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Sample records for bacteraemia anti-inflammatory soluble

  1. New nanomicelle curcumin formulation for ocular delivery: improved stability, solubility, and ocular anti-inflammatory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengshuang; Xin, Meng; Guo, Chuanlong; Lin, Guiming; Wu, Xianggen

    2017-11-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic curcumin formulation with high solubility, stability, and efficacy is needed for pharmaceutical use in clinics. The objective of this article was to describe a novel curcumin containing a nanomicelle formulation using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Nanomicelle curcumin was formulated and optimized and then further evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity/in vivo ocular irritation, in vitro cellular uptake/in vivo corneal permeation, and in vitro antioxidant activity/in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy. The solubility, chemical stability, and antioxidant activity were greatly improved after the encapsulation of the PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles. The nanomicelle curcumin ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and the nanomicelles are stable to the storage conditions, and it had good cellular tolerance. Nanomicelle curcumin also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo corneal permeation as well as improved anti-inflammatory efficacy when compared with a free curcumin solution. These findings indicate that nanomicelles could be promising topical delivery systems for the ocular administration of curcumin.

  2. Effect of Cyclodextrin Complexation of Curcumin on its Solubility and Antiangiogenic and Anti-inflammatory Activity in Rat Colitis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Vivek R.; Suresh, Sarasija; Devi, Kshama; Yadav, Seema

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to prepare and evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of cyclodextrin (CD) complex of curcumin for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in colitis-induced rat model. Inclusion complexes of curcumin were prepared by common solvent and kneading methods. These complexes were further evaluated for increase in solubility of poorly soluble curcumin. The inclusion complexes were characterized for enhancement in solubility, in vitro dissolution, surface morp...

  3. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junyan; Qiu Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: → Anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) is anti-inflammatory in a murine model. → TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo as expected from a sEHI. → TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. → TCC significantly repressed LPS-induced increased release of inflammatory cytokines.

  4. Effect of cyclodextrin complexation of curcumin on its solubility and antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity in rat colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek R; Suresh, Sarasija; Devi, Kshama; Yadav, Seema

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to prepare and evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of cyclodextrin (CD) complex of curcumin for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in colitis-induced rat model. Inclusion complexes of curcumin were prepared by common solvent and kneading methods. These complexes were further evaluated for increase in solubility of poorly soluble curcumin. The inclusion complexes were characterized for enhancement in solubility, in vitro dissolution, surface morphology, infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray studies. Solubility, phase solubility, and in vitro dissolution studies showed that curcumin has higher affinity for hydroxypropyl-beta-CD (HPbetaCD) than other CDs. HPbetaCD complex of curcumin was further investigated for its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity using chick embryo and rat colitis model. HPbetaCD complex of curcumin proved to be a potent angioinhibitory compound, as demonstrated by inhibition of angiogenesis in chorioallantoic membrane assay. Curcumin- and HPbetaCD-treated rats showed a faster weight gain compared to dextran sulfate solution (DSS) controls. Whole colon length appeared to be significantly longer in HPbetaCD-treated rats than pure curcumin and DSS controls. An additional finding in the DSS-treated rats was the predominance of eosinophils in the chronic cell infiltrate. Decreased mast cell numbers in the mucosa of the colon of CD of curcumin- and pure-curcumin-treated rats was observed. This study concluded that the degree of colitis caused by administration of DSS was significantly attenuated by CD of curcumin. Being a nontoxic natural dietary product, curcumin could be useful in the therapeutic strategy for IBD patients.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Water-Soluble Polysaccharide of Agaricus blazei Murill on Ovariectomized Osteopenic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of water-soluble polysaccharide of Agaricus blazei Murill (WSP-AbM on ovariectomized osteopenic rats. The rats were administered orally WSP-AbM (200 mg/kg BW for 8 weeks. Subsequent serum maleic dialdehyde (MDA level, total antioxidant status (TAOS, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB level, polymorphonuclear (PMN cells level, interleukin-1β (IL-1β level, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS level, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α level, adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. WSP-AbM administration markedly (P<0.05 decreased serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels and the expressions of ICAM-1, COX-2, and iNOS NF-κB compared with OVX rats. WSP-AbM administration alsomarkedly (P<0.05 decreased PMN infiltration. In conclusion, we observed that WSP-AbM supplementation had anti-inflammatory effects in a model of osteoporosis disease.

  6. Soluble Siglec-5 associates to PSGL-1 and displays anti-inflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Marion; Mezouar, Soraya; Pegon, Julie; Muczynski, Vincent; Adam, Frédéric; Bianchini, Elsa P.; Bazaa, Amine; Proulle, Valerie; Rupin, Alain; Paysant, Jerome; Panicot-Dubois, Laurence; Christophe, Olivier D.; Dubois, Christophe; Lenting, Peter J.; Denis, Cécile V.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between endothelial selectins and the leukocyte counter-receptor PSGL1 mediates leukocyte recruitment to inflammation sites. PSGL1 is highly sialylated, making it a potential ligand for Siglec-5, a leukocyte-receptor that recognizes sialic acid structures. Binding assays using soluble Siglec-5 variants (sSiglec-5/C4BP and sSiglec-5/Fc) revealed a dose- and calcium-dependent binding to PSGL1. Pre-treatment of PSGL1 with sialidase reduced Siglec-5 binding by 79 ± 4%. In confocal immune-fluorescence assays, we observed that 50% of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) simultaneously express PSGL1 and Siglec-5. Duolink-proximity ligation analysis demonstrated that PSGL1 and Siglec-5 are in close proximity (<40 nm) in 31 ± 4% of PBMCs. In vitro perfusion assays revealed that leukocyte-rolling over E- and P-selectin was inhibited by sSiglec-5/Fc or sSiglec-5/C4BP, while adhesion onto VCAM1 was unaffected. When applied to healthy mice (0.8 mg/kg), sSiglec-5/C4BP significantly reduced the number of rolling leukocytes under basal conditions (10.9 ± 3.7 versus 23.5 ± 9.3 leukocytes/field/min for sSiglec-5/C4BP-treated and control mice, respectively; p = 0.0093). Moreover, leukocyte recruitment was inhibited over a 5-h observation period in an in vivo model of TNFalpha-induced inflammation following injection sSiglec-5/C4BP (0.8 mg/kg). Our data identify PSGL1 as a ligand for Siglec-5, and soluble Siglec-5 variants appear efficient in blocking PSGL1-mediated leukocyte rolling and the inflammatory response in general. PMID:27892504

  7. Soluble Dietary Fibers Can Protect the Small Intestinal Mucosa Without Affecting the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Indomethacin in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    How to prevent the small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs is an urgent issue to be resolved. In the present study, we examined the effects of soluble dietary fibers on both anti-inflammatory and ulcerogenic effects of indomethacin in arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g were used. Arthritis was induced by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant (killed M. tuberculosis) into the plantar region of the right hindpaw. The animals were fed a regular powder diet for rats or a diet supplemented with soluble dietary fibers such as pectin or guar gum. Indomethacin was administered once a day for 3 days starting 14 days after the adjuvant injection, when marked arthritis was observed. The volumes of the hindpaw were measured before and after indomethacin treatment to evaluate the effect of indomethacin on edema. The lesions in the small intestine were examined 24 h after the final dosing of indomethacin. Hindpaw volume was increased about 3 times 14 days after injection of the adjuvant. Indomethacin (3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased hindpaw volume dose-dependently, but caused severe lesions in the small intestine at doses of 6 and 10 mg/kg. The addition of pectin (1-10 %) or guar gum (10 %) to the diet markedly decreased the lesion formation without affecting the anti-edema action of indomethacin. The same effects of pectin were observed when indomethacin was administered subcutaneously. It is suggested that soluble dietary fibers can prevent intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs without affecting the anti-inflammatory effect of these agents.

  8. Potential Eye Drop Based on a Calix[4]arene Nanoassembly for Curcumin Delivery: Enhanced Drug Solubility, Stability, and Anti-Inflammatory Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Giuseppe; Paterniti, Irene; Geraci, Corrada; Cunsolo, Francesca; Esposito, Emanuela; Cordaro, Marika; Blanco, Anna Rita; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Consoli, Grazia M L

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin is an Indian spice with a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities but poor aqueous solubility, rapid degradation, and low bioavailability that affect medical benefits. To overcome these limits in ophthalmic application, curcumin was entrapped in a polycationic calix[4]arene-based nanoaggregate by a simple and reproducible method. The calix[4]arene-curcumin supramolecular assembly (Calix-Cur) appeared as a clear colloidal solution consisting in micellar nanoaggregates with size, polydispersity index, surface potential, and drug loading percentage meeting the requirements for an ocular drug delivery system. The encapsulation in the calix[4]arene nanoassembly markedly enhanced the solubility, reduced the degradation, and improved the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin compared to free curcumin in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Calix-Cur did not compromise the viability of J774A.1 macrophages and suppressed pro-inflammatory marker expression in J774A.1 macrophages subjected to LPS-induced oxidative stress. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Calix-Cur reduced signs of inflammation in a rat model of LPS-induced uveitis when topically administrated in the eyes. Overall, the results supported the calix[4]arene nanoassembly as a promising nanocarrier for delivering curcumin to anterior ocular tissues.

  9. Antidiabetic, antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties of water and n-butanol soluble extracts from Saharian Anvillea radiata in high-fat-diet fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandouli, Chouaib; Cassien, Mathieu; Mercier, Anne; Delehedde, Caroline; Ricquebourg, Emilie; Stocker, Pierre; Mekaouche, Mourad; Leulmi, Zineb; Mechakra, Aicha; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Culcasi, Marcel; Pietri, Sylvia

    2017-07-31

    According to Saharian traditional medicine, Anvillea radiata Coss. & Dur. (Asteraceae) has been valued for treating a variety of ailments such as gastro-intestinal, liver and pulmonary diseases, and has gained awareness for its beneficial effect on postprandial hyperglycemia. However, to best of our knowledge, no detailed study of the antidiabetic curative effects of this plant has been conducted yet. To determine the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effect of dietary supplementation with Anvillea radiata extracts on high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice in relation with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, pancreatic beta-cells and skeletal muscle protection, and digestive enzyme inhibiting properties. Six extracts (water soluble and organic) from aerial parts of the plant were analyzed phytochemically (total phenolic and flavonoid content) and screened for in vitro superoxide (by chemiluminescence) and hydroxyl radical (by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping) scavenging, antioxidant (DPPH, TRAP and ORAC assays), xanthine oxidase, metal chelating, α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory property, and protective effects on copper-induced lipoprotein oxidation. Then selected hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts were assessed for toxicity in normal human lung fibroblasts and A549 cancer cells using FMCA and MTT assays. Two water-soluble extracts having the best overall properties were assessed for their (i) protective effect at 1-15µg/mL on metabolic activity of rat insulinoma-derived INS-1 cells exposed to hyperglycemic medium, and (ii) acute hypoglycemic effect on 16-weeks HFD-induced diabetic mice. Then diabetic mice were administered HFD supplemented by extracts (up to 150mg/kg/day) for 12 additional weeks using standard diet as control and the antidiabetic drug, metformin (150mg/kg), as positive control. Then the antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of extracts were determined. Of the highly efficient

  10. Systemic levels of the anti-inflammatory decoy receptor soluble RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products) are decreased in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; Otoni, Cristiane C; Jergens, Albert E; Grützner, Niels; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-10-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common condition in dogs, and a dysregulated innate immunity is believed to play a major role in its pathogenesis. S100A12 is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, which is involved in phagocyte activation and is increased in serum/fecal samples from dogs with IBD. S100A12 binds to the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a pattern-recognition receptor, and results of studies in human patients with IBD and other conditions suggest a role of RAGE in chronic inflammation. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE), a decoy receptor for inflammatory proteins (e.g., S100A12) that appears to function as an anti-inflammatory molecule, was shown to be decreased in human IBD patients. This study aimed to evaluate serum sRAGE and serum/fecal S100A12 concentrations in dogs with IBD. Serum and fecal samples were collected from 20 dogs with IBD before and after initiation of medical treatment and from 15 healthy control dogs. Serum sRAGE and serum and fecal S100A12 concentrations were measured by ELISA, and were compared between dogs with IBD and healthy controls, and between dogs with a positive outcome (i.e., clinical remission, n=13) and those that were euthanized (n=6). The relationship of serum sRAGE concentrations with clinical disease activity (using the CIBDAI scoring system), serum and fecal S100A12 concentrations, and histologic disease severity (using a 4-point semi-quantitative grading system) was tested. Serum sRAGE concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with IBD than in healthy controls (p=0.0003), but were not correlated with the severity of histologic lesions (p=0.4241), the CIBDAI score before (p=0.0967) or after treatment (p=0.1067), the serum S100A12 concentration before (p=0.9214) and after treatment (p=0.4411), or with the individual outcome (p=0.4066). Clinical remission and the change in serum sRAGE concentration after treatment were not significantly associated (p=0.5727); however, serum s

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of chloroform soluble fraction from Perilla frutescens britton leaves produced by radiation breeding in RAW264.7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Yun Ho; So, Yang Kang; Kim, Jin Baek; Jin, Chang Hyun [Advance Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Soo [Dept. Food Science and Technology Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Young [Freshwater Bioresources Utilization Division, Nakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The present study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of each solvent fraction of a mutant Perilla frutescens produced by radiation breeding. Following extraction with 80% methanol, P. frutescens was fractionated in the order of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol; the chloroform fraction exhibited less cytotoxicity, the greatest inhibitory effect on the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the highest rate of inhibition on the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and interferon-β (IFN-β). The chloroform fraction also suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reduced the activation of nuclear factor-{sub κ}B (NF-{sub κ}B) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the presence of corosolic acid in the chloroform fraction was identifed. Taken together, the present fndings indicate that the chloroform fraction obtained from mutant P. frutescens inhibited NO production in LPSstimulated RAW264.7 cells via the suppression of iNOS expression and the inactivation of NF-{sub κ}B.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2017-01-01

    and IL-10 is provoked by exercise and exerts direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra, thereby limiting IL-1β signalling. Moreover, muscle-derived IL-6 appears to have direct anti-inflammatory effects and serves as a mechanism to improve glucose tolerance....... In addition, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of long-term exercise are mediated via improvements in body composition. CONCLUSION: Physical activity represents a natural, strong anti-inflammatory strategy with minor side effects and should be integrated in the management of patients with cardiometabolic...

  13. Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crude methanolic extracts of leaves of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were evaluated for its anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities. When given orally to rats at dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg, the extract showed a significant (P<0.001) anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced paw edema in rats ...

  14. An anti-inflammatory principle from cactus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E H; Kahng, J H; Lee, S H; Shin, K H

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies, the ethanol extract of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) showed potent anti-inflammatory action. In the present study, following fractionation of the methanol extract of cactus stems guided by adjuvant-induced chronic inflammation model in mice, an active anti-inflammatory principle has been isolated and identified as beta-sitosterol.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of Zea mays L. husk extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Hyoyoung; Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jung-A; Kim, Mi Ok; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2016-08-19

    Zea mays L. (Z. mays) has been used for human consumption in the various forms of meal, cooking oil, thickener in sauces and puddings, sweetener in processed food and beverage products, bio-disel. However, especially, in case of husk extract of Z. mays, little is known about its anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, in this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of Z. mays husk extract (ZMHE) and its mechanisms of action were investigated. The husks of Z. Mays were harvested in kangwondo, Korea. To assess the anti-inflammatory activities of ZMHE, we examined effects of ZMHE on nitric oxide (NO) production, and release of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and eotaxin-1. The expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene was also determined by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. To determine its mechanisms of action, a luciferase reporter assay for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) was introduced. ZMHE inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of NO in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of iNOS gene was reduced, as confirmed by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. Effects of ZMHE on the AP-1 and NF-kB promoters were examined to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory activity. Activation of AP-1 and NF-kB promoters induced by LPS was significantly reduced by ZMHE treatment. In addition, LPS-induced production of sICAM-1 and IL-4-induced production of eotaxin-1 were all reduced by ZMHE. Our results indicate that ZMHE has anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating the expression of iNOS gene and its downregulation is mediated by inhibiting NF-kB and AP-1 signaling.

  16. EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY, ANTIBACTERIAL AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Anti-inflammatory activity was determined using a LOX-inhibitor screening assay kit according to the ... and the Ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Antimicrobial activities ..... the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the.

  17. Tomato leaves methanol extract possesses anti- inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... demonstrated, the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato leaves and its associated molecular mechanisms have not yet .... dissolved in 10% of culture-grade dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO; Sigma-. Aldrich .... In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  20. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek J. Zijlstra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of β-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 are discussed.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Benfotiamine are Mediated Through the Regulation of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Ramana, Kota V

    2011-01-01

    Benfotiamine, a lipid-soluble analogue of vitamin B1, is a potent anti-oxidant that is used as a food supplement for the treatment of diabetic complications. Our recent study indicates a novel role of benfotiamine in the prevention of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytotoxicity and inflammatory response in murine macrophages. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how benfotiamine mediates anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory role of...

  2. ANTI INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF MORINGA OLIEFERA. LAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K.N. Venkataswera; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Loganathan, V.; Nathan, S. Shanmuganathan

    1999-01-01

    The aqueous and ethanolic (90%) extract of the leaves of M.Oliera Lam (Fam: Moringaceae) were studied for their anti inflammatory action in ale albino rats. Two extracts exhibited maximum action within two hours of challenge. The aqueous extract sowed significant (P<0.01) odema suppression similar to that of Ibuprofen at the first hour of carrageenan injection. The results confirms the folkers claim of the plant. PMID:22556890

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Paresh; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Mohanty, Priya; Ghanim, Husam

    2007-07-01

    This review deals with the recent observations on the pro-inflammatory effects of glucose and the anti-inflammatory actions of insulin. Apart from being novel, they are central to our understanding of why hyperglycemia is a prognosticator of bad clinical outcomes including patients with acute coronary syndromes, stroke and in patients in the intensive care unit. The pro-inflammatory effect of glucose as well as that of other macronutrients including fast food meals provides the basis of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation in the obese and their propensity to atherosclerotic disease. The anti-inflammatory action of insulin provides a neutralizing effect to balance macronutrient induced inflammation on the one hand and the possibility of using insulin as an anti-inflammatory drug on the other. The actions of macronutrients and insulin described above explain why insulin resistant states like obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and atherosclerosis. They also suggest that insulin may be antiatherogenic.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory constituents of leaf extracts of Anacardium occidentale L. in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awakan, Oluwakemi Josephine; Malomo, Sylvia Omonirume; Adejare, Abdullahi Adeyinka; Igunnu, Adedoyin; Atolani, Olubunmi; Adebayo, Abiodun Humphrey; Owoyele, Bamidele Victor

    2018-01-01

    Anacardium occidentale L. leaf is useful in the treatment of inflammation and asthma, but the bioactive constituents responsible for these activities have not been characterized. Therefore, this study was aimed at identifying the bioactive constituent(s) of A. occidentale ethanolic leaf extract (AOEL) and its solvent-soluble portions, and evaluating their effects on histamine-induced paw edema and bronchoconstriction. The bronchodilatory effect was determined by measuring the percentage protection provided by plant extracts in the histamine-induced bronchoconstriction model in guinea pigs. The anti-inflammatory effect of the extracts on histamine-induced paw edema in rats was determined by measuring the increase in paw diameter, after which the percent edema inhibition was calculated. The extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the bioactive constituents. Column chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used respectively to isolate and characterize the constituents. The bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated bioactive constituent were evaluated. Histamine induced bronchoconstriction in the guinea pigs and edema in the rat paw. AOEL, hexane-soluble portion of AOEL, ethyl acetate-soluble portion of AOEL, and chloroform-soluble portion of AOEL significantly increased bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities (P 9-octadecenamide) was identified as the most abundant compound in the extracts and was isolated. Oleamide significantly increased bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities by 32.97% and 98.41%, respectively (P < 0.05). These results indicate that oleamide is one of the bioactive constituents responsible for the bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activity of A. occidentale leaf, and can therefore be employed in the management of bronchoconstriction and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Lippia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, S; Meckes, M; Pérez, C; Susunaga, A; Zavala, M A

    2005-10-31

    Lippia dulcis hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in several animal models. Hexane extract showed to be inactive, but the ethanol extract at doses of 400 mg/kg produced significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw oedema and reduced the weight of cotton pellet-induced granuloma, moreover, the topical application of 0.5 mg/ear of this extract inhibited the edema induced with TPA by 49.13%, an effect which is of less intensity than that produced by indomethacine at the same dose.

  6. Novel anti-inflammatory agents in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukides, Stelios; Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD related inflammation is less responsive to inhaled steroids compared to asthma. There are three major novel anti-inflammatory approaches to the management of COPD. The first approach is phosphodiesterase...... on these strategies exist at the moment. A third potential approach involves novel agents whose mechanism of action is closely related to COPD mechanisms and pathophysiology. Such novel treatments are of great interest since they may treat both COPD and co-morbidities. Several novel agents are currently under...

  7. Ursolic Acid and Oleanolic Acid: Pentacyclic Terpenoids with Promising Anti-Inflammatory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Sharma, Ajay; Tuli, Hardeep S; Punia, Sandeep; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived products are not only served as dietary components but also used to treat and prevent the inflammatory associated diseases like cancer. Among the natural products pentacyclic terpenoids including ursolic acid and oleanolic acid are considered as the promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. The current review extensively discusses the anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential of these pentacyclic moieties along with their proposed mechanisms of action. Furthermore, the relevant patents have also been listed to present the health benefits of these promising therapeutic agents to pin down the inflammatory diseases. Expert opinion: Pentacyclic terpenoids are known to negatively down-regulate a variety of extracellular and intracellular molecular targets associated with disease progression. The major anti-inflammatory effects of these molecules have been found to be mediated via inactivation of NFkB, STAT3/6, Akt/mTOR pathways. A number of patents on UA & OA based moieties have been reported between 2010 and 2016. Still there have been only a few compounds which meet the need of sufficient hydro solubility and bioavailability along with higher anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, it is essential to develop novel derivatives of terpenpoids which may not only overcome the solubility issues but also may improve their therapeutic effects. In addition, scientific community may utilize nanotechnology based drug delivery systems so as to increase the bio-availability, selectivity and dosages related problems.

  8. Nature is the best source of anti-inflammatory drugs: indexing natural products for their anti-inflammatory bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Miran; Rayan, Mahmoud; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Abdallah, Ziyad; Rayan, Anwar

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to index natural products for less expensive preventive or curative anti-inflammatory therapeutic drugs. A set of 441 anti-inflammatory drugs representing the active domain and 2892 natural products representing the inactive domain was used to construct a predictive model for bioactivity-indexing purposes. The model for indexing the natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity was constructed using the iterative stochastic elimination algorithm (ISE). ISE is capable of differentiating between active and inactive anti-inflammatory molecules. By applying the prediction model to a mix set of (active/inactive) substances, we managed to capture 38% of the anti-inflammatory drugs in the top 1% of the screened set of chemicals, yielding enrichment factor of 38. Ten natural products that scored highly as potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates are disclosed. Searching the PubMed revealed that only three molecules (Moupinamide, Capsaicin, and Hypaphorine) out of the ten were tested and reported as anti-inflammatory. The other seven phytochemicals await evaluation for their anti-inflammatory activity in wet lab. The proposed anti-inflammatory model can be utilized for the virtual screening of large chemical databases and for indexing natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity.

  9. Medicinal herbs as possible sources of anti-inflammatory products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Corciovă

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants constitute an inexhaustible source of bioactive compounds that can be valuable for research in the chemistry field of anti-inflammatory compounds. This review describes several plants from international and national flora that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity in various clinical trials. The paper includes: general aspects regarding the vegetal source, compounds responsible for anti-inflammatory activity, mechanism of action and clinical trials carried out with extracts or products containing standardized extracts.

  10. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ghasemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil’s claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle.

  11. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the leaf part of the plant for analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The ethanol extract of Ficus iteophylla leaves (100, 200, and 400mgkg-1, i.p) was evaluated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The analgesic effect was studied using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction ...

  12. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the possible anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of ethanolic extract of Pedalium murex Linn. fruits in selected experimental animal models. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pedalium murex Linn., with doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg, p.o., was evaluated by Lambda-carrageenan ...

  13. Assessment of anti-inflammatory potential of Sesbania bispinosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim and objectives: Leaf extracts and fractions of S. bispinosa were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity in mice using acute and chronic anti-inflammatory models with aspirin as a reference drug. Materials and methods: Methanol, chloroform and hexane were used to prepare leaf extracts by soxhlet extraction method, ...

  14. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Cyphostemma vogelii (Hook

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rita

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Key words: Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, mice, Cyphostemma vogelii, nociception. ... steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are considered the drugs of ..... 44-55. Hughes H, Lang M (1983). Control of pain in dogs and cats In: Kitchell. R, Erickson H (eds.) Animal pain. Baltimore Waverly press. pp. 207-.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Amorphophallus bulbifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the Amorphophallus Bulbifer in Wistar rats and mice. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of the hydroalcohol extract of A. bulbifer whole plant at dose levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. in rats was determined with a plethysmograph paw volume ...

  16. Bioassay guided isolation and identification of anti-inflammatory and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study describes the anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity and lipophilic profile with acute toxicological studies of Urtica dioica. Successive extraction of the leaves with organic solvents of increasing polarity and their screening for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity was assessed. Hexane extract ...

  17. Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros Cordifolia Extract. S Das, PK Haldar, G Pramanik, SP Panda, S Bera. Abstract. In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti- inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of stem bark of Diospyros cordifolia (MEDC) Roxb. The analgesic effects of the ...

  18. Phenotypic changes in neutrophils related to anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A E; Bayley, D L; Mikami, M; Llewellyn-Jones, C G; Stockley, R A

    2000-01-03

    Previous work from the group has shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents given to volunteers and patients inhibit PMN function possibly by affecting the developing neutrophil during the differentiation process. In this study indomethacin treatment in vivo reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and proteolytic degradation of fibronectin, with a maximal effect after 14 days. Stimulated neutrophil adherence to fibronectin was also reduced but this was not due to quantitative changes in beta(2) integrin expression or function. L-Selectin expression on resting and stimulated neutrophils was increased after 14 days and there was a small decrease in plasma levels of soluble L-selectin. These effects, however, could not be reproduced by treatment of neutrophils with indomethacin in vitro, suggesting they are due to effects on differentiating/maturing PMNs. In an attempt to interpret these changes, studies were performed with dexamethasone, which is known to alter neutrophil function and kinetics. Dexamethasone treatment reduced chemotaxis and increased superoxide generation after 1 day and was associated with increased expression of activated beta(2) integrins and reduced L-selectin expression on resting neutrophils. This suggests the appearance of mainly 'activated' cells as a result of demargination and indicates that the effects of indomethacin are distinctive and not related to changes in compartmentalisation.

  19. In vitro studies on the relationship between the anti-inflammatory activity of Physalis peruviana extracts and the phagocytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Willington; Ospina, Luis Fernando; Granados, Diana; Delgado, Gabriela

    2010-03-01

    The study of plants used in traditional medicine has drawn the attention of researchers as an alternative in the development of new therapeutics agents, such as the American Solanaceae Physalis peruviana, which has significant anti-inflammatory activity. The Physalis peruviana anti-inflammatory effect of ethanol or ether calyces extracts on the phagocytic process was assessed by using an in vitro phagocytosis model (Leishmania panamensis infection to murine macrophages). The Physalis peruviana extracts do not inhibit microorganism internalization and have no parasiticide effect. Most ET and EP extracts negatively affected the parasite's invasion of macrophages (Infected cells increased.). This observation might result from a down-regulation of the macrophage's microbicide ability associated with a selective reduction of proinflammatory cytokines levels. Physalis peruviana's anti-inflammatory activity described in this model is related to an immunomodulatory effect exerted on macrophages infected, which directly or indirectly "blocks" their ability to secrete soluble proinflammatory mediators.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Amorphophallus bulbifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    time of the animals treated with either standard or extract. Pentazocin ... standard. Results: The extract showed significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities at the two test dose ..... effectiveness of analgesic agents in the tail- flick pain ...

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treatment of acute gout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Durme, Caroline M. P. G.; Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) associated with better outcomes than cyclooxygenase inhibitors, glucocorticoids, IL-1 inhibitors or placebo in the treatment of acute gout? NSAIDs are not significantly associated with a difference in pain reduction compared with cyclooxygenase

  3. anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: bedisag@yahoo.fr. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES: CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF OCIMUM GRATISSIMUM,. EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA AND CYMBOPOGON GIGANTEUS INHIBITED. LIPOXYGENASE L-1 AND CYCLOOXYGENASE OF ...

  4. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  5. Assessment of anti-inflammatory potential of Sesbania bispinosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ganesh D. Boddawar

    2015-12-23

    Dec 23, 2015 ... anti-inflammatory remedy as it was found to possess higher ... of cell injury, & remove necrotic cells that causes inflamma- ... need of time to invent and evaluate more and more herbal .... serotonin on vascular permeability.

  6. Advancements in anti-inflammatory therapy for dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Erin; Narayanan, Srihari

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this literature review is to discuss recent discoveries in the pathophysiology of dry eye and the subsequent evolution of diagnostic and management techniques. The mechanisms of various anti-inflammatory treatments are reviewed, and the efficacy of common pharmacologic agents is assessed. Anti-inflammatory therapy is evaluated in terms of its primary indications, target population, and utility within a clinical setting. The Medline PubMed database and the World Wide Web were searched for current information regarding dry eye prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. After an analysis of the literature, major concepts were integrated to generate an updated portrayal of the status of dry eye syndrome. Inflammation appears to play a key role in perpetuating and sustaining dry eye. Discoveries of inflammatory markers found within the corneal and conjunctival epithelium of dry eye patients have triggered recent advancements in therapy. Pharmacologic anti-inflammatory therapy for dry eye includes 2 major categories: corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. Fatty acid and androgen supplementation and oral antibiotics have also shown promise in dry eye therapy because of their anti-inflammatory effects. Anti-inflammatory pharmacologic agents have shown great success in patients with moderate to severe dry eye when compared with alternative treatment modalities. A deeper understanding of the link between inflammation and dry eye validates the utilization of anti-inflammatory therapy in everyday optometric practice.

  7. SYNTHESIS NEW POTENTIAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AGENT SODIUM SALT OF PENTAGAMAVUNON-0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enade Perdana Istyastono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the response of living tissues to injury. The process affects physiological changes such as erythema, edema, asthma and fever. Non-steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs have been developed since they could inhibit inflammation process because of its ability to inhibit biosynthesis of prostaglandin, one of inflammation mediators, through inhibition of cyclooxigenase (COX enzymes. Molecules, which have been reported having anti-inflammatory activity, for example, are curcumin, some curcumin derivatives and curcumin analogues. One of curcumin analogues that has been  developed is pentagamavunon-0 (PGV-0 whose IUPAC name is 2,5-bis(4'-hidroxy-3'-methoxy-benzylidenecyclo-pentanone. But PGV-0, which is like curcumin, practically insoluble in water, so it causes problems in the development. The aim of this research is to synthesize a derivative of PGV-0, a natrium salt of PGV-0 (natrium pentagamavunonate-0/Na-pentagamavunonate-0, which is hoped to have a better anti-inflammatory activity and solubility in water than PGV-0. PGV-0 was synthesized by reacting vanillin and cyclopentanone catalized by acid. Na-pentagamavunonate-0 was synthesized with PGV-0 as a starting material using an appropriate method. This research was able to synthesize new compound that was estimated as a natrium salt of PGV-0 (natrium pentagamavunonate-0/Na-pentagamavunonate-0.   Keywords: Curcumin, PGV-0, Na-pentagamavunonate-0, anti-inflammation

  8. Curcumin: An Anti-Inflammatory Molecule from a Curry Spice on the Path to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusotam Basnet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  9. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Purusotam; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2011-06-03

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice) showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  10. Skeletal muscle secretome in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a pivotal anti-inflammatory role of adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, S; Abou-Samra, M; Boursereau, R; Noel, L; Brichard, S M

    2017-07-01

    Persistent inflammation exacerbates the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The hormone, adiponectin (ApN), which is decreased in the metabolic syndrome, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties on skeletal muscle and alleviates the dystrophic phenotype of mdx mice. Here, we investigate whether ApN retains its anti-inflammatory action in myotubes obtained from DMD patients. We unravel the underlying mechanisms by studying the secretome and the early events of ApN. Primary cultures of myotubes from DMD and control patients were treated or not by ApN after an inflammatory challenge. Myokines secreted in medium were identified by cytokine antibody-arrays and ELISAs. The early events of ApN signaling were assessed by abrogating selected genes. ApN retained its anti-inflammatory properties in both dystrophic and control myotubes. Profiling of secretory products revealed that ApN downregulated the secretion of two pro-inflammatory factors (TNFα and IL-17A), one soluble receptor (sTNFRII), and one chemokine (CCL28) in DMD myotubes, while upregulating IL-6 that exerts some anti-inflammatory effects. These changes were explained by pretranslational mechanisms. Earlier events of the ApN cascade involved AdipoR1, the main receptor for muscle, and the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α axis leading, besides alteration of the myokine profile, to the upregulation of utrophin A (a dystrophin analog). ApN retains its beneficial properties in dystrophic muscles by activating the AdipoR1-AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway, thereby inducing a shift in the secretion of downstream myokines toward a less inflammatory profile while upregulating utrophin. ApN, the early events of the cascade and downstream myokines may be therapeutic targets for the management of DMD.

  11. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, C G; Deepak, M; Viswanatha, G L; Savinay, G; Hanumantharaju, V; Rajendra, C E; Halemani, Praveen D

    2013-04-13

    To evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica in in vitro conditions. In vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition assays were used to evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities respectively. Methanolic extract (MEMI), successive water extract (SWMI) and ethyl acetate fraction (EMEMI), n-butanol fraction (BMEMI) and water soluble fraction (WMEMI) of methanolic extract were evaluated along with respective reference standards. In in vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have offered significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) values of 13.37, 3.55 and 14.19 μg/mL respectively. Gallic acid, a reference standard showed significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) value of 1.88 and found to be more potent compared to all the extracts and fractions. In in vitro LOX inhibition assay, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have showed significant inhibition of LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) values of 96.71, 63.21 and 107.44 μg/mL respectively. While, reference drug Indomethacin also offered significant inhibition against LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) of 57.75. Furthermore, MEMI was found to more potent than SWMI and among the fractions EMEMI was found to possess more potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. These findings suggest that the MEMI and EMEMI possess potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in in vitro conditions. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilization of spray drying technique for improvement of dissolution and anti-inflammatory effect of Meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Gamal; Badran, Mohamed; Zoheir, Khairy; Alomrani, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Meloxicam (MLX) is a poorly water-soluble non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The main objective of the present work was to enhance the dissolution of MLX and thus its bioavailability by the aid of additives. The novelty of this work rises from the utilization of spray drying technology to produce micro particulates solid dispersion systems containing MLX in the presence of small amount of additives. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Scan Electron Microscope (SEM) were used for studying the physico-chemical and morphological properties of MLX samples. The dissolution of MLX samples was investigated in two different pH media. The morphology of MLX solid dispersion micro-particles was spherical in shape according to SEM. FT-IR profiles indicated that a complex was formed between MLX and the additives. DSC patterns of the MLX micro-particles suggested a reduction in the crystallinity of MLX and probability of presence of an interaction between MLX and the additives. The rate of dissolution of the spray-dried MLX enhanced as compared with the unprocessed MLX in both acidic and neutral media. It was found that 100% of the added MLX released within 5 min in phosphate buffer dissolution medium (pH 7.4) compared to that of the unprocessed MLX (15% in 60 min). Such increase rate in the dissolution of the spray dried MLX could be attributed to the increase in wettability of MLX particles and the hydrophilic nature of the additives. The anti-inflammatory effect of the spray dried MLX was explored using formalin induced rat paw edema model. The spray-dried samples showed an increase in the anti-inflammatory activity of MLX as compared to the unprocessed MLX. This work reveals that the spray drying technique is suitable for preparation of micro-particles with improved dissolution and anti-inflammatory effect of MLX.

  13. Anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries - friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute and chronic tendon injuries are very common among athletes and in sedentary population. Most physicians prescribe anti-inflammatory managements to relieve the worst symptoms of swelling and pain, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and physical therapies. However, experimental research shows that pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins may play important regulatory roles in tendon healing. Noticeably nearly all cases of chronic tendon injuries we treat as specialists have received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by their physician, suggesting that there might be a potential interaction in some of these cases turning a mild inflammatory tendon injury into chronic tendinopathy in predisposed individuals. We are aware of the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids may well have a positive effect on the pain control in the clinical situation whilst negatively affect the structural healing. It follows that a comprehensive evaluation of anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries is needed and any such data would have profound clinical and health economic importance.

  14. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models.

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of Shirishavaleha: An Ayurvedic compound formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shyamlal Singh; Galib; Ravishankar, B; Prajapati, P K; Ashok, B K; Varun, B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Shirishavaleha prepared from two different parts of Shirisha (Albizia lebbeck Benth.), viz. the bark (Twak) and the heartwood (Sara). The activity was screened in the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model in albino rats. The raw materials were collected and authenticated in the university and the trial formulations were prepared by following standard classical guidelines. Randomly selected animals were divided into four groups of six animals each. The test drugs were administered orally at a dose of 1.8 g/kg for 5 days. Phenylbutazone was used as the standard anti-inflammatory drug for comparison. Between the two different test samples studied, the formulation made from heartwood showed a weak anti-inflammatory activity in this model while that made from the bark produced a considerable suppression of edema after 6 h. It appears that the bark sample would be preferable for clinical use.

  16. Kalanchosine dimalate, an anti-inflammatory salt from Kalanchoe brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sônia Soares; de Souza, Maria de Lourdes Mendes; Ibrahim, Tereza; de Melo, Giany Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Paula; Guette, Catherine; Férézou, Jean-Pierre; Koatz, Vera Lucia G

    2006-05-01

    This report describes the isolation and characterization of kalanchosine dimalate (KMC), an anti-inflammatory salt from the fresh juice of the aerial parts of Kalanchoe brasiliensis. KMC comprises the new metabolite kalanchosine (1) and malic acid (2) in a 1:2 stoichiometric ratio. Kalanchosine (1), 3,6-diamino-4,5-dihydroxyoctanedioic acid, is the first naturally occurring dimeric bis(gamma-hydroxy-beta-amino acid) and is at least partially responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of K. brasiliensis.

  17. Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent anti-inflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler A.; Sohn, Johann; Inman, Wayne D.; Bjeldanes, Leonard F.; Rayburn, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Extracts of four plant portions (roots, stems, leaves and flowers) of Urtica dioica, (the stinging nettle) were prepared using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) involving water, hexanes, methanol and dichloromethane. The extracts were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity in an NF-κB luciferase and MTT assay using macrophage immune (RAW264.7) cells. A standardized commercial ethanol extract of nettle leaves were also evaluated. The methanolic extract of the flowering portions displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity on par with the standard anti-inflammatory agent celastrol (1) but was moderately cytotoxic. Alternatively, the polar extracts (water, methanol, ethanol) of the roots, stems and leaves plant portions displayed moderate to weak anti-inflammatory activity, while the methanol and especially the water soluble extracts exhibited noticeable cytotoxicity. In contrast, the lipophilic dichloromethane extracts of the roots, stems and leaves exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effects ≥ 1 with minimal cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 cells. Collectively these results suggest that using lipophilic extracts of the roots, stems or leaves of stinging nettle may be more effective then traditional tinctures (water, methanol, ethanol) to undergo clinical evaluations for the treatment of inflammatory disorders including arthritis. A chemical investigation into the lipophillic extracts of stinging nettle to identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for their observed anti-inflammatory activity is further warranted. PMID:23092723

  18. Inclusion Complexes of Copaiba (Copaifera multijuga Hayne Oleoresin and Cyclodextrins: Physicochemical Characterization and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Gabriel de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexation with cyclodextrins (CDs is a technique that has been extensively used to increase the aqueous solubility of oils and improve their stability. In addition, this technique has been used to convert oils into solid materials. This work aims to develop inclusion complexes of Copaifera multijuga oleoresin (CMO, which presents anti-inflammatory activity, with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD by kneading (KND and slurry (SL methods. Physicochemical characterization was performed to verify the occurrence of interactions between CMO and the cyclodextrins. Carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in mice was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of CMO alone as well as complexed with CDs. Physicochemical characterization confirmed the formation of inclusion complex of CMO with both β-CD and HP-β-CD by KND and SL methods. Carrageenan-induced paw edema test showed that the anti-inflammatory activity of CMO was maintained after complexation with β-CD and HP-β-CD, where they were able to decrease the levels of nitrite and myeloperoxidase. In conclusion, this study showed that it is possible to produce inclusion complexes of CMO with CDs by KND and SL methods without any change in CMO’s anti-inflammatory activity.

  19. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of the volatile oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the qualitative methods used for the control of the antimicrobial activity, the method of diffusion on filter paper discs proved to be the most efficient, the results correlating well with the MIC. Our studies have demonstrated the efficiency of the natural compounds' of T. majus L. in anti-inflammatory treatments in animals.

  20. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background of study: Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances which can be used to treat various infectious diseases. Aim: The study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Justicia secunda Vahl leaf. Methods: The acute ...

  1. Phytochemical, Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Effects Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical screening was carried out on the ethylacetate portion of the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Pseudocedrella kotschyii and then evaluated for its analgesic (acetic acid-induced writhing) and anti-inflammatory (raw egg albumin-induced oedema) activities in mice and rats respectively. Phytochemical screening ...

  2. analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-30

    Apr 30, 2015 ... The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula ... Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, ... albino mice, while the phytochemical screening showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins and glycosides.

  3. The Phytochemical Constituents, Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Jatropha curcas were investigated in mice and rats respectively. The phytochemical screening of the extract was also carried out. The analgesic effect was determined by acetic acid – induced writhing test in mice. While the anti- ...

  4. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Eriobotrya japonica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: In the present work we determined phenolic and flavonoids content of Eriobotrya japonica leaves extracts and fractions and their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objectives: To evaluate the inhibition of inflammatory PLA2 and antioxidant effects of extracts and fractions from Erio-.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective potentials of the aerial parts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Toxicity of S. villosa extract was evaluated in rats. ... Conclusion: The results suggest that S. villosa possesses anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities ..... membrane integrity of hepatocytes of the CCl4- ... stabilization of endoplasmic reticulum that is ..... Erythrocytes Subjected to Oxidative Stress Phytother.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of water extract from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to evaluate the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of the water extract of the plant in experimental animal models (anti-inflammatory action by carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, the analgesic activity by acetic acid-induced writhing response method. The water extract of I. asarifolia in doses of ...

  7. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous extract of Hippobromus pauciflorus (L.f) Radlk leaves at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight were evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in male rats. Antiinflammatory activity was studied by using carrageenan and histamine induced oedema right hind paw volume while the ...

  8. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bovine mastitis is one of the most relevant and problematic diseases to treat and control in practice. Puxing Yinyang San (PYS) is a compound of herbs to treat bovine mastitis in China. This study was performed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of PYS in mice and rats. Materials and ...

  9. Synthesis, Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Microbial infections often produce pain and inflammation. Chemotherapeutic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed simultaneously in normal practice. The compound possessing all three activities is not common.The purpose of the present study was to examine whether molecular modification ...

  10. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of coral reef associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chellaram

    2012-10-04

    Oct 4, 2012 ... pharmacologists in 1989 and the potential of the oceans became clear with many unique bioactive substances .... their general behavior. Anti-inflammatory potential of the 100% acetone ... covery from the world's oceans has been accelerated by the chemical uniqueness of marine organisms and by the.

  11. anti-inflammatory activity of selected nigerian medicinal plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of nineteen plant species from an inventory of Nigerian medicinal plants were screened for activity in two in vitro anti-inflammatory model test systems, inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis and PAF-induced elastase release from neutrophilis. Anacardium occidentale and Acalipha hispida were active in both test ...

  12. Phytochemical screening, safety evaluation, anti-inflammatory and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the leaves of Lannea welwitschii ... was investigated in this study because the plant is used in Traditional African Medicine (TAM) to treat swellings, oedema, gout and diarrhoea. ... that tannin, flavonoid and reducing sugar were present while alkaloids, cardiac glycosides, ...

  13. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The alcoholic extract of Polygala arvensis (family Polygalaceae) was screened for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animals. The extract was administered for three consecutive days. Following an oral dose of 25 - 100 mg/kg, the extract exhibited graded dose response equivalent to 16.24% ...

  14. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of methanol fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of crude methanol fruit extract of Quercus incana (QI), as well as its acute toxicity and phytochemical profile. Methods: Two animal models were used: Wistar rats for carrageenan-induced paw inflammation and Swiss albino mice for acetic ...

  15. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol Extracts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methanol extracts and alkaloid fractions of different parts of four plant species belonging to Solanaceae family and used in Mexican traditional medicine were investigated for their total phenolic contents, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Materials and Methods: The total phenolic compounds of each ...

  16. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at screening the methanol tuber extract of Chlorophytum alismifolium for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities using experimental animal models. The antinociceptive activity was tested using acetic acid-induced writhing response in Swiss albino mice and formalininduced pain in Wistar rats, ...

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ruta graveolens Linn on carrageenan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous, ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Ruta graveolens were investigated for anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw edema in wistar male rats, and compared to a positive control drug, Voveran. These extracts were given (ip) in a concentration of 20 and 50 mg/kg b.w. before carrageenan injection.

  18. Investigations into the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of the ethanolic extract and fractions of Citrus sinensis stem-bark, investigate and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the most active fraction (EAF) of the ethanolic extract against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatic injury.

  19. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Methanoilc and Ethanolic Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Aqueous ethanoic and methanolic extracts of Citrus Sinensis Peel were investigated for anti- inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats, and compared to a positive control drug,. Indomethacin. These extracts were given(IP) in a concentration of 20, and 70mg/kg with extract with a ...

  20. Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Usage In Orthopaedics And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds with nti inflammatory, analgesic and often times anti pyretic roperties. They are weak organic acids and are the most commonly used drugs in Orthopaedic/Trauma practice. hey provide mild to moderate pain relief.

  1. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-15

    Jan 15, 2015 ... reduce significantly the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with Diclofenac. (positive control). This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of the methanolic extract prepared from Myrtus nivellei. Keywords: Anti-inflammatoy activity; Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab; ...

  2. Possible mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity and safety profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animals were grouped and treated with diclofenac, chlorpheniramine, and granisetron (reference anti-inflammatory agents), or aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistia stratiotes at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg orally. Control groups received distilled water. Paw thicknesses was measured at 30 or 60 min intervals for 2.5 ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini seed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... The Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) is a popular traditional medicinal plant in India. This study was intended to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of S. cumini seed in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats at the dose level of 200 and 400 mg/kg.

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF) a polyherbal tea consisting the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus, Albizia chevalieri and bark of Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, formalin induced pain and ...

  5. Flavonoids, anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of Macfadyena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kaempferol, 7-O, 8-C diglucoside and vicenin II were isolated, while 6, methoxy, acacetin 7-O glucoside; and quercitrin were isolated from ethanol extract. These compounds were characterized and identified by their physicochemical and spectral data. The crude ethanol extract exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity ...

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol, myricetin, fisetin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol, myricetin, fisetin and ibuprofen in rat pups. Methods: The expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by western blotting; the inhibition of these proteins by plant compounds was evaluated.

  7. Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Anacardium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Anacardium occidentale is a local medicinal plant used in ethno medicine for the treatment of diarrhea, constipation,pain and inflammation. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of this plant parts were assessed for anti- inflammatory and antibacterial activities using experimental animal model and agar disc ...

  8. Essential Oil Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Sage, Salvia officinalis L (Lamiaceae), is widely cultivated medicinal plant for its economic importance and large content of bioactive components; therefore, in the present study, the active components (volatile compounds) and the anti-inflammatory effect of S. officinalis have been investigated. Methods: Salvia ...

  9. Anti-inflammatory of both Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus are among the Palestinian trees that are traditionally used in folkloric medicine in treating many diseases; leaves of which are thought to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant effects. The goal of this study is to evaluate the in vitro inhibitory effect of ...

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of bark of Xeromphis spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Nath Das

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The bark of Xeromphis spinosa extracted by a mixture of equal proportions of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol at an oral dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity when compared with control.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-(3-Florophenylethylcaffeamide in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of one synthetic product, N-(3-Florophenylethylcaffeamide (abbrev. FECA, by using animal model of λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of FECA was determined by measuring the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and malondialdehyde (MDA in the edema paw tissue, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GRd in the liver. The results showed that FECA reduced the paw edema at three, four and five hours after λ-carrageenan administration. The levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α, and MDA in the λ-carrageenan-induced edema paws were reduced and the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd in liver tissues were raised by FECA. These results suggested that FECA possessed anti-inflammatory activities and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be related to the decrease of the levels of COX-2, NO, and TNF-α in inflamed tissues and the increase in the MDA level by increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Compounds Isolated from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Perez G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows over 300 compounds isolated and identified from plants that previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. They have been classified in appropriate chemical groups and data are reported on their pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and other properties.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and antipyretic potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Extracts of Terminalia citrina fruits were evaluated at doses of 200mg/kg, 400mg/kg and 600mg/kg in albino mice for preventive effect in inflammatory edema, peripheral pain sensation and pyrexia. Carrageenan induced paw edema method was utilized to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. Anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antioxidant effects of methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 67.05μg/ml (ABTS). Methanol extract was able to inhibit inflammation by in vitro about 85-90% (HRBC stabilization method) and in vivo about 40-45% (Paw oedema method) anti-inflammatory assays compared to standard produced 50.04% at 6h period. In cytotoxicity assay (MTT assay) methanolic extract exhibited IC50 ...

  16. Identification of active anti-inflammatory principles of betabeta wood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the anti-inflammatory components of beta-beta (Lunasia amara Blanco.) wood. Methods: The wood material was extracted with 96 % ethanol and fractionated with dichloromethane using a liquid-liquid continuous extraction (LLCE). The fractions were subjected to silica gel column chromatography.

  17. Microparticles Containing Curcumin Solid Dispersion: Stability, Bioavailability and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C C C; Mendonça, L M; Bergamaschi, M M; Queiroz, R H C; Souza, G E P; Antunes, L M G; Freitas, L A P

    2016-04-01

    This work aimed at improving the solubility of curcumin by the preparation of spray-dried ternary solid dispersions containing Gelucire®50/13-Aerosil® and quantifying the resulting in vivo oral bioavailability and anti-inflammatory activity. The solid dispersion containing 40% of curcumin was characterised by calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The solubility and dissolution rate of curcumin in aqueous HCl or phosphate buffer improved up to 3600- and 7.3-fold, respectively. Accelerated stability test demonstrated that the solid dispersion was stable for 9 months. The pharmacokinetic study showed a 5.5-fold increase in curcumin in rat blood plasma when compared to unprocessed curcumin. The solid dispersion also provided enhanced anti-inflammatory activity in rat paw oedema. Finally, the solid dispersion proposed here is a promising way to enhance curcumin bioavailability at an industrial pharmaceutical perspective, since its preparation applies the spray drying, which is an easy to scale up technique. The findings herein stimulate further in vivo evaluations and clinical tests as a cancer and Alzheimer chemoprevention agent.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Cajaninstilbene Acid and Its Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Yan; Lin, Jing; Lu, Kuo; Xu, Hong-Gui; Geng, Zhi-Zhong; Sun, Ping-Hua; Chen, Wei-Min

    2016-04-13

    Cajaninstilbene acid (CSA) is one of the active components isolated from pigeon pea leaves. In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of CSA and its synthesized derivatives were fully valued with regard to their activities on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in vitro cell model, as well as their impacts on the migration of neutrophils and macrophages in fluorescent protein labeled zebrafish larvae model by live image analysis. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of this type of compounds was clarified by western-blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that CSA, as well as its synthesized derivatives 5c, 5e and 5h, exhibited strong inhibition activity on the release of NO and inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. CSA and 5c greatly inhibited the migration of neutrophils and macrophages in injury zebrafish larvae. CSA and 5c treatment greatly inhibited the phosphorylation of proteins involved in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Moreover, we found that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) inhibitor GW9662 could reverse partly the roles of CSA and 5c, and CSA and 5c treatment greatly resist the decrease of PPARγ mRNA and protein induced by LPS stimulation. Our results identified the promising anti-inflammatory effects of CSA and its derivatives, which may serve as valuable anti-inflammatory lead compound. Additionally, the mechanism studies demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory activity of CSA and its derivative is associated with the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK pathways, relying partly on resisting the LPS-induced decrease of PPARγ through improving its expression.

  19. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic potential of phenolic acids and flavonoid fractions isolated from Lolium multiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ki-Choon; Son, Young-Ok; Hwang, Jung-Min; Kim, Beom-Tae; Chae, Minseon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2017-12-01

    Interest has recently renewed in using Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Poaceae) (called Italian ryegrass; IRG) silage as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet. This study investigated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic potential of IRG silage and identified the primary components in IRG active fractions. Total 16 fractions were separated from the chloroform-soluble extract of IRG aerial part using Sephadex LH-20 column before HPLC analysis. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the fractions at doses of 0-100 μg/mL were investigated using various cell-free and cell-mediated assay systems. To explore anti-septic effect of IRG fractions, female ICR and BALB/c mice orally received 40 mg/kg of phenolic acid and flavonoid-rich active fractions F 7 and F 8 every other day for 10 days, respectively, followed by LPS challenge. The active fractions showed greater antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential compared with other fractions. IC 50 values of F 7 and F 8 to reduce LPS-stimulated NO and TNF-α production were around 15 and 30 μg/mL, respectively. Comparison of retention times with authentic compounds through HPLC analysis revealed the presence of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, myricetin and kaempferol in the fractions as primary components. These fractions inhibited LPS-stimulated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Supplementation with F 7 or F 8 improved the survival rates of mice to 70 and 60%, respectively, in LPS-injected mice and reduced near completely serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. This study highlights antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic activities of IRG active fractions, eventually suggesting their usefulness in preventing oxidative damage and inflammatory disorders.

  20. Salvia macrosiphon seeds and seed oil: pharmacognostic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hamedi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:Wild Sage(Salvia macrosiphon Boiss. known as “Marvak” in Persian is one of the polymorphic and abundant plants of Lamiaceae. The plants whole seeds usually soaked or boiled in hot water are widely used for inflammatory ailments in folk medicine. Documents have shown that there is scant information on the chemical constituents of this plant seeds. The current study was carried out to assess the phytochemical constituents of Salvia macrosiphon seeds as well as anti-inflammatory activities. Methods: The seed oil extracted via a Soxhlet extractor was subjected to pharmacognostic assays using High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC, Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS analysis of fatty acids and sterols as well as evaluation of the possible anti-inflammatory activities in rats. Results: Total ash, acid insoluble and water soluble ash values were determined as 51.67±7.53, 10.00±0.02 and 30.01±5.01 mg/g, respectively. HPTLC assessment revealed the presence of different steroids, triterpenes and fatty acids. Amount of sterols in oil was found 2.44, 24.92 and 4.60 mg/g for esterified β-sitosterol, free β-sitosterol and free stigmasterol, respectively. The α-linolenic acid (77.69±6.10% was the principal fatty acid. Regarding the anti-inflammatory activity, the seed oil showed low activity in the early phase of formalin test; however, could not significantly inhibit the neutrophil-induced damage by reducing MPO activity in the paws of the rat. Conclusion: The seed oil did not exhibit satisfactory effects on acute inflammation in this study but considering the rich phytosterols content, the seed and its oil can be introduced as useful dietary supplements.

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  2. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activity of Ouabain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ingrid Bezerra de Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump, was identified as an endogenous substance of human plasma. Ouabain has been studied for its ability to interfere with various regulatory mechanisms. Despite the studies portraying the ability of ouabain to modulate the immune response, little is known about the effect of this substance on the inflammatory process. The aim of this work was to study the effects triggered by ouabain on inflammation and nociceptive models. Ouabain produced a reduction in the mouse paw edema induced by carrageenan, compound 48/80 and zymosan. This anti-inflammatory potential might be related to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, and mast-cell degranulation but not to histamine. Ouabain also modulated the inflammation induced by concanavalin A by inhibiting cell migration. Besides that, ouabain presented antinociceptive activity. Taken these data together, this work demonstrated, for the first time, that ouabain presented in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Heliotropium strigosum in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, Murad Ali; Gul, Farah; Hussain, Sajjid; Ashraf, Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    The current project was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of crude extract of Heliotropium strigosum and its subsequent solvent fractions in post carrageenan-induced edema and post xylene-induced ear edema at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The results revealed marked attenuation of edema induced by carrageenan injection in a dose-dependent manner. The ethyl acetate fraction was most dominant with 73.33% inhibition followed by hexane fraction (70.66%). When the extracts were challenged against xylene-induced ear edema, again ethyl acetate and hexane fractions were most impressive with 38.21 and 35.77% inhibition, respectively. It is concluded that various extracts of H. strigosum possessed strong anti-inflammatory activity in animal models. © The Author(s) 2012.

  4. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from 38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  5. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of r.a.p . ( Radix Angelicae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper was to study the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Radix Angelicae Pubescentis (R.A.P) ethanol extracts. Three classic anti-inflammatory models and two analgesic models were used in this research. In anti-inflammatory tests, all the extracts have a certain inhibition on the acute ...

  6. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086388 Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Ko....csml) Show Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. PubmedID 18086388 Title ...Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Authors K

  7. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M; Shikha, H A; Sadhu, S K; Rahman, M T; Datta, B K

    2001-08-01

    Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D F Buccini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities and the toxic effects of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva for elucidating the modulation mechanism between arthropod saliva and host. Methods: For saliva collection, engorged ticks were obtained from a controlled bovine infestation and collected by natural fall. The ticks were fixed and injected pilocarpine 0.2% for induction of salivation. Saliva was collected, lyophilized and stored at - 80 °C. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by the hemolysis method (25, 50, 100, 200 and 300 μ g/mL and MTT cell viability assay (2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 μ g/mL for 24, 48 and 72 h. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using the method of neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity of mice at doses of 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg; antinociceptive activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing test, and formalin-induced paw-licking in mice at dose of 15 mg/kg. Results: Saliva did not cause erythrocytes hemolysis at any concentration tested, as well as did not decrease cell viability in the MTT assay. Saliva inhibited neutrophil migration by 87% and 73% at doses of 15 and 20 mg/kg, respectively. In the nociceptive tests, saliva presented analgesic activity of 69.96% in the abdominal writhing test, and of 84.41% in the formalin test. Conclusions: The study proves that Rhipicephalus microplus saliva has significant in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. The data presented herein support the development of further studies to elucidate the active principles of Rhipicephalus microplus saliva and its mechanism of action and, in future, to develop novel anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs.

  9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Sandford

    2011-01-01

    Sanford H RothArizona Research and Education, Arthritis Laboratory, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less...

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ambrosia artemisiaefolia and Rhoeo spathacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez G, R M

    1996-09-01

    Alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Ambrosia artemisiaefolia and Rhoeo spathacea have been investigated for anti-inflammatory activity using various experimental models of inflammation (croton oil ear oedema, carrageenan-induced edema, cotton pellet granuloma and formaldehyde induced arthritis) and the results compared with phenylbutazone and bethamethasone, standard anti-inflammatory drugs. These extracts at doses of 50, 100 and 150mg/kg of A. artemisiaefolia and R. spathacea, showed significant inhibition of acute oedema in rats and mice induced by the phlogistic agents, carrageenan and croton oil, in a dose-dependant manner. The ethanol extracts reduced cotton pellet granuloma and caused a statistically significant inhibitory effect on edema in the chronic model of formaldehyde arthritis in rats. Since Ambrosia artemisiaefolia and Rhoeo spathacea were found to be effective in both acute and chronic phases of inflammation they can be considered as general anti-inflammatory agents. Copyright © 1996 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsiung Pan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating epidemiological and clinical evidence shows that inflammation is an important risk factor for various human diseases. Thus, suppressing chronic inflammation has the potential to delay, prevent, and control various chronic diseases, including cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, joint, skin, pulmonary, blood, lymph, liver, pancreatic, and intestinal diseases. Various natural products from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM have been shown to safely suppress proinflammatory pathways and control inflammation-associated disease. In vivo and/or in vitro studies have demonstrated that anti-inflammatory effects of TCM occur by inhibition of the expression of master transcription factors (for example, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, pro-inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, chemokines (for example, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-24, intercellular adhesion molecule expression and pro-inflammatory mediators (for example, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. However, a handful of review articles have focused on the anti-inflammatory activities of TCM and explore their possible mechanisms of action. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to identify the anti-inflammatory constituents of TCM and their molecular targets that may create new opportunities for innovation in modern pharmacology.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez González, Cuauhtemoc; Serrano Vega, Roberto; González-Chávez, Marco; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  13. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Epimedium brevicornu Maxim Ethanol Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Meng, Ning; Chang, Bingquan; Quan, Xianghua; Yuan, RuiYing; Li, Bin

    2018-04-05

    Epimedium brevicornu Maxim has been used as a traditional herbal drug in China. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of E. brevicornu Maxim ethanol extract (EBME) were investigated in RAW264.7 macrophages and mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results showed that EBME attenuated inflammation by decreasing the production of several proinflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin (PG) E 2 , inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. EBME increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2. The inhibitory effects of EBME on LPS-stimulated NO and PGE 2 expression were partially reversed by HO-1 inhibitor. EBME also elicited an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in LPS-induced peritonitis. Therefore, EBME exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Lipophilic stinging nettle extracts possess potent anti-inflammatory activity, are not cytotoxic and may be superior to traditional tinctures for treating inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler A; Sohn, Johann; Inman, Wayne D; Bjeldanes, Leonard F; Rayburn, Keith

    2013-01-15

    Extracts of four plant portions (roots, stems, leaves and flowers) of Urtica dioica (the stinging nettle) were prepared using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) involving water, hexanes, methanol and dichloromethane. The extracts were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in an NF-κB luciferase and MTT assay using macrophage immune (RAW264.7) cells. A standardized commercial ethanol extract of nettle leaves was also evaluated. The methanolic extract of the flowering portions displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity on par with a standard compound celastrol (1) but were moderately cytotoxic. Alternatively, the polar extracts (water, methanol, ethanol) of the roots, stems and leaves displayed moderate to weak anti-inflammatory activity, while the methanol and especially the water soluble extracts exhibited noticeable cytotoxicity. In contrast, the lipophilic dichloromethane extracts of the roots, stems and leaves exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effects greater than or equal to 1 with minimal cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 cells. Collectively these results suggest that using lipophilic extracts of stinging nettle may be more effective than traditional tinctures (water, methanol, ethanol) in clinical evaluations for the treatment of inflammatory disorders especially arthritis. A chemical investigation into the lipophilic extracts of stinging nettle to identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for their observed anti-inflammatory activity is further warranted. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R M; Dutra, T S; Simionatto, E; Ré, N; Kassuya, C A L; Cardoso, C A L

    2017-03-16

    Mangifera indica is widely found in Brazil, and its leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. The aim of this study is to perform composition analysis of essential oils from the M. indica varieties, espada (EOMIL1) and coração de boi (EOMIL2), and confirm their anti-inflammatory properties. Twenty-three volatile compounds were identified via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two essential oils from the leaves. Paw edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw model, while leukocyte migration was analyzed using the pleurisy model. At oral doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg, the essential oils significantly reduced edema formation and the increase in MPO activity induced by carrageenan in rat paws. For a dose of 300 mg/kg EOMIL1, 62 ± 8% inhibition of edema was observed, while EOMIL2 led to 51 ± 7% inhibition of edema. At a dose of 100 mg/kg, the inhibition was 54 ± 9% for EOMIL1 and 37 ± 7% for EOMIL2. EOMIL1 and EOMIL2 significantly reduced MPO activity at doses of 100 mg/kg (47 ± 5 and 23 ± 8%, respectively) and 300 mg/kg (50 ± 9 and 31 ± 7%, respectively). In the pleurisy model, inhibitions were also observed for EOMIL1 and EOMIL2 in the leukocyte migration test. The results of the present study show that essential oils from M. indica differ in chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity in rats.

  16. [Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by anti-inflammatory agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, C; Czernichow, P; Dechelotte, P; Ducrotte, P; Lerebours, E; Colin, R

    1989-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and evolutive characteristics of gastroduodenal bleeding occurring in patients receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs, containing salicylates or not, and to determine the relative toxicity of the NSAI drugs without salicylates. Eight hundred and fourty-five consecutive patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to endoscopically proven peptic ulcer or gastroduodenal erosions were admitted between 1983 and June 1987 to an intensive care unit for digestive tract hemorrhage. Of these, 267 were using anti-inflammatory drugs; 151 (56 p. 100) were taking NSAI drugs other than salicylates, 97 salicylates (36 p. 100) and 10, steroids (4 p. 100). Patients taking nonsteroidal drugs without or with salicylates were compared with patients bleeding from gastroduodenal ulcer or erosion not receiving anti-inflammatory therapy. Patients receiving nonsteroidal drugs not containing salicylates were older (70 p. 100 over 65 years of age vs 46 p. 100, p less than 0.001) and the proportion of female patients was greater (54 p. 100 vs 33 p. 100, p less than 0.001) than in the other group. No significant difference was observed with regard to the following parameters: percentage of gastric lesions, concomitant anticoagulant therapy, need for surgical hemostasis, or mortality. Patients taking aspirin had more gastric lesions (75 p. 100 vs 64 p. 100, p less than 0.05) and less need for surgical hemostasis (7 p. 100 vs 15 p. 100, p less than 0.05); the other parameters did not differ. NSAI drugs other than salicylates were taken more often for osteoarthritis than salicylates (33.6 p. 100 vs 17.4 p. 100, p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; Kakar, Ron; Berk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    for qualitative review. Eight RCTs (n = 312) assessing adjunctive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n = 53), omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n = 140), N-acetylcysteine (n = 76), and pioglitazone (n = 44) in the treatment of BD met the inclusion criteria for quantitative analysis. The overall effect size...... sample sizes limited interpretation of the current analysis.......OBJECTIVE: Inflammation has been implicated in the risk, pathophysiology, and progression of mood disorders and, as such, has become a target of interest in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the objective of the current qualitative and quantitative review was to determine...

  18. Acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resulting from direct toxicity on the bowel mucosa, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID-induced colitis is an underestimated although potentially serious condition. Plain abdominal radiographs and multidetector computed tomography allow to identify a right-sided acute colitis with associated pericolonic inflammation, progressively diminished changes along the descending and sigmoid colon, and rectal sparing, consistent with the hypothesized pathogenesis of NSAID colitis. Increased awareness of this condition should reduce morbidity through both prevention and early recognition. High clinical suspicion and appropriate patient questioning, together with consistent instrumental findings, negative biochemistry, and stool investigations should help physicians not to miss this important diagnosis.

  19. Hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer V; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Mørtz, Charlotte G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported to be the second most common cause of drug hypersensitivity. In 2011, experts from the EAACI/ENDA group and GA(2)LEN proposed a new classification system for NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to classify...... responders reacted to non-pyrazolone drugs. Only one patient could not be classified according to the EAACI/ENDA system. An overlap between respiratory and cutaneous symptoms was found in 15/39 (38%) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: All but one of our patients could be classified according to the EAACI...

  20. Rationale for anti-inflammatory therapy in dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, C S; Pflugfelder, S C

    2008-01-01

    Dry eye is a multifactorial condition that results in a dysfunctional lacrimal functional unit. Evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Changes in tear composition including increased cytokines, chemokines, metalloproteinases and the number of T cells in the conjunctiva are found in dry eye patients and in animal models. This inflammation is responsible in part for the irritation symptoms, ocular surface epithelial disease, and altered corneal epithelial barrier function in dry eye. There are several anti-inflammatory therapies for dry eye that target one or more of the inflammatory mediators/pathways that have been identified and are discussed in detail.

  1. Isolation, Characterization and Anti-Inflammatory Property of Thevetia Peruviana

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    R. Thilagavathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thevetia peruviana seeds contain glucosides of neriifolin, acetylneriifolin and thevetin. Seed oil distillates of Thevetia peruviana have been found to contain anti-bacterial activity. In the persent work, the fresh flowers of Thevetia peruviana was subjected to phytochemical studies. The results of the study showed that the flowers contain quercetin, kaempferol and quercetin-7-o-galactoside. The structure of the isolated compound was characterized by UV, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. The anti-inflammatory character of the isolated compound was tested by in vitro method and the results of the study revealed that the isolated compound showed a biphasic property.

  2. Anti-inflammatory Elafin in human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalberg, Cecilia; Noda, Nathalia; Polettini, Jossimara; Jacobsson, Bo; Menon, Ramkumar

    2017-02-01

    Elafin is a low molecular weight protein with antileukoproteinase, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and immunomodulating properties. The profile of Elafin in fetal membranes is not well characterized. This study determined the changes in Elafin expression and concentration in human fetal membrane from patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and in vitro in response to intra-amniotic polymicrobial pathogens. Elafin messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions were studied in fetal membranes from PPROM, normal term as well as in normal term not in labor membranes in an organ explant system treated (24 h) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured Elafin concentrations in culture supernatants from tissues treated with LPS and polybacterial combinations of heat-inactivated Mycoplasma hominis (MH), Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) and Gardnerella vaginalis (GV). Elafin mRNA expression in fetal membranes from women with PPROM was significantly higher compared to women who delivered at term after normal pregnancy (5.09±3.50 vs. 11.71±2.21; Pmembranes showed a significantly increased Elafin m-RNA expression (Pmembranes also showed no changes in Elafin protein concentrations compared to untreated controls. Higher Elafin expression in PPROM fetal membranes suggests a host response to an inflammatory pathology. However, lack of Elafin response to LPS and polymicrobial treatment is indicative of the minimal anti-inflammatory impact of this molecule in fetal membranes.

  3. Melatonin as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent Modulating Inflammasome Activation

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    Gaia Favero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation may be defined as the innate response to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, injury, and metabolic stress; its ultimate function is to restore the physiological homeostatic state. The exact aetiology leading to the development of inflammation is not known, but a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many inflammation-related clinical conditions. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of different inflammatory diseases also involves the inflammasomes, intracellular multiprotein complexes that mediate activation of inflammatory caspases thereby inducing the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine, is considered an important multitasking molecule with fundamental clinical applications. It is involved in mood modulation, sexual behavior, vasomotor control, and immunomodulation and influences energy metabolism; moreover, it acts as an oncostatic and antiaging molecule. Melatonin is an important antioxidant and also a widespread anti-inflammatory molecule, modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in different pathophysiological conditions. This review, first, gives an overview concerning the growing importance of melatonin in the inflammatory-mediated pathological conditions and, then, focuses on its roles and its protective effects against the activation of the inflammasomes and, in particular, of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  4. Anti-inflammatory therapy for urinary tract infection in children

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    A. A. Vyalkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to substantiate the importance of an etiological approach to diagnosing urinary tract infection in children in terms of the species and biological properties of an infectious agent and to evaluate the efficiency of anti-inflammatory therapy. The study included 116 patients aged 3-15 years with chronic pyelonephritis (Group 1 and isolated bacteriuria (Group 2. After 10-14-day antibiotic therapy, Group 1 patients were allocated to two subgroups: Subgroup la («=30 took furamag 5 mg/kg/day; Subgroup lb («=30 received furamag at the same dose in combination with canephron. The treatment cycle lasted 10-14 days. Subgroup 2a («=26 children had furamag 5 mgДg/day and Subgroup 2b (« =30 took furamag in combination with canephron. The duration of treatment was 14 days. The investigators established the high efficiency of therapy with furamag for renal infection in the children with the active and decrement phases and that of the drug of choice for its monotherapy of isolated highly virulent bacteriuria. Therapeutic efficiency was proven to be related to the species and biological characteristics of an infectious agent. Anti-inflammatory therapy for pyelonephritis in terms of the species of pathogenic bacteria was ascertained to improve the efficiency of treatment. A rationale was provided for the individual choice of antibiotics, followed by the use of furamag, eubiotics, and drugs aimed at inhibiting virulence factors and persistence of the pathogen to sanitize the primary focus of infection.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of Caesalpinia ferrea

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    Sandrine Maria A. Lima

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. belongs to the family Fabaceae. Known as pau-ferro and jucá, it is used in folk medicine to treat diabetes, as antipyretic and antirheumatic. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the ethanol extract of the fruits of C. ferrea (EECf. In the evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, EECf (50 mg/kg produced significantly inhibition of ear edema by 66.6% compared to control. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg showed inhibition of 83.9% compared to control. EECf (50 mg/kg inhibited of vascular permeability induced by acetic acid and was also able to reduce of cell migration to the peritoneal cavity induced by thioglycolate. In the writhing test induced by acid acetic, EECf (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of contortions by 24.9, 46.9 and 74.2%, respectively. In the formalin test, EECf presented effects only in the second phase. The results provided experimental evidence for the effectiveness of the traditional use of C. ferrea in treating various diseases associated with inflammation and pain.

  6. Decreasing Skin Graft Contraction through Topical Wound Bed Preparation with Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-2-0153 TITLE: Decreasing Skin Graft Contraction through Topical Wound Bed Preparation with Anti-Inflammatory Agents...09/14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Decreasing Skin Graft Contraction through Topical Wound Bed Preparation with Anti-Inflammatory Agents” 5a...of a specific topical anti-inflammatory drug that will reduce and shorten the inflammatory state of the recipient wound bed and thus, skin graft

  7. Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects of methyl palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2011-01-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) has been shown earlier to inhibit Kupffer cells and rat peritoneal macrophages. To evaluate the potential of MP to inhibit the activation of other macrophages, RAW cells (macrophages of alveolar origin) were treated with varying concentrations of MP (0.25, 0.5, 1 mM). Assessment of cytotoxicity using MTT assay revealed that 0.25 and 0.5 mM are not toxic to RAW cells. MP was able to inhibit the phagocytic function of RAW cells. Treatment of cells with MP 24 hours prior to LPS stimulation significantly decreased nitric oxide release and altered the pattern of cytokines release; there was a significant decrease in TNF-α and a significant increase in IL-10 compared to the controls. However, there is a non-significant change in IL-6 level. Furthermore, phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein was significantly decreased in RAW cells treated with 0.5 mM MP after LPS stimulation. Based upon the in-vitro results, it was examined whether MP treatment will be effective in preventing bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in-vivo. Bleomycin given by itself caused destruction of the lung architecture characterized by pulmonary fibrosis with collapse of air alveoli and emphysematous. Bleomycin induced a significant increase in hydroxyproline level and activated NF-κB, p65 expression in the lung. MP co-treatment significantly ameliorated bleomycin effects. These results suggest that MP has a potential of inhibiting macrophages in general. The present study demonstrated for the first time that MP has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effect that could be through NF-kB inhibition. Thus MP like molecule could be a promising anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drug. - Research highlights: →Methyl palmitate is a universal macrophage inhibitor. →It could be a promising nucleus of anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drugs. →The underlying mechanism of these effects could be through NF-kB inhibition.

  8. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

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    Saurabh Bhatia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis. Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR and alcoholic (PE fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity.  POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05 reduced abdominal writhes than PE.  In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p

  9. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of five Veronica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, U Sebnem; Saracoglu, Iclal; Inoue, Makoto; Ogihara, Yukio

    2002-04-01

    Biological activities of five Veronica species (Scrophulariaceae), V. cymbalaria, V. hederifolia, V. pectinata var. glandulosa, V. persica and V. polita were studied for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Their methanol extracts showed both the inhibitory activity of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and cytotoxic activity against KB epidermoid carcinoma and B16 melanoma. When the methanol extracts were fractionated between water and chloroform, water fractions significantly inhibited NO production without any cytotoxicity, while chloroform fractions showed cytotoxicity dose-dependently. When the radical scavenging activity was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), water fractions of the five Veronica species scavenged free radicals effectively, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of this species on NO production was due to their radical scavenging activity. On the other hand, chloroform fractions of Veronica species except for V. cymbalaria showed similar cytotoxic activity against KB and B16 melanoma cells.

  10. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlansky, Barry; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory properties, and aspirin is increasingly employed in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and ischemic stroke. Despite undisputed therapeutic efficacy for these indications, all NSAIDs impart a considerable risk of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A growing body of evidence supports an association between non-aspirin NSAIDs and acute coronary syndromes, and an expanding understanding of the gastroduodenal effects of aspirin, COX-2 selective agents, clopidogrel, and Helicobacter pylori synergism fuel controversies in NSAID use. In this review, we discuss risk stratification of patients taking NSAIDs and the appropriate application of proven gastro-protective strategies to decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage based upon an individualized assessment of risk for potential toxicities. Prevention of NSAID-related gastropathy is an important clinical issue, and therapeutic strategies for both the primary and secondary prevention of adverse events are continually evolving.

  11. Anti-inflammatory treatment for carditis in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Antoinette; Adler, Alma J; Saloojee, Haroon

    2015-05-28

    Rheumatic heart disease remains an important cause of acquired heart disease in developing countries. Although prevention of rheumatic fever and management of recurrences have been well established, optimal management of active rheumatic carditis remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2003, and previously updated in 2009 and 2012. To assess the effects, both harmful and beneficial, of anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin, corticosteroids and other drugs in preventing or reducing further valvular damage in patients with acute rheumatic fever. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 9 of 12), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1948 to 2013 October Week 1), EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2013 Week 41) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1982 to 17 October 2013). We last searched Index Medicus (1950 to April 2001) in 2001. We checked reference lists of identified studies and applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials comparing anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. aspirin, steroids, immunoglobulins, pentoxifylline) versus placebo or controls, or comparing any of the anti-inflammatory agents versus one another, in adults and children with acute rheumatic fever diagnosed according to Jones, or modified Jones, criteria. The presence of cardiac disease one year after treatment was the major outcome criterion selected. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias using the methodology outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration were used. No new studies were included in this update. Eight randomised controlled trials involving 996 people were selected for inclusion in the review. Researchers compared several steroidal agents such as corticotrophin, cortisone, hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin versus aspirin, placebo or no treatment. Six

  12. Pharmacological interactions of anti-inflammatory-analgesics in odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-02-01

    In this second article we describe the more interesting pharmacological interactions in dental practice based on the prescription of analgesic narcotics, paracetamol and non-selective non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) (which inhibit cyclooxigenase 1 -COX 1- and cyclooxigenase 2 -COX 2-) and selective NSAIs (COX 2 inhibitors). The importance of preventing the appearance of these pharmacological interactions is because these are medicaments prescribed daily in odontology for moderate pain treatment and inflammation in the oral cavity. Paracetamol can interact with warfarin and therefore care should be taken with chronic alcoholic patients. All NSAIs reduce renal blood flow and consequently are capable of reducing the efficacy of medicaments used for treating arterial hypertension, which act via a renal mechanism. Especial attention should be taken considering the risk of interaction between the antagonists of AT1 receptors of angiostensin II (ARAII) and the NSAIs.

  13. [Drug eruptions caused by noncorticoid anti-inflammatory agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujeau, J C; Guillaume, J C; Revuz, J; Touraine, R

    1984-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) may elicit various kinds of cutaneous side effects. The commonest ones are non-specific erythematous eruptions, sometimes with a phototoxic distribution, and urticaria. Vasculitis and severe bullous eruptions (Stevens-Johnson's syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis) are rare but may have severe outcomes. The overall incidence of cutaneous reactions is about the same for all NSAI, 1 to 3 p. 100, during the clinical studies performed before marketing the drug, but this increases afterwards (up to 45 p. 100 for Benoxaprofen). Drugs with long half-lives may carry a higher risk for severe cutaneous reactions. NSAI are now the main cause of drug induced TEN. Urticarial reactions seem related to pharmacological phenomena while the pathogenic events leading to other kinds of skin reactions remain unknown. An hypersensitivity reaction is postulated. The therapeutic value of corticosteroids for the severe cutaneous side effects of drugs is still controversial.

  14. Antinoceptive and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Ethanolic Extract, Fractions and Flavones Isolated from Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir (Leguminosae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluze P Cruz

    Full Text Available The bark of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poiret (Leguminosae family, popularly known as "jurema preta" in Brazil, is used by the population of Contendas of Sincorá (Bahia State, Brazil for the treatment of coughs and wound healing. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the bark ethanol extract (EEMT and solvent soluble fractions (hexane-H, DCM-D, EtOAc-E and BuOH-B of the extract in vivo. Additionally, we synthesized 5,7-dihidroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone (isosakuranetin and isolated the compound sakuranetin, and both compounds were also tested. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive assays performed were: writhing test; nociception induced by intraplantar formalin injection; leukocyte recruitment to the peritoneal cavity; evaluation of vascular permeability (Evans blue test; and evaluation of mechanical hypernociception (von Frey test. Production of TNF-α, IL-10, myeloperoxidase and the expression of ICAM-1 were also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni post-test (n = 8, with P < 0.05. The EEMT showed antinociceptive activities in writhing test (100-200 mg/kg, in the second phase of the formalin test (50-200 mg/kg, and in mechanical hypernociception (100 mg/kg. EEMT showed an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity and in the plantar tissue detected by the reduction of myeloperoxidase activity (100 mg/kg, reduction of IL-10 levels and expression of ICAM-1 in the peritoneal exudate and the mesentery (100 mg/kg, respectively. The four soluble EEMT fractions showed good results in tests for antinociceptive (H, D, E, B and anti-inflammation (H, D, E. Only sakuranetin showed reduction of the writhing and neutrophil migration (200 mg/kg. Thus, the EEMT and soluble fractions of M. tenuiflora bark demonstrated great antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, as also sakuranetin. More studies

  15. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory kaempferol glycosides from Sedum dendroideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Giany O; Malvar, David do C; Vanderlinde, Frederico A; Rocha, Fabio F; Pires, Priscila Andrade; Costa, Elson A; de Matos, Lécia G; Kaiser, Carlos R; Costa, Sônia S

    2009-07-15

    To identify the compounds responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects previously described for Sedum dendroideum, through bioassay-guided fractionation procedures. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated through mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed through croton oil-induced mouse ear oedema and carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The Sedum dendroideum juice afforded seven known flavonoids identified with basis on NMR data. The oral administration of the major kaempferol glycosides kaempferitrin [1] (17.29 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [2] (16.82 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-neohesperidoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [3] (13.50 micromol/kg) or alpha-rhamnoisorobin [5] (23.13 micromol/kg) inhibited by 47.3%, 25.7%, 60.2% and 58.0%, respectively, the acetic acid-induced nociception (indomethacin: 27.95 micromol/kg, p.o.; 68.9%). Flavonoids 1, 2, 3 or 5, at the same doses, reduced by 39.5%, 46.5%, 35.6% and 33.3%, respectively, the croton oil-induced oedema (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 83.7%) and impaired leukocyte migration by 42.9%, 46.3%, 50.4% and 49.6%, respectively (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 66.1%). Our findings show that the major kaempferol glycosides may account for the renowned medicinal use of Sedum dendroideum against pain and inflammatory troubles.

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Sanghuangporus sanghuang Mycelium

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    Wang-Ching Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is characterized by inflammation of the lung tissue and oxidative injury caused by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Studies have suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidant agents could be used for the treatment of ALI with a good outcome. Therefore, our study aimed to test whether the mycelium extract of Sanghuangporus sanghuang (SS-1, believed to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could be used against the excessive inflammatory response associated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS-induced ALI in mice and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. The experimental results showed that the administration of SS-1 could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation. SS-1 could reduce the number of inflammatory cells, inhibit myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, regulate the TLR4/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and the signal transduction of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in the lung tissue, and inhibit high mobility group box-1 protein 1 (HNGB1 activity in BALF. In addition, SS-1 could affect the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 and Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 in the lung tissue and regulate signal transduction in the KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP1/nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor Nrf2/Kelch Like ECH associated Protein 1 (Keap1 pathway. Histological results showed that administration of SS-1 prior to induction could inhibit the large-scale LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration of the lung tissue. Therefore, based on all experimental results, we propose that SS-1 exhibits a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mycelium of S. sanghuang can potentially be used for the treatment or prevention of inflammation-related diseases.

  17. Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of fixed dose combination: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in experimental animals

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    Amit Lahoti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Combining paracetamol with ibuprofen enhances analgesic/anti-inflammatory activity over their individual component but potentiation of analgesic activity of diclofenac was not seen when paracetamol was added to it.

  18. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Arbutus unedo aqueous extract

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    Idir Moualek

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: A. unedo showed in vitro anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the heat induced albumin denaturation and red blood cells membrane stabilization. Our results show that aqueous leaf extract of A. unedo has good antioxidant activity and interesting anti-inflammatory properties. A. unedo aqueous extract can be used to prevent oxidative and inflammatory processes.

  19. Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Root Extracts of Indigofera spicata F. in Mice. ... The results clearly demonstrate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous and 80% methanolic root extracts of the plant, providing evidence in part for the folkloric use of the plant. Keywords: ...

  20. Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid has been utilised by physicians for hundreds of years as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic (1). Derived from plant sources, such as the willow tree, it has the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and stimulate.

  1. In silico and in vivo anti-inflammatory studies of curcuminoids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the anti-inflammatory activity of curcuminoids in comparison with that of eugenol in silico, and to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of wound dressings made from zinc oxide powder and liquid turmeric extract with a high curcuminoid content. Methods: In silico studies were conducted, using ...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of Secamone afzelii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . This study re-ports the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of S. afzelii. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined by the carrageenan-induced paw oedema method in 7 day old chicks and antioxi-dant property by the 2 ...

  3. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs, especially the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their beneficial effects may be due to interference in the chronic inflammatory reaction, that takes place in AD.

  4. Anti-inflammatory drugs in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D

    2007-01-01

    Historically, anti-inflammatory drugs had their origins in the serendipitous discovery of certain plants and their extracts being applied for the relief of pain, fever and inflammation. When salicylates were discovered in the mid-19th century to be the active components of Willow Spp., this enabled these compounds to be synthesized and from this, acetyl-salicylic acid or Aspirin was developed. Likewise, the chemical advances of the 19th-20th centuries lead to development of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), most of which were initially organic acids, but later non-acidic compounds were discovered. There were two periods of NSAID drug discovery post-World War 2, the period up to the 1970's which was the pre-prostaglandin period and thereafter up to the latter part of the last century in which their effects on prostaglandin production formed part of the screening in the drug-discovery process. Those drugs developed up to the 1980-late 90's were largely discovered empirically following screening for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in laboratory animal models. Some were successfully developed that showed low incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects (the principal adverse reaction seen with NSAIDs) than seen with their predecessors (e.g. aspirin, indomethacin, phenylbutazone); the GI reactions being detected and screened out in animal assays. In the 1990's an important discovery was made from elegant molecular and cellular biological studies that there are two cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme systems controlling the production of prostanoids [prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxane (TxA2)]; COX-1 that produces PGs and TxA2 that regulate gastrointestinal, renal, vascular and other physiological functions, and COX-2 that regulates production of PGs involved in inflammation, pain and fever. The stage was set in the 1990's for the discovery and development of drugs to selectively control COX-2 and spare the COX-1 that is central to

  5. Brazilian medicinal plants with corroborated anti-inflammatory activities: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Victor Pena; Arruda, Caroline; Abd El-Salam, Mohamed; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2018-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders are common in modern life, and medicinal plants provide an interesting source for new compounds bearing anti-inflammatory properties. In this regard, Brazilian medicinal plants are considered to be a promising supply of such compounds due to their great biodiversity. To undertake a review on Brazilian medicinal plants with corroborated anti-inflammatory activities by selecting data from the literature reporting the efficacy of plants used in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory, including the mechanisms of action of their extracts and isolated compounds. A search in the literature was undertaken by using the following Web tools: Web of Science, SciFinder, Pub-Med and Science Direct. The terms 'anti-inflammatory' and 'Brazilian medicinal plants' were used as keywords in search engine. Tropicos and Reflora websites were used to verify the origin of the plants, and only the native plants of Brazil were included in this review. The publications reporting the use of well-accepted scientific protocols to corroborate the anti-inflammatory activities of Brazilian medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory potential were considered. We selected 70 Brazilian medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activity. The plants were grouped according to their anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. The main mechanisms involved inflammatory mediators, such as interleukins (ILs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cyclooxygenase (COX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The collected data on Brazilian medicinal plants, in the form of crude extract and/or isolated compounds, showed significant anti-inflammatory activities involving different mechanisms of action, indicating Brazilian plants as an important source of anti-inflammatory compounds.

  6. Nanoemulsion as a strategy for improving the oral bioavailability and anti-inflammatory activity of andrographolide

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    Yen CC

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ching-Chi Yen,1 Yi-Chen Chen,1 Ming-Tsang Wu,2 Chia-Chi Wang,1,3 Yu-Tse Wu1,4 1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Chinese Medicine Department, Ditmanson Medical Foundation, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan; 3PhD Program in Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: Andrographolide (AG, a compound with low water solubility, possesses various pharmacological activities, particularly anti-inflammatory activity. However, its low oral bioavailability is a major obstacle to its potential use. This study developed and optimized an AG-loaded nanoemulsion (AG-NE formulation to improve AG oral bioavailability and its protective effects against inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: A high-pressure homogenization technique was used to prepare the AG-NE and solubility, viscosity, and droplet size tests were conducted to develop the optimized AG-NE composed of α-tocopherol, ethanol, Cremophor EL, and water. The permeability was assessed using everted rat gut sac method and in vivo absorption and anti-inflammatory effect in rats was also evaluated. The plasma concentration of AG was determined using our validated high performance liquid chromatography method, which was used to generate a linear calibration curve over the concentration range of 0.1–25 µg/mL in rat plasma (R2>0.999.Results: The optimized AG-NE had a droplet size of 122±11 nm confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and a viscosity of 28 centipoise (cps. It was stable at 4 and 25°C for 90 days. An ex vitro intestinal permeability study indicated that the jejunum was the optimal site for AG absorption from the optimized AG-NE, which was 8.21 and 1.40 times higher than that from an AG suspension and AG ethanol solution, respectively. The pharmacokinetic results indicate that

  7. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of azadirachtin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Darly G; Godin, Adriana M; Menezes, Raquel R; Nogueira, Rafaela D; Brito, Ana Mercy S; Melo, Ivo S F; Coura, Giovanna Maria E; Souza, Danielle G; Amaral, Flávio A; Paulino, Tony P; Coelho, Márcio M; Machado, Renes R

    2014-06-01

    Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae) extracts have been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. However, the activities of azadirachtin, a limonoid and the major bioactive compound found in the extracts, have been poorly investigated in animal models. In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by azadirachtin in experimental models of pain and inflammation in mice. Carrageenan-induced paw edema and fibrovascular tissue growth induced by subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of azadirachtin in mice. Zymosan-induced writhing and hot plate tests were employed to evaluate the antinociceptive activity. To explore putative mechanisms of action, the level of tumor necrosis factor-α in inflammatory tissue was measured and the effect induced by opioidergic and serotonergic antagonists was evaluated. Previous per os (p. o.) administration of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) significantly reduced the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan. However, the concomitant increase of the paw concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α induced by this inflammatory stimulus was not reduced by azadirachtin. In addition to inhibiting the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan, azadirachtin (6, 60, and 120 mg/kg) inhibited the proliferative phase of the inflammatory response, as demonstrated by the reduced formation of fibrovascular tissue growth. Azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) also inhibited the nociceptive response in models of nociceptive (hot plate) and inflammatory (writhing induced by zymosan) pain. The activity of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) in the model of nociceptive pain was attenuated by a nonselective opioid antagonist, naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i. p.), but not by a nonselective serotonergic antagonist, cyproheptadine. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the activity of azadirachtin in experimental models of nociceptive and inflammatory pain, and also in models of acute and chronic inflammation

  8. Gastrointestinal absorption and anti-inflammatory effect of bromelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaka, K.I. Yamada, M.; Kawano, T; Suyama, T [Green Cross Corp., Osaka (Japan). Research Lab.

    1972-08-01

    In intraduodenal administration of /sup 125/I bromelain in the dog, a blood radioactive peak was attained at 4 hr, equivalent to 9.2% of the administered radioactivity, but, over 24 hr after the administration, 0.213 to 0.263% of the dose was found in the high molecular serum fraction, 21% of which was respondible for the absorbed as intact, equivalent to 0.042 to 0.052% of the administered. The gastrointestinal absorption immunologically proved the same. In intragastric administration of enteric-coated capsules containing /sup 125/I-bromelain as much as 1/8 th of the intraduodenal dose, the blood level reached the maximum at 6 hr following a 3 hr lag phase, equivalent to 0.6% of the administered, and 0.013% of the dose was attributed to the radioactivity in the high molecular serum fraction. The presence of bromelain absorbed was not evidenced immunologically. In intravenous administration of /sup 125/I-bromelain, /sup 125/I-bromelain was eliminated from the circulation at 50 min half-life, and low /sup 125/I molecules were detected immediately after the administration; it is indicative of the rapid break-down of /sup 125/I-bromelain by serum proteases. A binding of these low /sup 125/I-molecules to serum proteins was also revealed. A 24 hr urinary collection was found 68% of the dose. As for the anti-inflammatory effect of bromelain on the carrageenin-induced edema in the rat hind paw, bromelain orally administered in enteric-coated form showed 6.6% inhibition of edema at 73.5 mg/kg dose, and 39.0% inhibition at 120 mg/kg dose. This effect highly significant and almost equivalent to that obtained with hydrocortisone given at 10 mg/kg dose, while no powdered bromelain orally administered showed an inhibitory effect on the edema at 20 - 300 mg/kg dose level. The data obtained here indicate that orally administered bromelain is absorbable from the gastrointestinal tract and exhibits fairly potent anti-inflammatory activity on the exudative phases in enteric

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of desipramine and fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portet Karine

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antidepressants are heavily prescribed drugs and have been shown to affect inflammatory signals. We examined whether these have anti-inflammatory properties in animal models of septic shock and allergic asthma. We also analysed whether antidepressants act directly on peripheral cell types that participate in the inflammatory response in these diseases. Methods The antidepressants desipramine and fluoxetine were compared in vivo to the glucocorticoid prednisolone, an anti-inflammatory drug of reference. In a murine model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS-induced septic shock, animals received the drugs either before or after injection of LPS. Circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and mortality rate were measured. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, the effect of drug treatment on lung inflammation was assessed by counting leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavages. Bronchial hyperreactivity was measured using barometric plethysmography. In vitro production of TNF-α and Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and presumably Secreted (RANTES from activated monocytes and lung epithelial cells, respectively, was analysed by immunoassays. Reporter gene assays were used to measure the effect of antidepressants on the activity of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 which are involved in the control of TNF-α and RANTES expression. Results In the septic shock model, all three drugs given preventively markedly decreased circulating levels of TNF-α and mortality (50% mortality in fluoxetine treated group, 30% in desipramine and prednisolone treated groups versus 90% in controls. In the curative trial, antidepressants had no statistically significant effect, while prednisolone still decreased mortality (60% mortality versus 95% in controls. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, the three drugs decreased lung inflammation, albeit to different degrees. Prednisolone and fluoxetine reduced the number of macrophages, lymphocytes

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine are mediated through the regulation of the arachidonic acid pathway in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Ramana, Kota V

    2012-01-01

    Benfotiamine, a lipid-soluble analogue of vitamin B1, is a potent antioxidant that is used as a food supplement for the treatment of diabetic complications. Our recent study (U.C. Yadav et al., Free Radic. Biol. Med. 48:1423-1434, 2010) indicates a novel role for benfotiamine in the prevention of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytotoxicity and inflammatory response in murine macrophages. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how benfotiamine mediates anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory role of benfotiamine in regulating arachidonic acid (AA) pathway-generated inflammatory lipid mediators in RAW264.7 macrophages. Benfotiamine prevented the LPS-induced activation of cPLA2 and release of AA metabolites such as leukotrienes, prostaglandin E2, thromboxane 2 (TXB2), and prostacyclin (PGI2) in macrophages. Further, LPS-induced expression of AA-metabolizing enzymes such as COX-2, LOX-5, TXB synthase, and PGI2 synthase was significantly blocked by benfotiamine. Furthermore, benfotiamine prevented the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and expression of transcription factors NF-κB and Egr-1. Benfotiamine also prevented the LPS-induced oxidative stress and protein-HNE adduct formation. Most importantly, compared to specific COX-2 and LOX-5 inhibitors, benfotiamine significantly prevented LPS-induced macrophage death and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Thus, our studies indicate that the dual regulation of the COX and LOX pathways in AA metabolism could be a novel mechanism by which benfotiamine exhibits its potential anti-inflammatory response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Benfotiamine are Mediated Through the Regulation of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Ramana, Kota V

    2011-01-01

    Benfotiamine, a lipid-soluble analogue of vitamin B1, is a potent anti-oxidant that is used as a food supplement for the treatment of diabetic complications. Our recent study indicates a novel role of benfotiamine in the prevention of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytotoxicity and inflammatory response in murine macrophages. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how benfotiamine mediates anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory role of benfotiamine in regulating the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway generated inflammatory lipid mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Benfotiamine prevented the LPS-induced activation of cPLA2 and release of AA metabolites such as leukotrienes (LTB4), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxanes 2 (TXB2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) in macrophages. Further, LPS-induced expressions of AA metabolizing enzymes such as COX-2, LOX-5, TXB synthase and PGI2 synthase were significantly blocked by benfotiamine. Furthermore, benfotiamine prevented the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and expression of transcription factors NF-kB, and Egr-1. Benfotiamine also prevented the LPS-induced oxidative stress and protein-HNE adducts formation. Most importantly, as compared to specific COX-2 and LOX-5 inhibitors, benfotiamine significantly prevented the LPS-induced macrophage death and monocytes adhesion to endothelial cells. Thus, our studies indicate that the dual regulation of COX and LOX pathways in AA metabolism could be a novel mechanism by which benfotiamine exhibits its potential anti-inflammatory response. PMID:22067901

  12. [Meloxicam: the golden mean of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karateev, A E

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are most commonly used to treat acute and chronic pain in locomotor system (LMS) diseases. However, their administration may be accompanied by the development of dangerous complications as organic and functional disorders of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Physicians have currently a wide range of NSAIDs at their disposal; but none of the representatives of this group can be considered the best. Thus, highly selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (Coxibs) are substantially safer for GIT; however, their use is clearly associated with the increased risk of severe cardiovascular events. Nonselective NSAIDs, such as naproxen or ketoprofen, are safer for CVS, but more frequently cause significant GIT organic and functional disorders. Moderately selective NSAIDs, such as meloxicam (movalis), conceivably could be the most acceptable choice for treating the majority of patients in this situation. This drug has been long and extensively used in global clinical practice and has gained the confidence of physicians and patients. The major benefits of meloxicam are its proven efficacy, convenient treatment regimen, relatively low risk of complications as organic and functional disorders of the GIT and CVD and good compatibility with low-dose aspirin.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Dimethylfumarate: A Potential New Therapy for Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Seidel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, which results from the deregulated interaction of inflammatory cells and tissue forming cells. Beside the derangement of the epithelial cell layer, the most prominent tissue pathology of the asthmatic lung is the hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC bundles, which actively contributes to airway inflammation and remodeling. ASMCs of asthma patients secrete proinflammatory chemokines CXCL10, CCL11, and RANTES which attract immune cells into the airways and may thereby initiate inflammation. None of the available asthma drugs cures the disease—only symptoms are controlled. Dimethylfumarate (DMF is used as an anti-inflammatory drug in psoriasis and showed promising results in phase III clinical studies in multiple sclerosis patients. In regard to asthma therapy, DMF has been anecdotally reported to reduce asthma symptoms in patients with psoriasis and asthma. Here we discuss the potential use of DMF as a novel therapy in asthma on the basis of in vitro studies of its inhibitory effect on ASMC proliferation and cytokine secretion in ASMCs.

  14. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.; Miller, R. Eric; Fowler, Murray E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  15. Anti-inflammatory polysaccharides of Azadirachta indica seed tegument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia de Paulo Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Azadirachta indica A. Juss., Meliaceae, or Indian neem is a plant used to treat inûammatory disorders. Total polysaccharide (TPL and FI (fractioned by ion exchange chromatography from the seed tegument of A. indica were evaluated in models of acute inflammation (paw edema/peritonitis using Wistar rats. Paw edema (measured by hydroplethysmometry was induced s.c. by Λ-carrageenan (300 µg, histamine (100 µg, serotonin (20 µg, compound 48/80 (10 µg, prostaglandin (PGE2 30 µg or L-arginine (15 µg. Peritonitis (analyzed for leukocyte counts/protein dosage was induced i.p. by carrageenan (500 mg or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP 50 ng. Animals were treated i.v. with TPL (1 mg/kg or FI (0.01, 0.1, 1 mg/kg 30 min before stimuli. FI toxicity (at 0.1 mg/kg, i.v. for seven days was analyzed by the variation of body/organ mass and hematological/biochemical parameters. TPL extraction yielded 1.3%; FI, presenting high carbohydrate and low protein content, at 0.1 mg/kg inhibited paw edema induced by carrageenan (77%, serotonin (54%, PGE2 (69% and nitric oxide (73%, and the peritonitis elicited by carrageenan (48% or fMLP (67%, being well tolerated by animals. FI exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity, revealing to be important active component in traditionally prepared remedies to treat inflammatory states.

  16. Anti-inflammatory Hydrolyzable Tannins from Myricaria bracteata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Bao; Ding, Ya-Si; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jia-Bao; Cui, Bao-Song; Bai, Jin-Ye; Lin, Ming-Bao; Hou, Qi; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Li, Shuai

    2015-05-22

    Twelve hydrolyzable tannins were obtained from the twigs of Myricaria bracteata, including two new hellinoyl-type dimers, bracteatinins D1 (1) and D2 (2); a new hellinoyl-type trimer, bracteatinin T1 (3); two known monomers, nilotinin M4 (4) and 1,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(aS)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-d-glucose (5); six known dimers, tamarixinin A (6), nilotinin D8 (7), hirtellins A (10), B (9), and E (8), and isohirtellin C (11); and a known trimer, hirtellin T3 (12). The structures of the tannins were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis and comparisons to known tannins. All compounds were evaluated as free radical scavengers using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxy radicals and compared to the activity of BHT and Trolox. Compound 6 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on croton oil-induced ear edema in mice (200 mg/kg, inhibition rate 69.8%) and on collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice (20 mg/kg, inhibition rate 46.0% at day 57).

  17. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of glaucocalyxin B in microglia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Gan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over-activated microglia is involved in various kinds of neurodegenerative process including Parkinson, Alzheimer and HIV dementia. Suppression of microglial over activation has emerged as a novel strategy for treatment of neuroinflammation-based neurodegeneration. In the current study, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, which were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f. var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, were investigated in cultured microglia cells. Glaucocalyxin B (GLB, one of five ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, significantly decreased the generation of nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated microglia cells. In addition, GLB inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in LPS-activated microglia cells. Furthermore, GLB strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO-1 in BV-2 microglia cells. Finally, GLB exhibited neuroprotective effect by preventing over-activated microglia induced neurotoxicity in a microglia/neuron co-culture model. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the GLB possesses anti-nueroinflammatory activity, and might serve as a potential therapeutic agent for treating neuroinflammatory diseases.

  19. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidon Mona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children.

  20. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth SH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sanford H RothArizona Research and Education, Arthritis Laboratory, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis.Keywords: NSAIDs, osteoarthritis, topical administration, synovial fluid, peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori

  1. Coming to terms with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sanford H

    2012-05-07

    Despite well known complications, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the most commonly prescribed medications in the US for musculoskeletal disorders such as osteoarthritis. Although there has been a recent focus on the cardiovascular and renal complications associated with these agents, NSAID gastropathy continues to be a particular concern in many patients, especially those at increased risk for serious adverse events, including the elderly. Complicating the diagnosis of NSAID gastropathy is its silent course, which, up to half of the time, is asymptomatic. Several strategies are currently employed by physicians to mitigate the risk of serious gastrointestinal events. These include either addition of a proton pump inhibitor to current nonselective NSAID therapy or the use of a cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective NSAID. Although these agents are effective at mitigating the overall risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, they fail to address NSAID-related cardiovascular and renal risks. Due to their reduced systemic absorption, topical NSAIDs may present a viable option for patients at increased risk for serious NSAID-related adverse events, including gastropathy.

  2. Endoscopical appearances of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID- enteropathy

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    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAID have been associated with a sudden and sustained rise in the incidence of gastrointestinal ulcer complications. The aim of the study was to reveal the endoscopical abnormalities found in the duodenum & proximal jejunum due to NSAID. Thirty eight patients taking NSAID for their arthritis or rheumatism were included in this study. Gastro-duodeno-jejunoscopy was done with Olympus PCF-10. The endoscopical appearances of NSAID entero gastropathy were evaluated with a scoring system. The NSAID-entero-gastropathy appearances were endoscopically seen as hyperemia, erosion and ulcer. From all patient recruited, 7.9% complaint of diarrhea and 71.1% complaint of dyspepsia. Endoscopically, in the duodenal bulb we found 79% cases of hyperemia, 39.5% cases of erosion and 7.9% cases of ulcer. In the second part (descending part of the duodenum we found 28.9% cases of hyperemia, 15.8% cases of erosion and 2.6% case of ulcer. In the jejunum, we found 7.9% cases of hyperemia, 2.6% case of erosion and no ulcer. It is concluded that the most frequent abnormal endoscopical appearances in NSAID- enteropathy was hyperemia. The most frequent site of NSAID-enteropathy abnormal findings was in the duodenal bulb. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 225-9Keywords: NSAID-enteropathy, endoscopical appearances.

  3. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sanford H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenols in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Punzi, Leonardo; Spinella, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively investigated with regard to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulant properties in many inflammatory chronic conditions. The aim of this review is to summarise how these compounds can modulate the inflammatory pathways which characterise the most prevalent arthropathies including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-induced arthritis. Among polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate, carnosol, hydroxytyrosol, curcumin, resveratrol, kaempferol and genistein have been the most widely investigated in arthritis. The most important results of the studies outlined in this article show how polyphenolic compounds are able to inhibit the expression and the release of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes, the activity of different transcriptional factors and the production of reactive oxygen species in vitro. Studies on animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout show interesting results in terms of reduced tissue damage, restored cartilage homeostasis, and decreased levels of uric acid, respectively. Despite the multiple protective effects of polyphenols, there are no dietary recommendations for patients affected by rheumatic diseases. Future studies, including intervention trials, should be conducted to determine the relevance of polyphenols consumption or supplementation in arthritis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. [Reversible infertility from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomsvoll, Johan Fredrik; Rødevand, Erik; Koksvik, Hege Svean; Salvesen, Kjell Asmund; von Düring, Vidar; Rygnestad, Tarjei; Østensen, Monika

    2005-06-02

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may interfere with ovulation and the rupture of the follicle, causing reversible infertility. Literature review. Reversible infertility is shown both in animal and human studies of these drugs. As determined by ultrasound, the drugs may delay or inhibit ovulation. These findings are also confirmed by a few randomized controlled studies showing an increase in time from the luteinizing hormone surge to rupture of the follicle and an increased size of the unruptured follicle. Most of the hormone analyses show values in accordance with the ovulation/menstrual cycle. Also, two epidemiological studies have shown an association between NSAID use and spontaneous abortion. These studies have methodological weaknesses and their findings have to be elucidated in future studies. Women with fertility problems should avoid not only the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but also the traditional NSAIDs. However, women with rheumatic disease responding well to therapy should consult their physicians before stopping treatment. Reduced dose of a NSAID and temporary stop of drug treatment early in the menstrual cycle, or alternative drug treatment, may be a solution. NSAIDs should not be used in the last eight weeks of pregnancy.

  6. Novel delivery systems with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with increased risk of serious gastrointestinal side effects. Therefore, recent trends in the development of NSAIDs aim to reduce the incidence of side effects, and improve patient compliance. One of the strategies to improve efficacy and safety of oral NSAIDs is the development of combination products that contain gastroprotective agents. Several products containing NSAID in combination with proton pump inhibitors (ketoprofen/omeprazole, naproxen/esomeprazole, H2-receptor antagonists (ibuprofen/famotidine, and prostaglandin analogues (diclofenac/misoprostol are currently available on the market. Another approach refer to the special formulation design to allow dose reduction while preserving drug therapeutic efficacy. An example is SoluMatrix® technology, a manufacturing process that produce submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution and absorption properties. Patented SoluMatrix® technology has been successfully employed to develop low-dose diclofenac, meloxicam, indomethacin and naproxen products. Topical NSAID formulations enable drug delivery to target tissues, while reducing systemic exposure and concomitant side effects associated with oral NSAIDs. Dermal/transdermal NSAID delivery systems are subject of intensive investigation. So far, several 'advanced' drug delivery systems with diclofenac, ibuprofen and ketoprofen have been designed.

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Novel Standardized Solid Lipid Curcumin Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Pragati P; Slitt, Angela L; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with numerous chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. An overwhelming amount of data indicates that curcumin, a polyphenol obtained from the Indian spice turmeric, Curcuma longa, is a potential chemopreventive agent for treating certain cancers and other chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the low bioavailability of curcumin, partly due to its low solubility and stability in the digestive tract, limits its therapeutic applications. Recent studies have demonstrated increased bioavailability and health-promoting effects of a novel solid lipid particle formulation of curcumin (Curcumin SLCP, Longvida(®)). The goal of this study was to evaluate the aqueous solubility and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulations using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cultured murine macrophages. SLCPs treatment significantly decreased nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) levels at concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 μg/mL, and reduced interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Transient transfection experiments using a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) reporter construct indicate that SLCPs significantly inhibit the transcriptional activity of NF-κB in macrophages. Taken together, these results show that in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, SLCPs have improved solubility over unformulated curcumin, and significantly decrease the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediators NO, PGE2, and IL-6 by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  8. [Effect of anti-inflammatory therapy on the treatment of dry eye syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrukwa-Kominek, Ewa; Rogowska-Godela, Anna; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanisława

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a common chronic disease; agents and strategies for its effective management are still lacking. The syndrome tends to be accompanied by ocular surface inflammation; therefore, the use of anti-inflammatory agents might prove beneficial. The authors present up-to-date guidelines, strategies, and efficacy of dry eye syndrome management, including anti-inflammatory treatment. As no diagnostic tests are now available to assess ocular surface inflammation severity, the right timing to launch an anti-inflammatory agent is difficult to determine. Patients with mild intermittent bouts of symptoms which can be alleviated with ophthalmic lubricants do not typically require anti-inflammatory therapy. The latter should be considered in those who do not respond to lubricating drops, obtain poor results on clinical tests, and show symptoms of ocular surface irritation (eg. conjunctivae redness). Anti-inflammatory treatment of dry eye syndrome may include short-term corticosteroids, cyclosporine A emulsion, oral tetracycline therapy, oral omega-3 fatty acid supplements, and autologous serum eye drops. Anti-inflammatory treatment should be safe and effective; potential benefits should be evaluated for each individual patient. The authors have reviewed the advantages of anti-inflammatory treatment in dry eye syndrome, presented in literature.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengmei; Du, Bin; Xu, Baojun

    2018-05-24

    Inflammation is the first biological response of the immune system to infection, injury or irritation. Evidence suggests that the anti-inflammatory effect is mediated through the regulation of various inflammatory cytokines, such as nitric oxide, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor alpha-α, interferon gamma-γ as well as noncytokine mediator, prostaglandin E 2 . Fruits, vegetables, and food legumes contain high levels of phytochemicals that show anti-inflammatory effect, but their mechanisms of actions have not been completely identified. The aim of this paper was to summarize the recent investigations and findings regarding in vitro and animal model studies on the anti-inflammatory effects of fruits, vegetables, and food legumes. Specific cytokines released for specific type of physiological event might shed some light on the specific use of each source of phytochemicals that can benefit to counter the inflammatory response. As natural modulators of proinflammatory gene expressions, phytochemical from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes could be incorporated into novel bioactive anti-inflammatory formulations of various nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Finally, these phytochemicals are discussed as the natural promotion strategy for the improvement of human health status. The phenolics and triterpenoids in fruits and vegetables showed higher anti-inflammatory activity than other compounds. In food legumes, lectins and peptides had anti-inflammatory activity in most cases. However, there are lack of human study data on the anti-inflammatory activity of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes.

  10. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. saponin extract in mice

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    Sumana Sarkhel

    Full Text Available Objective: Quillaja saponaria bark contains a high percentage of triterpene saponins and has been used for centuries as antiinflammatory and analgesic agent in Chilean folk medicine.In the Present study the anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extract of commercially partially purified saponin from Quillaja saponaria Mol. in in vivo animal models. Methods & materials:: Aqueous extract of the plant material was prepared by cold maceration. The anti-inflammatory activity of a commercial Quillaja saponaria Mol. (QS saponin extract was investigated by carragenan induced mice paw edema model for acute inflammation (Winter, 1962 [16]. Results: The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carragenan in paw edema model in swiss albino mice (18–20 g. The anti-inflammatory activity was found to be dose dependent in carragenan induced paw edema. QS was found to significantly (p < 0.05 reduce the carragenan induced mice paw edema (38.59%; 20 mg/kg bw as compared to carragenan control. The percentage inhibition of standard anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was (55%; 10 mg/kg, bw. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate that the aqueous extract of Quillaja saponaria saponins (QS possess significant anti-inflammatory activity. Keywords: Anti-inflammatory activity, Aqueous extract, Paw edema

  11. DMPD: Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18336664 Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages...(.html) (.csml) Show Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. PubmedID 18...336664 Title Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macro

  12. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insight

  13. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Conjugated Silicon Quantum Dots: Their Cytotoxicity and Biological Effect

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    Kenji Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs have great potential for biomedical applications, including their use as biological fluorescent markers and carriers for drug delivery systems. Biologically inert Si-QDs are less toxic than conventional cadmium-based QDs, and can modify the surface of the Si-QD with covalent bond. We synthesized water-soluble alminoprofen-conjugated Si-QDs (Ap-Si. Alminoprofen is a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID used as an analgesic for rheumatism. Our results showed that the “silicon drug” is less toxic than the control Si-QD and the original drug. These phenomena indicate that the condensed surface integration of ligand/receptor-type drugs might reduce the adverse interaction between the cells and drug molecules. In addition, the medicinal effect of the Si-QDs (i.e., the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme was maintained compared to that of the original drug. The same drug effect is related to the integration ratio of original drugs, which might control the binding interaction between COX-2 and the silicon drug. We conclude that drug conjugation with biocompatible Si-QDs is a potential method for functional pharmaceutical drug development.

  14. Antioxidant, Anti-Glycation and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Phenolic Constituents from Cordia sinensis

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    Muhammad Nasir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine compounds have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of C. sinensis, namely protocatechuic acid (1, trans-caffeic acid (2, methyl rosmarinate (3, rosmarinic acid (4, kaempferide-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7, kaempferide-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (8 and kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamno-pyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (9, all reported for the first time from this species. The structures of these compounds were deduced on the basis of spectroscopic studies, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1–9 were investigated for biological activity and showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageen induced rat paw edema test. The antioxidant activities of isolated compounds 1–9 were evaluated by the DPPH radical scavenging test, and compounds 1, 2, 4 and 7–9 exhibited marked scavenging activity compared to the standard BHA. These compounds were further studied for their anti-glycation properties and some compounds showed significant anti-glycation inhibitory activity. The purity of compounds 2–5, 8 and 9 was confirmed by HPLC. The implications of these results for the chemotaxonomic studies of the genus Cordia have also been discussed.

  15. Antioxidant, anti-glycation and anti-inflammatory activities of phenolic constituents from Cordia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musayeib, Nawal; Perveen, Shagufta; Fatima, Itrat; Nasir, Muhammad; Hussain, Ajaz

    2011-12-08

    Nine compounds have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of C. sinensis, namely protocatechuic acid (1), trans-caffeic acid (2), methyl rosmarinate (3), rosmarinic acid (4), kaempferide-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7), kaempferide-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (8) and kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamno-pyranosyl (1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (9), all reported for the first time from this species. The structures of these compounds were deduced on the basis of spectroscopic studies, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-9 were investigated for biological activity and showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageen induced rat paw edema test. The antioxidant activities of isolated compounds 1-9 were evaluated by the DPPH radical scavenging test, and compounds 1, 2, 4 and 7-9 exhibited marked scavenging activity compared to the standard BHA. These compounds were further studied for their anti-glycation properties and some compounds showed significant anti-glycation inhibitory activity. The purity of compounds 2-5, 8 and 9 was confirmed by HPLC. The implications of these results for the chemotaxonomic studies of the genus Cordia have also been discussed.

  16. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-09-16

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested.

  17. Design, Synthesis, Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Novel Piroxicam Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer J. Barreiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a series of benzothiazine N-acylhydrazones 14a–h, planned by structural modification of piroxicam (1, a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Among the synthesized analogues, compounds 14f (LASSBio-1637 and 14g (LASSBio-1639 were identified as novel antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory prototypes, active by oral administration, acting by a mechanism of action that seems to be different from that of piroxicam, since they were inactive as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2 at concentrations of 10 mM.

  18. Design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of novel piroxicam analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Amanda Silva; Bispo Júnior, Walfrido; da Silva, Yolanda Karla Cupertino; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; Castro, Rosane de Paula; Sabino, José Ricardo; Lião, Luciano Morais; Lima, Lídia Moreira; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2012-11-28

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a series of benzothiazine N-acylhydrazones 14a–h, planned by structural modification of piroxicam (1), a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Among the synthesized analogues, compounds 14f (LASSBio-1637) and 14g (LASSBio-1639) were identified as novel antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory prototypes, active by oral administration, acting by a mechanism of action that seems to be different from that of piroxicam, since they were inactive as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) at concentrations of 10 mM.

  19. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Häuser, Winfried; Mücke, Martin; Tölle, Thomas Rudolf; Bell, Rae F; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, despite being considered not to be effective. To assess the analgesic efficacy, tolerability (drop-out due to adverse events), and safety (serious adverse events) of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from inception to January 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and online clinical trial registries. We included randomised, double-blind trials of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing any oral NSAID with placebo or another active treatment for relief of pain in fibromyalgia, with subjective pain assessment by the participant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality and potential bias. Primary outcomes were participants with substantial pain relief (at least 50% pain relief over baseline or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC)) or moderate pain relief (at least 30% pain relief over baseline or much or very much improved on PGIC), serious adverse events, and withdrawals due to adverse events; secondary outcomes were adverse events, withdrawals due to lack of efficacy, and outcomes relating to sleep, fatigue, and quality of life. Where pooled analysis was possible, we used dichotomous data to calculate risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT), using standard methods. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Our searches identified six randomised, double-blind studies involving 292 participants in suitably characterised fibromyalgia. The mean age of participants was between 39 and 50 years, and 89% to 100% were women. The initial pain intensity was around 7/10 on a 0 to 10 pain scale, indicating severe pain. NSAIDs tested were etoricoxib 90 mg

  20. Recent considerations in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G

    1998-07-27

    Conservative calculations estimate that approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each year among arthritis patients alone. The figures for all NSAID users would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally under-appreciated. The Arthritis, Rheumatism, and Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) Post-Marketing Surveillance Program (PMS) has prospectively followed patient status and outcomes, drug side effects, and the economic impact of illness for >11,000 arthritis patients at 8 participating institutions in the United States and Canada. Analysis of these data indicates that: (1) osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are 2.5-5.5 times more likely than the general population to be hospitalized for NSAID-related GI events; (2) the absolute risk for serious NSAID-related GI toxicity remains constant and the cumulative risk increases over time; (3) there are no reliable warning signals- >80% of patients with serious GI complications had no prior GI symptoms; (4) independent risk factors for serious GI events were age, prednisone use, NSAID dose, disability level, and previous NSAID-induced GI symptoms; and (5) antacids and H2 antagonists do not prevent NSAID-induced gastric ulcers, and high-risk NSAID users who take gastro-protective drugs are more likely to have serious GI complications than patients not taking such medications. Currently, limiting NSAID use is the only way to decrease the risk of NSAID-related GI events. Ongoing ARAMIS research is aimed at developing a simple point-score system for estimating individual risks of developing serious NSAID-related GI complications.

  1. Neostigmine interactions with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Sierralta, Fernando; Pinardi, Gianni

    2002-04-01

    1. The common mechanism of action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the inhibition of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase (COX), however, this inhibition is not enough to completely account for the efficacy of these agents in several models of acute pain. 2. It has been demonstrated that cholinergic agents can induce antinociception, but the nature of the interaction between these agents and NSAIDs drugs has not been studied. The present work evaluates, by isobolographic analysis, the interactions between the cholinergic indirect agonist neostigmine (NEO) and NSAIDs drugs, using a chemical algesiometric test. 3. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of NEO and of the different NSAIDs produced dose-dependent antinociception in the acetic acid writhing test of the mouse. 4. The i.p. or i.t. co-administration of fixed ratios of ED(50) fractions of NSAIDs and NEO, resulted to be synergistic or supra-additive for the combinations ketoprofen (KETO) and NEO, paracetamol (PARA) and NEO) and diclofenac (DICLO) and NEO administered i.p. However, the same combinations administered i.t. were only additive. In addition, the combinations meloxicam (MELO) and NEO and piroxicam (PIRO) and NEO, administered either i.p. or i.t., were additive. 5. The results suggest that the co-administration of NEO with some NSAIDs (e.g. KETO, PARA or DICLO) resulted in a synergistic interaction, which may provide evidence of supraspinal antinociception modulation by the increased acetylcholine concentration in the synaptic cleft of cholinergic interneurons. The interaction obtained between neostigmine and the NSAIDs could carry important clinical implications.

  2. Mechanism of inhibition of myeloperoxidase by anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A J; Winterbourn, C C

    1991-05-15

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the most powerful oxidant produced by human neutrophils, and should therefore be expected to contribute to the damage caused by these inflammatory cells. It is produced from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). We used a H2O2-electrode to assess the ability of a variety of anti-inflammatory drugs to inhibit conversion of H2O2 to HOCl. Dapsone, mefenamic acid, sulfapyridine, quinacrine, primaquine and aminopyrine were potent inhibitors, giving 50% inhibition of the initial rate of H2O2 loss at concentrations of about 1 microM or less. Phenylbutazone, piroxicam, salicylate, olsalazine and sulfasalazine were also effective inhibitors. Spectral investigations showed that the inhibitors acted by promoting the formation of compound II, which is an inactive redox intermediate of MPO. Ascorbate reversed inhibition by reducing compound II back to the active enzyme. The characteristic properties that allowed the drugs to inhibit MPO reversibly were ascertained by determining the inhibitory capacity of related phenols and anilines. Inhibition increased as substituents on the aromatic ring became more electron withdrawing, until an optimum reduction potential was reached. Beyond this optimum, their inhibitory capacity declined. The best inhibitor was 4-bromoaniline which had an I50 of 45 nM. An optimum reduction potential enables inhibitors to reduce MPO to compound II, but prevents them from reducing compound II back to the active enzyme. Exploitation of this optimum reduction potential will help in targeting drugs against HOCl-dependent tissue damage.

  3. Anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Donate-Correa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, is used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in kidney transplant patients. Experimental and clinical studies in non-transplant kidney disease patients have found this molecule to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this exploratory study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney-transplant recipients. Methods: Thirty one kidney transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism completed 3 months of treatment with oral paricalcitol (1 μg/day. Serum concentrations and gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed at the beginning and end of the study. Results: Paricalcitol significantly decreased parathyroid hormone levels with no changes in calcium and phosphorous. It also reduced serum concentrations of interleukin (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α by 29% (p < 0.05 and 9.5% (p < 0.05 compared to baseline, respectively. Furthermore, gene expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased by 14.1% (p < 0.001 and 34.1% (p < 0.001, respectively. The ratios between pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, both regarding serum concentrations and gene expression, also experienced a significant reduction. Conclusions: Paricalcitol administration to kidney transplant recipients has been found to have beneficial effects on inflammation, which may be associated with potential clinical benefits. Resumen: Antecedentes y objetivos: El paricalcitol, un activador selectivo del receptor de la vitamina D, se utiliza en el tratamiento del hiperparatiroidismo secundario en el receptor de trasplante renal. Estudios tanto clínicos como experimentales realizados en pacientes renales no trasplantados muestran propiedades antiinflamatorias para esta molécula. En

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  5. Screening of Bauhinia purpurea Linn. for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedhara, C.S.; Vaidya, V.P.; Vagdevi, H.M.; Latha, K.P.; Muralikrishna, K.S.; Krupanidhi, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Ethanol extract of the stem of Bauhinia purpurea Linn. was subjected to analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models. Materials and Methods: Albino Wistar rats and mice were the experimental animals respectively. Different CNS depressant paradigms like analgesic activity (determined by Eddy's hot plate method and acetic acid writhing method) and anti-inflammatory activity determined by carrageenan induced paw edema using plethysmometer in albino rats) were carried out, following the intra-peritoneal administration of ethanol extract of Bauhinia purpurea Linn. (BP) at the dose level of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg. Results: The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extracts of BP were significant (P Bauhinia purpurea has shown significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities at the dose of 100 mg/kg and was comparable with corresponding standard drugs. The activity was attributed to the presence of phytoconstituents in the tested extract. PMID:20336222

  6. In-vitro anti-inflammatory activities of 3-methoxy quercetin isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    controls. Conclusion: The results demonstrate the potent anti-inflammatory activity of 3-MQ and suggests its use as a potential .... This process was repeated severally ... (v.6.3). The instrumentation comprises a pump, ..... Measurement of whole.

  7. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    , nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity...

  8. Antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory activity of Carrageenan from Hypnea musciformis Wulfen

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Solimabi; Das, B.

    Pharmacological studies on K-carrageenan extracted from Hypnea musciformis have shown that it antagonizes histamine-induced spasm in guineapig ielum and possesses anti-inflammatory activity against rat hind paw oedema induced by commercial...

  9. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory properties of the hexane extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maj Obaseki

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... and human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane stabilization assays. ... bonariensis affirms the anti-inflammatory property of the plant and the phytochemicals ..... Plasma for liver function tests was obtained by centrifuging the.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Agaricus blazei Murill extract in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    potential therapy of atherosclerosis disease. Keywords: Anti-inflammatory agent, Agaricus blazei Murill, Proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, IL-10. This is an ..... belong to the β2 integrin family. .... Response through Intestinal Epithelial Cells and.

  11. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    Gulecha, Vishal; Sivakumar, T; Upaganlawar, Aman; Mahajan, Manoj; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods : The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FR...

  12. Treating Gulf War Illness with Novel Anti-Inflammatories: A Screening of Botantical Microglia Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0623 TITLE: Treating Gulf War Illness with Novel Anti-Inflammatories: A Screening of Botantical Microglia Modulators...Report 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treating Gulf War Illness with Novel Anti...SUBJECT TERMS Gulf War Illness, botanical, anti-inflammatory, biomarker, microglia, improvement, treatment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  13. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of statins in chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Snophia Suresh; Satya Narayana; P Jayakumar; Uma Sudhakar; V Pramod

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Statins are the group of lipid-lowering drugs commonly used to control cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Statins have potential anti-inflammatory effect by blocking the intermediate metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin medication in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients of age group between 40 and 60 years were selected from the outpatient pool of De...

  14. Study of evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of macrolide antibiotics in rats: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Punam A. Gosavi; Jugalkishore B. Jaju; Vishal M. Ubale; Ganesh R. Pawar; Shrikant C. Dharmadhikari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is a complex and dynamic condition in which many changes take place at the site of inflammation, as well as systemically. In general, inflammatory response acts to protect the host, but many times it goes unchecked with tissue destruction leading to a spectrum of inflammatory disorders. Anti-inflammatory drugs have long been used to treat spectrum of inflammatory conditions. Anti-inflammatory agents, in use today, though have efficacy, cause a variety of side effects ...

  15. Mechanisms of action underlying the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of propolis: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. R. Araujo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many biological properties have been attributed to various types of propolis, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumor, wound healing, and immunomodulatory activities. This article reviewed studies published that investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis of different origins and/or its isolated components, focusing on the mechanisms of action underlying this activity and also addressing some aspects of immunomodulatory effects. The search was performed of the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, HighWire Press, Scielo, Google Academics, Research Gate and ISI Web of Knowledgement. The anti-inflammatory activity was associated with propolis or compounds such as polyphenols (flavonoids, phenolic acids and their esters, terpenoids, steroids and amino acids. CAPE is the most studied compounds. The main mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis included the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and consequent inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis, free radical scavenging, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis, reduction in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive activity. Propolis was found to exert an anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro models of acute and chronic inflammation and others studies, indicating its promising potential as anti-inflammatory agent of natural origin and as a source of chemical compounds for the development of new drugs.

  16. [In vitro anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from Ilex centrochinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-jun; Yu, Li-juan; Li, Yan-ci; Liu, Meng-yuan; Wu, Zheng-zhi

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from flex centrochinensis S. Y. Hu in vitro and their structure-activity relationship. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage was used as inflammatory model. MTT assay for cell availability, Griess reaction for nitric oxide (NO) production, the content of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and PGE, were detected with ELISA kits; DPPH, superoxide anion and hydroxyl free radicals scavenging activities were also investigated. According to the result, all flavans tested exhibited anti-inflammatory effect in different levels. Among them, compounds 1, 3, 4 and 6 showed potent anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NO, TNF-alpha, IL-lp and IL-6, of which 1 was the most effective inhibitor, however, 2 and 5 were relatively weak or inactive. The order of free radical scavenging activities was similar to that of anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, these results suggest that 3, 4 and 6, especially of 1, were,in part responsible for the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activity of Ilex centrochinensis. Hydroxyl group at 4'-position of B-ring plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging capacities.

  17. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Siril, Prem Felix, E-mail: prem@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Javid, Farideh [School of Applied Science, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  18. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  19. Significant in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Pytren4Q-Mn a superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 mimetic scorpiand-like Mn (II complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Serena

    Full Text Available The clinical use of purified SOD enzymes has strong limitations due to their large molecular size, high production cost and immunogenicity. These limitations could be compensated by using instead synthetic SOD mimetic compounds of low molecular weight.We have recently reported that two SOD mimetic compounds, the Mn(II complexes of the polyamines Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q, displayed high antioxidant activity in bacteria and yeast. Since frequently molecules with antioxidant properties or free-radical scavengers also have anti-inflammatory properties we have assessed the anti-inflammatory potential of Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q Mn(II complexes, in cultured macrophages and in a murine model of inflammation, by measuring the degree of protection they could provide against the cellular injury produced by lipopolisacharide, a bacterial endotoxin.In this report we show that the Mn(II complex of Pytren4Q but not that of Pytren2Q effectively protected human cultured THP-1 macrophages and whole mice from the inflammatory effects produced by LPS. These results obtained with two molecules that are isomers highlight the importance of gathering experimental data from animal models of disease in assessing the potential of candidate molecules.The effective anti-inflammatory activity of the Mn(II complex of Pytren4Q in addition to its low toxicity, water solubility and ease of production would suggest it is worth taking into consideration for future pharmacological studies.

  20. Pharmacokinetic equivalence study of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandrawinata RR

    2018-04-01

    drug/reference drug were 103.40% (98.70%–108.32% for AUC0-72h and 109.26% (100.18%–119.18% for Cmax. No clinically significant differences in tmax and t½values were found between the test drug and the reference drug. No adverse events were experienced by the subjects during this study.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the evaluated generic etoricoxib 120 mg film-coated tablets were bioequivalent to the reference drug. Keywords: bioavailability, bioequivalence, etoricoxib, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor 

  1. Rapid resolution of cellulitis in patients managed with combination antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Lawrence; Peterson, Sandford; Simmons, Tom; Dall, Amy

    2005-03-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that host inflammatory response has some effect on the clinical manifestations of cellulitis. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate whether the addition of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) therapy to antibiotic treatment hastens resolution of cellulitis-related inflammation. Patients presenting in the emergency department with signs and symptoms of class II cellulitis were assigned to receive treatment with either antibiotic therapy alone (intravenous, supplemented with oral cephalexin or an equivalent) for 10 days (n = 33) or antibiotic therapy for 10 days plus an oral anti-inflammatory (ibuprofen 400 mg every 6 hours) for 5 days (n = 31). Patients were discharged as soon as possible to complete their therapy on an outpatient basis. The addition of an oral anti-inflammatory agent significantly (P < .05) shortened the time to regression of inflammation and complete resolution of cellulitis. Twenty-four of 29 evaluable patients (82.8%) who received supplemental anti-inflammatory treatment showed regression of inflammation within 1 to 2 days compared with only 3 of 33 patients (9.1%) treated without an anti-inflammatory in the same time frame. All patients receiving adjunctive anti-inflammatory treatment experienced complete resolution of cellulitis in 4 to 5 days or less, while 24.2% (8/33) of patients treated with antibiotic alone required 6 to 7 days, and 6.1% (2/33) required 7 days or more (P < .05). This small preliminary study provides some promising data, suggesting that the supplemental use of anti-inflammatory therapy may hasten the time to regression of inflammation and complete resolution of cellulitis.

  2. PRODRUGS OF NON- STEROID ANTI - INFLAMMATORY AGENTS (NSAIDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to novel depot formulations (prodrugs) comprising an immobility promoting unit linked via an ester to an active pharmaceutical ingredient, i.a. common NSAIDs. The novel depot formulations are suitable for intra-articular injections and are soluble at slightly acidic p...

  3. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruits of Vernonia anthelmintica (L Willd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Pandey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruits of Vernonia anthelmintica (L Willd. (V. anthelmintica. Method: Hot plate method in mice, acetic acid induced writhing response in mice, tail immersion test and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and cotton pellet induced granuloma in rats method were used for screening analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruit of V. anthelmintica (family: Asteraceae. Results: The result of the study showed that the ethanolic extract of V. anthelmintica (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, p.o. fruits possed peripheral and central analgesic activity in animal model. The V. anthelmintica fruits extract showed in vivo anti-inflammatory activity on acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity models in rats. Conclusions: On the basis of result it can be concluded that saponins, steroids, tannins and flavonoids are the major constituents that are present in the fruits of V. anthelmintica which may be responsible for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Extracts from Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata Blubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Johannessen Walquist

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-PUFA is commonly recognized to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD. In previous studies, cold-pressed whale oil (CWO and cod liver oil (CLO were given as a dietary supplement to healthy volunteers. Even though CWO contains less than half the amount of LC-n3-PUFA of CLO, CWO supplement resulted in beneficial effects on anti-inflammatory and CVD risk markers compared to CLO. In the present study, we prepared virtually lipid-free extracts from CWO and CLO and evaluated the antioxidative capacity (AOC and anti-inflammatory effects. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays were used to test the AOC, and the results indicated high levels of antioxidants present in all extracts. The anti-inflammatory effects of the extracts were tested with lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- treated THP-1 cells, measuring its ability to reduce cytokine and chemokine secretion. Several CWO extracts displayed anti-inflammatory activity, and a butyl alcohol extract of CWO most effectively reduced TNF-α (50%, p<0.05 and MCP-1 (85%, p<0.001 secretion. This extract maintained a stable effect of reducing MCP-1 secretion (60%, p<0.05 even after long-term storage. In conclusion, CWO has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may act in addition to its well-known LC-n3-PUFA effects.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Latif; Abdul, Razique; Sukul, R R; Nazish, Siddiqui

    2010-01-01

    The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Jorge Luis; Simas, Daniel Luiz Reis; Pinheiro, Mariana Martins Gomes; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; da Silva, Antonio Jorge Ribeiro; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO) obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response) and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Amorim

    Full Text Available Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o. and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  9. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  10. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of some Libyan medicinal plants in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Lutfun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballota pseudodictamnus (L. Benth. (Lamiaceae, Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Lamiaceae and Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae are three well-known medicinal plants from the Libyan flora, which have long been used for the treatment of inflammations. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory property of the methanol (MeOH extracts of the aerial parts of these plants. Shade-dried and ground aerial parts of B. pseudodictamnus, S. fruticosa and T. garganica were Soxhlet-extracted with MeOH. The extracts were concentrated by evaporation under reduced pressure at 40°C. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced mice paw edema model. The administration of the extracts at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight produced statistically significant inhibition (p < 0.05 of edema within 3 h of carrageenan administration. The results demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties of the test extracts. Among the extracts, the S. fruticosa extract exhibited the most significant inhibition of inflammation after 3 h (62.1%. Thus, S. fruticosa could be a potential source for the discovery and development of newer anti-inflammatory ‘leads’ for drug development. The anti-inflammatory activity of B. pseudodictamnus and S. fruticosa could be assumed to be related to high levels of phenolic compounds, e.g., flavonoids, present in these plants.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of Sonchus oleraceus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Fabiana C; Bitencourt, Andressa D; Cabral, Layla D M; Franqui, Lidiane S; Soncini, Roseli; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2010-02-17

    Sonchus oleraceus L. has been used to relieve headaches, general pain, hepatitis, infections, inflammation and rheumatism in Brazilian folk medicine. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce; there are no reports related to its possible anti-inflammatory effects. This study was aimed at evaluating the scientific basis for the traditional use of Sonchus oleraceus using in vivo inflammatory models. Carrageenan-induced paw edema, peritonitis and febrile response induced by lipopolysaccharide tests, as well as fibrovascular tissue growth induced by s.c. cotton pellet implantation were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of Sonchus oleraceus hydroethanolic extract (SoHE) in rats. The SoHE at test doses of 100-300 mg/kg p.o. clearly demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects by reduced paw edema induced by carragenan, inhibited leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity and reduced LPS-induced febrile response, and in the model of chronic inflammation using the cotton pellet-induced fibrovascular tissue growth in rats, the SoHE significantly inhibited the formation of granulomatous tissue. The extract administered at 300 mg/kg p.o. had a stronger anti-inflammatory effect than indomethacin (10mg/kg) or dexamethasone (1mg/kg). The hydroethanolic extract of Sonchus oleraceus markedly demonstrated anti-inflammatory action in rats, which supports previous claims of its traditional use. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and anti- allergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  13. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Release in Mice Injected with Crotalus durissus terrificus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernández Cruz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (Cdt were analyzed with respect to the susceptibility and the inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of severe envenomation. BALB/c female mice injected intraperitoneally presented sensibility to Cdt, with changes in specific signs, blood biochemical and inflammatory mediators. The venom induced reduction of glucose and urea levels and an increment of creatinine levels in serum from mice. Significant differences were observed in the time-course of mediator levels in sera from mice injected with Cdt. The maximum levels of IL-6, NO, IL-5, TNF, IL-4 and IL-10 were observed 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-injection, respectively. No difference was observed for levels of IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that the envenomation by Cdt is regulated both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses at time-dependent manner. In serum from mice injected with Cdt at the two first hours revealed of pro-inflammatory dominance. However, with an increment of time an increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines was observed and the balance toward to anti-inflammatory dominance. In conclusion, the observation that Cdt affects the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines provides further evidence for the role played by Cdt in modulating pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Methyl Salicylate Derivatives Bearing Piperazine Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfen; Yin, Yong; Wang, Lisheng; Liang, Pengyun; Li, Menghua; Liu, Xu; Wu, Lichuan; Yang, Hua

    2016-11-23

    In this study, a new series of 16 methyl salicylate derivatives bearing a piperazine moiety were synthesized and characterized. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activities of target compounds were investigated against xylol-induced ear edema and carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The results showed that all synthesized compounds exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activities. Especially, the anti-inflammatory activities of compounds M15 and M16 were higher than that of aspirin and even equal to that of indomethacin at the same dose. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity activities and anti-inflammatory activities of four target compounds were performed in RAW264.7 macrophages, and compound M16 was found to significantly inhibit the release of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, compound M16 was found to attenuate LPS induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 up-regulation. The current preliminary study may provide information for the development of new and safe anti-inflammatory agents.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus Ja; Roelofs, Pepijn Ddm; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2016-10-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for the treatment of sciatica. A previous Cochrane review on the efficacy of NSAIDs summarised findings for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) and sciatica. This is an update of the original review (2008) focusing on people suffering from sciatica. To determine the efficacy of NSAIDs in pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported side effects in people with sciatica. We performed electronic searches up to 24 June 2015 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and two trials registers. We searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews on the topics for additional trials. We included randomised controlled trials (double-blind, single-blind, and open-label) that assessed the efficacy of NSAIDs in sciatica. We included all trials that compared NSAIDs to placebo, to other NSAIDs, or to other medication. Additional interventions were allowed if there was a clear contrast for the treatment with NSAIDs in the trial. Three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Where feasible we calculated pooled results using Review Manager 5.3. We reported pain relief outcomes using mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We used risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI to report global improvement of treatment, adverse effects, and additional medication. We performed a meta-analysis if possible. We assessed level of evidence using the GRADE approach. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 10 trials reported in 9 publications (N = 1651). Only one trial out of 10 was assessed at low risk of bias. Five trials used the currently recommended daily dose for the drug, and two trials used lower daily doses available over the counter. Three trials investigated NSAIDs no longer approved for human use. The follow-up duration

  16. Amides of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with thiomorpholine can yield hypolipidemic agents with improved anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Gavalas, Antonios; Rekka, Eleni A

    2016-02-01

    Novel amides of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), α-lipoic acid and indole-3-acetic acid with thiomorpholine were synthesised by a simple method and at high yields (60-92%). All the NSAID derivatives highly decreased lipidemic indices in the plasma of Triton treated hyperlipidemic rats. The most potent compound was the indomethacin derivative, which decreased total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol by 73%, 80% and 83%, respectively. They reduced acute inflammation equally or more than most parent acids. Hence, it could be concluded that amides of common NSAIDs with thiomorpholine acquire considerable hypolipidemic potency, while they preserve or augment their anti-inflammatory activity, thus addressing significant risk factors for atherogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 3-Aminothiophene-2-Acylhydrazones: Non-Toxic, Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Lead-Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Karla Cupertino da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Different chemotypes are described as anti-inflammatory. Among them the N-acylhydrazones (NAH are highlighted by their privileged structure nature, being present in several anti-inflammatory drug-candidates. In this paper a series of functionalized 3-aminothiophene-2-acylhydrazone derivatives 5a–i were designed, synthesized and bioassayed. These new derivatives showed great anti-inflammatory and analgesic potency and efficacy. Compounds 5a and 5d stand out in this respect, and were also active in CFA-induced arthritis in rats. After daily treatment for seven days with 5a and 5d (50 µmol/Kg, by oral administration, these compounds were not renal or hepatotoxic nor immunosuppressive. Compounds 5a and 5d also displayed good drug-scores and low risk toxicity calculated in silico using the program OSIRIS Property Explorer.

  18. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among healthy people and specific cerebrovascular safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can increase bleeding and thrombosis, but little is known about the cerebrovascular safety of these drugs, especially among healthy people. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke associated with the use...... stroke). RESULTS: We selected 1,028,437 healthy individuals (median age 39 years). At least one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was claimed by 44·7% of the study population, and the drugs were generally used for a short period of time and in low doses. High-dose ibuprofen and diclofenac were......·35-3·42)]. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy individuals, use of commonly available nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, and naproxen was associated with increased risk of stroke....

  19. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an association between depression and inflammatory processes, a connection that seems to be bidirectional. Clinical trials have indicated antidepressant treatment effects for anti-inflammatory agents, both as add-on treatment and as monotherapy. In particular......, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity...... of the inflammatory cascade, limited clinical evidence, and the risk for side effects stress cautiousness before clinical application. Thus, despite proof-of-concept studies of anti-inflammatory treatment effects in depression, important challenges remain to be investigated. Within this paper, we review...

  20. Neuro-immune interactions via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallowitsch-Puerta, Margot; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of TNF and other cytokines can cause the pathophysiology of numerous diseases. Controlling cytokine synthesis and release is critical for preventing unrestrained inflammation and maintaining health. Recent studies identified an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism termed “the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” that controls cytokine production and inflammation. Here we review current advances related to the role of this pathway in neuro-immune interactions that prevent excessive inflammation. Experimental evidence indicates that vagus nerve cholinergic anti-inflammatory signaling requires alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on non-neuronal cytokine producing cells. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists inhibit cytokine release and protect animals in a variety of experimental lethal inflammatory models. Knowledge related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be exploited in therapeutic approaches directed towards counteracting abnormal chronic and hyper-activated inflammatory responses. PMID:17289087

  1. Optimization on Extraction Engineering of the Anti - inflammatory Bioactive Materials from Ainsliaea Fragrans Champ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ainsliaea fragrans Champ.(A.fragrans is a traditional Chinese herbal, phenolic compounds was the major anti - inflammatory bioactive constituents. To improve the bioavailability and enhanced the curative effect of A.fragrans, the anti - inflammatory effect of phenolic acids and the “non-active” group of control vectors constitute a new biomedical material, which is of great significance to the treatment of diseases inflammation. Hence, in this thesis, regarding the total phenolic acid transfer rate as the indicator, L9(34 orthogonal design was used to optimize the extraction process of total Phenolic acid from A.fragrans by reflux extraction method on solvent dosage, extraction times and extraction time.The optimal extraction technology was as follows: 15 times of water volume, reflux extraction 3 times, extraction time 60 min. The result of pharmacological activity indicated anti-inflammatory effect: 95% ethanol extraction > water extraction > 30% ethanol extraction > 60% ethanol extraction.

  2. Different activities of Schinus areira L.: anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davicino, R; Mattar, A; Casali, Y; Anesini, C; Micalizzi, B

    2010-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory drugs possess many serious side effects at doses commonly prescribed. It is really important to discover novel regulators of inflammation from natural sources with minimal adverse effects. Schinus areira L. is a plant native from South America and is used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory herb. For this study, the activity of aqueous extracts on inflammation and the effect on superoxide anion production in mice macrophages were assayed. Aqueous extracts were prepared by soaking herbs in cold water (cold extract), boiling water (infusion), and simmering water (decoction). Cold extract possess an anti-inflammatory activity. Decoction and infusion showed pro-inflammatory activity. Cold extract increased the production of superoxide anion. It has been proposed to use diverse methods to obtain extracts of S. areira L. with different effects. Cold extract, decoction, and infusion could be utilized as extracts or as pharmacological preparations for topical application.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of the apolar extract from the seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Rhodophyta, Nemaliales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rozas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The red seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Ellis & Solander Lamouroux, well known by the antibacterial activity of its polar extract and the cytotoxic activity of its oxygenated desmosterol, showed anti-inflammatory action in its apolar fraction. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was observed in samples collected at São Sebastião channel, northern littoral of São Paulo State, Brazil. The apolar extract and its fractions obtained through Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC reduced the topical inflammation produced by croton oil in mouse ear. Such data indicated that the apolar extract from the marine red alga G. marginata displayed anti-inflammatory activity (since 1mg/ear extract reduced 95±0.5% inflammation, which could be the result of the synergic activity of the four fractions present in the apolar extract.

  4. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO.

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract rich in ellagitannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; Mena, Pedro; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been used for centuries for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, there is a lack of comprehensive information focused on the properties of a certain pomegranate (poly)phenolic profile to cure pain and gastric injury induced by anti-inflammatory drugs. This study investigated the systemic effects of different doses of a HPLC-characterized pomegranate extract on the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice. The effect of the extract against gastric injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ethanol was also assessed. Pomegranate reduced nociception in both phases of the formalin test, suggesting central and peripheral activities to inhibit nociception. Indomethacin-induced gastric injury was not produced in the presence of pomegranate, which also protected against ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The present results reinforce the benefits of pomegranate (poly)phenolics in the treatment of pain as well as their anti-inflammatory properties.

  6. Pathogen- and host-directed anti-inflammatory activities of macrolide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Helen C; Theron, Annette J; Cockeran, Riana; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics possess several, beneficial, secondary properties which complement their primary antimicrobial activity. In addition to high levels of tissue penetration, which may counteract seemingly macrolide-resistant bacterial pathogens, these agents also possess anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their primary antimicrobial activity. Macrolides target cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as structural cells, and are beneficial in controlling harmful inflammatory responses during acute and chronic bacterial infection. These secondary anti-inflammatory activities of macrolides appear to be particularly effective in attenuating neutrophil-mediated inflammation. This, in turn, may contribute to the usefulness of these agents in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of both microbial and nonmicrobial origin, predominantly of the airways. This paper is focused on the various mechanisms of macrolide-mediated anti-inflammatory activity which target both microbial pathogens and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, with emphasis on their clinical relevance.

  7. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of calyces from Physalis peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Reina M; Aragón, Diana M; Ospina, Luis F; Ramos, Freddy A; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana calyces are used extensively in folk medicine. The crude ethanolic extract and some fractions of calyces were evaluated in order to explore antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the TPA-induced ear edema model. The antioxidant in vitro activity was measured by means of the superoxide and nitric oxide scavenging activity of the extracts and fractions. The butanolic fraction was found to be promising due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Therefore, a bio-assay guided approach was employed to isolate and identify rutin (1) and nicotoflorin (2) from their NMR spectroscopic and MS data. The identification of rutin in calyces of P. peruviana supports the possible use of this waste material for phytotherapeutic, nutraceutical and cosmetic preparations.

  8. Occurrence and fate of antibiotic, analgesic/anti-inflammatory, and antifungal compounds in five wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Shah, A; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-03-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the aquatic environment as a result of wastewater effluent discharge is a concern in many countries. In order to expand our understanding on the occurrence and fate of PPCPs during wastewater treatment processes, 62 antibiotic, analgesic/anti-inflammatory, and antifungal compounds were analyzed in 72 liquid and 24 biosolid samples from six wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) during the summer and winter seasons of 2010-2012. This is the first scientific study to compare five different wastewater treatment processes: facultative and aerated lagoons, chemically-enhanced primary treatment, secondary activated sludge, and advanced biological nutrient removal. PPCPs were detected in all WWTP influents at median concentrations of 1.5 to 92,000 ng/L, with no seasonal differences. PPCPs were also found in all final effluents at median levels ranging from 3.6 to 4,200 ng/L with higher values during winter (pRemoval efficiencies ranged between -450% and 120%, depending on the compound, WWTP type, and season. Mass balance showed that the fate of analgesic/anti-inflammatory compounds was predominantly biodegradation during biological treatment, while antibiotics and antifungal compounds were more likely to sorb to sludge. However, some PPCPs remained soluble and were detected in effluent samples. Overall, this study highlighted the occurrence and behavior of a large set of PPCPs and determined how their removal is affected by environmental/operational factors in different WWTPs. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of standardized dichloromethane extract of Salvia connivens on macrophages stimulated by LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Marco Martín; Ramos-Velázquez, Cinthia Saraí; Serrano-Vega, Roberto; Pérez-González, Cuauhtemoc; Sánchez-Mendoza, Ernesto; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud

    2017-12-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the chloroform extract of Salvia connivens Epling (Lamiaceae) has anti-inflammatory activity. Identification of the active components in the dicholorometane extract (DESC), and, standardization of the extract based in ursolic acid. DESC was prepared by percolation with dichlromethane and after washed with hot hexane, its composition was determined by CG-MS and NMR, and standardized by HPLC. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested on acute TPA-induced mouse ear oedema at doses of 2.0 mg/ear. The cell viability of macrophages was evaluated by MTT method, and pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, dihydroursolic acid and eupatorin were identified in DESC, which was standardized based on the ursolic acid concentration (126 mg/g). The anti-inflammatory activities of DESC, the acid mixture, and eupatorin (2 mg/ear) were 60.55, 57.20 and 56.40% inhibition, respectively, on TPA-induced ear oedema. The IC 50 of DESC on macrophages was 149.4 μg/mL. DESC (25 μg/mL) significantly reduced TNF-α (2.0-fold), IL-1β (2.2-fold) and IL-6 (2.0-fold) in macrophages stimulated with LPS and increased the production of IL-10 (1.9-fold). Inflammation is a basic response to injuries, and macrophages are involved in triggering inflammation. Macrophage cells exhibit a response to LPS, inducing inflammatory mediators, and DESC inhibits the biosynthesis of the pro-inflammatory and promote anti-inflammatory cytokines. DESC has an anti-inflammatory effect; reduced the levels of IL-1β, Il-6 and TNF-α; and increases IL-10 in macrophages stimulated with LPS. Ursolic acid is a good phytochemical marker.

  10. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Teucrium chamaedrys Leaves Aqueous Extract in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Pourmotabbed; Amir Farshchi; Golbarg Ghiasi; Peyman Malek Khatabi

    2010-01-01

    Objective(s)Current study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Teucrium chamaedrys in mice and rats. Materials and MethodsFor evaluating of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, we used the carrageenan- and dextran-induced paw oedema, acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick and formalin pain tests.ResultsThe extract of T. chamaedrys (50–200 mg/kg) and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg) produced a significant (P< 0.01) inhibitio...

  11. MODERN MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN. RECOURSES OF SYSTEM ANTI INFLAMMATORY TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Zaitseva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem of etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory infections in children are observed in this article. Modern approach to management of its treatment in pediatric patients, including often ailing children, is described. Authors give characteristics to main directions of treatment of obstructive syndrome. An experience of anti-inflammatory therapy with fenspiride (eurespal in children of different age is summa ized in this article.Key words: often ailing children, acute respiratory infections, bronchoobstructive syndrome, anti-inflammatory treatment, fenspiride.

  12. Gastrointestinal Complications Depending on the Selectivity of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Dzyak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of gastrointestinal complications during administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly used to treat a range of conditions, particularly rheumatic diseases. The results of own researches, which served to define the characteristics of changes in the state of gastric secretory function in patients receiving non-selective and selective anti-inflammatory agent and their comparative analysis, are provided. The data obtained demonstrated a certain contribution to the understanding of the mechanism of development of complications from the gastrointestinal tract when taken drugs of above group.

  13. Evaluation of In Vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Azomethines of Aryl Oxazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Niraimathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ability to inhibit erythrocyte hemolysis is often used as a characteristic of the membrane stabilising action of chemical compounds. Azomethines of aryl oxazoles were evaluated for anti-inflammatory by in vitro hemolytic membrane stabilising study. The effect of inflammation condition was studied on erythrocyte exposed to hypotonic solution. In this in vitro method the membrane stabilising action leads to anti-inflammatory activity and was compared with that produced by diclofenac sodium as the reference standard. Results of the evaluation indicate that the synthesised compounds found to exhibit membrane stabilising activity.

  14. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be prescribed. Infection, inflammation, and/or increased oxidative stress often require a specific treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and/or antioxidants. Combined therapies can contribute to improve sperm quality.

  16. Clostridium cadaveris bacteraemia: two cases and review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, R.P.; Rijn, M. Van; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Clostridium cadaveris is a strict anaerobic Gram-positive rod that is the most prominent bacterium during the decay of dead bodies. We present 2 rare cases of bacteraemia with C. cadaveris. The source of both infectious episodes was most probably of gastrointestinal origin.

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of human IgG4 antibodies by dynamic Fab arm exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Neut Kolfschoten, Marijn; Schuurman, Janine; Losen, Mario; Bleeker, Wim K.; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Vermeulen, Ellen; den Bleker, Tamara H.; Wiegman, Luus; Vink, Tom; Aarden, Lucien A.; de Baets, Marc H.; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies play a central role in immunity by forming an interface with the innate immune system and, typically, mediate proinflammatory activity. We describe a novel posttranslational modification that leads to anti-inflammatory activity of antibodies of immunoglobulin G, isotype 4 (IgG4). IgG4

  18. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paviaya, Udaybhan Singh; Kumar, Parveen; Wanjari, Manish M; Thenmozhi, S; Balakrishnan, B R

    2013-01-01

    Grewia asiatica Linn. (Family: Tiliaceae), called Phalsa in Hindi is an Indian medicinal plant used for a variety of therapeutic and nutritional uses. The root bark of the plant is traditionally used in rheumatism (painful chronic inflammatory condition). The present study demonstrates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of G. asiatica in rodents. The methanolic extract of Grewia asiatica (MEGA) and aqueous extract of Grewia asiatica (AEGA) of the bark were prepared and subjected to phytochemical tests and pharmacological screening for analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect in rodents. Analgesic effect was studied using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and hot plate analgesia in rats while anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats. The MEGA or AEGA was administered orally in doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day of body weight. Data were analysed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's test. The extracts showed a significant inhibition of writhing response and increase in hot plate reaction time and also caused a decrease in paw oedema. The effects were comparable with the standard drugs used. The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  19. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the n-butanol fraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BF) using standard procedures. The median lethal dose (LD50) of the fraction was determined using Lorke's method and the analgesic effect was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice, while the anti-inflammatory activity was ...

  20. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiarthritic Activity of Anthraquinone Derivatives in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay D. Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2 in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin and AEC significantly P<0.001 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant P<0.001 decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant P<0.001 inhibition in inflammation and arthritis.

  1. Immuno-modulation and anti-inflammatory benefits of antibiotics: the example of tilmicosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, André G

    2010-01-01

    Exaggerated immune responses, such as those implicated in severe inflammatory reactions, are costly to the metabolism. Inflammation and pro-inflammatory mediators negatively affect production in the food animal industry by reducing growth, feed intake, reproduction, milk production, and metabolic health. An ever-increasing number of findings have established that antibiotics, macrolides in particular, may generate anti-inflammatory effects, including the modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the alteration of neutrophil function. The effects are time- and dose-dependent, and the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain incompletely understood. Recent studies, mostly using the veterinary macrolide tilmicosin, may have shed new light on the mode of action of some macrolides and their anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, research findings demonstrate that this compound, amongst others, induces neutrophil apoptosis, which in turn provides anti-inflammatory benefits. Studies using tilmicosin model systems in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that this antibiotic has potent immunomodulatory effects that may explain why at least parts of its clinical benefits are independent of anti-microbial effects. More research is needed, using this antibiotic and others that may have similar properties, to clarify the biological mechanisms responsible for antibiotic-induced neutrophil apoptosis, and how this, in turn, may provide enhanced clinical benefits. Such studies may help establish a rational basis for the development of novel, efficacious, anti-microbial compounds that generate anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their antibacterial effects.

  2. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Profile of n-Hexane Fraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of n-hexane extract of the whole plant of Viola betonicifolia Sm, family: Violaceace. Methods: The n-hexane fraction of Viola betonicifolia (VBHF) was tested for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activities (carrageenan-induced and histamine-induced ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Careya arborea stem bark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanol extract of Careya arborea (MECA). The effects of MECA on the acute and chronic phases of inflammation were studied in carrageenan, dextran and mediators (histamine and serotonin) induced paw oedema and cotton ...

  4. Synthesis, Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of 3- Ethyl-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4(3H)-ones and evaluate them for their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Methods: The compounds, 3-ethyl-2-substituted amino-quinazolin-4(3H)-ones, were synthesized by reacting the amino group of 3-ethyl-2-hydrazino ...

  5. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of kaviiron (a Garcinia kola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kolaviron is a defatted ethanol extract from the seeds of Garcinia Kola. In the present study, the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Kolaviron is investigated using both thermal and chemical models of pain assessment in mice and rats. Varying doses of Kolaviron were given 30 minutes prior to the induction of ...

  6. Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions and methanolic extract of Philonotis hastate (Duby Wijk & MargaDant). ... The fractions and methanolic extract exhibited moderate antioxidant potentials with various models. The flavonoid contents of the methanol extract and fractions ranged between 1.70 ...

  7. Endogenous stress proteins as targets for anti-inflammatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, L.

    2009-01-01

    Stress proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsp) are important controllers of both cellular and immune homeostasis. Enhanced Hsp expression can be observed in virtually every inflammatory condition and has been proposed by us and others to lead to local activation of Hsp-specific anti-inflammatory

  8. The anti-inflammatory activity of dillapiole and some semisynthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise-Filho, Roberto; Pastrello, Michelli; Pereira Camerlingo, Carla Emygdio; Silva, Gisele Juni; Agostinho, Leonardo Aguiar; de Souza, Thaís; Motter Magri, Fátima Maria; Ribeiro, Roberto Rodrigues; Brandt, Carlos Alberto; Polli, Michelle Carneiro

    2011-11-01

    Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) produces an essential oil (dillapiole) with great exploitative potential and it has proven effects against traditional cultures of phytopathogens, such as fungi, bacteria and mollusks, as well as analgesic action with low levels of toxicity. This study investigated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of dillapiole. Furthermore, in order to elucidate its structure-anti-inflammatory activity relationship (SAR), semisynthetic analogues were proposed by using the molecular simplification strategy. Dillapiole and safrole were isolated and purified using column chromatography. The semisynthetic analogues were obtained by using simple organic reactions, such as catalytic reduction and isomerization. All the analogues were purified by column chromatography and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. The anti-inflammatory activities of dillapiole and its analogues were studied in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. Dillapiole and di-hydrodillapiole significantly (p<0.05) inhibited rat paw edema. All the other substances tested, including safrole, were less powerful inhibitors with activities inferior to that of indomethacin. These findings showed that dillapiole and di-hydrodillapiole have moderate anti-phlogistic properties, indicating that they can be used as prototypes for newer anti-inflammatory compounds. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the benzodioxole ring is important for biological activity as well as the alkyl groups in the side chain and the methoxy groups in the aromatic ring.

  9. Phytochemical Analysis by HPLC–HRESI-MS and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tabernaemontana catharinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ivan Marques

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae has been popularly used by folk medicine because of its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiophidic properties. This study aims to analyze the flavonoids composition of the hydroethanolic extract and of the ethyl acetate (EtOAc and butanol (BuOH fractions of T. catharinensis leaves, as well as to evaluate their anti-inflammatory activity using in vivo models. The phytochemical profile, determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography–High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC–HRESI-MS, showed the presence of flavonoids mainly having an isorhamnetin nucleus. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in carrageenan-induced paw edema (pre- and post-treatment with oral administration of a T. catharinensis hydroethanolic extract (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg and of organic fractions (50 mg/kg. The extract and fractions showed antiedematogenic activity by decreasing myeloperoxidase (MPO production. In the zymosan-air-pouch model, the extract and fractions inhibited leukocyte migration and significantly decreased the levels of various proteins, such as MPO, interleukin (IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, which revealed no cytotoxicity of the extract and the fractions. These results suggest that the hydroethanolic extract and organic fractions of T. catharinensis leaves have sufficient anti-inflammatory activity to support the popular use of this plant in the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  10. Ankle sprain: the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter A. A.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people per day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  11. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogs were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogs were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ1–42 levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate, CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ1–42 at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤ 1 µM): both Aβ1–42 and the ratio of Aβ1–42/Aβ1–40 were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach towards a clinically useful SALA. PMID:21405086

  12. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (AG is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as well as the mRNA abundance of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and interferon-beta (IFN-β in a dose-dependent manner in both lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- activated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. AG also substantially ameliorated the symptoms of LPS-induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Based on the results of luciferase reporter gene assays, kinase assays, and measurement of nuclear levels of transcription factors, the anti-inflammatory effects of AG were found to be clearly mediated by inhibition of both (1 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK/activator protein (AP-1 and (2 IκB kinase ε (IKKε/interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 pathways. In conclusion, we detected a novel molecular signaling pathway by which AG can suppress inflammatory responses. Thus, AG is a promising anti-inflammatory drug with two pharmacological targets.

  13. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  14. Anti-inflammatory Effects of apo-9′-Fucoxanthinone from the Brown Alga, Sargassum Muticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jin Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The marine environment is a unique source of bioactive natural products, of which Sargassum muticum (Yendo Fensholt is an important brown algae distributed in Jeju Island, Korea. S. muticum is a traditional Korean food stuff and has pharmacological functions including anti-inflammatory effects. However, the active ingredients from S. muticum have not been characterized.Methods:Bioguided fractionation of the ethanolic extract of S. muticum, collected from Jeju island, led to the isolation of a norisoprenoid. Its structure was determined by analysis of the spectroscopic data. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity and mechanisms of action of this compound were examined using lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells through ELISA assays and Western blot analysis.Results:Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone, belonging to the norisoprenoid family were identified. Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone effectively suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production. This compound also exerted their anti-inflammatory actions by down-regulating of NF-κB activation via suppression of IκB-α in macrophages.Conclusions:This is the first report describing effective anti-inflammatory activity for apo-9’-fucoxanthinone′-fucoxanthnone isolated from S. muticum. Apo-9′-fucoxanthinone may be a good candidate for delaying the progression of human inflammatory diseases and warrants further studies.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of linezolid on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Obara, Shigeaki; Kuroda, Yuko; Kizu, Junko

    2015-12-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of linezolid has recently been reported using in vitro experimental models. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of linezolid has not yet been demonstrated using in vivo experimental models. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of linezolid and other anti-MRSA agents using the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. The pretreatment with 50 mg/kg linezolid significantly suppressed edema rates, compared with control (5% glucose), with edema rates at 0.5 and 3 h after the administration of carrageenan being 17.3 ± 3.5 and 30.8 ± 3.0%, respectively. On the other hand, edema rates were not suppressed by the pretreatments with 50 mg/kg vancomycin, teicoplanin, arbekacin, and daptomycin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that linezolid exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were observed at linezolid concentrations that are achievable in human serum with conventional dosing. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the anti-inflammatory activities of linezolid, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, have a protective effect against destructive inflammatory responses in areas of inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanos SP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Stanos Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Pain Management, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events. Keywords: osteoarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, guidelines, topical analgesics, diclofenac

  17. Anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and cytoprotective activity of NO chimera nitrates of use in cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Ghenet K; Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Sohn, Johann; Edirisinghe, Praneeth D; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Qian; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2008-11-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have shown promise in colorectal cancer (CRC), but they are compromised by gastrotoxicity. NO-NSAIDs are hybrid nitrates conjugated to an NSAID designed to exploit the gastroprotective properties of NO bioactivity. The NO chimera ethyl 2-((2,3-bis(nitrooxy)propyl)disulfanyl)benzoate (GT-094), a novel nitrate containing an NSAID and disulfide pharmacophores, is effective in vivo in rat models of CRC and is a lead compound for design of agents of use in CRC. Preferred chemopreventive agents possess 1) antiproliferative and 2) anti-inflammatory actions and 3) the ability to induce cytoprotective phase 2 enzymes. To determine the contribution of each pharmacophore to the biological activity of GT-094, these three biological activities were studied in vitro in compounds that deconstructed the structural elements of the lead GT-094. The anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative actions of GT-094 in vivo were recapitulated in vitro, and GT-094 was seen to induce phase 2 enzymes via the antioxidant responsive element. In the variety of colon, macrophage-like, and liver cell lines studied, the evidence from structure-activity relationships was that the disulfide structural element of GT-094 is the dominant contributor in vitro to the anti-inflammatory activity, antiproliferation, and enzyme induction. The results provide a direction for lead compound refinement. The evidence for a contribution from the NO mimetic activity of nitrates in vitro was equivocal, and combinations of nitrates with acetylsalicylic acid were inactive.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Babassu Oil and Development of a Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Mysrayn Y. F. A.; dos Santos, Simone M.; Silva, Danielle R.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. Ferraz; Santos, Geanne K. N.; Hallwass, Fernando; Bianchi, Otávio; Silva, Alexandre G.; Melo, Janaína V.; Machado, Giovanna; Saraiva, Karina L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Babassu oil extraction is the main income source in nut breakers communities in northeast of Brazil. Among these communities, babassu oil is used for cooking but also medically to treat skin wounds and inflammation, and vulvovaginitis. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of babassu oil and develop a microemulsion system with babassu oil for topical delivery. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in mice ear edema using PMA, arachidonic acid, ethyl phenylpropiolate, phenol, and capsaicin as phlogistic agents. A microemulsion system was successfully developed using a Span® 80/Kolliphor® EL ratio of 6 : 4 as the surfactant system (S), propylene glycol and water (3 : 1) as the aqueous phase (A), and babassu oil as the oil phase (O), and analyzed through conductivity, SAXS, DSC, TEM, and rheological assays. Babassu oil and lauric acid showed anti-inflammatory activity in mice ear edema, through inhibition of eicosanoid pathway and bioactive amines. The developed formulation (39% A, 12.2% O, and 48.8% S) was classified as a bicontinuous to o/w transition microemulsion that showed a Newtonian profile. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of microemulsified babassu oil was markedly increased. A new delivery system of babassu microemulsion droplet clusters was designed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of vegetable oil. PMID:29430254

  19. Two new monoterpene glucosides from Xanthium strumarium subsp. sibiricum with their anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Xing, Xudong; Yan, Meiling; Guo, Xinyue; Yang, Lin; Yang, Liu

    2018-06-01

    Two new monoterpene glucosides: xanmonoter A (1) and xanmonoter B (2) were isolated from Xanthium strumarium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, MS and CD analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity with IC 50 values of 17.4, 22.1 μM, respectively.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts from Erythrina velutina and E. mulungu in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia M. M. Vasconcelos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs from Erythrina velutina Willd. (Ev and E. mulungu Mart. ex Benth. (Em in the carrageenan- and dextran-induced mice hind paw edema models. These medicinal plants belonging to the Fabaceae family are used in some Brazilian communities to treat pain, inflammation, insomnia and disorders of the central nervous system. In the present work, the extracts were administered orally in male mice at the doses of 200 or 400 mg/kg. In the carrageenan-induced test, only Em showed anti-inflammatory activity, decreasing the paw edema, at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg. No effect was observed with Ev in this model. On the other hand, in the dextran model, Ev demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect, showing decrease of the paw edema at the 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24th h. Em (200 or 400 mg/kg presented anti-inflammatory effect at the 2, 3 and 4th h after administration of dextran, as compared to control. In conclusion, the work showed that Ev and Em present anti-edematous actions, which possibly occurs by distinct mechanisms. While Ev seems to interfere especially in inflammatory processes in which mast cells have an important role, Em exerts greater activity in the inflammatory process that depends mainly on polymorphonuclear leucocytes. However, further studies are needed to determine the exact mechanism of action of the species investigated.

  1. Anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts from Erythrina velutina and E. mulungu in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia M. M. Vasconcelos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs from Erythrina velutina Willd. (Ev and E. mulungu Mart. ex Benth. (Em in the carrageenan- and dextran-induced mice hind paw edema models. These medicinal plants belonging to the Fabaceae family are used in some Brazilian communities to treat pain, inflammation, insomnia and disorders of the central nervous system. In the present work, the extracts were administered orally in male mice at the doses of 200 or 400 mg/kg. In the carrageenan-induced test, only Em showed anti-inflammatory activity, decreasing the paw edema, at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg. No effect was observed with Ev in this model. On the other hand, in the dextran model, Ev demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect, showing decrease of the paw edema at the 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24th h. Em (200 or 400 mg/kg presented anti-inflammatory effect at the 2, 3 and 4th h after administration of dextran, as compared to control. In conclusion, the work showed that Ev and Em present anti-edematous actions, which possibly occurs by distinct mechanisms. While Ev seems to interfere especially in inflammatory processes in which mast cells have an important role, Em exerts greater activity in the inflammatory process that depends mainly on polymorphonuclear leucocytes. However, further studies are needed to determine the exact mechanism of action of the species investigated.

  2. Assessment of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Y; Akita, S; Salamin, P A; Maier, R

    1990-10-01

    Four commercial gel preparations of topical anti-inflammatory agents have been assessed in six animal models commonly used to determine the biological activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for systemic administration. Only UV-induced erythema of the skin, adjuvant induced arthritis and the measurement of vascular permeability proved suitable for differentiation of the potency of the four topical agents. Carrageenin-induced paw oedema, the cotton pellet test and the assessment of the pain threshold according to Randall and Selitto were of little value. The effects of the gel preparation of diclofenac (CAS 15307-86-5) diethylammonium (Voltaren Emulgel) were comparable to two preparations containing 1% and 5% active ingredient, respectively. Gel 4 showed low overall activity. The experiments demonstrated that some of the models used for the assessment of anti-inflammatory agent for systemic administration proved suitable for the testing of topical preparations and that percutaneous absorption was insufficient to elicit anti-inflammatory effect in the animals at sites remote from the site of application.

  3. Topical glucocorticoid has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Møiniche, S; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of topical glucocorticoids in human thermal injury. The right and left legs of 12 healthy volunteers were allocated randomly to be treated with either 0.05% clobetasol propionate cream or placebo in a double-blind trial. Thermal...

  4. Effects of heat treatment on antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of orange by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the changes in functional components, antioxidative activities, antibacterial activities, anti-inflammatory activities of orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) by-products (OBP) by heat treatment at 50 and 100 degrees C (hereafter, 50D and 100D extracts, respectively). Optimal...

  5. Assessment Of Pattern Of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used in the treatment of pains. Self-medication is a common practice all over the world. Unwanted effects from use of this class of medication could pose health challenges. This study evaluated the prevalence and pattern of inappropriate use of NSAIDs among ...

  6. Negative effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ciprofloxacin, a second generation fluoroquinolone is often co-administered with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in life threatening situations in which Staphylococcus aureus infections are accompanied with pain and inflammation. This study was carried out to investigate possible in vitro interactions in co ...

  7. Effectiveness of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness of various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with vertebral fractures. Methods: A total of 78 patients (17 males and 61 females) with a mean age of 69.5 years were included. The major inclusion criterion was an osteoporotic vertebral fracture between T7 and L3.

  8. Toxic effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxicosis of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, piroxicam, indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and aspirin, which occasionally are locally used in Nigeria as rodenticides have been evaluated in rats using changes in the serum biochemical and haematological parameters as indices of toxicity. In the study, no ...

  9. Effects of dietary anticarcinogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on rat gastrointestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logt, E.M.J. van der; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Lieshout, E.M.M. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary compounds or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce cancer rates. Elevation of phase II detoxification enzymes might be one of the mechanisms leading to cancer prevention. We investigated the effects of dietary anticarcinogens and NSAIDs on rat gastrointestinal

  10. Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the non-obese diabetic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F. A.; Vosters, J. L.; Roescher, N.; Broekstra, N.; Tak, P. P.; Vervoordeldonk, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) has been shown to reduce inflammation in animal models, while abrogation of the pathway increases inflammation. We investigated whether modulation of CAP influences inflammation in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model for Sjögren's

  11. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of prosopis chilenses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abodola, M A; Lutfi, M F; Bakhiet, A O; Mohamed, A H

    2015-07-01

    Prosopis chilensis is used locally in Sudan for inflammatory conditions of joints; however, literature lacks scientific evidence for anti-inflammatory effect of this plant. To evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of prosopis chilenses. Edema inhibition percent (EI %) and hot plate method were used to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Prosopis chilenses in Wistar albino rats. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Prosopis chilenses were compared to indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid respectively. Ethanolic extract of prosopis chilensis at a dose of 200 and 100mg/kg body weight achieved peak EI% (EI% = 96.1%) and (EI% = 94.4%) three and four hours after oral dosing respectively. The maximum EI% for indomethacin was 97.0% and was recorded after 4 hours following oral administration of the drug at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. Prosopis chilensis extracts at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight significantly increased the rats' response time to hot plate compared to acetylsalicylic acid at a dose rate of 100mg/kg body weight (Pprosopis chilenses. Relevance of these effects to prosopis chilenses phy-to-constituents was discussed.

  12. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic extract of Lagenaria breviflora whole fruit in rat and mice. ... Its effect was comparable especially at 200mg/kg body weight to those of diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen. It could be suggested from the findings of this experiment that the extract may be ...

  13. COMPARISON OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF NIGELLA SATIVA AND DICLOFENAC SODIUM IN ALBINO RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Muhammad Usman; Qureshi, Hamid Javaid; Saleem, Tahira

    2015-01-01

    Nigella sativa or "Kalonji" is a naturally occurring plant in Pakistan and other countries which possesses a wide range of medicinal properties, the anti-inflammatory property being one of these. Diclofenac sodium is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. The purpose of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds with that of diclofenac sodium in albino rats. This laboratory randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in the Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore. The study was carried out on 90 male albino rats. Five percent formalin in a dose of 50 µl was injected into sub-plantar surface of right hind paw of each rat to produce inflammation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups of thirty each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. Increase in paw diameter, and total and differential leukocyte counts were measured as markers of inflammation. Nigella sativa seeds extract caused significant (pdiclofenac sodium; however, the extract was comparatively less potent than diclofenac sodium. The extract had no significant effect (p>0.05) on the total or differential leukocyte counts. Our results suggest that ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds possesses potent anti-inflammatory effect, in albino rats however, this effect is comparatively less but prolonged than that produced by diclofenac sodium.

  14. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the water extract from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In ayurvedic and Thai traditional medicine, the fruit of T. chebula is useful in arthritic disorders, inflammation, tumor, pains, chronic and recurrent fever. The study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models. Materials and methods: The water extract of T. chebula fruit was ...

  15. A glycoprotein with anti-inflammatory properties secreted by an Aspergillus nidulans modified strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. F. Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Total RNA from lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated rat macrophages used to treat protoplasts from an Aspergillus nidulans strain originated the RT2 regenerated strain, whose culture supernatant showed anti-inflammatory activity in Wistar rats. The protein fraction presenting such anti-inflammatory activity was purified and biochemically identified. The screening of the fraction responsible for such anti-inflammatory property was performed by evaluating the inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema in male Swiss mice. Biochemical analyses of the anti-inflammatory protein used chromatography, carbohydrates quantification of the protein sample, amino acids content analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Total sugar quantification revealed 32% glycosylation of the protein fraction. Amino acid analysis of such fraction showed a peculiar pattern presenting 29% valine. SDS-PAGE revealed that the protein sample is pure and its molecular weight is about 40kDa. Intravenous injection of the isolated substance into mice significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema. The isolated glycoprotein decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema in a prostaglandin-dependent phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect of the isolated glycoprotein on prostaglandin synthesis.

  16. Phytol: A chlorophyll component with anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Malin; Hellgren, Lars I.

    2014-01-01

    The naturally occurring dipterpene molecule Phytol is an alcohol that can be extracted from the chlorophyll of green plants. Phytol has been studied for decades and has been suggested to have both metabolic properties as well as potent anti-inflammatory effects. Phytol represents a molecule derived...

  17. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) Show Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Lung Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Isumi, Kyoko; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is increasingly recognized as a prevalent problem worldwide, especially in patients with a chronic lung disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a type of chronic inflammatory lung disease. Previous clinical studies have shown that COPD leads to low vitamin D levels, which further increase the severity of COPD. Vitamin D homeostasis represents one of the most important factors that potentially determine the severity of COPD. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in lung tissues are still unclear. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of VDR, we generated transgenic mice that show lung-specific VDR overexpression under the control of the surfactant protein C promoter (TG mice). The TG mice were used to study the expression patterns of proinflammatory cytokines using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The TG mice had lower levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-related cytokines than wild-type (WT) mice did. No significant differences in the expression of Th2 cytokines were observed between TG and WT mice. This study is the first to achieve lung-specific overexpression of VDR in TG mice: an interesting animal model useful for studying the relation between airway cell inflammation and vitamin D signaling. VDR expression is an important factor that influences anti-inflammatory responses in lung tissues. Our results show the crucial role of VDR in anti-inflammatory effects in lungs; these data are potentially useful for the treatment or prevention of COPD.

  18. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Methanol Extract of Cissus repens in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the CRMeOH. Analgesic effect was evaluated in two models including acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced paw licking. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by λ-carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema and histopathologic analyses. The results showed that CRMeOH (500 mg/kg decreased writhing response in the acetic acid assay and licking time in the formalin test. CRMeOH (100 and 500 mg/kg significantly decreased edema paw volume at 4th to 5th hours after λ-carrageenan had been injected. Histopathologically, CRMeOH abated the level of tissue destruction and swelling of the edema paws. These results were indicated that anti-inflammatory mechanism of CRMeOH may be due to declined levels of NO and MDA in the edema paw through increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd in the liver. Additionally, CRMeOH also decreased IL-1β, IL-6, NFκB, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS levels. The contents of two active ingredients, ursolic acid and lupeol, were quantitatively determined. This paper demonstrated possible mechanisms for the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of CRMeOH and provided evidence for the classical treatment of Cissus repens in inflammatory diseases.

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T.M. Enthoven (Wendy); P.D.D.M. Roelofs (Pepijn); R.A. Deyo (Richard); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic back pain is an important health problem. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat people with low back pain, especially people with acute back pain. Short term NSAID use is also recommended for pain relief in people with chronic back

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for a number of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. Paradoxically, it also contains nicotine, an anti-inflammatory alkaloid. There is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflammatory diseases, including ulcerative colitis, and the protective effect involves the activation of a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that requires the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on immune cells. Obesity is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. Nicotine significantly improves glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in genetically obese and diet-induced obese mice, which is associated with suppressed adipose tissue inflammation. Inflammation that results in disruption of the epithelial barrier is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease, and nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis. This article summarizes current evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Selective agonists for the α7nAChR could represent a promising pharmacological strategy for the treatment of inflammation in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine could be mediated via the expression of several nAChRs on a particular target cell.

  1. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of rice bran and green tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assay and flow cytometry. The anti-inflammatory effects of OCB were assessed by a nitric oxide (NO) assay ... (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts ... officially used at the 11th Winter Olympics Games of 1972 in ... well known for its beneficial properties on body condition ...

  2. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of rice bran and green tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of an enzyme bath of Oryza sativa (rice bran) and Camellia sinensis O. Kuntz (green tea) fermented with Bacillus subtilis (OCB). Methods: The anti-oxidant effects of OCB were assessed by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and flow ...

  3. Prescription Pattern Analysis of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Northeastern Iranian Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinali, Majid; Tabeshpour, Jamshid; Maziar, Seyed Vahid; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sent, Danielle; Azarkhiavi, Kamal Razavi; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy is a common cause of actual and potential adverse effects, such as bleeding and gastrointestinal ulceration, which exacerbates the patient's medical condition and might even be life threatening. We aimed to evaluate and analyze the

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, Sara; Di Nisio, Marcello; Gerdes, Victor; Porreca, Ettore; Souverein, Patrick; de Boer, Anthonius; Büller, Harry; Kamphuisen, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis, but their effect on venous thrombotic events is less well established. The study aimed to assess the risk of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients using NSAIDs and to evaluate

  5. Smoking, caffeine, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in families with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Dana B; Martin, Eden R; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Jewett, Rita; Stacy, Mark A; Scott, Burton L; Vance, Jeffery M; Scott, William K

    2007-04-01

    To assess associations between Parkinson disease (PD) and putatively protective factors-smoking, caffeine (coffee, tea, and soft drinks), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen). Family-based case-control study. Academic medical center clinic. A total of 356 case subjects and 317 family controls who self-reported environmental exposures. Associations between PD and environmental measures (history, status, dosage, duration, and intensity) of smoking, coffee, caffeine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were examined using generalized estimating equations with an independent correlation matrix while controlling for age and sex. Individuals with PD were significantly less likely to report ever smoking (odds ratio = 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.78). Additional measures of smoking revealed significant inverse associations with PD (Pcoffee drinking was inversely associated with PD (test for trend P = .05). Increasing dosage (trend P = .009) and intensity (trend P = .01) of total caffeine consumption were also inversely associated, with high dosage presenting a significant inverse association for PD (odds ratio = 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.99). There were no significant associations between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PD. Inverse associations of smoking and caffeine were corroborated using families with PD, thus emphasizing smoking and caffeine as important covariates to consider in genetic studies of PD.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Babassu Oil and Development of a Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysrayn Y. F. A. Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Babassu oil extraction is the main income source in nut breakers communities in northeast of Brazil. Among these communities, babassu oil is used for cooking but also medically to treat skin wounds and inflammation, and vulvovaginitis. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of babassu oil and develop a microemulsion system with babassu oil for topical delivery. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in mice ear edema using PMA, arachidonic acid, ethyl phenylpropiolate, phenol, and capsaicin as phlogistic agents. A microemulsion system was successfully developed using a Span® 80/Kolliphor® EL ratio of 6 : 4 as the surfactant system (S, propylene glycol and water (3 : 1 as the aqueous phase (A, and babassu oil as the oil phase (O, and analyzed through conductivity, SAXS, DSC, TEM, and rheological assays. Babassu oil and lauric acid showed anti-inflammatory activity in mice ear edema, through inhibition of eicosanoid pathway and bioactive amines. The developed formulation (39% A, 12.2% O, and 48.8% S was classified as a bicontinuous to o/w transition microemulsion that showed a Newtonian profile. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of microemulsified babassu oil was markedly increased. A new delivery system of babassu microemulsion droplet clusters was designed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of vegetable oil.

  7. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways.

  8. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Resveratrol through Classic Models in Mice and Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation and pain are closely related to humans’ and animals’ health. Resveratrol (RSV is a natural compound with various biological activities. The current study is aimed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of RSV in vivo. Materials and Methods. The analgesic effects were assessed by the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate tests. The anti-inflammatory effects were determined using the xylene-induced mouse ear oedema, the acetic acid-induced rat pleurisy, and carrageenan-induced rat synovitis tests, respectively. Results. The analgesic results showed that RSV could significantly inhibit the number of writhes and improve the time and pain threshold of mice standing on hot plate. The anti-inflammatory results showed that RSV could inhibit the ear oedema of mice. In acetic acid-induced pleurisy test, RSV could significantly inhibit the WBC and pleurisy exudates, could decrease the production of NO, and elevate the activity of SOD in serum. In carrageenan-induced synovitis test, RSV could reduce the content of MDA and elevate the T-SOD activity in serum; RSV could inhibit the expressions of TP, PGE2, NO, and MDA. Conclusion. Shortly, these results indicated that RSV had potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities and could be a potential new drug candidate for the treatment of inflammation and pain.

  9. Amauroderma rugosum (Blume & T. Nees Torrend: Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui-Mun Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amauroderma rugosum is a wild mushroom that is worn as a necklace by the indigenous communities in Malaysia to prevent fits and incessant crying by babies. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritive composition and antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of A. rugosum extracts on LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Nutritional analysis of freeze-dried mycelia of A. rugosum (KUM 61131 from submerged culture indicated a predominant presence of carbohydrates, proteins, dietary fibre, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. The ethanol crude extract (EE, its hexane (HF, ethyl acetate (EAF, and aqueous (AF fractions of mycelia of A. rugosum grown in submerged culture were evaluated for antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects. EAF exhibited the highest total phenolic content and the strongest antioxidant activity based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS assays. HF showed dose-dependent inhibition of NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and NO radical scavenging activity. Gas chromatographic analysis of HF revealed the presence of ethyl linoleate and ergosterol, compounds with known anti-inflammatory properties. In conclusion, the nutritive compositions and significant antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of mycelia extracts of A. rugosum have the potential to serve as a therapeutic agent or adjuvant in the management of inflammatory disorders.

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Sodium Valproate on Carrageenan-Induced Paw Edema in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mj Khoshnood

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABESTRACT: Introduction & objective: Inflammation is a body defensive response to the endogenous and exogenous stimulators such as chemical, radiation, trauma and invasive microorganism, which result pain and tissue necrosis. There are many natural and synthetic drugs for treatment of inflammation and lot of them are under investigation. Sodium valporate is an antiepileptic drug used particularly in the treatment of primary generalized seizure notably absence, myocolonic seizure, acute manic phase of bipolar disorder and prophylaxis of migraine. The previous observations showed sodium valporate increases level of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA in the central and peripheral nervous system. In acute inflammation, GABA showed a significant attenuation of paw edema and nociception. The aim of this study was evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of sodium valporate. Materials & Methods: In order to evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antiexudative of sodium valporate doses of 200,400 and 600 mg/kg were investigated on rat paw edema that induced by carrageenan. In addition, the plasma leakage in the inflamed tissue was evaluated by application of trypan blue as intravenous injection. Dexamethason was used as positive control. Results: Results showed sodium valporate doses of 400 and 600 mg/kg decreased inflammatory and exudative effect as compared to control group. Conclusion: Although the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of this drug were not evident but we can say sodium valporate in addition to already proved effects has anti-inflammatory effect.

  11. General unknown screening, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Dendrobium macrostachyum Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimisha Pulikkal Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The results showed a relatively high concentration of phenolics, high scavenger activity and high anti-inflammatory activity of the stem extract compared to the leaf extract. The results indicate that the plant can be a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory and Antibothropic Properties of Jatropha Elliptica, a Plant from Brazilian Cerrado Biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sára Costa Ferreira-Rodrigues

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibothropic and anti-inflammatory properties of J. elliptica. Methods: Phytochemical screening and thin-layer chromatography (TLC assays were performed on J. elliptica hydroalcoholic extract (TE in order to observe its main constituents. The antibothropic activity of TE was evaluated by the in vitro neuromuscular blockade caused by Bothrops jararacussu venom (Bjssu, in a mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm model (PND. A quantitative histological study was carried out to observe a possible protection of TE against the venom myotoxicity. The anti-inflammatory activity was also evaluated in two models, Bjssu-induced paw edema, and carrageenan-induced neutrophils migration in the peritoneal cavity. Results: TLC analysis revealed several compounds in TE, such as saponins, alkaloids, and phenolic constituents. TE was able to neutralize the blockade and the myotoxicity induced by venom, when it was pre-incubated for 30 min with venom. In addition, it showed anti-inflammatory activity, inducing less neutrophils migration and reducing paw edema. Conclusion: J. elliptica showed both antibothropic and anti-inflammatory properties.

  13. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of the Aqueous Leaf Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    suggest that the extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, which may be mediated solely by ... were then carefully separated from the stem; air dried for 7 days and pulverized using an electric mill. ... venier caliper, baseline measurement of the right hind .... to the release of mast cell autacoids like histamine.

  14. In vitro anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extracts of Acalypha alopecuroidea (Euphorbiaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Madlener, S.; Svačinová, Jana; Kitner, Miloslav; Kopecký, Jiří; Eytner, R.; Lackner, A.; Vo, T. P. N.; Frisch, R.; Grusch, M.; De Martin, R.; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav; Krupitza, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2009), s. 881-891 ISSN 1019-6439 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Acalypha alopecuroidea * cancer * anti-inflammatory activity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2009

  15. In vitro anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was determined using free radical scavenging assays such as DPPH, ABTS and NO2. The antiinflammatory potential was carried out using inhibition of protein denaturation of egg albumin as a model of anti-inflammatory capacity. Results: Both the crude methanolic extract and saponins ...

  16. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Launer, L J; Ott, A

    1995-01-01

    Based on reports that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the cross-sectional relation between NSAID use and the risk for AD in a population-based study of disease and disability in older people. After controlling...

  17. Helicobacter pylori and risk of ulcer bleeding among users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, C; Lauritsen, Jens; Hallas, J

    1999-01-01

    Peptic ulcer complications related to use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most common serious adverse drug reactions. Whether Helicobacter pylori infection potentiates this gastrointestinal toxicity of NSAIDs is still unresolved. In this study, we investigated...... the role of H. pylori as a cause of bleeding peptic ulcer among NSAID users....

  18. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of antibiotics and their use in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Swetalina Pradhan; Bhushan Madke; Poonam Kabra; Adarsh Lata Singh

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics (antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic) are class of drugs which result in either killing or inhibiting growth and multiplication of infectious organisms. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed by all specialties for treatment of infections. However, antibiotics have hitherto immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and can be exploited for various noninfectious dermatoses. Dermatologists routinely prescribe antibiotics in treatment of various noninfectious disorders. ...

  19. Valosin containing protein (VCP) interacts with macrolide antibiotics without mediating their anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nujić, Krunoslav; Smith, Marjorie; Lee, Michael; Belamarić, Daniela; Tomašković, Linda; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Malnar, Ivica; Polančec, Denis; Schneider, Klaus; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-02-29

    In addition to antibacterial activity, some macrolide antibiotics, such as azithromycin and clarithromycin, also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo, although the targets and mechanism(s) of action remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to identify protein targets of azithromycin and clarithromycin which could potentially explain their anti-inflammatory effects. Using chemical proteomics approach, based on compound-immobilized affinity chromatography, valosin containing protein (VCP) was identified as a potential target of the macrolides. Validation studies confirmed the interaction of macrolides and VCP and gave some structural characteristics of this interaction. Cell based assays however, including the use of gene silencing and the study of VCP specific cellular functions in J774.A1 (murine macrophage) and IB3-1 (human cystic fibrotic epithelial) cell lines, failed to confirm an association between the binding of the macrolides to VCP and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest the absence of an abundant high affinity protein target and the potential involvement of other biological molecules in the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Macrolide Hybrid Compounds: Drug Discovery Opportunities in Anti- Infective and Anti-inflammatory Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paljetak, Hana Cipcic; Tomaskovic, Linda; Matijasic, Mario; Bukvic, Mirjana; Fajdetic, Andrea; Verbanac, Donatella; Peric, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Macrolides, polyketide natural products, and their 15-membered semi-synthetic derivatives are composed of substituted macrocyclic lactone ring and used primarily as potent antibiotics. Recently their usefulness was extended to antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area. Hybrid macrolides presented in this article are the next generation semi-synthetic compounds that combine pharmacophores from antibacterial, antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area with 14- and 15-membered azalide scaffolds. Antibacterial azalide hybrids with sulphonamides showed improved activity against resistant streptococci while quinolone conjugates demonstrated full coverage of respiratory pathogens including macrolide resistant strains and their efficacy was confirmed in mouse pneumonia model. Antimalarial macrolide hybrids, mainly involving (chloro)quinoline pharmacophores, showed outstanding activity against chloroquine resistant strains, favourable pharmacokinetics, promising in vivo efficacy as well as encouraging developmental potential. Anti-inflammatory hybrids were obtained by combining macrolides with corticosteroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They were found active in in vivo animal models of locally induced inflammation, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrated improved safety over parent steroid drugs. Overall, macrolide hybrids possess significant potential to be developed as potent novel medicines in therapeutic areas of utmost pharmaceutical interest. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Immuno-modulation and anti-inflammatory benefits of antibiotics: The example of tilmicosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, André G.

    2010-01-01

    Exagerated immune responses, such as those implicated in severe inflammatory reactions, are costly to the metabolism. Inflammation and pro-inflammatory mediators negatively affect production in the food animal industry by reducing growth, feed intake, reproduction, milk production, and metabolic health. An ever-increasing number of findings have established that antibiotics, macrolides in particular, may generate anti-inflammatory effects, including the modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the alteration of neutrophil function. The effects are time- and dose-dependent, and the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain incompletely understood. Recent studies, mostly using the veterinary macrolide tilmicosin, may have shed new light on the mode of action of some macrolides and their anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, research findings demonstrate that this compound, amongst others, induces neutrophil apoptosis, which in turn provides anti-inflammatory benefits. Studies using tilmicosin model systems in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that this antibiotic has potent immunomodulatory effects that may explain why at least parts of its clinical benefits are independent of anti-microbial effects. More research is needed, using this antibiotic and others that may have similar properties, to clarify the biological mechanisms responsible for antibiotic-induced neutrophil apoptosis, and how this, in turn, may provide enhanced clinical benefits. Such studies may help establish a rational basis for the development of novel, efficacious, anti-microbial compounds that generate anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their antibacterial effects. PMID:20357951

  2. Improvement of bioavailability and anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin in combination with emu oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Nair, Kala; Singareddy, Sreenivasa Reddy; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Talluri, M V N Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of emu oil on bioavailability of curcumin when co-administered and to evaluate the property that enhances the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin. Oral bioavailability of curcumin in combination with emu oil was determined by measuring the plasma concentration of curcumin by HPLC. The anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated in carrageenan-induced paw edema model (acute model) and in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis model (chronic model) in male SD rats. The anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin in combination with emu oil has been significantly increased in both acute and chronic inflammatory models as evident from inhibition of increase in paw volume, arthritic score, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The increased anti-inflammatory activity in combination therapy is due to enhanced bioavailability (5.2-fold compared to aqueous suspension) of curcumin by emu oil. Finally, it is concluded that the combination of emu oil with curcumin will be a promising approach for the treatment of arthritis.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the aqueous extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carrageenan and histamine-induced rat paw oedema were conducted to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity, while acetic acid-induced writhing test was conducted to assess the analgesic activity of the plant. The extract was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) to rats at graded doses of 50, 100, 200 mg/kg body weight (BWt).

  4. Dermatomyositis-like syndrome induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, J J; Collet, A M; Bonerandi, J J

    1989-01-01

    A dermatomyositis-like syndrome developed in a patient treated with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAI), niflumic acid, and regressed after the cessation of treatment. Previously an eruption had occurred under treatment with another NSAI, diclofenac. Our report shows that NSAI can induce not only lupus-like syndromes but also other connective tissue disorders.

  5. Medicinal chemistry and anti-inflammatory activity of nitric oxide-releasing NSAI drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç And, Esra; Küçükgüzel, S Güniz

    2009-05-01

    Nitric Oxide, which acts as a non-specific cytotoxic mediator and a biological messenger on immunological competence, has been gaining significantly increasing importance. As an alternative to conventional NSAIDs having significant side effects, pharmacologically improved and therapeutically enhanced NO releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with less side effects are being planned to produce.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Solenostemon monostachyus aerial part extract in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Fiom Okokon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Solenostemon monostachyus is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments such as ulcer, hypertension, pains and inflammatory diseases. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of S. monostachyus aerial parts was carried out to ascertain its uses in traditional medicine. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of S. monostachyus was cold extracted by soaking the dried powdered material in ethanol. The aerial parts crude extract (75 –225 mg/kg of  S. monostachyus was investigated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities using various experimental models; acetic acid, formalin and thermal- induced pains models for analgesic study and carrageenin, egg albumin and xylene – induced edema models for anti-inflammatory investigation. Results: The extract caused a significant (pConclusion: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of this plant may in part be mediated through the chemical constituents of the plant and the results of the analgesic action suggest central and peripheral mechanisms. The findings of this work confirm the ethno medical use of this plant to treat inflammatory conditions.

  7. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The use of medications by football players in many populations is known to be high. Data on African players are scarce. Objective. To determine the magnitude of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and nutritional supplements by Zimbabwean football players. Methods. We conducted a ...

  8. Postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection.......To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection....

  9. DMPD: Endogenous anti-inflammatory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17132099 Endogenous anti-inflammatory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin.... Kobayashi H. Biol Chem. 2006 Dec;387(12):1545-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Endogenous anti-inflam...matory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin. PubmedID 17132099 Title Endogenous anti-inflammatory s

  10. Assessment of phytochemicals, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory potential of Boerhavia procumbens Banks ex Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Jasia; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Haq, Ihsan Ul

    2016-08-01

    Boerhavia procumbens is traditionally used in the treatment of various disorders including jaundice and gonorrhea, is a refrigerant, and exhibits anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the phytochemical classes, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of methanol extract (BPME) and different fractions (n-hexane (BPHE), ethyl acetate (BPEE), n-butanol (BPBE), and residual aqueous fraction (BPAE)) of B. procumbens against carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. To assess the anti-inflammatory effects of B. procumbens, 42 Sprague Dawley male rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into seven groups. Group I received distilled water and group II was treated with diclofenac potassium (10 mg/kg) body weight (bw) orally. Groups III, IV, V, VI, and VII were administered BPME, BPHE, BPEE, BPBE, and BPAE (200 mg/kg bw) orally, 1 h before the treatment with carrageenan (10 mg/kg bw) in rats. Anti-inflammatory effects of B. procumbens were determined by estimating the inhibition of edema at 1st, 2nd, and 3rd hour after carrageenan injection. Qualitative analysis of methanol extract indicated the composition of diverse classes, namely, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, phlobatannins, cardiac glycosides, alkaloids, terpenoids, and anthraquinones. Quantitative determination illustrated that BPBE and BPEE possessed the highest concentration of total phenolic (60.45 ± 2.1 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram sample) and total flavonoid content (68.05 ± 2.3 mg rutin equivalent per gram sample), respectively. A dose-dependent response for antioxidant activity was exhibited by all the samples. The sample with the highest aptitude for antioxidant activity was the BPBE for 2,2-azobis,3-ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging and total antioxidant capacity. Carrageenan-induced paw edema was significantly (p antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential and accredit the local use of B. procumbens in various disorders.

  11. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of honey: the involvement of autonomic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoyele, Bamidele Victor; Oladejo, Rasheed Olajiire; Ajomale, Kayode; Ahmed, Rasheedat Omotayo; Mustapha, Abdulrasheed

    2014-03-01

    The use of honey for therapeutic purposes is on the increase and many studies have shown that honey has the ability to influence biological systems including pain transmission. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of honey and the effects of concurrent administration of autonomic nervous system blocking drugs. Studies on analgesic activities was carried out using hotplate and formalin-induced paw licking models while the anti-inflammatory activity was by the carrageenan paw oedema method. Animals were distributed into six groups consisting of five animals each. They were administered saline, honey (600 mg/kg), indomethacin (5 mg/kg), autonomic blockers (3 μg/kg of tamsulosin, 20 mg/kg (intraperitoneally) of propranolol, 2 ml/kg of atropine or 10 mg/kg (intra muscularly) of hexamethonium) or honey (200 and 600 mg/kg) with one of the blockers. The results showed that honey reduced pain perception especially inflammatory pain and the administration of tamsulosin and propranolol spared the effect of honey. Hexamethonium also spared the effects of honey at the early and late phases of the test while atropine only inhibited the early phase of the test. However, atropine and hexamethonium spared the anti-inflammatory effects of honey but tamsulosin abolished the effects while propranolol only abolished the anti-inflammatory effects at the peak of the inflammation. The results suggest the involvement of autonomic receptors in the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of honey although the level of involvement depends on the different types of the receptors.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of Scoparia dulcis L. and betulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Peng, Wen-Huang; Chiu, Tai-Hui; Lai, Shang-Chih; Lee, Chao-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study intended to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the 70% ethanol extract from Scoparia dulcis (SDE) and betulinic acid on λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of SDE and betulinic acid was examined by detecting the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the edema paw tissue and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRd) in the liver. The betulinic acid content in SDE was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the anti-inflammatory model, the results showed that SDE (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) and betulinic acid (20 and 40 mg/kg) reduced the paw edema at 3, 4 and 5 h after λ-carrageenan administration. Moreover, SDE and betulinic acid affected the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in the λ-carrageenan-induced edema paws. The activities of SOD, GPx and GRd in the liver tissue were increased and the MDA levels in the edema paws were decreased. It is suggested that SDE and betulinic acid possessed anti-inflammatory activities and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms appear to be related to the reduction of the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in inflamed tissues, as well as the inhibition of MDA level via increasing the activities of SOD, GPx and GRd. The analytical result showed that the content of betulinic acid in SDE was 6.25 mg/g extract.

  13. Sucrose esters from Physalis peruviana calyces with anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Luis A; Ocampo, Yanet C; Gómez, Harold A; De la Puerta, Rocío; Espartero, José L; Ospina, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana is a native plant from the South American Andes and is widely used in traditional Colombian medicine of as an anti-inflammatory medicinal plant, specifically the leaves, calyces, and small stems in poultice form. Previous studies performed by our group on P. peruviana calyces showed potent anti-inflammatory activity in an enriched fraction obtained from an ether total extract. The objective of the present study was to obtain and elucidate the active compounds from this fraction and evaluate their anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro. The enriched fraction of P. peruviana was purified by several chromatographic methods to obtain an inseparable mixture of two new sucrose esters named peruviose A (1) and peruviose B (2). Structures of the new compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic methods and chemical transformations. The anti-inflammatory activity of the peruvioses mixture was evaluated using λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and lipopolysaccharide-activated peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that the peruvioses did not produce side effects on the liver and kidneys and significantly attenuated the inflammation induced by λ-carrageenan in a dosage-dependent manner, probably due to an inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2, which was demonstrated in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of sucrose esters in P. peruviana that showed a potent anti-inflammatory effect. These results suggest the potential of sucrose esters from the Physalis genus as a novel natural alternative to treat inflammatory diseases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. In-vitro antioxidant and in-vivo anti-inflammatory activities of aerial parts of Cassia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignasu P. Mehta

    2017-05-01

    The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured using scavenging of 2,2′-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH, bleaching of β-carotene and % inhibition of H2O2. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan induced paw edema method on Wistar albino rats. The etahnolic extracts of aerial parts of C. siamea and C. javanica were evaluated for in vivo anti-inflammatory activity against the animal model of female Wistar albino rats. Ethanol extracts showed significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects. The contents of flavonoids and total phenolic compounds could be correlated with the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities observed for C. siamea and C. javanica. Our findings suggest that aerial parts of C. siamea and C. javanica contain potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds, which could be tested as drug candidates against oxidative and inflammation-related pathological processes in medicinal chemistry studies.

  15. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals.

  16. Screening of Luzula species native to the Carpathian Basin for anti-inflammatory activity and bioactivity-guided isolation of compounds from Luzula luzuloides (Lam.) Dandy & Wilmott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Barbara; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Szappanos, Ádám; Mándi, Attila; Hunyadi, Attila; Kurtán, Tibor; Jakab, Gusztáv; Hohmann, Judit; Vasas, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The present study focused on the anti-inflammatory screening of Luzula species native to the Carpathian Basin and bioactivity-guided isolation of compounds of Luzula luzuloides (Lam.) Dandy & Wilmott. The anti-inflammatory properties of extracts with different polarity prepared from Luzula species were determined. Among them, the CH 2 Cl 2 -soluble fraction of L. luzuloides possessed strong inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation (99.39±0.37%) and elastase release (114.22±3.13%) in fMLP/CB-induced human neutrophils at concentration of 10μg/mL. From this fraction, six compounds (1-6) were isolated by the combination of different chromatographic methods. The structures of the compounds were determined by means of MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results allowed the identification of the new 1,6-dihydroxy-2-keto-1,7-dimethyl-8-vinyl-1,2-dihydrophenanthrene (1) from the plant, named luzulin A. Chiral HPLC and HPLC-ECD analysis revealed that 1 possesses low enantiomeric excess and TDDFT-ECD calculations afforded the configurational assignment of the separated enantiomers. Three known phenanthrenes [juncuenin B (2), dehydrojuncuenin B (3) and juncusol (4)] and two flavonoids [apigenin (5) and luteolin (6)] were also isolated. The anti-inflammatory activity of the isolated compounds was tested and IC 50 values were determined. This was the first time that phenanthrenes were detected in a Luzula species. The oxidative transformation of juncuenin B (3) led to the isolation of its possible biometabolites, namely luzulin A (1), dehydrojuncuenin B (4), and juncuenin D (7). The isolated compounds (1-4) confirm that besides flavonoids, phenanthrenes could also serve as chemotaxonomic markers for Luzula species and prove the close relationship of Juncus and Luzula genus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of animal oils from the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Delporte, Carla; Valenzuela-Barra, Gabriela; Silva, Ximena; Vargas-Arana, Gabriel; Lima, Beatriz; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2014-10-28

    Animal oils and fats from the fishes Electrophorus electricus and Potamotrygon motoro, the reptiles Boa constrictor, Chelonoidis denticulata (Geochelone denticulata) and Melanosuchus niger and the riverine dolphin Inia geoffrensis are used as anti-inflammatory agents in the Peruvian Amazon. The aim of the study was to assess the topic anti-inflammatory effect of the oils/fats as well as to evaluate its antimicrobial activity and fatty acid composition. The oils/fats were purchased from a traditional store at the Iquitos market of Belen, Peru. The topic anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by the mice ear edema induced by arachidonic acid (AA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at the dose of 3mg oil/ear. Indomethacine and nimesulide were used as reference anti-inflammatory drugs. The application resembles the traditional topical use of the oils. The antimicrobial effect of the oils/fats was assessed by the microdilution test against reference strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis. The fatty acid composition of the oils/fats (as methyl esters) was determined by GC and GC-MS analysis after saponification. All oils/fats showed topic anti-inflammatory activity, with better effect in the TPA-induced mice ear edema assay. The most active drugs were Potamotrygon motoro, Melanosuchus niger and Geochelone denticulata. In the AA-induced assay, the best activity was found for Potamotrygon motoro and Electrophorus electricus oil. The oil of Electrophorus electricus also showed a weak antimicrobial effect with MIC values of 250 µg/mL against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Salmonella enteritidis-MI. The main fatty acids in the oils were oleic, palmitic and linoleic acids. Topical application of all the oils/fats investigated showed anti-inflammatory activity in the mice ear edema assay. The effect can be related with the identity and composition of the fatty acids in the samples. This study gives support to the traditional

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of Lavandula dentata L. and Lavandula stoechas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Vezza, Teresa; Garrido-Mesa, Jose; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Utrilla, M Pilar; González-Tejero, M Reyes; Casares-Porcel, Manuel; Molero-Mesa, Joaquin; Del Mar Contreras, Maria; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Pérez-Palacio, José; Diaz, Caridad; Vergara, Noemí; Vicente, Francisca; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-08-22

    Plants from genus Lavandula have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs in Mediterranean traditional medicine. Nowadays, there is a growing interest for complementary medicine, including herbal remedies, to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To test the anti-inflammatory properties of Lavandula dentata and Lavandula stoechas extracts in two inflammatory experimental models: TNBS model of rat colitis and the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice, in order to mimic the intestinal conditions and the extra-intestinal manifestations of human IBD, respectively. The extracts were characterized through the qualitative HPLC analysis. Then, they were assayed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies were performed in BMDMs and CMT-93 epithelial cells with different concentrations of the extracts (ranging from 0.1 to 100µg/ml). The extracts were tested in vivo in the TNBS model of rat colitis (10 and 25mg/kg) and in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice (10, 25 and 100mg/kg). L. dentata and L. stoechas extracts displayed immunomodulatory properties in vitro down-regulating different mediators of inflammation like cytokines and nitric oxide. They also showed anti-inflammatory effects in the TNBS model of colitis as evidenced by reduced myeloperoxidase activity and increased total glutathione content, indicating a decrease of neutrophil infiltration and an improvement of the oxidative state. Besides, both extracts modulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and ameliorated the altered epithelial barrier function. They also displayed anti-inflammatory effects in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice, since a significant reduction of the paw thickness was observed. This was associated with a down-regulation of the expression of different inducible enzymes like MMP-9, iNOS and COX-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, all involved in the maintenance of the inflammatory condition. L. dentata and L. stoechas extracts showed intestinal anti-inflammatory

  19. Restoration of dietary-fat induced blood–brain barrier dysfunction by anti-inflammatory lipid-modulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallebage-Gamarallage Menuka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified use of non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs and statins for prevention of dementia, but their efficacy in slowing progression is not well understood. Cerebrovascular disturbances are common pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported chronic ingestion of saturated fatty acids (SFA compromises blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity resulting in cerebral extravasation of plasma proteins and inflammation. However, the SFA-induced parenchymal accumulation of plasma proteins could be prevented by co-administration of some cholesterol lowering agents. Restoration of BBB dysfunction is clinically relevant, so the purpose of this study was to explore lipid-lowering agents could reverse BBB disturbances induced by chronic ingestion of SFA’s. Methods Wild-type mice were fed an SFA diet for 12 weeks to induce BBB dysfunction, and then randomised to receive atorvastatin, pravastatin or ibuprofen in combination with the SFA-rich diet for 2 or 8 weeks. Abundance of plasma-derived immunoglobulin-G (IgG and amyloid-β enriched apolipoprotein (apo-B lipoproteins within brain parenchyme were quantified utilising immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Atorvastatin treatment for 2 and 8 weeks restored BBB integrity, indicated by a substantial reduction of IgG and apo B, particularly within the hippocampus. Pravastatin, a water-soluble statin was less effective than atorvastatin (lipid-soluble. Statin effects were independent of changes in plasma lipid homeostasis. Ibuprofen, a lipid-soluble cyclooxygenase inhibitor attenuated cerebral accumulation of IgG and apo B as effectively as atorvastatin. Our findings are consistent with the drug effects being independent of plasma lipid homeostasis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBB dysfunction induced by chronic ingestion of SFA is reversible with timely introduction and sustained treatment with agents that suppress inflammation.

  20. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  1. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrul Alam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities ofthe methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL. Materials and Methods: MPBL was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model. Analgesic activity of MPBL was evaluated by hot plate, writhing, and formalin tests. Total phenolic and flavonoids content, total antioxidant activity, scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical, peroxynitrate (ONOO- as well as  inhibition of total ROS generation, and assessment of reducing power were used to evaluate antioxidant potential of MPBL. Results: The extract of MPBL, at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, produced a significant (p

  2. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Cuscuta chinensis seeds in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jung-Chun; Chang, Wen-Te; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Chiu, Yung-Jia; Chao, Wei-Kai; Lin, Ying-Chih; Lin, Ming-Kuem; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2014-01-01

    The seeds of Cuscuta chinensis, Cuscutae Semen, are commonly used as a medicinal material for treating the aching and weakness of the loins and knees, tonifying the defects of the liver and the kidney, and treating the diarrhea due to hypofunction of the kidney and the spleen. Since aching and inflammation are highly correlated with such diseases, the aim of this study is to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the seeds of C. chinensis. The antinociceptive effect of the seeds of C. chinensis was evaluated via the acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced paw licking methods. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated via the λ-carrageenan induced mouse paw edema method. The results found that 100 and 500 mg/kg of the methanol extract of the seeds of C. chinensis( CC MeOH ) significantly decreased (p Cuscutae Semen in inflammatory diseases.

  3. Assessment of Anti-inflammatory Activity of Taxus Baccata Linn. Bark Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Mariappan, G; Sarkar, Dipankar; Sarkar, Piyali

    2010-01-01

    Taxus baccata (L) known as Sthauneyaka in Sanskrit(1) has wide range of biological activities including analgesic, anti-malarial, anti-rheumatic, sedative, anti-spasmodic, aphrodisiac and anti-asthmatic. In the present study, the dried and powdered bark of Taxus baccata (L) was extracted with 95% ethanol and ether at room temperature and screened for their anti--inflammatory activity by Carrageenan-induced paw edema method in rat. 95% ethanol extract exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activity at 200mg/kg four hours after administration in comparison with ether extract, as well reference standard, Aspirin. The observed pharmacological activities provide a scientific basis for the folklore use of the plant in treating acute inflammation.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and angiogenic activity of polysaccharide extract obtained from Tibetan kefir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Maria Rosa Machado; Boller, Christian; Zibetti, Rosiane Guetter Mello; de Souza, Daiany; Pedroso, Luciana Lopes; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    The search for new bioactive molecules is a driving force for research pharmaceutical industries, especially those molecules obtained from fermentation. The molecules possessing angiogenic and anti-inflammatory attributes have attracted attention and are the focus of this study. Angiogenic activity from kefir polysaccharide extract, via chorioallantoic membrane assay, exhibited a pro-angiogenic effect compared with vascular endothelial factor (pro-angiogenic) and hydrocortisone (anti-angiogenic) activity as standards with an EC50 of 192ng/mL. In terms of anti-inflammatory activity determined via hyaluronidase enzyme assay, kefir polysaccharide extract inhibited the enzyme with a minimal activity of 2.08mg/mL and a maximum activity of 2.57mg/mL. For pharmaceutical purposes, kefir polysaccharide extract is considered to be safe because it does not inhibit VERO cells in cytotoxicity assays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Anti-inflammatory Treatment on Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Adverse Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Ole; Benros, Michael E; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-01-01

    -controlled trials assessing the efficacy and adverse effects of pharmacologic anti-inflammatory treatment in adults with depressive symptoms, including those who fulfilled the criteria for depression. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers. Pooled standard mean difference (SMD...... investigated cytokine inhibitors (n=2,004). The pooled effect estimate suggested that anti-inflammatory treatment reduced depressive symptoms (SMD, -0.34; 95% CI, -0.57 to -0.11; I2=90%) compared with placebo. This effect was observed in studies including patients with depression (SMD, -0.54; 95% CI, -1.......08 to -0.01; I2=68%) and depressive symptoms (SMD, -0.27; 95% CI, -0.53 to -0.01; I2=68%). The heterogeneity of the studies was not explained by differences in inclusion of clinical depression vs depressive symptoms or use of NSAIDs vs cytokine inhibitors. Subanalyses emphasized the antidepressant...

  6. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour. Pericarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Jhong Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the water extract of longan pericarp (WLP. The results showed that WLP exhibited radical scavenging, reducing activity and liposome protection activity. In addition, WLP also inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO production in macrophages. Further, administration of WLP, in the range of 100–400 mg/kg, showed a concentration-dependent inhibition on paw edema development following carrageenan (Carr treatment in mice. The anti-inflammatory effects of WLP may be related to NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α suppression and associated with the increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase. Overall, the results showed that WLP might serve as a natural antioxidant and inflammatory inhibitor.

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and benign oesophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, S R; Fellows, I W; Ogilvie, A L; Atkinson, M

    1982-01-01

    Drug histories were obtained from 76 patients at the time of initial Eder-Puestow dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture. Six patients had consumed drugs known to cause oesophageal ulceration (emepronium bromide and potassium preparations). Of the remaining 70 patients, 22 had regularly taken a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug before the onset of dysphagia compared with 10 patients in a control group matched for age and sex; this difference was significant (p less than 0.02). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may have a causative role in the formation of oesophageal stricture in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux, in whom they should be prescribed with caution. PMID:6807392

  8. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief. PMID:23091348

  9. Benzimidazole derivatives: search for GI-friendly anti-inflammatory analgesic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gaba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been successfully used for the alleviation of pain and inflammation in the past and continue to be used daily by millions of patients worldwide. However, gastrointestinal (GI toxicity associated with NSAIDs is an important medical and socioeconomic problem. Local generation of various reactive oxygen species plays a significant role in the formation of gastric ulceration associated with NSAIDs therapy. Co-medication of antioxidants along with NSAIDs has been found to be beneficial in the prevention of GI injury. This paper describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of N-1-(phenylsulfonyl-2-methylamino-substituted-1H-benzimidazole derivatives as anti-inflammatory analgesic agents with lower GI toxicity. Studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of the test compounds decreased GI toxicity.

  10. Marine bioactive compounds: stereospecific anti-inflammatory activity of natural and synthetic cordiachromene A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benslimane, A F; Pouchus, Y F; Verbist, J F; Petit, J Y; Khettab, E N; Welin, L; Brion, J D

    1992-01-01

    A new synthesis is proposed for cordiachromene A (CCA), a bioactive component of the ascidian Aplidium antillense Gravier, using a method producing a racemic mixture. The anti-inflammatory activities of a natural extract and a chemically synthetic form of CCA were assessed in vivo by carrageenan-induced rat-paw edema. The activity of synthetic CCA was confirmed by a test on kaolin-induced granuloma in the rat. Strong activities were measured for both CCA, but comparison of results of the first test suggests that only the natural optically active isomer has an anti-inflammatory effect. CCA is similar to indomethacin in its effect on carrageenan-induced rat-paw edema and ten times as active as phenylbutazone.

  11. Cardiovascular outcomes and systemic anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with severe psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common disease and is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce risk of cardiovascular events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular events, i.e. cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke, in patients...... with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODS: Individual-level linkage of administrative registries was used to perform a longitudinal nationwide cohort study. Time-dependent multivariable adjusted Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence...... intervals (CIs) of cardiovascular events associated with use of biological drugs, methotrexate, cyclosporine, retinoids and other antipsoriatic therapies, including topical treatments, phototherapy and climate therapy. RESULTS: A total of 6902 patients (9662 treatment exposures) with a maximum follow...

  12. Curcumin: An age-old anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Fadus

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural anti-inflammatory agent that has been used for treating medical conditions for many years. Several experimental and pharmacologic trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the role as an anti-inflammatory agent. Curcumin has been shown to be effective in treating chronic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer's and common malignancies like colon, stomach, lung, breast, and skin cancers. As treatments in medicine become more and more complex, the answer may be something simpler. This is a review article written with the objective to systematically analyze the wealth of information regarding the medical use of curcumin, the “curry spice”, and to understand the existent gaps which have prevented its widespread application in the medical community.

  13. Effect of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate and anti-inflammatory gel in infusion phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cökmez, Atilla; Gür, Serhat; Genç, Hüdai; Deniz, Sümer; Tarcan, Ercüment

    2003-10-01

    Phlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous infusion. It has been suggested that it is initiated by venoconstriction at the infusion site, hence treatment with a vasodilator may reduce its incidence. A prospective controlled study was carried out on the effect of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and topical anti-inflammatory gel (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; NSAID) on the survival of peripheral intravenous infusion in 386 patients. A total of 34.9% (43 out of 123) of the infusions failed in the control group compared with 14.1% (18 out of 127) in the NSAID group (P NSAI gel and GTN but NSAI gel is more effective than GTN.

  14. Effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory meloxicam on stomach, kidney, and liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burukoglu, Dilek; Baycu, Cengiz; Taplamacioglu, Fulya; Sahin, Erhan; Bektur, Ezgi

    2016-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs are the most commonly used group of drugs today. Increase in the use of standard NSAI for treating pain and inflammation was restricted by the fact that these drugs were proven to possibly cause gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Meloxicam is a NSAI that has anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects. This study aims to investigate the effects of meloxicam on stomach, kidney, and liver of rats under light microscopy level. Based on the light microscopic observations, mononuclear cell infiltration and pseudolobular formation was established in liver samples of animals in the experimental group. Metaplasia in surface and glandular epithelia and atrophy were observed in stomach samples. Glomerular stasis-related hypertrophy and focal interstitial nephritis were found in kidneys. It was concluded in this study that meloxicam might cause hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and gastric metaplasia in rats at a used dose and duration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of seeds of the tropical fruit camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Kazunaga; Suga, Katsumi; Honma, Atsushi; Shirosaki, Miyuki; Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic extract of seeds of the tropical fruit camu-camu was screened for its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced paw edema model mice. The extract significantly suppressed both the formation of edema in mice by oral administration and the release of nitric oxide from macrophage-derived RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. Based on the results of a spectroscopic analysis, the active compound was identified by in vivo bioassay-guided fractionation to be 3β-hydroxy-lup-20(29)-en-28-oic acid, betulinic acid, known as an anti-inflammatory triterpenoid. These findings suggest that camu-camu seed extract is a potentially useful material as a source of betulinic acid and as a functional food for prevention of immune-related diseases.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity and qualitative analysis of different extracts of Maytenus obscura (A. Rich.) Cuf. by high performance thin layer chromatography method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed F. Alajmi; Perwez Alam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform aqueous ethanol soluble fraction (AESF) and dichloromethane extract of aerial parts of Maytenus obscura (A. Rich.) Cuf. using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and to test anti-inflammatory activity of these extracts.Methods:HPTLC studies were carried out using CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with Linomat IV applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3, CAMAG ADC 2 and WIN CATS-4 software were used. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested by injecting different groups of rats (6 each) with formalin in hind paw and measuring the edema volume before and 1 h later formalin injection. Control group received saline i.p. The extracts treatment was injected i.p. in doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg 1 h before formalin administration. Indomethacin (30 mg/kg) was used as standard.Results:The results of preliminary phytochemical studies confirmed the presence of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, phenol, flavonoid, saponin, triterpenoid, alkaloid and anthraquinone in both extracts. Chromatography was performed on glass-backed silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates with the green solvents toluene: ethyacetate: glacial acetic acid (5:3:0.2, v/v/v) as mobile phase. HPTLC finger printing of AESF revealed major eight peaks with Rf values in the range of 0.28 to 0.80 and the dichloromethane revealed major 11 peaks with Rf values in the range of 0.12 to 0.76. The purity of sample was confirmed by comparing the absorption spectra at start, middle and end position of the band. Treatment of rats (i.p.) with AESF and dichloromethane in doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg inhibited singnificantly (P<0.05, n=6) formalin-induced inflammation by 50%, 55.9%, 45.5%, and 51.4%, respectively.Conclusions:HPTLC finger printing of AESF and dichloromethane of Maytenus obscura revealed eight major spots for alcoholic extracts and nine major spots for dichloromethane extracts. These HPTLC profiles may be of great usefulness in the quality control of herbal products containing these extracts. The

  17. Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelle, Sven; Reichenbach, Stephan; Wandel, Simon; Hildebrand, Pius; Tschannen, Beatrice; Villiger, Peter M; Egger, Matthias; Jüni, Peter

    2011-01-11

    To analyse the available evidence on cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Network meta-analysis. Bibliographic databases, conference proceedings, study registers, the Food and Drug Administration website, reference lists of relevant articles, and reports citing relevant articles through the Science Citation Index (last update July 2009). Manufacturers of celecoxib and lumiracoxib provided additional data. All large scale randomised controlled trials comparing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or placebo. Two investigators independently assessed eligibility. The primary outcome was myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included stroke, death from cardiovascular disease, and death from any cause. Two investigators independently extracted data. 31 trials in 116 429 patients with more than 115 000 patient years of follow-up were included. Patients were allocated to naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, etoricoxib, rofecoxib, lumiracoxib, or placebo. Compared with placebo, rofecoxib was associated with the highest risk of myocardial infarction (rate ratio 2.12, 95% credibility interval 1.26 to 3.56), followed by lumiracoxib (2.00, 0.71 to 6.21). Ibuprofen was associated with the highest risk of stroke (3.36, 1.00 to 11.6), followed by diclofenac (2.86, 1.09 to 8.36). Etoricoxib (4.07, 1.23 to 15.7) and diclofenac (3.98, 1.48 to 12.7) were associated with the highest risk of cardiovascular death. Although uncertainty remains, little evidence exists to suggest that any of the investigated drugs are safe in cardiovascular terms. Naproxen seemed least harmful. Cardiovascular risk needs to be taken into account when prescribing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

  18. Antimelanogenesis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Hazwani Mat; Sim, Kae Shin; Tan, Yee Shin

    2018-01-01

    Five culinary-medicinal mushrooms are commonly available in the Malaysian market: Agaricus bisporus (white and brown), Ganoderma lucidum, Hypsizygus marmoreus, Pleurotus floridanus, and P. pulmonarius. These species were selected for use in the current study, the aim of which was to investigate the antimelanogenesis and anti-inflammatory activity of these mushrooms in an attempt to evaluate their potential use in cosmeceuticals. Mushroom fruiting bodies were extracted with hot water, and the extracts were freeze-dried before testing. The antimelanogenesis activity of the extracts was determined by cell viability assay, measurement of intracellular melanin content, and cellular tyrosinase assay with B16F10 melanoma cells. The anti-inflammatory activity of the mushroom extracts was tested by measuring the levels of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin-10 excreted by RAW264.7 macrophages. Brown A. bisporus reduced intracellular melanin content to the largest extent-up to 57.05 ± 3.90%-without a cytotoxic effect on B16F10 melanoma cells. This extract also reduced cellular tyrosinase activity to 17.93 ± 2.65%, performing better than kojic acid, the positive control. In parallel, the extract from brown A. bisporus, at the highest concentration tested, has appreciable anti-inflammatory activity through reductions of NO and TNF-α levels. The other 5 extracts showed moderate antimelanogenesis and anti-inflammatory activities. In summary, our findings show that A. bisporus (brown) extract has the potential to be used as an ingredient in whitening skincare products and to sooth the inflammatory response on the skin.

  19. Phytochemical composition, anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxic effects of essential oils from three Pinus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basholli-Salihu, Mimoza; Schuster, Roswitha; Hajdari, Avni; Mulla, Dafina; Viernstein, Helmut; Mustafa, Behxhet; Mueller, Monika

    2017-12-01

    Inflammation and cell differentiation lead to a number of severe diseases. In the recent years, various studies focused on the anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity of essential oils (EOs) of numerous plants, including different Pinus species. The phytochemical composition, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activity of EOs from needles and twigs of Pinus heldreichii Christ (Pinaceae) and P. peuce Griseb., and from needles, twigs and cones of P. mugo Turra were determined. For separation and identification of the EOs, gas chromatography/flame ion detector (GC/FID) and GC/mass spectrometry were performed. The amount of secreted IL-6 in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage model was quantified (concentration of oils: 0.0001-0.2%, 3 h incubation). Cytotoxicity on the cancer cell lines HeLa, CaCo-2 and MCF-7 were determined using a MTT (Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide) assay (concentration of oils: 0.001-0.1%, 24 h incubation). The most prominent members in the oils include: δ-3-carene, α-pinene and linalool-acetate (P. mugo); α-pinene, β-phellandrene and β-pinene (P. peuce); limonene, α-pinene and (E)-caryophyllene (P. heldreichii). EOs showed significant cytotoxic effects on cancer cell lines (IC 50 0.007 to >0.1%), with a reduction in cell viability with up to 90% at a concentration of 0.1%, and anti-inflammatory activity (IC 50 0.0008-0.02%) with a reduction of IL-6 secretion with up to 60% at a concentration of 0.01%. The EOs of needles and twigs from P. peuce and P. heldreichii as well as of needles, twigs and cones of P. mugo can be considered as promising agents for anticancer and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  20. Chemical composition, acute toxicity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Moroccan Tetraclinis articulata L.

    OpenAIRE

    El Jemli, Meryem; Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Doukkali, Zouhra; Bouidida, El Houcine; Touati, Driss; Nejjari, Rachid; El Guessabi, Lahcen; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-distilled essential oil (EO) from the leaves of the western Mediterranean and Moroccan endemic plant Tetraclinis articulata was analyzed by GC/MS and examined for its acute toxicity on mice, in order to establish the safe doses. Furthermore, the anti-Inflammatory activity was evaluated based on carrageenan and trauma induced rats paw edema and the antioxidant potential has been investigated using different methods including DPPH radical-scavenging assay, Trolox equivalent antioxidant ca...

  1. The impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the small intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Fukui, Akifumi; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The small intestine has been called as a dark continent of digestive tract and it had been very difficult to diagnose or treat the disease of small intestine. However recent technological development including video capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy has made us to aware the various diseases of small intestine. By using capsule endoscopy, many researchers reported that more than 70% of patients treated continuously with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) exhibit the mu...

  2. Lung abscess complicating pneumococcal pneumonia: a causal role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibelin, Aude; de Prost, Nicolas; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary abscess is a distinctly uncommon complication of pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent adults that has recently been reported to occur following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We report herein the case of a 24-year-old patient with no predisposing risk factor who developed a lung abscess after NSAIDs exposure, further illustrating this potentially severe complication of NSAIDs use, especially in the absence of associated antibiotic therapy.

  3. Lung abscess complicating pneumococcal pneumonia: a causal role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelin, Aude; de Prost, Nicolas; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2013-08-20

    Pulmonary abscess is a distinctly uncommon complication of pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent adults that has recently been reported to occur following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We report herein the case of a 24-year-old patient with no predisposing risk factor who developed a lung abscess after NSAIDs exposure, further illustrating this potentially severe complication of NSAIDs use, especially in the absence of associated antibiotic therapy.

  4. Current possibilities of anti-inflammatory therapy in children with acute respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    E. E. Lokshina; O. V. Zaytseva

    2017-01-01

    The paper gives an update on the pathogenesis of acute respiratory diseases, the basis for which is inflammation of the airway mucosal lining. It reflects the results of a comparative clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride used in the combination therapy for respiratory diseases in children. The findings allow one to recommend the use of fenspiride to treat this condition in children.

  5. Current possibilities of anti-inflammatory therapy in children with acute respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Lokshina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the pathogenesis of acute respiratory diseases, the basis for which is inflammation of the airway mucosal lining. It reflects the results of a comparative clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride used in the combination therapy for respiratory diseases in children. The findings allow one to recommend the use of fenspiride to treat this condition in children.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  7. In vivo immune signatures of healthy human pregnancy: Inherently inflammatory or anti-inflammatory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Graham

    Full Text Available Changes in maternal innate immunity during healthy human pregnancy are not well understood. Whether basal immune status in vivo is largely unaffected by pregnancy, is constitutively biased towards an inflammatory phenotype (transiently enhancing host defense or exhibits anti-inflammatory bias (reducing potential responsiveness to the fetus is unclear. Here, in a longitudinal study of healthy women who gave birth to healthy infants following uncomplicated pregnancies within the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD cohort, we test the hypothesis that a progressively altered bias in resting innate immune status develops. Women were examined during pregnancy and again, one and/or three years postpartum. Most pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, including CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18 and TNFα, was reduced in vivo during pregnancy (20-57%, p<0.0001. Anti-inflammatory biomarkers (sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, and IL-1Ra were elevated by ~50-100% (p<0.0001. Systemic IL-10 levels were unaltered during vs. post-pregnancy. Kinetic studies demonstrate that while decreased pro-inflammatory biomarker expression (CCL2, CXCL10, IL-18, and TNFα was constant, anti-inflammatory expression increased progressively with increasing gestational age (p<0.0001. We conclude that healthy resting maternal immune status is characterized by an increasingly pronounced bias towards a systemic anti-inflammatory innate phenotype during the last two trimesters of pregnancy. This is resolved by one year postpartum in the absence of repeat pregnancy. The findings provide enhanced understanding of immunological changes that occur in vivo during healthy human pregnancy.

  8. The Anti-Inflammatory properties of interleukin 18 binding protein in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study pointed out that IL-18BPa has additional anti-inflammatory property through downregulating the expression of IFN-ã and IL-12, at the same time, upregulating the expression of IL-4 and IL-10. Both IFN-ã and IL-12 could upregulated the mRNA and protein levels of IL-18BPa in both the normal and RA subjects.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunoregulatory Functions of Artemisinin and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenchen Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin and its derivatives are widely used in the world as the first-line antimalarial drug. Recently, growing evidences reveal that artemisinin and its derivatives also possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. Meanwhile, researchers around the world are still exploring the unknown bioactivities of artemisinin derivatives. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion on recent advances of artemisinin derivatives affecting inflammation and autoimmunity, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and also drug development of artemisinins beyond antimalarial functions.

  10. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model.Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed.Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01.The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  11. In ova angiogenesis analgesic and anti inflammatory potency of Aerva monsoniae (Amaranthaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the wound healing potency of aqueous extract of Aerva monsoniae (A. monsoniae by in vitro method using fertilized eggs, in vivo analgesic and anti inflammatory activity in rodents and the anti bacterial activity on the bacterial strains that infect the wound. Methods: The whole plant of A. monsoniae was extracted with water and then subjected to preliminary chemical screening. It was then evaluated for in ova angiogenesis on fertilized white leg horn eggs using the concentrations of 200-600 毺 g/mL. The analgesic activity was evaluated in mice using the dose 100 and 250 mg/kg. The anti inflammatory activity was evaluated in rats using the dose 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg. In both the parameters water was used as the control and diclofenac was used the standard. The anti bacterial activity on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aerugenosa was performed. Results: The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids and saponins. The in ova angiogenesis revealed a dose dependent activity which proves the wound healing claim of the plant as more number of blood capillaries were formed at the site of the drug. The plant proved to be a potent analgesic and anti inflammatory agent at doses 1 00 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg. The anti bacterial activity was present but at higher doses. Conclusions: The parameters studied in the present investigation proved that the plant is a potent wound healer. Further in vivo wound healing studies on animal model is desired. As the extract showed potent analgesic, anti inflammatory and anti bacterial properties, it can be considered that when formulated into suitable formulation, and it can reduce the pain, inflammation and infections related to wound very well.

  12. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activity of nigella sativa and diclofenac sodium in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M.U.; Qureshi, H.J.; Saleem, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa or Kalonji is a naturally occurring plant in Pakistan and other countries which possesses a wide range of medicinal properties, the anti-inflammatory property being one of these. Diclofenac sodium is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. The purpose of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds with that of diclofenac sodium in albino rats. Method: This laboratory randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in the Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore. The study was carried out on 90 male albino rats. Five percent formalin in a dose of 50 meu was injected into sub-plantar surface of right hind paw of each rat to produce inflammation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups of thirty each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. Increase in paw diameter, and total and differential leukocyte counts were measured as markers of inflammation. Results: Nigella sativa seeds extract caused significant (p<0.05) reduction in the paw inflammatory response in albino rats. The effect was longer in duration than the effect caused by diclofenac sodium; however, the extract was comparatively less potent than diclofenac sodium. The extract had no significant effect (p>0.05) on the total or differential leukocyte counts. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds possesses potent anti-inflammatory effect, in albino rats however, this effect is comparatively less but prolonged than that produced by diclofenac sodium. (author)

  13. Can the anti-inflammatory activities of β2-agonists be harnessed in the clinical setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theron AJ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Annette J Theron,1,2 Helen C Steel,1 Gregory R Tintinger,1 Charles Feldman,3 Ronald Anderson1 1Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, 2Tshwane Academic Division of the National Health Laboratory Service, Pretoria, 3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand and Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Beta2-adrenoreceptor agonists (β2-agonists are primarily bronchodilators, targeting airway smooth muscle and providing critical symptomatic relief in conditions such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These agents also possess broad-spectrum, secondary, anti-inflammatory properties. These are mediated largely, though not exclusively, via interactions with adenylyl cyclase-coupled β2-adrenoreceptors on a range of immune and inflammatory cells involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of the airways. The clinical relevance of the anti-inflammatory actions of β2-agonists, although often effective in the experimental setting, remains contentious. The primary objectives of the current review are: firstly, to assess the mechanisms, both molecular and cell-associated, that may limit the anti-inflammatory efficacy of β2-agonists; secondly, to evaluate pharmacological strategies, several of which are recent and innovative, that may overcome these limitations. These are preceded by a consideration of the various types of β2-agonists, their clinical applications, and spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities, particularly those involving adenosine 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-mediated clearance of cytosolic calcium, and altered gene expression in immune and inflammatory cells. Keywords: adenylyl cyclase, corticosteroids, cyclic AMP, muscarinic

  14. What does a study of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sales statistics give the Russian Federation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Georgievna Barskova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the data obtained by Pharmexpert on the sales of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the Russian Federation. Ibuprofen, ketorolac, diclofenac, and nimesulide are sales leaders. Possible reasons for the popularity of a number of medications and whether it is expedient to use intramuscular formulations are considered. The WHO data on indi-cations for and contraindications to the use of injectable dosage form are given.

  15. Wound repair and anti-inflammatory potential of Lonicera japonica in excision wound-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Liu, I-Min

    2012-11-23

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae), a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant, is used to treat some infectious diseases and it may have uses as a healthy food and applications in cosmetics and as an ornamental groundcover. The ethanol extract of the flowering aerial parts of L. japonica (LJEE) was investigated for its healing efficiency in a rat excision wound model. Excision wounds were inflicted upon three groups of eight rats each. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction in skin wound sites in rats treated with simple ointment base, 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment, or the reference standard drug, 0.2% (w/w) nitrofurazone ointment. The effects of LJEE on the contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine during healing were estimated. The antimicrobial activity of LJEE against microorganisms was also assessed. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of LJEE was investigated to understand the mechanism of wound healing. LJEE exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis. The ointment formulation prepared with 10% (w/w) LJEE exhibited potent wound healing capacity as evidenced by the wound contraction in the excision wound model. The contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine also correlated with the observed healing pattern. These findings were supported by the histopathological characteristics of healed wound sections, as greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts, and angiogenesis were observed in the 10% (w/w) LJEE ointment-treated group. The results also indicated that LJEE possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, as it enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that suppress proinflammatory cytokine production. The results suggest that the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of LJEE act synergistically to accelerate wound repair.

  16. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity controls systemic cytokine levels through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Parrish, William R.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Ochani, Mahendar; Puerta, Margot; Ochani, Kanta; Chavan, Sangeeta; Al-Abed, Yousef; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of cytokines by the immune system contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Recent advances in understanding the biology of cytokine toxicity led to the discovery of the “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway,” defined as neural signals transmitted via the vagus nerve that inhibit cytokine release through a mechanism that requires the alpha7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Vagus nerve regulation of peripheral functions is controlled by brain nuclei and neural networks, but despite considerable importance, little is known about the molecular basis for central regulation of the vagus nerve-based cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report that brain acetylcholinesterase activity controls systemic and organ specific TNF production during endotoxemia. Peripheral administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine significantly reduced serum TNF levels through vagus nerve signaling, and protected against lethality during murine endotoxemia. Administration of a centrally-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist abolished the suppression of TNF by galantamine, indicating that suppressing acetylcholinesterase activity, coupled with central muscarinic receptors, controls peripheral cytokine responses. Administration of galantamine to α7nAChR knockout mice failed to suppress TNF levels, indicating that the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is required for the anti-inflammatory effect of galantamine. These findings show that inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase suppresses systemic inflammation through a central muscarinic receptor-mediated and vagal- and α7nAChR-dependent mechanism. Our data also indicate that a clinically used centrally-acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor can be utilized to suppress abnormal inflammation to therapeutic advantage. PMID:18639629

  17. Anti-inflammatory evaluation and characterization of leaf extract of Ananas comosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargutkar, Samira; Brijesh, S

    2018-04-01

    Ananas comosus (L.) Merr (Pineapple) is a tropical plant with an edible fruit. In the present study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of A. comosus leaf extract (ALE) was studied. ALE prepared using soxhlet apparatus was subjected to preliminary qualitative phytochemical analysis and quantitative estimations of flavonoids and tannins. The components present in ALE were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Inhibitory effects of ALE on protein denaturation, and proteinase activity were assessed. Its effect on secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages was also analyzed. Further, its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced inflammatory rat model was examined. The preliminary qualitative phytochemical analysis revealed presence of flavonoids, phenols, tannins, carbohydrates, glycosides, and proteins in the extract. Total flavonoids and total tannins were 0.17 ± 0.006 mg equivalent of quercetin/g of ALE and 4.04 ± 0.56 mg equivalent of gallic acid/g of ALE. LC-MS analysis identified the presence of 4-hydroxy pelargonic acid, 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic and 4-methoxycinnamic acid, whereas GC-MS analysis identified the presence of campesterol and ethyl isoallocholate that have been previously reported for anti-inflammatory activity. ALE showed significant inhibition of protein denaturation and proteinase activity and also controlled secretion of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and prostaglandins, as well as the generation of reactive oxygen species by activated macrophages. ALE also significantly decreased carrageenan-induced acute paw edema. The study, therefore, identified the components present in ALE that may be responsible for its anti-inflammatory activity and thus demonstrated its potential use against acute inflammatory diseases.

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heleniak, Zbigniew; Cieplińska, Magdalena; Szychliński, Tomasz; Rychter, Dymitr; Jagodzińska, Kalina; Kłos, Alicja; Kuźmiuk, Izabela; Tylicka, Marzena Jakimowicz; Tylicki, Leszek; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Aims Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of pain management. There are no detailed data on NSAIDs use in Poland, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of NSAIDs use as well as knowledge of their side-effects in patients with CKD. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in 972 individuals with CKD, enrolled in a written survey originally developed by the auth...

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was measured using the griess method. iNOS and proteins regulating NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling were analyzed by Western blot. In anti-cancer activity, cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Cleaved PARP, ATF3 and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Western blot. Results In anti-inflammatory effect, MRBE blocked NO production via suppressing iNOS over-expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, MRBE inhibited NF-κB activation through p65 nuclear translocation via blocking IκB-α degradation and ERK1/2 activation via its hyper-phosphorylation. In anti-cancer activity, MRBE deos-dependently induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. MRBE treatment to SW480 cells activated ATF3 expression and down-regulated cyclin D1 level. We also observed that MRBE-induced ATF3 expression was dependent on ROS and GSK3β. Moreover, MRBE-induced cyclin D1 down-regulation was mediated from cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, which was dependent on ROS. Conclusions These findings suggest that mulberry root bark exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. PMID:24962785

  20. Anti-inflammatory and toxicological evaluation of essential oil from Piper glabratum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Lidiane Schultz; Santos, Joyce Alencar; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Mota, Jonas da Silva; Junior, Ubirajara Lanza; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2017-02-23

    Although some of the species of the genus Piper exhibit interesting biological properties, studies on Piper glabratum Kunth are very limited. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and the toxicological profile of the essential oil from P. glabratum leaves (OEPG) in mice. The acute toxicity of OEPG was evaluated by oral administration to female mice as single doses of 500, 1000, 2000 or 5000mg/kg/body weight. In the subacute toxicity test, the females received 500 or 1000mg/kg/body weight of OEPG for 28 days. The anti-inflammatory potential of OEPG was evaluated using four models including pleurisy, edema, mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia models in mouse paws. No clinical signs of toxicity were observed in animals after acute treatment, which suggested that the LD 50 is greater than 5000mg/kg. The subacute exposure to OEPG produced no significant changes in the hematological or biochemical parameters. Similarly, the histology of the organs and the estrus cycle displayed no marked alterations. OEPG exhibited anti-inflammatory activity as indicated by inhibition of the leukocyte migration (100, 300, 700mg/kg) and the protein extravasation into the pleural exudates (700mg/kg). After intraplantar injection of carrageenan, it was observed that the 700mg/kg dose of OEPG reduced edema formation and decreased the sensitivity to mechanical stimulation and cold. These results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory potential of the essential oil of P. glabratum leaves in the absence of toxicity in female mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapies aimed at the gut microbiota and inflammation: antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, anti-inflammatory therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2011-03-01

    Several recent observations have raised the possibility that disturbances in the gut microbiota and\\/or a low-grade inflammatory state may contribute to symptomatology and the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Consequent on these hypotheses, several therapeutic categories have found their way into the armamentarium of those who care for IBS sufferers. These agents include probiotics, prebiotics, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents.

  2. Polyphenols from Cymbopogon citratus leaves as topical anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Ferreira, João Pinto; Vitorino, Carla; Pina, Maria Eugénia; Sousa, João José; Figueiredo, Isabel Vitória; Batista, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-03

    A variety of plant polyphenols have been reported to have anti-inflammatory, frequently associated with erythema, edema, hyperplasia, skin photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Cymbopogon citratus (DC). Stapf (Poaceae) is a worldwide known medicinal plant, used in traditional medicine in inflammation-related conditions. In this work, the anti-inflammatory potential of C. citratus infusion (CcI) and its polyphenols as topical agents was evaluated in vivo. The plant extract was prepared and its fractioning led two polyphenol-rich fractions: flavonoids fraction (CcF) and tannins fraction (CcT). An oil/water emulsion was developed with each active (CcI, CcF+CcT and diclofenac), pH and texture having been evaluated. Release tests were further performed using static Franz diffusion cells and all collected samples were monitored by HPLC-PDA. In vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity evaluation was performed by the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. The texture analysis revealed statistically significant differences for all tested parameters to CcF+CcT, supporting its topical application. Release experiments lead to the detection of the phenolic compounds from each sample in the receptor medium and the six major flavonoids were quantified, by HPLC-PDA: carlinoside, isoorientin, cynaroside, luteolin 7-O-neohesperidoside, kurilesin A and cassiaoccidentalin B. The CcF+CcT formulation prompted to the higher release rate for all these flavonoids. CcI4%, CcI1% and CcF+CcT exhibited an edema reduction of 43.18, 29.55 and 59.09%, respectively. Our findings highlight that CcI, containing luteolin 7-O-neohesperidoside, cassiaoccidentalin B, carlinoside, cynaroside and tannins have a potential anti-inflammatory topical activity, suggesting their promising application in the treatment of skin inflammatory pathologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kaempferol and Kaempferol Rhamnosides with Depigmenting and Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rho, Ho Sik; Ghimeray, Amal Kumar; Yoo, Dae Sung; Ahn, Soo Mi; Kwon, Sun Sang; Lee, Keun Ha; Cho, Dong Ha; Cho, Jae Youl

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the biological activity of kaempferol and its rhamnosides. We isolated kaempferol (1), a-rhamnoisorobin (2), afzelin (3), and kaempferitrin (4) as pure compounds by far-infrared (FIR) irradiation of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) leaves. The depigmenting and anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was evaluated by analyzing their structure-activity relationships. The order of the inhibitory activity with regard to depigmentation and nitric oxide ...

  4. Studies on anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, constant use of NSAID may lead to some side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers, bleeding and renal disorders. This study evaluates analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in female Wistar rats. Diclofenac sodium was used as a standard drug for comparison. L. rhamnosus, drugs and vehicle were administered orally. Acetic acid-induced writhing test and carrageenan-induced paw edema model were used for evaluation. Paw edema and number of writhes were measured subsequently. Pro-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-17) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines were estimated in serum after 24 h. Results showed that L. rhamnosus significantly decreased the paw thickness at t=24 h by 28.66 % while drug decreased by 19.33 %. Also, L. rhamnosus treatment and standard drug showed a protection of 66.66 % and 41.66 %, respectively. L. rhamnosus and diclofenac sodium treatment significantly down-regulated pro-inflammatory and up-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokines at prhamnosus was more pronounced in comparison to diclofenac sodium. The present study clearly suggests that L. rhamnosus suppressed carrageenan-induced paw edema after second phase and decreased the acetic acid-induced writhings. It ameliorated the inflammatory pathways by down-regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, additional clinical investigations are needed to prove the efficacy of L. rhamnosus in treatment/management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  5. Chitosan drives anti-inflammatory macrophage polarisation and pro-inflammatory dendritic cell stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Oliveira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC share the same precursor and play key roles in immunity. Modulation of their behaviour to achieve an optimal host response towards an implanted device is still a challenge. Here we compare the differentiation process and polarisation of these related cell populations and show that they exhibit different responses to chitosan (Ch, with human monocyte-derived macrophages polarising towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype while their DC counterparts display pro-inflammatory features. Macrophages and DC, whose interactions with biomaterials are frequently analysed using fully differentiated cells, were cultured directly on Ch films, rather than exposed to the polymer after complete differentiation. Ch was the sole stimulating factor and activated both macrophages and DC, without leading to significant T cell proliferation. After 10 d on Ch, macrophages significantly down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory markers, CD86 and MHCII. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, decreased with time for cells cultured on Ch, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 and TGF-β1, significantly increased. Altogether, these results suggest an M2c polarisation. Also, macrophage matrix metalloproteinase activity was augmented and cell motility was stimulated by Ch. Conversely, DC significantly enhanced CD86 expression, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Our findings indicate that cells with a common precursor may display different responses, when challenged by the same biomaterial. Moreover, they help to further comprehend macrophage/DC interactions with Ch and the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals associated with implant biomaterials. We propose that an overall pro-inflammatory reaction may hide the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, likely relevant for tissue repair/regeneration.

  6. Antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Viola betonicifolia whole plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrexia, algesia and inflammation are associated with several pathological conditions. Synthetic drugs available for the treatment of these conditions cause multiple unwanted effects. Several studies are ongoing worldwide to find natural healing agents with better safety profile. The current study was thus aimed at evaluating antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of whole plant of V. betonicifolia (VBME. Methods VBME was employed to assess antipyretic activity in yeast induced hyperthermia. Analgesic profile was ascertained in acetic acid induced writhing, hot plat and tail immersion test. Nevertheless, the anti-inflammatory activity was tested in carrageenan induced paw edema and histamine induced inflammatory tests. BALB/c mice were used at test doses of 100, 200 and 300mg/kg body weight intra peritoneally (i.p. Results In yeast induced pyrexia, VBME demonstrated dose dependently (78.23% protection at 300mg/kg, similar to standard drug, paracetamol (90% at 150mg/kg i.p. VBME showed a dose dependent analgesia in various pain models i.e. acetic acid, hot plat and tail immersion having 78.90%, 69.96% and 68.58% protection respectively at 300mg/kg. However, the analgesic action of VBME was completely antagonized by the injection of naloxone like opiate antagonists. Similarly carrageenan and histamine induces inflammation was significantly antagonized by VBME, 66.30% and 60.80% respectively at 300mg/kg. Conclusions It is concluded that VBME has marked antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in various animal models and this strongly supports the ethnopharmacological uses of Viola betonicifolia as antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory plant.

  7. Antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Viola betonicifolia whole plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Naveed; Saeed, Muhammad; Khan, Haroon

    2012-05-02

    Pyrexia, algesia and inflammation are associated with several pathological conditions. Synthetic drugs available for the treatment of these conditions cause multiple unwanted effects. Several studies are ongoing worldwide to find natural healing agents with better safety profile. The current study was thus aimed at evaluating antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of whole plant of V. betonicifolia (VBME). VBME was employed to assess antipyretic activity in yeast induced hyperthermia. Analgesic profile was ascertained in acetic acid induced writhing, hot plat and tail immersion test. Nevertheless, the anti-inflammatory activity was tested in carrageenan induced paw edema and histamine induced inflammatory tests. BALB/c mice were used at test doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight intra peritoneally (i.p). In yeast induced pyrexia, VBME demonstrated dose dependently (78.23%) protection at 300 mg/kg, similar to standard drug, paracetamol (90%) at 150 mg/kg i.p. VBME showed a dose dependent analgesia in various pain models i.e. acetic acid, hot plat and tail immersion having 78.90%, 69.96% and 68.58% protection respectively at 300 mg/kg. However, the analgesic action of VBME was completely antagonized by the injection of naloxone like opiate antagonists. Similarly carrageenan and histamine induces inflammation was significantly antagonized by VBME, 66.30% and 60.80% respectively at 300 mg/kg. It is concluded that VBME has marked antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in various animal models and this strongly supports the ethnopharmacological uses of Viola betonicifolia as antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory plant.

  8. In Vivo Anti-inflammatory Activity of Lipoic Acid Derivatives in Mice 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunon Kwiecień

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In mammals lipoic acid (LA and its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA function as cofactors for multienzymatic complexes catalyzing the decarboxylation of α-ketoacids. Moreover, LA is used as a drug in a variety of diseases including inflammatory diseases. The aim of the study was to examine anti-inflammatory properties of LA metabolites.Material/methods:The present paper reports the chemical synthesis of 2,4-bismethylthio-butanoic acid (BMTBA and tetranor-dihydrolipoic acid (tetranor-DHLA. BMTBA is one of the biotransformation products of LA, while tetranor-DHLA is an analogue of DHLA. Structural identity of these compounds was confirmed by 1H NMR. These compounds were assessed for their anti-inflammatory activity in mice. For this purpose, the zymosan-induced peritonitis and the carrageenan-induced hind paw edema animal models were applied.Results/conclusions: The obtained results indicated that the early vascular permeability measured at 30 min of zymosan-induced peritonitis was significantly inhibited in groups receiving BMTBA (10, 30, 50 mg/kg. The early infiltration of neutrophils measured at 4 hours of zymosan-induced peritonitis was inhibited in the group receiving BMTBA (50 mg/kg and tetranor-DHLA (50 mg/kg. The results indicated that the increase in paw edema was significantly inhibited in the groups receiving BMTBA (50, 100 mg/kg and tetranor-DHLA (30, 50 mg/kg. In summary, the present studies clearly demonstrated that both BMTBA and tetranor-DHLA were able to act as anti-inflammatory agents. This is the first study examining in vivo the anti-inflammatory properties of LA metabolites.

  9. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan

    OpenAIRE

    Sharopov, Farukh; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Gulmurodov, Isomiddin; Khalifaev, Davlat; Isupov, Salomiddin; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia) were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli, 625 µg/mL (MIC) and 1250 µg/mL (MBC) for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), respectively. The essential oil of Galagan...

  10. Supplementation of xanthophylls decreased proinflammatory and increased anti-inflammatory cytokines in hens and chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Yun; Xie, Qing-Mei; Jin, Ling; Sun, Bao-Li; Ji, Jun; Chen, Feng; Ma, Jing-Yun; Bi, Ying-Zuo

    2012-11-28

    The present study investigated the effects of xanthophylls (containing 40 % of lutein and 60 % of zeaxanthin) on proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF)) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-4 and IL-10) expression of breeding hens and chicks. In Expt 1, a total of 432 hens were fed diets supplemented with 0 (as the control group), 20 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls (six replicates per treatment). The liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were sampled at 35 d of the trial. The results showed that both levels of xanthophyll addition decreased IL-1β mRNA in the liver and jejunum, IL-6 mRNA in the liver, IFN-γ mRNA in the jejunum and LITAF mRNA in the liver compared to the control group. Expt 2 was a 2 × 2 factorial design. Male chicks hatched from 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophyll diet of hens were fed a diet containing either 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls. The liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were collected at 0, 7, 14 and 21 d after hatching. The results showed that in ovo xanthophylls decreased proinflammatory cytokine expression (IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and LITAF) in the liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-4 and IL-10) in the liver, jejunum and ileum mainly at 0-7 d after hatching. In ovo effects gradually vanished and dietary effects began to work during 1-2 weeks after hatching. Dietary xanthophylls modulated proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ) in the liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the liver and jejunum mainly from 2 weeks onwards. In conclusion, xanthophylls could regulate proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in different tissues of hens and chicks.

  11. High Hydrostatic Pressure-Assisted Enzymatic Treatment Improves Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Phosvitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Heejoo; Bamdad, Fatemeh; Gujral, Naiyana; Suh, Joo-Won; Sunwoo, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Phosvitin (PV) is a highly-phosphorylated metal-binding protein in egg yolk. Phosphoserine clusters make PV resistant to enzymatic digestion, which might be nutritionally undesirable. This study was designed to determine the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and enzymatic hydrolysis (HHP-EH) on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of PV hydrolysates (PVHs). PV was hydrolyzed by alcalase, elastase, savinase, thermolysin, and trypsin at 0.1, 50, and 100 MPa pressure levels. PVHs were evaluated for degree of hydrolysis, molecular weight distribution patterns, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in chemical and cellular models. The effect of PVH on gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) was also evaluated using real time-PCR. The hydrolysate with most potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis to identify the peptide sequence. Hydrolysates produced at 100 MPa exhibited higher degree of hydrolysis and greater reducing power and free radical scavenging activity compared to those obtained at atmospheric pressure. After adjusting the phosphate content, alcalase- and trypsin-digested PVHs showed superior iron chelation capacity (69-73%), regardless of pressure. Both alcalase- and trypsin-digested PVHs significantly inhibited nitric oxide production by RAW264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-stimulated up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines was also suppressed by alcalase-digested PVH. The HHP-EH method could play a promising role in the production of bioactive peptides from hydrolysis-resistant proteins. HHP-assisted PVH may be useful in preparing a potential pharmaceutical with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Immuno-modulation and anti-inflammatory benefits of antibiotics: The example of tilmicosin

    OpenAIRE

    Buret, André G.

    2010-01-01

    Exagerated immune responses, such as those implicated in severe inflammatory reactions, are costly to the metabolism. Inflammation and pro-inflammatory mediators negatively affect production in the food animal industry by reducing growth, feed intake, reproduction, milk production, and metabolic health. An ever-increasing number of findings have established that antibiotics, macrolides in particular, may generate anti-inflammatory effects, including the modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine...

  13. Seagrass as a potential source of natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraj, N; Kanmani, P; Satishkumar, R; Paari, A; Pattukumar, V; Arul, V

    2012-04-01

    Halophila spp. is a strong medicine against malaria and skin diseases and is found to be very effective in early stages of leprosy. Seagrasses are nutraceutical in nature and therefore of importance as food supplements. The antibacterial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of Halophila ovalis R. Br. Hooke (Hydrocharitaceae) methanol extract were investigated and the chemical constituents of purified fractions were analyzed. Plant materials were collected from Pondicherry coastal line, and antimicrobial screening of crude extract, and purified fractions was carried out by the disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) of the purified fractions and reference antibiotics were determined by microdilution method. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were investigated in vitro. Chemical constituents of purified fractions V and VI were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and the phytochemicals were quantitatively determined. Methanol extract inhibited the growth of Bacillus cereus at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 50 µg/mL and other Gram-negative pathogens at 75 µg/ml, except Vibrio vulnificus. Reducing power and total antioxidant level increased with increasing extract concentration. H. ovalis exhibited strong scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals at IC(50) of 0.13 and 0.65 mg/mL, respectively. Methanol extract of H. ovalis showed noticeable anti-inflammatory activity at IC(50) of 78.72 µg/mL. The GC-MS analysis of H. ovalis revealed the presence of triacylglycerols as major components in purified fractions. Quantitative analysis of phytochemicals revealed that phenols are rich in seagrass H. ovalis. These findings demonstrated that the methanol extract of H. ovalis exhibited appreciable antibacterial, noticeable antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities, and thus could be use as a potential source for natural health products.

  14. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Calogero, Aldo E.; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be pr...

  15. Pathogen- and Host-Directed Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Macrolide Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Steel, Helen C.; Theron, Annette J.; Cockeran, Riana; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics possess several, beneficial, secondary properties which complement their primary antimicrobial activity. In addition to high levels of tissue penetration, which may counteract seemingly macrolide-resistant bacterial pathogens, these agents also possess anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their primary antimicrobial activity. Macrolides target cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as structural cells, and are beneficial in controlling harmfu...

  16. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  17. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of octadecylamine-functionalized nanodiamond on primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, A E; Witherel, C E; Gogotsi, Y; Spiller, K L

    2017-09-26

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis are characterized by excessive pro-inflammatory or "M1" activation of macrophages, the primary cells of the innate immune system. Current treatments include delivery of glucocorticoids (e.g. dexamethasone - Dex), which reduce pro-inflammatory M1 behaviour in macrophages. However, these treatments have many off-target effects on cells other than macrophages, resulting in broad immunosuppression. To limit such side effects, drug-incorporated nano- and microparticles may be used to selectively target macrophages via phagocytosis, because of their roles as highly effective phagocytes in the body. In this study, surface-modified nanodiamond (ND) was explored as a platform for the delivery of dexamethasone to macrophages because of ND's rich surface chemistry, which contributes to ND's high potential as a versatile drug delivery platform. After finding that octadecylamine-functionalized nanodiamond (ND-ODA) enhanced adsorption of Dex compared to carboxylated ND, the effects of Dex, ND-ODA, and Dex-adsorbed ND-ODA on primary human macrophage gene expression were characterized. Surprisingly, even in the absence of Dex, ND-ODA had strong anti-inflammatory effects, as determined by multiplex gene expression via NanoString and by protein secretion analysis via ELISA. ND-ODA also inhibited expression of M2a markers yet increased the expression of M2c markers and phagocytic receptors. Interestingly, the adsorption of Dex to ND-ODA further increased some anti-inflammatory effects, but abrogated the effect on phagocytic receptors, compared to its individual components. Overall, the ability of ND-ODA to promote anti-inflammatory and pro-phagocytic behaviour in macrophages, even in the absence of loaded drugs, suggests its potential for use as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic to directly target macrophages through phagocytosis.

  19. Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ethanol Extract of Ficus Iteophylla Leaves in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulmalik, IA; Sule, MI; Musa, A M; Yaro, A H; Abdullahi, MI; Abdulkadir, MF; Yusuf, H

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the leaf part of the plant for analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The ethanol extract of Ficus iteophylla leaves (100, 200, and 400mgkg−1, i.p) was evaluated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The analgesic effect was studied using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and hot plate test in mice, while the anti-inflammatory effect was investigated using carrageenan induced paw oedema in rats. The ethanol extract at 100mgkg−1, 200mgkg−1,...

  20. Bioactivities of the ethanol extract from Ageratum fastigiatum branches: antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; Santos, Bruna C S; Alves, Maria Silvana; Araújo, Aílson L A; Yamamoto, Célia H; Pinto, Míriam A O; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C; Sousa, Orlando V

    2016-07-11

    The present study was designed to investigate the antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanol extract from Ageratum fastigiatum branches. Phytochemical screening and total phenol and flavonoid contents were determined. The antioxidant activity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-pycrilhydrazin (DPPH) and iron reducing power methods. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, hot plate and tail immersion assays; while the carrageenan-induced paw edema and pleurisy tests were performed to examine the anti-inflammatory activity against acute inflammation. The extract revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, terpenes, sterols and saponins. Expressive levels of total phenols and flavonoids and a promising antioxidant effect were quantified. At the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, the extract inhibited the writhing, reduced both phases of paw licking time and increased the reaction time on the hot plate. In the tail immersion test, the extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) caused a significant inhibition of pain. In these doses, the paw edema, exudate volume and leucocyte mobilization were significantly reduced. These results suggest that A. fastigiatum can be an active source of substances with antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, adding scientific support to the appropriate use in the Brazilian folk medicine.

  1. Screening of Baccaurea ramiflora (Lour.) extracts for cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, neuropharmacological and antidiarrheal activities.

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    Nesa, Mst Luthfun; Karim, S M Sajedul; Api, Khairunasa; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Islam, Md Monirul; Kabir, Asma; Sarker, Mithun Kumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Asadujjaman, Mohammad; Munir, Mohammad Sirajum

    2018-01-30

    It has been observed that the various part of Baccaurea ramiflora plant is used in rheumatoid arthritis, cellulitis, abscesses, constipation and injuries. This plant also has anticholinergic, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, antiviral, antioxidant, diuretic and cytotoxic activities. The present studyaimed to assess the cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and antidiarrheal activities of methanol extract of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seeds in mice model. The cytotoxic activity was determined by brine shrimp lethality bioassay; anti-nociceptive activity was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin- induced licking and biting, and tail immersion methods. The anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and anti-diarrheal activities were assessed by carrageenan-induced hind paw edema, the open field and hole cross tests, and castor oil-induced diarrheal methods, respectively. The data were analyzed by one way ANOVA (analysis of variance) followed by Dunnett's test. In brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the LC 50 values of the methanol extracts of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seed were 40 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL, respectively. Our investigation showed that Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seed extracts (200 mg/kg) inhibited acetic acid induced pain 67.51 and 66.08%, respectively (p analgesic, anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and antidiarrheal activities of methanol extract of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seeds (200 mg/kg).

  2. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulecha, Vishal; Sivakumar, T; Upaganlawar, Aman; Mahajan, Manoj; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FRII, FRIII, FRIV and FRV) of F. religiosa at the dose level of 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o were tested. The fraction FRI (40 mg/kg, p.o.) and FRIII (40 mg/kg, p.o) were found to be more effective (Pacetic acid induced writhing compared to the other fractions. FRI (20 mg/kg, p.o.) and FRIII (20 mg/kg, p.o.) were also found to be more effective in increasing latency period in tail flick method. Out of five different fractions of F. religiosa leaves tested, FRI and FRIII possess potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities against different models of inflammation and pain.

  3. N-arylmethylideneaminophthalimide: Design, synthesis and evaluation as analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents.

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    Banarouei, Nasimossadat; Davood, Asghar; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Saeedi, Ghazaleh; Shafiee, Abbas

    2018-04-23

    N-aryl derivatives of phthalimide and 4-nitro phthalimide have demonstrated cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity. Also they possess an excellent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. In this work, a new series of N-arylmethylideneamino derivatives of phthalimide and 4-nitro phthalimide were designed and synthesized. The designed compounds were synthesized by condensation of the appropriate aldehyde and N-aminophthalimide in ethanol at room temperature at PH around 3. Their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated by acetic acid-induced pain test and carrageenan-induced paw edema test in mice and rats, respectively. The details of the synthesis and chemical characterization of the analogs are described. In vivo screening showed compounds 3a, 3b, 3f and 3h were the most potent analgesic compounds. In addition compounds 3a, 3c, 3d, 3e and 3j indicated comparable anti-inflammatory activity to indomethacin as reference drug. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds isolated from the fruits of Artocarpus heterophyllus.

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    Fang, Song-Chwan; Hsu, Chin-Lin; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2008-06-25

    Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam is a large evergreen tree cultivated throughout Southeast Asia for its fruits. Its leaves and roots have been used for medicinal purposes. The aim of this work was to study the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of the fruits of Artocarpus heterophyllus. Three phenolic compounds were characterized as artocarpesin [5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxy-6-(3-methylbut-3-enyl) flavone] ( 1), norartocarpetin (5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) ( 2), and oxyresveratrol [ trans-2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxystilbene] ( 3) by spectroscopic methods and through comparison with data reported in the literatures. The anti-inflammatory effects of the isolated compounds ( 1- 3) were evaluated by determining their inhibitory effects on the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. These three compounds exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity. The results indicated that artocarpesin ( 1) suppressed the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2) through the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expressions. Thus, artocarpesin ( 1) may provide a potential therapeutic approach for inflammation-associated disorders.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of different agave plants and the compound cantalasaponin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosas-Brisson, Nayeli; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio R; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Cortazar, Manases; Tortoriello, Jaime; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel

    2013-07-10

    Species of the agave genus, such as Agave tequilana, Agave angustifolia and Agave americana are used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat inflammation-associated conditions. These plants' leaves contain saponin compounds which show anti-inflammatory properties in different models. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory capacity of these plants, identify which is the most active, and isolate the active compound by a bio-directed fractionation using the ear edema induced in mice with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) technique. A dose of 6 mg/ear of acetone extract from the three agave species induced anti-inflammatory effects, however, the one from A. americana proved to be the most active. Different fractions of this species showed biological activity. Finally the F5 fraction at 2.0 mg/ear induced an inhibition of 85.6%. We identified one compound in this fraction as (25R)-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23α-triol-3,6-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (cantalasaponin-1) through 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral analysis and two dimensional experiments like DEPT NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC. This steroidal glycoside showed a dose dependent effect of up to 90% of ear edema inhibition at the highest dose of 1.5 mg/ear.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Different Agave Plants and the Compound Cantalasaponin-1

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    Jaime Tortoriello

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Species of the agave genus, such as Agave tequilana, Agave angustifolia and Agave americana are used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat inflammation-associated conditions. These plants’ leaves contain saponin compounds which show anti-inflammatory properties in different models. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory capacity of these plants, identify which is the most active, and isolate the active compound by a bio-directed fractionation using the ear edema induced in mice with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA technique. A dose of 6 mg/ear of acetone extract from the three agave species induced anti-inflammatory effects, however, the one from A. americana proved to be the most active. Different fractions of this species showed biological activity. Finally the F5 fraction at 2.0 mg/ear induced an inhibition of 85.6%. We identified one compound in this fraction as (25R-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23α-triol-3,6-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (cantalasaponin-1 through 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral analysis and two dimensional experiments like DEPT NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC. This steroidal glycoside showed a dose dependent effect of up to 90% of ear edema inhibition at the highest dose of 1.5 mg/ear.

  7. Avicenna's Canon of Medicine: a review of analgesics and anti-inflammatory substances

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    Shahla Mahdizadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring substances mentioned in medieval medical literatures currently have, and will continue to have, a crucial place in drug discovery. Avicenna was a Persian physician who is known as the most influential medical writers in the Middle ages. Avicenna`s Canon of Medicine, the most famous books in the history of medicine, presents a clear and organized summary of all the medical knowledge of the time, including a long list of drugs. Several hundred substances and receipts from different sources are mentioned for treatment of different illnesses in this book. The aim of the present study was to provide a descriptive review of all anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs presented in this comprehensive encyclopedia of medicine. Data for this review were provided by searches of different sections of this book. Long lists of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances used in the treatment of various diseases are provided. The efficacy of some of these drugs, such as opium, willow oil, curcuma, and garlic, was investigated by modern medicine; pointed to their potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This review will help further research into the clinical benefits of new drugs for treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain.

  8. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Methanol Extract of Ficus pumila L. in Mice

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    Chi-Ren Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the methanol extract of Ficus pumila (FPMeOH. Analgesic effects were evaluated in two models including acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced paw licking. The results showed FPMeOH decreased writhing response in the acetic acid assay and licking time in the formalin test. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by λ-carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema and histopathological analyses. FPMeOH significantly decreased the volume of paw edema induced by λ-carrageenan. Histopathologically, FPMeOH abated the level of tissue destruction and swelling of the edema paws. This study indicated anti-inflammatory mechanism of FPMeOH may be due to declined levels of NO and MDA in the edema paw through increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd in the liver. Additionally, FPMeOH also decreased the level of inflammatory mediators such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2. HPLC fingerprint was established and the contents of three active ingredients, rutin, luteolin, and apigenin, were quantitatively determined. This study provided evidence for the classical treatment of Ficus pumila in inflammatory diseases.

  9. Microemulsion based on Pterodon emarginatus oil and its anti-inflammatory potential

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    Henrique Pascoa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the development of a pharmaceutical product containing vegetable actives from a Brazilian medicinal plant. The possibility of forming a microemulsion using Pterodon emarginatus ("sucupira" oil was evaluated and the anti-inflammatory potential of this microemulsion was also examined. A formulation was developed using P. emarginatus oil, a mixture of ethoxylated Castor Oil (Ultramone(r R-540/propylene glycol 2:1 (surfactant/cosurfactant and distilled water at a ratio of 10:15:75, respectively. The microemulsion which was selected was then subjected to the preliminary stability test and analyzed in terms of average diameter of droplets, pH, zeta potential, and polydispersity index, on the 1st, 7th, 15th, and 30th days after preparation and stored at different temperatures (5 ± 2 °C, 25 ± 2 °C, and 40 ± 2 °C. The anti-inflammatory in vivo activity of both oil and formulation were evaluated, using the experimental model of croton oil-induced ear edema. The preliminary stability test showed that the microemulsion stored at 5 and 25 °C retained its original features throughout the 30-day period. The anti-inflammatory potential of both oil and formulation was shown to be statistically significant (p < 0.001, when compared to the control group, however, the microemulsion proved to be more effective (p < 0.05 than the oil when applied directly to the ear.

  10. Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective layer-by-layer coatings for neural implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiling; Nong, Jia; Zhong, Yinghui

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Infection, inflammation, and neuronal loss are common issues that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of chronically implanted neural prostheses. Minocycline hydrochloride (MH) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and effective anti-inflammatory drug that also exhibits potent neuroprotective activities. In this study, we investigated the development of biocompatible thin film coatings capable of sustained release of MH for improving the long term performance of implanted neural electrodes. Approach. We developed a novel magnesium binding-mediated drug delivery mechanism for controlled and sustained release of MH from an ultrathin hydrophilic layer-by-layer (LbL) coating and characterized the parameters that control MH loading and release. The anti-biofilm, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective potencies of the LbL coating and released MH were also examined. Main results. Sustained release of physiologically relevant amount of MH for 46 days was achieved from the Mg2+-based LbL coating at a thickness of 1.25 μm. In addition, MH release from the LbL coating is pH-sensitive. The coating and released MH demonstrated strong anti-biofilm, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective potencies. Significance. This study reports, for the first time, the development of a bioactive coating that can target infection, inflammation, and neuroprotection simultaneously, which may facilitate the translation of neural interfaces to clinical applications.

  11. [Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Moroccan Erica arborea L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezouar, F; Badri, W; Hsaine, M; Bourhim, N; Fougrach, H

    2013-12-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity, and acute toxicity of Moroccan Erica arborea leaves. Antioxidant capacity was assessed by diphenyle-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), phosphomolybdate (PPM) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) tests and anti-inflammatory capacity was evaluated by hind paw oedema model using carrageenan-induced inflammation in rat. The acute toxicity was evaluated using mice. Acute toxicity of ethanolic extract of E. arborea showed no sign of toxicity at dose of 5 g/kg B.W. Our extracts have important antioxidant properties. The efficient concentration of the ethanolic extract (10.22 μg/ml) required for decreasing initial DPPH concentration by 50% was comparable to that of standard solution butyl-hydroxy-toluene (BHT) (8.87 μg/ml). The administration of ethanolic extract at doses of 200 and 400mg/kg B.W. was able to prevent plantar oedema and exhibited a significant inhibition against carrageenan-induced inflammation when compared to the control group (NaCl 0.9%) but comparable to those of diclofenac (reference drug). Our results show that the leaves of E. arborea may contain some bioactive compounds which are responsible for the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities observed here. Our finding may indicate the possibility of using the extracts of this plant to prevent the antioxidant and inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activities of essential oil isolated from the calyx of Hibiscus sabdariffa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Wen-Li; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-12

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., belonging to the family of Malvaceae, is considered to be a plant with health care applications in China. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the composition of its essential oil and assess its potential therapeutic effect on anti-inflammatory activity. A water steam distillation method was used to extract the essential oil from H. Sabdariffa. The essential oil components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and a total of 18 volatile constituents were identified, the majority of which were fatty acids and ester compounds. Biological activity showed that the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa exhibited excellent anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The nitric oxide (NO) inhibition rate reached 67.46% when the concentration of the essential oil was 200 μg mL -1 . Further analysis showed that the anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa might be exerted through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPK (JNK and ERK1/2) signaling pathways to decrease NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS) production. Thus, the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa is a good source of a natural product with a beneficial effect against inflammation, and it may be applied as a food supplement and/or functional ingredient.

  13. The investigation of anti-inflammatory activity of Yi Guanjian decoction by serum metabonomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Sufang; Cai, Xiaorong; Huang, Rongqing; Xiao, Bingkun; Yang, Jianyun

    2017-01-30

    Yi Guanjian (YGJ), one of the Chinese herbal medicines most commonly used in western countries, reported to possess significant anti-inflammatary effects that inhibit the process of inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammation effects remain largely unresolved. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of YGJ and to explore its potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms by serum metabonomics approach. An xylene-induced mouse right-ear-edema model was used as an inflammatory response in vivo model. Ear edema, prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and Tumor-Necrosis-Factor-alpha (TNF-α) were detected. Then, serum metabolic profiling was analyzed and pathway analysis performed on the biomarkers reversed after YGJ administration and further integration of metabolic networks. The results showed that YGJ alleviated ear edema and decreased serum PGE 2 and TNF-α levels. Fourteen biomarkers were screened, and the levels were all reversed to different degrees after YGJ administration. These biomarkers were mainly related to linoleic acid metabolism, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism and citrate cycle (TCA cycle). In metabolic networks, glycine and pyruvate were node molecules. This indicated that YGJ could significantly inhibit inflammatory response triggered by acute local stimulation and exerted anti-inflammatory activity mainly by regulating node molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Anti-Nociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Heterofucan from Dictyota menstrualis

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    Helena Bonciani Nader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term that defines a family of homo- and hetero-polysaccharides containing sulfated l-fucose in its structure. In this work, a heterofucan (F2.0v from the seaweed, Dictyota menstrualis, was evaluated as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agent. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg inhibits 100% of leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity after chemical stimulation. However, F2.0v does not alter the expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg has peripheral antinociceptive activity with potency similar to dipyrone. On the other hand, it had no effect on pain response on the hot plate test. Confocal microscopy analysis and flow cytometry showed that F2.0v binds to the surface of leucocytes, which leads us to suggest that the mechanism of action of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive F2.0v is related to its ability to inhibit the migration of leukocytes to the site of tissue injury. In summary, the data show that F2.0v compound has great potential as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory, and future studies will be performed to further characterize the mechanism of action of F2.0v.

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of statins in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Snophia; Narayana, Satya; Jayakumar, P; Sudhakar, Uma; Pramod, V

    2013-01-01

    Statins are the group of lipid-lowering drugs commonly used to control cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Statins have potential anti-inflammatory effect by blocking the intermediate metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin medication in chronic periodontitis patients. Thirty patients of age group between 40 and 60 years were selected from the outpatient pool of Department of Periodontics, Thaimoogambigai Dental College and Hospital, Chennai. Thirty patients selected were grouped into two groups, Group-I consists of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis and on statin medication and Group-II consists of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Clinical parameters were recorded and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-1β using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean GCF IL-1β levels in generalized chronic periodontitis patients who are on statin medication (Group-I) were lower than the generalized chronic periodontitis patients without statin medication (Group-II). Reduction of GCF IL-1β levels in statin users indicate that statins have anti-inflammatory effect on periodontal disease.

  16. Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiparasitic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Laennecia confusa

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    María G. Martínez Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper investigated the potential benefit of the traditional Mexican medicinal plant Laennecia confusa (Cronquist G. L. Nesom (Asteraceae. Fractions from the hexane, chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts were analyzed for antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and antiparasitic activities. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts and fractions was assessed on bacterial and fungal strains, in addition to the protozoa Leishmania donovani, using a microdilution assay. The propensity of the plant's compounds to produce adverse effects on human health was also evaluated using propidium iodine to identify damage to human macrophages. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts and fractions was investigated by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6. Chemical analyses demonstrated the presence of flavonoids, cyanogenic and cardiotonic glycosides, saponins, sesquiterpene lactones, and triterpenes in the chloroform extract. A number of extracts and fractions show antibacterial activity. Of particular interest is antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and its relative methicillin-resistant strain, MRSA. Hexanic and chloroformic fractions also exhibit antifungal activity and two extracts and the fraction CE 2 antiparasitic activity against Leishmania donovani. All bioactive extracts and fractions assayed were also found to be cytotoxic to macrophages. In addition, the hexane and methane extracts show anti-inflammatory activity by suppressing the secretion of interleukine-6.

  17. Controlled release from aspirin based linear biodegradable poly(anhydride esters) for anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Queeny; Movva, Sahitya; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2017-08-07

    This work reports the synthesis of a novel, aspirin-loaded, linear poly (anhydride ester) and provides mechanistic insights into the release of aspirin from this polymer for anti-inflammatory activity. As compared to conventional drug delivery systems that rely on diffusion based release, incorporation of bioactives in the polymer backbone is challenging and high loading is difficult to achieve. In the present study, we exploit the pentafunctional sugar alcohol (xylitol) to provide sites for drug (aspirin) attachment at its non-terminal OH groups. The terminal OH groups are polymerized with a diacid anhydride. The hydrolysis of the anhydride and ester bonds under physiological conditions release aspirin from the matrix. The resulting poly(anhydride ester) has high drug loading (53%) and displays controlled release kinetics of aspirin. The polymer releases 8.5 % and 20%, of the loaded drug in one and four weeks, respectively and has a release rate constant of 0.0035h -0.61 . The release rate is suitable for its use as an anti-inflammatory agent without being cytotoxic. The polymer exhibits good cytocompatibility and anti-inflammatory properties and may find applications as injectable or as an implantable bioactive material. The physical insights into the release mechanism can provide development of other drug loaded polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Ranking by Nondeterministic Assessments of Probabilistic Type

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    Madalina luiza MOLDOVEANU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available With a number of common therapeutic prescriptions, common mechanisms, common pharmacological effects - analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory (acetaminophen excepted, common side effects (SE (platelet dysfunction, gastritis and peptic ulcers, renal insufficiency in susceptible patients, water and sodium retention, edemas, nephropathies, and only a few different characteristics – different chemical structures, pharmacokinetics and different therapeutic possibility, different selectivities according to cyclooxygenase pathway 1 and 2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs similarities are more apparent than differences. Being known that in a correct treatment benefits would exceed risks, the question “Which anti-inflammatory drug presents the lowest risks for a patient?” is just natural. By the Global Risk Method (GRM and the Maximum Risk Method (MRM we have determined the ranking of fourteen NSAIDs considering the risks presented by each particular NSAID. Nimesulide, Etoricoxib and Celecoxib safety level came superior to the other NSAIDs, whereas Etodolac and Indomethacin present an increased side effects risk.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of jojoba liquid wax in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habashy, Ramy R; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Khalifa, Amani E; Al-Azizi, Mohammed M

    2005-02-01

    Jojoba [Simmondsia chinensis (Link 1822) Schneider 1907] is an arid perennial shrub grown in several American and African countries. Jojoba seeds, which are rich in liquid wax, were used in folk medicine for diverse ailments. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of jojoba liquid wax (JLW) was evaluated in a number of experimental models. Results showed that JLW caused reduction of carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In a test for anti-inflammatory potential utilizing the chick's embryo chroioallantoic membrane (CAM), JLW also caused significant lowering of granulation tissue formation. Topical application of JLW reduced ear oedema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, JLW also reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In addition, JLW ameliorated histopathological changes affected by croton oil application. In the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in air pouch in rats, JLW reduced nitric oxide (NO) level and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of JLW in combating inflammation in several experimental models. Further investigations are needed to identify the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory property of JLW.

  20. Nutraceuticals of anti-inflammatory activity as complementary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Okbi, Sahar Y

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by elevated oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. The severe side effects of drug used during such disease necessitate the search for new and safe approaches. Food is a rich source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory bioactive constituents including phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, phytosterols, toccopherols, and carotenoids. We have a series of publications dealing with the anti-inflammatory activity of different food extracts (as nutraceuticals) in experimental animals (acute and chronic inflammation model) and in clinical study (RA patients). Fish oil, primrose oil, extracts of black cumin, fenugreek, liquorice, coriander, tomato, carrot, sweet potato, broccoli, green tea, rosemary, hazelnut, walnut, wheat germ, and date in addition to the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum were the nutraceuticals studied. During these studies, changes in inflammatory biomarkers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), seromucoids, fibrinogen, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), prostaglandin E2), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), antioxidant status (total antioxidant capacity, vitamin C, vitamin E, retinol, β-carotene), the level of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) and colonic microflora in response to the administration of nutraceuticals have been assessed. Results of these studies showed that the majority of nutraceuticals studied possess beneficial effect toward chronic inflammatory diseases, which might be due to the presence of one or more of the above-mentioned phytochemicals. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutraceuticals may serve as complementary medicine for the management of RA. © The Author(s) 2012.

  1. Effects of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on experimental radiation pneumonitis

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    Gross, N.J.; Holloway, N.O.; Narine, K.R. (Medical Radiology Service, Hines VA Hospital, Maywood, IL (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Corticosteroids have previously been found to be protective against the mortality of radiation pneumonitis in mice, even when given well after lethal lung irradiation. The authors explored the possibility that this effect was due to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions by giving various nonsteroidal inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism to groups of mice that had received 19 Gy to the thorax (bilaterally). Treatments of four cyclooxygenase inhibitors, one lipoxygenase inhibitor, and one leukotriene receptor antagonist, given by various routes in various doses, were commenced 10 weeks after irradiation or sham irradiation and continued throughout the period when death from radiation pneumonitis occurs, 11-26 weeks after irradiation. Each of the treatments had the appropriate effect on arachidonate metabolism in the lungs as assessed by LTB4 and PGE2 levels in lung lavage fluid. The principal end point was mortality. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine and the LTD4/LTE4 receptor antagonist LY 171883 markedly reduced mortality in dose-response fashion. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors were divergent; piroxicam and ibuprofen were marginally protective, indomethacin in all doses accelerated mortality, and aspirin reduced mortality in a dose-response fashion. These results suggest that the protective effect of corticosteroids in radiation pneumonitis can be tentatively attributed to their anti-inflammatory actions, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, particularly those that affect lipoxygenase products, may offer equal or better protection than corticosteroids against mortality due to radiation pneumonitis.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of essential oils from Syzygium cumini and Psidium guajava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Antonio C; Souza, Mariana C; Henriques, Maria G M O; Ramos, Mônica F S

    2013-07-01

    Despite the many biological activities reported for essential oils, their anti-inflammatory ability is relatively underexplored considering the wide variation in plant sources and in their volatile composition. Oils from Syzygium cumini Skells (SC) and Psidium guajava L. (PG) (Myrtaceae) have been described as having diverse pharmacological activities. The current study seeks to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oils from the leaves of SC and PG, as well as some of their terpene-enriched fractions (+V = more volatile and -V = less volatile) obtained by vacuum distillation. Both the pharmacological responses and chemical compositions were correlated. The relative contents of the oils and their fractions were evaluated by gas chromatography. Individual constituents in the oils were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Anti-inflammatory activity was accessed in the lipopolysaccharide-induced pleurisy model, by measuring the inhibition of total leukocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil migration in the mice pleural lavage, after oil treatment with the oils at 100 mg/kg. Eosinophil migration was inhibited by SC (67%), SC (+V) (63%), PG (76%), PG (+V) (67%) and PG (-V) (74%). This efficacy was correlated with the presence of β-pinene and β-caryophyllene in the oils, a result that was reinforced by evaluating both these pure components (38 and 50% inhibition, respectively). Synergistic effects associated with the presence of α-pinene were speculated. Essential oils from SC and PG may be useful to treat inflammatory diseases by mechanisms that include the inhibition of eosinophil migration.

  3. Fatty acid composition, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. seeds

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    Sumaia Awad Elkariem Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hibiscus (H. sabdariffa (commonly known as “Karkadeh” in Arabic is widely used in various pharmacological applications in Sudan. The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of H. sabdariffa seed extracts using rat models. In acute anti-inflammatory models, oral administration of petroleum ether extract of H. sabdariffa seeds inhibited the hind paw edema (p<0.01 which was induced by carrageenan. The petroleum ether extract exhibited significant (p<0.01 inhibition of vascular permeability in rats induced by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (0.6%. In cotton pellet granuloma method, the petroleum ether extract of H. sabdariffa seed showed significant inhibition of granuloma. The extract reduced (p<0.001 abdominal constrictions which was induced by injection of acetic acid (0.7%. Analysis of seed oil of H. sabdariffa using Gas Chromatography revealed the presence of three fatty acids; these were linolelaidic acid, arachidic acid, and palmitic acid. In conclusion, H. sabdariffa seeds possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in rat model.

  4. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan

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    Farukh Sharopov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli, 625 µg/mL (MIC and 1250 µg/mL (MBC for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. The essential oil of Galagania fragrantissima was highly active against MRSA at concentrations as low as 39.1 µg/mL and 78.2 µg/mL for MIC and MBC, respectively. Origanum tyttanthum essential oil showed the highest antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 0.12 mg/mL for ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and 0.28 mg/mL for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. Galagania fragrantissima and Origanum tyttanthum essential oils showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity; IC50 values of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX inhibition were 7.34 and 14.78 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, essential oils of Origanum tyttanthum and Galagania fragrantissima exhibit substantial antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. They are interesting candidates in phytotherapy.

  5. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanos, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Properties of Flavonoids from Heliotropium subulatum Exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bharat; Sharma, Ram A

    2015-01-01

    Heliotropium subulatum is an erect or procumbent perennial herb; leaves contain foliar trichomes and its resinous exudate is used in traditional medicine. The anti-inflammatory activity of dichloromethane fraction and isolated flavonoids was evaluated by using carrageenan and CFA-induced paw oedema models. Similarly, the disc diffusion and microdilution methods were used for the assessment of antimicrobial activity. Five isolated flavonoids were investigated for their antiinflammatory and antimicrobial activities. Eriodictyol demonstrated maximum anti-inflammatory activity (53.09%) at 30.0 mg/kg dose on 6(th) h and similarly, it inhibited the CFA-induced arthritis swelling (41.84%) with 30.0 mg/kg dose on 8(th) day respectively. As per disc diffusion and microdilution methods used for antimicrobial activity determination, the pinocembrin was found to be most active against Staphylococcus aureus (IZ=27±0.7 mm, 08 μg/ml dose) and Candida albicans (IZ=17±0.9 mm; 12 μg/ml dose). These investigated results revealed that the eriodictyol and pinocembrin showed significant anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. Further studies which aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of these isolated flavonoids in the treatment of inflammations and various types of infections have been initiated.

  7. Leaves extract of Murraya Koenigii linn for anti--inflammatory and analgesic activity in animal models

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    Shailly Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has been done for the investigation of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of methanol extract of dried leaves of Murraya koenigii Linn by oral administration at dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, to healthy animals. Extract was studied for its anti-inflammatory activity by using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in albino rats and the mean increase in paw volume and % inhibition in paw volume were measured plethysmometrically at different time intervals after carrageenan (1% w/v injection. Extract was also evaluated for analgesic activity using Eddy′s hot plate method and formalin induced paw licking method in albino rats. The methanol extract showed significant (P < 0.001 reduction in the carrageenan-induced paw edema and analgesic activity evidenced by increase in the reaction time by eddy′s hot plate method and percentage increase in pain in formalin test. The methanol extract showed anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect in dose dependent manner when compared with the control and standard drug, diclofenac sodium (10mg/kg, p.o. These inhibitions were statistically significant (P < 0.05. Thus our investigation suggests a potential benefit of Murraya koenigii in treating conditions associated with inflammatory pain.

  8. Study of antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of certain Iranian medicinal plants

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    Fariba Sharififar

    2012-02-01

    Methods: The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of methanol extracts of tested plants were evaluated using hot-plate and carrageenan-induced edema methods respectively. The plant extracts were studied by i.p administration at three doses of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg. Results: In the hot-plate test, the extracts of T. foeunm-graecum (100 mg/kg and Z. majdae (200 and 400m g/kg significantly increased the tolerance to pain in female albino mice in comparison to control. The administration of T. foenum-graecum at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg and V. tricolor (400mg/kg significantly reduced the paw edema in male rat which measured in all the times of observation after carrageenan administration in comparison to control and reference (Ibuprofen, 400mg/kg. Conclusions: The present work comparatively demonstrated considerable antinociceptive and anti inflammatory effect of all of the tested plants especially T. foeunm-graecum. The results here confirm traditional uses of T. foeunm-graecum both as analgesic or anti inflammatory agents. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 19-24

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Melittin on Porphyromonas Gingivalis LPS-Stimulated Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woon-Hae; An, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Gwon, Mi-Gyeong; Gu, Hyemin; Jeon, Minji; Kim, Min-Kyung; Han, Sang-Mi; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2018-02-05

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that contributes to the destruction of the gingiva. Porphyromonas gingivalis ( P. gingivalis ) can cause periodontitis via its pathogenic lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Melittin, a major component of bee venom, is known to have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. However, the role of melittin in the inflammatory response has not been elucidated in periodontitis-like human keratinocytes. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of melittin on a P. gingivalis LPS (PgLPS)-treated HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. The cytotoxicity of melittin was measured using a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, and a Cell Counting Kit-8. The effect of melittin on PgLPS-induced inflammation was determined with Western blot, real-time quantitative PCT, and immunofluorescence. PgLPS increased the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Moreover, PgLPS induced activation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B/Akt. Melittin also inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by suppressing the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, ERK, and Akt. Melittin attenuates the PgLPS-induced inflammatory response and could therefore be applied in the treatment of periodontitis for anti-inflammatory effects.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of fisetin in human gingival fibroblasts treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín

    2014-10-01

    Fisetin is an anti-inflammatory flavonoid; however, its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not yet understood. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of fisetin and its association with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-beta pathways in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cell signaling, cell viability, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression of HGFs treated with various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 μM) of fisetin were measured by cell viability assay (MTT), Western blotting, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on COX-2. We found that fisetin significantly reduced the synthesis and expression of prostaglandin E2 in HGFs treated with LPS. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK was suppressed consistently by fisetin in HGFs treated with LPS. The data indicate that fisetin inhibits MAPK activation and COX-2 expression without affecting cell viability. These findings may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of the effect of fisetin on periodontal disease.

  11. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Isoorientin Isolated from Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa

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    Kotha Anilkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the major causative factor of different diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer. Anti-inflammatory drugs are often the first step of treatment in many of these diseases. The present study is aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory properties of isoorientin, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor isolated from the tubers of Pueraria tuberosa, in vitro on mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 and in vivo on mouse paw edema and air pouch models of inflammation. Isoorientin reduced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cell line in vitro and carrageenan induced inflammatory animal model systems in vivo. Cellular infiltration into pouch tissue was reduced in isoorientin treated mice compared to carrageenan treated mice. Isoorientin treated RAW 264.7 cells and animals showed reduced expression of inflammatory proteins like COX-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, and interleukin 1-β (IL-1-β both in vitro and in vivo. The antioxidant enzyme levels of catalase and GST were markedly increased in isoorientin treated mice compared to carrageenan treated mice. These results suggest that isoorientin, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, not only exerts anti-inflammatory effects in LPS induced RAW cells and carrageenan induced inflammatory model systems but also exhibits potent antioxidant properties.

  12. Synthesis and Study of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Amide Derivatives of Ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Khalili, Mohsen; Olama, Zahra; Karami, Shirin; Nahri-Niknafs, Babak

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs worldwide and represent a mainstay in the therapy of acute and chronic pain and inflammation. The traditional NSAIDs like ibuprofen (I) contain free carboxylic acid group which can produce gastrointestinal (GI) damage for long-term use. In order to obtain the novel NSAIDs with less side effects; carboxylic acid moiety has been modified into various amide groups which is the most active area of research in this family. In this research, synthesis of various pharmacological heterocyclic amides of ibuprofen is described. All the new compounds were tested for their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in mice and compared with standard (Ibuprofen) and control (saline) groups. The results revealed that all the synthesized compounds (III-VI) exhibited more analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in tail immersion (as a model of acute thermal pain), formalin (as a model of acute chemical and chronic pain) and paw edema (as a model of acute inflammation) tests when compared with standard and control animals. These pharmacological activities were significant for VI compared to other new compounds (III-V) which may be concern to more effective role of morpholin for the reduction of pain and inflammation compared to other used heterocyclic amines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities A of eugenol essential oil in experimental animal models

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    Apparecido N. Daniel

    Full Text Available Eugenia caryophyllata, popular name "clove", is grown naturally in Indonesia and cultivated in many parts of the world, including Brazil. Clove is used in cooking, food processing, pharmacy; perfumery, cosmetics and the clove oil (eugenol have been used in folk medicine for manifold conditions include use in dental care, as an antiseptic and analgesic. The objective of this study was evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of eugenol used for dentistry purposes following oral administration in animal models in vivo. The anti-inflammatory activity of eugenol was evaluated by inflammatory exudates volume and leukocytes migration in carrageenan-induced pleurisy and carrageenan-induced paw edema tests in rats. The antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests in mice. Eugenol (200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the volume of pleural exudates without changing the total blood leukocyte counts. At dose of 200 mg/kg, eugenol significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced edema, 2-4 h after injection of the flogistic agent. In the hot-plate test, eugenol administration (100 mg/kg showed unremarkable activity against the time-to-discomfort reaction, recorded as response latency, which is blocked by meperidine. Eugenol at doses of 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg had a significant antinociceptive effect in the test of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhing, compared to the control animals. The data suggest that eugenol possesses anti-inflammatory and peripheral antinociceptive activities.

  14. Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Garcinia nervosa (Clusiaceae

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    N. M. U. Seruji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our continuing interest on Sarawak Garcinia species, we carried out the evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities on the methanolic extracts of Garcinia nervosa. The extracts were prepared from its air-dried grounded leaves and barks. The evaluation of antioxidant activities was done using the (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl DPPH radical scavenging assay and the result showed high radical scavenging activities. Meanwhile, the anti-inflammatory evaluation was performed using the lipoxygenase assay, hyaluronidase assay, and xanthine oxidase assay which showed, both of these extracts exhibited high anti-inflammatory properties. The lipoxygenase assay showed a high inhibition of enzyme activity for the barks extracts and a moderate enzyme activity for the leaves extracts. However, there were low inhibitions for both extracts in the hyaluronidase assay and only the barks extracts exhibited moderate antigout properties in the xanthine oxidase assay. For the cytotoxic assay, the extracts exhibited positive responses against the three cancer cell lines, the HeLa cell lines, MCF-7 cell lines, and HT-29 cell lines. Thus, Garcinia nervosa contains high antioxidativeand anti-inflammation properties, which have great potential in the development of pharmaceutical and dermatological products.

  15. Toxicological analysis and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil from Piper vicosanum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff Brait, Débora Regina; Mattos Vaz, Márcia Soares; da Silva Arrigo, Jucicléia; Borges de Carvalho, Luciana Noia; Souza de Araújo, Flávio Henrique; Vani, Juliana Miron; da Silva Mota, Jonas; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano; Negrão, Fábio Juliano; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil from Piper vicosanum leaves (OPV) and evaluated the toxicological potential of this oil through acute toxicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity tests. The acute toxicity of OPV was evaluated following oral administration to female rats at a single dose of 2 g/kg b.w. To evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potential, male mice were divided into five groups: I: negative control; II: positive control; III: 500 mg/kg of OPV; IV: 1000 mg/kg of OPV; V: 2000 mg/kg of OPV. The anti-inflammatory activity of OPV was evaluated in carrageenan-induced pleurisy and paw edema models in rats. No signs of acute toxicity were observed, indicating that the LD50 of this oil is greater than 2000 mg/kg. In the comet assay, OPV did not increase the frequency or rate of DNA damage in groups treated with any of the doses assessed compared to that in the negative control group. In the micronucleus test, the animals treated did not exhibit any cytotoxic or genotoxic changes in peripheral blood erythrocytes. OPV (100 and 300 mg/kg) significantly reduced edema formation and inhibited leukocyte migration analyzed in the carrageenan-induced edema and pleurisy models. These results show that OPV has anti-inflammatory potential without causing acute toxicity or genotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties of Polygonum barbatum (L. Hara var. barbata

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    M. Abdul Mazid

    Full Text Available The antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties of the extracts of P. barbatum (L. Hara var. barbata, Polygonaceae, at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, were evaluated in mice/rat models using, respectively, the acetic-acid-induced writhing method, the carrageenan-induced edema test and the Lipschitz method. In the acetic-acid-induced writhing test in mice, all extracts displayed a dose dependent analgesic effect. The most potent analgesic activity was observed with the petroleum ether extract at the dose of 400 mg/kg body weight with an inhibition of writhing response 46.8% compared to 62.2% for the positive control aminopyrine. Petroleum ether extract at the dose of 400 mg/kg body weight also displayed the highest levels of anti-inflammatory activity after 2 h with the 39.3% inhibition of paw edema, and this effect was better than the effect observed by the conventional anti-inflammatory agent phenylbutazone (maximum inhibition of 38.3% after 4 h. All extracts increased urine volume in a dose-dependent manner, and the ethyl acetate extract showed a significant level of diuresis comparable to that of the standard diuretic agent furosemide.

  17. Evaluation of analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activity on Cordia dichotoma G. Forst. Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Kaur, Jagjit

    2015-01-01

    Cordia dichotoma G. Forst. is an important medicinal plant of family Boraginaceae. Traditionally, its leaves are used to treat fever, headache, and joint pain but its medicinal activities have not been proven by research. To evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activity of C. dichotoma G. Forst. leaf extract. The various extracts of leaf powder were prepared by using soxhlet apparatus. The methanol extract was selected for pharmacological study. To evaluate analgesic activity, Eddy's hot plate method, to study anti-inflammatory activity, carageenan-induced rat paw edema method, and to study antipyretic activity, yeast-induced pyrexia method was used. SD female rats (180-200 g) were used for the study. In all three tests, the methanol extract high dose (400 mg/kg) was found to be highly significant as compared to standard drug. This study proved the traditional uses of plant leaves and concluded the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activity of the leaf methanol extract.

  18. Importance of asparagine on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity of selected anti-inflammatory peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina, E-mail: csorico@comunidad.unam.mx [Química Computacional, Facultad de Estudios Superiores (FES)-Zaragoza, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Iztapalapa, C.P. 09230 México, D.F. (Mexico); Barrientos-Salcedo, Carolina [Laboratorio de Química Médica y Quimiogenómica, Facultad de Bioanálisis Campus Veracruz-Boca del Río, Universidad Veracruzana, C.P. 91700 Veracruz (Mexico); Campos-Fernández, Linda; Alvarado-Salazar, Andres [Química Computacional, Facultad de Estudios Superiores (FES)-Zaragoza, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Iztapalapa, C.P. 09230 México, D.F. (Mexico); Esquivel, Rodolfo O. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (UAM-Iztapalapa), C.P. 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-08-18

    Highlights: • Asparagine plays an important role to anti-inflammatory effect of peptides. • The electron-donor substituent groups favor the formation of the hydrogen bonds, which contribute in the structural stability of peptides. • Chemical reactivity and the physicochemical features are crucial in the biological functions of peptides. - Abstract: Inflammatory response events are initiated by a complex series of molecular reactions that generate chemical intermediaries. The structure and properties of peptides and proteins are determined by the charge distribution of their side chains, which play an essential role in its electronic structure and physicochemical properties, hence on its biological functionality. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of changing one central amino acid, such as substituting asparagine for aspartic acid, from Cys–Asn–Ser in aqueous solution, by assessing the conformational stability, physicochemical properties, chemical reactivity and their relationship with anti-inflammatory activity; employing quantum-chemical descriptors at the M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level. Our results suggest that asparagine plays a more critical role than aspartic acid in the structural stability, physicochemical features, and chemical reactivity of these tripeptides. Substituent groups in the side chain cause significant changes on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity, and consequently on their anti-inflammatory activity.

  19. Review article: anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action of Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoulakis, C

    2009-10-15

    Saccharomyces boulardii, a well-studied probiotic, can be effective in inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with diverse pathophysiology, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and bacterially mediated or enterotoxin-mediated diarrhoea and inflammation. To discuss the mechanisms of action involved in the intestinal anti-inflammatory action of S. boulardii. Review of the literature related to the anti-inflammatory effects of this probiotic. Several mechanisms of action have been identified directed against the host and pathogenic microorganisms. S. boulardii and S. boulardii secreted-protein(s) inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by interfering with the global mediator of inflammation nuclear factor kappaB, and modulating the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38. S. boulardii activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) that protects from gut inflammation and IBD. S. boulardii also suppresses 'bacteria overgrowth' and host cell adherence, releases a protease that cleaves C. difficile toxin A and its intestinal receptor and stimulates antibody production against toxin A. Recent results indicate that S. boulardii may interfere with IBD pathogenesis by trapping T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. The multiple anti-inflammatory mechanisms exerted by S. boulardii provide molecular explanations supporting its effectiveness in intestinal inflammatory states.

  20. Review article: Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action of Saccharomyces boulardii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoulakis, C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii), a well-studied probiotic, can be effective in inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with diverse pathophysiology, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), and bacterially – or enterotoxin-mediated diarrhea and inflammation. Aim Discuss the mechanisms of action involved in the intestinal anti-inflammatory action of S. boulardii Methods Review of the literature related to the anti-inflammatory effects of this probiotic. Results Several mechanisms of action have been identified directed against the host and pathogenic microorganisms. S. boulardii and S. boulardii secreted protein(s) inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by interfering with the global mediator of inflammation nuclear factor κB, and modulating the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38. S. boulardii activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) that protects from gut inflammation and IBD. S. boulardii also suppresses “bacteria overgrowth” and host cell adherence, releases a protease that cleaves C. difficile toxin A and its intestinal receptor, and stimulates antibody production against toxin A. Recent results indicate that S. boulardii may interfere with IBD pathogenesis by trapping T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusions The multiple anti-inflammatory mechanisms exerted by S. boulardii provide molecular explanations supporting its effectiveness in intestinal inflammatory states. PMID:19706150

  1. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharopov, Farukh; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Gulmurodov, Isomiddin; Khalifaev, Davlat; Isupov, Salomiddin; Wink, Michael

    2015-11-02

    Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia) were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli , 625 µg/mL (MIC) and 1250 µg/mL (MBC) for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), respectively. The essential oil of Galagania fragrantissima was highly active against MRSA at concentrations as low as 39.1 µg/mL and 78.2 µg/mL for MIC and MBC, respectively. Origanum tyttanthum essential oil showed the highest antioxidant activity with IC 50 values of 0.12 mg/mL for ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and 0.28 mg/mL for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) . Galagania fragrantissima and Origanum tyttanthum essential oils showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity; IC 50 values of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition were 7.34 and 14.78 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, essential oils of Origanum tyttanthum and Galagania fragrantissima exhibit substantial antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. They are interesting candidates in phytotherapy.

  2. Gelatin-carboxymethyl tamarind gum biocomposites: In vitro characterization & anti-inflammatory pharmacodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Sougata, E-mail: janapharmacy@rediffmail.com; Banerjee, Abhisek; Sen, Kalyan Kumar; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, gelatin and carboxymethyl tamarind gum (CTG) were chemically cross-linked to control the delivery of aceclofenac from their interpenetrating network (IPNs). Infrared spectra, thermal and X-ray data supported that drug and polymer was compatible in the composite hydrogels. Irregularly shaped IPN microstructures were seen under field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). IPN system was capable of entrapping about 96% of the drug fed. CTG in IPN structures suppressed the drug release rate in HCl solution (pH 1.2); however extended the same in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). The drug release was controlled by polymer chain relaxation/swelling and simple diffusion in vitro. The anti-inflammatory activity of drug-loaded biocomposites lasted over 7 h in albino rats, thus suggesting their potential as an anti-inflammatory therapeutics. - Highlights: • Novel gelatin-carboxymethyl tamarind gum biocomposites was synthesized. • FTIR, thermal and X-ray study ensured compatibility between drug and polymers. • FE-SEM image revealed irregular shape of the IPN microstructures. • In vivo anti-inflammatory pharmacodynamics in rat model was encouraging.

  3. Enhanced barrier functions and anti-inflammatory effect of cultured coconut extract on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soomin; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jihee; Lee, Young In; Lee, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Ju Hee

    2017-08-01

    Natural plant oils have been used as a translational alternative to modern medicine. Particularly, virgin coconut oil (VCO) has gained popularity because of its potential benefits in pharmaceutical, nutritional, and cosmetic applications. Cultured coconut extract (CCE) is an alternative end product of VCO, which undergoes a further bacterial fermentation process. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CCE on human skin. We analyzed the expression of skin barrier molecules and collagens after applying CCE on human explanted skin. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of CCE, the expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The CCE-treated group showed increased expression of cornified cell envelope components, which contribute to protective barrier functions of the stratum corneum. Further, the expression of inflammatory markers was lower in the CCE-treated group after exposure to UVB radiation. These results suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of CCE against UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. Additionally, the CCE-treated group showed increased collagen and hyaluronan synthase-3 expression. In our study, CCE showed a barrier-enhancing effect and anti-inflammatory properties against ex vivo UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. The promising effect of CCE may be attributed to its high levels of polyphenols and fatty acid components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-inflammatory Activities and Gastric Ulcer-inducing Properties of Tetraacetylquercetin and Tetrapivaloylquercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Herowati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin (3,3’4’,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone has been reported to show anti-inflammatory activity. However, its low oral bioavailability limits the application of quercetin in therapy. Ester derivatives of quercetin have been reported to have higher bioavailability than quercetin. This research aimed to study the anti-inflammatory activities and gastric ulcer-inducing properties of tetraacetylquercetinas well as tetrapivaloylquercetin. Synthesis of tetra-acyl derivatives of quercetin was conducted using acetic anhydride or pivaloyl chloride in the presence of pyridine and the structure was confirmed by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopy as well as elemental analysis. At a dose of 20 mg/kg bw, oral administration of quercetin only showed 20% inhibition activity on carragenan induced rat paw edema, while tetraacetyl and tetrapivaloyl derivatives at equimolar dose showed 11-33% and 5-15% inhibition activity respectively. Contrary to the gastric ulcer healing-promoting action of quercetin, tetraacetylquercetin caused mild gastric ulcers. However, no gastric ulcer was observed after administration of tetrapivaloylquercetin. It was concluded that acylation enhances the anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin but causes mild gastric ulcers in the case of tetraacetylation.

  5. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of a crude extract of Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Martins, R A B; Pegoraro, D H; Woisky, R; Penna, S C; Sertié, J A A

    2002-04-01

    Petiveria alliacea L (Phytolaccaceae) is a perennial bush plant that grows widely in Brazil. The roots and leaves of P. alliacea have been used in folk medicine for their antispasmodic, sedative, diuretic and antihelminthic actions. We recently described the anti-inflammatory properties of P. alliacea administered topically and orally in different animal models. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of a crude lyophilized extract of P. alliacea roots administered to rats with pleurisy. The oral administration of P. alliacea root extract did not significantly reduce the total number of leukocytes at the doses tested. By contrast, the highest dose of extract tested (43.9 mg/kg body wt.) significantly reduced the number of migrating neutrophils, mononuclear cells and eosinophils; the dose of 31.4 mg/kg body wt. also reduced mononuclear cell migration. The P. alliacea root extract also showed a significant analgesic effect in the experimental model used. The results of this study provide a basis for the use of P. alliacea extracts in popular folk medicine, but further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Mesona procumbens in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Liao, Jung-Chun; Chiu, Chuan-Sung; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lin, Tsung-Hui; Deng, Jeng-Shyan

    2012-04-01

    Mesona procumbens is consumed as a herbal drink and jelly-type dessert in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extract of M. procumbens (AMP) using the λ-carrageenin (Carr)-induced mouse paw oedema model. The fingerprint chromatogram of AMP was obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. To investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of AMP, the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in paw oedema were monitored. Serum nitric oxide (NO), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were also evaluated. The fingerprint chromatogram from HPLC indicated that AMP contained protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, vanillic acid and caffeic acid. In the anti-inflammatory test, AMP decreased paw oedema after Carr administration and increased the CAT, SOD and GPx activities and decreased the MDA level in paw oedema at 5 h after Carr injection. AMP also affected the serum NO, TNF-α and IL-1β levels at 5 h after Carr injection. Western blotting revealed that AMP decreased the expression of Carr-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Mesona procumbens has the potential to provide a therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated disorders. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Iridoids and Verbascoside Isolated from Castilleja tenuiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Rodríguez-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Castilleja tenuiflora (Orobanchaceae has been used in Mexican traditional medicine as a treatment for cough, dysentery, anxiety, nausea and vomiting as well as hepatic and gastrointestinal diseases. The ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Castilleja tenuiflora was separated by silica gel column chromatography. The fractions were evaluated using the induced edema acetate 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol (TPA anti-inflammatory activity model. The most active fraction was subjected to medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC with UV detection at 206 and 240 nm. The following iridoids were isolated: geniposidic acid, aucubin, bartioside, 8-epi-loganin, mussaenoside, and the phenylpropanoid verbascoside. The most active iridoid was geniposidic acid, which was more active than the control (indomethacin, and the least active iridoid was mussaenoside. 8-epi-Loganin, and mussaenoside have not been previously reported to be anti-inflammatory compounds. The results of these investigations confirm the potential of Mexican plants for the production of bioactive compounds and validate the ethnomedical use of Castilleja tenuiflora-like anti-inflammatory plants.

  8. Effects of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on experimental radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, N.J.; Holloway, N.O.; Narine, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    Corticosteroids have previously been found to be protective against the mortality of radiation pneumonitis in mice, even when given well after lethal lung irradiation. The authors explored the possibility that this effect was due to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions by giving various nonsteroidal inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism to groups of mice that had received 19 Gy to the thorax (bilaterally). Treatments of four cyclooxygenase inhibitors, one lipoxygenase inhibitor, and one leukotriene receptor antagonist, given by various routes in various doses, were commenced 10 weeks after irradiation or sham irradiation and continued throughout the period when death from radiation pneumonitis occurs, 11-26 weeks after irradiation. Each of the treatments had the appropriate effect on arachidonate metabolism in the lungs as assessed by LTB4 and PGE2 levels in lung lavage fluid. The principal end point was mortality. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine and the LTD4/LTE4 receptor antagonist LY 171883 markedly reduced mortality in dose-response fashion. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors were divergent; piroxicam and ibuprofen were marginally protective, indomethacin in all doses accelerated mortality, and aspirin reduced mortality in a dose-response fashion. These results suggest that the protective effect of corticosteroids in radiation pneumonitis can be tentatively attributed to their anti-inflammatory actions, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, particularly those that affect lipoxygenase products, may offer equal or better protection than corticosteroids against mortality due to radiation pneumonitis

  9. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Untreated, Germinated, and Fermented Mung Bean Aqueous Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlaily Mohd Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of untreated mung bean (MB, germinated mung bean (GMB, and fermented mung bean (FMB was performed on both in vitro (inhibition of inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide(NO and in vivo (inhibition of ear oedema and reduction of response to pain stimulus studies. Results showed that both GMB and FMB aqueous extract exhibited potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro results showed that GMB and FMB were potent inflammatory mediator (NO inhibitors at both 2.5 and 5 mg/mL. Further in vivo studies showed that GMB and FMB aqueous extract at 1000 mg/kg can significantly reduce ear oedema in mice caused by arachidonic acid. Besides, both 200 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg concentrations of GMB and FMB were found to exhibit potent antinociceptive effects towards hotplate induced pain. With these, it can be concluded that GMB and FMB aqueous extract exhibited potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in children: a formidable foe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the most common causes of bacteraemia in children. In order to evade and overcome the immune responses of its host and any antimicrobial therapies aimed at destroying it, this organism, through various mechanisms, continues to evolve. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a ...

  12. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Buddleja globosa, Buddlejaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, N; Rosales, L; Apablaza, C; Goïty, L; Erazo, S; Negrete, R; Theodoluz, C; Rodríguez, J; Delporte, C

    2008-03-05

    Buddleja globosa, known as "matico", is employed in Chile for wound healing. To validate the traditional use of the crude drug through in vivo and in vitro evaluation of the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant properties of its extracts. Sequential hexane, dichloromethane, methanol and total methanol extracts were studied using bioguided fractionation. The following activities were investigated: analgesic (writhing test), oral and topic anti-inflammatory (paw- and ear-induced edema), free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH, superoxide anion, lipid peroxidation and xanthine oxidase inhibition). Sodium naproxen, nimesulide, indomethacin were used as reference drugs for in vivo, quercetin and allopurinol for in vitro assays. A mixture of alpha- and beta-amyrins was isolated from the hexane extract that showed 41.2% of analgesic effect at 600 mg/kg, inhibited by 47.7 and 79.0% the arachidonic acid (AA) and 12-deoxyphorbol-13-decanoate (TPA)-induced inflammation at 3mg/20 microL/ear, respectively. A mixture of beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, stigmastenol, stigmastanol and campesterol was isolated from the fraction CD4-N and beta-sitosterol-glycoside from the fraction CD5-N, reducing TPA-induced inflammation by 78.2 and 83.7% at 1mg/20 microL/ear, respectively. The fraction CD4-N at 300 mg/kg also showed analgesic activity (38.7%). The methanol extract at 600mg/kg per os showed anti-inflammatory effect (61.4%), topic anti-inflammatory (56.7% on TPA) and analgesic activity (38.5%). Verbascoside and luteolin-7-O-glucoside were the major components of the methanol extract; apigenin 7-O-glucoside was also detected. Inhibition of superoxide anion, lipoperoxidation, and DPPH bleaching effect was found in the methanol serial and global extracts. The present report demonstrate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Buddleja globosa and validate its use in Chilean traditional medicine.

  13. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF EUCALYPTUS SPP. AND PISTASCIA LENTISCUS LEAF EXTRACTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qabaha, Khaled; Ras, Sari Abu; Abbadi, Jehad; Al-Rimawi, Fuad

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus are among the Palestinian trees that are traditionally used in folkloric medicine in treating many diseases; leaves of which are thought to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant effects. The goal of this study is to evaluate the in vitro inhibitory effect of Eucalyptus spp . and Pistascia lentiscus extracts on Lipopolysacaride (LPS)-induced Interlukin-6 (Il-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) by polymorphonuclear Cells (PMNCs). Polymorphonuclear cells were isolated from the whole blood using Histopaque (Ficol-1077) method and then cultured in an enriched Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RBMI) medium. Supernatants' Interlukin-6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α) levels were determined 24 hour after LPS stimulation. HPLC was employed to determine the concentration of phenolic compounds in the extracts. The concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were compared using paired-samples t test. Eucalyptus spp . and Pistascia lentiscus leaves extracts have shown significant reduction in the levels of both Il-6 and TNF-α Gallic acid; a strong anti-inflammatory agent was found to be the major phenolic compound in both leaf extracts. However, other anti-inflammatory phenolic compounds were detected in Pitascia lentiscus extract including syringic acid and p-coumaric acid, while chlorogenic acid was detected in Eucalyptus spp . leaf extract. Reduction in the levels of Il-6 and TNF-α upon the effect of both Eucalyptus spp . and Pistascia lentiscus extract is an indication of their anti-inflammatory effects. Our results may also indicate that the observed anti-inflammatory effect of the above extracts may be due to the presence of gallic acid and other phenolic compounds. List of Abbreviations and Nomenclature: LPS: Lipopolysacaride, Il-6: Interlukin-6, TNF-α: Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, PMNCs: Polymorphonuclear Cells, HPLC: High Performance Liquid Chromatography, ELISA: Enzyme Linked Immune Sorbent Assay, EDTA

  14. Structure-Activity Relationship Study on the Ethyl p-Methoxycinnamate as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismiarni Komala

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate (EPMC (1 has been isolated as a major compound from the rhizome of Kaempferia galanga together with the other compound ethyl cinnamate (2. As reported in the literature, EPMC (1 exhibited a significant in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. In this research, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of compounds 1 and 2 by using anti-denaturation of heat bovine serum albumin (BSA method. In order to analyze active sites that are responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity, therefore, it is necessary to conduct structural modification of EPMC (1. The structural modification was performed through re-esterification reaction by using conventional and assistance of the unmodified microwave oven. Evaluation of the results of the bioassay indicated that the ester and methoxy functional groups of EPMC (1 play an important role for the anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. Synthesis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of New Alkyl-Substituted Phthalimide 1H-1,2,3-Triazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalom Pôrto de Oliveira Assis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four new 1,2,3-triazole phthalimide derivatives with a potent anti-inflammatory activity have been synthesized in the good yields by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction from N-(azido-alkylphthalimides and terminal alkynes. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined by injecting carrageenan through the plantar tissue of the right hind paw of Swiss white mice to produce inflammation. All the compounds 3a–c and 5a–c exhibited an important anti-inflammatory activity; the best activity was found for the compounds 3b and 5c, which showed to be able to decrease by 69% and 56.2% carrageenan-induced edema in mice. These compounds may also offer a future promise as a new anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Regioselective synthesis of isoxazole-mercaptobenzimidazole hybrids and their in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kankala, Shravankumar; Kankala, Ranjith Kumar; Gundepaka, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Regioselective synthesis of isoxazole-mercaptobenzimidazole hybrids and their efficiency in in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity was described. A comparison of structure-activity relationship for there compounds was also emphasized....

  17. Incidence of HACEK bacteraemia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Lisbeth; Olesen, Bente; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    to an annual incidence of 0.44 per 100,000 population. The annual incidence for males and females was 0.56 and 0.31 per 100,000, respectively. The median age was 56 years (range 0-97 years) with variation among genera. One hundred and forty-three isolates were identified to the species level and six...... to the genus level: Haemophilus spp. n=55, Aggregatibacter spp. n=37, Cardiobacterium spp. n=9, Eikenella corrodens n=21, and Kingella spp. n=27. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study of incidence of HACEK bacteraemia in a large surveillance population and may inspire further studies of the HACEK group...

  18. The anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine in the rat model of carrageenan-induced paw edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiollah Hajhashemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Recently anti-inflammatory effects of antidepressants have been demonstrated. Venlafaxine belongs to newer antidepressants with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibition property. The pain alleviating properties of venlafaxine in different pain models such as neurogenic pain, diabetic neuropathy, and fibromyalgia have been demonstrated. Anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine and also its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine and determine possible underlying mechanisms. Materials and Methods: We examined the anti-inflammatory effects of intraperitoneal (IP and intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of venlafaxine in the rat model of carrageenan-induced paw edema. Results: Our results showed that both IP (50 and 100 mg/kg and ICV (50 and 100 μg/rat injection of venlafaxine inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema. Also IP and ICV administration of venlafaxine significantly decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α production. Finally, we tried to reverse the anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine by yohimbine (5 mg/kg, IP, an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. Our results showed that applied antagonist failed to change the anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that venlafaxine has potent anti-inflammatory effect which is related to the peripheral and central effects of this drug. Also we have shown that anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine is mediated mostly through the inhibition of IL-1β and TNF-α production and decreases MPO activity in the site of inflammation.

  19. Anti-inflammatory evaluation of the methanolic extract of Taraxacum officinale in LPS-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Daun; Kim, Seok Joong; Kim, Hong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. Since even low-level endotoxemia constitutes a powerful and independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis, it is important to find therapies directed against the vascular effects of endotoxin to prevent atherosclerosis. Taraxacum officinale (TO) is used for medicinal purposes because of its choleretic, diuretic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties, but its anti-inflammatory e...

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Tualang honey in alkali injury on the eyes of rabbits: Experimental animal study

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkaran, Karuppannan; Zunaina, Embong; Bakiah, Shaharuddin; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Sirajudeen, KNS; Naik, Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Alkali injury is one of the most devastating injuries to the eye. It results in permanent unilateral or bilateral visual impairment. Chemical eye injury is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents play a major role in the treatment of chemical eye injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory (clinical and histopathological) and antioxidant effects of Tualang honey versus conventional treatment ...

  1. Enhanced function of immuno-isolated islets in diabetes therapy by co-encapsulation with an anti-inflammatory drug

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Tram T.; Thai, Anh V.; Cohen, Joshua; Slosberg, Jeremy E.; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Doloff, Joshua C.; Ma, Minglin; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Tang, Katherine; Gu, Zhen; Cheng, Hao; Weir, Gordon C.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Immuno-isolation of islets has the potential to enable the replacement of pancreatic function in diabetic patients. However, host response to the encapsulated islets frequently leads to fibrotic overgrowth with subsequent impairment of the transplanted grafts. Here, we identified and incorporated anti-inflammatory agents into islet-containing microcapsules to address this challenge. In vivo subcutaneous screening of 16 small molecule anti-inflammatory drugs was performed to identify promising...

  2. The anti-inflammatory effect of Sonchus oleraceus aqueous extract on lipopolysaccharide stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Dong, Dan-Dan; Huang, Qiu-Ping; Li, Jing; Du, Yong-Yong; Li, Bin; Li, Huan-Qing; Huyan, Ting

    2017-12-01

    Sonchus oleraceus L. (Asteraceae) (SO) is a dietary and traditional medicinal plant in China. However, its underlying mechanism of action as an anti-inflammatory agent is not known. This study evaluates the anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of SO. The extract of SO was used to treat RAW 264.7 cells (in the working concentrations of 500, 250, 125, 62.5, 31.3 and 15.6 μg/mL) for 24 h. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators produced in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were assessed. Meanwhile, the expression level of TLR-4, COX-2, pSTATs and NF-κB was tested. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory activity of the extract in vivo was assessed using xylene-induced mouse ear oedema model and the anti-inflammatory compounds in the extracts were analyzed by HPLC-MS. SO extract significantly inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators at gene and protein levels with the concentration of 31.3 μg/mL, and suppressed the expression of TLR-4, COX-2, NF-κB and pSTAT in RAW 264.7 cells. The anti-inflammatory activity of SO in vivo has significant anti-inflammatory effects with the concentration of 250 and 125 mg/kg, and less side effect on the weights of the mice at the concentration of 250 mg/kg. Moreover, HPLC-MS analysis revealed that the anti-inflammatory compounds in the extract were identified as villosol, ferulaic acid, β-sitosterol, ursolic acid and rutin. This study indicated that SO extract has anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo, which will be further developed as novel pharmacological strategies in order to defeat inflammatory diseases.

  3. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer complications: a risk factor analysis for clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J M; Hallas, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recognized as an important cause of peptic ulcer complications. The aim of this nested case-control study was to identify risk factors for NSAID-related ulcer complications.......Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recognized as an important cause of peptic ulcer complications. The aim of this nested case-control study was to identify risk factors for NSAID-related ulcer complications....

  4. Are anti-inflammatory agents effective in treating gingivitis as solo or adjunct therapies? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, David; Martin, Conchita; Sanz-Sánchez, Ignacio; Beyth, Nurit; Shapira, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Systematically review the scientific evidence for efficiency of anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis, either as solo treatments or adjunctive therapies. A protocol was developed aimed to answer the following focused question: "Are anti-inflammatory agents effective in treating gingivitis as solo or adjunct therapies?" RCTs and cohort studies on anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis studies were searched electronically. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted. The primary outcome measures were indices of gingival inflammation. A sub-analysis was performed dividing the active agents into anti-inflammatory and other drugs. The search identified 3188 studies, of which 14 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The use of anti-inflammatory or other agents, in general showed a higher reduction in the test than in the control in terms of gingival indexes and bleeding scores. Only two RCTs on inflammatory drugs could be meta-analysed, showing a statistically significant reduction in the GI in the experimental group [WMD = -0.090; 95% CI (-0.105; -0.074); p = 0.000]. However, the contribution of both studies to the global result was unbalanced (% weight: 99.88 and 0.12 respectively). Most of the tested material showed beneficial effect as anti-inflammatory agents against gingivitis, either as a single treatment modality or as an adjunctive therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Teucrium chamaedrys Leaves Aqueous Extract in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourmotabbed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sCurrent study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Teucrium chamaedrys in mice and rats. Materials and MethodsFor evaluating of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, we used the carrageenan- and dextran-induced paw oedema, acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick and formalin pain tests.ResultsThe extract of T. chamaedrys (50–200 mg/kg and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg produced a significant (P< 0.01 inhibition of the second phase response in the formalin pain model, while only the high dose (200 mg/kg of the extract showed an analgesic effect in the first phase. The extract also inhibited acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes in a dose-dependent manner. The tail flick latency was dose dependently enhanced by the extract but this was significantly (P< 0.05 lower than that produced by morphine (10 mg/kg. The extract (25–250 mg/kg administered 1 hr before carrageenan-induced paw swelling produced a dose dependent inhibition of the oedema. No effect was observed with the dextran-induced oedema model. Results of the phytochemical screening show the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and triterpenoids in the extract.ConclusionThe data obtained also suggest that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the extract may be mediated via both peripheral and central mechanisms. The role of alkaloids, flavonoids and triterpenoids will evaluate in future studies.

  6. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles enhance anti-inflammatory effects of intranasally delivered theophylline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Won; Shirley, Shawna A; Lockey, Richard F; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2006-08-24

    Chitosan, a polymer derived from chitin, has been used for nasal drug delivery because of its biocompatibility, biodegradability and bioadhesiveness. Theophylline is a drug that reduces the inflammatory effects of allergic asthma but is difficult to administer at an appropriate dosage without causing adverse side effects. It was hypothesized that adsorption of theophylline to chitosan nanoparticles modified by the addition of thiol groups would improve theophylline absorption by the bronchial epithelium and enhance its anti-inflammatory effects. We sought to develop an improved drug-delivery matrix for theophylline based on thiolated chitosan, and to investigate whether thiolated chitosan nanoparticles (TCNs) can enhance theophylline's capacity to alleviate allergic asthma. A mouse model of allergic asthma was used to test the effects of theophylline in vivo. BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and OVA-challenged to produce an inflammatory allergic condition. They were then treated intranasally with theophylline alone, chitosan nanoparticles alone or theophylline adsorbed to TCNs. The effects of theophylline on cellular infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, histopathology of lung sections, and apoptosis of lung cells were investigated to determine the effectiveness of TCNs as a drug-delivery vehicle for theophylline. Theophylline alone exerts a moderate anti-inflammatory effect, as evidenced by the decrease in eosinophils in BAL fluid, the reduction of bronchial damage, inhibition of mucus hypersecretion and increased apoptosis of lung cells. The effects of theophylline were significantly enhanced when the drug was delivered by TCNs. Intranasal delivery of theophylline complexed with TCNs augmented the anti-inflammatory effects of the drug compared to theophylline administered alone in a mouse model of allergic asthma. The beneficial effects of theophylline in treating asthma may be enhanced through the use of this novel drug delivery

  7. Anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinergic and cytotoxic effects of Sida rhombifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Siau Hui; Teh, Soek Sin; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian

    2017-12-01

    Sida (Malvaceae) has been used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of diarrhoea, malarial, gastrointestinal dysentery, fevers, asthma and inflammation. This study evaluates the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and anti-cholinergic activities of Sida rhombifolia Linn. whole plant for the first time. S. rhombifolia whole plant was extracted by n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol using Soxhlet apparatus. The plant extracts were evaluated for their antioxidant (DPPH, FIC and FRAP), anti-inflammatory (NO and protein denaturation inhibitions), cytotoxic (MTT) and anti-cholinesterase (AChE) properties in a range of concentrations to obtain IC 50 values. GC-MS analysis was carried out on the n-hexane extract. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited the most significant antioxidant activities by scavenging DPPH radicals and ferrous ions with EC 50 of 380.5 and 263.4 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, the n-hexane extract showed the strongest anti-inflammatory activity with IC 50 of 52.16 and 146.03 μg/mL for NO and protein denaturation inhibition assays, respectively. The same extract also revealed the strongest effects in anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic tests at the concentration of 100 μg/mL, AChE enzyme inhibition was 58.55% and human cancer cells, SNU-1 and Hep G2 inhibition was 68.52% and 47.82%, respectively. The phytochemicals present in the n-hexane extract are palmitic acid, linoleic acid and γ-sitosterol. The present study revealed that the n-hexane extract possessed relatively high pharmacological activities in anti-inflammation, cytotoxicity and anti-cholinesterase assays. Thus, further work on the detail mechanism of the bioactive phytochemicals which contribute to the biological properties are strongly recommended.

  8. A Novel Tetrasubstituted Imidazole as a Prototype for the Development of Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Marcus Vinicius P S; Munhoz, Antonio C M; Theindl, Lais C; Mohr, Eduarda Talita B; Saleh, Najla; Parisotto, Eduardo B; Rossa, Thaís A; Zamoner, Ariane; Creczynski-Pasa, Tania B; Filippin-Monteiro, Fabíola B; Sá, Marcus M; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott

    2018-04-14

    Although inflammation is a biological phenomenon that exists to protect the host against infections and/or related problems, its unceasing activation results in the aggravation of several medical conditions. Imidazoles, whether natural or synthetic, are molecules related to a broad spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we screened eight novel small molecules of the imidazole class synthesized by our research group for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity. The effect of the selected molecules was confirmed in an in vivo inflammatory model. We also analyzed whether the effects were caused by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor transmigration. Of the eight imidazoles tested, methyl 1-allyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4-acetate (8) inhibited nitric oxide metabolites and pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β) secretion in J774 macrophages stimulated with LPS. It also attenuated leukocyte migration and exudate formation in the pleural cavity of mice challenged with carrageenan. Furthermore, imidazole 8 reverted the oxidative stress pattern triggered by carrageenan in the pleural cavity by diminishing myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase activities and reducing the production of nitric oxide metabolites and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Finally, these effects can be attributed, at least in part, to the ability of this compound to prevent NF-κB transmigration. In this context, our results demonstrate that imidazole 8 has promising potential as a prototype for the development of a new anti-inflammatory drug to treat inflammatory conditions in which NF-κB and oxidative stress play a prominent role. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Badrul; Akter, Fahima; Parvin, Nahida; Sharmin Pia, Rashna; Akter, Sharmin; Chowdhury, Jesmin; Sifath-E-Jahan, Kazi; Haque, Ekramul

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL). MPBL was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model. Analgesic activity of MPBL was evaluated by hot plate, writhing, and formalin tests. Total phenolic and flavonoids content, total antioxidant activity, scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, peroxynitrate (ONOO) as well as inhibition of total ROS generation, and assessment of reducing power were used to evaluate antioxidant potential of MPBL. The extract of MPBL, at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, produced a significant (p<0.05) increase in pain threshold in hot plate method whereas significantly (p<0.05) reduced the writhing caused by acetic acid and the number of licks induced by formalin in a dose-dependent manner. The same ranges of doses of MPBL caused significant (p<0.05) inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema after 4 h in a dose-dependent manner. In DPPH, ONOO(-), and total ROS scavenging method, MPBL showed good antioxidant potentiality with the IC50 value of 16.33±1.02, 25.16±0.61 , and 41.72±0.48 µg/ml, respectively with a significant (p<0.05) good reducing power. The findings of the study suggested that MPBL has strong analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects, conforming the traditional use of this plant for inflammatory pain alleviation to its antioxidant potentiality.

  10. Chemical composition, acute toxicity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Moroccan Tetraclinis articulata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jemli, Meryem; Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Doukkali, Zouhra; Bouidida, El Houcine; Touati, Driss; Nejjari, Rachid; El Guessabi, Lahcen; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2017-07-01

    Hydro-distilled essential oil (EO) from the leaves of the western Mediterranean and Moroccan endemic plant Tetraclinis articulata was analyzed by GC/MS and examined for its acute toxicity on mice, in order to establish the safe doses. Furthermore, the anti-Inflammatory activity was evaluated based on carrageenan and trauma induced rats paw edema and the antioxidant potential has been investigated using different methods including DPPH radical-scavenging assay, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and Ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The major identified compounds in GC/MS analysis were bornyl acetate (26.81%), camphor (22.40%) and α-pinene (7.16%), with 25 other minor constituents. No mortalities in acute toxicity were observed, indicating that the LD 50 of T. articulata essential oil is highest than 5 g/kg. In the anti-inflammatory test based on chemical and mechanical induced trauma, the EO demonstrated an effective reduce swelling by 64.71 ± 9.38% and 69.09 ± 6.02% respectively obtained 6 h after administration at the dose of 200 mg/kg when compared to the control groups. Moreover in the antioxidant testing battery, T. articulata essential oil showed a promising scavenging effect measured by DPPH, TEAC and ferric-reducing power assays with IC 50 values of 12.05 ± 0.24 mg/mL, 8.90 ± 0.17 mg/mL and 0.15 ± 0.01 mg/mL respectively. These results suggest that, the EO from the leaves of T. articulata constitutes a valuable source of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant metabolites. These findings argue for the possible integration of this oil in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries.

  11. [Influence of Aging on Severity and Anti-Inflammatory Treatment of Experimental Dry Eye Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Braun, Tobias; Krösser, Sonja; Gehlsen, Uta

    2017-05-01

    Purpose Aging is an important factor in dry-eye disease that has not been studied in the context of therapeutic measures. Aging-associated modifications of the ocular immune system implicate that anti-inflammatory therapies may act differently among younger individuals in terms of onset and effect of different substances. The goal of this study was to determine differences in clinical phenotype and topical anti-inflammatory therapy using a desiccating stress mouse model. Methods An experimental dry-eye disease (desiccating stress model) was induced in 12-week and 12-month-old female BALB/c mice. Topical therapy included 0.05% cyclosporine/F4H5 (Novaliq), F4H5, 0.05% cyclosporine (Restasis ® , Allergan) and dexamethasone (Monodex ® , Thea Pharma) for 3 consecutive weeks. A control group received no therapy whatsoever. Readout parameters included tear secretion, corneal fluorescein staining at 5 timepoints and histological analysis of goblet cell count at the end of the experiments. Results The older mice demonstrated a significantly stronger dry eye phenotype than the younger mice. Following therapy, the older mice responded to topical anti-inflammatory therapy significantly later than the younger individuals. Regarding the different substances used, cyclosporine/F4H5 showed a significantly faster decrease in corneal fluoresceine staining after only 1 week of therapy in comparison to all other groups. This substance was also superior regarding tear secretion and goblet cell count in age matched groups and in comparison to younger mice. Conclusions These experimental data support the implication that aging should be considered as an important factor in daily clinical practice. Furthermore, the differences found between substance classes, such as calcineurin antagonists and steroids, as well as different drug formulations, should be considered in future pre-clinical and clinical trials. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Spirulina platensis Extract via the Modulation of Histone Deacetylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tho X. Pham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that the organic extract of Spirulina platensis (SPE, an edible blue-green alga, possesses potent anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated if the regulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs play a role in the anti-inflammatory effect of SPE in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with SPE rapidly and dose-dependently reduced HDAC2, 3, and 4 proteins which preceded decreases in their mRNA levels. Degradation of HDAC4 protein was attenuated in the presence of inhibitors of calpain proteases, lysosomal acidification, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, respectively, but not a proteasome inhibitor. Acetylated histone H3 was increased in SPE-treated macrophages to a similar level as macrophages treated with a pan-HDAC inhibitor, with concomitant inhibition of inflammatory gene expression upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of HDAC3 increased basal and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression, while HDAC4 knockdown increased basal expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, but attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that SPE decreased p65 binding and H3K9/K14 acetylation at the Il-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα promoters. Our results suggest that SPE increased global histone H3 acetylation by facilitating HDAC protein degradation, but decreases histone H3K9/K14 acetylation and p65 binding at the promoters of Il-1β and Tnfα to exert its anti-inflammatory effect.

  13. Methanol extract of Xanthium strumarium L. possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Tae; Park, Young-Mi; Won, Jong-Heon; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Hee-Juhn; Choi, Jong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2005-01-01

    As an attempt to identify bioactive natural products with anti-inflammatory activity, we evaluated the effects of the methanol extract of the semen of Xanthium strumarium L. (MEXS) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production in RAW 264.7 cells. Our data indicate that MEXS is a potent inhibitor of NO, PGE2 and TNF-alpha production. Consistent with these findings, the expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-alpha mRNA were down-regulated in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MEXS inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity and the translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus by blocking the degradation of inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (IkappaB-alpha). We further evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of MEXS in vivo. MEXS (100, 200 mg/kg/d, p.o.) reduced acute paw edema induced by carrageenin in rats, and showed analgesic activities in an acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and a hot plate test in mice. Thus, our study suggests that the inhibitions of iNOS, COX-2 expression, and TNF-alpha release by the methanol extract of the semen of Xanthium strumarium L. are achieved by blocking NF-kappaB activation, and that this is also responsible for its anti-inflammatory effects.

  14. Comparative study of anti-inflammatory, ulcerogenic and cytotoxic activities of racemate and S-ibuprofen

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    Flavio Henrique Nuevo Benez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ibuprofen is widely commercialized in racemic form. Although metabolic chiral inversion occurs through the conversion of R(--ibuprofen to S(+-ibuprofen and the latter enantiomer is considered the active form, clinical trials involving the administration of a racemate to S-enantiomer dosage ratio of 1:0.5 have demonstrated that S(+-ibuprofen is as efficacious as the racemic formulation. Moreover, the R(--enantiomer has been implicated in adverse gastrointestinal effects found with the racemic form, but the mechanisms involved in this process are not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of a racemate to S(+-ibuprofen dosage ratio of 1:0.5 using the carrageenan air pouch model of inflammation and determine both ulcerogenic activity and the chiral conversion rate in rats. An in vitro study of the cytotoxicity of racemate and S(+-ibuprofen in gastric cells was also performed. Although the plasma level of S(+-ibuprofen was raised after racemate administration, no significant difference was found in anti-inflammatory activity, as assessed by exudate formation, PGE2 production and leukocyte migration to the air pouches. Fewer gastric lesions were found after S(+-ibuprofen administration, despite the low gastric PGE2 content. In the in vitro study, the racemic compound proved more cytotoxic than S(+-ibuprofen. The present findings suggest that the S-enantiomer of ibuprofen could be considered a therapeutic alternative to minimize gastrointestinal side effects, since the chiral inversion of R(--ibuprofen to S(+-ibuprofen did not result in an improved anti-inflammatory response.

  15. Characterization of bergenin in Endopleura uchi bark and its anti-inflammatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunomura, Rita C.S.; Nunomura, Sergio M.; Oliveira, Viviane G.; Silva, Saulo L. da

    2009-01-01

    Endopleura uchi (Huber) Cuatrec. is an Amazon species traditionally used for the treatment of inflammations and female disorders. Pure bergenin was isolated from the methanolic extract of bark of E. uchi, firstly by using liquid-liquid partition chromatography followed by column chromatography over Sephadex LH-20 and then silica gel 60 flash chromatography. The structure of bergenin was identified on the basis of its NMR spectra. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by the measurement of the inhibitory concentration (IC) of bergenin against three key enzymes: COX-1, COX-2 (cyclooxygenases) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). These enzymes were selected because they are important targets for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory drugs associated with the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. The IC50 of bergenin for phospholipase A2 was determined as 156.6 μmol L-1 and bergenin was not considered active as compared to the positive control, tioetheramide PC. Bergenin did not inhibit COX-1 as well (IC50 = 107.2 μmol L-1). However, bergenin selectively inhibited COX-2 (IC50 = 1.2 μmol L-1). Because of the use of E. uchi in traditional medicine, bergenin was quantified in teas prepared as prescribed in traditional medicine by RP-HPLC as being 3% in the bark of E. uchi. The inhibitory activity towards COX-2 is important, since selective inhibitors of COX-2 have been clinically validated as anti-inflammatory therapeutics due to their enhanced gastrointestinal safety. (author)

  16. A study of the energy absorption and exposure buildup factors of some anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekinci, Neslihan; Kavaz, Esra; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    Human radiation exposure is increasing due to radiation development in science and technology. The development of radioprotective agents is important for protecting patients from the side effects of radiotherapy and for protecting the public from unwanted irradiation. Radioprotective agents are used to reduce the damage caused by radiation in healthy tissues. There are several classes of radioprotective compounds that are under investigation. Analgesics and anti-inflammatory compounds are being considered for treating or preventing the effects of damage due to radiation exposure, or for increasing the chance of survival after exposure to a high dose of radiation. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of some analgesic and anti-inflammatory compounds by evaluating buildup factors. The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) were calculated to select compounds in a 0.015–15 MeV energy region up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth elements were also investigated. Significant variations in both EABF and EBF values were observed for several compounds at the moderate energy region. At energies below 0.15 MeV, EABF and EBF values increased with decreasing equivalent atomic number (Z eq ) of the samples. In addition, EABF and EBF were the largest for ibuprofen, aspirin, paracetamol, naproxen and ketoprofen at 0.05 and 0.06 MeV, respectively, and the EABF value was 0.1 MeV for aceclofenac. From these results, we concluded that the buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac compared to other materials. - Highlights: • Buildup factors of anti-inflammatory drugs have been calculated by a G-P fitting method. • Z eff of diclofenac was observed higher than other compounds. • It was found that buildup of photons is less for aceclofenac and diclofenac. • It would be appealing to use aceclofenac and diclofenac as radioprotective

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of Mangifera indica L. extract in a model of colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Lucía; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Gárate, Icíar; García-Bueno, Borja; Madrigal, José LM; Menchén, Luis; Garrido, Gabino; Leza, Juan C

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract from Mangifera indica L. (MIE) on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats. METHODS: MIE (150 mg/kg) was administered in two different protocols: (1) rectally, over 7 d at the same time as DSS administration; and (2) once daily over 14 d (by oral gavage, 7 d before starting DSS, and rectally for 7 d during DSS administration). General observations of clinical signs were performed. Anti-inflammatory activity of MIE was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Colonic lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, expression of inflammatory related mediators [inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, respectively] and cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and TNF receptors 1 and 2] in colonic tissue were also assessed. Interleukin (IL)-6 and TNF-α serum levels were also measured. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that MIE has anti-inflammatory properties by improvement of clinical signs, reduction of ulceration and reduced MPO activity when administered before DSS. In addition, administration of MIE for 14 d resulted in an increase in GSH and reduction of TBARS levels and iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and TNF R-2 expression in colonic tissue, and a decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels. CONCLUSION: MIE has anti-inflammatory activity in a DSS-induced rat colitis model and preventive administration (prior to DSS) seems to be a more effective protocol. PMID:20954278

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of Mangifera indica in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, Oluwafemi Gabriel; Esume, Celestine

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies in standard laboratories have indicated that a typical mango stem bark aqueous extract (Magnifera indica Linn) possess anti-malaria and anti-fever properties. Recent information also exists in the literature, suggesting its potency as a very effective anti-inflammatory plant extract. This study will therefore contribute immensely to the systemic search for a useful, less toxic and natural bioactive medicinal compound. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Mangifera indica (MI) in a carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema model of acute inflammation. Rats (n=5) were treated orally with MI (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg), acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg) or distilled water (3 mL). Thirty minutes later, acute inflammation was induced with a sub-plantar injection of 0.1 mL of 1% carrageenin solution into the right hind paw of the rats. The paw oedema sizes were measured with the aid of a Vernier calliper over a period of 3 hours. The aqueous extract of MI (50-200 mg/kg, p.o.) produced a dose-dependent and significant inhibition of the acute inflammation induced by the carrageenin in rats when compared with controls. The percentage inhibition of oedema formation produced by MI (200 mg/kg, p.o.) was similar to that elicited by acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg, p.o.). The results of this preliminary investigation suggest that MI contains active compounds with an anti-inflammatory activity. However, more detailed studies using additional models are necessary to further characterise the effects of MI in inflammatory disorders.

  19. "Smart tattoo" glucose biosensors and effect of coencapsulated anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Chaudhary, Ayesha; McShane, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive glucose biosensors with increased functional longevity form one of the most promising techniques for continuous glucose monitoring. In the present study, we developed a novel nanoengineered microsphere formulation comprising alginate microsphere glucose sensors and anti-inflammatory-drug-loaded alginate microspheres. The formulation was prepared and characterized for size, shape, in vitro drug release, biocompatibility, and in vivo acceptability. Glucose oxidase (GOx)- and Apo-GOx-based glucose sensors were prepared and characterized. Sensing was performed both in distilled water and simulated interstitial body fluid. Layer-by-layer self-assembly techniques were used for preventing drug and sensing chemistry release. Finally, in vivo studies, involving histopathologic examination of subcutaneous tissue surrounding the implanted sensors using Sprague-Dawley rats, were performed to test the suppression of inflammation and fibrosis associated with glucose sensor implantation. The drug formulation showed 100% drug release with in 30 days with zero-order release kinetics. The GOx-based sensors showed good enzyme retention and enzyme activity over a period of 1 month. Apo-GOx-based visible and near-infrared sensors showed good sensitivity and analytical response range of 0-50 mM glucose, with linear range up to 12 mM glucose concentration. In vitro cell line studies proved biocompatibility of the material used. Finally, both anti-inflammatory drugs were successful in controlling the implant-tissue interface by suppressing inflammation at the implant site. The incorporation of anti-inflammatory drug with glucose biosensors shows promise in improving sensor biocompatibility, thereby suggesting potential application of alginate microspheres as "smart tattoo" glucose sensors with increased functional longevity. © 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Piper attenuatum Methanol Extract in LPS-Stimulated Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Jin Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piper attenuatum is used as a traditional medicinal plant in India. One of the substances in P. attenuatum has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is insufficient research about the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action of P. attenuatum. The effects of P. attenuatum methanol extract (Pa-ME on the production of inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, the expression of proinflammatory genes, the translocation level of transcription factors, and intracellular signaling activities were investigated using macrophages. Pa-ME suppressed the production of NO and PGE2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-, pam3CSK4-, and poly(I:C-stimulated RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. The mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 were decreased by Pa-ME. P-ME reduced the translocation of p50/NF-κB and AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos, as well as the activity of their upstream enzymes Src, Syk, and TAK1. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed failure of binding between their substrates, phospho- (p- p85 and p-MKK3/6. p-p85 and p-MKK3/6, which were induced by overexpression of Src, Syk, and TAK1, were also reduced by Pa-ME. Therefore, these results suggest that Pa-ME exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by targeting Src and Syk in the NF-κB signaling pathway and TAK1 in the AP-1 signaling pathway.

  1. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance in gasoline exhaust induced pulmonary injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Veerapandian; Paul, Bholanath; Uthirappan, Mani; Pandey, Renu; Sahu, Anand Prakash; Lal, Kewal; Prasad, Arun Kumar; Srivastava, Suresh; Saxena, Ashok; Mathur, Neeraj; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2005-03-01

    Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and associated changes in pulmonary bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of unleaded gasoline exhaust (GE) exposed mice were investigated. Animals were exposed to GE (1 L/min of GE mixed with 14 L/min of compressed air) using a flow-past, nose-only, dynamic inhalation exposure chamber for different durations (7, 14, and 21 days). The particulate content of the GE was found to be 0.635, +/-0.10 mg PM/m3. Elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed in BALF of GE-exposed mice, but interleukin 1beta(IL-1beta) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) remained unaffected. GE induced higher activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (gammaGT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the BALF, indicating Type II alveolar epithelial cell injury, Clara-cell injury, and general toxicity, respectively. Total protein in the BALF increased after 14 and 21 days of exposure, indicating enhanced alveolar-capillary permeability. However, the difference in the mean was found statistically insignificant in comparison to the compressed air control. Total cell count in the BALF of GE-exposed mice ranged between 0.898 and 0.813x10(6) cells/ml, whereas the compressed air control showed 0.65x10(6) cells/mL. The histopathological changes in GE-exposed lung includes perivascular, and peribronchiolar cuffing of mononuclear cells, migration of polymorphonuclear cells in the alveolar septa, alveolar thickening, and mild alveolar edematous changes indicating inflammation. The shift in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and elevation of the pulmonary marker enzymes indicate toxic insult of GE. This study will help in our understanding of the mechanism of pulmonary injury by GE in the light of cytokine profiles, pulmonary marker enzymes, and lung architecture.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells in uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Maria A; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Eiro, Noemi; Gonzalez, Francisco; Saa, Jorge; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells (CM-hUCESCs) in uveitis. To do that, uveitis was induced in rats after footpad injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccaride (LPS). Human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells after LPS challenge were used to test anti-inflammatory effect of CM-hUCESCs 'ìn vitro'. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interkeukin-6, interkeukin-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and the anti-inflammatory interkeukin-10. Leucocytes from aqueous humor (AqH) were quantified in a Neubauer chamber, and eye histopathological analysis was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Additionally, using a human cytokine antibody array we evaluated CM-hUCESCs to determine mediating proteins. Results showed that administration of CM-hUCESCs significantly reduced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines both 'in vitro' and 'in vivo', and decreased leucocytes in AqH and ocular tissues. High levels of cytokines with anti-inflammatory effects were found in CM-hUCESCs, suggesting a possible role of these factors in reducing intraocular inflammation. In summary, treatment with CM-hUCESCs significantly reduces inflammation in uveitis. Our data indicate that CM-hUCESCs could be regarded as a potential therapeutic agent for patients suffering from ocular inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta essential oil in activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Parastoo; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta (T. minuta) essential oil. Methods In the present study T. minuta essential oil was obtained from leaves of T. minuta via hydro-distillation and then was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The anti-oxidant capacity of T. minuta essential oil was examined by measuring reactive oxygen, reactive nitrogen species and hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The anti-inflammatory activity of T. minuta essential oil was determined through measuring NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α mRNA expression in lipopolysacharide-stimulated murine macrophages using real-time PCR. Results Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the main components in the T. minuta essential oil were dihydrotagetone (33.86%), E-ocimene (19.92%), tagetone (16.15%), cis-β-ocimene (7.94%), Z-ocimene (5.27%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The T. minuta essential oil had the ability to scavenge all reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species radicals with IC50 12-15 µg/mL, which indicated a potent radical scavenging activity. In addition, T. minuta essential oil significantly reduced NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthaseand TNF-α mRNA expression in the cells at concentrations of 50 µg/mL, indicating a capacity of this product to potentially modulate/diminish immune responses. Conclusions T. minuta essential oil has radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and could potentially be used as a safe effective source of natural anti-oxidants in therapy against oxidative damage and stress associated with some inflammatory conditions. PMID:25182441

  4. Dual anti-inflammatory and anti-parasitic action of topical ivermectin 1% in papulopustular rosacea.

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    Schaller, M; Gonser, L; Belge, K; Braunsdorf, C; Nordin, R; Scheu, A; Borelli, C

    2017-11-01

    Recently, therapy of rosacea with inflammatory lesions (papulopustular) has improved substantially with the approval of topical ivermectin 1% cream. It is assumed to have a dual mode of action with anti-inflammatory capacities and anti-parasitic effects against Demodex, which however has not yet been demonstrated in vivo. To find scientific rationale for the dual anti-inflammatory and anti-parasitic mode of action of topical ivermectin 1% cream in patients with rosacea. A monocentric pilot study was performed including 20 caucasion patients with moderate to severe rosacea, as assessed by investigator global assessment (IGA score ≥3) and a Demodex density ≥15/cm 2 . Patients were treated with topical ivermectin 1% cream once daily (Soolantra ® ) for ≥12 weeks. The density of Demodex mites was assessed with skin surface biopsies. Expression of inflammatory and immune markers was evaluated with RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence staining. The mean density of mites was significantly decreased at week 6 and week 12 (P < 0.001). The gene expression levels of IL-8, LL-37, HBD3, TLR4 and TNF-α were downregulated at both time points. Reductions in gene expression were significant for LL-37, HBD3 and TNF-α at both follow-up time points and at week 12 for TLR4 (all P < 0.05). Reduced LL-37 expression (P < 0.05) and IL-8 expression were confirmed on the protein level by immunofluorescence staining. All patients improved clinically, and 16 of 20 patients reached therapeutic success defined as IGA score ≤1. Topical ivermectin 1% cream acts by a dual, anti-inflammatory and anti-parasitic mode of action against rosacea by killing Demodex spp. in vivo, in addition to significantly improving clinical signs and symptoms in the skin. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects and anti-oxidant capacity of Myrathius arboreus (Cecropiaceae) in experimental models.

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    Oluwole, Oluwafemi Gabriel; Ologe, Olufunmilayo; Alabi, Akinyinka; Tunde Yusuf, Ganiyu; Umukoro, Solomon

    2017-11-27

    Inflammation is involved in various diseases; search for safe treatments is warranted. Anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extract of Myrathius arboreus (EEMa) were studied in carrageenan-induced model, formaldehyde sub-acute-induced model, and in 48 h lipopolysaccharide-induced air pouch model of inflammation. EEMa membrane-stabilizing activities and anti-oxidant capacity were determined in vitro. In the carrageenan model EEMa (125, 250, or 500 mg/kg), indomethacin (5 mg/kg), or vehicle 3 mL/kg was administered orally in rats (n=5). After 1 h, 0.1 mL of 1% carrageenan was injected into the right hind paw of rats. Change in edema sizes was measured for 3 h with plethysmometer. One-tenth milliliter (0.1 mL) of 2.5% formaldehyde was injected into the rat paw on the first day and the third day to induce sub-acute inflammation; changes in the edema sizes were determined, and percentages of inhibitions were calculated. Anti-inflammatory effects of EEMa were further examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced air-pouch based on leukocytes count, volume of exudates, levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, nitric oxides, and tumor necrosis factor released into the inflammatory fluids. EEMa-free radicals scavenging activities were studied in DPPH and reducing power tests. Membrane-stabilizing activities of EEMa were evaluated in the red blood cell lysis induced by thermal and hypotonic solution. EEMa (250, 500 mg/kg) produced significant (p<0.001; p<0.05) inhibition of inflammation when compared with vehicle. Also, EEMa (250, 500, or 1000 μg/mL) significantly stabilized membrane and produced free radical scavenging activities. M. arboreus possesses anti-inflammatory and the anti-oxidant properties that might benefit translational medicine.

  6. Chemical composition, acute toxicity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Moroccan Tetraclinis articulata L.

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    Meryem El Jemli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydro-distilled essential oil (EO from the leaves of the western Mediterranean and Moroccan endemic plant Tetraclinis articulata was analyzed by GC/MS and examined for its acute toxicity on mice, in order to establish the safe doses. Furthermore, the anti-Inflammatory activity was evaluated based on carrageenan and trauma induced rats paw edema and the antioxidant potential has been investigated using different methods including DPPH radical-scavenging assay, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and Ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP. The major identified compounds in GC/MS analysis were bornyl acetate (26.81%, camphor (22.40% and α-pinene (7.16%, with 25 other minor constituents. No mortalities in acute toxicity were observed, indicating that the LD50 of T. articulata essential oil is highest than 5 g/kg. In the anti-inflammatory test based on chemical and mechanical induced trauma, the EO demonstrated an effective reduce swelling by 64.71 ± 9.38% and 69.09 ± 6.02% respectively obtained 6 h after administration at the dose of 200 mg/kg when compared to the control groups. Moreover in the antioxidant testing battery, T. articulata essential oil showed a promising scavenging effect measured by DPPH, TEAC and ferric-reducing power assays with IC50 values of 12.05 ± 0.24 mg/mL, 8.90 ± 0.17 mg/mL and 0.15 ± 0.01 mg/mL respectively. These results suggest that, the EO from the leaves of T. articulata constitutes a valuable source of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant metabolites. These findings argue for the possible integration of this oil in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries.

  7. Evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcer properties of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight: A therapeutic supplement

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    Poornima Nagulsamy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In folklore systems of medicine, bilberry fruit and leaf extracts have been used for the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, diabetes, inflammation, and ulcer. The present study was to determine antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcerogenic activities of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight leaf and fruit. The phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid contents of V. leschenaultii leaf and fruit were quantified and were subjected to assess their antioxidant potential using various in vitro systems such as 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging, phosphomolybdenum, and ferric reducing antioxidant power reduction activities. Based on the antioxidant potential, acetone and methanol extracts of leaf and fruit were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity and protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric damage in a rat model. The quantification of secondary metabolites shows that the phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin contents are higher in methanol extracts of fruit and leaf. The results of antioxidant assays exhibited that the methanol extracts of leaf possesses better 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activity. Oral administration of the acetone fruit and leaf extracts of V. leschenaultii were capable of reducing the edema formation in rats against carrageenan and egg albumin induced inflammation. Moreover, leaf and fruit acetone extracts at the dose of 400 mg/kg highly inhibited ulcer formation. The study concluded that the plant substances such as total phenols, flavonoids along with appreciable antioxidant potential could be the supportive evidence to prove both the anti-inflammatory and antiulcer activities of V. leschenaultii. The traditional importance of this plant will help to reveal the potential of plant to provide alternative phytotherapeutics for human health.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly on ethylene glycol induced renal inflammation in rats

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    Zeyneb Aslan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of Royal Jelly were investigated by inducing renal inflammation in rats with the use of ethylene glycol. For this purpose, the calcium oxalate urolithiasis model was obtained by feeding rats with ethylene glycol in drinking water. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided in five study groups. The 1st group was determined as the control group. The rats in the 2nd group received ethylene glycol (1% in drinking water. The rats in the 3rd group were daily fed with Royal Jelly by using oral gavage. The 4th group was determined as the preventive group and the rats were fed with ethylene glycol (1% in drinking water while receiving Royal Jelly via oral gavage. The 5th group was determined as the therapeutic group and received ethylene glycol in drinking water during the first 2 weeks of the study and Royal Jelly via oral gavage during the last 2 weeks of the study. Results: At the end of the study, proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-18 levels in blood and renal tissue samples from the rats used in the application were measured. Conclusion: The results have shown that ethylene glycol does induce inflammation and renal damage. This can cause the formation of reactive oxygen species. Royal Jelly is also considered to have anti-inflammatory effects due to its possible antiradical and antioxidative effects. It can have positive effects on both the prevention of urolithiasis and possible inflammation during the existing urolithiasis and support the medical treatment.

  9. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles enhance anti-inflammatory effects of intranasally delivered theophylline

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    Mohapatra Shyam S

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chitosan, a polymer derived from chitin, has been used for nasal drug delivery because of its biocompatibility, biodegradability and bioadhesiveness. Theophylline is a drug that reduces the inflammatory effects of allergic asthma but is difficult to administer at an appropriate dosage without causing adverse side effects. It was hypothesized that adsorption of theophylline to chitosan nanoparticles modified by the addition of thiol groups would improve theophylline absorption by the bronchial epithelium and enhance its anti-inflammatory effects. Objectives We sought to develop an improved drug-delivery matrix for theophylline based on thiolated chitosan, and to investigate whether thiolated chitosan nanoparticles (TCNs can enhance theophylline's capacity to alleviate allergic asthma. Methods A mouse model of allergic asthma was used to test the effects of theophylline in vivo. BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA and OVA-challenged to produce an inflammatory allergic condition. They were then treated intranasally with theophylline alone, chitosan nanoparticles alone or theophylline adsorbed to TCNs. The effects of theophylline on cellular infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, histopathology of lung sections, and apoptosis of lung cells were investigated to determine the effectiveness of TCNs as a drug-delivery vehicle for theophylline. Results Theophylline alone exerts a moderate anti-inflammatory effect, as evidenced by the decrease in eosinophils in BAL fluid, the reduction of bronchial damage, inhibition of mucus hypersecretion and increased apoptosis of lung cells. The effects of theophylline were significantly enhanced when the drug was delivered by TCNs. Conclusion Intranasal delivery of theophylline complexed with TCNs augmented the anti-inflammatory effects of the drug compared to theophylline administered alone in a mouse model of allergic asthma. The beneficial effects of theophylline in

  10. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits

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    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; de Alencar, Severino Matias

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC—MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·−, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods. PMID:27050817

  11. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Fungal Metabolites in Mouse Intestine as Revealed by In vitro Models

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    Dominik Schreiber

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, which include Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory disorders that can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract or the colonic mucosal layer. Current therapies aiming to suppress the exaggerated immune response in IBD largely rely on compounds with non-satisfying effects or side-effects. Therefore, new therapeutical options are needed. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of the fungal metabolites, galiellalactone, and dehydrocurvularin in both an in vitro intestinal inflammation model, as well as in isolated myenteric plexus and enterocyte cells. Administration of a pro-inflammatory cytokine mix through the mesenteric artery of intestinal segments caused an up-regulation of inflammatory marker genes. Treatment of the murine intestinal segments with galiellalactone or dehydrocurvularin by application through the mesenteric artery significantly prevented the expression of pro-inflammatory marker genes on the mRNA and the protein level. Comparable to the results in the perfused intestine model, treatment of primary enteric nervous system (ENS cells from the murine intestine with the fungal compounds reduced expression of cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and inflammatory enzymes such as COX-2 and iNOS on mRNA and protein levels. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of the fungal metabolites were observed in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD-1 after stimulation with IFN-γ (10 ng/ml, TNF-α (10 ng/ml, and IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Our results show that the mesenterially perfused intestine model provides a reliable tool for the screening of new therapeutics with limited amounts of test compounds. Furthermore, we could characterize the anti-inflammatory effects of two novel active compounds, galiellalactone, and dehydrocurvularin which are interesting candidates for studies with chronic animal models of IBD.

  12. Characterization of bergenin in Endopleura uchi bark and its anti-inflammatory activity

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    Nunomura, Rita C.S.; Nunomura, Sergio M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Coordenacao em Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais], e-mail: ritasn@ufam.edu.br; Oliveira, Viviane G.; Silva, Saulo L. da [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Endopleura uchi (Huber) Cuatrec. is an Amazon species traditionally used for the treatment of inflammations and female disorders. Pure bergenin was isolated from the methanolic extract of bark of E. uchi, firstly by using liquid-liquid partition chromatography followed by column chromatography over Sephadex LH-20 and then silica gel 60 flash chromatography. The structure of bergenin was identified on the basis of its NMR spectra. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by the measurement of the inhibitory concentration (IC) of bergenin against three key enzymes: COX-1, COX-2 (cyclooxygenases) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). These enzymes were selected because they are important targets for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory drugs associated with the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. The IC50 of bergenin for phospholipase A2 was determined as 156.6 {mu}mol L-1 and bergenin was not considered active as compared to the positive control, tioetheramide PC. Bergenin did not inhibit COX-1 as well (IC50 = 107.2 {mu}mol L-1). However, bergenin selectively inhibited COX-2 (IC50 = 1.2 {mu}mol L-1). Because of the use of E. uchi in traditional medicine, bergenin was quantified in teas prepared as prescribed in traditional medicine by RP-HPLC as being 3% in the bark of E. uchi. The inhibitory activity towards COX-2 is important, since selective inhibitors of COX-2 have been clinically validated as anti-inflammatory therapeutics due to their enhanced gastrointestinal safety. (author)

  13. Analysis of the Potential Topical Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Averrhoa carambola L. in Mice

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    Daniela Almeida Cabrini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, are very common in the population; however, the treatments currently available are not well tolerated and are often ineffective. Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae is an Asian tree that has been used in traditional folk medicine in the treatment of several skin disorders. The present study evaluates the topical anti-inflammatory effects of the crude ethanolic extract of A. carambola leaves, its hexane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions and two isolated flavonoids on skin inflammation. Anti-inflammatory activity was measured using a croton oil-induced ear edema model of inflammation in mice. Topically applied ethanolic extract reduced edema in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a maximum inhibition of 73 ± 3% and an ID50 value of 0.05 (range: 0.02–0.13 mg/ear. Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity was also inhibited by the extract, resulting in a maximum inhibition of 60 ± 6% (0.6 mg/ear. All of the fractions tested caused inhibition of edema formation and of MPO activity. Treatment with the ethyl acetate fraction was the most effective, resulting in inhibition levels of 75 ± 5 and 54 ± 8% for edema formation and MPO activity, respectively. However, treatment of mice with isolated compounds [apigenin-6-C-β-l-fucopyranoside and apigenin-6-C-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-β-l-fucopyranoside] did not yield successful results. Apigenin-6-C-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-β-l-fucopyranoside caused only a mild reduction in edema formation (28 ± 11%. Taken together, these preliminary results support the popular use of A. carambola as an anti-inflammatory agent and open up new possibilities for its use in skin disorders.

  14. Analysis of the Potential Topical Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Averrhoa carambola L. in Mice.

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    Cabrini, Daniela Almeida; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Imazu, Priscila; da Silva, Cíntia Delai; Pietrovski, Evelise Fernandes; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; da Silveira Prudente, Arthur; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Otuki, Michel Fleith

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, are very common in the population; however, the treatments currently available are not well tolerated and are often ineffective. Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) is an Asian tree that has been used in traditional folk medicine in the treatment of several skin disorders. The present study evaluates the topical anti-inflammatory effects of the crude ethanolic extract of A. carambola leaves, its hexane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions and two isolated flavonoids on skin inflammation. Anti-inflammatory activity was measured using a croton oil-induced ear edema model of inflammation in mice. Topically applied ethanolic extract reduced edema in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a maximum inhibition of 73 ± 3% and an ID(50) value of 0.05 (range: 0.02-0.13) mg/ear. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was also inhibited by the extract, resulting in a maximum inhibition of 60 ± 6% (0.6 mg/ear). All of the fractions tested caused inhibition of edema formation and of MPO activity. Treatment with the ethyl acetate fraction was the most effective, resulting in inhibition levels of 75 ± 5 and 54 ± 8% for edema formation and MPO activity, respectively. However, treatment of mice with isolated compounds [apigenin-6-C-β-l-fucopyranoside and apigenin-6-C-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-l-fucopyranoside] did not yield successful results. Apigenin-6-C-(2″-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-β-l-fucopyranoside caused only a mild reduction in edema formation (28 ± 11%). Taken together, these preliminary results support the popular use of A. carambola as an anti-inflammatory agent and open up new possibilities for its use in skin disorders.

  15. Evaluation of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of seed extracts from six Nigella species.

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    Landa, Premysl; Marsik, Petr; Havlik, Jaroslav; Kloucek, Pavel; Vanek, Tomas; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2009-04-01

    Seed extracts from six species of the genus Nigella (Family Ranunculaceae)-Nigella arvensis, Nigella damascena, Nigella hispanica, Nigella nigellastrum, Nigella orientalis, and Nigella sativa-obtained by successive extraction with n-hexane, chloroform, and methanol, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 10 strains of pathogenic bacteria and yeast using the microdilution method as well as for anti-inflammatory properties by in vitro cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 assay. Chemical characterization of active extracts was carried out including free and fixed fatty acid analysis. Comparison of antimicrobial activity showed that N. arvensis chloroform extract was the most potent among all species tested, inhibiting Gram-positive bacterial and yeast strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.25 to 1 mg/mL. With the exception of selective inhibitory action of n-hexane extract of N. orientalis on growth of Bacteroides fragilis (MIC = 0.5 mg/mL), we observed no antimicrobial activity for other Nigella species. Anti-inflammatory screening revealed that N. sativa, N. orientalis, N. hispanica, N. arvensis n-hexane, and N. hispanica chloroform extracts had strong inhibitory activity (more than 80%) on COX-1 and N. orientalis, N. arvensis, and N. hispanica n-hexane extracts were most effective against COX-2, when the concentration of extracts was 100 microg/mL in both COX assays. In conclusion, N. arvensis, N. orientalis, and N. hispanica seeds, for the first time examined for antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects, revealed their significant activity in one or both assays.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and apoptotic effects of the polyphenol curcumin on human fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

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    Kloesch, Burkhard; Becker, Tatjana; Dietersdorfer, Elisabeth; Kiener, Hans; Steiner, Guenter

    2013-02-01

    It has recently been reported that the polyphenol curcumin has pronounced anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic properties. This study investigated possible anti-inflammatory and apoptotic effects of curcumin on the human synovial fibroblast cell line MH7A, and on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MH7A cells and RA-FLS were stimulated either with interleukin (IL)-1β or phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), and treated simultaneously or sequentially with increasing concentrations of curcumin. Release of interleukin (IL)-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). In MH7A cells, modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as p38 and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) were analysed by a reporter gene assay and Western blot, respectively. Pro-apoptotic events were monitored by Annexin-V/7-AAD based assay. Cleavage of pro-caspase-3 and -7 was checked with specific antibodies. Curcumin effectively blocked IL-1β and PMA-induced IL-6 expression both in MH7A cells and RA-FLS. VEGF-A expression could only be detected in RA-FLS and was induced by PMA, but not by IL-1β. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited activation of NF-κB and induced dephosphorylation of ERK1/2. Treatment of FLS with high concentrations of curcumin was associated with a decrease in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The natural compound curcumin represents strong anti-inflammatory properties and induces apoptosis in FLS. This study provides an insight into possible molecular mechanisms of this substance and suggests it as a natural remedy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases like RA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

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    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  18. Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ulcerogenic activity of a zinc-diclofenac complex in rats

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    L.H. Santos

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ulcerogenic activity of a zinc-diclofenac complex (5.5 or 11 mg/kg in male Wistar rats (180-300 g, N = 6 and compared it to free diclofenac (5 or 10 mg/kg and to the combination of diclofenac (5 or 10 mg/kg and zinc acetate (1.68 or 3.5 mg/kg. The carrageenin-induced paw edema and the cotton pellet-induced granulomatous tissue formation models were used to assess the anti-inflammatory activity, and the Hargreaves model of thermal hyperalgesia was used to assess the antinociceptive activity. To investigate the effect of orally or intraperitoneally (ip administered drugs on cold-induced gastric lesions, single doses were administered before exposing the animals to a freezer (-18ºC for 45 min in individual cages. We also evaluated the gastric lesions induced by multiple doses of the drugs. Diclofenac plus zinc complex had the same anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects as diclofenac alone. Gastric lesions induced by a single dose administered per os and ip were reduced in the group treated with zinc-diclofenac when compared to the groups treated with free diclofenac or diclofenac plus zinc acetate. In the multiple dose treatment, the complex induced a lower number of the most severe lesions when compared to free diclofenac and diclofenac plus zinc acetate. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the zinc-diclofenac complex may represent an important therapeutic alternative for the treatment of rheumatic and inflammatory conditions, as its use may be associated with a reduced incidence of gastric lesions.

  19. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Methanol Extract from Pogostemon cablin

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    Tsung-Chun Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin (PC is a herbal medicine traditionally applied to treat not only common cold, nausea and diarrhea but also headache and fever. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of standardized PC methanol extract (PCMeOH in vivo. Investigations were performed in mice with two analgesic models. One was acetic acid-induced writhing response and the other formalin-induced paw licking. The anti-inflammatory effect was tested by λ-carrageenan (Carr-induced mice paw edema. These analgesic experimental results indicated that PCMeOH (1.0 g/kg decreased the acetic acid-induced writhing responses and PCMeOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg decreased the licking time in the second phase of the formalin test. Moreover, Carr-induced paw edema inflammation was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner when PCMeOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg was administered 3 and 4 h after the Carr injection. Mechanistic studies showed that PCMeOH decreased the levels of malondialdehyde in the edema paw by increasing the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in the liver and decreasing the cyclooxygenase 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α activities in the edema paw. This study has demonstrated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of PCMeOH, thus verifying its popular use in traditional medicine.

  20. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, effect on blood pressure & gastric tolerability of antidepressants

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    Preeta Kaur Chugh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Antidepressants are being used as analgesics for various pain related disorders like neuropathic and non neuropathic pain. Although their analgesic activity is well recognized but anti-inflammatory potential of antidepressants is still inconclusive. Since the antidepressants are used for longer duration, it becomes important to elucidate effect of anti-depressants on blood pressure and gastric mucosa. This study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of various antidepressant drugs as well as their effect on blood pressure and gastric tolerability on chronic administration in rats. Methods: Rat paw oedema model was used for studying anti-inflammatory activity, single dose of test drug (venlafaxine 20 and 40 mg/kg, amitryptline 25 mg/kg, fluoxetine 20 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally 45 min prior to administration of 0.1 ml of 1 per cent carrageenan in sub-planter region. Oedema induced in test group was compared with normal saline treated control group. For studying effect on blood pressure and gastric tolerability, test drugs were administered for 14 days. Blood pressure was recorded on days 0, 7 and 14 using tail cuff method. On day 14, 4 h after drug administration, rats were sacrificed and stomach mucosa was examined for ulcerations. Results: Pretreatment of rats with venlafaxine (40 mg/kg resulted in a significant decrease in paw oedema as compared to control (2.4 ± 0.15 to 1.1 ± 0.16 ml, P<0.01. Similarly, in the group pretreated with fluoxetine, significant decrease in paw oedema was observed in comparison to control (P<0.05. Significant change in mean blood pressure was seen in rats pretreated with venlafaxine 40 mg/kg (126.7 ± 4.2 to 155.2 ± 9.7, P<0.05 and fluoxetine (143.5 ± 2.6 to 158.3 ± 1.2, P<0.05 on day 7. No significant difference with regard to gastric tolerability was observed among groups. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed significant anti-inflammatory

  1. Role of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Gynecology

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    Anna Livshits

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in obstetrics, gynecology and infertility. These medications are commonly used in different fields of reproductive medicine, for pain management after operative procedures and to relieve dysmenorrhea. In addition to their analgesic effect, NSAIDs are helpful in the management of menorrhagia by decreasing menstrual blood loss. NSAIDs alleviate pain associated with medical abortion, assist in undertaking natural cycle in-vitro fertilization by preventing follicular rupture and reducing premature ovulation, and serve as tocolytics in preterm labor. New NSAIDs may have a growing role in management of women's health.

  2. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and - if possible - eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order...

  3. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use has been linked to a reduction in the risk of several cancer types. For endometrial cancer, however, results have been inconsistent. To summarize the available evidence on the risk of endometrial cancer associated with use of aspirin...... a random effects model. RESULTS: Six case-control and seven cohort studies were found eligible for our meta-analysis. We observed risk reductions in endometrial cancer associated with regular use of aspirin (case-control: 11%, cohort: 8%) and NA-NSAIDs (case-control: 9%, cohort: 6%), compared to non...

  4. A binding site for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in FAAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolacci, Laura; Romeo, Elisa; Veronesi, Marina; Magotti, Paola; Albani, Clara; Dionisi, Mauro; Lambruschini, Chiara; Scarpelli, Rita; Cavalli, Andrea; Vivo, Marco De; Piomelli, Daniele; Garau, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting the cyclooxygenasemediated biosynthesis of prostanoids, various widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) enhance endocannabinoid signaling by blocking the anandamidedegrading membrane enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The X-ray structure of FAAH in complex with the NSAID carprofen, along with studies of site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme activity assays, and nuclear magnetic resonance, now reveal the molecular details of this interaction, providing information that may guide the design of dual FAAH-cyclooxygenase inhibitors with superior analgesic efficacy. PMID:23240907

  5. Novel chloroacetamido compound CWR-J02 is an anti-inflammatory glutaredoxin-1 inhibitor.

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    Olga Gorelenkova Miller

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin (Grx1 is a ubiquitously expressed thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase that specifically catalyzes reduction of S-glutathionylated substrates. Grx1 is known to be a key regulator of pro-inflammatory signaling, and Grx1 silencing inhibits inflammation in inflammatory disease models. Therefore, we anticipate that inhibition of Grx1 could be an anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy. We used a rapid screening approach to test 504 novel electrophilic compounds for inhibition of Grx1, which has a highly reactive active-site cysteine residue (pKa 3.5. From this chemical library a chloroacetamido compound, CWR-J02, was identified as a potential lead compound to be characterized. CWR-J02 inhibited isolated Grx1 with an IC50 value of 32 μM in the presence of 1 mM glutathione. Mass spectrometric analysis documented preferential adduction of CWR-J02 to the active site Cys-22 of Grx1, and molecular dynamics simulation identified a potential non-covalent binding site. Treatment of the BV2 microglial cell line with CWR-J02 led to inhibition of intracellular Grx1 activity with an IC50 value (37 μM. CWR-J02 treatment decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene transcription in the microglial cells in a parallel concentration-dependent manner, documenting the anti-inflammatory potential of CWR-J02. Exploiting the alkyne moiety of CWR-J02, we used click chemistry to link biotin azide to CWR-J02-adducted proteins, isolating them with streptavidin beads. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis identified many CWR-J02-reactive proteins, including Grx1 and several mediators of inflammatory activation. Taken together, these data identify CWR-J02 as an intracellularly effective Grx1 inhibitor that may elicit its anti-inflammatory action in a synergistic manner by also disabling other pro-inflammatory mediators. The CWR-J02 molecule provides a starting point for developing more selective Grx1 inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents for therapeutic

  6. A novel anti-inflammatory role of NCAM-derived mimetic peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downer, Eric J; Cowley, Thelma R; Lyons, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    as a novel anti-inflammatory agent. Administration of FGL to aged rats attenuated the increased expression of markers of activated microglia, the increase in pro-inflammatory interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the impairment in long-term potentiation (LTP). We report that the age-related increase in microglial...... activation was accompanied by decreased expression of neuronal CD200, and suggest that the proclivity of FGL to suppress microglial activation is due to its stimulatory effect on neuronal CD200. We demonstrate that FGL enhanced interleukin-4 (IL-4) release from glial cells and IL-4 in turn enhanced neuronal...

  7. Inhibition of the development of myringosclerosis by local administration of fenspiride, an anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, C; Hellström, S

    1997-01-01

    Earlier studies have revealed a relationship between the development of myringosclerosis and oxygen-derived free radicals. The latter can be blocked by the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride. The present study was undertaken to test the ability of fenspiride to prevent myringosclerosis from developing during healing of the tympanic membrane. Myringotomized rats were treated with either topical applications or intraperitoneal injections of fenspiride for 12 days, after which the tympanic membranes were examined by otomicroscopy and studied histologically by light microscopy. Topically applied fenspiride was found to inhibit the development of sclerotic lesions, whereas intraperitoneal injections were ineffective.

  8. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activities of Buddleja crispa.

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    Bukhari, Ishfaq A; Gilani, Anwar H; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Saeed, Anjum

    2016-02-25

    Buddleja crispa Benth (Buddlejaceae) is a dense shrub; several species of genus Buddleja have been used in the management of various health conditions including pain and inflammation. The present study was aimed to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet properties of B. crispa. Male rats (220-270 gm,) and mice (25-30 gm) were randomly divided into different groups (n = 6). Various doses of plant extract of B. crispa, its fractions and pure compounds isolated from the plant were administered intraperitoneally (i.p). The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activities were assessed using acetic acid and formalin-induced nociception in mice, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and arachidonic acid-induced platelets aggregation tests. The intraperitoneal administration of the methanolic extract (50 and 100 mg/kg), hexane fraction (10 and 25 mg/kg i.p) exhibited significant inhibition (P < 0.01) of the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and attenuated formalin-induced reaction time of animals in second phase of the test. Pure compounds BdI-2, BdI-H3 and BH-3 isolated from B. crispa produced significant (P < 0.01) analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced and formalin tests. The crude extract of B. crispa (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) and its hexane fraction inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw edema with maximum inhibition of 65 and 71% respectively (P < 0.01). The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of the plant extract and isolated pure compounds were comparable to diclofenac sodium. B. crispa plant extract (0.5-2.5 mg/mL) produced significant anti-platelet effect (P < 0.01) with maximum inhibition of 78% at 2.5 mg/ml. The findings from our present study suggest that B. crispa possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet properties. B. crispa could serve a potential novel source of compounds effective in pain and inflammatory conditions.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid exert anti-inflammatory actions in the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joseph B J; Lajczak, Natalia K; Kelly, Orlaith B; O'Dwyer, Aoife M; Giddam, Ashwini K; Ní Gabhann, Joan; Franco, Placido; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Jefferies, Caroline A; Keely, Simon; Roda, Aldo; Keely, Stephen J

    2017-06-01

    Ward JB, Lajczak NK, Kelly OB, O'Dwyer AM, Giddam AK, Ní Gabhann J, Franco P, Tambuwala MM, Jefferies CA, Keely S, Roda A, Keely SJ. Ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid exert anti-inflammatory actions in the colon. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 312: G550-G558, 2017. First published March 30, 2017; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00256.2016.-Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise a group of common and debilitating chronic intestinal disorders for which currently available therapies are often unsatisfactory. The naturally occurring secondary bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), has well-established anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions and may therefore be effective in treating IBD. We aimed to investigate regulation of colonic inflammatory responses by UDCA and to determine the potential impact of bacterial metabolism on its therapeutic actions. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of UDCA, a nonmetabolizable analog, 6α-methyl-UDCA (6-MUDCA), and its primary colonic metabolite lithocholic acid (LCA) was assessed in the murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model of mucosal injury. The effects of bile acids on cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6, Il-1β, and IFN-γ) release from cultured colonic epithelial cells and mouse colonic tissue in vivo were investigated. Luminal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. UDCA attenuated release of proinflammatory cytokines from colonic epithelial cells in vitro and was protective against the development of colonic inflammation in vivo. In contrast, although 6-MUDCA mimicked the effects of UDCA on epithelial cytokine release in vitro, it was ineffective in preventing inflammation in the DSS model. In UDCA-treated mice, LCA became the most common colonic bile acid. Finally, LCA treatment more potently inhibited epithelial cytokine release and protected against DSS-induced mucosal inflammation than did UDCA. These studies identify a new role for the primary metabolite of UDCA, LCA, in preventing colonic

  10. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

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    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  11. [Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Siberian plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Iu V; Povet'eva, T N; Aksinenko, S G; Suslov, N I; Gaĭdamovich, N N; Nagorniak, Iu G; Popova, E V; Kravtsova, S S; Andreeva, T I

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations have shown that water-alcohol extracts from plants containing alkaloids (Aconitum baikalense, Aconitum septentrionale, Delphinium elatum L., Conium maculatum) and salicylic acid (Filipendula ulmaria, Salix viminalis, Fragaria vesca, Rubus idaeus) inhibited the development of main symptoms of inflammation, viz. exudation, pain, fever, to the same extent as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The substances studied in this work may be used to develop new efficient pharmacological preparations for the treatment of different inflammatory conditions associated with severe pain syndrome.

  12. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

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    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs. This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  13. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds

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    Vanesa Andreu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies. The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about

  14. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs

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    Mohamed Nadjib Boukhatem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Volatile oils obtained from lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf, Poaceae family] are used in traditional medicine as remedies for the treatment of various diseases. Aims: In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral anti-inflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods: The chemical profile of LGEO as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed two major components: geranial (42.2%, and neral (31.5%. The antifungal activity of LGEO was evaluated against several pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi using disc diffusion and vapor diffusion methods. Results: LGEO exhibited promising antifungal effect against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger, with different inhibition zone diameters (IZDs (35–90 mm. IZD increased with increasing oil volume. Significantly, higher anti-Candida activity was observed in the vapor phase. For the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect, LGEO (10 mg/kg, administered orally significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema with a similar effect to that observed for oral diclofenac (50 mg/kg, which was used as the positive control. Oral administration of LGEO showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, topical application of LGEO in vivo resulted in a potent anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by using the mouse model of croton oil-induced ear edema. To our knowledge, this is the first such report to be published. The topical application of LGEO at doses of 5 and 10 µL/ear significantly reduced acute ear edema induced by croton oil in 62.5 and 75% of the mice, respectively. In addition, histological analysis clearly confirmed that LGEO inhibits the skin inflammatory response in animal models. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for

  15. The importance of balanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in diffuse lung disease

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    Strieter Robert

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lung responds to a variety of insults in a remarkably consistent fashion but with inconsistent outcomes that vary from complete resolution and return to normal to the destruction of normal architecture and progressive fibrosis. Increasing evidence indicates that diffuse lung disease results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors pro-inflammatory mediators dictating the development of chronic diffuse lung disease. This review focuses on the mediators that influence this imbalance.

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Gastroenteropathy Asssociated to Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

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    Stella Ilone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is a group of drugs used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. High consumption of NSAIDs associated with high gastrointestinal side effects. Common complaint from patients, which ranging from mild heartburn to the onset of gastrointestinal bleeding, often complicates the adequate administration of NSAIDs. Various methods have been developed to reduce the likelihood of gastroenteropathy complication. Early diagnosis, appropriate prompt treatment, as well as adequate monitoring will reduce morbidity and mortality from complications due to NSAIDs. This paper will discuss the diagnosis and management of gastro-enteropathy NSAID through approaching the underlying pathophysiology.

  17. The prevention of gastropathy and upper abdominal symptoms caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish

    2006-01-01

    The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is increasing, primarily due to arthritis in the aging population. This article reviews current data on the risk of gastrointestinal complications related to NSAIDs and strategies to manage risk in patients taking these agents. Risks of NSAID use include gastrointestinal ulceration, hemorrhage, or perforation; renal dysfunction; death; and dyspepsia. Alternate therapies include use of non-NSAID analgesics; low-dose NSAIDs; and concurrent administration of cytoprotective agents with NSAIDs, acid inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors, and COX-2 agents.

  18. Coprescribing proton-pump inhibitors with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: risks versus benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwee, Kok Ann; Goh, Vernadine; Lima, Graca; Setia, Sajita

    2018-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often coadministered with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) to reduce NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events. This coadministration is generally regarded as safe, and is included in many of the guidelines on NSAID prescription. However, recent evidence indicates that the GI risks associated with NSAIDs can be potentiated when they are combined with PPIs. This review discusses the GI effects and complications of NSAIDs and how PPIs may potentiate these effects, options for prevention of GI side effects, and appropriate use of PPIs in combination with NSAIDs.

  19. Anti-inflammatory agents of the carbamoylmethyl ester class: synthesis, characterization, and pharmacological evaluation

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    Sadek B

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bassem Sadek,1 Amar Mansuor Hamruoni,2 Abdu Adem1 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Al Ain University of Science and Technology, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates Abstract: In this study, target compounds 5–12 were synthesized via acid amine coupling of ibuprofen and naproxen with methyl ester derivatives of amino acids, namely, l-proline, sarcosine, l-tyrosine, and l-glutamic acid. When tested for anti-inflammatory activity using the acute carrageenan-induced hind paw method in rats, compounds 5–12 showed significantly greater anti-inflammatory activity, in the range of 40.64%–87.82%, compared with a placebo control group (P < 0.001. Among the newly synthesized compounds 5–12, naproxen derivatives 9–12 with anti-inflammatory activity ranging between 66.99% and 87.82% showed significantly higher (P < 0.05 potency than ibuprofen derivatives 5–8 with inhibition in the range of 22.03%–52.91% and control groups of ibuprofen (76.34% or naproxen (75.59%, P < 0.05. Moreover, derivatives 9–12 derived from naproxen, in particular compounds 9 and 10 which achieved 83.91% and 87.82% inhibition of inflammation, respectively, showed significantly (P < 0.05 higher potency than naproxen derivatives 11 and 12. Notably, among naproxen derivatives 9–12, the gastric ulcerogenicity for 9 (ulcer index 11.73 and 10 (ulcer index 12.30 was found to be significantly lower (P < 0.05 than that of the active ibuprofen and naproxen control groups with ulcer indices of 22.87 and 24.13, respectively. On the other hand, naproxen derivatives 9–11 showed significant inhibition (P < 0.05 of prostaglandin E2 synthesis when compared with the active control group receiving indomethacin, suggesting a correlation between the observed low ulcerogenicity and effect on prostaglandin E2 synthesis for compounds 9 and 10. However

  20. Renal Side Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Neonates

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    Marc Gewillig

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen or indomethacin are commonly prescribed drugs to induce pharmacologic closure of a patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates. Based on a recently published Cochrane meta-analysis, both drugs are equally effective to induce closure. Drug choice can therefore be based on differences in side effects or pharmaco-economic arguments. The current review quantifies the negative impact of either ibuprofen or indomethacin on renal function, including diuresis, glomerular filtration rate and renal tubular function. Both ibuprofen and indomethacin have a quantifiable impact on renal function. However, compared to ibuprofen, the negative impact of indomethacin is more pronounced.