all isolates were used for quantitative measurement of ammonia by the indophenol blue method. The effects of pure commercial compounds on inducement of trap formation in A. oligospora were tested. Taken together, results demonstrated that the predominant bacterial volatile compound inducing trap formation was ammonia. Meanwhile, ammonia also played a role in other nematode-trapping fungi, including Arthrobotrys guizhouensis YMF1·00014, producing adhesive nets; Dactylellina phymatopaga YMF1·01474, producing adhesive knobs; Dactylellina cionopaga YMF1·01472, producing adhesive columns and Drechslerella brochopaga YMF1·01829, producing constricting rings. PMID:26928264

  20. The influences of fish infusion broth on the biogenic amines formation by lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeray Küley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of fish infusion decarboxylase broth (IDB on biogenic amines (BA formation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB were investigated. BA productions by single LAB strains were tested in five different fish (anchovy, mackerel, white shark, sardine and gilthead seabream IDB. The result of the study showed that significant differences in ammonia (AMN and BA production were observed among the LAB strains in fish IDB (p < 0.05. The highest AMN and TMA production by LAB strains were observed for white shark IDB. The all tested bacteria had decarboxylation activity in fish IDB. The uppermost accumulated amines by LAB strains were tyramine (TYM, dopamine, serotonin and spermidine. The maximum histamine production was observed in sardine (101.69 mg/L and mackerel (100.84 mg/L IDB by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and Pediococcus acidophilus, respectively. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Pediococcus acidophilus had a high TYM producing capability (2943 mg/L and 1157 mg/L in sardine IDB.

  1. Graphene Induces Formation of Pores That Kill Spherical and Rod-Shaped Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T H; Truong, Vi Khanh; Quinn, Matthew D J; Notley, Shannon M; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2015-08-25

    Pristine graphene, its derivatives, and composites have been widely reported to possess antibacterial properties. Most of the studies simulating the interaction between bacterial cell membranes and the surface of graphene have proposed that the graphene-induced bacterial cell death is caused either by (1) the insertion of blade-like graphene-based nanosheets or (2) the destructive extraction of lipid molecules by the presence of the lipophilic graphene. These simulation studies have, however, only take into account graphene-cell membrane interactions where the graphene is in a dispersed form. In this paper, we report the antimicrobial behavior of graphene sheet surfaces in an attempt to further advance the current knowledge pertaining to graphene cytotoxicity using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. Graphene nanofilms were fabricated to exhibit different edge lengths and different angles of orientation in the graphene sheets. These substrates were placed in contact with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, where it was seen that these substrates exhibited variable bactericidal efficiency toward these two pathogenic bacteria. It was demonstrated that the density of the edges of the graphene was one of the principal parameters that contributed to the antibacterial behavior of the graphene nanosheet films. The study provides both experimental and theoretical evidence that the antibacterial behavior of graphene nanosheets arises from the formation of pores in the bacterial cell wall, causing a subsequent osmotic imbalance and cell death.

  2. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  3. Plasmid Instability in Batch Cultures of Recombinant Bacteria. A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, William E.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a laboratory experiment designed to expose students to problem-solving methods individually and as a group. Included are background information, a list of materials, laboratory procedures, analysis methods, and probable results. (CW)

  4. Formation of the light-harvesting complex I (B870) of anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, G

    1996-09-01

    The light-harvesting (LH) complex I (B870) of anoxygenic photosynthetic purple bacteria is the oligomeric form of its subunit B820 consisting of the low-molecular-weight polypeptides alpha, beta, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl), and carotenoids in the stoichiometric ratio [alpha1 beta1 (BChl2) Crt1-2]n. LHI surrounds the photochemical reaction center (RC). The major absorption band of the LHI complex is species-specific and is found at 870-890 nm; those of the subunit and the monomeric BChl a (dissolved in methanol) absorb at 820 and 770 nm, respectively. The isolated LHI complex can be reversibly dissociated to the B820 subunit or to the polypeptides and pigments by addition of detergents. Reconstitution of the B820 or the functional B870 complex is still possible after partial truncation of the N- or C-terminal regions of the alpha- or beta-polypeptide or of the beta-polypeptide only. The minimal structural requirements for reconstitution of a spectrally wild-type form after truncation of the polypeptides and/or modifications of the BChl molecule are described. The insertion of the LHIalpha- and LHIbeta-polypeptides into the membrane and the in vivo assembly of LHI, studied in a cell-free system and in whole cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus, depend on the primary structures of both polypeptides, BChl, the chaperones DnaK and GroEL, membrane-bound proteins, and energized membranes. Exchanges, deletions, or insertions of amino acyl residues, especially in the conserved region of the N-terminus of the LHIalpha-polypeptide, prevent or reduce the efficiency and stability of the LHI assembly. Therefore, reconstitution of LHI in a detergent micelle does not exactly reproduce the formation of the LHI complex in the photosynthetic membrane in vivo. The N-terminal domains play a crucial role in the formation of the oligomeric protein scaffold and of the pigment array. Facultatively phototrophic bacteria such as Rhodospirillum (Rsp.) rubrum or Rhodobacter (Rba.) capsulatus can

  5. Comparative genomics analyses on EPS biosynthesis genes required for floc formation of Zoogloea resiniphila and other activated sludge bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weixing; Guo, Feng; Song, Yulong; Gao, Na; Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Zhang, Liping; Yu, Dianzhen; Xia, Ming; Yu, Ying; Qi, Ming; Tian, Chunyuan; Chen, Haofeng; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Tong; Qiu, Dongru

    2016-10-01

    Activated sludge (AS) process has been widely utilized for municipal sewage and industrial wastewater treatment. Zoolgoea and its related floc-forming bacteria are required for formation of AS flocs which is the key to gravitational effluent-and-sludge separation and AS recycling. However, little is known about the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Zoogloea and its related bacteria. This report deals with the comparative genomic analyses on two Zoogloea resiniphila draft genomes and the closely related proteobacterial species commonly found in AS. In particular, the metabolic processes involved in removal of organic matters, nitrogen and phosphorus were analyzed. Furthermore, it is revealed that a large gene cluster, encoding eight glycosyltransferases and other proteins involved in biosynthesis and export of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), was required for floc formation. One of the two asparagine synthase paralogues, associated with this EPS biosynthesis gene cluster, was required for floc formation in Zoogloea. Similar EPS biosynthesis gene cluster(s) were identified in the genome of other AS proteobacteria including polyphosphate-accumulating Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (CAP) and nitrifying Nitrosopira and Nitrosomonas bacteria, but the gene composition varies interspecifically and intraspecifically. Our results indicate that floc formation of desired AS bacteria, including CAP strains, facilitate their recruitment into AS and gradual enrichment via repeated AS settling and recycling processes. PMID:27403872

  6. Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu-1 by iron reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa Yoko

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental batch and miscible-flow cultures were studied in order to determine the mechanistic pathways of microbial Fe(III respiration in ferruginous smectite clay, NAu-1. The primary purpose was to resolve if alteration of smectite and release of Fe precedes microbial respiration. Alteration of NAu-1, represented by the morphological and mineralogical changes, occurred regardless of the extent of microbial Fe(III reduction in all of our experimental systems, including those that contained heat-killed bacteria and those in which O2, rather than Fe(III, was the primary terminal electron acceptor. The solid alteration products observed under transmission electron microscopy included poorly crystalline smectite with diffuse electron diffraction signals, discrete grains of Fe-free amorphous aluminosilicate with increased Al/Si ratio, Fe-rich grains, and amorphous Si globules in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In reducing systems, Fe was also found as siderite. The small amount of Fe partitioned to the aqueous phase was primarily in the form of dissolved Fe(III species even in the systems in which Fe(III was the primary terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. From these observations, we conclude that microbial respiration of Fe(III in our laboratory systems proceeded through the following: (1 alteration of NAu-1 and concurrent release of Fe(III from the octahedral sheets of NAu-1; and (2 subsequent microbial respiration of Fe(III.

  7. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 deg. C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na2S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe3S4) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 deg. C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS2) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials.

  8. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramp, Jonathan P. [Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bigham, Jerry M.; Jones, F. Sandy [School of Environment and Natural Resources, 2021 Coffey Road, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tuovinen, Olli H., E-mail: tuovinen.1@osu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States) and Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 deg. C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na{sub 2}S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 deg. C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials.

  9. Formation of Fe-sulfides in cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramp, Jonathan P; Bigham, Jerry M; Jones, F Sandy; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize Fe-sulfides produced with sulfate-reducing bacteria under experimental laboratory conditions. Fe-sulfides were precipitated with biologically produced sulfide in cultures growing at 22, 45, and 60 degrees C for up to 16 weeks. Abiotic controls were prepared by reacting liquid media with Na(2)S solutions. Precipitates were collected anaerobically, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additional analyses included total Fe and S content, magnetic susceptibility, specific surface area, and scanning electron microscopy. Mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) were the dominant iron sulfide phases formed in sulfate-reducing bacterial cultures. An increase in the incubation temperature from 22 to 60 degrees C enhanced the crystallinity of the Fe-sulfides. Generally, greigite was more prevalent in abiotic samples and mackinawite in biogenic materials. Pyrite (FeS(2)) was also found in abiotic precipitates. Abiotic samples had a higher magnetic susceptibility because of the greigite and displayed improved crystallinity compared to biotic materials. PMID:19962824

  10. Oxalate-Degrading Capacities of Gastrointestinal Lactic Acid Bacteria and Urinary Tract Stone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium oxalate is one the most significant causes of human kidney stones. Increasing oxalate uptake results in increased urinary oxalate. Elevated urinary oxalate is one the most important causes of kidney stone formation. This study aims to evaluate oxalate-degrading capacity of lactic acid bacteria and its impact on incidence of kidney stone.Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on serum, urinary, and fecal samples. The research population included a total of 200 subjects divided in two equal groups. They were selected from the patients with urinary tract stones, visiting urologist, and also normal people. The level of calcium, oxalate, and citrate in the urinary samples, parathyroid and calcium in the serum samples, and degrading activity of fecal lactobacillus strains of all the subjects were evaluated. Then, data analysis was carried out using SPSS-11.5, χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test, and analysis of variance. Results: The results revealed that the patients had higher urinary level of oxalate and calcium, as well as higher serum level of parathyroid hormone than normal people. In contrast, urinary level of citrate was higher in normal people. In addition, there was a significant difference between the oxalate-degrading capacities of lactobacillus isolated from the patients and their normal peers.Conclusion: Reduction of digestive lactobacillus-related oxalate-degrading capacity and increased serum level of parathyroid hormone can cause elevated urinary level of oxalate and calcium in people with kidney stone.

  11. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria : new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; S. Benz; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; M. Schnaiter; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature...

  12. New consensus guidelines from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of infrequently isolated or fastidious bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, James H; Hindler, Janet F

    2007-01-15

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recently published a new laboratory guideline for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of infrequently encountered or fastidious bacteria not covered in previous CLSI publications. The organisms include Aeromonas species, Bacillus species, and Vibrio species that may cause infections following environmental exposure. Fastidious organisms that may cause endocarditis or medical device infections include Abiotrophia and Granulicatella species; coryneform bacteria; Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella group gram-negative rods; and the instrinsically vancomycin-resistant gram-positive organisms Erysipelothrix, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Pediococcus species. Organisms not previously covered in depth in CLSI guidelines include Branhamella catarrhalis, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Listeria species, and Pasteurella species. Clinically important drug resistance has been reported for each of these organisms. The guidelines provide recommendations for when it may be important to test these organisms, how standard methods may be easily adapted for testing, and appropriate interpretive criteria for results. Communication with infectious diseases clinicians prior to performing such testing is emphasized.

  13. Long-term effects of antibiotics on the elimination of chemical oxygen demand, nitrification, and viable bacteria in laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are contaminants of the environment because of their widespread use and incomplete removal by microorganisms during wastewater treatment. The influence of a mixture of ciprofloxacin (CIP), gentamicin (GM), sulfamethoxazole (SMZ)/trimethoprim (TMP), and vancomycin (VA), up to a final concentration of 40 mg/L, on the elimination of chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrification, and survival of bacteria, as well as the elimination of the antibiotics, was assessed in a long-term study in laboratory treatment plants (LTPs). In the presence of 30 mg/L antibiotics, nitrification of artificial sewage by activated sludge ended at nitrite. Nitrate formation was almost completely inhibited. No nitrification at all was possible in the presence of 40 mg/L antibiotics. The nitrifiers were more sensitive to antibiotics than heterotrophic bacteria. COD elimination in antibiotic-stressed LTPs was not influenced by ≤20 mg/L antibiotics. Addition of 30 mg/L antibiotic mixture decreased COD removal efficiency for a period, but the LTPs recovered. Similar results were obtained with 40 mg/L antibiotic mixture. The total viable count of bacteria was not affected negatively by the antibiotics. It ranged from 2.2 × 10(6) to 8.2 × 10(6) colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) compared with the control at 1.4 × 10(6)-6.3 × 10(6) CFU/mL. Elimination of the four antibiotics during phases of 2.4-30 mg/L from the liquid was high for GM (70-90 %), much lower for VA, TMP, and CIP (0-50 %), and highly fluctuating for SMZ (0-95 %). The antibiotics were mainly adsorbed to the sludge and not biodegraded. PMID:22622431

  14. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Iversen, Stig Lykke; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Johansen, Eric

    2005-08-01

    Research innovations are constantly occurring in universities, research institutions and industrial research laboratories. These are reported in the scientific literature and presented to the scientific community in various congresses and symposia as well as through direct contacts and collaborations. Conversion of these research results to industrially useful innovations is, however, considerably more complex than generally appreciated. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications will be illustrated with two recent examples from Chr. Hansen A/S: the implementation in industrial scale of a new production technology based on respiration by Lactococcus lactis and the introduction to the market of L. lactis strains constructed using recombinant DNA technology.

  15. Calcium carbonate precipitation by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from biofilms formed on deteriorated ignimbrite stones: influence of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation by these isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Angélica; Sepúlveda-Sánchez, José David; Mercedes Alonso Guzmán, Elia Mercedes; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic CaCO3-precipitating bacteria were isolated from biofilms on deteriorated ignimbrites, siliceous acidic rocks, from Morelia Cathedral (Mexico) and identified as Enterobacter cancerogenus (22e), Bacillus sp. (32a) and Bacillus subtilis (52g). In solid medium, 22e and 32a precipitated calcite and vaterite while 52g produced calcite. Urease activity was detected in these isolates and CaCO3 precipitation increased in the presence of urea in the liquid medium. In the presence of calcium, EPS production decreased in 22e and 32a and increased in 52g. Under laboratory conditions, ignimbrite colonization by these isolates only occurred in the presence of calcium and no CaCO3 was precipitated. Calcium may therefore be important for biofilm formation on stones. The importance of the type of stone, here a siliceous stone, on biological colonization is emphasized. This calcium effect has not been reported on calcareous materials. The importance of the effect of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation is discussed in relation to other applications of CaCO3 precipitation by bacteria.

  16. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.;

    2006-01-01

    bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...... well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth and...... aggregation was studied by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show that the presence of bacteria was a prerequisite for aggregation of T. weissflogii but not of Navicula sp. Occurrences of distinct populations of free-living and attached...

  17. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  18. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røder, Henriette L; Raghupathi, Prem K; Herschend, Jakob; Brejnrod, Asker; Knøchel, Susanne; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven different locations in a meat processing environment and evaluated their biofilm formation capability. A diverse group of bacteria was isolated and most were classified as poor biofilm producers in a Calgary biofilm device assay. Isolates from two sampling sites, the wall and the meat chopper, were further examined for multispecies biofilm formation. Eight strains from each sampling site were chosen and all possible combinations of four member co-cultures were tested for enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C and 24 °C. In approximately 20% of the multispecies consortia grown at 15 °C, the biofilm formation was enhanced when comparing to monospecies biofilms. Two specific isolates (one from each location) were found to be present in synergistic combinations with higher frequencies than the remaining isolates tested. This data provides insights into the ability of co-localized isolates to influence co-culture biofilm production with high relevance for food safety and food production facilities.

  19. Technical Note: Reactivity of C1 and C2 organohalogens formation – from plant litter to bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3 dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN, chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH2 and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, we found increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  20. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil via biovolatilization by genetically engineered bacteria under laboratory conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liu; Fan Zhang; Jian Chen; Guoxin Sun

    2011-01-01

    In Rhodopseudomonas palustris,an arsM gene,encoding bacterial and archaeal homologues of the mammalian Cyt19 As(ⅢH)S-adenosylmethionine methytransferase,was regulated by arsenicals.An expression of arsM was introduced into strains for the methylation of arsenic.When arsM was expressed in Sphingomonas desiccabilis and Bacillus idriensis,it had 10 folds increase of methyled arsenic gas compared to wild type in aqueous system.In soil system,about 2.2%-4.5% of arsenic was removed by biovolatilization during 30 days.This study demonstrated that arsenic could be removed through volatilization from the contaminated soil by bacteria which have arsM gene expressed.These results showed that it is possible to use microorganisms expressing arsM as an inexnensive,effìcient strategy for arsenic bioremediation from contaminated water and soil.

  1. Laboratory identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated on Clostridium difficile selective medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Cristina; Warszawski, Nathalie; Korsak, Nicolas; Taminiau, Bernard; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Daube, Georges

    2016-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in the bacterium, the methodology for Clostridium difficile recovery has not yet been standardized. Cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose taurocholate (CCFT) has historically been the most used medium for C. difficile isolation from human, animal, environmental, and food samples, and presumptive identification is usually based on colony morphologies. However, CCFT is not totally selective. This study describes the recovery of 24 bacteria species belonging to 10 different genera other than C. difficile, present in the environment and foods of a retirement establishment that were not inhibited in the C. difficile selective medium. These findings provide insight for further environmental and food studies as well as for the isolation of C. difficile on supplemented CCFT.

  2. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire

    OpenAIRE

    Elahe Vahid Dastjerdi; Zahra Abdolazimi; Marzieh Ghazanfarian; Parisa Amdjadi; Mohammad Kamalinejad; Arash Mahboubi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire. Methods: Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evalua...

  3. NODC Standard Format Marine Bacteria (F009) Data (1975-1979) (NODC Accession 0014148)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Bacteria (F009) data set contains data from bacteriological studies of the water column and ocean bottom. Data include the density (number per unit...

  4. New Discoveries in Planetary Systems and Star Formation through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    WGLA, AAS; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    As the panel on Planetary Systems and Star Formation (PSF) is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of solar system bodies (other than the Sun) and extrasolar planets, debris disks, exobiology, the formation of individual stars, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, molecular clouds and the cold ISM, dust, and astrochemistry. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astro- physics which are required for fully realizing the PSF scientific opportunities in the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics and chemistry which produce the observed spectra and describe the astrophysical processes. We discuss four areas of laboratory astrophysics relevant to the PSF panel: atomic, molecular, solid matter, and plasma physics. Section 2 describes some of the new opportunitie...

  5. Laboratory simulations of suprauroral mechanisms leading to perpendicular ion heating and conic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments are presented simulating aspects of perpendicular ion heating and conic formation that are observed or hypothesized to occur in the terrestrial ionosphere and magnetosphere. Previous laboratory observations of ion conics in the presence of the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave are reviewed. Field-aligned ion beams, accompanied by beam-generated electrostatic ion cyclotron modes, resulted in perpendicular energization of beam ions and also the heating of background plasma ions. Antenna-launched broadband and narrow-band lower hybrid waves produced considerable perpendicular ion heating and non-Maxwellian tail formation. Laboratory results are discussed in light of in situ measurements by the S3-3 satellite and the MARIE sounding rocket

  6. Laboratory Studying of Metabolic Activity of Terrestrial Bacteria in Subsurface Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovina, M. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Kogan, V. T.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Large amount of water ice presents in subsurface layers of Mars according to observational data. This ice is able to intensive sublimation through porous upper regolith if the surface is heated enough by sunlight. TES data give the value of maximal daytime temperature for some areas of martian surface up to 300 K. Under such conditions vapours diffuse through the porous surface layer. As a result the "wet layer" appears under sand's surface. In our experiment we used special vacuum chamber to model the process of ice sublimation and vapour diffusion while heating. This chamber has a cryogenic pump inside for effective capturing of water vapour. The atmospheric pressure inside was maintained at 0.1-0.01 mbar. We use water ice sample covered by several centimetres of sand with weight fraction of organic matter (glucose) ~ 10-5-10-4. Sublimation is driven by radiation heating of sand's surface. Temperature control of sand's surface is also provided. We have discovered the increase of bacterial population of Vibrio Sp. in the "wet layer". These results confirm that shallow ground ice and a few hours of heating per day could provide sufficient conditions for growth of bacterial population under martian surface. Environments of some areas of modern Mars are close to that we have modelled in our experiments. We also present upgraded experimental setup especially constructed for studying of metabolism of different types of bacteria and different chemical composition of soil. Further upgrade is in progress at present and it will allow us to vary atmospheric composition inside the chamber and measure products of metabolism such as methane etc.

  7. Role in Cheese Flavour Formation of Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria from Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Bæk

    Undefined mesophilic cheese starters are complex ecosystems that contain both homofermentative and heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, with the Lactococcus genera representing the former and Lceuonostoc and sometimes Lactobacillus the latter. These starters originate from old butter starters....... A cheese trial was performed with selected strains to investigate how the heterofermentative strains influenced the ripening in semi-hard cheese. The cheeses were made using a Lactococcus starter including citrate positive Lactoccus and with the addition of one strain of heterofermentative bacteria...... at the time. Differences were seen in the establishment of the heterofermentative bacteria in the cheese matrix, Le. pseudomesenteroides and Lb. danicus grew to a higher number and survived longer than Le. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris. More secondary alcohols and less acetoin were found in cheeses where...

  8. Characterization of sulphate scaling formation damage from laboratory measurements to predict well productivity decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedrikovetsky, P.G.; Monteiro, R. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia e Exploracao de Petroleo (LENEP); Moraes, G.P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Ensino Descentralizada (UNED-Macae); Lopes Junior, R.P. [PETROBRAS, Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bacia de Campos; Rosario, F.F.; Bezerra, M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Barium sulphate scaling is a chronicle disaster during offshore waterflood project where injected and formation waters are incompatible, and their mixing causes salt precipitation. It was detected in several fields of Campos Basin. The mathematical model for sulphate precipitation contains two empirical parameters: the reaction kinetics coefficient that characterizes how fast the precipitation is going on, and the formation damage coefficient showing which permeability impairment the precipitation causes. Knowledge of these two parameters is essential for reliable prediction of the well productivity decline during sea/produced water injection. These parameters are empirical and depend on rock properties; therefore they should be determined from laboratory coreflood tests by forcing the injected and formation waters through rock. Despite these tests have been presented in numerous papers, there were no attempts to determine the model coefficients from laboratory data in order to perform the laboratory-data-based reservoir simulation. A new method for simultaneous determination of both coefficients from the coreflood data is developed. The method determines the kinetic coefficient from ion concentration measurements at the core effluent; then the formation damage coefficient is determined from the pressure drop measurements. The laboratory procedures are routine, the data are available in the literature. The method is based on inverse problem for reactive flow in rocks. The inverse solution is obtained from the exact quasi steady state concentration profile during coreflood. The proposed method furnishes unique values for two coefficients, and the solution is stable with respect to small perturbations of the measured values. The laboratory data on sulphate scaling by CENPES/PETROBRAS, Brazil, and Herriot-Watt University, UK, were treated, and the data were used for prediction of productivity decline in Campos Basin reservoir. The well behaviour forecast and history

  9. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival.

  10. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings. PMID:27183339

  11. Formation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids from H2 and CO2 by a Mixed Culture of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, I.; Cooney, C L

    1981-01-01

    The biological utilization of CO2 and H2 for the formation of short-chain fatty acids was studied by using a mixed culture of bacteria. Optimization of a medium was carried out in continuous culture to identify limiting factors which controlled growth and production of organic acids. The optimal pH for growth and acid production was 7.0 at 37°C; the maximal cell concentration obtained was 5.9 g of cells per liter (dry weight), and the maximal amount of volatile acids formed was 4.7 g/liter, w...

  12. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  13. Gas hydrate formation rates from dissolved-phase methane in porous laboratory specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.; Spangenberg, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sands highly saturated with gas hydrates are potential energy resources, likely forming from methane dissolved in pore water. Laboratory fabrication of gas hydrate-bearing sands formed from dissolved-phase methane usually requires 1–2 months to attain the high hydrate saturations characteristic of naturally occurring energy resource targets. A series of gas hydrate formation tests, in which methane-supersaturated water circulates through 100, 240, and 200,000 cm3 vessels containing glass beads or unconsolidated sand, show that the rate-limiting step is dissolving gaseous-phase methane into the circulating water to form methane-supersaturated fluid. This implies that laboratory and natural hydrate formation rates are primarily limited by methane availability. Developing effective techniques for dissolving gaseous methane into water will increase formation rates above our observed (1 ± 0.5) × 10−7 mol of methane consumed for hydrate formation per minute per cubic centimeter of pore space, which corresponds to a hydrate saturation increase of 2 ± 1% per day, regardless of specimen size.

  14. High-throughput screening of metal-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes against biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Thierry; Badel, Stéphanie; Mayer, Pascal; Groelly, Jérome; de Frémont, Pierre; Jacques, Béatrice; Braunstein, Pierre; Teyssot, Marie-Laure; Gaulier, Christelle; Cisnetti, Federico; Gautier, Arnaud; Roland, Sylvain

    2014-06-01

    A set of molecules including a majority of metal-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes (metal=Ag, Cu, and Au) and azolium salts were evaluated by high-throughput screening of their activity against biofilm formation associated with pathogenic bacteria. The anti-planktonic effects were compared in parallel. Representative biofilm-forming strains of various genera were selected (Listeria, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia). All the compounds were tested at 1 mg L(-1) by using the BioFilm Ring Test. An information score (IS, sum of the activities) and an activity score (AS, difference between anti-biofilm and anti-planktonic activity) were determined from normalized experimental values to classify the most active molecules against the panel of bacterial strains. With this method we identified lipophilic Ag(I) and Cu(I) complexes possessing aromatic groups on the NHC ligand as the most efficient at inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:24729552

  15. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Vahid Dastjerdi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire.Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evaluated in brain heart infusion agar medium using well-plate method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by macro-dilution method. The inhibitory effect on orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using viable cell count in biofilm medium. At the final phase, samples were fixed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.The growth inhibition zone diameter was proportional to the extract concentration. The water extract demonstrated the maximum antibacterial effect on Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25 mg/ml and maximum bactericidal effect on S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 and S. sobrinus ATCC 27607 with minimum bactericidal concentration of 25 mg/ml. The water extract decreased bacterial biofilm formation by S. sanguinis, S. sobrinus, S. salivarius, S. mutans ATCC 35608 and E. faecalis CIP 55142 by 93.7-100%, 40.6-99.9%, 85.2-86.5%, 66.4-84.4% and 35.5-56.3% respectively.Punica granatum L. water extract had significant antibacterial properties against 5 oral bacteria and prevented orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation. However, further investigations are required to generalize these results to the clinical setting.

  16. Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Lang, C; Grohmann, G; Gi, U S; Baltes, W

    1999-09-01

    Azo dyes represent the major class of dyestuffs. They are metabolised to the corresponding amines by liver enzymes and the intestinal microflora following incorporation by both experimental animals and humans. For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbed by the skin. A method for measuring the ability of human skin flora to reduce azo dyes was established. In a standard experiment, 3x10(11) cells of a culture of Staphylococcus aureus were incubated in synthetic sweat (pH 6.8, final volume 20 mL) at 28 degrees C for 24 h with Direct Blue 14 (C.I. 23850, DB 14). The reaction products were extracted and analysed using HPLC. The reduction product o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, OT) could indeed be detected showing that the strain used was able to metabolise DB 14 to the corresponding aromatic amine. In addition to OT, two further metabolites of DB 14 were detected. Using mass spectrometry they were identified as 3,3'-dimethyl-4-amino-4'-hydroxybiphenyl and 3, 3'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl. The ability to cleave azo dyes seems to be widely distributed among human skin bacteria, as, under these in vitro conditions, bacteria isolated from healthy human skin and human skin bacteria from strain collections also exhibited azo reductase activity. Further studies are in progress in order to include additional azo dyes and coloured textiles. At the moment, the meaning of the results with regard to consumer health cannot be finally assessed.

  17. Formation of lactic acid bacteria-yeasts communities on the olive surface during Spanish-style Manzanilla fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Domínguez-Manzano, J; Romero-Gil, V; Rodriguez-Gómez, F; García-García, P; Garrido-Fernández, A; Jiménez-Díaz, R

    2012-12-01

    This work examines the formation of poly-microbial communities adhered to the surface of Manzanilla olive fruits processed according to the Spanish style. The experimental design consisted of four pilot fermenters inoculated with four Lactobacillus pentosus strains, plus another fermenter which was not inoculated and fermented spontaneously. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were analysed in depth on olive epidermis throughout fermentation by plate count, molecular techniques and scanning electron microscopy. Data show that in all cases high population levels (above 8 log(10) CFU per olive) were reached for both groups of microorganisms at the second week of fermentation and that these counts never fell below 6 log(10) CFU per olive during the 3 months that fermenters were monitored. In situ observation of olive epidermis slices revealed a strong aggregation and adhesion between bacteria and yeasts by the formation of a matrix which embedded the microorganisms. Geotrichum candidum, Pichia galeiformis and Candida sorbosa were the main yeast species isolated from these biofilms at the end of fermentation (confirmed by RFLP analysis of the 5.8S-ITS region), while molecular characterization of lactobacilli isolates by means of RAPD-PCR with primer OPL(5) showed in many cases a high similarity in their banding profiles with the inoculated strains. Results obtained in this survey show the importance of studying the olive epidermis throughout fermentation, because ultimately, olives are ingested by consumers. PMID:22986192

  18. The impact of selected strains of probiotic bacteria on metabolite formation in set yoghurt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settachaimongkon, S.; Nout, M.J.R.; Antunes Fernandes, E.C.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Smid, E.J.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12 in cofermentation with traditional starters on metabolite formation in set yoghurt was evaluated. Microbial activity during fermentation and refrigerated storage was investigated by monitoring bacterial popul

  19. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment.

  20. Co-feeding of microalgae and bacteria may result in increased N assimilation in Artemia as compared to mono-diets, as demonstrated by a 15N isotope uptake laboratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, H.T.; Boeckx, P.; Sorgeloos, P.; Bossier, P.; Van Stappen, G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the co-feeding of bacteria and microalgae on nitrogen (N) assimilation in an Artemia franciscana gnotobiotic laboratory culture test. Two strains of bacteria were used, HT3 and HT6, isolated from previous Artemia laboratory cultures. These were fed in combination with microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta strains, either the high quality DT 19/6B or the low quality DT 19/27 strain. Each combination of algae and bacteria was offered in different proportions, i....

  1. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was –42.2±0.3°C. Our results suggest that immersion freezing of these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses would not be important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in polar clouds or to the formation of sea ice. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  2. Neotenic formation in laboratory colonies of the termite Coptotermes gestroi after orphaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The termite Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann, 1896 (Rhinotermitidae: Coptotermitinae is an exotic species in Brazil and information concerning its reproductive developmental biology is scarce. We induced the formation of neotenics in laboratory colonies through orphaning experiments. Orphaning experiments were conducted in three-year old colonies of C. gestroi kept under laboratory conditions. After three months, eight nymphoid neotenics were observed in one colony after queen removal. Histological analysis showed that these neotenics were non-functional. The results suggest that these individuals may have arisen from the first nymphal instar (N1 or from an early N1 instar after one or two larval moults. Neotenics also were recorded on two incipient colonies of C. gestroi that lost the queen naturally.

  3. Comparing laboratory column test treatments with field profiles of fecal indicator bacteria and virus from concentrated source areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feighery, J.; Culligan, P.; Ferguson, A. S.; Mailloux, B. J.; McKay, L. D.; Ahmed, K.; Alam, M.; Huq, M.; Emch, M.; Serre, M. L.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

    2010-12-01

    Fecal contamination of potable water supplies is prevalent throughout the developing world. In rural Bangladesh, groundwater contamination of shallow unconfined aquifers is attributed to the infiltration of fecal organisms from sewage ponds, sewage ditches and latrines. However, few studies conclusively link sources to wells at the scale required for microbial transport to occur. We present a combined field and laboratory investigation into the transport of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enteric viral indicator F+ RNA coliphage (MS-2) using drive point piezometers and extracted sediment cores. Fieldwork and coring took place in the Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Field measurements at the 100-cm scale were made using an array of three drive-point piezometers under highly contaminated ponds and canals over a 10-day period during the peak of the monsoon season. The profiles of E. coli detected under ponds and canals by a culture-based most probable number method were consistent with a first order filtration rate over the distances studied and filtration rates ranged from 1 - 8 m-1. In order to determine possible attachment mechanisms and the influence of sediment treatments applied in laboratory testing, duplicate column transport studies at the 10-cm scale were performed on intact cores processed immediately on-site, intact cores preserved by freezing, dried repacked sediment, acid-washed repacked sediment, and a uniform silica sand. Two ionic strengths (3.5 and 20 mM) were used to encompass the range of electrical conductivity typically found in the shallow portion of the aquifer. Columns were dissected and the attached E. coli quantified by section. Even at the solution chemistry less favorable for particle attachment (low ionic strength), filtration rates for the core tested on-site predict a transport distance of 0.5m for a 4-log unit reduction in E. coli concentration. Although the filtration rates found in the field study are lower

  4. Spectrum of bacteria associated with diabetic foot ulcer and biofilm formation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Banu

    2015-09-01

    The organisms causing chronic diabetic foot ulcers were commonly multidrug-resistant; this was also observed among biofilm formers. Therefore, screening for biofilm formation, along with the usual antibiogram, needs to be performed as a routine procedure in chronic diabetic ulcers to formulate effective treatment strategies for these patients.

  5. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  6. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for cloud formation in the Arctic (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was −42.2±0.3°C. Our results indicated that these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses are not important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in sea ice or polar clouds. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  7. Location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in the gliding bacteria Cytophaga hutchinsonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the recently published genome sequence of Cytophagahutchinsonii revealed an unusual collection of genes for an organism that can attackcrystalline cellulose. Consequently, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists, as towhat mechanism this organism uses to degrade its insoluble substrates. Cellulose, being ahighly polymeric compound and insoluble in water, cannot enter the cell walls ofmicroorganisms. Cellulose-degrading enzymes have therefore to be located on the surface ofthe cell wall or released extracellularly. The location of most cellulase enzymes has beenstudied. However, basic information on C. hutchinsonii cellulases is almost non-existent. Inthe present study, the location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in C.hutchinsonii were demonstrated on different substrates. Various fractions isolated from C.hutchinsonii after cell rupture were assayed for carboxymethyl-cellulase activity (CMC.The cellulases were found to be predominantly cell-free during active growth on solka-flok,although 30% of activity was recorded on cell-bound enzymes. Relatively little CM-cellulase was formed when cells were grown on glucose and cellobiose. Apparently glucoseor labile substrates such as cellobiose seem to repress the formation of CM-cellulase. Thesefindings should provide some insight into possible hydrolysis mechanisms by C.hutchinsonii.

  8. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid, E-mail: cesar.contreras@nasa.gov, E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

  9. Geology of the host formation for the new hydraulic fracturing facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid low-level radioactive wastes are disposed of at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the hydrofracture process. Wastes are mixed with cement and other additives to form a slurry that is injected into a low permeability shale at 300-m depth. Important properties for a host shale formation at a hydrofracture facility include: (1) predictable fracture behavior; (2) hydrologic isolation; and (3) favorable mineralogy and geochemistry to retard radionuclide migration and enhance grout stability. The stratigraphy, petrology, diagenesis, structural geology, and hydrology of the Pumpkin Valley Shale host formation at the ORNL site are summarized and discussed in light of these three properties. Empirical data from hydrofracture operations at ORNL over the past 25 years suggest that many aspects of the Pumpkin Valley Shale make it favorable for use as a host. This observation agrees with analysis of several aspects of the Pumpkin Valley Shale geology at the ORNL site. Although presently available data suggest that the permeability of the Pumpkin Valley Shale is low and that it should provide sufficient hydrologic isolation, more data are needed to properly evaluate this aspect of host formation performance

  10. Design and process aspects of laboratory scale SCF particle formation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemavarapu, Chandra; Mollan, Matthew J; Lodaya, Mayur; Needham, Thomas E

    2005-03-23

    Consistent production of solid drug materials of desired particle and crystallographic morphologies under cGMP conditions is a frequent challenge to pharmaceutical researchers. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology gained significant attention in pharmaceutical research by not only showing a promise in this regard but also accommodating the principles of green chemistry. Given that this technology attained commercialization in coffee decaffeination and in the extraction of hops and other essential oils, a majority of the off-the-shelf SCF instrumentation is designed for extraction purposes. Only a selective few vendors appear to be in the early stages of manufacturing equipment designed for particle formation. The scarcity of information on the design and process engineering of laboratory scale equipment is recognized as a significant shortcoming to the technological progress. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide the information and resources necessary for startup research involving particle formation using supercritical fluids. The various stages of particle formation by supercritical fluid processing can be broadly classified into delivery, reaction, pre-expansion, expansion and collection. The importance of each of these processes in tailoring the particle morphology is discussed in this article along with presenting various alternatives to perform these operations.

  11. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust

  12. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron Alves Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL, Vatairea macrocarpa (VML, Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL, Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL, and Hypnea musciformis (HML showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units. The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins.

  13. Laboratory Simulation of Haze/Aerosol formation in warm and hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Lyons, James R.; Wright, David P.

    2016-10-01

    During the transit of an exoplanet across its host star, transmitted starlight through exoplanet atmosphere is absorbed and scattered, and the recorded transit spectra reveal important chemical information. There are many detected exoplanets in which hazes/aerosols obscure the incident photons, and consequently, fewer photons are transmitted through the atmosphere, contributing to a flat/nearly flat transit spectrum. Here, we have carried out two complementary approaches to address haze formation. First, laboratory simulations of haze condensation in exoplanet atmospheres are carried out using an electric discharge tube. A mixture of likely gas species (i.e. H2, He, H2O, CH4, N2 and H2S) is inserted into a glass manifold on a vacuum line, at a pressure ~100-10 mbar, and depending on the exoplanet category (e.g., warm or hot Jupiters), the temperature is set. Applying a few kilovolts produces plasma in the discharge tube, and as a result, particles are formed. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the optical constants (complex refractive index) of the collected laboratory hazes. Then, chemical characterization is made using RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy) and XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Second, we developed a transit modeling code by which the transit spectra are generated using observational and laboratory data as an input. The model accounts for Mie scattering from haze particles in the vis-NIR spectral region, and Rayleigh scattering which comes from gases and particles (effective in UV-vis). The measured refractive indexes (real and imaginary part) describe the absorption and scattering in the vis-NIR transmission region, and, by generating transit spectra close to the observed ones from exoplanets, constraints on atmospheric chemical characterization can be revealed. Our laboratory results show that haze particles formed in the presence of water and with the solar C/O ratio = 0.5. The other outcome of our experiment is that

  14. Laboratory Formation of Fullerenes from PAHs: Top-down Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castellanos, Pablo; Paardekooper, Daniel M.; Linnartz, Harold; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Interstellar molecules are thought to build up in the shielded environment of molecular clouds or in the envelope of evolved stars. This follows many sequential reaction steps of atoms and simple molecules in the gas phase and/or on (icy) grain surfaces. However, these chemical routes are highly inefficient for larger species in the tenuous environment of space as many steps are involved and, indeed, models fail to explain the observed high abundances. This is definitely the case for the C60 fullerene, recently identified as one of the most complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Observations have shown that, in some photodissociation regions, its abundance increases close to strong UV-sources. In this Letter we report laboratory findings in which C60 formation can be explained by characterizing the photochemical evolution of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sequential H losses lead to fully dehydrogenated PAHs and subsequent losses of C2 units convert graphene into cages. Our results present for the first time experimental evidence that PAHs in excess of 60 C-atoms efficiently photo-isomerize to buckminsterfullerene, C60. These laboratory studies also attest to the importance of top-down synthesis routes for chemical complexity in space.

  15. LABORATORY FORMATION OF FULLERENES FROM PAHS: TOP-DOWN INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castellanos, Pablo; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Paardekooper, Daniel M.; Linnartz, Harold, E-mail: zhen@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-20

    Interstellar molecules are thought to build up in the shielded environment of molecular clouds or in the envelope of evolved stars. This follows many sequential reaction steps of atoms and simple molecules in the gas phase and/or on (icy) grain surfaces. However, these chemical routes are highly inefficient for larger species in the tenuous environment of space as many steps are involved and, indeed, models fail to explain the observed high abundances. This is definitely the case for the C{sub 60} fullerene, recently identified as one of the most complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Observations have shown that, in some photodissociation regions, its abundance increases close to strong UV-sources. In this Letter we report laboratory findings in which C{sub 60} formation can be explained by characterizing the photochemical evolution of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sequential H losses lead to fully dehydrogenated PAHs and subsequent losses of C{sub 2} units convert graphene into cages. Our results present for the first time experimental evidence that PAHs in excess of 60 C-atoms efficiently photo-isomerize to buckminsterfullerene, C{sub 60}. These laboratory studies also attest to the importance of top-down synthesis routes for chemical complexity in space.

  16. A new laboratory method for evaluating formation damage in fractured carbonate reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Yan; Yan Jienian; Zou Shengli; Wang Shuqi; Lu Rende

    2008-01-01

    Natural carbonate core samples with artificial fractures are often used to evaluate the damage of fractured carbonate formations in the laboratory. It is shown that the most frequent error for evaluation results directly from the random width characterized by the artificial fractures. To solve this problem,a series of simulated fractured core samples made of stainless steel with a given width of fracture were prepared. The relative error for the width of artificial fracture decreased to 1%. The width of natural and artificial fractures in carbonate reservoirs can be estimated by image log data. A series of tests for formation damage were conducted by using the stainless steel simulated core samples flushed with different drilling fluids, such as the suifonate/polymer drill-in fluid and the solids-free drill-in fluid with or without ideal packing bridging materials. Based on the experimental results using this kind of simulated cores, a novel approach to the damage control of fractured carbonate reservoirs was presented. The effective temporary plugging ring on the end face of the simulated core sample can be observed clearly.The experimental results also show that the stainless steel simulated cores made it possible to visualize the solids and filtrate invasion.

  17. Laboratory Studies of the Role of Amines in Particle Formation, Growth and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-02-07

    Organosulfur compounds have a variety of sources, particularly biological processes in the oceans. Their oxidation in air forms sulfur dioxide, which is further oxidized to sulfuric acid, as well as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). While sulfuric acid is a well known precursor to particles in air, MSA had not been regarded as a source of new particle formation. Laboratory studies were carried out under this project that showed MSA forms new particles quite efficiently in the presence of amines and water vapor. The data could be reproduced with a relatively simple kinetics model representing cluster formation and growth, which is promising for representing this chemistry in global climate models. The initial steps in the kinetics scheme are based on quantum chemical calculations of likely clusters. The organosulfur chemistry was introduced into an atmospheric model for southern California and used to predict the impact of going to a fossil-fuel free world in which anthropogenic emissions of SO2 are removed, but the natural processes remain.

  18. Electrochemical Dissolution Behavior and the Residue Formation Mechanism of Laboratory Made Carbonyl Nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Why residue is formed during anodic dissolution of carbonyl nickel was explained. • Spatiotemporal pattern of pitting in anodic Ni dissolution was described. • The role of sulfur impurities on anodic Ni dissolution was explained. - Abstract: The anodic dissolution of two laboratory-made Ni samples obtained using the carbonyl method was investigated to understand the origin of residue formation in the anode basket in an electroplating tank. The first sample was obtained with 3 ppm addition of carbonyl sulfide to introduce a small amount of sulfur (CN-S sample). The second was obtained without sulfur impurities (CN sample). Linear sweep voltammetry and chronopotentiometry were applied to characterize the dissolution of these samples. The dissolution of the CN-S sample took place in the active region at low overpotentials. This behavior is determined by the presence of sulfur impurities that break down the passive layer and facilitate Ni dissolution. The CN sample without sulfur was dissolved at high overpotentials. The overpotential-time plots displayed regular large amplitude oscillations in which the overvoltage periodically moved between the transpassive and passive regimes. The anodic dissolution of this sample was controlled by two competing processes: breakdown and formation of the passive layer. Scanning electron microscopy and white light interference microscopy were applied to monitor the morphological changes of the two samples as a function of the dissolution time. The results of these studies showed that the CN-S sample dissolved uniformly across the surface. However, the roughness and the aspect ratio of the protruding features on the surface increased with time. This sample produced a fine residue due to detachment of small protruding crystallites. In contrast, the dissolution of the CN sample involved pit formation and took place predominantly from the bulk of the pits. The dissolution of this sample left a porous skeleton of more

  19. Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

    2014-05-01

    The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

  20. High-throughput identification of bacteria and yeast by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in conventional medical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S Q; Claas, E C J; Kuijper, Ed J

    2010-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory.

  1. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. PMID:26617163

  2. Combined Effects of Curcumin and (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate on Inhibition of N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Mediated Biofilm Formation in Wastewater Bacteria from Membrane Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2015-11-01

    This work investigated the potential of curcumin (CCM) and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated biofilm formation in gramnegative bacteria from membrane bioreactor (MBR) activated sludge. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CCM alone against all the tested bacteria were 200-350 μg/ml, whereas those for EGCG were 300-600 μg/ml. Biofilm formation at one-half MICs indicated that CCM and EGCG alone respectively inhibited 52-68% and 59-78% of biofilm formation among all the tested bacteria. However, their combination resulted in 95-99% of biofilm reduction. Quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) assay with known biosensor strains demonstrated that CCM inhibited the expression of C4 and C6 homoserine lactones (HSLs)-mediated phenotypes, whereas EGCG inhibited C4, C6, and C10 HSLs-based phenotypes. The Center for Disease Control biofilm reactor containing a multispecies culture of nine bacteria with onehalf MIC of CCM (150 μg/ml) and EGCG (275 μg/ml) showed 17 and 14 μg/cm(2) of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on polyvinylidene fluoride membrane surface, whereas their combination (100 μg/ml of each) exhibited much lower EPS content (3 μg/cm(2)). Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations also illustrated that the combination of compounds tremendously reduced the biofilm thickness. The combined effect of CCM with EGCG clearly reveals for the first time the enhanced inhibition of AHL-mediated biofilm formation in bacteria from activated sludge. Thus, such combined natural QSI approach could be used for the inhibition of membrane biofouling in MBRs treating wastewaters.

  3. ON WATER FORMATION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: LABORATORY STUDY OF THE O+D REACTION ON SURFACES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the interstellar medium (ISM), an important channel of water formation is the reaction of atoms on the surface of dust grains. Here, we report on a laboratory study of the formation of water via the O+D reaction network. While prior studies were done on ices, as appropriate to the formation of water in dense clouds, we explored how water formation occurs on bare surfaces, i.e., in conditions mimicking the transition from diffuse to dense clouds (Av ∼ 1-5). Reaction products were detected during deposition and afterward when the sample is brought to a high temperature. We quantified the formation of water and intermediary products, such as D2O2, over a range of surface temperatures (15-25 K). The detection of OD on the surface signals the importance of this reactant in the overall scheme of water formation in the ISM.

  4. A study on the effects of some laboratory-derived genetic mutations on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Parvathi, A.; George, J.; Krohne, G.; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    =UTF-8 0 Author version: World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.: 25(3); 2009; 527-531 A study on the effects of some laboratory derived genetic mutations on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes Sanath Kumar 1 . Ammini Parvathi 2 . Jeffy... found to have no role, others had varying effects from moderate to severe, on attachment and biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes. Materials and methods Bacterial strains and media Two wild type (WT) strains EGDe (BAA-679, serotype 1/2a) and its...

  5. 55 Cancri: A Laboratory for Testing Numerous Conjectures about Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M

    2008-01-01

    Five planets are presently believed to orbit the primary star of 55 Cnc, but there exists a large 5 AU gap in their distribution between the two outermost planets. This gap has attracted considerable interest because it may contain one or more lower--mass planets whose existence is not contradicted by long-term orbit stability analyses, in fact it is expected according to the "packed planetary systems" hypothesis and an empirical Titius--Bode relation recently proposed for 55 Cnc. Furthermore, the second largest planet is just the second farthest and it orbits very close to the star. Its orbit, the most circular of all, appears to be nearly but not quite commensurable with the orbit of the third planet, casting doubt that any migration or resonant capture of the inner planets has ever occurred and lending support to the idea of "in--situ" giant planet formation by the process of core accretion. All of the above ideas will be tested in the coming years in this natural laboratory as more observations will becom...

  6. Laboratory formation of fullerenes from PAHs: Top-down interstellar chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhen, Junfeng; Paardekooper, Daniel M; Linnartz, Harold; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar molecules are thought to build up in the shielded environment of molecular clouds or in the envelope of evolved stars. This follows many sequential reaction steps of atoms and simple molecules in the gas phase and/or on (icy) grain surfaces. However, these chemical routes are highly inefficient for larger species in the tenuous environment of space as many steps are involved and, indeed, models fail to explain the observed high abundances. This is definitely the case for the C$_{60}$ fullerene, recently identified as one of the most complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Observations have shown that, in some PDRs, its abundance increases close to strong UV-sources. In this letter we report laboratory findings in which C$_{60}$ formation can be explained by characterizing the photochemical evolution of large PAHs. Sequential H losses lead to fully dehydrogenated PAHs and subsequent losses of C$_{2}$ units convert graphene into cages. Our results present for the first time experimental evide...

  7. Origin and diversity of metabolically active gut bacteria from laboratory-bred larvae of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera, Insecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Nicole; Martens, Rainer; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2008-12-01

    Cultivation-independent analyses based on genetic profiling of partial bacterial 16S rRNA genes by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR-SSCP of the 16S rRNA itself, and stable isotope probing (SIP), followed by RT-PCR-SSCP, were applied to characterize the diversity of metabolically active bacteria in the larval gut of Manduca sexta bred on tobacco leaves under greenhouse conditions. For SIP, hatching larvae were fed with leaves from tobacco plants grown in a (13)CO(2)-enriched atmosphere. Dominant SSCP bands were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Only one major gut colonizer, an Enterococcus relative, was detected; it occurred in the heavy RNA fraction, demonstrating its metabolic activity, and it originated from eggs, where its metabolic activity was also indicated by rRNA-based SSCP profiles. In contrast, a Citrobacter sedlakii relative was detected on eggs by DNA-SSCP, but rRNA-SSCP and SIP-rRNA-SSCP were negative, suggesting that these bacterial cells were inactive. A Burkholderia relative was dominant and metabolically active on the tobacco leaves but inactive inside the gut, where it was also quantitatively reduced, as suggested by lower band intensities in the DNA-based SSCP profiles. SIP-RNA-SSCP detected another metabolically active gut bacterium (Enterobacter sp.) and more bacteria in the light RNA fraction, indicating low or no metabolic activity of the latter inside the gut. We conclude that the larval gut supported only a low diversity of metabolically active bacteria. PMID:18849461

  8. Formative evaluation of traditional instruction and cooperative inquiry projects in undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichas, Michael A.

    Reform agendas for practice in undergraduate chemistry are moving curriculum beyond traditional behaviorist teaching strategies to include constructivist approaches, for extending student learning beyond simple mastery of chemistry content (Bunce & Robinson, 1997; Lagowski, 1998; Herron & Nurrenburn, 1999). Yet implementing new strategies requires assessment of their benefit to learning. This study was undertaken to provide a formal and formative evaluation of the curricula in General and Organic chemistry laboratory courses, which are structured with both Traditional expository lab exercises, and a cooperative inquiry exercise called the Open Ended Project. Using a mixed-methodological case study framework, the primary goal of the research was to determine how the inclusion of these teaching strategies impacts student learning in the areas of Academic Achievement and Affective Learning from the perspective of the students enrolled in these lab classes. The findings suggest that the current curriculum structure of including both Traditional Instruction and the Open Ended Project does address students' Academic Achievement and Affective Learning. However, students perceived that these curriculum components each contributed differently to their learning. For Academic Achievement, Traditional Experiments and the Project had a positive impact on students' operational skills, such as how to use and choose lab techniques for performing or designing experiments, as well as their conceptual learning, such as understanding concepts, and relating those concepts during data analysis. Yet for Affective Learning, such as students' sense of confidence, accomplishment, and engagement, the Project, which has a cooperative learning element, had a positive impact on student learning, while Traditional Experiments, which do not have a cooperative learning element, had a moderate negative impact. The findings point to Cooperative Learning as the key element, which makes the positive

  9. Laboratory Scale of Liquid Coal Fuel Combustion Process and Exhaust Gas Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika K. Hendratna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Much research of coal has been already undertaken to ascertain the possibilities of coal being used as substitute for heavy fuel oil in the transportation sector. The effects of using coal as transportation fuel to the environment must also be considered. This study will review several aspects of the coal oil combustion process including combustion behavior, flame stability, some emissions from exhaust gas; CO, NOx and the particulate matter in a well insulated laboratory scale furnace for more stable of combustion. Approach: New way for preparation for liquid coal oil steady combustion on a 2.75 m horizontal boiler with four annular segment tubes, a water jacket system and a system for measurement of water temperature inside was archived. Data was gained by applying liquid coal in the experiment. Detailed preparation and setting for steady combustion of coal oil and formation of the exhaust gas were discussed based on data sampling from four sample points in each centre of the angular tube segments. Results: Preparation for coal oil combustion is an important point in the successful of combustion. Heating coal fuel to than 100°C, heating the fuel line to the same temperature and providing enough air pressure for atomization of coal oil until 0.1 MPa allows coal fuel smoothly atomized in the semi gas phase. There was enough of air combustion via a blower with 4500 L min-1 of flow rate and a 24 L min-1 of water flow rate in the water jacket transforms the energy of the fuel to the heat. Uncolored of the exhaust gas and the physical inspection describes the completion of combustion. This result close-relates with the pollutants formation in the exhaust gas. Conclusion: By conducting a deep research process, there is a chance for the substitute of heavy fuel oil with liquid coal fuel with no special treatment needed in combustion process without ignoring the contribution of the combustion results as an environmental problem.

  10. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  11. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Natacha C.; Ramiro, Juan M. P.; Quecan, Beatriz X. V.; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian’...

  12. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  13. Ice Formation Potential of Laboratory Generated Biogenic and Anthropogenic-Biogenic SOA Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Lambe, A. T.; Massoli, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is ubiquitous in the atmosphere and may play an important role in cloud glaciation processes. We investigated several laboratory generated SOA particles systems for their initial water uptake and ice formation propensity as a function of temperature, T, relative humidity with respect to water, RH, relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice, and for different humidification rates, cRHice. This includes pure SOA particles formed from α-pinene, isoprene, and longifolene volatile organic compound precursors with and without the presence of sulfate seed particles as well as oxidized soot and soot-coated α-pinene and naphthalene SOA with varying O/C ratios and coating thicknesses. Micro-spectroscopic chemical imaging using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) is used to characterize SOA, SOA-sulfate, SOA-soot particles generated in the Boston College potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor in relation to their ice nucleation behavior. Water uptake is consistently observed on SOA particles at RH=75% and 95% for 262 and 228 K, respectively, followed by homogeneous ice nucleation applying atmospherically relevant cRHice=1 % min-1. When cRHice=25 % min-1, ice nucleation is delayed by about 30-40% RHice and cannot be explained by homogeneous ice nucleation. This implies diffusion limitation of water into these potentially glassy or semi-solid organic particles resulting in non-equilibrium between ambient RH and particle water activity. These data will aid in our understanding of the role of organic particle phase states in response to changes in T and RH which is crucial information for prediction of atmospheric ice nucleation.

  14. Formation of Nodular Structures and Nitrogen Fixation by Rhizobia on Oilseed Rape Roots Following Treatment with Pectionolytic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUXIAOJIA; ZHANGXUEJIANG

    1996-01-01

    Nodular structures were formed by rhizobia on oilseed rape oilseed rape roots following treatment with pectinolytic bacteria.Nodules developed within 50 days.Photomicrograph of nodule cells showed that the capsulated bacteria were intracellular.Rhizobia resolated from the root nodules retained not only the ability of nodulation but also the characteristic of resistance to 100μg neomycin mL-1,A low nitrogenase activity of the nodules was determined by the method of acetylene reduction.

  15. Population Dynamics and Metabolite Target Analysis of Lactic Acid Bacteria during Laboratory Fermentations of Wheat and Spelt Sourdoughs▿

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Scheirlinck, Ilse; Van Schoor, Ann; Huys, Geert; Vancanneyt, Marc; Vandamme, Peter; De Vuyst, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Four laboratory sourdough fermentations, initiated with wheat or spelt flour and without the addition of a starter culture, were prepared over a period of 10 days with daily back-slopping. Samples taken at all refreshment steps were used for determination of the present microbiota. Furthermore, an extensive metabolite target analysis of more than 100 different compounds was performed through a combination of various chromatographic methods including liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and...

  16. Diversity of iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria in flow reactors in Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christina; Polerecky, L.; Ramette, Alban; Haeusler, Stefan; Bizic-Ionescu, Mina; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Processes of iron mineralization are of great significance to the understanding of Early-Earth geochemistry. Of specific interest are processes at circumneutral pH, where chemical oxidation of Fe can outcompete biological oxidation. To better understand microbially-induced mineral formation and the

  17. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.;

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...

  18. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm

  19. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti,, E-mail: widi@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Winardi, Sugeng [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  20. Laboratory bioassay for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on plant growth and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, K.S.; Liberta, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on juvenile corn growth and the ability of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi, indigenous to coal spoil, to form mycorrhizae. The bioassay demonstrated that application rates can be identified that have the potential to promote increased plant dry weight without suppressing the formation of VA mycorrhizae in a plant's root system.

  1. Laboratory Simulation of an Iron(II)-rich Precambrian Marine Upwelling System to Explore the Growth of Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Wu, Wenfang; Kappler, Andreas; Swanner, Elizabeth D

    2016-01-01

    A conventional concept for the deposition of some Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIF) proceeds on the assumption that ferrous iron [Fe(II)] upwelling from hydrothermal sources in the Precambrian ocean was oxidized by molecular oxygen [O2] produced by cyanobacteria. The oldest BIFs, deposited prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at about 2.4 billion years (Gy) ago, could have formed by direct oxidation of Fe(II) by anoxygenic photoferrotrophs under anoxic conditions. As a method for testing the geochemical and mineralogical patterns that develop under different biological scenarios, we designed a 40 cm long vertical flow-through column to simulate an anoxic Fe(II)-rich marine upwelling system representative of an ancient ocean on a lab scale. The cylinder was packed with a porous glass bead matrix to stabilize the geochemical gradients, and liquid samples for iron quantification could be taken throughout the water column. Dissolved oxygen was detected non-invasively via optodes from the outside. Results from biotic experiments that involved upwelling fluxes of Fe(II) from the bottom, a distinct light gradient from top, and cyanobacteria present in the water column, show clear evidence for the formation of Fe(III) mineral precipitates and development of a chemocline between Fe(II) and O2. This column allows us to test hypotheses for the formation of the BIFs by culturing cyanobacteria (and in the future photoferrotrophs) under simulated marine Precambrian conditions. Furthermore we hypothesize that our column concept allows for the simulation of various chemical and physical environments - including shallow marine or lacustrine sediments. PMID:27500924

  2. Dual-species biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and environmental bacteria isolated from fresh-cut processing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nancy T; Nou, Xiangwu; Lefcourt, Alan M; Shelton, Daniel R; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-02-01

    Biofilm formation is a mechanism adapted by many microorganisms that enhances the survival in stressful environments. In food processing facilities, foodborne bacterial pathogens, which many are poor biofilm formers, could potentially take advantage of this protective mechanism by interacting with other strong biofilm producers. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of bacteria native to fresh produce processing environments on the incorporation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms. Bacteria strains representing 13 Gram-negative species isolated from two fresh produce processing facilities in a previous study were tested for forming dual-species biofilms with E. coli O157:H7. Strong biofilm producing strains of Burkholderia caryophylli and Ralstonia insidiosa exhibited 180% and 63% increase in biofilm biomass, and significant thickening of the biofilms (B. caryophylli not tested), when co-cultured with E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 populations increased by approximately 1 log in dual-species biofilms formed with B. caryophylli or R. insidiosa. While only a subset of environmental isolates with strong biofilm formation abilities increased the presence of E. coli O157:H7 in biofilms, all tested E. coli O157:H7 exhibited higher incorporation in dual-species biofilms with R. insidiosa. These observations support the notion that E. coli O157:H7 and specific strong biofilm producing bacteria interact synergistically in biofilm formation, and suggest a route for increased survival potential of E. coli O157:H7 in fresh produce processing environments.

  3. New Discoveries in Planetary Systems and Star Formation through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    WGLA, AAS; Brickhouse, Nancy; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, U.S.A.); Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    As the panel on Planetary Systems and Star Formation (PSF) is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of solar system bodies (other than the Sun) and extrasolar planets, debris disks, exobiology, the formation of individual stars, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, molecular clouds and the cold ISM, dust, and astrochemistry. Central to the progress in these areas ...

  4. New laboratory procedures for evaluation of drilling induced formation damage and horizontal well performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, N.G.; Adair, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Horizontal well performance can decrease due to drilling induced formation damage. Thus, it is important to evaluate formation damage before drilling. The formation damage is usually modelled using a skin factor which is assumed to be constant. These tests compare the final permeability after mud damage, to the initial undamaged permeability. This method is over-simplified since it does not take into consideration the variable nature in which wellbore cleanup occurs. By measuring the regain permeability at incrementally increasing pressure differentials across the core, a more comprehensive test was developed to evaluate the drilling mud damage removal. The new test procedure indicated that fluid inflow will not occur until a minimum `threshold pressure` is achieved. Development of a finite-difference wellbore simulator to model early-time transient productivity in a horizontal well was also discussed. 8 ref., 14 figs.

  5. THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ LEARNING-COGNITIVE COMPETENCES BASED ON LABORATORY WORKS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVGENIY YUR’EVICH ANDRUSENKO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in Russian education must be made in an inte-grated way. Strategic goal of the state policy in the field of education is to enhance access to quality education, which must be relevant to the requirements of the inno-vative development of economy, current needs of society and all citizens. The list of tasks includes the competence approach as an important part of modernization of educa-tion. Among the key competences are distinguished learning-cognitive competences, for the formation of which are indicated teaching methods, forms and means. Laboratory work in computer science and ICT is one of such means. Laboratory work is a link between theoreti-cal and practical learning and is an important component of theory and practice: it strengthens and improves knowledge and skills, which are used in the process of further studies.

  6. A Laboratory Study of the Effects of Interbeds on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Shale Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how the characteristics of interbeds affect hydraulic fracture propagation in the continental shale formation, a series of 300 mm × 300 mm × 300 mm concrete blocks with varying interbeds, based on outcrop observation and core measurement of Chang 7-2 shale formation, were prepared to conduct the hydraulic fracturing experiments. The results reveal that the breakdown pressure increases with the rise of thickness and strength of interbeds under the same in-situ field stress and injection rate. In addition, for the model blocks with thick and high strength interbeds, the hydraulic fracture has difficulty crossing the interbeds and is prone to divert along the bedding faces, and the fracturing effectiveness is not good. However, for the model blocks with thin and low strength interbeds, more long branches are generated along the main fracture, which is beneficial to the formation of the fracture network. What is more, combining the macroscopic descriptions with microscopic observations, the blocks with thinner and lower strength interbeds tend to generate more micro-fractures, and the width of the fractures is relatively larger on the main fracture planes. Based on the experiments, it is indicated that the propagation of hydraulic fractures is strongly influenced by the characteristics of interbeds, and the results are instructive to the understanding and evaluation of the fracability in the continental shale formation.

  7. Sedimentary phosphate and associated fossil bacteria in a Paleoproterozoic tidal flat in the 1.85 Ga Michigamme Formation, Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Eric E.; Pufahl, Peir K.; Edwards, Cole T.

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is a nutrient fundamental to life and when it precipitates in modern environments bacteria are intimately involved in its release, concentration, and mineralization. Preserved fossil bacteria in phosphate crusts and grains from the ca. 1850 million-year-old Bijiki Iron Formation Member of the Michigamme Formation, Michigan provide insight into the longevity and nature of this relationship. The Michigamme Formation accumulated near the end of the Earth's initial phosphogenic episode (ca. 2.2 and 1.8 Ga) to produce one of the first granular phosphorites. Phosphatic lithofacies consist of fine- to medium-sand-sized francolite peloids concentrated on bedding surfaces in peritidal facies. Granular beds are up to 2 cm thick and peloids are often partially to completely replaced by dolomite and chert. The grains contain organic matter and pyrite framboids that suggest bacterial breakdown of organic matter and bacterial sulfate reduction. The peritidal nature of phosphorite in the Michigamme Formation is in sharp contrast to Phanerozoic phosphogenic environments in deeper coastal upwelling settings. Peritidal settings were well suited for phosphogenesis under the very low oxygen and low dissolved sulfate levels of the Paleoproterozoic as cyanobacteria produced oxygen in shallow water and evaporation led to increased sulfate concentrations. Such concomitant processes helped establish focused redox interfaces in the sediment that chemosynthetic bacterial communities (sulfur oxidizers, reducers, forms that concentrate P, and possibly iron oxidizers) could exploit. Phosphate released from organic matter by heterotrophic bacteria and Fe-redox pumping was further concentrated by these chemotrophs; a process that forms late Neoproterozoic to Phanerozoic phosphorites but on a much larger scale. This early example of a granular phosphorite demonstrates that, like their Phanerozoic counterparts, Paleoproterozoic phosphorites are the concentrated indirectly biomineralized

  8. Formation of Episodic Magnetically Driven Radiatively Cooled Plasma Jets in the Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki-Vidal, F; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N; Chittenden, J P; Hall, G N; Harvey-Thompson, A; Marocchino, A; Ning, C; Stehle, C; Frank, A; Blackman, E G; Bott, S C; Ray, T; 10.1007/s10509-009-9981-1

    2009-01-01

    We report on experiments in which magnetically driven radiatively cooled plasma jets were produced by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the MAGPIE pulsed power facility. The jets were driven by the pressure of a toroidal magnetic field in a ''magnetic tower'' jet configuration. This scenario is characterized by the formation of a magnetically collimated plasma jet on the axis of a magnetic ''bubble'', confined by the ambient medium. The use of a radial metallic foil instead of the radial wire arrays employed in our previous work allows for the generation of episodic magnetic tower outflows which emerge periodically on timescales of ~30 ns. The subsequent magnetic bubbles propagate with velocities reaching ~300 km/s and interact with previous eruptions leading to the formation of shocks.

  9. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  10. Ternary complex formation between AmtB, GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG reveals a novel facet of nitrogen regulation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, Luciano F; Merrick, Mike; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Araujo, Luíza M; Souza, Emanuel M

    2007-12-01

    Ammonium movement across biological membranes is facilitated by a class of ubiquitous channel proteins from the Amt/Rh family. Amt proteins have also been implicated in cellular responses to ammonium availability in many organisms. Ammonium sensing by Amt in bacteria is mediated by complex formation with cytosolic proteins of the P(II) family. In this study we have characterized in vitro complex formation between the AmtB and P(II) proteins (GlnB and GlnZ) from the diazotrophic plant-associative bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. AmtB-P(II) complex formation only occurred in the presence of adenine nucleotides and was sensitive to 2-oxoglutarate when Mg(2+) and ATP were present, but not when ATP was substituted by ADP. We have also shown in vitro complex formation between GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG, which was stimulated by ADP. The stoichiometry of this complex was 1:1 (DraG monomer : GlnZ trimer). We have previously reported that in vivo high levels of extracellular ammonium cause DraG to be sequestered to the cell membrane in an AmtB and GlnZ-dependent manner. We now report the reconstitution of a ternary complex involving AmtB, GlnZ and DraG in vitro. Sequestration of a regulatory protein by the membrane-bound AmtB-P(II) complex defines a new regulatory role for Amt proteins in Prokaryotes.

  11. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram;

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone...... was not affected by pH in the range relevant to swimming pools (pH 6.8 – 7.8) and a half-life time at 10-12 min was obtained. Repeating the ozonation, the decomposition of ozone increased at the second dose of ozone added (t½,2=8 min) and then decreased again at the third and fourth dose of ozone (t½,3=17 min; t...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  12. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq. Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3 are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  13. Laboratory investigation on the formation of unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Osamura, Y.; Huang, L. C. L.; Lee, Y. T.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2000-04-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments of ground state cyano radicals, CN(X 2Σ +), with hydrocarbons acetylene (C 2H 2), ethylene (C 2H 4), methylacetylene (CH 3CCH), allene (H 2CCCH 2), dimethylacetylene (CH 3CCCH 3), and benzene (C 6H 6,) were performed to investigate the formation of unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere. These radical-neutral reactions have no entrance barrier, depict an exit barrier well below the energy of the reactant molecules, and are all exothermic. The CN radical attacks the π electron density at the olefine, alkyne, and aromatic molecules; the formation of an initial addition complex is a common pathway on the involved potential energy surfaces for all reactions. A subsequent carbon-hydrogen bond rupture yields the unsaturated nitriles HCCCN, C 2H 3CN, CH 3CCCN, H 2CCCH(CN), H 2CCCH 2CN, and C 6H 5CN as detected in our experiments. The explicit identification of this CN vs H atom exchange pathway under single collision, makes this reaction-class a compelling candidate to synthesize unsaturated nitriles in Titan's atmosphere. This versatile concept makes it even possible to predict the formation of nitriles once the corresponding unsaturated hydrocarbons are identified in Titan. Here, the C 2H 2 as well as cyanoacetylene, HCCCN, have been already identified unambiguously in Titan's troposphere. Those nitriles as sampled in our crossed beam experiments resemble an ideal challenge to be detected in the framework of the NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan.

  14. The cosmic MeV neutrino background as a laboratory for black hole formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yüksel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of the cosmic rate of core collapses, and the associated neutrino flux, commonly assume that a fixed fraction of massive stars collapse to black holes. We argue that recent results suggest that this fraction instead increases with redshift. With relatively more stars vanishing as “unnovae” in the distant universe, the detectability of the cosmic MeV neutrino background is improved due to their hotter neutrino spectrum, and expectations for supernova surveys are reduced. We conclude that neutrino detectors, after the flux from normal SNe is isolated via either improved modeling or the next Galactic SN, can probe the conditions and history of black hole formation.

  15. New laboratory procedures for evaluation of drilling induced formation damage and horizontal well performance: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adair, K.L. [Resman Oil and Gas Ltd. (Canada); Gruber, N.G. [Core Laboratories Canada Ltd. (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic leakoff/regain permeability and threshold pressure data was analyzed from a total of 37 special core studies performed on twenty carbonate and sandstone formations from Western Canada. The investigation was prompted by previous findings suggesting the importance of these parameters in assessing drilling mud damage and cleanup performance. Empirical equations were developed to predict threshold inflow pressure, regain permeability, and skin and well productivity, as a function of permeability drawdown. The correlations identified in this paper could be used during horizontal well planning and evaluation to estimate well productivity, inflow contribution profile, and drawdown required for effective damage control. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Water Mediated Wittig Reactions of Aldehydes in the Teaching Laboratory: Using Sodium Bicarbonate for the in Situ Formation of Stabilized Ylides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael J. B.; Fallot, Lucas B.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Bergdahl, B. Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of alkenes using the Wittig reaction is a traditional part of many undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory curricula. The aqueous medium version of the Wittig reaction presented is a reliable adaptation of this alkene formation reaction as a very safe alternative in the introductory organic chemistry laboratory. The…

  17. Insights into the formation mechanism of chloropropanol fatty acid esters under laboratory-scale deodorization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Katsuhito; Hori-Koriyama, Natsuko; Tsumura, Kazunobu; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chloropropanol fatty acid esters (CPFAEs) are well-known contaminants in refined oils and fats, and several research groups have studied their formation. However, the results obtained in these studies were not satisfactory because the CPFAEs were not analyzed comprehensively. Thus, in the present study, a comprehensive analysis was performed to obtain new details about CPFAE formation. Each lipid (monopalmitin, dipalmitin, tripalmitin, monoolein, diolein, triolein, and crude palm oil) was heated at 250°C for 90 min, and the CPFAEs were analyzed using supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that CP fatty acid monoesters were formed from monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols after heating in the presence of a chlorine compound. In addition, CP fatty acid diesters were formed from diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols under the same conditions. In the case of crude palm oil, only CP fatty acid diesters were formed. Therefore, these results indicated that CPFAEs in refined palm oil were formed mainly from triacylglycerols. PMID:26822095

  18. The Effects of Sugars on the Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli 185p on Stainless Steel and Polyethylene Terephthalate Surfaces in a Laboratory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangholi, Mahdi; Jamalli, Ailar

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacteria utilize various methods in order to live in protection from adverse environmental conditions. One such method involves biofilm formation; however, this formation is dependent on many factors. The type and concentration of substances such as sugars that are present in an environment can be effective facilitators of biofilm formation. Methods First, the physico-chemical properties of the bacteria and the target surface were studied via the MATS and contact angle measurement methods. Additionally, adhesion to different surfaces in the presence of various concentrations of sugars was compared in order to evaluate the effect of these factors on the biofilm formation of Escherichia coli, which represents a major food contaminant. Results Results showed that the presence of sugars has no effect on the bacterial growth rate; all three concentrations of sugars were hydrophilic and demonstrated a high affinity toward binding to the surfaces. Conclusions The impact of sugars and other factors on biofilm formation can vary depending on the type of bacteria present.

  19. Laboratory and tentative interstellar detection of trans-methyl formate using the publicly available Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Neill, Justin L; Zaleski, Daniel P; Steber, Amanda L; Pate, Brooks H; Lattanzi, Valerio; Spezzano, Silvia; McCarthy, Michael C; Remijan, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of the higher-energy trans conformational isomer of methyl formate has been assigned for the first time using several pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometers in the 6-60 GHz frequency range. This species has also been sought toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud using the publicly available PRIMOS survey from the Green Bank Telescope. We detect seven absorption features in the survey that coincide with laboratory transitions of trans-methyl formate, from which we derive a column density of 3.1 (+2.6, -1.2) \\times 10^13 cm-2 and a rotational temperature of 7.6 \\pm 1.5 K. This excitation temperature is significantly lower than that of the more stable cis conformer in the same source but is consistent with that of other complex molecular species recently detected in Sgr B2(N). The difference in the rotational temperatures of the two conformers suggests that they have different spatial distributions in this source. As the abundance of trans-methyl formate is far higher ...

  20. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, K.; Swanson, B. D.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for cloud formation in the Arctic (Bigg and Leck, 2001), the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA) of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice...

  1. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, K.; Swanson, B. D.

    2008-01-01

    Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001), the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA) of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a...

  2. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances.

  3. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances. PMID:27362920

  4. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  5. Phase I - Laboratory Study Effects of Cement Grout Structures on Colloid Formation from SRS Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to better understand the influence of grout structures and fills on colloid formation. Low-Level Waste is disposed in concrete vaults and trenches at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF). Two types of enhanced trench disposal are approved for use including; Intimately-Mixed Cement-Stabilized waste forms, such as Ashcrete and Blowcrete resulting from operation of the Consolidated Incinerator Facility, and Cement-Stabilized Encapsulated waste, where waste forms (e.g., contaminated equipment) will be surrounded by a grout or other cementitious material. The presence of concrete structures and process of grouting in trenches are expected to generate colloids, both from the grout itself and as a result of the interactions of these cementitious materials and their degradation products with the surrounding soils. The extent of occurrence, mobility, and influence on contaminant transport of colloidal materials in aquifer systems is the subject of this study. The intent of this study is not to modify the PA but to aid in our understanding of the significance of this phenomenon. Information generated in this study will help in considering whether colloid-enhanced contaminant migration should be considered in establishing waste acceptance criteria and in the design and development of waste disposal systems

  6. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase

  7. A formative evaluation of problem-based learning as an instructional strategy in a medical laboratory technician course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane Patricia

    2002-09-01

    This study is a formative evaluation of problem-based learning as an effective course delivery strategy in a second year introductory Medical Laboratory Technician discipline-specific hematology course. This strategy can serve two purposes in this type of course: discipline specific content knowledge and process skills learning. A needs study identified that students required additional workplace skills as they entered the clinical internship. Students tested well on the national registry examinations, discipline-specific content knowledge, but group process skills needed improvement in the areas of collaboration, communication, and critical reasoning. Problem-based learning was identified as an change intervention to help provide these skills. A search of the literature revealed that the Baker College cultural and physical environment would support this intervention. Twelve cases were written, situated in a clinical laboratory environment, addressing learning issues identified in a modified Delphi survey of laboratory personnel e.g. fiscal responsibility, turn-around time, invasiveness of laboratory techniques, and holistic view of healthcare environment. A hematology class of 13 students received the intervention. The cases were structured to proceed from instructor-centered (guided) learning issues to learner-centered learning issues. Observations of the in-group collaboration processes were documented, as well as oral presentations and critical reasoning, with students given periodic feedback on these skills. Student surveys provided data about satisfaction, attitude to PBL process, and self-efficacy. Multiple choice discipline-specific content examinations were given and compared with classes from the previous four years. The study found that students receiving the PBL treatment scored as well as or better than students from previous years on traditional multiple choice exams. Recall questions showed positive significance and application/analysis questions

  8. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun M; Bullen, Thomas D; Dewald, James; Zhang, Donghui; Curran, Seamus; Islam, Farhana S; Beveridge, Terry J; Oremland, Ronald S

    2007-04-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [epsilon] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods ( approximately 10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger ( approximately 1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards ( approximately 100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. PMID:17277198

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from very low birth weight babies: comprehensive comparisons of bacteria at different stages of biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garland Suzanne M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci are major causes of bloodstream infections in very low birth weight babies cared for in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The virulence of these bacteria is mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm-related infections often fail to respond to antibiotic chemotherapy guided by conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests. Methods Coagulase-negative staphylococcal blood culture isolates were grown in different phases relevant to biofilm formation: planktonic cells at mid-log phase, planktonic cells at stationary phase, adherent monolayers and mature biofilms and their susceptibilities to conventional antibiotics were assessed. The effects of oxacillin, gentamicin, and vancomycin on preformed biofilms, at the highest achievable serum concentrations were examined. Epifluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with bacterial viability staining and polysaccharide staining were used to confirm the stimulatory effects of antibiotics on biofilms. Results Most coagulase-negative staphylococcal clinical isolates were resistant to penicillin G (100%, gentamicin (83.3% and oxacillin (91.7% and susceptible to vancomycin (100%, ciprofloxacin (100%, and rifampicin (79.2%. Bacteria grown as adherent monolayers showed similar susceptibilities to their planktonic counterparts at mid-log phase. Isolates in a biofilm growth mode were more resistant to antibiotics than both planktonic cultures at mid-log phase and adherent monolayers; however they were equally resistant or less resistant than planktonic cells at stationary phase. Moreover, for some cell-wall active antibiotics, concentrations higher than conventional MICs were required to prevent the establishment of planktonic cultures from biofilms. Finally, the biofilm-growth of two S. capitis isolates could be enhanced by oxacillin at the highest achievable serum concentration. Conclusion

  11. Assessment of disinfection qualityof surgery laboratory and bacteria species identification%实验室消毒效果评价及细菌种群鉴定的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王霄; 廉萍; 刘桂芳

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess the disinfection results of laboratory and bacteria species identification. Methods The results of disinfection of laboratory were inspected according to the 《disinfection and experiment specification》and《disinfect technical specification》 , and the bacteria species were identified by random primer PCR. Results The objective surface (90.90%) and pressure steam sterilization (100.00%) basically met the national natural bacteria killing standards,while the qualification rates of operators' hands,indoor air and used disinfectant were 86.36%, 76.47% and 85.71% failed to meet the standard. The positive bacteria strains were identified by random primer PCR. Conclusion The environmental conditions and sterilization quality of the laboratory could improved by implementing strict operation procedureand random primer PCR can be used for assessment of disinfection quality of a sterile environment.%目的 对某无菌实验室进行消毒效果检测,并进行细菌种属鉴定.方法 按照和进行消毒,随机引物PCR法进行阳性菌落种属鉴定.结果 物体表面(90.90%)及压力蒸汽灭菌(100.00%)基本达到国家自然菌杀灭率标准,实验人员手(86.36%)、室内空气(76.47%)、使用过的消毒液(85.71%)未达标.随机引物PCR成功对阳性菌株进行了种属鉴定.结论 改善实验室环境条件,严格操作程序可提升消毒效果,随机引物PCR法可有效应用于无菌环境的消毒效果评价.

  12. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S K; Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2007-04-26

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of NSTec and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemical Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary

  13. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Natacha C; Ramiro, Juan M P; Quecan, Beatriz X V; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D G

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian's foods and (ii) to develop protective biofilms with these strains and test them for exclusion of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. LAB were tested for survival in acid and bile salt conditions, surface properties, biosurfactant production, β-galactosidase and gelatinase activity, antibiotic resistance and presence of virulence genes. Most strains survived exposure to pH 2 and 4% bile salts. The highest percentages of auto-aggregation were obtained after 24 h of incubation. Sixty-seven percentage auto-aggregation value was observed in W. viridescens 113 and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 exhibited the highest co-aggregation (69% with Listeria monocytogenes and 74.6% with E. coli O157:H7), while the lowest co-aggregation was exhibited by W. viridescens 113 (53.4% with Listeria monocytogenes and 38% with E. coli O157:H7). Tests for hemolytic activity, bacterial cell adherence with xylene, and drop collapse confirmed the biosurfactant-producing ability of most strains. Only one strain (L. lactis 368) produced β-galactosidase. All strains were negative for virulence genes cob, ccf, cylLL, cylLs, cyllM, cylB, cylA and efaAfs and gelatinase production. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the MIC for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin did not exceed the epidemiological cut-off suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. Some strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and resistance

  14. A laboratory study on formation of oil-SPM aggregates using the NIST standard reference material 1941b. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelifa, A.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Yang, C.; Landriault, M.; Fingas, M.; Brown, C.E.; Gamble, L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Pjontek, D. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The dispersion of spilled oil in water can be enhanced by a natural process in which suspended particulate matter (SPM) combines with oil droplets to form Oil-SPM aggregates (OSA). A laboratory setup and procedure were developed in this study to examine the formation of OSAs in which the sediment (Standard Reference Material 1941b) was mixed with Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crudes at concentrations varying from 25 to 300 mg/L. The OSAs were separated from the bulk water using a newly developed procedure. Gas chromatography combined with flame ionization analysis was used to measure the oil trapped in the OSAs. The sediment trapped in the sinking OSAs was then isolated for gravimetric quantification. This procedure has the potential to isolate sinking OSAs with minimum alteration with dispersed oil. Oil mass of less than 2 mg trapped in OSAs was measured with 0.8 mg uncertainty at a 95 per cent confidence level. This setup was capable of imaging droplets of 0.1 {mu}g and up in size. The study showed that formation of sinking OSAs reaches maximum efficiency at an optimum oil to sediment ratio that decreases from 0.5 to approximately 0.1 when the ratio between oil density and the water density increases from 0.84 to 0.97. The percentage of oil trapped in sinking OSAs increases quickly from approximately 0.5 per cent to 30 per cent of the initial oil mass when sediment concentration increases from 25 to 100 mg/l. The highest trapping efficiency was found to decrease exponentially with oil density. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  15. A laboratory study on formation of oil-SPM aggregates using the NIST standard reference material 1941b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelifa, A.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Yang, C.; Landriault, M.; Fingas, M.; Brown, C.E.; Gamble, L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Pjontek, D. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The dispersion of spilled oil in water can be enhanced by a natural process in which suspended particulate matter (SPM) combines with oil droplets to form Oil-SPM aggregates (OSA). A laboratory setup and procedure were developed in this study to examine the formation of OSAs in which the sediment (Standard Reference Material 1941b) was mixed with Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crudes at concentrations varying from 25 to 300 mg/L. The OSAs were separated from the bulk water using a newly developed procedure. Gas chromatography combined with flame ionization analysis was used to measure the oil trapped in the OSAs. The sediment trapped in the sinking OSAs was then isolated for gravimetric quantification. This procedure has the potential to isolate sinking OSAs with minimum alteration with dispersed oil. Oil mass of less than 2 mg trapped in OSAs was measured with 0.8 mg uncertainty at a 95 per cent confidence level. This setup was capable of imaging droplets of 0.1 {mu}g and up in size. The study showed that formation of sinking OSAs reaches maximum efficiency at an optimum oil to sediment ratio that decreases from 0.5 to approximately 0.1 when the ratio between oil density and the water density increases from 0.84 to 0.97. The percentage of oil trapped in sinking OSAs increases quickly from approximately 0.5 per cent to 30 per cent of the initial oil mass when sediment concentration increases from 25 to 100 mg/l. The highest trapping efficiency was found to decrease exponentially with oil density. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  16. Spectrophotometric Determination of 6-Propyl-2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Prussian Blue Complex Formation: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Robert; Skowron, Monika; Ciesielski, Witold; Rembisz, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory experiment challenges students to determine 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) based on Prussian blue complex formation. Prussian blue is formed by ferricyanide and Fe(II) ions which are generated in situ from Fe(III) ions reduced by PTU. The absorbance of this product was measured at a wavelength of 840 nm, after a reaction time of 30…

  17. Decarboxylative Conversion of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Klebsiella oxytoca and Erwinia uredovora, Epiphytic Bacteria of Polymnia sonchifolia Leaf, Possibly Associated with Formation of Microflora on the Damaged Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashidoko, Y; Urashima, M; Yoshida, T; Mizutani, J

    1993-01-01

    Two bacteria, Klebsiella oxytoca and Erwinia uredovora, which constituted epiphytic microftora on yacon (Polymnia sonchifolia) leaves, converted hydroxycinnamic acids into hydroxystyrenes decarboxylatively. Hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase was extracted as crude protein from the bacterial cells, and was substrate-inducible. This decarboxylation was for the bacteria a detoxification of hydroxycinnamic acids of plants, but the metabolites were toxic to other test bacteria and fungi, including some phytopathogens. The possible ecological role of these epiphytic bacteria on the host-plant was discussed. from the viewpoint of their chemical interaction via the styrene derivatives. PMID:27314772

  18. Significant histamine formation in tuna ( Thunnus albacares ) at 2 degrees C - effect of vacuum- and modified atmosphere-packaging on psychrotolerant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Jette; Laursen, B. G.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2005-01-01

    histamine fish poisoning had a histamine concentration of > 7000 mg/kg and this high concentration was most likely produced by psychrotolerant Morganella morganii-like bacteria or by Photobacterium phosphoreum. Similar psychrotolerant M. morganii-like bacteria dominated the spoilage microbiota of fresh MAP...

  19. Establishment and Exploration of identification of bacteria in microbiology laboratories%浅谈微生物实验室中细菌的鉴定方法建立及探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕兰; 梁嘉雯

    2016-01-01

    目的:对洁净室收集到的某一微生物进行鉴定。方法采用无菌操作技术对所采集的环境菌进行分离培养,结合革兰氏染色法技术及API鉴定系统,对环境菌进行鉴定分析,从而建立起微生物实验室中细菌的鉴定方法与步骤。结果待鉴定菌有96.1%的可能性是表皮葡萄球菌,2.1%的可能性是产色葡萄球菌。结论该方法的鉴定概率属于“好的鉴定”。%ObjectiveTo identify a microorganism colected in the clean room.Methods Using aseptic technique colected bacteria were isolated and cultured environment, combined with gram staining technology and API identification systems, forensic analysis of environmental bacteria, in order to establish microbiological laboratory methods and procedures identified in bacteria.Results The possibility that the unknown microorganism is staphylococcus epidermidis is 96.1%, the possibility that the unknown microorganism is staphylococcus chromogenes is 2.1%.ConclusionThe identification probability of the method belongs to “good identification”.

  20. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehy...

  1. Origin and Diversity of Metabolically Active Gut Bacteria from Laboratory-Bred Larvae of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera, Insecta)▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmann, Nicole; Martens, Rainer; Christoph C Tebbe

    2008-01-01

    Cultivation-independent analyses based on genetic profiling of partial bacterial 16S rRNA genes by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR-SSCP of the 16S rRNA itself, and stable isotope probing (SIP), followed by RT-PCR-SSCP, were applied to characterize the diversity of metabolically active bacteria in the larval gut of Manduca sexta bred on tobacco leaves under greenhouse conditions. For SIP, hatching larvae were fed with leaves from tobacco p...

  2. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  3. Formation of Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters Both in Real Edible Oils during Laboratory-Scale Refining and in Chemical Model during High Temperature Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Guoqin; Liu, Xinqi

    2016-07-27

    In the present study, the formation mechanisms of glycidyl fatty acid esters (GEs) were investigated both in real edible oils (soybean oil, camellia oil, and palm oil) during laboratory-scale preparation and refining and in chemical model (1,2-dipalmitin (DPG) and 1-monopalmitin (MPG)) during high temperature exposure (160-260 °C under nitrogen). The formation process of GEs in the chemical model was monitored using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the roasting and pressing process could produce certain amounts of GEs that were much lower than that produced in the deodorization process. GE contents in edible oils increased continuously and significantly with increasing deodorization time below 200 °C. However, when the temperature exceeded 200 °C, GE contents sharply increased in 1-2 h followed by a gradual decrease, which could verify a simultaneous formation and degradation of GEs at high temperature. In addition, it was also found that the presence of acylglycerol (DAGs and MAGs) could significantly increase the formation yield of GEs both in real edible oils and in chemical model. Compared with DAGs, moreover, MAGs displayed a higher formation capacity but substantially lower contribution to GE formation due to their low contents in edible oils. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopic evidence showed that cyclic acyloxonium ion intermediate was formed during GE formation derived from DPG and MPG in chemical model heated at 200 °C. PMID:27319409

  4. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the formation of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after engine exit plane (<5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the near-field formation of contrail ice particles. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentrations have a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation. When soot was introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, homogeneous ice particle formation was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher altitude standard day conditions were found to favor ice particle formation as expected. The microphysical model captures experimental trends well, but discrepancies between the model and the experiments exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to the lack of treatment of turbulent mixing in the model and particle loss and scatter during the experimental sampling process. Future measurement activities are planned to investigate other important

  5. Hydraulic characterization of the boom clay formation from the HADES underground laboratory in Mol: evolution and assessment of the piezometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The network of piezometers installed in the Boom clay formation from the HADES Underground laboratory (-223 m) at Mol is an invaluable tool for the measurement and physical understanding of the groundwater flow towards a non closes deep repository system in an argillaceous formation. The hydraulic testing, test interpretation and groundwater sampling methodologies in a plastic clay (19 - 26 % H2O) at medium depth are presented. The results obtained from in situ tests (metric to local scale, 1 to 30 m) and from laboratory experiments on vertical and horizontal clay plugs (centimetric scale, 3 - 7 cm) have put into evidence the anisotropy of the Boom clay. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity is approximately 2.4 times higher than the vertical one. Laboratory and in situ results are discussed. Their comparison gives coherent hydraulic and transport parameters supporting the model used to describe quantitatively the migration of radionuclides through the clay. Meanwhile, concerning the hydraulic conductivity, a large discrepancy still subsists with the regional model (kilometric scale, 40 km x 80 km) which is presently being revisited (i.a. boundary conditions and refinement of the mesh, from 5 to 0.5 km) and with the regional observations often too scarce (water level measurements in the sandy aquifers surrounding the Boom clay formation). (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Assessing the precision of high-throughput computational and laboratory approaches for the genome-wide identification of protein subcellular localization in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkman Fiona SL

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of a bacterial protein's subcellular localization (SCL is important for genome annotation, function prediction and drug or vaccine target identification. Subcellular fractionation techniques combined with recent proteomics technology permits the identification of large numbers of proteins from distinct bacterial compartments. However, the fractionation of a complex structure like the cell into several subcellular compartments is not a trivial task. Contamination from other compartments may occur, and some proteins may reside in multiple localizations. New computational methods have been reported over the past few years that now permit much more accurate, genome-wide analysis of the SCL of protein sequences deduced from genomes. There is a need to compare such computational methods with laboratory proteomics approaches to identify the most effective current approach for genome-wide localization characterization and annotation. Results In this study, ten subcellular proteome analyses of bacterial compartments were reviewed. PSORTb version 2.0 was used to computationally predict the localization of proteins reported in these publications, and these computational predictions were then compared to the localizations determined by the proteomics study. By using a combined approach, we were able to identify a number of contaminants and proteins with dual localizations, and were able to more accurately identify membrane subproteomes. Our results allowed us to estimate the precision level of laboratory subproteome studies and we show here that, on average, recent high-precision computational methods such as PSORTb now have a lower error rate than laboratory methods. Conclusion We have performed the first focused comparison of genome-wide proteomic and computational methods for subcellular localization identification, and show that computational methods have now attained a level of precision that is exceeding that of high

  7. Prognostic value of clinical, laboratory and molecular predictors in the formation of personalized approaches to breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phokhach A.V.

    2016-06-01

    group without Herceptin (27,4±3,4 months and higher than the HER-2 / neu-negative patients (38,1±3,0 months. The value of coefficient Spearman rank correlation to tumor response and the factor of menopause, age, general condition of the patient were - 0.174; -0.222; -0.250 (P 0.05, in accordance. In the presence of neutropenia at 1 week after treatment it has been revealed significantly better tumor response to treatment - the correlation coefficient: 0.204 (p <0.05. Conclusion. Molecular subtypes detection had shown that HER-2/neu-positive and tripple negative breast cancer demonstrated the most aggresive course of disease. It was found that a more pronounced tumor response to combination chemotherapy can be expected in young patients, pre-menopausal, high ECOG status. The presence of neutropenia has a significantly positive impact on the results of treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. Citation: Phokhach AV, Elhajj MH, Bondarenko IN, Zavizion VF, Hurtovyi VA. [Prognostic value of clinical, laboratory and molecular predictors in the formation of personalized approaches to breast cancer treatment]. Morphologia. 2016;10(2:53-60. Russian.

  8. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  9. Radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for manmade pollutants and naturally occurring constituents. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, five domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, two dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. The water samples were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Toluene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample. Two samples contained fecal coliform bacteria counts that exceeded established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water

  10. Radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Edwards, D.D. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [State of Idaho, Dept. of Water Resources (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for manmade pollutants and naturally occurring constituents. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, five domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, two dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. The water samples were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Toluene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample. Two samples contained fecal coliform bacteria counts that exceeded established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water.

  11. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  12. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a 60Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of 60Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 μg/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. 60Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants

  13. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  14. Formation of histamine and biogenic amines in cold-smoked tuna: An investigation of psychrotolerant bacteria from samples implicated in cases of histamine fish poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Jette; Dalgaard, Paw

    2006-01-01

    . Product characteristics and profiles of biogenic amines in the implicated products were also recorded. In the single poisoning case, psychrotolerant Morganella morganii -like bacteria most likely was responsible for the histamine production in CST with 2.2% ñ 0.6% NaCl in the water phase (WPS...

  15. Effect of consumption of dairy products with probiotic bacteria on biofilm formation on silicone rubber implant surfaces in an artificial throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Mei, HC; Van de Belt-Gritter, B; van Weissenbruch, R; Dijk, F; Albers, FWJ; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Indwelling voice prostheses are most often made of silicone rubber. However, the silicone rubber surface attracts large quantities of yeasts and bacteria and their colonization on the valve side of voice prostheses leads to frequent malfunctioning Indwelling voice prostheses are therefore usually re

  16. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illangasekare, Tissa [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Trevisan, Luca [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Agartan, Elif [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mori, Hiroko [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vargas-Johnson, Javier [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cihan, Abdullah [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Quanlin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  17. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram;

    2016-01-01

    byproducts during subsequent chlorination. The ozone reaction was observed to behave according to first order kinetics. For tap water half-life was 4 min whilst polluted and unpolluted pool water exhibited half-life of 8 and 11 min, respectively. When ozonation dosage was repeated half-life of ozone......Ozonation experiments were performed using unchlorinated tap water used for filling municipal swimming pools, actual pool water and pool water polluted by addition of fresh tap water and artificial body fluid to evaluate ozone kinetics and water quality effects on formation of volatile disinfection...... was approximated 17-19 min in all samples. Subsequent chlorination revealed ozone removed reactivity of dissolved organic carbon toward chlorine for tap and polluted pool water, decreasing formation rate of trihalomethanes (TTHM). In pool water higher rates of TTHM formation was observed after the initial ozone...

  18. Comparison of culture and PCR assays for detection of bacteria in laboratory rats and mice%培养法和 PCR法用于实验大、小鼠细菌检测的比较分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯洁; 谢建云; 冯丽萍; 魏晓锋; 高诚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficiency of bacteria culture and PCR assays for detection of Staphylococcus aureus ( S.aureus) , Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P.aeruginosa) and Klebsiella pneumoniae ( K.pneumoniae) in laboratory rats and mice.Methods Bacteria culture combined with biochemical identification and PCR assay were used to detect 78 SPF rats and 422 SPF mice and the results of the two methods were compared .Results All the 78 rats were negative .Of the 422 mice, the positive rate by culture was 7.11%(30/422), of which, 10 were S.aureus, 22 were P.aeruginosa, and 2 were K.pneumoniae.The positive rate by PCR was 7.58%(32/422), of which, 10 were S.aureus, 25 were P. aeruginosa, and 2 were K.pneumoniae.Conclusions The high sensitivity , rapid procedure and easy to operate of PCR assay makes it valuable for rapid bacteria diagnosis and large-scale screening in laboratory animals .%目的:比较培养法和PCR法对实验大、小鼠的细菌检测效果。方法分别采用传统细菌分离培养结合生化鉴定方法和PCR方法,对78只SPF级大鼠和422只SPF级小鼠进行检测,对两种方法的检测结果进行比较分析。结果78只SPF级大鼠均未检测出阳性。422只SPF级小鼠,培养法检测阳性率7.11%(30/422),其中金黄色葡萄球菌10只,绿脓杆菌22只,肺炎克雷伯杆菌2只。 PCR法检测阳性率7.58%(32/422),其中金黄色葡萄球菌10只,绿脓杆菌25只,肺炎克雷伯杆菌2只。结论 PCR法的敏感性高于培养法,操作简便、快捷,适用于实验动物细菌的快速诊断和大规模的质量筛查。

  19. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Identification of rare pathogenic bacteria in a clinical microbiology laboratory: impact of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Abat, Cedric; Rolain, Jean Marc; Colson, Philippe; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Gouriet, Frédérique; Fournier, Pierre Edouard; Drancourt, Michel; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2013-07-01

    During the past 5 years, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful tool for routine identification in many clinical laboratories. We analyzed our 11-year experience in routine identification of clinical isolates (40 months using MALDI-TOF MS and 91 months using conventional phenotypic identification [CPI]). Among the 286,842 clonal isolates, 284,899 isolates of 459 species were identified. The remaining 1,951 isolates were misidentified and required confirmation using a second phenotypic identification for 670 isolates and using a molecular technique for 1,273 isolates of 339 species. MALDI-TOF MS annually identified 112 species, i.e., 36 species/10,000 isolates, compared to 44 species, i.e., 19 species/10,000 isolates, for CPI. Only 50 isolates required second phenotypic identifications during the MALDI-TOF MS period (i.e., 4.5 reidentifications/10,000 isolates) compared with 620 isolates during the CPI period (i.e., 35.2/10,000 isolates). We identified 128 bacterial species rarely reported as human pathogens, including 48 using phenotypic techniques (22 using CPI and 37 using MALDI-TOF MS). Another 75 rare species were identified using molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS reduced the time required for identification by 55-fold and 169-fold and the cost by 5-fold and 96-fold compared with CPI and gene sequencing, respectively. MALDI-TOF MS was a powerful tool not only for routine bacterial identification but also for identification of rare bacterial species implicated in human infectious diseases. The ability to rapidly identify bacterial species rarely described as pathogens in specific clinical specimens will help us to study the clinical burden resulting from the emergence of these species as human pathogens, and MALDI-TOF MS may be considered an alternative to molecular methods in clinical laboratories.

  1. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  2. THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ LEARNING-COGNITIVE COMPETENCES BASED ON LABORATORY WORKS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ICT

    OpenAIRE

    EVGENIY YUR’EVICH ANDRUSENKO

    2015-01-01

    Changes in Russian education must be made in an inte-grated way. Strategic goal of the state policy in the field of education is to enhance access to quality education, which must be relevant to the requirements of the inno-vative development of economy, current needs of society and all citizens. The list of tasks includes the competence approach as an important part of modernization of educa-tion. Among the key competences are distinguished learning-cognitive competences, for the formation o...

  3. Exploitation of host lipids by bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vromman, François; Subtil, Agathe

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Bacteria that interact with eukaryotic cells have developed a variety of strategies to divert host lipids, or cellular processes driven by lipids, to their benefit. Host lipids serve as building blocks for bacterial membrane formation and as energy source. They promote the formation of specific microdomains, facilitating interactions with the host. Host lipids are also critical players in the entry of bacteria or toxins into cells, and, for bacteria growing inside para...

  4. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    , the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  5. Thermally-Induced Chemistry and the Jovian Icy Satellites: A Laboratory Study of the Formation of Sulfur Oxyanions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that magnetospheric radiation in the Jovian system drives reaction chemistry in ices at temperatures relevant to Europa and other icy satellites. Here we present new results on thermally-induced reactions at 50-100 K in solid H2O-SO2 mixtures, reactions that take place without the need for a high-radiation environment. We find that H2O and SO2 react to produce sulfur Oxyanions, such as bisulfite, that as much as 30% of the SO2 can be consumed through this reaction, and that the products remain in the ice when the temperature is lowered, indicating that these reactions are irreversible. Our results suggest that thermally-induced reactions can alter the chemistry at temperatures relevant to the icy satellites in the Jovian system.

  6. An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement.

  7. INFLATION OF A DIPOLE FIELD IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS: TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAGNETODISK FORMATION IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OF A HOT JUPITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant exoplanets at close orbits, or so-called hot Jupiters, are supposed to have an intensive escape of upper atmospheric material heated and ionized by the radiation of a host star. An interaction between outflowing atmospheric plasma and the intrinsic planetary magnetic dipole field leads to the formation of a crucial feature of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere—an equatorial current-carrying magnetodisk. The presence of a magnetodisk has been shown to influence the topology of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere and to change a standoff distance of the magnetopause. In this paper, the basic features of the formation of a hot Jupiter's magnetodisk are studied by means of a laboratory experiment. A localized central source produces plasma that expands outward from the surface of the dipole and inflates the magnetic field. The observed structure of magnetic fields, electric currents, and plasma density indicates the formation of a relatively thin current disk extending beyond the Alfvénic point. At the edge of the current disk, an induced magnetic field was found to be several times larger than the field of the initial dipole.

  8. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Pavuluri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA and biogenic aerosols (BA, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2 and malonic (C3 and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4 and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8 that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8 is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  9. Secondary organic aerosol formation in cloud droplets and aqueous particles (aqSOA: a review of laboratory, field and model studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Progress has been made over the past decade in predicting secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass in the atmosphere using vapor pressure-driven partitioning, which implies that SOA compounds are formed in the gas phase and then partition to an organic phase (gasSOA. However, discrepancies in predicting organic aerosol oxidation state, size and product (molecular mass distribution, relative humidity (RH dependence, color, and vertical profile suggest that additional SOA sources and aging processes may be important. The formation of SOA in cloud and aerosol water (aqSOA is not considered in these models even though water is an abundant medium for atmospheric chemistry and such chemistry can form dicarboxylic acids and "humic-like substances" (oligomers, high-molecular-weight compounds, i.e. compounds that do not have any gas phase sources but comprise a significant fraction of the total SOA mass. There is direct evidence from field observations and laboratory studies that organic aerosol is formed in cloud and aerosol water, contributing substantial mass to the droplet mode.

    This review summarizes the current knowledge on aqueous phase organic reactions and combines evidence that points to a significant role of aqSOA formation in the atmosphere. Model studies are discussed that explore the importance of aqSOA formation and suggestions for model improvements are made based on the comprehensive set of laboratory data presented here. A first comparison is made between aqSOA and gasSOA yields and mass predictions for selected conditions. These simulations suggest that aqSOA might contribute almost as much mass as gasSOA to the SOA budget, with highest contributions from biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants (i.e. NOx at high relative humidity and cloudiness. Gaps in the current understanding of aqSOA processes are discussed and further studies (laboratory, field, model

  10. Experimental investigation of the formation and propagation of plasma jets created by a power laser: application to laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma jets are often observed in the polar regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSO). For a better understanding of the whole processes at the origin of their formation and evolution, this research thesis aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a plasma jet generation by a power laser, and at investigating its characteristics. After a detailed description of Young Stellar Objects jets and an overview of theoretical models, the author describes some experiments performed with gas guns, pulsed machines and power lasers. He describes means of generation of a jet by laser interaction via strong shock propagation. He reports experimental work, describing the target, laser operating conditions and the determination of jet parameters: speed, temperature, density. Then, he introduces results obtained for plasma jet propagation in vacuum, describes their evolution with respect to initial conditions (target type, laser operating conditions), and identifies optimal conditions for generating a jet similar to that in astrophysical conditions. He considers their propagation in ambient medium like for YSO jets in interstellar medium. Two distinct cases are investigated: collision of two successive shocks in a gaseous medium, and propagation of a plasma jet in a gas jet

  11. Quantitative Analyses of Force-Induced Amyloid Formation in Candida albicans Als5p: Activation by Standard Laboratory Procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho X J Chan

    Full Text Available Candida albicans adhesins have amyloid-forming sequences. In Als5p, these amyloid sequences cluster cell surface adhesins to create high avidity surface adhesion nanodomains. Such nanodomains form after force is applied to the cell surface by atomic force microscopy or laminar flow. Here we report centrifuging and resuspending S. cerevisiae cells expressing Als5p led to 1.7-fold increase in initial rate of adhesion to ligand coated beads. Furthermore, mechanical stress from vortex-mixing of Als5p cells or C. albicans cells also induced additional formation of amyloid nanodomains and consequent activation of adhesion. Vortex-mixing for 60 seconds increased the initial rate of adhesion 1.6-fold. The effects of vortex-mixing were replicated in heat-killed cells as well. Activation was accompanied by increases in thioflavin T cell surface fluorescence measured by flow cytometry or by confocal microscopy. There was no adhesion activation in cells expressing amyloid-impaired Als5pV326N or in cells incubated with inhibitory concentrations of anti-amyloid dyes. Together these results demonstrated the activation of cell surface amyloid nanodomains in yeast expressing Als adhesins, and further delineate the forces that can activate adhesion in vivo. Consequently there is quantitative support for the hypothesis that amyloid forming adhesins act as both force sensors and effectors.

  12. The Bacteria and Mycoplasma Monitoring in the Laboratory Animal Facility by Using Sentinel Mice%实验动物设施内哨兵鼠对病原菌监控的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马元元; 孔申申; 陶迎红; 杨国生; 李雪迎

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过使用哨兵鼠的监控探讨我院实验动物屏障环境中病原菌的产生途径.方法 选择27只ICR小鼠、27只Nu/+裸鼠和27只SD大鼠作为哨兵鼠,分为实验组(手术组、非手术组)和正常对照组,实验组通过更换“脏垫料”进行饲养,对照组按正常饲养方式饲养,每隔3个月送检27只哨兵鼠进行检测,共送检3次.结果 正常对照组3次均未检测到病原菌,实验组在冬季月份未检测到病原菌感染,春、夏二季检测到病原菌感染,三个季节的病原菌感染率有显著性差异,P=0.012,其中春季较冬/夏季感染率有显著性差异,P=0.004,另两个季节之间差异不显著;病原菌感染率随着动物饲养量的增减而升高或降低;实验组中手术组病原菌感染率较非手术组略高;大鼠的病原菌感染率略高于小鼠.结论 屏障环境内实验鼠群的病原菌感染可能与季节、饲养量、频繁实验操作、动物种类等有直接关系.%To investigate the spread of bacteria and mycoplasma in the laboratory animal' s barrier environment in our hospital by using sentinel mice. Method A total 27 ICR mice, 27 Nu/ + nude mice and 27 SD rats were observed as "sentinel mice", divided into experimental groups (surgical group and non-surgical group) and normal control group. The animals in experimental groups were housed by different "dirty bedding" exposure. Those in the normal control group were housed with the normal breeding procedure. 27 sentinel mice were examined every three months, three times in all. Results Bacteria and mycoplasma infection was not detected in normal control group at all, compared with the higher infection rates in experimental groups. The infections occurred more frequently during spring, then summer, but were not able to be detected during winter season. The infection rates in three seasons showed statistical difference (P =0.012) , especially during spring, showed significant statistical difference

  13. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie;

    into reservoirs, however, a complete understanding of the penetration behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where the pore throat sizes are almost comparable with the sizes of bacteria vegetative cells. This study investigates the penetration of bacteria into chalk. Two bacteria types...

  14. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Youngblood, T. [Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States); Lamothe, D. [American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  15. 从腐败食品中分离的乳酸菌生物被膜形成的影响因素%Effect of Different Cultivation Conditions on Biofilm Formation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Spoiled Food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽斯; 张宏梅; 刘学禄; 张文艳; 黄宝威; 许佳晶; 郑添信; 刘彦兰

    2011-01-01

    从腐败的蔬菜和肉质食品中分离筛选乳酸菌(LAB),并以其作为研究对象,对乳酸菌生物成膜不同影响因素进行研究.生化分离鉴定乳酸菌,在不同的营养物质浓度及培养条件下,用96孔板法检测乳酸菌成膜.在无外添加物,37℃和42℃的培养温度,pH 4有利于乳酸菌生物膜的形成,低温不利于生物膜的形成.低浓度的NaCl可促进LAB形成生物膜,但高于某浓度,就抑制LAB成膜.不同LAB菌株对不同葡萄糖浓度成膜效果不同,且与温度交互作用.结果表明,腐败食品中乳酸菌具有一定的生物被膜形成能力,控制乳酸菌生物膜的形成对于防治食品的腐败变质具有一定的意义.%To isolate and identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from spoiled food and investigate the effect of different factors on biofilm formation. The strains were identified by the biochemistry methods. Biofilm formation was tested by microtiter-plate method under the different nutrient conditions, temperature and pH. The strains' biofilm was detected by microtiter - plate method. 37℃, 42℃ and pH4 suboptimal for growth increased the production of biofilm. Low concentration of sodium chloride enhanced the biofilm formation (BF), but above a certain level, BFs were restrained. Different concentrations of glucose have different effect on strains biofilm formation at different temperatures. BFs were spread widely among lactic acid bacteria from spoiled food. Preventing the formation of BFs has its significance in food preservation.

  16. [Microbiology--laboratory examinations for bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Renjun; Imafuku, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    As it has been required to identify pathogenic microbes in shorter times, simple and rapid methods have been developed and used. Here, we summarized the present situation of rapid diagnostic testing in clinical microbiology in Japan, and also presented our results on PBP2' detection. The rapid test kits available in Japan for E. coli, Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus were described. Rapid examination methods are based mainly on immunologic reactions, which included slide agglutination using latex particle, immunochromatography and ELISA. Times required for the identification are 10 to 15 minutes. Moreover, rapid test kits employing PCR are also marketed. Further, we evaluated MRSA-LA "Seiken" which is a rapid detection kit for PBP2' produced by MRSA. The test was shown to be highly sensitive and specific. For the rapid identification of pathogenic microbes, simple and rapid test kits described here will be used more in clinical diagnosis.

  17. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Hydrogen and chlorine abundances in the Kimberley formation of Gale crater measured by the DAN instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Hardgrove, C.; Stack, K. M.; Sanin, A. B.; Lisov, D.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Harshman, K.; Jun, I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Mischna, M.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Starr, R.; Tate, C.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2016-05-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover acquired a series of measurements as part of an observational campaign of the Kimberley area in Gale crater. These observations were planned to assess the variability of bulk hydrogen and neutron-absorbing elements, characterized as chlorine-equivalent concentration, in the geologic members of the Kimberley formation and in surface materials exposed throughout the area. During the traverse of the Kimberley area, Curiosity drove primarily over the "Smooth Hummocky" unit, a unit composed primarily of sand and loose rocks, with occasional stops at bedrock of the Kimberley formation. During the Kimberley campaign, DAN detected ranges of water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) and chlorine-equivalent concentrations of 1.5-2.5 wt % and 0.6-2 wt %, respectively. Results show that as the traverse progressed, DAN observed an overall decrease in both WEH and chlorine-equivalent concentration measured over the sand and loose rocks of the Smooth Hummocky unit. DAN measurements of WEH and chlorine-equivalent concentrations in the well-exposed sedimentary bedrock of the Kimberley formation show fluctuations with stratigraphic position. The Kimberley campaign also provided an opportunity to compare measurements from DAN with those from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instruments. DAN measurements obtained near the Windjana drill location show a WEH concentration of ~1.5 wt %, consistent with the concentration of low-temperature absorbed water measured by SAM for the Windjana drill sample. A comparison between DAN chlorine-equivalent concentrations measured throughout the Kimberley area and APXS observations of corresponding local surface targets and drill fines shows general agreement between the two instruments.

  19. Rumen bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 1011 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (104-106/g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 102-104/g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (107-109 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  20. Polysaccharide-capped silver Nanoparticles inhibit biofilm formation and eliminate multi-drug-resistant bacteria by disrupting bacterial cytoskeleton with reduced cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyasi, Sridhar; Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Mishra, Mitali; Ghosh, Arnab; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Satyam, Parlapalli Venkata; Mohapatra, Harapriya; Goswami, Chandan; Goswami, Luna

    2016-04-01

    Development of effective anti-microbial therapeutics has been hindered by the emergence of bacterial strains with multi-drug resistance and biofilm formation capabilities. In this article, we report an efficient green synthesis of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) by in situ reduction and capping with a semi-synthetic polysaccharide-based biopolymer (carboxymethyl tamarind polysaccharide). The CMT-capped AgNPs were characterized by UV, DLS, FE-SEM, EDX and HR-TEM. These AgNPs have average particle size of ~20–40 nm, and show long time stability, indicated by their unchanged SPR and Zeta-potential values. These AgNPs inhibit growth and biofilm formation of both Gram positive (B. subtilis) and Gram negative (E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium) bacterial strains even at concentrations much lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints of antibiotics, but show reduced or no cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. These AgNPs alter expression and positioning of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins FtsZ and FtsA. CMT-capped AgNPs can effectively block growth of several clinical isolates and MDR strains representing different genera and resistant towards multiple antibiotics belonging to different classes. We propose that the CMT-capped AgNPs can have potential bio-medical application against multi-drug-resistant microbes with minimal cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF TOFU PRODUCTION METHOD WITH PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ADDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Zielińska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a production method for tofu with probiotic bacteria under laboratory conditions. The works included: selection of a strain and tofu production conditions, and a storage test of the manufactured product. It was concluded that the sensory quality of tofu with the addition of different probiotic cultures did not differ significantly (p>0.01, depending on used strains and their mixtures, and the sample quality was comparable to the commercial product. It was observed that the number of Lactobacillus bacteria in study samples was the factor determining the palatability of tofu (r= 0.75. On the other hand, the sensory quality of products was significantly affected by the production method of tofu with the addition of probiotic bacteria. It was concluded that the formation of curds from soy beverage by the addition of CaSO4, followed by inoculation with Lactobacillus casei ŁOCK 0900 at the amount of 9.26 log CFU/g and incubation at temp. of 37C for 2h as well as for 20h are methods recommended for production tofu with regard to sensory qualities of the final product among all tested methods. The number of lactic acid bacteria in studied tofu samples was maintained at the high level (109-1010 CFU/g, and the number of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp lactis BB-12 bacteria did not exceed 103 CFU/g, whereas the number of Lactobacillus bacteria was equal to 108-109 CFU/g. For the period of 15 days of storage of tofu with probiotic bacteria at the temperature of 4C the number of lactic acid bacteria was maintained at the constant level of approx. 109 CFU/g. It was concluded that it is possible to produce tofu with probiotic bacteria that has acceptable sensory characteristics and a high number of lactic acid bacteria, therefore the product could be considered as a functional one.

  2. Sulfur-cycling fossil bacteria from the 1.8-Ga Duck Creek Formation provide promising evidence of evolution's null hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. William; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B.; Walter, Malcolm R.; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; Williford, Kenneth H.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Valley, John W.; Gallardo, Victor A.; Espinoza, Carola; Flannery, David T.

    2015-02-01

    The recent discovery of a deep-water sulfur-cycling microbial biota in the ∼2.3-Ga Western Australian Turee Creek Group opened a new window to life's early history. We now report a second such subseafloor-inhabiting community from the Western Australian ∼1.8-Ga Duck Creek Formation. Permineralized in cherts formed during and soon after the 2.4- to 2.2-Ga "Great Oxidation Event," these two biotas may evidence an opportunistic response to the mid-Precambrian increase of environmental oxygen that resulted in increased production of metabolically useable sulfate and nitrate. The marked similarity of microbial morphology, habitat, and organization of these fossil communities to their modern counterparts documents exceptionally slow (hypobradytelic) change that, if paralleled by their molecular biology, would evidence extreme evolutionary stasis.

  3. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  4. Formation of dimethyloligosulfides in Lake Kinneret: Biogenic formation of inorganic oligosulfide intermediates under oxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, B.; Dor, I.; Chalifa, I.; Lev, O. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Hadas, O. [Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, Ltd., Tiberias (Israel). Yigal Alon Kinneret Limnological Lab.

    1999-02-15

    The mechanism of formation of dimethyloligosulfides in Lake Kinneret was investigated by field and laboratory studies. The process was simulated under laboratory conditions using obligate aerobic and facultative bacteria that were isolated from Lake Kinneret and fed with different types of organo-sulfur nutrients. The lysis products of Peridinium gatunense--a dinoflagellate that dominates the phytoplankton population in Lake Kinneret during the winter-spring season--are the primary source of dimethyloligosulfides. Bacterial assimilation of the aged alga or algae lysis products yields inorganic oligosulfides, which are then methylated to form the dimethyloligosulfides. All the steps of this process are carried out under oxic conditions.

  5. Influence of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 on post-acidification, metabolite formation and survival of starter bacteria in set-yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settachaimongkon, Sarn; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Gazi, Inge; Nout, M J Robert; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the growth and survival of the model probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in co-culture with traditional yoghurt starters and to investigate the impact of preculturing on their survival and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt. L. plantarum WCFS1 was precultured under sublethal stress conditions (combinations of elevated NaCl and low pH) in a batch fermentor before inoculation in milk. Adaptive responses of L. plantarum WCFS1 were evaluated by monitoring bacterial population dynamics, milk acidification and changes in volatile and non-volatile metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. The results demonstrated that sublethal preculturing did not significantly affect survival of L. plantarum WCFS1. On the other hand, incorporation of sublethally precultured L. plantarum WCFS1 significantly impaired the survival of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus which consequently reduced the post-acidification of yoghurt during refrigerated storage. A complementary metabolomics approach using headspace SPME-GC/MS and (1)H NMR combined with multivariate statistical analysis revealed substantial impact of sublethally precultured L. plantarum WCFS1 on the metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. This study provides insight in the technological implications of non-dairy model probiotic strain L. plantarum WCFS1, such as its good stability in fermented milk and the inhibitory effect on post-acidification. PMID:27375240

  6. Isolation and characterization of a crude oil degrading bacteria from formation water:comparative genomic analysis of environmental Ochrobactrum intermedium isolate versus clinical strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-jun CHAI; Du-jie HOU; Yue-hui SHE; Xia-wei JIANG; Fan ZHANG; Bei-wen ZHENG; Fu-chang SHU; Zheng-liang WANG; Qing-feng CUI; Han-ping DONG; Zhong-zhi ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we isolated an environmental clone of Ochrobactrum intermedium, strain 2745-2, from the formation water of Changqing oilfield in Shanxi, China, which can degrade crude oil. Strain 2745-2 is aerobic and rod-shaped with optimum growth at 42 °C and pH 5.5. We sequenced the genome and found a single chromosome of 4 800 175 bp, with a G+C content of 57.63%. Sixty RNAs and 4737 protein-coding genes were identified:many of the genes are responsible for the degradation, emulsification, and metabolizing of crude oil. A comparative genomic analysis with related clinical strains (M86, 229E, and LMG3301T) showed that genes involved in virulence, disease, defense, phages, prophages, transposable elements, plasmids, and antibiotic resistance are also present in strain 2745-2.%题目:一株分离自地层水的石油降解菌的特性研究:Ochrobactrum intermedium环境分离菌株与临床分离菌株的比较基因组分析  目的:对一株地层水分离的石油降解菌 Ochrobactrum intermedium 2745-2进行生理生化特性的研究、全基因组测序以及比较基因组研究。  创新点:首次对一株分离自地层水的石油降解菌 O. inter-medium 2745-2进行了生理生化特性研究以及基因组测序,从基因组角度解释菌株2745-2对石油的降解能力。通过菌株2745-2与同种其他临床分离菌株的比较基因组学分析,表明2745-2仍具有多种与致病性相关的基因。  方法:通过微生物富集培养的方法从油井的地层水中分离石油降解微生物,通过聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增16S核糖体RNA(rRNA)序列进行比较和分析确定菌株的分类地位属于 O. intermedium (图1)。采用Illumina HiSeq2000对菌株2745-2进行高通量测序,采用 Velvet 1.2.07和 RAST server分别进行数据组装和注释(表1)。PHAST寻找基因组中的噬菌体相关序列(图4和表2)。通过BLAST+和BRIG对环境分离菌株(2745-2

  7. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process,

  8. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process, known as dark-fermentation, fermentative microorganisms are able to generate H2 from renewable resources like carbohydrate-rich plant material or industrial waste streams. Because of their favourable biomass degrading capabilities...

  9. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations.

  10. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Lin, Hui [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zheng, Wang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomanicek, Stephen J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Xinbin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Elias, Dwayne A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liang, Liyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  11. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  12. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  13. In situ and laboratory investigations of fluid flow through an argillaceous formation at different scales of space and time, Tournemire tunnel, southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Lucien; Heitz, Jean-François; Golvan, Yann Moreau-Le

    2001-01-01

    In the context of a research and development program on waste disposal, an experimental site (Tournemire tunnel, Aveyron, France) was selected by the French Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN) in order to undertake studies on potential fluid flow at different scales of space and time within a 250-m-thick argillaceous formation. The argillite has a low natural water content ( 3-5%) and very low radii access porosity. Diffusion (tritiated water) coefficients (1×10-12 to 2×10-11 m2/s) and hydraulic conductivities derived from different types of laboratory tests (10-14 to 10-13 m/s) are characteristics of a very low-permeable rock. In situ hydraulic tests (including long-term hydraulic-head measurements) were used to obtain values for hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity at a scale of 1-10 m (10-13 to 10-11 m/s). Despite uncertainties on these data (due to a scale factor, presence of fissures, and possible artefacts due to hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling), it is expected that fluid flow is essentially governed by diffusion processes. Identification of possible natural flows at larger scales of time and space was investigated using natural isotopic tracers from interstitial fluids. Modelling, based on the deuterium profile along the clay formation and assuming pure diffusion processes, provides estimations of possible flow times. However, lack of knowledge concerning the past geological evolution of the site and the possible role of a fracture network do not permit reduction of uncertainties on these estimations at this stage. Résumé. Dans le cadre de son programme de recherche et développement sur les stockages de déchets, un site expérimental (tunnel de Tournemire, Aveyron, France) a été sélectionné par l'Institut de Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire (IPSN) pour conduire des études sur les possibilités de transferts de fluides à différentes échelles de temps et d'espace au sein d'une formation argileuse de 250 m d'épaisseur. L

  14. Deposition of calcium carbonate in karst caves: role of bacteria in Stiffe's cave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercole Claudia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria make a significant contribution to the accumulation of carbonate in several natural habitats where large amounts of carbonates are deposited. However, the role played by microbial communities in speleothem formation (stalactites, stalagmites etc. in caves is still unclear. In bacteria carbonate is formed by autotrophic pathways, which deplete CO2 from the environment, and by heterotrophic pathways, leading to active or passive precipitation. We isolated cultivable heterotrophic microbial strains, able to induce CaCO3 precipitation in vitro, from samples taken from speleothems in the galleries of Stiffe’s cave, L’Aquila, Italy. We found a large number of bacteria in the calcite formations (1 x 104 to 5 x 109 cells g-1. Microscopic examination, in laboratory conditions at different temperatures, showed that most of the isolates were able to form calcium carbonate microcrystals. The most crystalline precipitates were observed at 32°C. No precipitation was detected in un-inoculated controls media or in media that had been inoculated with autoclaved bacterial cells. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis showed that most of the carbonate crystals produced were calcite. Bacillus strains were the most common calcifying isolates collected from Stiffe’s Cave. Analysis of carbonate-solubilization capability revealed that the non-calcifying bacteria were carbonate solubilizers.

  15. Corrosion of low alloy steels in natural seawater. Influence of alloying elements and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic infrastructures immersed in natural seawater are exposed to important corrosion phenomena, sometimes characterised as microbiologically influenced corrosion. The presence of alloying elements in low alloy steels could present a corrosion resistance improvement of the structures. In this context, tests are performed with commercial steel grades, from 0,05 wt pc Cr to 11,5 wt pc Cr. They consist in 'on site' immersion in natural seawater on the one hand, and in laboratory tests with immersion in media enriched with marine sulphide-producing bacteria on the other hand. Gravimetric, microbiological, electrochemical measurements and corrosion product analyses are carried out and show that corrosion phenomenon is composed of several stages. A preliminary step is the reduction of the corrosion kinetics and is correlated with the presence of sessile sulphide-producing bacteria and an important formation of sulphur-containing species. This phase is shorter when the alloying element content of the steel increases. This phase is probably followed by an increase of corrosion, appearing clearly after an 8-month immersion in natural seawater for some of the grade steels. Chromium and molybdenum show at the same time a beneficial influence to generalised corrosion resistance and a toxic effect on sulphide-producing bacteria. This multidisciplinary study reflects the complexity of the interactions between bacteria and steels; sulphide-producing bacteria seem to be involved in corrosion processes in natural seawater and complementary studies would have to clarify occurring mechanisms. (author)

  16. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  17. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However,...

  18. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  19. In situ and laboratory investigations of fluid flow through an argillaceous formation at different scales of space and time, Tournemire tunnel, southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Lucien; Heitz, Jean-François; Golvan, Yann Moreau-Le

    2001-01-01

    In the context of a research and development program on waste disposal, an experimental site (Tournemire tunnel, Aveyron, France) was selected by the French Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN) in order to undertake studies on potential fluid flow at different scales of space and time within a 250-m-thick argillaceous formation. The argillite has a low natural water content ( 3-5%) and very low radii access porosity. Diffusion (tritiated water) coefficients (1×10-12 to 2×10-11 m2/s) and hydraulic conductivities derived from different types of laboratory tests (10-14 to 10-13 m/s) are characteristics of a very low-permeable rock. In situ hydraulic tests (including long-term hydraulic-head measurements) were used to obtain values for hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity at a scale of 1-10 m (10-13 to 10-11 m/s). Despite uncertainties on these data (due to a scale factor, presence of fissures, and possible artefacts due to hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling), it is expected that fluid flow is essentially governed by diffusion processes. Identification of possible natural flows at larger scales of time and space was investigated using natural isotopic tracers from interstitial fluids. Modelling, based on the deuterium profile along the clay formation and assuming pure diffusion processes, provides estimations of possible flow times. However, lack of knowledge concerning the past geological evolution of the site and the possible role of a fracture network do not permit reduction of uncertainties on these estimations at this stage. Résumé. Dans le cadre de son programme de recherche et développement sur les stockages de déchets, un site expérimental (tunnel de Tournemire, Aveyron, France) a été sélectionné par l'Institut de Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire (IPSN) pour conduire des études sur les possibilités de transferts de fluides à différentes échelles de temps et d'espace au sein d'une formation argileuse de 250 m d'épaisseur. L

  20. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  1. Barite encrustation of benthic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at a marine cold seep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, E W N; Bailey, J V; Flood, B E; Jones, D S; Gilhooly, W P; Joye, S B; Teske, A; Mason, O U

    2015-11-01

    Crusts and chimneys composed of authigenic barite are found at methane seeps and hydrothermal vents that expel fluids rich in barium. Microbial processes have not previously been associated with barite precipitation in marine cold seep settings. Here, we report on the precipitation of barite on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria at a brine seep in the Gulf of Mexico. Barite-mineralized bacterial filaments in the interiors of authigenic barite crusts resemble filamentous sulfide-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Beggiatoa. Clone library and iTag amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene show that the barite crusts that host these filaments also preserve DNA of Candidatus Maribeggiatoa, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria. Isotopic analyses show that the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of barite have lower δ(34)S and δ(18)O values than many other marine barite crusts, which is consistent with barite precipitation in an environment in which sulfide oxidation was occurring. Laboratory experiments employing isolates of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria from Gulf of Mexico seep sediments showed that under low sulfate conditions, such as those encountered in brine fluids, sulfate generated by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria fosters rapid barite precipitation localized on cell biomass, leading to the encrustation of bacteria in a manner reminiscent of our observations of barite-mineralized Beggiatoa in the Gulf of Mexico. The precipitation of barite directly on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, and not on other benthic substrates, suggests that sulfide oxidation plays a role in barite formation at certain marine brine seeps where sulfide is oxidized to sulfate in contact with barium-rich fluids, either prior to, or during, the mixing of those fluids with sulfate-containing seawater in the vicinity of the sediment/water interface. As with many other geochemical interfaces that foster mineral precipitation, both biological and abiological processes likely contribute

  2. An individual-based model for biofilm formation at liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardré, Maxime; Henry, Hervé; Douarche, Carine; Plapp, Mathis

    2015-12-01

    The bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently forms biofilms at the interface between the culture medium and the air. We present a mathematical model that couples a description of bacteria as individual discrete objects to the standard advection-diffusion equations for the environment. The model takes into account two different bacterial phenotypes. In the motile state, bacteria swim and perform a run-and-tumble motion that is biased toward regions of high oxygen concentration (aerotaxis). In the matrix-producer state they excrete extracellular polymers, which allows them to connect to other bacteria and to form a biofilm. Bacteria are also advected by the fluid, and can trigger bioconvection. Numerical simulations of the model reproduce all the stages of biofilm formation observed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we study the influence of various model parameters on the dynamics and morphology of biofilms.

  3. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  4. Summary of bacteria found in captive sea turtles 2002-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains a summary of bacteria which have been isolated in sea turtles dead and alive at the NOAA Galveston Laboratory and is based on reports received...

  5. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria a

  6. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  7. Learning Chemistry from Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Clardy, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Jon Clardy Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University All animals, including humans, originated and evolved on a planet already teeming with bacteria, and the two kingdoms of life have been competing and cooperating through their joint history. Although bacteria are most familiar as pathogens, some bacteria produce small molecules that are essential for the biology of animals and other eukaryotes. This lecture explores some of...

  8. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface

  9. The Formation of Rational and Irrational Behaviors in Risky Investment Decision Making: Laboratory Experiment of Coping Theory Implication in Investors’ Adaptation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Wendy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the stock investor's rational and irrational behavior formation through Investor's Adaptation model. Hypotheses testings were conducted by manipulating four market conditions using between-subject experimental design. The results supported the hypotheses proposed in this study. When given treatment one (opportunity-high control, investors tended to adapt the profit maximizing strategy (rational. Meanwhile, when given treatment two (opportunity-low control, three (threat-high control and four (threat-low control, they tended to adapt the profit satisfying strategy (rational-emotional, bad news handling strategy (emotional-rational, and self-preserving strategy (irrational respectively. The application of rational strategies are intended to obtain personal benefits and profit, while adapting irrational strategy is intended to recover emotional stability and reduce some other tensions. Another finding showed that for the investors, the relatively irrational decision formation was "harder" than that of rational.

  10. A report on the piloting of a novel computer-based medical case simulation for teaching and formative assessment of diagnostic laboratory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence D. Kreiter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Insufficient attention has been given to how information from computer-based clinical case simulations is presented, collected, and scored. Research is needed on how best to design such simulations to acquire valid performance assessment data that can act as useful feedback for educational applications. This report describes a study of a new simulation format with design features aimed at improving both its formative assessment feedback and educational function. Methods: Case simulation software (LabCAPS was developed to target a highly focused and well-defined measurement goal with a response format that allowed objective scoring. Data from an eight-case computer-based performance assessment administered in a pilot study to 13 second-year medical students was analyzed using classical test theory and generalizability analysis. In addition, a similar analysis was conducted on an administration in a less controlled setting, but to a much large sample (n=143, within a clinical course that utilized two random case subsets from a library of 18 cases. Results: Classical test theory case-level item analysis of the pilot assessment yielded an average case discrimination of 0.37, and all eight cases were positively discriminating (range=0.11–0.56. Classical test theory coefficient alpha and the decision study showed the eight-case performance assessment to have an observed reliability of σ=G=0.70. The decision study further demonstrated that a G=0.80 could be attained with approximately 3 h and 15 min of testing. The less-controlled educational application within a large medical class produced a somewhat lower reliability for eight cases (G=0.53. Students gave high ratings to the logic of the simulation interface, its educational value, and to the fidelity of the tasks. Conclusions: LabCAPS software shows the potential to provide formative assessment of medical students’ skill at diagnostic test ordering and to provide valid feedback to

  11. Induction of trap formation in nematode-trapping fungi by a bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Ma, Mingchuan; Liu, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingwei; Qu, Qing; Lu, Kaiping; Fu, Denggao; Zhang, KeQin

    2011-09-01

    Three soil bacterial strains were identified as Chryseobacterium sp. TFB on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Conidia of Arthrobotrys oligospora produced a few mycelial traps (MT) and conidial traps (CT) when cultured with bacterial cells that they did not produce when cultured with a bacterial cell-free culture filtrate. However, co-culture of A. oligospora with bacterial cells and bacteria-free filtrate simultaneously induced MT and CT in large amounts. With the increased concentration of bacteria-free filtrate, the number of typical CT increased, but conidial germination was progressively inhibited. Scanning electron microscopy of A. oligospora co-cultured with bacteria revealed that bacterial attachment to hyphae was a prerequisite to trap formation and that bacteria-free filtrate facilitated bacterial attachments to hyphae. The results that the addition of nutrients in co-culture medium decreased the number of traps suggest that this type of trap formation may be favoured at a low nutrient status. Eight fungi tested were able to form MT and CT when co-cultured with bacterial cells and bacteria-free culture filtrate, but the abilities varied among species. This study provides novel evidence that under laboratory conditions, soil bacteria attaching to hyphae could induce traps in nematode-trapping fungi. PMID:21722172

  12. Characterization of Mediterranean Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of motile prokaryotes that are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats and cosmopolitan in distribution. In this study, we collected magnetotactic bacteria from the Mediterranean Sea. A remarkable diversity of morphotypes was observed, including muiticellular types that seemed to differ from those previously found in North and South America. Another interesting organism was one with magnetosomes arranged in a six-stranded bundle which occupied one third of the cell width. The magnetosome bundle was evident even under optic microscopy. These cells were connected together and swam as a linear entire unit. Magnetosomes did not always align up to form a straight linear chain. A chain composed of rectangle magnetosomes bent at a position with an oval crystal. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the crystal at the pivotal position suggested uncompleted formation of the crystal. This is the first report of Mediterranean magnetotactic bacteria, which should be useful for studies of biogeochemical cycling and geohistory of the Mediterranean Sea.

  13. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; A.A. te Velde; L. de Boer; D. Speijer; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.A.J. Zaat

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria t

  14. Creation of a dynamic database and analysis of LIDAR measurements in web format at the Laboratory of Environmental Laser Applications at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LIDAR system (Light Detection and Ranging) laser remote sensing at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - Laboratory of Environmental Laser Applications allows on line measurements of variations in the concentrations of atmospheric aerosols by sending a laser beam to the atmosphere and collecting the backscattered light. Such a system supplies a great number of physical parameters that must be managed in an agile form to the attainment of a real time analysis. Database implementation therefore becomes an important toll of communication and graphical visualization of measurements. A criterion for classification of this valuable information was adopted, establishing defined levels of storage from specific characteristics of the determined data types. The compilation and automation of these measurements will promote optimized integration between data, analysis and retrieval of the resulting properties and of the atmosphere, improving future research and data analysis. (author)

  15. Metallization of bacteria cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiangfeng; (黎向锋); LI; Yaqin; (李雅芹); CAI; Jun; (蔡军); ZHANG; Deyuan; (张德远)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  16. 16S rRNA gene sequencing versus the API 20 NE system and the VITEK 2 ID-GNB card for identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacteria in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, P P; Zbinden, R; Abels, S; Böddinghaus, B; Altwegg, M; Böttger, E C

    2006-04-01

    Over a period of 26 months, we have evaluated in a prospective fashion the use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a means of identifying clinically relevant isolates of nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (non-Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in the microbiology laboratory. The study was designed to compare phenotypic with molecular identification. Results of molecular analyses were compared with two commercially available identification systems (API 20 NE, VITEK 2 fluorescent card; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). By 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, 92% of the isolates were assigned to species level and 8% to genus level. Using API 20 NE, 54% of the isolates were assigned to species and 7% to genus level, and 39% of the isolates could not be discriminated at any taxonomic level. The respective numbers for VITEK 2 were 53%, 1%, and 46%, respectively. Fifteen percent and 43% of the isolates corresponded to species not included in the API 20 NE and VITEK 2 databases, respectively. We conclude that 16S rRNA gene sequencing is an effective means for the identification of clinically relevant nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli. Based on our experience, we propose an algorithm for proper identification of nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli in the diagnostic laboratory.

  17. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  18. THE AVAILABILITY OF Mytilus galloprovincialis FOR MONITORING ENTERIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nüket SĐVRĐ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the usage of Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 as monitoring organism on enteric bacteria concentrations in heavily polluted marine environments and its use possibilities as water quality improving tool were investigated. The ability of the Mediterranean Mussel to accumulate and purge fecal coliform bacteria investigated in laboratory experiments. First, increase on bacteria concentration was observed on 1,5th hour and sharp decrease rate lasted until 10th hours after that period slow but steady declining bacteria concentration rate was observed and beginning bacteria concentration rate was reached within next 30- 50 hours. Time dependent bacteria concentration reduction has found statistically significant at p<0.001 (r-sq = 0.81. The investigation has also revealed that mussel farming could be established in the over polluted area which is the case only in the different discharge points in the sea.

  19. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  20. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  1. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  2. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.)

  3. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  4. Biofilm formation in a hot water system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, L.K.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik;

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached......, in the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water. Therefore...

  5. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  6. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.;

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  7. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  8. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  9. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future. PMID:27062655

  10. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  11. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  12. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  13. Montlake Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NWFSC conducts critical fisheries science research at its headquarters in Seattle, WA and at five research stations throughout Washington and Oregon. The unique...

  14. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  15. μHall chip for sensitive detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issadore, David; Chung, Hyun Jung; Chung, Jaehoon; Budin, Ghyslain; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2013-09-01

    Sensitive, rapid and phenotype-specific enumeration of pathogens is essential for the diagnosis of infectious disease, monitoring of food chains, and for defense against bioterrorism. Microbiological culture and genotyping, techniques that sensitively and selectively detect bacteria in laboratory settings, have limited application in clinical environments due to high cost, slow response times, and the need for specially trained staff and laboratory infrastructure. To address these challenges, we developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall (μHall) platform capable of measuring single, magnetically tagged bacteria directly in clinical specimens with minimal sample processing. We demonstrated the clinical utility of the μHall chip by enumerating Gram-positive bacteria. The overall detection limit of the system was similar to that of culture tests (~10 bacteria), but the assay time was 50-times faster. This low-cost, single-cell analytical technique is especially well-suited to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited clinical settings.

  16. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  17. Role of bacteria in DMS(P) cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.S.; Chinchkar, U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    during pre and post monsoon may suggest the response of the bacteria to the available substrates. Utilization of DMS by different physiological groups of bacteria isolated from the field were monitored in the laboratory to grade their metabolic... mats: In situ concentrations & metabolism by a colourless sulphur bacterium. Appl. Environ. Microbiol . 57 :1758?1763. Wolfe, G.V., M. Levasseur, G. Cantin, and S. Michaud. 1999. Microbial consumption and production of dimethyl sulphide (DMS...

  18. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  19. [Genetic virulence markers of opportunistic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of opportunistic bacteria phenotypic and genetic virulence markers indicates that pathogenicity formation is based on a structural modification of bacterial DNA which is linked with migration of interbacterial pathogenicity "islands" genetic determinants. Structural organization features of these mobile genetic elements determine high expression probability, and PCR detection of pathogenicity "islands" determinants that control adhesins, invasins, cytotoxic and cytolitic toxines synthesis may indicate etiopathogenetic significance of clinical isolates.

  20. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    E. S. Vorobey; O. S. Voronkova; A. I. Vinnikov

    2012-01-01

    Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molec...

  1. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed “mycophagy&r

  2. Embedded clusters: laboratories for star formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Lada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los cúmulos embebidos son las unidades fundamentales de formación estelar en nuestra Galaxia, por tanto, es crítico estudiar sus propiedades para entender como transcurre la formación estelar tanto en la escala local como en la escala Galáctica. Hemos inspeccionado cúmulos embebidos en nubes moleculares locales con FLAMINGOS y estamos investigando las historias de formación estelar, la FIM, así como la estructura y evolución de estos cúmulos jóvenes. En esta presentación discutiré nuestros resultados para los cúmulos en los complejos de formación estelar en la Roseta y en Orión donde encontramos evidencia de evolución de la estructura de los cúmulos y variaciones de la función inicial de masa en el extremo de masas bajas.

  3. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tugwell, Jenna, E-mail: jenna.tugwell@googlemail.co [Department of Radiology, Ysbyty Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor, North Wales (United Kingdom); Maddison, Adele [Nuffield Health, Shrewsbury Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  4. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples of blood, urine, or other tissues or ...

  5. A formação dos oostegitos em Porcellio dilatatus Brandt (Crustácea, Isopoda, Oniscidea em laboratório Formation of oostegites in Porcellio dilatatus Brandt (Crustácea, Isopoda, Oniscidea in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme de Loyola e Silva

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Woodlice were reared in laboratory in the environmental climate of the city of Curitiba, Brazil, with the purpose of getting to know the process of formation of oostegites. Two kinds of cultivation were adopted: natural populations to be controlled were kept in small glass aquariums resembling the natural environment; and, new-bom woodlice were raised each one isolated in small plastic receptacles, with a special diet until two years old or over. When adults, after recognizing their sexes, males and females were put together to copulate during one or more days, and some of the females were fertilized. After 30 days, the fertilized females realized ecdise and acquired oostegites. The complete process (copulation, fecundation, incubation and birth occurred between 25 and 50 days. The females fertilized only once produced one or more broods, each brood varying from 10 to 30 youngs. The spermatic mass reserved in the seminal receptacle depleted after having realized one, two or, rarely, three broods; the females without sperm in the receptacle realized ecdise, lost oostegites and got again virginal aspect. Females in such condition, kept alone, isolated from males have never acquire oostegites again. Otherwise, in contact with males, once fertilized they realized ecdise and acquired new oostegites. The authors have concluded that the oostegites only are formed because of the received sperm and its continuity depends on the sperm accumulated in the seminal receptacle, for more than one brood.

  6. Growth at low ammonium concentrations and starvation response as potential factors involved in niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    In nature, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria and plants for limiting amounts of ammonium. Previous laboratory experiments conducted with Nitrosomonas europaea suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are weak competitors for ammonium. To obtain a better insight

  7. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part A - Overview, experimental design and water data of an experiment in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P., E-mail: paul.wersin@gruner.ch [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Gruner Ltd., Gellertstrasse 55, 4020 Basel (Switzerland); Leupin, O.X. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Mettler, S. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Solexperts Ltd., Mettlenbachstrasse 25, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Gaucher, E.C. [BRGM, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Maeder, U. [University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); De Canniere, P. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA, Laboratoire de Recherche Souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, RD960 BP9, 55290 Bure (France); Gaebler, H.E. [BGR, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Kunimaro, T. [JAEA, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kiho, K. [CRIEPI, 1646 Abiko, Abiko-city Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, 85301 Schweitenkirchen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > The composition was affected by the complex interplay of diffusion, mineral and surface reactions. > The {sup 13}C signals for carbon species showed significant variations which could only be partly explained. > The main cations remained remarkably constant during the experiment. > This underlines the strong buffering via cation exchange and carbonate dissolution/precipitation. - Abstract: An in situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed porewater chemistry (PC) experiment, was carried out for a period of 5 years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby a traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed-off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions of the porewater, but because of unexpected microbiologically-induced redox reactions, the objective was extended to elucidate the biogeochemical processes occurring in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO{sub 2} and porewater chemistry in the low permeability clay formation. The behaviour of the conservative tracers {sup 2}H and Br{sup -} could be explained by diffusive dilution in the clay and moreover the results showed that diffusive equilibration between the borehole water and the formation occurred within about 3 year's time. However, the composition and pH/pCO{sub 2} conditions differed considerably from those of the in situ porewater. Thus, pH was lower and pCO{sub 2} was higher than indicated by complementary laboratory investigations. The noted differences are explained by microbiologically-induced redox reactions occurring in the borehole and in the interfacial wall area which were caused by an organic source released from the equipment material. The degradation of this source was accompanied by sulfate reduction and - to a lesser extent - by methane generation, which induced a high rate of acetogenic reactions

  8. Can bacteria save the planet?

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria might just hold the key to preserving the environment for our great grandchildren. Philip Hunter explores some of the novel ways in which systems biology and biotechnology are harnessing bacteria to produce renewable energy and clean up pollution.

  9. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  10. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  11. Exopolysaccharides from Marine Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Zhenming; FANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives,textiles, pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria,including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  12. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  13. Interaction between Chlorella vulgaris and bacteria:interference and resource competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Liang; WANG Renjun; ZHAO Peng; CHEN Ruinan; ZHOU Wenli; TANG Liuqing; TANG Xuexi

    2014-01-01

    Research of interaction mechanism between Chlorella vulgaris and two bacterial strains (Z-QD08 and Z-QS01) were conducted under laboratory conditions. Growth rates of bacteria and C. vulgaris were tested under co-culture conditions to evaluate the effects of concentrations of C. vulgaris and bacteria on their interactions. To test whether the availability of inorganic nutrients, vitamins and trace metals affects the interactions between C. vulgaris and bacteria, experiments were performed with or without the culture medium filtrate of C. vulgaris or bacteria. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was promot-ed at low concentrations of bacteria (5×106 cells/ml), and expressed a positive correlation with the bacteria density, whereas opposite trend was observed for treatments with high bacteria density (10×106 cells/ml and 20×106 cells/ml). The growth rate of bacteria decreased with the increasing concentrations of C. vul-garis. The growth of bacteria Z-QD08 was inhibited by C. vulgaris through interference competition, while the mechanism for interaction between bacteria Z-QS01 and C. vulgaris was resource competition. The influence of cell density on the interaction between microalgae and bacteria was also discussed. These ex-periments confirm some elements of published theory on interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae and suggest that heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the development of blooms in natural waters.

  14. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans responses to bacteria from its natural habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowedder, Holli; Braendle, Christian; Félix, Marie-Anne; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Most Caenorhabditis elegans studies have used laboratory Escherichia coli as diet and microbial environment. Here we characterize bacteria of C. elegans' natural habitats of rotting fruits and vegetation to provide greater context for its physiological responses. By the use of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based sequencing, we identified a large variety of bacteria in C. elegans habitats, with phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria being most abundant. From laboratory assays using isolated natural bacteria, C. elegans is able to forage on most bacteria (robust growth on ∼80% of >550 isolates), although ∼20% also impaired growth and arrested and/or stressed animals. Bacterial community composition can predict wild C. elegans population states in both rotting apples and reconstructed microbiomes: alpha-Proteobacteria-rich communities promote proliferation, whereas Bacteroidetes or pathogens correlate with nonproliferating dauers. Combinatorial mixtures of detrimental and beneficial bacteria indicate that bacterial influence is not simply nutritional. Together, these studies provide a foundation for interrogating how bacteria naturally influence C. elegans physiology. PMID:27317746

  16. CLOSTRIDIA IN LABORATORY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : The significance of anaerobic bacteria as human pathogens is well documented. We undertook this preliminary study to detect anaerobic clostridial infections from clinical samples. MATERIAL AND METHODS : 58 clinical samples from various sites were obtained d epending upon diverse manifestations during five consecutive years. They were subjected to direct smears using Gram stain and cultured anaerobically using Robertson’s cooked meat broth. Culture smears were read after incubation from 48 hours to 5 days. RES ULTS: Out of the 58 samples only 18 samples (25.86% grew Gram positive spore bearing bacilli. Most of the samples showed polymicrobial flora. There was a preponderance of Gram positive bacilli with subterminal and central spores (55.55%. CONCLUSION: Alth ough diagnostic anaerobiasis is tedious and time consuming all clinical microbiology laboratories should start the work in view of the significance of anaerobic infections. KEYWORDS: Anaerobes, Clostridia, Gram stain, Robertson’s cooked meat broth.

  17. Data on the standardization of a cyclohexanone-responsive expression system for Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ilaria; Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of robust microbial cell factories requires the use of dedicated genetic tools somewhat different from those traditionally used for laboratory-adapted microorganisms. We have edited and formatted the ChnR/P chnB regulatory node of Acinetobacter johnsonii to ease the targeted engineering of ectopic gene expression in Gram-negative bacteria. The proposed compositional standard was thoroughly verified with a monomeric and superfolder green fluorescent protein (msf•GFP) in Escherichia coli. The expression data presented reflect a tightly controlled transcription initiation signal in response to cyclohexanone. Data in this article are related to the research paper "Genetic programming of catalytic Pseudomonas putida biofilms for boosting biodegradation of haloalkanes" [1].

  18. Laboratory Course on "Streptomyces" Genetics and Secondary Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Räty, Kaj; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The "'Streptomyces' genetics and secondary metabolism" laboratory course gives an introduction to the versatile soil dwelling Gram-positive bacteria "Streptomyces" and their secondary metabolism. The course combines genetic modification of "Streptomyces"; growing of the strain and protoplast preparation, plasmid…

  19. Quorum sensing in plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bodman, Susanne B; Bauer, W Dietz; Coplin, David L

    2003-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) allows bacteria to assess their local population density and/or physical confinement via the secretion and detection of small, diffusible signal molecules. This review describes how phytopathogenic bacteria have incorporated QS mechanisms into complex regulatory cascades that control genes for pathogenicity and colonization of host surfaces. Traits regulated by QS include the production of extracellular polysaccharides, degradative enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and pigments, as well as Hrp protein secretion, Ti plasmid transfer, motility, biofilm formation, and epiphytic fitness. Since QS regulatory systems are often required for pathogenesis, interference with QS signaling may offer a means of controlling bacterial diseases of plants. Several bacterial pathogens of plants that have been intensively studied and have revealed information of both fundamental and practical importance are reviewed here: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pantoea stewartii, Erwinia carotovora, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Xanthomonas campestris. PMID:12730390

  20. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed.

  1. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  2. Oligotrophy and pelagic marine bacteria : Facts and fiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, F; Prins, RA; Gottschal, JC

    1997-01-01

    Oligotrophy, or the inability of bacterial cells to propagate at elevated nutrient concentrations, is a controversial phenomenon in microbiology. The exact cause of the unculturability of many indigenous marine bacteria on standard laboratory media has still not been resolved. Unfortunately the phys

  3. Effect of ciliates on nitrification and nitrifying bacteria in Baltic Sea sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Prast, M.; Bischof, Adrian A.; Waller, Uwe; Amann, R.; Berninger, U.-G.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrification in aquatic sediments is catalyzed by bacteria. While many autecological studies on these bacteria have been published, few have regarded them as part of the benthic microbial food web. Ciliates are important as grazers on bacteria, but also for remineralization of organic matter. We tested the hypothesis that ciliates can affect nitrification. Experiments with Baltic Sea sediments in laboratory flumes, with or without the addition of cultured ciliates, were conducted. We found i...

  4. Pathogenic and ice-nucleation active (INA) bacteria causing dieback of willows in short rotation forestry

    OpenAIRE

    Nejad, Pajand

    2005-01-01

    To find out whether bacteria isolated from diseased plant parts can be the main causal agent for the dieback appearing in Salix energy forestry plantations in Sweden during the last few years, and if the joint effects of bacteria and frost injury are synergistic, extensive sampling of shoots from diseased Salix plants was performed. We performed several laboratory and greenhouse investigations and used evaluation techniques on the functions of the Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) bacteria. We carr...

  5. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  6. A Comparison of Heat versus Methanol Fixation for Gram Staining Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerath, Jeanne M.; Roland, Jenna M.; Rossi, Lucas C.; Weishalla, Steven R.; Wolf, Melissa M.

    2009-01-01

    Gram staining bacteria is a fundamental technique introduced in general biology and microbiology laboratory courses. Two common problems students encounter when Gram staining bacteria are (1) having a difficult time locating bacterial cells on the microscope slide and (2) over-decolorizing bacterial cells during the staining procedure such that…

  7. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  8. Chemical communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  9. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  10. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  11. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  12. Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  13. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  14. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  15. Nitrous oxide formation during nitritation and nitrification of high-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Beier, Maike; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) in nitritation and nitrification under stable, comparable and not limiting conditions typical for treatment of high-strength wastewater. A laboratory-scale aerated chemostat was operated with reject water at different sludge retention times, achieving suppression of nitrate formation by wash-out of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria for nitritation. The N2O formation factor during stable nitritation was higher (2.90% N2O-N /NH4(-)-Nox) than during nitrification (0.74%). The positive correlation of N2O formation rates and ammonium oxidation rates was linear and thus did not contribute to changes of the N2O formation factor. The dominant factor for N2O formation during stable operation was high nitrite concentration, which was positively correlated with N2O formation rates. The highest formation factors were observed during a transition phase from nitrification to nitritation with unstable process conditions (4.81%) and during a short-term experiment with increased pH of 7 (10.28%). The results indicate that even with operational conditions that are regarded favourable for the process of nitritation N2O formation can be limited but not avoided. PMID:23752381

  16. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria...... with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when cultured with blood DC......, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the intestinal microbiota...

  17. Radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the biological and ecological examinations on the radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria (mainly concerning Micrococcus radiodurans). Radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria were isolated from the irradiated areas of the natural world as well as from the general areas and from the Rn waters in the Misasa hot spring. The acquiring of the tolerance to radiation in bacteria was also examined. In addition, the future problems of microbiological treatment with irradiation were mentioned. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  18. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Moura, Jose J.G. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.moura@dq.fct.unl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m{sup -2} that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces.

  19. Laboratory activity to effectively teach introductory geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students' proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84-86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

  20. Laboratory Activity to Effectively Teach Introductory Geomicrobiology Concepts to Non-Geology Majors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C.; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84–86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors. PMID:24358384

  1. Laboratory activity to effectively teach introductory geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students' proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84-86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors. PMID:24358384

  2. Laboratory Activity to Effectively Teach Introductory Geomicrobiology Concepts to Non-Geology Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Marvasi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1 learn how microbialinduced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2 understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3 comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84–86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

  3. Avaliação em escala laboratorial da utilização do processo eletrolítico no tratamento de águas Laboratory scale assessment of an electrolytic process for water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Otenio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Water treatment uses chlorine for disinfection causing formation of trihalomethanes. In this work, an electrolytic water pre-treatment was studied and applied to the water from a fountainhead. The action against microorganisms was evaluated using cast-iron and aluminum electrodes. Assays were made in laboratory using the electrolytic treatment. After 5 min of electrolysis the heterotrophic bacteria count was below 500 cfu/mL and complete elimination of total and fecal coliforms was observed. Using electrolytic treatment as a pretreatment of conventional tap water treatment is proposed.

  4. Swimming and transport of bacteria in time-periodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Rebecca; Patteson, Alison; Gagnon, David; Arratia, Paulo

    The transport of bacteria can be highly influenced by external flows in oceans, rivers, and intestinal tracts. This has implications in biological systems for the performance of major biological processes, such as biofilm formation. In this study, we experimentally investigate the aggregation and transport of swimming Vibrio cholerae bacteria in time-periodic flows. Bacteria are placed in a well-characterized flow, and bacterial concentrations are recorded for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) that spans two orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10. It is generally found that bacteria deplete from regions of high deformation rate and accumulate near vortices. This phenomenon seems to be dictated by a combination of bacterial activity and background flow vorticity. R.W. supported by NSF-GRFP.

  5. Airborne bacteria in the atmosphere: Presence, purpose, and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Wenke; Moretti, Serena; Denys, Siegfried; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Numerous recent studies have highlighted that the types of bacteria present in the atmosphere often show predictable patterns across space and time. These patterns can be driven by differences in bacterial sources of the atmosphere and a wide range of environmental factors, including UV intensity, precipitation events, and humidity. The abundance of certain bacterial taxa is of interest, not only for their ability to mediate a range of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, such as cloud formation and ice nucleation, but also for their implications -both beneficial and detrimental-for human health. Consequently, the widespread importance of airborne bacteria has stimulated the search for their applicability. Improving air quality, modelling the dispersal of airborne bacteria (e.g. pathogens) and biotechnological purposes are already being explored. Nevertheless, many technological challenges still need to be overcome to fully understand the roles of airborne bacteria in our health and global ecosystems.

  6. Selective toxicity of Catechin-a natural flavonoid towards bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Aafreen; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava

    2016-07-01

    Catechin is a plant polyphenol composed of epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) as diastereoisomers. Among the various classes of flavonoids, catechin was found to be the most powerful free radical scavenger, scavenging the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated due to oxidative damage with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. The toxicity of catechin towards bacteria was studied using gram-positive bacteria (B. subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) as model organisms and was found to be more toxic towards gram-positive bacteria. From the results, catechin was found to be beneficial as well as toxic (inhibitory) to the bacteria at a selective concentration behaving as double-edged swords with an IC50 value of 9 ppm for both the bacteria. The inhibitory mechanism of catechin was by oxidative damage through membrane permeabilization which was confirmed by the formation and treatment of bacterial liposomes. SEM images of the control and treated bacteria reveals membrane damage with morphological changes. PMID:27052380

  7. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  8. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  9. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...

  10. Techniques for Reduction and Biomineralization of Radioactive Uranium by Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new thing revealed by this study was a formation of 'ningyoite', which was made as a new mineral when phosphorus component added into the uranium bioreduction process. In addition, a main sulfide mineral formed by sulfate-reducing bacteria was mackinawite which can incorporate much of uranium as coexisting with metal impurities such as manganese or nickel elements

  11. Genetic analysis of symbiosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Endosymbiotic interactions form a fundament of life as we know it and are characterized by the formation of new specialized membrane compartments, in which the microbes are hosted inside living plant cells. A striking example is the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria (r

  12. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  14. Survival of bacteria in nuclear waste buffer materials. The influence of nutrients, temperature and water activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, K.; Motamedi, M. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    The concept of deep geological disposal of spent fuel is common to many national nuclear waste programs. Long-lived radioactive waste will be encapsulated in canisters made of corrosion resistant materials e.g. copper and buried several hundred meters below ground in a geological formation. Different types of compacted bentonite clay, or mixtures with sand, will be placed as a buffer around the waste canisters. A major concern for the performance of the canisters is that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be present in the clay and induce corrosion by production of hydrogen sulphide. This report presents data on viable counts of SRB in the bedrock of Aespoe hard rock laboratory. A theoretical background on the concept water activity is given, together with basic information about SRB. Some results on microbial populations from a full scale buffer test in Canada is presented. These results suggested water activity to be a strong limiting factor for survival of bacteria in compacted bentonite. As a consequence, experiments were set up to investigate the effect from water activity on survival of SRB in bentonite. Here we show that survival of SRB in bentonite depends on the availability of water and that compacting a high quality bentonite to a density of 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a water activity (a{sub w}) of 0.96, prevented SRB from surviving in the clay. 24 refs.

  15. Survival of bacteria in nuclear waste buffer materials. The influence of nutrients, temperature and water activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of deep geological disposal of spent fuel is common to many national nuclear waste programs. Long-lived radioactive waste will be encapsulated in canisters made of corrosion resistant materials e.g. copper and buried several hundred meters below ground in a geological formation. Different types of compacted bentonite clay, or mixtures with sand, will be placed as a buffer around the waste canisters. A major concern for the performance of the canisters is that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may be present in the clay and induce corrosion by production of hydrogen sulphide. This report presents data on viable counts of SRB in the bedrock of Aespoe hard rock laboratory. A theoretical background on the concept water activity is given, together with basic information about SRB. Some results on microbial populations from a full scale buffer test in Canada is presented. These results suggested water activity to be a strong limiting factor for survival of bacteria in compacted bentonite. As a consequence, experiments were set up to investigate the effect from water activity on survival of SRB in bentonite. Here we show that survival of SRB in bentonite depends on the availability of water and that compacting a high quality bentonite to a density of 2.0 g/cm3, corresponding to a water activity (aw) of 0.96, prevented SRB from surviving in the clay. 24 refs

  16. Controlled electrophoretic deposition of bacteria to surfaces for the design of biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, AT; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, the formation of ordered clusters of both spherical and rod-shaped bacteria on an electrode during electrophoretic deposition is described, inside clusters, adhering bacteria are regularly spaced with an interbacterial distance that can be controlled by adjusting the ionic strength o

  17. Polymeric supports for the adhesion of a consortium of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, M; Azeredo, Joana; Feijó, J.; Oliveira, Rosário

    1997-01-01

    The nitrifying performance of the biofilm formed onto polymeric supports (high density polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinylchloride and polymethyl-methacrylate) was correlated with hydrophobicity and surface charge of both bacteria and support media. Polypropylene, the most hydrophobic material, had the best properties for biofilm formation. The adhesion of nitrifying bacteria mainly governed by hydrophobic interactions though electrostatic interactions were a determinant when ...

  18. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís Braghini Sá

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity.

  19. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, André Luís Braghini; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Cotta, Simone Raposo; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Andreote, Fernando Dini; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2014-01-01

    In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity. PMID:24948930

  20. Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle

    OpenAIRE

    André Luís Braghini Sá; Armando Cavalcante Franco Dias; Maria Carolina Quecine; Simone Raposo Cotta; Cristiane Cipola Fasanella; Fernando Dini Andreote; Itamar Soares de Melo

    2014-01-01

    In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity.

  1. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter;

    2011-01-01

    a transient peak at 6 hours, and in Rheinheimera the concentration peaked at 12 hours and remained high. Interestingly, the Rheinheimera biofilm dispersed immediately after the eDNA concentration peaked. The antimicrobial effect of eDNA was tested in growth experiments, and Rheinheimera was strongly affected...

  2. Influence of bacteria on film formation inhibiting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mild steel coupons were incubated separately in two bacterial cultures namely Pseudomonas flava and Pseudomonas stutzeri. A significant reduction in the corrosion rate was observed in presence of P. flava. With a view to understand the mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion/corrosion inhibition, various electrochemical and biological experiments such as weight change measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were made. The exposed surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The scraped surface film was also examined using FT-IR (Fourier transform infra red) spectroscopy. The results suggest that P. flava have enhancing effect on corrosion inhibitive properties of phosphate film

  3. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  4. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  5. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  6. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  7. Photochemical Production and Behavior of Hydroperoxyacids in Heterotrophic Bacteria Attached to Senescent Phytoplanktonic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Vaultier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The photooxidation of cellular monounsaturated fatty acids was investigated in senescent phytoplanktonic cells (Emiliania huxleyi and in their attached bacteria under laboratory controlled conditions. Our results indicated that UV-visible irradiation of phytodetritus induced the photooxidation of oleic (produced by phytoplankton and bacteria and cis-vaccenic (specifically produced by bacteria acids. These experiments confirmed the involvement of a substantial singlet oxygen transfer from senescent phytoplanktonic cells to attached bacteria, and revealed a significant correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll, a photosensitizer, in the phytodetritus and the photodegradation state of bacteria. Hydroperoxyacids (fatty acid photoproducts appeared to be quickly degraded to ketoacids and hydroxyacids in bacteria and in phytoplanktonic cells. This degradation involves homolytic cleavage (most likely induced by UV and/or transition metal ions and peroxygenase activity (yielding epoxy acids.

  8. Recent development of mass spectrometry and proteomics applications in identification and typing of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Hernandez, Drexler; Wang, Gehua

    2016-01-01

    Identification and typing of bacteria occupy a large fraction of time and work in clinical microbiology laboratories. With the certification of some MS platforms in recent years, more applications and tests of MS‐based diagnosis methods for bacteria identification and typing have been created, not only on well‐accepted MALDI‐TOF‐MS‐based fingerprint matches, but also on solving the insufficiencies of MALDI‐TOF‐MS‐based platforms and advancing the technology to areas such as targeted MS identification and typing of bacteria, bacterial toxin identification, antibiotics susceptibility/resistance tests, and MS‐based diagnostic method development on unique bacteria such as Clostridium and Mycobacteria. This review summarizes the recent development in MS platforms and applications in bacteria identification and typing of common pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26751976

  9. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  10. Bacteria-based concrete: from concept to market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of self-healing concrete—a concrete which can autonomously repair itself after crack formation, with no or limited human intervention—has received a lot of attention over the past 10 years as it could help structures to last longer and at a lower maintenance cost. This paper gives an overview on the key aspects and recent advances in the development of the bacteria-based self-healing concrete developed at the University of Technology of Delft (The Netherlands). Research started with the screening and selection of concrete compatible bacteria and nutrients. Several types of encapsulated bacteria and nutrients have been developed and tested. The functionality of these healing agents was demonstrated by showing metabolic activity of activated bacterial spores by oxygen consumption measurements and by regain of material functionality in form of regain of water tightness. Besides development of bacteria-based self-healing concrete, a bacteria-based repair mortar and liquid system were developed for the treatment of aged concrete structures. Field trials have been carried out with either type of bacteria-based systems and the promising results have led to a spinoff company Basilisk Self-Healing Concrete with the aim to further develop these systems and bring them to the market.

  11. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Mega

  12. PREVENTION OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON NORFLOXACINMETRONIDAZOLE TREATED URETERAL LATEX STENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. ELAYARAJAH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial-associated bacterial infections present common and challenging complications with medical implants. The purpose of this study was to determine the antibacterial properties of latex rubber stents with integrated norfloxacin-metronidazole (synergistic antibacterial agent combinations for the first time in order to prevent the colonization and biofilm formation on the surface of ureteral stents. Treating of latex rubber stents were carried out by adding the norfloxacin-metronidazole with the fresh latex during polymerization (polymerization method. Polymerization was facilitated by adding water and formic acid to the latexantibacterialagents solution mixture. The numbers of adhered bacteria on treated and untreated stents were calculated. Difference in the number of viable bacteria adhered on the surface of treated and untreated stentswere statistically calculated using chi square testing procedure with P < 0.05 considered significant. Tests for persistence were carried out using serial plate transfer method to determine withstanding ability of antibacterial agentss in the stents. A primary skin irritation test was performed on a laboratory animal to determine thehypersensitivity reaction of antibacterial agents treated latex rubber discs. Numbers of adhered bacteria on the surface of antibacterial agents treated and untreated stents were calculated. In the polymerization method, the number of adhered bacteria on the surface of treated stents was reduced to a significant level (P<0.05.Persistence test showed the antibacterial activity of antibacterial agents treated stents till 5 days for polymerization method. In primary skin irritation test no significant erythema and edema was detected over the skin of lab animal according to the standard skin irritation scoring.

  13. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Common Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammaddoost Chakoosari ( Msc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Probiotics are living microorganisms that have beneficial effects on the health of digestive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial ability of acidic and neutral supernatants (culture supernatant of lactic acid bacteria against common bacterial pathogens. Methods: Four species of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum PTCC1745, Lactobacillus PTCC1608, Lactobacillus Saki PTCC1712 and Lactobacillus Lactis PTCC1336 were obtained from the microbial collection of Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology in Lyophilized form. The antimicrobial activity of neutral and acidic supernatants against bacterial pathogens was investigated using the Disk and Well Diffusion Agar methods. Results: Lactic acid bacteria showed good antimicrobial ability against six pathogenic bacteria with the highest inhibitory effect observed in Lactococcus lactis against E. coli PTCC1399 through well method with an average diameter of 14 mm inhibition zone. In this study, the well diffusion method was far more sensitive compared to the disk method and acidic supernatants showed higher antimicrobial efficiency compared to neutral types. Conclusion: the Metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria are able to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria that can be an important and practical solution for the prevention and treatment of infections and ultimately improve human health. Keywords: Lactobacillus; Lactococcus; Probiotic; Antibacterial

  14. Cadmium Modulates Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xueqing; Santos, Regiane R.; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of cadmium exposure on Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984) biofilm formation. Bacteria were cultured in the absence or presence of different concentrations (0-50 mu M) of cadmium. Biofilm formation and bacterial viability were assessed. Quantitativ

  15. Screening of aspartate dehydrogenase of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Shoko; Okamura, Tokumitsu; Yasumasa, Izumi; Takeno, Tomomi; Ohsugi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-two strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 12 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NAD^+. Four strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 7 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NADP^+. Seven strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 4 strains of bacteria cultured und...

  16. Bacteria Delay the Jamming of Particles at Microchannel Bottlenecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendekie, Zenamarkos Bantie; Gaveau, Arthur; Lammertink, Rob G H; Bacchin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Clogging of channels by complex systems such as mixtures of colloidal and biological particles is commonly encountered in different applications. In this work, we analyze and compare the clogging mechanisms and dynamics by pure and mixture suspensions of polystyrene latex particles and Escherichia coli by coupling fluorescent microscopic observation and dynamic permeability measurements in microfluidic filters. Pure particles filtration leads to arches and deposit formation in the upstream side of the microfilter while pure bacteria form streamers in the downstream zone. When mixing particle and bacteria, an unexpected phenomenon occurs: the clogging dynamics is significantly delayed. This phenomenon is related to apparent "slippery" interactions between the particles and the bacteria. These interactions limit the arches formation at the channels entrances and favour the formation of dendritic structures on the pillars between the channels. When these dendrites are eroded by the flow, fragments of the deposit are dragged towards the channels entrances. However, these bacteria/particles clusters being lubricated by the slippery interactions are deformed and stretched by the shear thus facilitating their passage through the microchannels. PMID:27510611

  17. Does the presence of bacteria effect basaltic glass dissolution rates? 1: Dead Pseudomonas reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Benezeth, Pascale

    2010-05-01

    Basaltic glass and crystalline basalt formations in Iceland have been suggested for industrial CO2 storage due to their porous and permeable properties and high reactivity. Acid CO2-saturated waters in contact with basaltic glass will lead to rapid dissolution of the glass and release of divalent cations, (Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+) that can react to form stable carbonates and thereby trap the CO2. However, the basalt formations in Iceland not only contains glass and mineral assemblages, but also host microbiological communities that either by their presence or by active involvement in chemical reactions could affect the amount of basaltic glass being dissolved and CO2 being trapped. Samples of natural bacteria communities from the CO2 storage grounds in Iceland were collected, separated, and purified using agar plate technique and cultured under laboratory conditions in nutrient broth-rich media. Heterotrophic aerobic Gram-negative strain of Pseudomonas reactants was selected for a series of flow-through experiments aimed at evaluation of basaltic glass dissolution rate in the presense of increasing amounts of dead bacteria and their lysis products. The experiments were carried out using mixed-flow reactors at pH 4, 6, 8 and 10 at 25 °C. Each of the four reactors contained 1 gram of basaltic glass of the size fraction 45-125 μm. This glass was dissolved in ~ 0.01 M buffer solutions (acetate, MES, bicarbonate and carbonate+bicarbonate mixture) of the desired pH. All experiments ran 2 months, keeping the flowrate and temperature stable and only changing the concentration of dead bacteria in the inlet solutions (from 0 to 430 mg/L). Experiments were performed in sterile conditions, and bacterial growth was prevented by adding NaN3 to the inlet solutions. Routine culturing of bacteria on the agar plates confirmed the sterility of experiments. Samples of outlet solutions were analyzed for major cations and trace elements by ICP-MS. Results demonstrate a slight decrease in the

  18. Chitin elicitation of natural product production in marine bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld;

    on glucose-based medium. The different phenotypic responses to a natural growth substrate may reflect different niche-adaptations or ecological functions of the compounds produced and it represents a fruitful approach for elicitation of natural product production in marine bacteria.......Genome sequences reveal that our current standard laboratory conditions only support a fraction of the potential secondary metabolism in bacteria.1 Thus, we must rethink cultivation, detection, and isolation strategies for bacterial secondary metabolites in order to explore the huge, so far...... uncharacterized chemical potential of these organisms. As part of a new project on ecology-driven drug discovery at the Technical University of Denmark, we investigate the use of chitin to elicit or alter production of antibacterial compounds in marine bacteria. Within our large collection of Gram...

  19. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  20. Bacteria, fungi and protozoa paper

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Bacteria and fungi in source and treated drinking water This dataset is associated with the following publication: King , D., S. Pfaller , M. Donohue , S. Vesper ,...

  1. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  2. Adherention ability of intestinal bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Morgensternová, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that provide positive health benefits. Bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium belong to this group. These bacteria have to meet a number of criteria so that they could be considered for probiotic. These include the ability to survive, grow, and be metabolically active in the gastrointestinal tract of the recipient. Probiotics protect the intestinal mucus from the adhesion of pathogenic organisms. The aim of this thesis was to test the ability of different ...

  3. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.;

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  4. A comparative effect of 3 disinfectants on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The disinfection effect of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in circulating cooling water was studied. The results of the test indicated that high purity chlorine dioxide was the most effective biocide in the 3 disinfectants, and with a dosage of 0.5mg/L, chlorine dioxide could obtain perfect effect. High purity chloride dioxide could have the excellent effect with the pH value of 6 to 10, and could keep it within 72 h. Chlorine and their mixture couldn't reach the effect of chlorine dioxide.

  5. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  6. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method.

  7. Teaching Cardiovascular Integrations with Computer Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nils S.; Campbell, Kenneth B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a computer-based instructional unit in cardiovascular physiology. The program (which employs simulated laboratory experimental techniques with a problem-solving format is designed to supplement an animal laboratory and to offer students an integrative approach to physiology through use of microcomputers. Also presents an overview of the…

  8. 铁锰菌和硝化菌同步去除铁、锰和氨氮的研究%Simultaneous Removal of Iron, Manganese and Ammonia Nitrogen by Iron and Manganese Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐玉兰; 武卫斌; 赵玉华; 傅金祥; 郜玉楠; 王小兰

    2013-01-01

    在实验室条件下,提取人工挂膜启动后运行效果良好的除铁、锰和氨氮的BAF滤料上的混合菌,将其分离富集培养出铁锰菌和硝化菌,研究了铁锰菌、硝化菌和混合茵各自同步去除铁、锰和氨氮的效能.结果表明,铁锰菌不仅对铁和锰具有去除作用,对氨氮也有去除作用,且主要为亚硝化作用;硝化菌仅对氨氮有去除作用,对铁和锰则几乎无去除作用;混合菌同步去除铁、锰和氨氮的效果最好,铁锰菌和硝化菌共存对同步去除铁、锰和氨氮具有协同作用.%Mixed bacteria for removal of iron, manganese and ammonia nitrogen were extracted in laboratory from the ceramic media in a well-operated BAF after artificial biofilm formation. Iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria and nitrobacteria were separated and enriched from the mixed bacteria. The respective efficiencies of three types of bacteria for simultaneous removal of iron, manganese and ammonia nitrogen were investigated. The results showed that iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria not only simultaneously removed iron and manganese, but also ammonia nitrogen via nitrosation. Nitrobacteria removed ammonia nitrogen, but not iron and manganese. Mixed bacteria showed the highest efficiency in simultaneous removal of iron, manganese and ammonia nitrogen. Iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria and nitrobacteria had a synergistic effect in simultaneous removal of iron, manganese and ammonia nitrogen.

  9. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  11. Phototropic sulfur and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the chemocline of meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele PEDUZZI

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Cadagno, a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the catchment area of a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the Piora Valley in the southern Alps of Switzerland, is characterized by a compact chemocline with high concentrations of sulfate, steep gradients of oxygen, sulfide and light and a turbidity maximum that correlates to large numbers of bacteria (up to 107 cells ml-1. The most abundant taxa in the chemocline are large- and small-celled purple sulfur bacteria, which account for up to 35% of all bacteria, and sulfate- reducing bacteria that represent up to 23% of all bacteria. Depending on the season, as much as 45% of all bacteria in the chemocline are associated in aggregates consisting of different populations of small-celled purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Lamprocystis (up to 35% of all bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the family Desulfobulbaceae (up to 12% of all bacteria that are almost completely represented by bacteria closely related to Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes. Their association in aggregates is restricted to small-celled purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Lamprocystis, but not obligate since non-associated cells of bacteria related to D. thiozymogenes are frequently found, especially under limited light conditions in winter and early summer. Aggregate formation and concomitant growth enhancement of isolates of both partners of this association suggests synergistic interactions that might resemble a sulfide-based source-sink relationship between the sulfate-reducing bacterium that is able to sustain growth by a disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds (sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, with the purple sulfur bacteria acting as a biotic scavenger. The availability of these isolates opens up the door for future studies considering other facets of potential interactions in aggregates since both types of organisms are metabolically highly versatile and interactions may not be limited to sulfur compounds only.

  12. Influence of natural substrates and co-occurring marine bacteria on the production of secondary metabolites by Photobacterium halotolerans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Giobergia, Sonia; Møller, Kirsten A.;

    Genome sequences reveal that our current standard laboratory conditions only support a fraction of the potential secondary metabolism in bacteria. Thus, we must rethink cultivation, detection, and isolation strategies for bacterial secondary metabolites in order to explore the huge, so far unchar...... uncharacterized chemical potential of these organisms. We are currently investigating the use of natural substrates and co-cultures with commensal bacteria to elicit or alter production of antibacterial compounds in marine bacteria....

  13. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  14. Probing minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianxun; Zheng, Yan; Yan, Ya; Yang, Lingling; Yao, Yihui; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Chen, Yuqing; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-06-15

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has become a major threat to public health. Advanced tools are urgently needed to quickly diagnose antibiotic-resistant infections to initiate appropriate treatment. Here we report the development of a highly sensitive flow cytometric method to probe minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via single cell detection. Monoclonal antibody against TEM-1 β-lactamase and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated secondary antibody were used to selectively label resistant bacteria green, and nucleic acid dye SYTO 62 was used to stain all the bacteria red. A laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was applied to simultaneously detect the side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria. By using E. coli JM109/pUC19 and E. coli JM109 as the model systems for antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible bacteria, respectively, as low as 0.1% of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were accurately quantified. By monitoring the dynamic population change of a bacterial culture with the administration of antibiotics, we confirmed that under the antimicrobial pressure, the original low population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria outcompeted susceptible strains and became the dominant population after 5hours of growth. Detection of antibiotic-resistant infection in clinical urine samples was achieved without cultivation, and the bacterial load of susceptible and resistant strains can be faithfully quantified. Overall, the HSFCM-based quantitative method provides a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of antibiotic resistance and holds the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies. PMID:26852201

  15. Laboratory Studies of Astrophysical Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Jets and outflows produced during star-formation are observed on many scales: from the "micro-jets" extending a few hundred Astronomical Units to the "super-jets" propagating to parsecs distances. Recently, a new "class" of short-lived (hundreds of nano-seconds) centimetre-long jets has emerged in the laboratory as a complementary tool to study these complex astrophysical flows. Here I will discuss and review the recent work done on "simulating" protostellar jets in the laboratory using z-pinch machines.

  16. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning; Spillum, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotics of the β-lactam group are able to alter the shape of the bacterial cell wall, e.g. filamentation or a spheroplast formation. Early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility may be complicated by filamentation of bacteria as this can be falsely interpreted as growth...... in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results Three E. coli strains displaying...... different resistant profiles and differences in filamentation kinetics were used to study a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify length of bacteria and bacterial filamentation. A total of 12 β-lactam antibiotics or β-lactam–β-lactamase inhibitor combinations were analyzed for their ability to induce...

  17. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2005-01-01

    the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria.......Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...

  18. Vanadium removal from LD converter slag using bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazimi, S M J; Abbasalipour, Z; Rashchi, F

    2015-04-15

    Removal of vanadium from Linz-Donawits (LD) converter slag was investigated by means of three different species of microbial systems: Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (autotrophic bacteria), Pseudomonas putida (heterotrophic bacteria) and Aspergillus niger (fungi). The bioleaching process was carried out in both one-step and two-step process and the leaching efficiencies in both cases were compared. Formation of inorganic and organic acids during the leaching process caused mobilization of vanadium. In order to reduce toxic effects of the metal species on the above mentioned microorganisms, a prolonged adaptation process was performed. Both bacteria, A. thiooxidans and P. putida were able to remove more than 90% of vanadium at slag concentrations of 1-5 g L(-1) after 15 days. Also, the maximum achievable vanadium removal in the fungal system was approximately 92% at a slag concentration of 1 g L(-1) after 22 days.

  19. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  20. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  1. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. PMID:25485864

  2. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  3. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  4. Insects as alternative hosts for phytopathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarasah, Geetanchaly; Stavrinides, John

    2011-05-01

    Phytopathogens have evolved specialized pathogenicity determinants that enable them to colonize their specific plant hosts and cause disease, but their intimate associations with plants also predispose them to frequent encounters with herbivorous insects, providing these phytopathogens with ample opportunity to colonize and eventually evolve alternative associations with insects. Decades of research have revealed that these associations have resulted in the formation of bacterial-vector relationships, in which the insect mediates dissemination of the plant pathogen. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of plant pathogenic bacteria to use insects as alternative hosts, exploiting them as they would their primary plant host. The identification of specific bacterial genetic determinants that mediate the interaction between bacterium and insect suggests that these interactions are not incidental, but have likely arisen following the repeated association of microorganisms with particular insects over evolutionary time. This review will address the biology and ecology of phytopathogenic bacteria that interact with insects, including the traditional role of insects as vectors, as well as the newly emerging paradigm of insects serving as alternative primary hosts. Also discussed is one case where an insect serves as both host and vector, which may represent a transitionary stage in the evolution of insect-phytopathogen associations. PMID:21251027

  5. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals, mobilis

  6. Exopolysaccharides from sourdough lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Sandra; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-01-01

    The use of sourdough improves the quality and increases the shelf life of bread. The positive effects are associated with metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) during sourdough fermentation, including organic acids, exopolysaccharides (EPS), and enzymes. EPS formed during sourdough fermentation by glycansucrase activity from sucrose influence the viscoelastic properties of the dough and beneficially affect the texture and shelf life (in particular, starch retrogradation) of bread. Accordingly, EPS have the potential to replace hydrocolloids currently used as bread improvers and meet so the consumer demands for a reduced use of food additives. In this review, the current knowledge about the functional aspects of EPS formation by sourdough LAB especially in baking applications is summarized.

  7. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  8. Platelets and Infections – Complex Interactions with Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Damien, Pauline; Chabert, Adrien; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-like receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb–IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet-bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis, or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet–bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the aggregation response

  9. Platelets and infections—complex interactions with bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind eHAMZEH-COGNASSE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-Like Receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet-bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bacteria in latex paint were demonstrated.

  11. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices. PMID:27263015

  12. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  13. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  14. The specificationof nano-structure superficial layers in some of the pathogen bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilla Jalalpoor

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The superficial layer is a part of the cellular envelop that is seen in bacteria and archaea. This superficial layer is a single layer structure composed of subordinate proteins or glycoproteins. The superficial layer is the outer most cellular structure that is in the exchange and reaction around environment with bacteria. This structure has very diversity in bacteria different types.Materials and Method: The related articles to superficial layer were extracted of these articles: Pubmed, Elsevier Science, and Yahoo, from 1995 to 2010 years. For this purpose keywords were searched including superficial layer, pathogenesis, pathogen bacteria,Results: There is consensus in the case of the superficial layer and about the existence of this superficial structure lead to increased pathogenesis in bacteria, in all of the research articles.Conclusion: S-layers in pathogen bacteria with bacteria protection against bacteriophages and phagocytosis, resistance against low pH, adhesion, stabilisation of the membrane and providing adhesion sites for exoproteins caused pathogenesis, infection resistant and antibiotic resistant in host.The result of this study shows the prevalence of considerable S-layer in pathogen bacteria and this matter identified the bacteria generator importance of this structure in the laboratory

  15. Adaptation, Bacteria and Maxwell's Demons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan E.; Austin, Robert H.

    2007-03-01

    We propose a method to study the adaptation of bacterial populations with an asymmetric wall of Maxwell Demon openings. A Maxwell Demon opening is a funnel which is easier to enter than to leave. The interaction of swimming cells with such a Maxwell Demon Wall results in a population density separation, in apparent (but not real) violation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, as we will show. Bacteria can be exposed to spatial challenges in order to move to e. g. higher food levels. The question we address in these experiments is: do the bacteria adapt and overcome the Maxwell Demon Wall?

  16. Laboratory Diagnostic Strategy for Thrombophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马西

    2010-01-01

    @@ Thrombophilia is described as a tendency to develop thrombosis as a consequence of predisposing factors that may be genetically determined, acquired, or both. The risk factors associated with venous thromboembolism are different from those associated with arterial thrombosis. Venous and arterial thromboses are also distinct clinical entities that differ in the microenvironment of clot formation and the structure of the clots formed. Therefore, the tests to be used in laboratory investigation of these two conditions are different.

  17. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents II: Bacteriophage Exploitation and Biocontrol of Biofilm Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the viruses of bacteria. In the guise of phage therapy they have been used for decades to successfully treat what are probable biofilm-containing chronic bacterial infections. More recently, phage treatment or biocontrol of biofilm bacteria has been brought back to the laboratory for more rigorous assessment as well as towards the use of phages to combat environmental biofilms, ones other than those directly associated with bacterial infections. Considered in a companion ar...

  18. Peptidoglycan from Bacillus cereus Mediates Commensalism with Rhizosphere Bacteria from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium Group

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Snow Brook; Dunn, Anne K.; Klimowicz, Amy K.; Handelsman, Jo

    2006-01-01

    Previous research in our laboratory revealed that the introduction of Bacillus cereus UW85 can increase the populations of bacteria from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium (CF) group of the Bacteroidetes phylum in the soybean rhizosphere, suggesting that these rhizosphere microorganisms have a beneficial relationship (G. S. Gilbert, J. L. Parke, M. K. Clayton, and J. Handelsman, Ecology 74:840-854, 1993). In the present study, we determined the frequency at which CF bacteria coisolated with B. cere...

  19. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic methods for microbial ecology: analysis of bacteria, bacteria-polymer mixtures and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, P. D.; Henson, J. M.; Guckert, J. B.; Nivens, D. E.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been used to rapidly and nondestructively analyze bacteria, bacteria-polymer mixtures, digester samples and microbial biofilms. Diffuse reflectance FT-IR (DRIFT) analysis of freeze-dried, powdered samples offered a means of obtaining structural information. The bacteria examined were divided into two groups. The first group was characterized by a dominant amide I band and the second group of organisms displayed an additional strong carbonyl stretch at approximately 1740 cm-1. The differences illustrated by the subtraction spectra obtained for microbes of the two groups suggest that FT-IR spectroscopy can be utilized to recognize differences in microbial community structure. Calculation of specific band ratios has enabled the composition of bacteria and extracellular or intracellular storage product polymer mixtures to be determined for bacteria-gum arabic (amide I/carbohydrate C-O approximately 1150 cm-1) and bacteria-poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (amide I/carbonyl approximately 1740 cm-1). The key band ratios correlate with the compositions of the material and provide useful information for the application of FT-IR spectroscopy to environmental biofilm samples and for distinguishing bacteria grown under differing nutrient conditions. DRIFT spectra have been obtained for biofilms produced by Vibrio natriegens on stainless steel disks. Between 48 and 144 h, an increase in bands at approximately 1440 and 1090 cm-1 was seen in FT-IR spectra of the V. natriegens biofilm. DRIFT spectra of mixed culture effluents of anaerobic digesters show differences induced by shifts in input feedstocks. The use of flow-through attenuated total reflectance has permitted in situ real-time changes in biofilm formation to be monitored and provides a powerful tool for understanding the interactions within adherent microbial consortia.

  20. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  1. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  2. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  3. String Formatting Considered Harmful for Novice Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael C.; Jadud, Matthew C.; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.

    2010-01-01

    In Java, "System.out.printf" and "String.format" consume a specialised kind of string commonly known as a format string. In our study of first-year students at the Ateneo de Manila University, we discovered that format strings present a substantial challenge for novice programmers. Focusing on their first laboratory we found that 8% of all the…

  4. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  5. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  6. Geotechnical characterization through in situ and laboratory tests of several geological formations present in the route of the Future Fix Connection between Spain and Morocco through Gibraltar Strait; Caracterizacion geotecnica mediante ensayos in situ y de laboratorio de algunas formaciones geologicas presentes en la traza de la Futura Conexion Fija entre Espana y Marruecos a traves del estrecho de Gibraltar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucho Martinez, A.; Diez Torres, J. A.; Muniz Menendez, M.; Cano Linares, H.; Ruiz Fonticiella, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    CEDEX and SECEGSA (Sociedad Española para la Comunicación Fija a través del Estrecho de Gibraltar), Have been collaborating since a few decades ago to study different technical aspects related to the Fix Connection through the Gibraltar Strait, mainly in relation to the geological and geotechnical properties of the different formations present in the route. In order to do so, many studies of geotechnical characterization of materials, in situ and laboratory testing campaigns have been carried out. Furthermore, they have participated in some Expertise Committees carrying out some advice work related to studies performed by other organizations. This paper presents a brief description of the most relevant aspects of the main geological and geotechnical studies performed related to this Project of the Future Fix Connection and obtained through the study of SECEGSAs extensive data base. Moreover, it includes a synopsis of the geotechnical characterization carried out through in situ and laboratory tests on different Miocene and Eocene formations from the Algeciras Unit, present in the route of the future Fix Connection between Spain and gibraltar through the Gibraltar Strait. (Author)

  7. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  8. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  9. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  10. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  11. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  12. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  13. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  14. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  15. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  16. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  17. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  18. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  19. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  20. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  1. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  2. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  3. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  4. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems. DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  5. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  6. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  7. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of Cr(VI)-reducer basalt-inhabiting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibakhashvili, Nelly Yasonovna; Frontasyeva, Marina Vladimirovna; Kirkesali, Elena Ivanovna; Aksenova, Nadezhda Gennadievna; Kalabegishvili, Tamaz Levanovich; Murusidze, Ivana Georgievich; Mosulishvili, Ligury Mikhailovich; Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2006-09-15

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to study elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance, demonstrating that the bacteria differ in their rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(V) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 microg/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental conditions typical of the basalts. The concentrations of at least 12-19 different elements were determined in each type of bacteria simultaneously starting with the major to ultratrace elements. The range of concentrations spans over 8 orders of magnitude.

  8. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  9. Ammonia production by human faecal bacteria, and the enumeration, isolation and characterization of bacteria capable of growth on peptides and amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The products of protein breakdown in the human colon are considered to be detrimental to gut health. Amino acid catabolism leads to the formation of sulfides, phenolic compounds and amines, which are inflammatory and/or precursors to the formation of carcinogens, including N-nitroso compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of protein breakdown and the bacterial species involved. Results Casein, pancreatic casein hydrolysate (mainly short-chain peptides or amino acids were incubated in vitro with suspensions of faecal bacteria from 3 omnivorous and 3 vegetarian human donors. Results from the two donor groups were similar. Ammonia production was highest from peptides, followed by casein and amino acids, which were similar. The amino acids metabolized most extensively were Asp, Ser, Lys and Glu. Monensin inhibited the rate of ammonia production from amino acids by 60% (P = 0.001, indicating the involvement of Gram-positive bacteria. Enrichment cultures were carried out to investigate if, by analogy with the rumen, there was a significant population of asaccharolytic, obligately amino acid-fermenting bacteria (‘hyper-ammonia-producing’ bacteria; HAP in the colon. Numbers of bacteria capable of growth on peptides or amino acids alone averaged 3.5% of the total viable count, somewhat higher than the rumen. None of these were HAP, however. The species enriched included Clostridium spp., one of which was C. perfringens, Enterococcus, Shigella and Escherichia coli. Conclusions Protein fermentation by human faecal bacteria in the absence of sugars not only leads to the formation of hazardous metabolic products, but also to the possible proliferation of harmful bacteria. The kinetics of protein metabolism were similar to the rumen, but HAP bacteria were not found.

  10. Enumeration of petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ biological treatment is one among a number of emerging technologies that may be applied to the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. In 1985, a surface spill of 1,500 gallons of dielectric transformer oil at the Sandia National Laboratories (HERMES II facility) resulted in contamination of soil up to depths of 160 feet. The extent of contamination and site characteristics favored the application of in-situ bioremediation as a potential remedial technology. The purpose of this research was to enumerate indigenous microbial populations capable of degrading petroleum hydrocarbons. Microbial enumeration and characterization methods suitably adapted for hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria were used as an indicator of the presence of viable microbial consortia in excavated oil samples with hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. Microbial activity was quantified by direct and streak plating soil samples on silica gel media. Effects of toxicity and temperature were studied using batch cultures of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (selectively isolated in an enrichment medium), at temperatures of 20 and 35 C. It was concluded from this study that it is possible to isolate native microorganisms from contaminated soils from depths of 60 to 160 feet, and with oil concentration ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. About 62% of the microorganisms isolated form the contaminated soil were capable of using contaminant oil as a substrate for growth and metabolism under aerobic conditions. Growth rates were observed to be 50% higher for the highest contaminant concentration at 20 C. Resistance to toxicity to contaminant oil was also observed to be greater at 20 C than at 35 C

  11. "DRUG RESISTANCE PATTERN IN ISOLATED BACTERIA FROM BLOOD CULTURES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sobhani

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia is an important infectious disease which may lead to death. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance in different communities are different and understanding these differences is important. In the present study, relative frequency and pattern of drug resistance have been examined in bacteria isolated from blood cultures in Razi Hospital laboratory. The method of the study was descriptive. Data collection was carried out retrospectively. Total sample consisted of 311 positive blood cultures from 1999 to 2001. Variables under study were bacterial strains, antibiotics examined in antibiogram, microbial resistance, and patients' age and sex. The most common isolated bacteria were Salmonella typhi (22.2% and the least common ones were Citrobacter (1.6%. The highest antibiotic resistance was seen against amoxicillin (88.4%. The proportion of males to females was1: 1/1 and the most common age group was 15-44 (47.3%. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance were different in some areas and this subject requires further studies in the future.

  12. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  13. Simulating Experiments on Enrichment of Gold by Bacteria and Their Geochemical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景荣; 陆建军; 等

    1997-01-01

    The experiments on the enrichment of gold by bacteria indicate that bacteria have a very intense capacity of enriching gold and act as an arrester of trace gold in sea water,Bacteria enrich gold in two forms:absorption and adsorption.Absorption means that gold finds its way into organisms and it is combined with the mercapto group of protein,whereas adsorption means that gold is adsorbed on organisma by amino acid secreted by cell walls,Bacteria are organisms with very high vitality and reproductive capacity and huge productivity in nature Bacteria,which are important geolgical agents for gold enrichment and can exert effects on geological environments by their metabolism,are of important geochemical significance for the formation of gold-bearing black rock series.

  14. Physico-chemical factors and bacteria in fish ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, X.; Xiuzheng, F.; Tongbing, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of pond water and mud samples show that nitrifying bacteria (including ammonifying bacteria, nitrite bacteria, nitrobacteria and denitrifying bacteria) are in general closely correlated with various physico-chemical factors, ammonifying bacteria are mainly correlated with dissolved oxygen; denitrifying bacteria are inversely correlated with phosphorus; nitrite bacteria are closely correlated with nitrites, nitrobacteria are inversely correlated with ammoniac nitrogen. The nitrifying ...

  15. The Preliminary Report on Rumen Protozoa Grazing Rate on Bacteria with a Fluorescence-Labeled Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Meng-zhi; WANG Hong-rong; LI Guo-xiang; CAO Heng-chun; LU Zhan-jun

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the bacterial predation rate by rumen protozoa were carried out under laboratory conditions using a technique of fluorescence-labeled bacteria (FLB). Four Xuhuai goats were used in this experiment to obtain rumen protozoa and bacteria. Two groups were designed as follows: One group was the whole bacteria which were labeled using fluorescence through removing free bacteria from rumen fluid (WFLB); the other group was the bacteria which were labeled using fluorescence without removing free bacteria from rumen fluid (FLB). The result indicated that the bacterial predation rates of rumen Protozoa was 398.4 cells/(cell h) for the group WFLB, 230.4 cells/(cell h) for the group FLB, when the corresponding values expressed as bacteria-N, they were 2.15Pg N/(cell h) for the group WFLB, and 1.24Pg N/(cell h) for the group FLB, respectively. Extrapolating the assimilation quantity of nitrogen by ciliates on bacteria of Xuhuai goat, there were 103.2mg N/(d capita) for the group WFLB, and 59.5mg N/(d capita) for the group FLB, respectively. It was estimated that protein losses due to microbial recycling were 0.645g pro/(d capita) for the group WFLB and 0.372g pro/(d capita) for the group FLB, respectively. In addition, the fluorescence-labeled technique would be a potential assay for the determination of bacterial predation rate by rumen protozoa.

  16. Selection of antibiotic-resistant standard plate count bacteria during water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J L; Calomiris, J J; Seidler, R J

    1982-08-01

    Standard plate count (SPC) bacteria were isolated from a drinking-water treatment facility and from the river supplying the facility. All isolates were identified and tested for their resistance to six antibiotics to determine if drug-resistant bacteria were selected for as a consequence of water treatment. Among the isolates surviving our test procedures, there was a significant selection (P less than 0.05) of gram-negative SPC organisms resistant to two or more of the test antibiotics. These bacteria were isolated from the flash mix tank, where chlorine, alum, and lime are added to the water. Streptomycin resistance in particular was more frequent in this population as compared with bacteria in the untreated river water (P less than 0.01). SPC bacteria from the clear well, which is a tank holding the finished drinking water at the treatment facility, were also more frequently antibiotic resistant than were the respective river water populations. When 15.8 and 18.2% of the river water bacteria were multiply antibiotic resistant, 57.1 and 43.5%, respectively, of the SPC bacteria in the clear well were multiply antibiotic resistant. Selection for bacteria exhibiting resistance to streptomycin was achieved by chlorinating river water in the laboratory. We concluded that the selective factors operating in the aquatic environment of a water treatment facility can act to increase the proportion of antibiotic-resistant members of the SPC bacterial population in treated drinking water.

  17. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and vomiting are possible consequences, FDA ... products can harbor several species of potentially harmful bacteria, researchers warn. Two types in particular -- Bacillus licheniformis ...

  18. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W M M S Bandara; Gamini Seneviratne; S A Kulasooriya

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  19. Regularities of polymer substances transformation into methane by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    V. І. Karpenko; L. S. Yastremska; І. G. Burun; Y. V. Lembey; O. S. Tatarchenko

    2006-01-01

    The paper shows the regularities of polymer substances transformation into methane by extracted thermophilic anaerobic bacteria. The sequence of substrate use by the methane generating bacteria corresponds to the energy efficiency of the methane genesis reactions as in the first place hydrogen is used and then acetate is. Combined cultivation of extracted different anaerobic cultures gives the opportunity to increase ethanol and hydrogen yield as well as the effectiveness of methane formation.

  20. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Jennifer L.; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2011-01-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size wer...

  1. Coral-Associated Bacteria and Their Role in the Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfur▿

    OpenAIRE

    Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Tapiolas, Dianne; Willis, Bette L.; Bourne, David G

    2009-01-01

    Marine bacteria play a central role in the degradation of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and acrylic acid, DMS being critical to cloud formation and thereby cooling effects on the climate. High concentrations of DMSP and DMS have been reported in scleractinian coral tissues although, to date, there have been no investigations into the influence of these organic sulfur compounds on coral-associated bacteria. Two coral species, Montipora aequituberculata and Acropor...

  2. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  3. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  4. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  5. Studies to control biofilm formation by coupling ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithila, S D Ruth; Anandkumar, B; Vanithakumari, S C; George, R P; Mudali, U Kamachi; Dayal, R K

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium on microbial density and biofilm formation tendency on titanium surfaces. Application of 24 kHz, 400 W high power ultrasound through a 14 mm horn type SS (stainless steel) Sonicator with medium amplitude of 60% for 30 min brought about three order decrease in total bacterial density of laboratory tap water, cooling tower water and reservoir water and two order decrease in seawater. Studies on the effect of ultrasonication on dilute pure cultures of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria showed five order and three order decrease for Pseudomonas sp. and Flavobacterium sp. respectively and two order and less than one order decrease for Bacillus sp. and Micrococcus sp. respectively. Ultrasonication increased lag phase and reduced logarithmic population increase and specific growth rate of Gram-negative bacteria whereas for Gram-positive bacteria specific growth rate increased. Studies on the biofilm formation tendency of these ultrasonicated mediums on titanium surface showed one order reduction under all conditions. Detailed biofilm imaging by advanced microscopic techniques like AFM, SEM and epifluorescence microscopy clearly visualized the lysed/damaged cells and membrane perforations due to ultrasonication. Combination of ultrasonication and anodization brought about maximum decrease in bacterial density and biofilm formation with greater than two order decrease in seawater, two order decrease in Bacillus sp. culture and more than four order decrease in Flavobacterium sp. culture establishing the synergistic effect of anodization and ultrasonication in this study. PMID:23871547

  6. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, J

    2008-01-01

    The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bac...

  8. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Peyton, Shelly R; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were 20 times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young's moduli. Soft (44.05-308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495-2877 kPa), and stiff (5152-6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 h incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 h incubation period, there were 52 and 82% fewer E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62 and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 h incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that could potentially be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections.

  9. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  10. Compartmentalization of bacteria in microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Judith; Heunis, Tiaan; Harmzen, Elrika; Dicks, Leon M T; Meuldijk, Jan; Klumperman, Bert

    2014-12-18

    Lactobacillus plantarum strain 423 was encapsulated in hollow poly(organosiloxane) microcapsules by templating water-in-oil Pickering emulsion droplets via the interfacial reaction of alkylchlorosilanes. The bacteria were suspended in growth medium or buffer to protect the cells against pH changes during the interfacial reactions with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of this work open up novel avenues for the encapsulation of microbial cells.

  11. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Raimondi; Alberto Amaretti; Maddalena Rossi

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-typ...

  12. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Dennis A. Bazylinski

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aqu...

  13. Dormant state in bacteria: Conceptions and implications for terrestrial biogeoscience and astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Gaining insight into strategies and mechanisms that ensure long term-preservation of microorganisms in various environments, including cold habitats, is a very important issue for terrestrial biogeoscience and astrobiology. This communication has a focus on the analysis of the published and our experimental data regarding the dormant state of different microorganisms, with an emphasis on non-spore-forming bacteria, which are widely spread in numerous ecological niches (e.g. permafrost sediments). Albeit it is recognized that one of the strategies to endure environmental stresses is entering of non-spore-forming bacteria into the viable-but-non-culturable state, a question of whether these microorganisms have the resting stage remains unclear. However, our previous studies showed that non-spore-forming bacteria and yeast could form cyst-like cells that possess many attributes of constitutively resting cells. As applied to the survival strategy of non-spore-forming bacteria in permafrost sediments, recognizing a very important role of the viable-but-nonculturable state in asporogenous bacteria, we however believe that their long-term maintenance in such habitats is due to the formation of cyst-like cells. Interestingly, bacterial isolates from permafrost sediments showed a greater productivity of autoregulatory factors, favoring the transition of cells into the resting state, and a more elevated resistance to some stresses than closely related collection strains. This suggests a greater potentiality of the permafrost isolates to enter the resting stage and thereby to survive for millennia years in natural habitats. However, it is known that only a little part of microorganisms that are present in environmental samples can be enumerated by standard plating on agar media, and a discrepancy between the total number of cells and those capable of forming colonies is a rather common case. Such a discrepancy can be due to either the actual non-culturability of microbial

  14. Comparison of cell-specific activity between free-living and attached bacteria using isolates and natural assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Tang, K.W.; Kiørboe, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    Marine snow aggregates are microbial hotspots that support high bacterial abundance and activities. We conducted laboratory experiments to compare cell-specific bacterial protein production (BPP) and protease activity between free-living and attached bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages attached...... to model aggregates (agar spheres) had threefold higher BPP and two orders of magnitude higher protease activity than their free-living counterpart. These observations could be explained by preferential colonization of the agar spheres by bacteria with inherently higher metabolic activity and/or individual...... bacteria increasing their metabolism upon attachment to surfaces. In subsequent experiments, we used four strains of marine snow bacteria isolates to test the hypothesis that bacteria could up- and down-regulate their metabolism while on and off an aggregate. The protease activity of attached bacteria...

  15. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  16. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in common that

  17. Drosophila lifespan enhancement by exogenous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brummel, Ted; Ching, Alisa; Seroude, Laurent; Simon, Anne F.; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-01-01

    We researched the lifespan of Drosophila under axenic conditions compared with customary procedure. The experiments revealed that the presence of bacteria during the first week of adult life can enhance lifespan, despite unchanged food intake. Later in life, the presence of bacteria can reduce lifespan. Certain long-lived mutants react in different ways, indicating an interplay between bacteria and longevity-enhancing genes.

  18. Current strategies for improving food bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, O P; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Novel concepts and methodologies are emerging that hold great promise for the directed improvement of food-related bacteria, specifically lactic acid bacteria. Also, the battle against food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria can now be fought more effectively. Here we describe recent advances in micro

  19. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof-the-art...

  20. Role of bacteria in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Increased numbers of mucosa-associated Escherichia coli are observed in both of the major inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (DC). A potential pathophysiological link between the presence of pathogenic invasive bacteria and genetic host susceptibility of patients with ileal CD is suspected. In CD patients, with increased ileal expression of the CEACAM6 molecule acting as a receptor recognized by type 1 pilus bacterial adhesin, and with the identification of mutations in the NOD2-encoding gene, the presence of pathogenic invasive bacteria could be the link between abnormal ileal bacterial colonization and innate immune responses to invasive bacteria. In a susceptible host, the sequential etiological steps of the disease induced by adherent-invasive E. Coli (AIEC) are: (1) abnormal colonization via binding to the CEACAM6 receptor, which is overexpressed in the ileal mucosa of CD patients; (2) ability to adhere to and to invade intestinal epithelial cells, which allows bacteria to cross the mucosal barrier; (3) survival and replication within infected macrophages in the lamina propria; and (4) induction of tumor necrosis factor-a secretion and granuloma formation.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  2. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  3. Crenarchaeal Biofilm Formation under Extreme Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Koerdt; Julia Gödeke; Jürgen Berger; Thormann, Kai M.; Sonja-Verena Albers

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitr...

  4. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  5. Bacteria induce osteoclastogenesis via an osteoblast-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanling; Mehta, Chetan K; Hsu, Tun-Yi; Alsulaimani, Fahad F H

    2002-06-01

    Bacteria or their products may cause chronic inflammation and subsequent bone loss. This inflammation and bone loss may be associated with significant morbidity in chronic otitis media, periodontitis, endodontic lesions, and loosening of orthopedic implants caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-contaminated implant particles. Currently, it is not clear how bacteria or endotoxin-induced bone resorption occurs and what cell types are involved. Here we report that Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, and Escherichia coli LPS induce osteoclastic cell formation from murine leukocytes in the absence of osteoblasts. In contrast, stimulation with parathyroid hormone had no effect. These multinucleated, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were positive for receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK), the receptor for osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL), also known as RANK ligand (RANKL). Blocking antibodies demonstrated that their formation was dependent upon expression of OPGL and, to a lesser extent, on tumor necrosis factor alpha. Mononuclear cells represented a significant source of OPGL production. In vivo, P. gingivalis injection stimulated OPGL expression in both mononuclear leukocytes and osteoblastic cells. Thus, these findings describe a pathway by which bacteria could enhance osteolysis independently of osteoblasts and suggest that the mix of cells that participate in inflammatory and physiologic bone resorption may be different. This may give insight into new targets of therapeutic intervention.

  6. Effectiveness of hand washing and disinfection methods in removing transient bacteria after patient nursing.

    OpenAIRE

    Ojajärvi, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of various hand washing and disinfection methods in removing transient skin bacteria was studied in hospital after dry or moist contamination of the hands when nursing burn patients. The results were compared with those of laboratory tests with volunteers. A fairly good correlation of the bacterial reductions existed between hospital and laboratory tests. All other methods removed Staph. aureus from the hands more effectively than liquid soap. Gram-negative bacilli were more...

  7. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  8. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis (ENAA) of Cr(VI)-reducer Basalt-inhabiting Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsibakhashvili, N Ya; Kirkesali, E I; Aksenova, N G; Kalabegishvili, T L; Murusidze, I G; Mosulishvili, L M; Holman, H Y N

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) has been applied to studying elemental composition of Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from polluted basalts from the Republic of Georgia. Cr(VI)-reducing ability of the bacteria was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrating that the bacteria differ in the rates of Cr(VI) reduction. A well-pronounced correlation between the ability of the bacteria to accumulate Cr(V) and their ability to reduce Cr(V) to Cr(III) observed in our experiments is discussed. Elemental analysis of these bacteria also revealed that basalt-inhabiting bacteria are distinguished by relative contents of essential elements such as K, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co. A high rate of Cr(III) formation correlates with a high concentration of Co in the bacterium. ENAA detected some similarity in the elemental composition of the bacteria. The relatively high contents of Fe detected in the bacteria (140-340 $\\mu $g/g of dry weight) indicate bacterial adaptation to the environmental condition...

  9. Thermophilic fermentative bacteria from a deep borehole in granitic rock in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewzyk, Ulrich; Szewzyk, Regine; Stenstroem, Thor-Axel

    1997-07-01

    A borehole drilled to a final depth of 6779 m in granitic rock in Gravberg, Sweden, was sampled and examined for the presence and activity of anaerobic bacteria. The application of anaerobic enrichment and isolation techniques resulted in pure cultures of various fermenting bacteria. Growth in enrichment cultures was observed only in those cultures inoculated from water samples from a depth of 3500 m. Pure cultures of anaerobic, fermenting bacteria were obtained with the following substrates: glucose, starch, xylane, ethanol, and lactate. All isolated bacteria were so far undiscribed bacteria by means of their physiological properties. One strain of the glucose fermenting bacteria was further characterized concerning its phylogenetic position and was found to be closest related to Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum. However, by means of its characteristic metabolism, it was clearly separated from C. thermohydrosulfuricum. No sulfate-reducing or methanogenic bacteria were found in any of the samples. Fermentative bacteria growing in the presence of hematite often reduced the iron and induced the formation and deposition of insoluble iron sulfides.

  10. Isolation, Characterization, and Genetic Diversity of Ice Nucleation Active Bacteria on Various Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA ELIZABETH WATURANGI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation active (INA bacteria is a group of bacteria with the ability to catalyze the ice formation at temperature above -10 oC and causing frost injury in plants. Since, most of the literature on INA bacteria were from subtropical area, studies of INA bacteria from tropical area are needed. We sampled eight fruits and 36 leaves of 21 plant species, and then identified through biochemical and genetic analysis. INA bacteria were characterized for INA protein classification, pH stability, and optimization of heat endurance. We discovered 15 INA bacteria from seven plants species. Most of bacteria are oxidase and H2S negative, catalase and citrate positive, gram negative, and cocoid formed. These INA bacteria were classified in to three classes based on their freezing temperature. Most of the isolates were active in heat and pH stability assay. Some isolates were analysed for 16S rRNA gene. We observed that isolates from Morinda citrifolia shared 97% similiarity with Pseudomonas sp. Isolate from Piper betle shared 93% similarity with P. pseudoalcaligenes. Isolate from Carica papaya shared 94% similarity with Pseudomonas sp. While isolate from Fragaria vesca shared 90% similarity with Sphingomonas sp.

  11. Distribution of Ice Nucleation-Active (INA Bacteria from Rain-water and Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEPHANIE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Certain bacteria that induce biological ice nucleation are suspected to play an important role in condensation and ice nuclei formation in clouds. Those bacteria can produce biological ice nucleator1, which is a protein and usually found on leaf surface and air. Most studies on INA bacteria were conducted in subtropical areas. In this study, INA bacteria were isolated from rain-water and air between March to May 2008 from Jakarta, Bogor, Bekasi, Tangerang, and Depok. The percentage of INA bacteria from rainfall for those area are 19.4, 18.7, 5.3, 2.2, and 6.4% respectively, while percentage for air are 9.5, 6.5, 0, 2.7, and 1.8%. The highest incidence of INA bacteria were from rain-water and air found in sample from Jakarta and then followed by the samples from Bogor. It was shown that the percentage of INA bacteria from rain-water was higher than air for all of the samples from different areas. The isolate from Jakarta (isolate A32 which had the highest activity for ice nucleation, with the temperature classification at -2.7 oC, revealed 100% similarity with Pantoea sp. The presence of INA bacteria in rain-water and air might play an important role in nucleation process which is required for rainfall induction.

  12. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents II: Bacteriophage Exploitation and Biocontrol of Biofilm Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the viruses of bacteria. In the guise of phage therapy they have been used for decades to successfully treat what are probable biofilm-containing chronic bacterial infections. More recently, phage treatment or biocontrol of biofilm bacteria has been brought back to the laboratory for more rigorous assessment as well as towards the use of phages to combat environmental biofilms, ones other than those directly associated with bacterial infections. Considered in a companion article is the inherent ecological utility of bacteriophages versus antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents. Discussed here is a model for phage ecological interaction with bacteria as they may occur across biofilm-containing ecosystems. Specifically, to the extent that individual bacterial types are not highly abundant within biofilm-containing environments, then phage exploitation of those bacteria may represent a “Feast-or-famine” existence in which infection of highly localized concentrations of phage-sensitive bacteria alternate with treacherous searches by the resulting phage progeny virions for new concentrations of phage-sensitive bacteria to infect. An updated synopsis of the literature concerning laboratory testing of phage use to combat bacterial biofilms is then provided along with tips on how “Ecologically” such phage-mediated biofilm control can be modified to more reliably achieve anti-biofilm efficacy.

  13. Zooplankton and aggregates as refuge for aquatic bacteria: protection from UV, heat and ozone stresses used for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kam W; Dziallas, Claudia; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2011-02-01

    Aggregates and zooplankton may provide refuge for aquatic bacteria against external hazards. The ability of attached bacteria to survive and recover from stressors commonly used for water treatment was tested in the laboratory. Without zooplankton or aggregates, both UV and ozone significantly reduced abundance of free-living bacteria in both freshwater and marine medium. The presence of zooplankton carcasses and aggregates, however, allowed some of the attached bacteria to survive and recover quickly within 3 days. Heat exposure was the least effective as both free-living and attached bacteria were able to recover quickly. Selective survival of bacterial phylotypes led to large changes in bacterial community composition after stress exposures, and some of the bacteria that recovered belonged to groups with known pathogens. This study demonstrates that zooplankton and aggregates protected various aquatic bacteria from external stressors, and organic remains generated from zooplankton and aggregates after stress exposure even enabled the surviving bacteria to quickly regrow and subsequently be released into the surrounding water. Hence, water disinfection treatments that overlooked the potential persistence of bacteria associated with organisms and aggregates may not be effective in preventing the spread of undesirable bacteria.

  14. Natural biofilm formation with Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, Emilie; Héchard, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation could be studied in various conditions. Most of the studies with Legionella pneumophila used monospecies biofilm in culture media. In some cases, it is important to study bacteria in conditions more close to environmental conditions. In this paper, we describe protocols to produce natural biofilms from river water that were spiked with L. pneumophila. PMID:23150397

  15. Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

  16. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Alix M Denoncourt; Paquet, Valérie E.; Charette, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging...

  17. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  18. Some aspects about laboratory cometary models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades, astronomers have directed their attention toward the study of the solar system bodies, like comets, and they have made many discoveries. These studies have provided profound insights into the formation and earliest story of the solar system. A complementary role in the study of comets has been played by laboratory research on cometary models. In this paper, we discuss some aspects of laboratory experiments proposed in the literature, specially those associated with the chemical reactions that may occur in the comets. These comments are made the light of chemical composition, energy source, relevant chemical reactions and compounds detected in several laboratory simulations of cometary material. (author). Abstract only

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  20. The bioleaching of different sulfide concentrates using thermophilic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F.; Blázquez, M. L.; González, F.; Ballester, A.; Mier, J. L.

    1995-05-01

    The bioleaching of different mineral sulfide concentrates with thermophilic bacteria (genus Sulfolobus @#@) was studied. Since the use of this type of bacteria in leaching systems involves stirring and the control of temperature, the influence of the type of stirring and the pulp density on dissolution rates was studied in order to ascertain the optimum conditions for metal recovery. At low pulp densities, the dissolution kinetic was favored by pneumatic stirring, but for higher pulp densities, orbital stirring produced the best results. A comparative study of three differential concentrates, one mixed concentrate, and one global concentrate was made. Copper and iron extraction is directly influenced by bacterial activity, while zinc dissolution is basically due to an indirect mechanism that is activated in the presence of copper ions. Galvanic interactions between the different sulfides favors the selective bioleaching of some phases (sphalerite and chalcopyrite) and leads to high metal recovery rates. However, the formation of galvanic couples depends on the type of concentrate.

  1. TO THE QUESTION OF BIOSYNTHESIS OF CROTONALDEHYDE OF WINE YEAST AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA DURING VINIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushnereva E. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the possible pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde in wine production in the result of the activity of wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria. It established that exposure to exhaust gases, noble rot, pathogens and pests on grape plant does not lead to the biosynthesis of crotonaldehyde in grape berry. The experimental data to identify probable pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde during vinification has been presented. The effect of the test substance on the life of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria has been estimated

  2. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus;

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...... (geJ). and 2) a nuclease attacking nucleic acids intracellularly. The efficacy of these lethal genes has been assessed in model constructions with a synthetic lac promoter. By combination with the regulatory pathway of the TOL genes. a system was designed which allows bacterial growth in the presence...

  3. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. PMID:23916557

  4. Sewage-pollution indicator bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Rodrigues, V.; Alwares, E.; Rodrigues, C.; Baksh, R.; Jayan, S.; Mohandass, C.

    ?8 September 2002), and post-monsoon (12?15 March 2003). The schedule of observations is given in table 11.1. At each location, water samples were collected every three hours for 24 hours. The eight samples collected over a 24-hour period allowed us to examine..., small (less than 2 mm June 13, 2007 20:6 RPS rpb001ch11 SEWAGE-POLLUTION INDICATOR BACTERIA 117 Table 11.1 Sampling schedule followed for enumeration of bacterial populations during this study. Estuary Sampling dates Sampling strategy Mandovi 28?29 April...

  5. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease.

  6. Laboratory study on new particle formation from the reaction OH + SO2: influence of experimental conditions, H2O vapour, NH3 and the amine tert-butylamine on the overall process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Curtius

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation experiments starting from the reaction of OH radicals with SO2 have been performed in the IfT-LFT flow tube under atmospheric conditions at 293±0.5 K for a relative humidity of 13–61%. The presence of different additives (H2, CO, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene for adjusting the OH radical concentration and resulting OH levels in the range (4–300 ×105 molecule cm−3 did not influence the nucleation process itself. The number of detected particles as well as the threshold H2SO4 concentration needed for nucleation was found to be strongly dependent on the counting efficiency of the used counting devices. High-sensitivity particle counters allowed the measurement of freshly nucleated particles with diameters down to about 1.5 nm. A parameterization of the experimental data was developed using power law equations for H2SO4 and H2O vapour. The exponent for H2SO4 from different measurement series was in the range of 1.7–2.1 being in good agreement with those arising from analysis of nucleation events in the atmosphere. For increasing relative humidity, an increase of the particle number was observed. The exponent for H2O vapour was found to be 3.1 representing an upper limit. Addition of 1.2×1011 molecule cm−3 or 1.2×1012 molecule cm−3 of NH3 (range of atmospheric NH3 peak concentrations revealed that NH3 has a measureable, promoting effect on the nucleation rate under these conditions. The promoting effect was found to be more pronounced for relatively dry conditions, i.e. a rise of the particle number by 1–2 orders of magnitude at RH = 13% and only by a factor of 2–5 at RH = 47% (NH3 addition: 1.2×1012 molecule cm−3. Using the amine tert-butylamine instead of NH3, the enhancing impact of the base for nucleation and particle growth appears to be stronger. Tert-butylamine addition of about 1010 molecule cm−3 at RH = 13% enhances particle formation by about two orders of magnitude, while for NH3 only a small or negligible

  7. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems. The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  8. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  9. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to...

  10. Laboratory Demographics Lookup Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website provides demographic information about laboratories, including CLIA number, facility name and address, where the laboratory testing is performed, the...

  11. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  12. Geological Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers use computed tomography (CT) scanners at NETL’s Geological Services Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, to peer into geologic core samples to determine how...

  13. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  14. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...

  15. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  16. Moriah Wind System Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Moriah Wind System Laboratory provides in-service support for the more than 50 U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command ships on which...

  17. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  18. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  19. Mechanical Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Mechanical Testing Laboratory in Albany, OR, helps researchers investigate materials that can withstand the heat and pressure commonly found in fossil energy...

  20. High Bay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a specially constructed facility with elevated (37 feet) ceilings and an overhead catwalk, and which is dedicated to research efforts in reducing...

  1. Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) is part of the Aerospace Engineering Department and A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College...

  2. The effect of bacteria on diatom community structure - The 'antibiotics' approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.

    Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, pp. 84. Croft, M.T., Lawrence, A.D., Raux-Deery, E., Warren, M.J., Smith, A.G., 2005. Algae acquire vitamin B 12 through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. Nature 438, 90-93. Cullen, J.J., Lesser, M.P., 1991...

  3. A novel, optical, on-line bacteria sensor for monitoring drinking water quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højris, Bo; Christensen, Sarah Christine Boesgaard; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    Today, microbial drinking water quality is monitored through either time-consuming laboratory methods or indirect on-line measurements. Results are thus either delayed or insufficient to support proactive action. A novel, optical, on-line bacteria sensor with a 10-minute time resolution has been...... conditions such as pollution events in drinking water....

  4. Using a Microbial Physiologic and Genetic Approach to Investigate How Bacteria Sense Physical Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussi, María Alejandra; Actis, Luis A.; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was designed to illustrate how physical stimuli such as temperature and light are sensed and processed by bacteria to elaborate adaptive responses. In particular, we use the well-characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis" to show that temperature modulates gene expression, resulting ultimately in modification…

  5. Marine environmental pollution stress detection through direct viable counts of bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Kenkre, V.D.; Verlecar, X.N.

    of reliably measuring DVC was useful in realising decreased metabolic functioning of bacteria during pre-monsoon, a season where dispersion of land discharges/effluents is much lower. From laboratory and field analyses of this study it is ascertained that DVC...

  6. A novel, optical, on-line bacteria sensor for monitoring drinking water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højris, Bo; Christensen, Sarah Christine Boesgaard; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smith, Christian; Dahlqvist, Mathis

    2016-04-01

    Today, microbial drinking water quality is monitored through either time-consuming laboratory methods or indirect on-line measurements. Results are thus either delayed or insufficient to support proactive action. A novel, optical, on-line bacteria sensor with a 10-minute time resolution has been developed. The sensor is based on 3D image recognition, and the obtained pictures are analyzed with algorithms considering 59 quantified image parameters. The sensor counts individual suspended particles and classifies them as either bacteria or abiotic particles. The technology is capable of distinguishing and quantifying bacteria and particles in pure and mixed suspensions, and the quantification correlates with total bacterial counts. Several field applications have demonstrated that the technology can monitor changes in the concentration of bacteria, and is thus well suited for rapid detection of critical conditions such as pollution events in drinking water.

  7. Bacteria for power generation; Des bacteries pour produire de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timizar, N.

    2003-11-01

    The metabolism of some anaerobic bacteria allows to generate electrons thanks to some redox processes. Thus it is possible to produce clean and renewable electricity from sewage sludges, forest soils or marine sediments rich in bacteria and organic compounds. The bio-battery is today no more an utopia and several laboratories contribute to its permanent improvement. Recently, the properties of a bacteria named Rhodoferax ferriducens have been explored: this bacteria sticks directly on the anode, metabolizes the sugar and directly transfers its electrons to the anode without the need of an insoluble intermediate compound. Some poly-aniline conductive polymers when coated on a platinum anode can multiply the energy efficiency of the battery. Also, some possible substitutes to the costly platinum, used for the electrodes, are under study. Short paper. (J.S.)

  8. Ocean bacteria: performance on CODCr and NH4(+)-N removal in landfill leachate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yali; Yi, Aifei; Li, Haoran; Wang, Weida; Du, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the performance of mixed ocean bacteria, isolated from the ocean sediment, on landfill leachate treatment. In this treatment, ocean bacteria were the only constituent added to remove organics and NH(4)(+)-N. Given their considerable influence on wastewater purification, factors such as inoculum, initial pH, processing time and oxygen condition, were directly involved in this research. As indicated by laboratory test results, chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and NH(4)(+)-N removal could reach 94.45% and 67.87%, respectively, after 3 days of treatment, in conditions of natural pH 6.3 and with the application of oxygen. The volt-ampere characteristics of the bacteria solution verified the redox-active ability of the bacteria in landfill leachate treatment.

  9. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  10. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  11. Experiences with Remote Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Nafalski; Ozdemir Gol; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; José M. M. Ferreira; Ingvar Gustavsson

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on experiences of academics and students involved in using remote engineering laboratories both when students work individually or collaboratively with others on the experiments. Positives and negatives are highlighted and are contrasted with expectations of what the remote laboratories can bring into pedagogical environments. Recommendations and conclusions follow on how to better use the remote laboratories in teaching.

  12. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  13. Good Laboratory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  14. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Yanika; Grigonyte, Aurelija Marija; Boeing, Philipp; Wolfenden, Bethan; Smith, Patrick; Beaufoy, William; Rose, Simon; Ratisai, Tonderai; Zaikin, Alexey; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists' efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15-20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global 'do-it-yourself' research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i) that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii) that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrick(TM) standard and finally, (iii) that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrick(TM) formatted plasmid. Results. All species were stable

  15. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Yanika; Grigonyte, Aurelija Marija; Boeing, Philipp; Wolfenden, Bethan; Smith, Patrick; Beaufoy, William; Rose, Simon; Ratisai, Tonderai; Zaikin, Alexey; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists' efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15-20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global 'do-it-yourself' research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i) that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii) that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrick(TM) standard and finally, (iii) that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrick(TM) formatted plasmid. Results. All species were stable

  16. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeing, Philipp; Wolfenden, Bethan; Smith, Patrick; Beaufoy, William; Rose, Simon; Ratisai, Tonderai; Zaikin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists’ efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15–20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global ‘do-it-yourself’ research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i) that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii) that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrickTM standard and finally, (iii) that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrickTM formatted plasmid. Results. All species were stable

  17. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A. [INTEVEP S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  19. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation. Strahlenempfindlichkeit und Erholungsvermoegen von Mutanten der Hefe Saccharomyces cerevisiae im Vergleich zu Wildtyphefen unter Beruecksichtigung der Riesenzellbildung nach Roentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-06-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG).

  20. ADAPTATIONS OF INDIGENOUS BACTERIA TO FUEL CONTAMINATION IN KARST AQUIFERS IN SOUTH-CENTRAL KENTUCKY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Thomas D.; Metge, David W.; Daniel T. Agymang,; Bradley, Michael W.; Hileman, Gregg; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The karst aquifer systems in southern Kentucky can be dynamic and quick to change. Microorganisms that live in these unpredictable aquifers are constantly faced with environmental changes. Their survival depends upon adaptations to changes in water chemistry, taking advantage of positive stimuli and avoiding negative environmental conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2001 to determine the capability of bacteria to adapt in two distinct regions of water quality in a karst aquifer, an area of clean, oxygenated groundwater and an area where the groundwater was oxygen depleted and contaminated by jet fuel. Water samples containing bacteria were collected from one clean well and two jet fuel contaminated wells in a conduit-dominated karst aquifer. Bacterial concentrations, enumerated through direct count, ranged from 500,000 to 2.7 million bacteria per mL in the clean portion of the aquifer, and 200,000 to 3.2 million bacteria per mL in the contaminated portion of the aquifer over a twelve month period. Bacteria from the clean well ranged in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm, whereas bacteria from one fuel-contaminated well were generally larger, ranging in size from 0.2 to 3.9 mm. Also, bacteria collected from the clean well had a higher density and, consequently, were more inclined to sink than bacteria collected from contaminated wells. Bacteria collected from the clean portion of the karst aquifer were predominantly (,95%) Gram-negative and more likely to have flagella present than bacteria collected from the contaminated wells, which included a substantial fraction (,30%) of Gram-positive varieties. The ability of the bacteria from the clean portion of the karst aquifer to biodegrade benzene and toluene was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in laboratory microcosms. The rate of fuel biodegradation in laboratory studies was approximately 50 times faster under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic, sulfur-reducing conditions. The