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Sample records for backbone conformational dynamics

  1. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  2. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  3. Backbone Dynamics of Triple-helical Collagen-like Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarev, Yu.A.; Lazareva, A.V.; Komarov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Some details of the backbone dynamics in the collagen-like triple helix is discussed and the role of backbone dynamics in functioning collagen proteins is illustrated. On a series of oligotripeptides synthetic analogs of collagen formation of high-frequency vibrational backbone dynamics and low-frequency nonlinear backbone dynamics upon stepwise elongation of peptide chain have been described using infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen-exchange method. In the fully completed triple helix the lev...

  4. Backbone dynamics of the human CC-chemokine eotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Jiqing; Mayer, Kristen L.; Stone, Martin J. [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    1999-10-15

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine with potent chemoattractant activity towards eosinophils. {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data have been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of recombinant human eotaxin. {sup 15}N longitudinal (R{sub 1}) and transverse (R{sub 2}) auto relaxation rates, heteronuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N steady-state NOEs, and transverse cross-relaxation rates ({eta}{sub xy}) were obtained at 30 deg. C for all resolved backbone secondary amide groups using {sup 1} H-detected two-dimensional NMR experiments. Ratios of transverse auto and cross relaxation rates were used to identify NH groups influenced by slow conformational rearrangement. Relaxation data were fit to the extended model free dynamics formalism, yielding parameters describing axially symmetric molecular rotational diffusion and the internal dynamics of each NH group. The molecular rotational correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) is 5.09{+-}0.02 ns, indicating that eotaxin exists predominantly as a monomer under the conditions of the NMR study. The ratio of diffusion rates about unique and perpendicular axes (D{sub parallel}/D{sub perpendicular}) is 0.81{+-}0.02. Residues with large amplitudes of subnanosecond motion are clustered in the N-terminal region (residues 1-19), the C-terminus (residues 68-73) and the loop connecting the first two {beta}-strands (residues 30-37). N-terminal flexibility appears to be conserved throughout the chemokine family and may have implications for the mechanism of chemokine receptor activation. Residues exhibiting significant dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale are located close to the two conserved disulfide bonds, suggesting that these motions may be coupled to disulfide bond isomerization.

  5. Conformational Dynamics of Insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-xin eHua

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We have exploited a prandial insulin analogue (insulin lispro, the active component of Humalog®; Eli Lilly and Co. to elucidate the underlying structure and dynamics of insulin as a monomer in solution. Whereas NMR-based modeling recapitulates structural relationships of insulin crystals (T-state protomers, dynamic anomalies are revealed by amide-proton exchange kinetics in D2O. Surprisingly, the majority of hydrogen bonds observed in crystal structures are only transiently maintained in solution, including key T-state-specific inter-chain contacts. Long-lived hydrogen bonds (as defined by global exchange kinetics exist only at a subset of four -helical sites (two per chain flanking an internal disulfide bridge (cystine A20-B19; these sites map within the proposed folding nucleus of proinsulin. The anomalous flexibility of insulin otherwise spans its active surface and may facilitate receptor binding. Because conformational fluctuations promote the degradation of pharmaceutical formulations, we envisage that dynamic re-engineering of insulin may enable design of ultra-stable formulations for humanitarian use in the developing world.

  6. Hydrogen exchange: A sensitive analytical window into protein conformation and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  7. Influence of backbone rigidness on single chain conformation of thiophene-based conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjian; Liu, Jianhua; Simón-Bower, Lauren; Zhai, Lei; Gesquiere, Andre J

    2013-04-25

    Structural order of conjugated polymers at different length scales directs the optoelectronic properties of the corresponding materials; thus it is of critical importance to understand and control conjugated polymer morphology for successful application of these materials in organic optoelectronics. Herein, with the aim of probing the dependence of single chain folding properties on the chemical structure and rigidness of the polymer backbones, single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to four thiophene-based conjugated polymers. These include regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT-14), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thiophene-2-yl)thiophen-2-ylthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole) (PTzQT-12), and poly(3,3-didodecylquaterthiophene)] (PQT-12). Our previous work has shown that RR-P3HT and PBTTT-14 polymer chains fold in their nanostructures, whereas PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 do not fold in their nanostructures. At the single molecule level, it was found that RR-P3HT single chains almost exclusively fold into loosely and strongly aggregated conformations, analogous to the folding properties in nanostructures. PQT-12 displays significant chain folding as well, but only into loosely aggregated conformations, showing an absence of strongly aggregated polymer chains. PBTTT-14 exhibits a significant fraction of rigid polymer chain. The findings made for single molecules of PQT-12 and PBTTT-14 are thus in contrast with the observations made in their corresponding nanostructures. PTzQT-12 appears to be the most rigid and planar conjugated polymer of these four polymers. However, although the presumably nonfolding polymers PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 exhibit less folding than RR-P3HT, there is still a significant occurrence of chain folding for these polymers at the single molecule level. These results suggest that the folding properties of conjugated polymers can be influenced by the architecture of the

  8. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014 ▸), FEBS J. 281, 4061–4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries. PMID:26894545

  9. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-28

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment.

  10. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqian Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1, was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  11. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL. PMID:27548192

  12. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the defunct domain of calcium vector protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théret, I; Baladi, S; Cox, J A; Gallay, J; Sakamoto, H; Craescu, C T

    2001-11-20

    CaVP (calcium vector protein) is a Ca(2+) sensor of the EF-hand protein family which is highly abundant in the muscle of Amphioxus. Its three-dimensional structure is not known, but according to the sequence analysis, the protein is composed of two domains, each containing a pair of EF-hand motifs. We determined recently the solution structure of the C-terminal domain (Trp81-Ser161) and characterized the large conformational and dynamic changes induced by Ca(2+) binding. In contrast, the N-terminal domain (Ala1-Asp86) has lost the capacity to bind the metal ion due to critical mutations and insertions in the two calcium loops. In this paper, we report the solution structure of the N-terminal domain and its backbone dynamics based on NMR spectroscopy, nuclear relaxation, and molecular modeling. The well-resolved three-dimensional structure is typical of a pair of EF-hand motifs, joined together by a short antiparallel beta-sheet. The tertiary arrangement of the two EF-hands results in a closed-type conformation, with near-antiparallel alpha-helices, similar to other EF-hand pairs in the absence of calcium ions. To characterize the internal dynamics of the protein, we measured the (15)N nuclear relaxation rates and the heteronuclear NOE effect in (15)N-labeled N-CaVP at a magnetic field of 11.74 T and 298 K. The domain is mainly monomeric in solution and undergoes an isotropic Brownian rotational diffusion with a correlation time of 7.1 ns, in good agreement with the fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements. Data analysis using a model-free procedure showed that the amide backbone groups in the alpha-helices and beta-strands undergo highly restricted movements on a picosecond to nanosecond time scale. The amide groups in Ca(2+) binding loops and in the linker fragment also display rapid fluctuations with slightly increased amplitudes. PMID:11705378

  13. Folding a protein by discretizing its backbone torsional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a coarse codification of local conformational constraints associated with each folding motif of a peptide chain in order to obtain a rough solution to the protein folding problem. This is accomplished by implementing a discretized version of the soft-mode dynamics on a personal computer (PC). Our algorithm mimics a parallel process as it evaluates concurrent folding possibilities by pattern recognition. It may be implemented in a PC as a sequence of perturbation-translation-renormalization (p-t-r) cycles performed on a matrix of local topological constraints (LTM). This requires suitable representational tools and a periodic quenching of the dynamics required for renormalization. We introduce a description of the peptide chain based on a local discrete variable the values of which label the basins of attraction of the Ramachandran map for each residue. Thus, the local variable indicates the basin in which the torsional coordinates of each residue lie at a given time. In addition, a coding of local topological constraints associated with each secondary and tertiary structural motif is introduced. Our treatment enables us to adopt a computation time step of 81 ps, a value far larger than hydrodynamic drag time scales. Folding pathways are resolved as transitions between patterns of locally encoded structural signals that change within the 10 μs-100 ms time scale range. These coarse folding pathways are generated by the periodic search for structural patterns in the time-evolving LTM. Each pattern is recorded as a contact matrix, an operation subject to a renormalization feedback loop. The validity of our approach is tested vis-a-vis experimentally-probed folding pathways eventually generating tertiary interactions in proteins which recover their active structure under in vitro renaturation conditions. As an illustration, we focus on determining significant folding intermediates and late kinetic bottlenecks that occur within the

  14. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  15. Direct Observation of Aggregation-Induced Backbone Conformational Changes in Tau Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, A C; Shine, A; Vijayan, Vinesh

    2016-09-12

    In tau proteins, the hexapeptides in the R2 and R3 repeats are known to initiate tau fibril formation, which causes a class of neurodegenerative diseases called the taupathies. We show that in R3, in addition to the presence of the hexapeptides, the correct turn conformation upstream to it is also essential for producing prion-like fibrils that are capable of propagation. A time-dependent NMR aggregation assay of a slow fibril forming R3-S316P peptide revealed a trans to cis equilibrium shift in the peptide-bond conformation preceding P316 during the growth phase of the aggregation process. S316 was identified as the key residue in the turn that confers templating capacity on R3 fibrils to accelerate the aggregation of the R3-S316P peptide. These results on the specific interactions and conformational changes responsible for tau aggregation could prove useful for developing an efficient therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27513615

  16. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2012-08-27

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence-structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu. edu/~madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  18. An Analytic Method for the Kinematics and Dynamics of a Multiple-Backbone Continuum Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots have been the subject of extensive research due to their potential use in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose a new continuum robot with three backbones, and provide a unified analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a multiple‐backbone continuum robot. The robot achieves actuation by independently pulling three backbones to carry out a bending motion of two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DoF. A three‐dimensional CAD model of the robot is built and the kinematical equation is established on the basis of the Euler‐Bernoulli beam. The dynamical model of the continuum robot is constructed by using the Lagrange method. The simulation and the experiment’s validation results show the continuum robot can exactly bend into pre‐set angles in the two‐dimensional space (the maximum error is less than 5% of the robot length and can make a circular motion in three‐dimensional space. The results demonstrate that the proposed analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a continuum robot is feasible.

  19. On the stochastic dynamics of molecular conformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An important functioning mechanism of biological macromolecules is the transition between different conformed states due to thermal fluctuation. In the present paper, a biological macromolecule is modeled as two strands with side chains facing each other, and its stochastic dynamics including the statistics of stationary motion and the statistics of conformational transition is studied by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi Hamiltonian systems. The theoretical results are confirmed with the results from Monte Carlo simulation.

  20. Dynamic Resource Allocation and QoS Control Capabilities of the Japanese Academic Backbone Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Aoki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic resource control capabilities have become increasingly important for academic networks that must support big scientific research projects at the same time as less data intensive research and educational activities. This paper describes the dynamic resource allocation and QoS control capabilities of the Japanese academic backbone network, called SINET3, which supports a variety of academic applications with a wide range of network services. The article describes the network architecture, networking technologies, resource allocation, QoS control, and layer-1 bandwidth on-demand services. It also details typical services developed for scientific research, including the user interface, resource control, and management functions, and includes performance evaluations.

  1. The influence of DNA binding on the backbone dynamics of the yeast cell-cycle protein Mbp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbp1 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the cell cycle in yeast. The N-terminus of this protein contains a DNA binding domain that includes a winged helix-turn-helix motif. The C-terminal 24 residues of this domain (the 'tail') are disordered in the crystal state, but are important for DNA binding. We have measured 15N NMR relaxation rates at 11.75 and 14.1 T to determine the dynamics of the free protein and in its complex with a specific DNA duplex. The dynamics data were quantitatively analysed using both spectral density mapping and the Lipari-Szabo formalism including the effects of chemical exchange and rotational anisotropy. A detailed analysis has been made of the effect of anisotropy, exchange and experimental precision on the recovered motional parameters. The backbone NH relaxation is affected by motions on a variety of time scales from millisecond to tens of picoseconds. The relaxation data show a structured core of 100 residues corresponding to that observed in the crystal state. Within the core of the protein, two regions on either side of the putative recognition helix (helix B) show slow (ca. 0.2 ms) conformational exchange dynamics that are quenched upon DNA binding. The C-terminal 24 residues are generally more dynamic than in the core. However, in the free protein, a stretch of ∼8 residues in the middle of the tail show relaxation behaviour similar to that in the core, indicating a structured region. NOEs between Ala 114 in this structured part of the tail and residues in the N-terminal beta strand of the core of the protein demonstrate that the tail folds back onto the core of the protein. In the complex with DNA, the structured part of the tail extends by ca. 3 residues. These data provide a framework for understanding the biochemical data on the mechanism and specificity of DNA binding

  2. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  3. S-Shaped Conformation of the Quaterthiophene Molecular Backbone in Two-Dimensional Bisterpyridine-Derivative Self-Assembled Nanoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervella, Yann; Shilova, Ekaterina; Latil, Sylvain; Jousselme, Bruno; Silly, Fabien

    2015-12-15

    The conformation and the two-dimensional self-assembly of 4'-(3',4″-dihexyloxy-5,2':5',2″:5″,2‴-quaterthien-2,5‴-diyl)-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) molecules are theoretically and experimentally investigated. This molecular building block forms a hydrogen-bonded chiral supramolecular nanoarchitecture on graphite at the solid/liquid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that the molecule adopts an S-shaped conformation in this structure. DFTB+ calculations reveal that this conformation is not the lowest-energy conformation. The molecular nanoarchitecture appears to be stabilized by hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals interactions. I-, L-, and D-shaped molecular conformations are, however, locally observed at the domain boundary, but these conformations do not self-assemble into organized 2D structures. PMID:26624809

  4. Conformational Dynamics and Allostery in Pyruvate Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Katherine A; Zhu, Shaolong; Liuni, Peter; Peng, Fen; Kessans, Sarah A; Wilson, Derek J; Dobson, Renwick C J

    2016-04-22

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the final step in glycolysis and is allosterically regulated to control flux through the pathway. Two models are proposed to explain how Escherichia coli pyruvate kinase type 1 is allosterically regulated: the "domain rotation model" suggests that both the domains within the monomer and the monomers within the tetramer reorient with respect to one another; the "rigid body reorientation model" proposes only a reorientation of the monomers within the tetramer causing rigidification of the active site. To test these hypotheses and elucidate the conformational and dynamic changes that drive allostery, we performed time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies followed by mutagenic analysis to test the activation mechanism. Global exchange experiments, supported by thermostability studies, demonstrate that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate binding to the allosteric domain causes a shift toward a globally more dynamic ensemble of conformations. Mapping deuterium exchange to peptides within the enzyme highlight site-specific regions with altered conformational dynamics, many of which increase in conformational flexibility. Based upon these and mutagenic studies, we propose an allosteric mechanism whereby the binding of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate destabilizes an α-helix that bridges the allosteric and active site domains within the monomeric unit. This destabilizes the β-strands within the (β/α)8-barrel domain and the linked active site loops that are responsible for substrate binding. Our data are consistent with the domain rotation model but inconsistent with the rigid body reorientation model given the increased flexibility at the interdomain interface, and we can for the first time explain how fructose 1,6-bisphosphate affects the active site. PMID:26879751

  5. A New Type of Conformal Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Stichel, P C

    2004-01-01

    We consider the Lagrangian particle model introduced in [hep-th/9612017] for zero mass but nonvanishing second central charge of the planar Galilei group. Extended by a magnetic vortex or a Coulomb potential the model exibits conformal symmetry. In the former case we observe an additional SO(2,1) hidden symmetry. By either a canonical transformation with constraints or by freezing scale and special conformal transformations at $t=0$ we reduce the six-dimensional phase-space to the physically required four dimensions. Then we discuss bound states (bounded solutions) in quantum dynamics (classical mechanics). We show that the Schr\\"odinger equation for the pure vortex case may be transformed into the Morse potential problem thus providing us with an explanation of the hidden SO(2,1) symmetry.

  6. A new type of conformal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the Lagrangian particle model introduced in [Ann. Phys. 260 (1997) 224] for zero mass but nonvanishing second central charge of the planar Galilei group. Extended by a magnetic vortex or a Coulomb potential the model exhibits conformal symmetry. In the former case we observe an additional SO(2,1) hidden symmetry. By either a canonical transformation with constraints or by freezing scale and special conformal transformations at t=0 we reduce the six-dimensional phase-space to the physically required four dimensions. Then we discuss bound states (bounded solutions) in quantum dynamics (classical mechanics). We show that the Schroedinger equation for the pure vortex case may be transformed into the Morse potential problem thus providing us with an explanation of the hidden SO(2,1) symmetry

  7. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model-free appr......The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  8. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of a natural and a consensus designed 3-TPR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarymowycz, Virginia A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Regan, Lynne; Stone, Martin J

    2008-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) is a 34-amino acid helix-turn-helix motif that occurs in tandem arrays in numerous proteins. Here we compare the backbone dynamics of a natural 3-repeat TPR domain, from the protein UBP, with the behavior of a designed protein CTPR3, which consists of three identical consensus TPR units. Although the three tandem TPR repeats in both CTPR3 and UBP behave as a single unit, with no evidence of independent repeat motions, the data indicate that certain positions in UBP are significantly more flexible than are the corresponding positions in CTPR3. Most of the dynamical changes occur at or adjacent to positions that are involved in intra-repeat packing interactions. These observations lead us to suggest that the three-TPR domain of UBP does not incorporate optimized packing, compared to that seen in the idealized CTPR. The natural TPR domain is not only less stable overall than CTPR3, but also presents increased local flexibility at the positions where the sequences differs from the conserved consensus.

  9. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part II. Interplay of local backbone conformational dynamics and long-range hydrophobic interactions in hairpin formation

    OpenAIRE

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    Two peptides, corresponding to the turn region of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, consisting of residues 51–56 [IG(51–56)] and 50–57 [IG(50–57)], respectively, were studied by CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. Our results show that the part of the sequence corresponding to the β-turn in the native structure (DDATKT) of the B3 domain forms bent conformations similar to ...

  10. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael J; Pell, Andrew J; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-07-10

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with (1)H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of (15)N and (13)C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu(+) (diamagnetic) or Cu(2+) (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to (1)H-(1)H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable.

  11. Dynamics and Conformational Energetics of a Peptide Hormone: Vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, A. T.; Osguthorpe, D. J.; Dauber-Osguthorpe, P.; Hempel, J. C.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical methodology for use in conjunction with experiment was applied to the neurohypophyseal hormone lysine vasopressin for elucidation of its accessible molecular conformations and associated flexibility, conformational transitions, and dynamics. Molecular dynamics and energy minimization techniques make possible a description of the conformational properties of a peptide in terms of the precise positions of atoms, their fluctuations in time, and the interatomic forces acting on them. Analysis of the dynamic trajectory of lysine vasopressin shows the ability of a flexible peptide hormone to undergo spontaneous conformational transitions. The excursions of an individual phenylalanine residue exemplify the dynamic flexibility and multiple conformational states available to small peptide hormones and their component residues, even within constraints imposed by a cyclic hexapeptide ring.

  12. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  13. A New Type of Conformal Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Stichel, P. C.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the Lagrangian particle model introduced in [hep-th/9612017] for zero mass but nonvanishing second central charge of the planar Galilei group. Extended by a magnetic vortex or a Coulomb potential the model exibits conformal symmetry. In the former case we observe an additional SO(2,1) hidden symmetry. By either a canonical transformation with constraints or by freezing scale and special conformal transformations at $t=0$ we reduce the six-dimensional phase-space to the physically ...

  14. Dynamics in the Charged Time Conformal Schwarzschild Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Jawad, Abdul; Shahzad, M Umair; Abbas, G

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present the new technique for discussing the dynamical motion of neutral as well as charged particles in the absence/presence of magnetic field around the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. Initially, we find the numerical solutions of geodesics of Schwarzschild black hole and the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We observe that the Schwarzschild spacetime admits the time conformal factor $e^{\\epsilon f(t)}$, where $f(t)$ is an arbitrary function and $\\epsilon$ is very small which causes the perturbation in the spacetimes. This technique also re-scale the energy content of spacetime. We also investigate the thermal stability, horizons and energy conditions corresponding time conformal Schwarzschild spacetime. Also, we examine the dynamics of neutral and charged particle around time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We investigate the circumstances under which the particle can escape from vicinity of black hole after collision with another particle. We analyze the effective pot...

  15. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Peng, Xubiao

    2012-01-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of spermwhale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete non-linear Schrodinger equation. Likewise, ours supports solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the multisoliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300K and below the theta-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348K. We confirm that the...

  16. Iterated Conformal Dynamics and Laplacian Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Barra, Felipe; Davidovitch, Benny; Procaccia, Itamar

    2001-01-01

    The method of iterated conformal maps for the study of Diffusion Limited Aggregates (DLA) is generalized to the study of Laplacian Growth Patterns and related processes. We emphasize the fundamental difference between these processes: DLA is grown serially with constant size particles, while Laplacian patterns are grown by advancing each boundary point in parallel, proportionally to the gradient of the Laplacian field. We introduce a 2-parameter family of growth patterns that interpolates bet...

  17. Dynamical realization of l-conformal Galilei algebra and oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galajinsky, Anton, E-mail: galajin@mph.phtd.tpu.ru [Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk, Lenin Ave. 30 (Russian Federation); Masterov, Ivan, E-mail: masterov@mph.phtd.tpu.ru [Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk, Lenin Ave. 30 (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-11

    The method of nonlinear realizations is applied to the l-conformal Galilei algebra to construct a dynamical system without higher derivative terms in the equations of motion. A configuration space of the model involves coordinates, which parametrize particles in d spatial dimensions, and a conformal mode, which gives rise to an effective external field. It is shown that trajectories of the system can be mapped into those of a set of decoupled oscillators in d dimensions.

  18. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  19. Conformational dynamics of the human propeller telomeric DNA quadruplex on a microsecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Barira; Sgobba, Miriam; Laughton, Charlie; Orozco, Modesto; Sponer, Jiri; Neidle, Stephen; Haider, Shozeb

    2013-01-01

    The human telomeric DNA sequence with four repeats can fold into a parallel-stranded propeller-type topology. NMR structures solved under molecular crowding experiments correlate with the crystal structures found with crystal-packing interactions that are effectively equivalent to molecular crowding. This topology has been used for rationalization of ligand design and occurs experimentally in a number of complexes with a diversity of ligands, at least in the crystalline state. Although G-quartet stems have been well characterized, the interactions of the TTA loop with the G-quartets are much less defined. To better understand the conformational variability and structural dynamics of the propeller-type topology, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent up to 1.5 μs. The analysis provides a detailed atomistic account of the dynamic nature of the TTA loops highlighting their interactions with the G-quartets including formation of an A:A base pair, triad, pentad and hexad. The results present a threshold in quadruplex simulations, with regards to understanding the flexible nature of the sugar-phosphate backbone in formation of unusual architecture within the topology. Furthermore, this study stresses the importance of simulation time in sampling conformational space for this topology. PMID:23293000

  20. Security Conformance for the Dynamically Routed Data

    OpenAIRE

    Suma Patra; Dr.V.Janaki; Priyanka suram; Nalubala Ranjeeth Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Secure transmission of data plays a crucial role in the networks. To improve the security many methodologies have been proposed till now, like cryptographic designs, intrusion detection, dynamic routing etc. In this paper we consider that the data transmission is done by using the concept of dynamic routing. Sometimes the sender may be neglecting the security due to the lack of personal interest, but the receiver has to take the utmost care. In such cases the receiver after forcing the sender...

  1. Iterated conformal dynamics and Laplacian growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Felipe; Davidovitch, Benny; Procaccia, Itamar

    2002-04-01

    The method of iterated conformal maps for the study of diffusion limited aggregates (DLA) is generalized to the study of Laplacian growth patterns and related processes. We emphasize the fundamental difference between these processes: DLA is grown serially with constant size particles, while Laplacian patterns are grown by advancing each boundary point in parallel, proportional to the gradient of the Laplacian field. We introduce a two-parameter family of growth patterns that interpolates between DLA and a discrete version of Laplacian growth. The ultraviolet putative finite-time singularities are regularized here by a minimal tip size, equivalently for all the models in this family. With this we stress that the difference between DLA and Laplacian growth is not in the manner of ultraviolet regularization, but rather in their deeply different growth rules. The fractal dimensions of the asymptotic patterns depend continuously on the two parameters of the family, giving rise to a "phase diagram" in which DLA and discretized Laplacian growth are at the extreme ends. In particular, we show that the fractal dimension of Laplacian growth patterns is higher than the fractal dimension of DLA, with the possibility of dimension 2 for the former not excluded. PMID:12005963

  2. Effects of ion binding on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k determined by 15N NMR relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akke, M; Skelton, N J; Kördel, J; Palmer, A G; Chazin, W J

    1993-09-21

    The backbone dynamics of apo- and (Cd2+)1-calbindin D9k have been characterized by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants and steady-state [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effects were measured at a magnetic field strength of 11.74 T by two-dimensional, proton-detected heteronuclear NMR experiments using 15N-enriched samples. The relaxation parameters were analyzed using a model-free formalism that characterizes the dynamics of the N-H bond vectors in terms of generalized order parameters and effective correlation times. The data for the apo and (Cd2+)1 states were compared to those for the (Ca2+)2 state [Kördel, J., Skelton, N. J., Akke, M., Palmer, A. G., & Chazin, W. J. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4856-4866] to ascertain the effects on ion ligation on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k. The two binding loops respond differently to ligation by metal ions: high-frequency (10(9)-10(12) s-1) fluctuations of the N-terminal ion-binding loop are not affected by ion binding, whereas residues G57, D58, G59, and E60 in the C-terminal ion-binding loop have significantly lower order parameters in the apo state than in the metal-bound states. The dynamical responses of the four helices to binding of ions are much smaller than that for the C-terminal binding loop, with the strongest effect on helix III, which is located between the linker loop and binding site II. Significant fluctuations on slower time scales also were detected in the unoccupied N-terminal ion-binding loop of the apo and (Cd2+)1 states; the apparent rates were greater for the (Cd2+)1 state. These results on the dynamical response to ion binding in calbindin D9k provide insights into the molecular details of the binding process and qualitative evidence for entropic contributions to the cooperative phenomenon of calcium binding for the pathway in which the ion binds first in the C-terminal site. PMID:8373781

  3. Strong dynamics, composite Higgs and the conformal window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogradi, Daniel; Patella, Agostino

    2016-08-01

    We review recent progress in the lattice investigations of near-conformal non-Abelian gauge theories relevant for dynamical symmetry breaking and model building of composite Higgs models. The emphasis is placed on the mass spectrum and the running renormalized coupling. The role of a light composite scalar isosinglet particle as a composite Higgs particle is highlighted.

  4. Strong dynamics, composite Higgs and the conformal window

    OpenAIRE

    Nogradi, Daniel; Patella, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in the lattice investigations of near-conformal non-abelian gauge theories relevant for dynamical symmetry breaking and model building of composite Higgs models. The emphasis is placed on the mass spectrum and the running renormalized coupling. The role of a light composite scalar isosinglet particle as a composite Higgs particle is highlighted.

  5. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen;

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA denaturat...... report recent findings on the search process of proteins for a specific target on the DNA. © 2006 Materials Research Society....

  6. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 deg. C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D {1H}-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear {1H}-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (τm) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motions cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action

  7. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarata C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India); Bhuyan, Abani K.; Udgaonkar, Jayant B. [University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS), National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India); Hosur, R.V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-10-15

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 deg. C, pH 6.6, using {sup 15}N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. {sup 15}N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R{sub 1}), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R{sub 2}), and steady-state heteronuclear {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide {sup 15}N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub m}) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motions cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface

  8. NMR detection of slow conformational dynamics in an endonuclease toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Sara B.-M.; Boetzel, Ruth; MacDonald, Colin [University of East Anglia, School of Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom); Lian Luyun [Leicester University, Biological NMR Centre (United Kingdom); Pommer, Ansgar J. [University of East Anglia, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Reilly, Ann; James, Richard; Kleanthous, Colin [Leicester University, Biological NMR Centre (United Kingdom); Moore, Geoffrey R. [University of East Anglia, School of Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-15

    The cytotoxic activity of the secreted bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase housed in the C-terminus of the protein. Double-resonance and triple-resonance NMR studies of the 134-amino acid{sup 15} N- and {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labelled DNase domain are presented. Extensive conformational heterogeneity was evident from the presence of far more resonances than expected based on the amino acid sequence of the DNase, and from the appearance of chemical exchange cross-peaks in TOCSY and NOESY spectra. EXSY spectra were recorded to confirm that slow chemical exchange was occurring. Unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments are presented for one region of the protein, Pro{sup 65}-Asn{sup 72}, which exists in two slowly exchanging conformers based on the identification of chemical exchange cross-peaks in 3D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 15}N EXSY-HSQC, NOESY-HSQC and TOCSY-HSQC spectra, together with C{sup {alpha}} and C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts measured in triple-resonance spectra and sequential NH NOEs. The rates of conformational exchange for backbone amide resonances in this stretch of amino acids, and for the indole NH of either Trp{sup 22} or Trp{sup 58}, were determined from the intensity variation of the appropriate diagonal and chemical exchange cross-peaks recorded in 3D{sup 1} H-{sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOESY-HSQC spectra. The data fitted a model in which this region of the DNase has two conformers, N{sub A} and N{sub B}, which interchange at 15 {sup o}C with a forward rate constant of 1.61 {+-} 0.5 s{sup -1} and a backward rate constant of 1.05 {+-} 0.5 s{sup -1}. Demonstration of this conformational equilibrium has led to a reappraisal of a previously proposed kinetic scheme describing the interaction of E9 DNase with immunity proteins [Wallis et al. (1995) Biochemistry, 34, 13743-13750 and 13751-13759]. The revised scheme is consistent with the specific inhibitor protein for the E9 DNase, Im9, associating with both the N{sub A} and N{sub B

  9. Thermal adaptation of conformational dynamics in ribonuclease H.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A Stafford

    Full Text Available The relationship between inherent internal conformational processes and enzymatic activity or thermodynamic stability of proteins has proven difficult to characterize. The study of homologous proteins with differing thermostabilities offers an especially useful approach for understanding the functional aspects of conformational dynamics. In particular, ribonuclease HI (RNase H, an 18 kD globular protein that hydrolyzes the RNA strand of RNA:DNA hybrid substrates, has been extensively studied by NMR spectroscopy to characterize the differences in dynamics between homologs from the mesophilic organism E. coli and the thermophilic organism T. thermophilus. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are reported for five homologous RNase H proteins of varying thermostabilities and enzymatic activities from organisms of markedly different preferred growth temperatures. For the E. coli and T. thermophilus proteins, strong agreement is obtained between simulated and experimental values for NMR order parameters and for dynamically averaged chemical shifts, suggesting that these simulations can be a productive platform for predicting the effects of individual amino acid residues on dynamic behavior. Analyses of the simulations reveal that a single residue differentiates between two different and otherwise conserved dynamic processes in a region of the protein known to form part of the substrate-binding interface. Additional key residues within these two categories are identified through the temperature-dependence of these conformational processes.

  10. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ≳ 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for

  11. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain); Angulo, Jesus; Ojeda, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Unidad de RM y Unidad de RMN de Biomoleculas Asociada al CSIC, Laboratorio de Estructura e Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose Carracido (Spain); Nieto, Pedro M.; Martin-Lomas, Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Lozano, Rosa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2006-08-15

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural conformations of rhodopsin and prion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the structural conformation of the rhodopsin and prion proteins. We have estimated the effect of specific disease-related amino acid mutations on the dynamics and conformational changes

  13. Lessons in Protein Design from Combined Evolution and Conformational Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Swarnendu Tripathi; M Neal Waxham; Cheung, Margaret S.; Yin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in the control of every cellular process. How natural selection has optimized protein design to produce molecules capable of binding to many partner proteins is a fascinating problem but not well understood. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of protein sequence evolution and conformational dynamics to study how calmodulin (CaM), which plays essential roles in calcium signaling pathways, has adapted to bind to a large number of partne...

  14. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 310-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins

  15. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  16. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  17. Conformity of LINAC-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using Dynamic Conformal Arcs and Micro-Multileaf Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the conformity of dynamic conformal arc linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery and to describe a standardized method of isodose surface (IDS) selection. Methods and Materials: In 174 targets, the conformity index (CI) at the prescription IDS used for treatment was calculated as CI = (PIV/PVTV)/(PVTV/TV), where TV is the target volume, PIV (prescription isodose volume) is the total volume encompassed by the prescription IDS, and PVTV is the TV encompassed by the IDS. In addition, a 'standardized' prescription IDS (sIDS) was chosen according to the following criteria: 95% of the TV was encompassed by the PIV and 99% of TV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose. The CIs at the sIDS were also calculated. Results: The median CI at the prescription IDS and sIDS was 1.63 and 1.47, respectively (p < 0.001). In 132 of 174 cases, the volume of normal tissue in the PIV was reduced by the prescription to the sIDS compared with the prescription IDS, in 20 cases it remained unchanged, and in 22 cases it was increased. Conclusion: The CIs obtained with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery are comparable to those previously reported for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Using a uniform method to select the sIDS, adequate target coverage was usually achievable with prescription to an IDS greater than that chosen by the treating physician (prescription IDS), providing sparing of normal tissue. Thus, the sIDS might aid physicians in identifying a prescription IDS that balances coverage and conformity

  18. Influence of conformational molecular dynamics on matter wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gring, Michael; Eibenberger, Sandra; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Berrada, Tarik; Arndt, Markus; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Hornberger, Klaus; Müri, Marcel; Mayor, Marcel; Böckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of thermally activated internal molecular dynamics on the phase shifts of matter waves inside a molecule interferometer. While de Broglie physics generally describes only the center-of-mass motion of a quantum object, our experiment demonstrates that the translational quantum phase is sensitive to dynamic conformational state changes inside the diffracted molecules. The structural flexibility of tailor-made hot organic particles is sufficient to admit a mixture of strongly fluctuating dipole moments. These modify the electric susceptibility and through this the quantum interference pattern in the presence of an external electric field. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory allow us to quantify the time-dependent structural reconfigurations and to predict the ensemble-averaged square of the dipole moment which is found to be in good agreement with the interferometric result. The experiment thus opens a new perspective on matter wave interfe...

  19. Revisiting the Internal Conformational Dynamics and Solvation Properties of Cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Cirstina S.; De Moura, Andri F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2007-08-06

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the internal conformational dynamics and solvation properties of the three natural cyclodextrins, α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrin, in aqueous solution at room temperature. These glucose-derived oligosacharides present a molecular structure that confers them the ability to complex host molecules and change their physico-chemical properties. The structural behavior of cyclodextrins in solution is crucial for their complexation abilities. Analyses of the obtained trajectories show that inter-glucose secondary hydrogen bonds are present in solution, but show a very dynamical character where alternative hydrogen bonds to water molecules can be formed. Despite of the lower hydrophilicity of the cyclodextrins inner-cavities, they were found to be solvated and the number of water molecules inside of the cavity roughly doubles per glucose unit added to the ring. The residence times for water molecules inside of the cavities are inversely proportional to the cavity size.

  20. Conformational dynamics and aggregation behavior of piezoelectric diphenylalanine peptides in an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Catherine M; Northey, Thomas; Ryan, Kate; Brooks, Bernard R; Kholkin, Andrei L; Rodriguez, Brian J; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic peptides including diphenylalanine (FF) have the capacity to self-assemble into ordered, biocompatible nanostructures with piezoelectric properties relevant to a variety of biomedical applications. Electric fields are commonly applied to align FF nanotubes, yet little is known about the effect of the electric field on the assembly process. Using all-atom molecular dynamics with explicit water molecules, we examine the response of FF monomers to the application of a constant external electric field over a range of intensities. We probe the aggregation mechanism of FF peptides, and find that the presence of even relatively weak fields can accelerate ordered aggregation, primarily by facilitating the alignment of individual molecular dipole moments. This is modulated by the conformational response of individual FF peptides (e.g., backbone stretching) and by the cooperative alignment of neighboring FF and water molecules. These observations may facilitate future studies on the controlled formation of nanostructured aggregates of piezoelectric peptides and the understanding of their electro-mechanical properties. PMID:25240398

  1. Time-resolved infrared studies of protein conformational dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Causgrove, T.P.; Dyer, R.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Callender, R.H. [Univ. of New York, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    We have demonstrated that TRIR in the amide I region gives structural information regarding protein conformational changes in realtime, both on processes involved in the development of the functional structure (protein folding) and on protein structural changes that accompany the functional dynamics of the native structure. Assignment of many of the amide I peaks to specific amide or sidechain structures will require much additional effort. Specifically, the congestion and complexity of the protein vibrational spectra dictate that isotope studies are an absolute requirement for more than a qualitative notion of the structural interpretation of these measurements. It is clear, however, that enormous potential exists for elucidating structural relaxation dynamics and energetics with a high degree of structural specificity using this approach.

  2. Conformal Dynamics for TeV Physics and Cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the topic of dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry and its link to unparticle physics and cosmology. The knowledge of the phase diagram of strongly coupled theories plays a fundamental role when trying to construct viable extensions of the standard model (SM). Therefore we...... of chiral gauge theories we will introduce a novel all orders beta function for chiral gauge theories. This permits the first unified study of all non-supersymmetric gauge theories with fermionic matter representation both chiral and non-chiral. To the best of our knowledge the phase diagram...... of these complex models appears here for the first time. We will introduce recent extensions of the SM featuring minimal conformal gauge theories known as minimal walking models. Finally we will discuss the electroweak phase transition at nonzero temperature for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  3. Conformal dynamics of fractal growth patterns without randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch; Feigenbaum; Hentschel; Procaccia

    2000-08-01

    Many models of fractal growth patterns (such as diffusion limited aggregation and dielectric breakdown models) combine complex geometry with randomness; this double difficulty is a stumbling block to their elucidation. In this paper we introduce a wide class of fractal growth models with highly complex geometry but without any randomness in their growth rules. The models are defined in terms of deterministic itineraries of iterated conformal maps, generating the function Phi((n))(omega) which maps the exterior of the unit circle to the exterior of an n-particle growing aggregate. The complexity of the evolving interfaces is fully contained in the deterministic dynamics of the conformal map Phi((n))(omega). We focus attention on a class of growth models in which the itinerary is quasiperiodic. Such itineraries can be approached via a series of rational approximants. The analytic power gained is used to introduce a scaling theory of the fractal growth patterns and to identify the exponent that determines the fractal dimension.

  4. [Functionally-relevant conformational dynamics of water-soluble proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, G V; Sivozhelezov, V S; Shaĭtan, K V

    2013-01-01

    A study is reported of the functional-relevant dynamics of three typical water-soluble proteins: Calmodulin, Src-tyrosine kinase as well as repressor of Trp operon. Application of the state-of-art methods of structural bioinformatics allowed to identify dynamics seen in the X-ray structures of the investigated proteins associated with their specific biological functions. In addition, Normal Mode analysis technique revealed the most probable directions of the functionally-relevant motions for all that proteins were also predicted. Importantly, overall type of the motions observed on the lowest-frequency modes was very similar to the motions seen from the analysis of the X-ray data of the examined macromolecules. Thereby it was shown that the large-scale as well as local conformational motions of the proteins might be predetermined already at the level of their tertiary structures. In particular, the determining factor might be the specific fold of the alpha-helixes. Thus functionally-relevant in vivo dynamics of the investigated proteins might be evolutionally formed by means of natural selection at the level of the spatial topology. PMID:23705506

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation study on zwitterionic structure to maintain the normal conformations of Glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Han; ZHU; HaoMiao; SHEN; Jian

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to normal conformational Glutathione (GSH) and GSH over zwitterionic and hydrophobic surfaces respectively. Conformational analysis of GSH during the simulation time on RMSD, conformational flexibility and dihedral distribution were performed. The results showed that zwitterionic structure maintains the normal conformations of GSH to a better extent, which should be a first good proof of the hypothesis of "maintain of normal structure".

  6. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Francisco [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Rogan, José; Valdivia, J.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Varas, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Av. Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au{sub 12} cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au{sub 12}→Au{sub 13} is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au{sub 12}Ag and Au{sub 12}Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au{sub 12}Ag and 4483 Au{sub 12}Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously.

  7. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au12 cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au12→Au13 is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au12Ag and Au12Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au12Ag and 4483 Au12Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously

  8. Extending the Standard Model with Confining and Conformal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRaven, John Emory

    This dissertation will provide a survey of models that involve extending the standard model with confining and conformal dynamics. We will study a series of models, describe them in detail, outline their phenomenology, and provide some search strategies for finding them. The Gaugephobic Higgs model provides an interpolation between three different models of electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgsless models, Randall-Sundrum models, and the Standard Model. At parameter points between the extremes, Standard Model Higgs signals are present at reduced rates, and Higgsless Kaluza-Klein excitations are present with shifted masses and couplings, as well as signals from exotic quarks necessary to protect the Zbb coupling. Using a new implementation of the model in SHERPA, we show the LHC signals which differentiate the generic Gaugephobic Higgs model from its limiting cases. These are all signals involving a Higgs coupling to a Kaluza-Klein gauge boson or quark. We identify the clean signal pp → W (i) → WH mediated by a Kaluza-Klein W, which can be present at large rates and is enhanced for even Kaluza-Klein numbers. Due to the very hard lepton coming from the W+/- decay, this signature has little background, and provides a better discovery channel for the Higgs than any of the Standard Model modes, over its entire mass range. A Higgs radiated from new heavy quarks also has large rates, but is much less promising due to very high multiplicity final states. The AdS/CFT conjectures a relation between Extra Dimensional models in AdS5 space, such as the Gaugephobic Higgs Model, and 4D Conformal Field theories. The notion of conformality has found its way into several phenomenological models for TeV-scale physics extending the standard model. We proceed to explore the phenomenology of a new heavy quark that transforms under a hidden strongly coupled conformal gauge group in addition to transforming under QCD. This object would form states similar to R-Hadrons. The heavy state

  9. New Insights into Active Site Conformation Dynamics of E. coli PNP Revealed by Combined H/D Exchange Approach and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazazić, Saša; Bertoša, Branimir; Luić, Marija; Mikleušević, Goran; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michal; Narczyk, Marta; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The biologically active form of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Escherichia coli (EC 2.4.2.1) is a homohexamer unit, assembled as a trimer of dimers. Upon binding of phosphate, neighboring monomers adopt different active site conformations, described as open and closed. To get insight into the functions of the two distinctive active site conformations, virtually inactive Arg24Ala mutant is complexed with phosphate; all active sites are found to be in the open conformation. To understand how the sites of neighboring monomers communicate with each other, we have combined H/D exchange (H/DX) experiments with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both methods point to the mobility of the enzyme, associated with a few flexible regions situated at the surface and within the dimer interface. Although H/DX provides an average extent of deuterium uptake for all six hexamer active sites, it was able to indicate the dynamic mechanism of cross-talk between monomers, allostery. Using this technique, it was found that phosphate binding to the wild type (WT) causes arrest of the molecular motion in backbone fragments that are flexible in a ligand-free state. This was not the case for the Arg24Ala mutant. Upon nucleoside substrate/inhibitor binding, some release of the phosphate-induced arrest is observed for the WT, whereas the opposite effects occur for the Arg24Ala mutant. MD simulations confirmed that phosphate is bound tightly in the closed active sites of the WT; conversely, in the open conformation of the active site of the WT phosphate is bound loosely moving towards the exit of the active site. In Arg24Ala mutant binary complex Pi is bound loosely, too.

  10. Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of the DNA backbone at different hydration levels mapped by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Liu, Yingliang; Siebert, Torsten; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    DNA oligomers are studied at 0% and 92% relative humidity, corresponding to N  20 water molecules per base pair. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared spectroscopy of DNA backbone modes between 920 and 1120 cm(-1) maps fluctuating interactions at the DNA surface. At both hydration levels, a frequency fluctuation correlation function with a 300 fs decay and a slow decay beyond 10 ps is derived from the 2D lineshapes. The fast component reflects motions of DNA helix, counterions, and water shell. Its higher amplitude at high hydration level reveals a significant contribution of water to the fluctuating forces. The slow component reflects disorder-induced inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:26798841

  11. Conformational analysis of six- and twelve-membered ring compounds by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD)-based conformational analysis has been performed on a number of cycloalkanes in order to demonstrate the reliability and generality of MD as a tool for conformational analysis. MD simulations on cyclohexane and a series of methyl-substituted cyclohexanes were performed a...... provided 19 out of the 20 most stable conformations found in the MM2 force field. Finally, the general performance of the MD method for conformational analysis is discussed.......A molecular dynamics (MD)-based conformational analysis has been performed on a number of cycloalkanes in order to demonstrate the reliability and generality of MD as a tool for conformational analysis. MD simulations on cyclohexane and a series of methyl-substituted cyclohexanes were performed...

  12. Testing Backbone.js

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with the step by step tutorial and instructions in recipe format helping you setup test infrastructure and gradually advance your skills to plan, develop, and test your backbone applications.If you are a JavaScript developer looking for recipes to create and implement test support for your backbone application, then this book is ideal for you.

  13. Exotic Galilean Conformal Symmetry and its Dynamical Realisations

    CERN Document Server

    Lukierski, J; Zakrzewski, W J

    2006-01-01

    The six-dimensional exotic Galilean algebra in (2+1) dimensions with two central charges $m$ and $\\theta$, is extended when $m=0$, to a ten-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra with dilatation, expansion, two acceleration generators and the central charge $\\theta$. A realisation of such a symmetry is provided by a model with higher derivatives recently discussed in \\cite{peterwojtek}. We consider also a realisation of the Galilean conformal symmetry for the motion with a Coulomb potential and a magnetic vortex interaction. Finally, we study the restriction, as well as the modification, of the Galilean conformal algebra obtained after the introduction of the minimally coupled constant electric and magnetic fields.

  14. Active site conformational dynamics in human uridine phosphorylase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo P Roosild

    Full Text Available Uridine phosphorylase (UPP is a central enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzing the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose-1-phosphate. Human UPP activity has been a focus of cancer research due to its role in activating fluoropyrimidine nucleoside chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and capecitabine. Additionally, specific molecular inhibitors of this enzyme have been found to raise endogenous uridine concentrations, which can produce a cytoprotective effect on normal tissues exposed to these drugs. Here we report the structure of hUPP1 bound to 5-FU at 2.3 A resolution. Analysis of this structure reveals new insights as to the conformational motions the enzyme undergoes in the course of substrate binding and catalysis. The dimeric enzyme is capable of a large hinge motion between its two domains, facilitating ligand exchange and explaining observed cooperativity between the two active sites in binding phosphate-bearing substrates. Further, a loop toward the back end of the uracil binding pocket is shown to flexibly adjust to the varying chemistry of different compounds through an "induced-fit" association mechanism that was not observed in earlier hUPP1 structures. The details surrounding these dynamic aspects of hUPP1 structure and function provide unexplored avenues to develop novel inhibitors of this protein with improved specificity and increased affinity. Given the recent emergence of new roles for uridine as a neuron protective compound in ischemia and degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, inhibitors of hUPP1 with greater efficacy, which are able to boost cellular uridine levels without adverse side-effects, may have a wide range of therapeutic applications.

  15. 2D IR Spectroscopy of Histidine: Probing Side-Chain Structure and Dynamics via Backbone Amide Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J.; Gai, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that histidine is involved in many biological functions due to the structural versatility of its side chain. However, probing the conformational transitions of histidine in proteins, especially those occurring on an ultrafast time scale, is difficult. Herein we show, using a histidine dipeptide as a model, that it is possible to probe the tautomer and protonation status of a histidine residue by measuring the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of its amide I vibrationa...

  16. Conformal invariance and conserved quantities of dynamical system of relative motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiang-Wei; Zhao Yong-Hong; Li Yan-Min

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses in detail the conformal invariance by infinitesimal transformations of a dynamical system of relative motion.The necessary and sufficient conditions of conformal invariance and Lie symmetry are given simulta neously by the action of infinitesimal transformations.Then it obtains the conserved quantities of conformal invariance by the infinitesimal transformations.Finally an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  17. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  18. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    Full Text Available The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design.

  19. Exotic Galilean Conformal Symmetry and its Dynamical Realisations

    OpenAIRE

    Lukierski, J.; Stichel, P. C.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The six-dimensional exotic Galilean algebra in (2+1) dimensions with two central charges $m$ and $\\theta$, is extended when $m=0$, to a ten-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra with dilatation, expansion, two acceleration generators and the central charge $\\theta$. A realisation of such a symmetry is provided by a model with higher derivatives recently discussed in \\cite{peterwojtek}. We consider also a realisation of the Galilean conformal symmetry for the motion with a Coulomb potential a...

  20. Mapping the conformational landscape of a dynamic enzyme by multitemperature and XFEL crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Kenner, Lillian R.; Warkentin, Matthew; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Thompson, Michael C.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; McPhillips, Scott E.; Song, Jinhu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Holton, James M.; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Soltis, S. Michael; Lemke, Henrik; Gonzalez, Ana; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Cohen, Aina E.; van den Bedem, Henry; Thorne, Robert E.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-09-30

    Determining the interconverting conformations of dynamic proteins in atomic detail is a major challenge for structural biology. Conformational heterogeneity in the active site of the dynamic enzyme cyclophilin A (CypA) has been previously linked to its catalytic function, but the extent to which the different conformations of these residues are correlated is unclear. Here we compare the conformational ensembles of CypA by multitemperature synchrotron crystallography and fixed-target X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) crystallography. The diffraction-before-destruction nature of XFEL experiments provides a radiation-damage-free view of the functionally important alternative conformations of CypA, confirming earlier synchrotron-based results. We monitored the temperature dependences of these alternative conformations with eight synchrotron datasets spanning 100-310 K. Multiconformer models show that many alternative conformations in CypA are populated only at 240 K and above, yet others remain populated or become populated at 180 K and below. These results point to a complex evolution of conformational heterogeneity between 180-–240 K that involves both thermal deactivation and solvent-driven arrest of protein motions in the crystal. The lack of a single shared conformational response to temperature within the dynamic active-site network provides evidence for a conformation shuffling model, in which exchange between rotamer states of a large aromatic ring in the middle of the network shifts the conformational ensemble for the other residues in the network. Together, our multitemperature analyses and XFEL data motivate a new generation of temperature- and time-resolved experiments to structurally characterize the dynamic underpinnings of protein function.

  1. Exotic Galilean conformal symmetry and its dynamical realisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukierski, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, pl. Maxa Borna 9, 50-205 Wroclaw (Poland)]. E-mail: lukier@ift.uni.wroc.pl; Stichel, P.C. [An der Krebskuhle 21, D-33619 Bielefeld (Germany)]. E-mail: peter@physik.uni-bielefeld.de; Zakrzewski, W.J. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.j.zakrzewski@durham.ac.uk

    2006-08-28

    The six-dimensional exotic Galilean algebra in (2+1) dimensions with two central charges m and {theta}, is extended when m=0, to a ten-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra with dilatation, expansion, two acceleration generators and the central charge {theta}. A realisation of such a symmetry is provided by a model with higher derivatives recently discussed in [P.C. Stichel, W.J. Zakrzewski, Ann. Phys. 310 (2004) 158]. We consider also a realisation of the Galilean conformal symmetry for the motion with a Coulomb potential and a magnetic vortex interaction. Finally, we study the restriction, as well as the modification, of the Galilean conformal algebra obtained after the introduction of the minimally coupled constant electric and magnetic fields.

  2. Exotic Galilean conformal symmetry and its dynamical realisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The six-dimensional exotic Galilean algebra in (2+1) dimensions with two central charges m and θ, is extended when m=0, to a ten-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra with dilatation, expansion, two acceleration generators and the central charge θ. A realisation of such a symmetry is provided by a model with higher derivatives recently discussed in [P.C. Stichel, W.J. Zakrzewski, Ann. Phys. 310 (2004) 158]. We consider also a realisation of the Galilean conformal symmetry for the motion with a Coulomb potential and a magnetic vortex interaction. Finally, we study the restriction, as well as the modification, of the Galilean conformal algebra obtained after the introduction of the minimally coupled constant electric and magnetic fields

  3. Conformational flexibility of β-secretase:molecular dynamics simulation and essential dynamics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing XIONG; Xiao-qin HUANG; Ling-ling SHEN; Jian-hua SHEN; Xiao-min LUO; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG; Kai-xian CHEN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Based on the structural analysis to reveal the mechanism of ligand binding to β-secretase and the specificity of each binding sub-site. METHODS: Molecular dynamics was used to simulate on the ligand free β-secretase and ligand bound β-secretase. The trajectories were analyzed using the essential dynamics, and the significant conformational change was illustrated employing the DynDom program. RESULTS: The essential dynamics and DynDom analyses clearly showed that the β-secretase experienced a large conformational change upon the substrate or inhibitor binding. The flap structure adopted a swing motion, gradually covering the active site to facilitate the ligand binding process. Residues Ser86 and Ile87 served as the hinge point. Inhibitor-enzyme interaction analysis revealed that residues at P2, Pl, and P1' positions of the inhibitor were very important for the binding, and residues at P2' and P3' positions may be modified to improve the binding specificity. S3 subsite of the enzyme still had space to modify the inhibitors in increasing the binding affinity. CONCLUSION: The information presented here is valuable and could be used to identify small molecular inhibitors of β-secretase.

  4. Increased dynamics in the 40-57 Ω-loop of the G41S variant of human cytochrome c promote its pro-apoptotic conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsisiotis, Andreas Ioannis; Deacon, Oliver M; Wilson, Michael T; Macdonald, Colin; Blumenschein, Tharin M A; Moore, Geoffrey R; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia 4 is an inherited autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia, which occurs due to mutations in the human gene for cytochrome c that results in enhanced mitochondrial apoptotic activity. The Gly41Ser mutation was the first to be reported. Here we report stopped-flow kinetic studies of azide binding to human ferricytochrome c and its Gly41Ser variant, together with backbone amide H/D exchange and (15)N-relaxation dynamics using NMR spectroscopy, to show that alternative conformations are kinetically and thermodynamically more readily accessible for the Gly41Ser variant than for the wild-type protein. Our work reveals a direct conformational link between the 40-57 Ω-loop in which residue 41 resides and the dynamical properties of the axial ligand to the heme iron, Met80, such that the replacement of glycine by serine promotes the dissociation of the Met80 ligand, thereby increasing the population of a peroxidase active state, which is a key non-native conformational state in apoptosis. PMID:27461282

  5. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Self-Organising Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Fabio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. Results The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. Conclusions The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to

  6. Conformational Dynamics of o-Fluoro-Substituted Z-Azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, S K; Rogers, R A; Shi, J; Gao, C; Rinaldi, P L; Brittain, W J

    2015-11-20

    A conformational analysis of o-fluoro Z-azobenzene reveals a slight preference for aromatic C-F/π interaction. Density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the conformation with a C-F/π interaction is preferred by approximately 0.3-0.5 kcal/mol. Ground-state conformations were corroborated with X-ray crystallography. (Z)-Azobenzene (Z-AB) with at least one o-fluoro per ring displays (19)F-(19)F through-space (TS) coupling. 2D J-resolved NMR was used to distinguish through-bond from TS coupling ((TS)JFF). (TS)JFF decreases as the temperature is lowered and the multiplets coalesce into broad singlets. We hypothesize that the coalescence temperature (Tc) corresponds to the barrier for phenyl rotation. The experimentally determined barrier of 8-10 kcal/mol has been qualitatively verified by DFT where transition states with a bisected geometry were identified with zero-point energies of 6-9 kcal/mol relative to ground state. These values are significantly higher that values estimated from previous theoretical studies but lie within a reasonable range for phenyl rotation in hydrocarbon systems.

  7. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex. PMID:22243137

  8. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex.

  9. Conformational dynamics in substrate-binding domains influences transport in the ABC importer GlnPQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Schuurman-Wolters, Geesina; Ploetz, Evelyn; Husada, Florence; Vietrov, Ruslan; de Boer, Marijn; Cordes, Thorben; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The conformational dynamics in ABC transporters is largely elusive. The ABC importer GlnPQ from Lactococcus lactis has different covalently linked substrate-binding domains (SBDs), thus making it an excellent model system to elucidate the dynamics and role of the SBDs in transport. We demonstrate by

  10. Triggered drug release from dynamic microspheres via a protein conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J; Pytel, Nicholas J; Ng, Kelvin; Murphy, William L

    2010-06-11

    In this study we formed and characterized dynamic hydrogel microspheres in which a protein conformational change was used to control microsphere volume changes and the release of an encapsulated drug. In particular, a specific biochemical ligand, trifluoperazine, induced calmodulin's nanometer scale conformation change, which translated to a 48.7% microsphere volume decrease. This specific, ligand-induced volume change triggered the release of a model drug, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), at pre-determined times. After release from the microspheres, 85.6 +/- 10.5% of VEGF was in its native conformation. Taken together, these results suggest that protein conformational change could serve as a useful mechanism to control drug release from dynamic hydrogels.

  11. Future High Capacity Backbone Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiayuan

    This thesis - Future High Capacity Backbone Networks - deals with the energy efficiency problems associated with the development of future optical networks. In the first half of the thesis, novel approaches for using multiple/single alternative energy sources for improving energy efficiency...... is studied in details with dynamic network simulations using OPNET. Dynamic routing optimization methods are proposed. The influences of re-routing and load-balancing factors on the algorithm are evaluated with a focus on different re-routing thresholds. Results from dynamic network simulations show that re...... aiming for reducing the dynamic part of the energy consumption of the network may increase the fixed part of the energy consumption meanwhile. In the second half of the thesis, the conflict between energy efficiency and Quality of Service (QoS) is addressed by introducing a novel software defined...

  12. Extracting Conformational Ensembles of Small Molecules from Molecular Dynamics Simulations: Ampicillin as a Test Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Malloci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and exhaustive description of the conformational ensemble sampled by small molecules in solution, possibly at different physiological conditions, is of primary interest in many fields of medicinal chemistry and computational biology. Recently, we have built an on-line database of compounds with antimicrobial properties, where we provide all-atom force-field parameters and a set of molecular properties, including representative structures extracted from cluster analysis over μs-long molecular dynamics (MD trajectories. In the present work, we used a medium-sized antibiotic from our sample, namely ampicillin, to assess the quality of the conformational ensemble. To this aim, we compared the conformational landscape extracted from previous unbiased MD simulations to those obtained by means of Replica Exchange MD (REMD and those originating from three freely-available conformer generation tools widely adopted in computer-aided drug-design. In addition, for different charge/protonation states of ampicillin, we made available force-field parameters and static/dynamic properties derived from both Density Functional Theory and MD calculations. For the specific system investigated here, we found that: (i the conformational statistics extracted from plain MD simulations is consistent with that obtained from REMD simulations; (ii overall, our MD-based approach performs slightly better than any of the conformer generator tools if one takes into account both the diversity of the generated conformational set and the ability to reproduce experimentally-determined structures.

  13. Using local states to drive the sampling of global conformations in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Pandini, A; Fornili, A

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes associated with protein function often occur beyond the time scale currently accessible to unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, so that different approaches have been developed to accelerate their sampling. Here we investigate how the knowledge of backbone conformations preferentially adopted by protein fragments, as contained in precalculated libraries known as structural alphabets (SA), can be used to explore the landscape of protein conformations in MD simul...

  14. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of wild-type Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c{sub 552} and its b-type variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozawa, Kaeko; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Redfield, Christina, E-mail: christina.redfield@bioch.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Smith, Lorna J., E-mail: lorna.smith@chem.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome c{sub 552} from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is a typical c-type cytochrome which binds heme covalently via two thioether bonds between the two heme vinyl groups and two cysteine thiol groups in a CXXCH sequence motif. This protein was converted to a b-type cytochrome by substitution of the two cysteine residues by alanines (Tomlinson and Ferguson in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:5156–5160, 2000a). To probe the significance of the covalent attachment of the heme in the c-type protein, {sup 15}N relaxation and hydrogen exchange studies have been performed for the wild-type and b-type proteins. The two variants share very similar backbone dynamic properties, both proteins showing high {sup 15}N order parameters in the four main helices, with reduced values in an exposed loop region (residues 18–21), and at the C-terminal residue Lys80. Some subtle changes in chemical shift and hydrogen exchange protection are seen between the wild-type and b-type variant proteins, not only for residues at and neighbouring the mutation sites, but also for some residues in the heme binding pocket. Overall, the results suggest that the main role of the covalent linkages between the heme group and the protein chain must be to increase the stability of the protein.

  15. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  17. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein conformational dynamics in live eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Iwo; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Soranno, Andrea; Wunderlich, Bengt; Dingfelder, Fabian; Stüber, Jakob C; Plückthun, Andreas; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule methods have become widely used for quantifying the conformational heterogeneity and structural dynamics of biomolecules in vitro. Their application in vivo, however, has remained challenging owing to shortcomings in the design and reproducible delivery of labeled molecules, the range of applicable analysis methods, and suboptimal cell culture conditions. By addressing these limitations in an integrated approach, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing protein dynamics from milliseconds down to the nanosecond regime in live eukaryotic cells with confocal single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. We illustrate the versatility of the approach by determining the dimensions and submicrosecond chain dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein; by detecting even subtle changes in the temperature dependence of protein stability, including in-cell cold denaturation; and by quantifying the folding dynamics of a small protein. The methodology opens possibilities for assessing the effect of the cellular environment on biomolecular conformation, dynamics and function. PMID:26147918

  18. Conformational dynamics of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Quick, Matthias; Islam, Shahidul M; Roux, Benoît; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2014-05-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) from Aquifex aeolicus is a bacterial homolog of neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) that catalyze reuptake of neurotransmitters at the synapse. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutants of LeuT have been interpreted as conformational states in the coupled transport cycle. However, the mechanistic identities inferred from these structures have not been validated, and the ligand-dependent conformational equilibrium of LeuT has not been defined. Here, we used distance measurements between spin-label pairs to elucidate Na(+)- and leucine-dependent conformational changes on the intracellular and extracellular sides of the transporter. The results identify structural motifs that underlie the isomerization of LeuT between outward-facing, inward-facing and occluded states. The conformational changes reported here present a dynamic picture of the alternating-access mechanism of LeuT and NSSs that is different from the inferences reached from currently available structural models. PMID:24747939

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of poly (ethylene oxide) hydration and conformation in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Udaya; Dormidontova, Elena

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most actively used polymers, especially in biomedical applications due to its high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and potency to inhibit protein adsorption. PEO solubility and conformation in water depends on its capability to form hydrogen bonds. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigated the details of water packing around PEO chain and characterized the type and lifetime of hydrogen bonds in aqueous and mixed solvent solutions. The observed polymer chain conformation varies from an extended coil in pure water to collapsed globule in hexane and a helical-like conformation in pure isobutyric acid or isobutyric acid -water mixture in agreement with experimental observations. We'll discuss the implications of protic solvent arrangement and stability of hydrogen bonds on PEO chain conformation and mobility. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  20. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view. PMID:27493064

  1. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view.

  2. Radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases with single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA), a novel technique for radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases, and to compare SIDCA with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and multiple-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (MIDCA) for plan quality. Methods and materials: SIDCA, MIDCA, and VMAT plans were created on 6 patients with 3–5 metastases. Plans were evaluated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (RCI), Paddick conformity index (PCI), gradient index (GI), volumes that received more than 100% (V100%), 50% (V50%), 25% (V25%) and 10% (V10%) of prescription dose, total monitor units (MUs), and delivery time (DT). Results: SIDCA achieved conformal plans (RCI = 1.38 ± 0.12, PCI = 0.72 ± 0.06) with steep dose fall-off (GI = 3.97 ± 0.51). MIDCA plans had comparable plan quality and MUs as SIDCA, but 52% longer DT. The VMAT plans had better conformity (RCI = 1.15 ± 0.09, p < 0.01 and PCI = 0.86 ± 0.06, p < 0.01) than SIDCA, worse GI (4.34 ± 0.46, p < 0.01), higher V25% (p = 0.05) and V10% (p = 0.02), 49% less MUs and 46% shorter DT. Conclusions: All three techniques achieved conformal plans with steep dose fall-off from targets. SIDCA plans had similar plan quality as MIDCA but more efficient to delivery. SIDCA plans had lower peripheral dose spread than VMAT; VMAT plans had better conformity and faster delivery time than SIDCA

  3. Conformational dynamics and antigenicity in the disordered malaria antigen merozoite surface protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A MacRaild

    Full Text Available Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2 of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27 using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design.

  4. Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity in the Disordered Malaria Antigen Merozoite Surface Protein 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Dean; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Nováček, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design. PMID:25742002

  5. Backbone colorings for graphs: Tree and path backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Hajo; Fomin, Fedor V.; Golovach, Petr A.; Woeginger, Gerhard J.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and study backbone colorings, a variation on classical vertex colorings: Given a graph $G = (V,E)$ and a spanning subgraph $H$ of $G$ (the backbone of $G$), a backbone coloring for $G$ and $H$ is a proper vertex coloring $V \\to {1,2,\\ldots}$ of $G$ in which the colors assigned to adjace

  6. Backbone colorings for networks: tree and path backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, H.J.; Fomin, F.V.; Golovach, P.A.; Woeginger, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce and study backbone colorings, a variation on classical vertex colorings: Given a graph $G=(V,E)$ and a spanning subgraph $H$ of $G$ (the backbone of $G$), a backbone coloring for $G$ and $H$ is a proper vertex coloring $V\\rightarrow \\{1,2,\\ldots\\}$ of $G$ in which the colors assigned to

  7. The conformational dynamics of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in gating ligand entry into the buried binding cavity of vitamin D receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Wei-Ven; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of holo vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed a canonical conformation in which the ligand is entrapped in a hydrophobic cavity buried in the ligand-binding domain (LBD). The mousetrap model postulates that helix 12 is positioned away from the domain to expose the interior cavity. However, the extended form of helix 12 is likely due to artifacts during crystallization. In this study, we set out to investigate conformational dynamics of apo VDR using molecular dynamics simulation on microsecond timescale. Here we show the neighboring backbones of helix 2-helix 3n and beta strand 2-helix 6 of LBD, instead of the helix 12, undergo large-scale motion, possibly gating the entrance of ligand to the ligand binding domain. Docking analysis to the simulated open structure of VDR with the estimated free energy of −37.0 kJ/mol, would emphasise the role of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in facilitating the entrance of calcitriol to the LBD of VDR. PMID:27786277

  8. Backbone amide linker strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    In the backbone amide linker (BAL) strategy, the peptide is anchored not at the C-terminus but through a backbone amide, which leaves the C-terminal available for various modifications. This is thus a very general strategy for the introduction of C-terminal modifications. The BAL strategy...... to assemble the final peptide. One useful application of this strategy is in the synthesis of C-terminal peptide aldehydes. The C-terminal aldehyde is masked as an acetal during synthesis and then conveniently demasked in the final cleavage step to generate the free aldehyde. Another application...... amino acid residue by reductive amination. This can be used as a general approach for the introduction of other C-terminal modifications as well as functionalities, such as fluorophors. The second step is an acylation of a secondary amine, followed by standard Fmoc-based solid-phase synthesis...

  9. Conformational dynamics in substrate-binding domains influences transport in the ABC importer GlnPQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K; Ploetz, Evelyn; Husada, Florence; Vietrov, Ruslan; de Boer, Marijn; Cordes, Thorben; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The conformational dynamics in ABC transporters is largely elusive. The ABC importer GlnPQ from Lactococcus lactis has different covalently linked substrate-binding domains (SBDs), thus making it an excellent model system to elucidate the dynamics and role of the SBDs in transport. We demonstrate by single-molecule spectroscopy that the two SBDs intrinsically transit from open to closed ligand-free conformation, and the proteins capture their amino acid ligands via an induced-fit mechanism. High-affinity ligands elicit transitions without changing the closed-state lifetime, whereas low-affinity ligands dramatically shorten it. We show that SBDs in the closed state compete for docking onto the translocator, but remarkably the effect is strongest without ligand. We find that the rate-determining steps depend on the SBD and the amino acid transported. We conclude that the lifetime of the closed conformation controls both SBD docking to the translocator and substrate release.

  10. Is DNA a nonlinear dynamical system where solitary conformational waves are possible?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ludmila V Yakushevich

    2001-09-01

    DNA is considered as a nonlinear dynamical system in which solitary conformational waves can be excited. The history of the approach, the main results, and arguments in favour and against are presented. Perspectives are discussed pertaining to studies of DNA’s nonlinear properties.

  11. DNA polymerase conformational dynamics and the role of fidelity-conferring residues: Insights from computational simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano eMeli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Herein we investigate the molecular bases of DNA polymerase I conformational dynamics that underlie the replication fidelity of the enzyme. Such fidelity is determined by conformational changes that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before the chemical ligation step. We report a comprehensive atomic resolution study of wild type and mutant enzymes in different bound states and starting from different crystal structures, using extensive molecular dynamics (MD simulations that cover a total timespan of ~ 5 microseconds. The resulting trajectories are examined via a combination of novel methods of internal dynamics and energetics analysis, aimed to reveal the principal molecular determinants for the (destabilization of a certain conformational state. Our results show that the presence of fidelity-decreasing mutations or the binding of incorrect nucleotides in ternary complexes tend to favor transitions from closed towards open structures, passing through an ensemble of semi-closed intermediates. The latter ensemble includes the experimentally observed ajar conformation which, consistent with previous experimental observations, emerges as a molecular checkpoint for the selection of the correct nucleotide to incorporate. We discuss the implications of our results for the understanding of the relationships between the structure, dynamics and function of DNA polymerase I at the atomistic level.

  12. Beyond Crystallography: Investigating the Conformational Dynamics of the Purine Riboswitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Colby D.; Batey, Robert T.

    Riboswitches are structured elements located in the 5'-untranslated regions of numerous bacterial mRNAs that serve to regulate gene expression via their ability to specifically bind metabolites. The purine riboswitch ligand-binding domain has emerged as an important model system for investigating the relationship between RNA structure and function. Directed by NMR and crystallographically generated structures of this RNA, a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques have been utilized to understand its dynamic nature. In this review, we describe these various approaches and what they reveal about the purine riboswitch.

  13. Imatinib (Gleevec@) conformations observed in single crystals, protein-Imatinib co-crystals and molecular dynamics: Implications for drug selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarroshan, B.; Siddegowda, M. S.; Li, Hong qi; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.; Rathore, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Structure and dynamics of the Leukemia drug, Imatinib, were examined using X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics studies. Comparison of conformations observed in single crystals with several reported co-crystals of protein-drug complexes suggests existence of two conserved conformations of Imatinib, extended and compact (or folded), corresponding to two binding modes of interaction with the receptor. Furthermore, these conformations are conserved throughout a dynamics simulation. The present study attempts to draw a parallel on conformations and binding patterns of interactions, obtained from small-molecule single-crystal and macromolecule co-crystal studies, and provides structural insights for understanding the high selectivity of this drug molecule.

  14. Backbone colorings along perfect matchings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, H.J.; Fujisawa, J.; Yoshimoto, K.

    2003-01-01

    Given a graph $G=(V,E)$ and a spanning subgraph $H$ of $G$ (the backbone of $G$), a backbone coloring for $G$ and $H$ is a proper vertex coloring $V\\rightarrow \\{1,2,\\ldots\\}$ of $G$ in which the colors assigned to adjacent vertices in $H$ differ by at least two. In a recent paper, backbone coloring

  15. Orientation-dependent backbone-only residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordner Andrew J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical scoring functions have proven useful in protein structure modeling. Most such scoring functions depend on protein side chain conformations. However, backbone-only scoring functions do not require computationally intensive structure optimization and so are well suited to protein design, which requires fast score evaluation. Furthermore, scoring functions that account for the distinctive relative position and orientation preferences of residue pairs are expected to be more accurate than those that depend only on the separation distance. Results Residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design were derived using only backbone geometry. Unlike previous studies that used spherical harmonics to fit 2D angular distributions, Gaussian Mixture Models were used to fit the full 3D (position only and 6D (position and orientation distributions of residue pairs. The performance of the 1D (residue separation only, 3D, and 6D scoring functions were compared by their ability to identify correct threading solutions for a non-redundant benchmark set of protein backbone structures. The threading accuracy was found to steadily increase with increasing dimension, with the 6D scoring function achieving the highest accuracy. Furthermore, the 3D and 6D scoring functions were shown to outperform side chain-dependent empirical potentials from three other studies. Next, two computational methods that take advantage of the speed and pairwise form of these new backbone-only scoring functions were investigated. The first is a procedure that exploits available sequence data by averaging scores over threading solutions for homologs. This was evaluated by applying it to the challenging problem of identifying interacting transmembrane alpha-helices and found to further improve prediction accuracy. The second is a protein design method for determining the optimal sequence for a backbone structure by applying Belief Propagation

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Insulin: Elucidating the Conformational Changes that Enable Its Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Papaioannou

    Full Text Available A sequence of complex conformational changes is required for insulin to bind to the insulin receptor. Recent experimental evidence points to the B chain C-terminal (BC-CT as the location of these changes in insulin. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations of insulin that reveal new insights into the structural changes occurring in the BC-CT. We find three key results: 1 The opening of the BC-CT is inherently stochastic and progresses through an open and then a "wide-open" conformation--the wide-open conformation is essential for receptor binding, but occurs only rarely. 2 The BC-CT opens with a zipper-like mechanism, with a hinge at the Phe24 residue, and is maintained in the dominant closed/inactive state by hydrophobic interactions of the neighboring Tyr26, the critical residue where opening of the BC-CT (activation of insulin is initiated. 3 The mutation Y26N is a potential candidate as a therapeutic insulin analogue. Overall, our results suggest that the binding of insulin to its receptor is a highly dynamic and stochastic process, where initial docking occurs in an open conformation and full binding is facilitated through interactions of insulin receptor residues with insulin in its wide-open conformation.

  17. Investigating protein conformational energy landscapes and atomic resolution dynamics from NMR dipolar couplings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Loïc; Blackledge, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to protein dynamics. In particular inter-nuclear dipolar couplings, that become measurable in solution when the protein is dissolved in a dilute liquid crystalline solution, report on all conformations sampled up to millisecond timescales. As such they provide the opportunity to describe the Boltzmann distribution present in solution at atomic resolution, and thereby to map the conformational energy landscape in unprecedented detail. The development of analytical methods and approaches based on numerical simulation and their application to numerous biologically important systems is presented. PMID:26517337

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  19. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  20. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin

    Neutron scattering and fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) are employed to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with ethylenediamine (EDA) core under various charge conditions. Regarding to the conformational characteristics, we focus on scrutinizing density profile evolution of PAMAM dendrimers as the molecular charge of dendrimer increases from neutral state to highly charged condition. It should be noted that within the context of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), the dendrimers are composed of hydrocarbon component (dry part) and the penetrating water molecules. Though there have been SANS experiments that studied the charge-dependent structural change of PAMAM dendrimers, their results were limited to the collective behavior of the aforementioned two parts. This study is devoted to deepen the understanding towards the structural responsiveness of intra-molecular polymeric and hydration parts separately through advanced contrast variation SANS data analysis scheme available recently and unravel the governing principles through coupling with MD simulations. Two kinds of acids, namely hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, are utilized to tune the pH condition and hence the molecular charge. As far as the dynamical properties, we target at understanding the underlying mechanism that leads to segmental dynamic enhancement observed from quasielstic neutron scattering (QENS) experiment previously. PAMAM dendrimers have a wealth of potential applications, such as drug delivery agency, energy harvesting medium, and light emitting diodes. More importantly, it is regarded as an ideal system to test many theoretical predictions since dendrimers conjugate both colloid-like globular shape and polymer-like flexible chains. This Ph.D. research addresses two main challenges in studying PAMAM dendrimers. Even though neutron scattering is an ideal tool to study this PAMAM dendrimer solution due to its matching temporal and

  1. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian, E-mail: sfalberti@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Peña 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Roitberg, Adrian E. [Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  2. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

  3. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  4. A correspondence between solution-state dynamics of an individual protein and the sequence and conformational diversity of its family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Friedland

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conformational ensembles are increasingly recognized as a useful representation to describe fundamental relationships between protein structure, dynamics and function. Here we present an ensemble of ubiquitin in solution that is created by sampling conformational space without experimental information using "Backrub" motions inspired by alternative conformations observed in sub-Angstrom resolution crystal structures. Backrub-generated structures are then selected to produce an ensemble that optimizes agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings (RDCs. Using this ensemble, we probe two proposed relationships between properties of protein ensembles: (i a link between native-state dynamics and the conformational heterogeneity observed in crystal structures, and (ii a relation between dynamics of an individual protein and the conformational variability explored by its natural family. We show that the Backrub motional mechanism can simultaneously explore protein native-state dynamics measured by RDCs, encompass the conformational variability present in ubiquitin complex structures and facilitate sampling of conformational and sequence variability matching those occurring in the ubiquitin protein family. Our results thus support an overall relation between protein dynamics and conformational changes enabling sequence changes in evolution. More practically, the presented method can be applied to improve protein design predictions by accounting for intrinsic native-state dynamics.

  5. Conformational Selection in a Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Dynamic Pathway Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan S. Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit. Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here, we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  6. Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) to generate conformational transition pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2013-07-21

    Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) is proposed as a molecular simulation method to generate conformational transition pathway under the condition that a set of "reactant" and "product" structures is known a priori. In PaCS-MD, the cycle of short multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations and selection of the structures close to the product structure for the next cycle are repeated until the simulated structures move sufficiently close to the product. Folding of 10-residue mini-protein chignolin from the extended to native structures and open-close conformational transition of T4 lysozyme were investigated by PaCS-MD. In both cases, tens of cycles of 100-ps MD were sufficient to reach the product structures, indicating the efficient generation of conformational transition pathway in PaCS-MD with a series of conventional MD without additional external biases. Using the snapshots along the pathway as the initial coordinates, free energy landscapes were calculated by the combination with multiple independent umbrella samplings to statistically elucidate the conformational transition pathways.

  7. Conformal optical design with combination of static and dynamic aberration corrections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Li Lin; Huang Yi-Fan; Liu Jia-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Conformal domes that are shaped to meet aerodynamic requirements can increase range and speed for the host platform. Because these domes typically deviate greatly from spherical surface descriptions, a variety of aberrations are induced which vary with the field-of-regard (FOR) angle. A system for correcting optical aberrations created by a conformal dome has an outer surface and an inner surface. Optimizing the inner surface is regard as static aberration correction. A deformable mirror is placed at the position of the secondary mirror in the two-mirror all reflective imaging system, which is the dynamic aberration correction. An ellipsoidal MgF2 conformal dome with a fineness ratio of 1.0 is designed as an example. The FOR angle is 00°-30°, and the design wavelength is 4 μm. After the optimization at 7zoom positions by using the design tools Code V, the root-mean-square (RMS) spot size is reduced to approximately 0.99 to 1.48 times the diffraction limit. The design results show that the performances of the conformal optical systems can be greatly improved by the combination of the static correction and the dynamic correction.

  8. Study conformational dynamics of intrinsically disordered protein by PET-FCS (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlein, Joerg; Zhou, Man; Van, Qui; Gregor, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) form a large and functionally important class of proteins that lack an ordered three-dimensional structure. IDPs play an important role in cell signaling, transcription, or chromatin remodeling. The discovery of IDPs has challenged the traditional paradigm of protein structure which states that protein function depends on a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Due to their high conformational flexibility and the lack of ordered secondary structure, it is challenging to study the flexible structure, dynamics and energetics of these proteins with conventional methods. In our work, we employ photoinduced electron transfer (PET) combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for studying the conformational dynamics of one specific class of IDPs: phenylalanine-glycine rich protein domains (FG repeats) which are dominant building blocks within the pore of nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear pore complexes are large protein assemblies that cross the nuclear envelope and form selective barrier, which regulate bidirectional exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm.

  9. Collective dynamics of belief evolution under cognitive coherence and social conformity

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Nathaniel; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Human history has been marked by social instability and conflict, often driven by the irreconcilability of opposing sets of beliefs, ideologies, and religious dogmas. The dynamics of belief systems has been studied mainly from two distinct perspectives, namely how cognitive biases lead to individual belief rigidity and how social influence leads to social conformity. Here we propose a unifying framework that connects cognitive and social forces together in order to study the dynamics of societal belief evolution. Each individual is endowed with a network of interacting beliefs that evolves through interaction with other individuals in a social network. The adoption of beliefs is affected by both internal coherence and social conformity. Our framework explains how social instabilities can arise in otherwise homogeneous populations, how small numbers of zealots with highly coherent beliefs can overturn societal consensus, and how belief rigidity protects fringe groups and cults against invasion from mainstream ...

  10. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  11. Designing molecular dynamics simulations to shift populations of the conformational states of calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozlem Aykut

    Full Text Available We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca(2+-CaM. We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca(2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca(2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca(2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength.

  12. Conformational Properties of Comb-Like Polyelectrolytes: A Coarse-Grained MD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelichi, Mahdi; Eikerling, Michael H

    2016-03-17

    This article presents a coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of single comb-like polyelectrolyte or ionomer chains in aqueous solution. The model polymer is comprised of a hydrophobic backbone chain with grafted side chains that terminate in anionic headgroups. The comb-polymer is modeled at a coarse-grained level with implicit treatment of the solvent. The computational study rationalizes conformational properties of the backbone chain and localization of counterions as functions of side chain length, grafting density of side chains, backbone stiffness, and counterion valence. The main interplay that determines the ionomer properties unfolds between electrostatic interactions among charged groups, hydrophobic backbone interactions, and steric effects induced by the pendant side chains. Depending on the density of branching sites, we have found two opposing effects of side chain length on the backbone gyration radius and local persistence length. Variation in comb-polyelectrolyte architecture is shown to have nontrivial effects on the localization of mobile counterions. Changes in Bjerrum length and counterion valence are also shown to alter the strength of Coulomb interactions and emphasize the role of excluded-volume effects on controlling the backbone conformational behavior. The results of simulations are in qualitative agreement with existing experimental and theoretical studies. The comprehensive conformational picture provides a framework for future studies of comb-polyelectrolyte systems. PMID:26910617

  13. Conformational polymorphism of the PrP106-126 peptide in different environments : A molecular dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Mark, AE; Saracino, GAA; Cosentino, U; Pitea, D; Moro, G; Salmona, M

    2006-01-01

    Extensive molecular dynamic simulations (similar to 240 ns) have been used to investigate the conformational behavior of PrP106-126 prion peptide in four different environments (water, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexane, and trifluoroethanol) and under both neutral and acidic conditions. The conformational

  14. Living Without Supersymmetry -- the Conformal Alternative and a Dynamical Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    We show that key results of supersymmetry can be achieved via conformal symmetry. We propose that the Higgs boson be a dynamical bound state rather than a fundamental scalar, so that there is no quadratic divergence self-energy problem for it and no need to invoke supersymmetry to resolve it. We study a conformal invariant theory of interacting fermions and gauge bosons, in which there is scaling with anomalous dimensions and dynamical symmetry breaking, with the dynamical dimension of $\\bar{\\psi}\\psi$ being reduced from 3 to 2. With this reduction we augment the theory with a then renormalizable 4-fermion interaction with dynamical dimension equal to 4. We reinterpret the theory as a renormalizable version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, with the gauge theory sector with its now massive fermion being the mean field and the 4-fermion interaction being the residual interaction. It is this residual interaction that generates dynamical Goldstone and Higgs states, states that, as noted by Baker and Johnson...

  15. Interdependence of conformational and chemical reaction dynamics during ion assembly in polar solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W; Sun, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2011-10-01

    We have utilized time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy to study the interdependence of the conformational and chemical reaction dynamics of ion assembly in solution. We investigated the chemical interconversion dynamics of the LiNCS ion pair and the (LiNCS)(2) ion-pair dimer, as well as the spectral diffusion dynamics of these ionic assemblies. For the strongly coordinating Lewis base solvents benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, we observe Li(+) coordination by both solvent molecules and NCS(-) anions, while the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane shows no evidence for solvent coordination of Li(+) ions. The strong interaction between the ion-pair dimer structure and the Lewis base solvents leads to ion-pair dimer solvation dynamics that proceed more slowly than the ion-pair dimer dissociation. We have attributed the slow spectral diffusion dynamics to electrostatic reorganization of the solvent molecules coordinated to the Li(+) cations present in the ion-pair dimer structure and concluded that the dissociation of ion-pair dimers depends more critically on longer length scale electrostatic reorganization. This unusual inversion of the conformational and chemical reaction rates does not occur for ion-pair dimer dissociation in nitromethane or for ion pair association in any of the solvents.

  16. Conformation and dynamics of the ligand shell of a water-soluble Au102 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salorinne, Kirsi; Malola, Sami; Wong, O. Andrea; Rithner, Christopher D.; Chen, Xi; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles, stabilized by a passivating layer of organic molecules, form a versatile class of nanostructured materials with potential applications in material chemistry, nanoscale physics, nanomedicine and structural biology. While the structure of the nanoparticle core is often known to atomic precision, gaining precise structural and dynamical information on the organic layer poses a major challenge. Here we report a full assignment of 1H and 13C NMR shifts to all ligands of a water-soluble, atomically precise, 102-atom gold nanoparticle stabilized by 44 para-mercaptobenzoic acid ligands in solution, by using a combination of multidimensional NMR methods, density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics simulations augment the data by giving information about the ligand disorder and visualization of possible distinct ligand conformations of the most dynamic ligands. The method demonstrated here opens a way to controllable strategies for functionalization of ligated nanoparticles for applications.

  17. Conformational Dynamics in FKBP Domains: Relevance to Molecular Signaling and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaster, David M; Hernandez, Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Among the 22 FKBP domains in the human genome, FKBP12.6 and the first FKBP domains (FK1) of FKBP51 and FKBP52 are evolutionarily and structurally most similar to the archetypical FKBP12. As such, the development of inhibitors with selectivity among these four FKBP domains poses a significant challenge for structure-based design. The pleiotropic effects of these FKBP domains in a range of signaling processes such as the regulation of ryanodine receptor calcium channels by FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 and steroid receptor regulation by the FK1 domains of FKBP51 and FKBP52 amply justify the efforts to develop selective therapies. In contrast to their close structural similarities, these four FKBP domains exhibit a substantial diversity in their conformational flexibility. A number of distinct conformational transitions have been characterized for FKBP12 spanning timeframes from 20 s to 10 ns and in each case these dynamics have been shown to markedly differ from the conformational behavior for one or more of the other three FKBP domains. Protein flexibilitybased inhibitor design could draw upon the transitions that are significantly populated in only one of the targeted proteins. Both the similarities and differences among these four proteins valuably inform the understanding of how dynamical effects propagate across the FKBP domains as well as potentially how such intramolecular transitions might couple to the larger scale transitions that are central to the signaling complexes in which these FKBP domains function.

  18. Refinement of the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone Torsion Beta for AMBER Force Fields Improves the Description of Z- and B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Cheatham, Thomas E; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-12-01

    Z-DNA duplexes are a particularly complicated test case for current force fields. We performed a set of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with various AMBER force field parametrizations including our recent refinements of the ε/ζ and glycosidic torsions. None of these force fields described the ZI/ZII and other backbone substates correctly, and all of them underpredicted the population of the important ZI substate. We show that this underprediction can be attributed to an inaccurate potential for the sugar-phosphate backbone torsion angle β. We suggest a refinement of this potential, β(OL1), which was derived using our recently introduced methodology that includes conformation-dependent solvation effects. The new potential significantly increases the stability of the dominant ZI backbone substate and improves the overall description of the Z-DNA backbone. It also has a positive (albeit small) impact on another important DNA form, the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA), and improves the description of the canonical B-DNA backbone by increasing the population of BII backbone substates, providing a better agreement with experiment. We recommend using β(OL1) in combination with our previously introduced corrections, εζ(OL1) and χ(OL4), (the combination being named OL15) as a possible alternative to the current β torsion potential for more accurate modeling of nucleic acids.

  19. Improved ligand binding energies derived from molecular dynamics: replicate sampling enhances the search of conformational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Marc; Beroza, Paul

    2013-08-26

    Does a single molecular trajectory provide an adequate sample conformational space? Our calculations indicate that for Molecular Mechanics--Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) measurement of protein ligand binding, a single molecular dynamics trajectory does not provide a representative sampling of phase space. For a single trajectory, the binding energy obtained by averaging over a number of molecular dynamics frames in an equilibrated system will converge after an adequate simulation time. A separate trajectory with nearly identical starting coordinates (1% randomly perturbed by 0.001 Å), however, can lead to a significantly different calculated binding energy. Thus, even though the calculated energy converges for a single molecular dynamics run, the variation across separate runs implies that a single run inadequately samples the system. The divergence in the trajectories is reflected in the individual energy components, such as the van der Waals and the electrostatics terms. These results indicate that the trajectories sample different conformations that are not in rapid exchange. Extending the length of the dynamics simulation does not resolve the energy differences observed between different trajectories. By averaging over multiple simulations, each with a nearly equivalent starting structure, we find the standard deviation in the calculated binding energy to be ∼1.3 kcal/mol. The work presented here indicates that combining MM-PBSA with multiple samples of the initial starting coordinates will produce more precise and accurate estimates of protein/ligand affinity. PMID:23845109

  20. Fast 3D Pattern Synthesis with Polarization and Dynamic Range Ratio Control for Conformal Antenna Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Comisso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an iterative algorithm for the 3D synthesis of the electric far-field pattern of a conformal antenna array in the presence of requirements on both the polarization and the dynamic range ratio (DRR of the excitations. Thanks to the use of selectable weights, the algorithm allows a versatile control of the DRR and of the polarization in a given angular region and requires a low CPU time to provide the array excitations. Furthermore, a modified version of the algorithm is developed to enable the optimization of the polarization state by phase-only control. Numerical results are presented to verify the usefulness of the proposed approach for the joint pattern and polarization synthesis of conformal arrays with reduced or even unitary DRR.

  1. On dynamical realizations of l-conformal Galilei and Newton-Hooke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Galajinsky, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In two recent papers [N. Aizawa, Y. Kimura, J. Segar, J. Phys. A 46 (2013) 405204] and [N. Aizawa, Z. Kuznetsova, F. Toppan, J. Math. Phys. 56 (2015) 031701], representation theory of the centrally extended l-conformal Galilei algebra has been applied so as to construct second order differential equations exhibiting the l-conformal Galilei group as kinematical symmetry. It was suggested to treat them as the Schrodinger equations which involve Hamiltonians describing dynamical systems without higher derivatives. The Hamiltonians possess two unusual features, however. First, they involve the standard kinetic term only for one degree of freedom, while the remaining variables provide contributions linear in momenta. This is typical for Ostrogradski's canonical approach to the description of higher derivative systems. Second, the Hamiltonian in the second paper is not Hermitian in the conventional sense. In this work, we study the classical limit of the quantum Hamiltonians and demonstrate that the first of them i...

  2. Conformational dynamics of dry lamellar crystals of sugar based lipids: an atomistic simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan ManickamAchari

    Full Text Available The rational design of a glycolipid application (e.g. drug delivery with a tailored property depends on the detailed understanding of its structure and dynamics. Because of the complexity of sugar stereochemistry, we have undertaken a simulation study on the conformational dynamics of a set of synthetic glycosides with different sugar groups and chain design, namely dodecyl β-maltoside, dodecyl β-cellobioside, dodecyl β-isomaltoside and a C12C10 branched β-maltoside under anhydrous conditions. We examined the chain structure in detail, including the chain packing, gauche/trans conformations and chain tilting. In addition, we also investigated the rotational dynamics of the headgroup and alkyl chains. Monoalkylated glycosides possess a small amount of gauche conformers (∼20% in the hydrophobic region of the lamellar crystal (LC phase. In contrast, the branched chain glycolipid in the fluid Lα phase has a high gauche population of up to ∼40%. Rotational diffusion analysis reveals that the carbons closest to the headgroup have the highest correlation times. Furthermore, its value depends on sugar type, where the rotational dynamics of an isomaltose was found to be 11-15% and more restrained near the sugar, possibly due to the chain disorder and partial inter-digitation compared to the other monoalkylated lipids. Intriguingly, the present simulation demonstrates the chain from the branched glycolipid bilayer has the ability to enter into the hydrophilic region. This interesting feature of the anhydrous glycolipid bilayer simulation appears to arise from a combination of lipid crowding and the amphoteric nature of the sugar headgroups.

  3. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  4. DNA Conformational Variations Induced by Stretching 3'5'-Termini Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Wen-Peng; LEI Xiao-Ling

    2011-01-01

    @@ Investigating the interaction between protein and stretched DNA molecules has become a new way to study the protein DNA interaction.The conformations from different stretching methods give us a further understanding of the interaction between protein and DNA.We study the conformational variations of a 22-mer DNA caused by stretching both 3'-and 5'-termini by molecular dynamics simulations.It requires 250kJ/mol to stretch the DNA molecule by 3'5'-termini for 3.5 run and the force plateau is at 123.8 pN.The stretching 3'5'-termini leads to large values of the angle opening and the dihedral propeller between bases in one base pair, the double helix untwists from 34°to 20°and the successive base pairs rolls to the side of the DNA major groove.The distances between successive base pairs increases from 3.2.(A) to 5.6(A).%Investigating the interaction between protein and stretched DNA molecules has become a new way to study the protein DNA interaction. The conformations from different stretching methods give us a further understanding of the interaction between protein and DNA. We study the conformational variations of a 22-met DNA caused by stretching both 3'- and 5'-termini by molecular dynamics simulations. It requires 250k J/mol to stretch the DNA molecule by 3'5'-termini for 3.5nm and the force plateau is at 123.8pN. The stretching 3'5'-termini leads to large values of the angle opening and the dihedral propeller between bases in one base pair, the double helix untwists from 34° to 20° and the successive base pairs rolls to the side of the DNA major groove. The distances between successive base pairs increases from 3.2 (A) to 5.6 (A).

  5. Conformer specific dissociation dynamics of iodocyclohexane studied by velocity map imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaouris, D. K.; Wenge, A. M.; Murdock, D.; Oliver, T. A. A.; Richmond, G.; Ritchie, G. A. D.; Dixon, R. N.; Ashfold, M. N. R.

    2011-09-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of iodocyclohexane has been studied using velocity map imaging following excitation at many wavelengths within its A-band (230 ≤ λ ≤ 305 nm). This molecule exists in two conformations (axial and equatorial), and one aim of the present experiment was to explore the extent to which conformer-specific fragmentation dynamics could be distinguished. Ground (I) and spin-orbit excited (I*) state iodine atom products were monitored by 2 + 1 resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, and total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra and angular distributions derived from analysis of images recorded at all wavelengths studied. TKER spectra obtained at the longer excitation wavelengths show two distinct components, which can be attributed to the two conformers and the different ways in which these partition the excess energy upon C-I bond fission. Companion calculations based on a simple impulsive model suggest that dissociation of the equatorial (axial) conformer preferentially yields vibrationally (rotationally) excited cyclohexyl co-fragments. Both I and I* products are detected at the longest parent absorption wavelength (λ ˜ 305 nm), and both sets of products show recoil anisotropy parameters, β > 1, implying prompt dissociation following excitation via a transition whose dipole moment is aligned parallel to the C-I bond. The quantum yield for forming I* products, ΦI*, has been determined by time resolved infrared diode laser absorption methods to be 0.14 ± 0.02 (at λ = 248 nm) and 0.22 ± 0.05 (at λ = 266 nm). Electronic structure calculations indicate that the bulk of the A-band absorption is associated with transition to the 4A' state, and that the (majority) I atom products arise via non-adiabatic transfer from the 4A' potential energy surface (PES) via conical intersection(s) with one or more PESs correlating with ground state products.

  6. Sequence-dependent nanometer-scale conformational dynamics of individual RecBCD-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ashley R; Seaberg, Maasa H; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Sun, Gang; Wilds, Christopher J; Li, Hung-Wen; Perkins, Thomas T

    2016-07-01

    RecBCD is a multifunctional enzyme that possesses both helicase and nuclease activities. To gain insight into the mechanism of its helicase function, RecBCD unwinding at low adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (2-4 μM) was measured using an optical-trapping assay featuring 1 base-pair (bp) precision. Instead of uniformly sized steps, we observed forward motion convolved with rapid, large-scale (∼4 bp) variations in DNA length. We interpret this motion as conformational dynamics of the RecBCD-DNA complex in an unwinding-competent state, arising, in part, by an enzyme-induced, back-and-forth motion relative to the dsDNA that opens and closes the duplex. Five observations support this interpretation. First, these dynamics were present in the absence of ATP. Second, the onset of the dynamics was coupled to RecBCD entering into an unwinding-competent state that required a sufficiently long 5' strand to engage the RecD helicase. Third, the dynamics were modulated by the GC-content of the dsDNA. Fourth, the dynamics were suppressed by an engineered interstrand cross-link in the dsDNA that prevented unwinding. Finally, these dynamics were suppressed by binding of a specific non-hydrolyzable ATP analog. Collectively, these observations show that during unwinding, RecBCD binds to DNA in a dynamic mode that is modulated by the nucleotide state of the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27220465

  7. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Aykaç Fas

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM. The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  8. Global Conformational Dynamics of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Bound to Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter V. Coveney

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme responsible for the transcription of the RNA genome of the HIV virus into DNA suitable for incorporation within the DNA of human host cells. Its crucial role in the viral life cycle has made it one of the major targets for antiretroviral drug therapy. The Non-Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NNRTI class of drugs binds allosterically to the enzyme, affecting many aspects of its activity. We use both coarse grained network models and atomistic molecular dynamics to explore the changes in protein dynamics induced by NNRTI binding. We identify changes in the flexibility and conformation of residue Glu396 in the RNaseH primer grip which could provide an explanation for the acceleration in RNaseH cleavage rate observed experimentally in NNRTI bound HIV-1 RT. We further suggest a plausible path for conformational and dynamic changes to be communicated from the vicinity of the NNRTI binding pocket to the RNaseH at the other end of the enzyme.

  9. Characterization of IgG1 Conformation and Conformational Dynamics by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houde, Damian; Arndt, Joseph; Domeier, Wayne; Berkowitz, Steven; Engen, John R.; (NEU); (Biogen)

    2009-04-22

    Protein function is dictated by protein conformation. For the protein biopharmaceutical industry, therefore, it is important to have analytical tools that can detect changes in protein conformation rapidly, accurately, and with high sensitivity. In this paper we show that hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) can play an important role in fulfilling this need within the industry. H/DX-MS was used to assess both global and local conformational behavior of a recombinant monoclonal IgG1 antibody, a major class of biopharmaceuticals. Analysis of exchange into the intact, glycosylated IgG1 (and the Fab and Fc regions thereof) showed that the molecule was folded, highly stable, and highly amenable to analysis by this method using less than a nanomole of material. With improved chromatographic methods, peptide identification algorithms and data-processing steps, the analysis of deuterium levels in peptic peptides produced after labeling was accomplished in 1--2 days. On the basis of peptic peptide data, exchange was localized to specific regions of the antibody. Changes to IgG1 conformation as a result of deglycosylation were determined by comparing exchange into the glycosylated and deglycosylated forms of the antibody. Two regions of the IgG1 (residues 236-253 and 292-308) were found to have altered exchange properties upon deglycosylation. These results are consistent with previous findings concerning the role of glycosylation in the interaction of IgG1 with Fc receptors. Moreover, the data clearly illustrate how H/DX-MS can provide important characterization information on the higher order structure of antibodies and conformational changes that these molecules may experience upon modification.

  10. Hadron spectroscopy and dynamics from light-front holography and conformal symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Téramond Guy F.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To a first semiclassical approximation one can reduce the multi-parton light-front problem in QCD to an effective one-dimensional quantum field theory, which encodes the fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian. This procedure leads to a relativistic light-front wave equation for arbitrary spin which incorporates essential spectroscopic and non-perturbative dynamical features of hadron physics. The mass scale for confinement and higher dimensional holographic mapping to AdS space are also emergent properties of this framework.

  11. Conformity, anticonformity and polarization of opinions: insights from a mathematical model of opinion dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Tyll; Weron, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and quantifying polarization in social systems is important because of many reasons. It could for instance help to avoid segregation and conflicts in the society (DiMaggio et al. 1996) or to control polarized debates and predict their outcomes (Walton 1991). In a recent paper (Siedlecki et al. 2016) we used an agent-based model of a segmented society to check if the polarization may be induced by a competition between conformity and anticonformity. Among other things we have shown that the interplay of intra-clique conformity and inter-clique anticonformity may indeed lead to a bi-polarized state of the system. This paper is a continuation of the work done in (Siedlecki et al. 2016). We consider here a slightly modified version of the model that allows for mathematical treatment and gives more insight into the dynamics of the system. We determine conditions needed to arrive at consensus in a double-clique network with conformity and anticonformity as types of social influence and find regimes, i...

  12. Studies of (-)-pironetin binding to α-tubulin: conformation, docking, and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Hernández, Angel E; Mendoza-Espinoza, José Alberto; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive conformational analysis for the anticancer agent pironetin (1) was achieved by molecular modeling using density functional theory calculations at the B3PW91/DGTZVP level in combination with calculated and experimental (1)H-(1)H coupling constants comparison. Two solvent-dependent conformational families (L and M) were revealed for the optimum conformations. Docking studies of the pironetin-tubulin complex determined a quantitative model for the hydrogen-bond interactions of pironetin through the αAsn249, αAsn258, and αLys352 amino groups in α-tubulin, which supported the formation of a covalent adduct between the αLys352 and the β carbon atom of the α,β-unsaturated lactone. Saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy confirmed that pironetin binds to tubulin, while molecular dynamics exposed a distortion of the tubulin secondary structure at the H8 and H10 α-helices as well as at the S9 β-sheet, where αLys352 is located. A large structural perturbation in the M-loop geometry between the αIle274 and αLeu285 residues, an essential region for molecular recognition between α-α and β-β units of protofilaments, was also identified and provided a rationale for the pironetin inhibitory activity. PMID:24761989

  13. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Almeida

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4, and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO, which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation, a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  14. Structure and dynamics of water in crowded environments slows down peptide conformational changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cheng; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Rao, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.rao@frias.uni-freiburg.de [Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Soft Matter Research, Albertstrasse 19, 79104 Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    The concentration of macromolecules inside the cell is high with respect to conventional in vitro experiments or simulations. In an effort to characterize the effects of crowding on the thermodynamics and kinetics of disordered peptides, molecular dynamics simulations were run at different concentrations by varying the number of identical weakly interacting peptides inside the simulation box. We found that the presence of crowding does not influence very much the overall thermodynamics. On the other hand, peptide conformational dynamics was found to be strongly affected, resulting in a dramatic slowing down at larger concentrations. The observation of long lived water bridges between peptides at higher concentrations points to a nontrivial role of the solvent in the altered peptide kinetics. Our results reinforce the idea for an active role of water in molecular crowding, an effect that is expected to be relevant for problems influenced by large solvent exposure areas like in intrinsically disordered proteins.

  15. FRET Fluctuation Spectroscopy of Diffusing Biopolymers: Contributions of Conformational Dynamics and Translational Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Kaushik; Levitus, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    The use of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) to study conformational dynamics in diffusing biopolymers requires that the contributions to the signal due to translational diffusion are separated from those due to conformational dynamics. A simple approach that has been proposed to achieve this goal involves the analysis of fluctuations in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) efficiency. In this work, we investigate the applicability of this methodology by combining Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. Results show that diffusion does not contribute to the measured fluctuations in FRET efficiency in conditions where the relaxation time of the kinetic process is much shorter than the mean transit time of the molecules in the optical observation volume. However, in contrast to what has been suggested in previous work, the contributions of diffusion are otherwise significant. Neglecting the contributions of diffusion can potentially lead to an erroneous interpretation of the kinetic mechanisms. As an example, we demonstrate that the analysis of FRET fluctuations in terms of a purely kinetic model would generally lead to the conclusion that the system presents complex kinetic behavior even for an idealized two-state system PMID:20030305

  16. Cosmological consequences of nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine

    2011-12-01

    Nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale as motivated by the hierarchy problem can be characterized by a stage of significant supercooling at the electroweak epoch. This has important cosmological consequences. In particular, a common assumption about the history of the universe is that the reheating temperature is high, at least high enough to assume that TeV-mass particles were once in thermal equilibrium. However, as we discuss in this paper, this assumption is not well justified in some models of strong dynamics at the TeV scale. We then need to reexamine how to achieve baryogenesis in these theories as well as reconsider how the dark matter abundance is inherited. We argue that baryonic and dark matter abundances can be explained naturally in these setups where reheating takes place by bubble collisions at the end of the strongly first-order phase transition characterizing conformal symmetry breaking, even if the reheating temperature is below the electroweak scale ~ 100 GeV. In particular, non-thermal production of heavy WIMPs during bubble collisions becomes a well-motivated possibility. We also discuss inflation as well as gravity wave smoking gun signatures of this class of models.

  17. Cosmological Consequences of Nearly Conformal Dynamics at the TeV scale

    CERN Document Server

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale as motivated by the hierarchy problem can be characterized by a stage of significant supercooling at the electroweak epoch. This has important cosmological consequences. In particular, a common assumption about the history of the universe is that the reheating temperature is high, at least high enough to assume that TeV-mass particles were once in thermal equilibrium. However, as we discuss in this paper, this assumption is not well justified in some models of strong dynamics at the TeV scale. We then need to reexamine how to achieve baryogenesis in these theories as well as reconsider how the dark matter abundance is inherited. We argue that baryonic and dark matter abundances can be explained naturally in these setups where reheating takes place by bubble collisions at the end of the strongly first-order phase transition characterizing conformal symmetry breaking, even if the reheating temperature is below the electroweak scale $\\sim 100$ GeV. We also discuss infla...

  18. Conformational Search on the Lewis X Structure by Molecular Dynamic: Study of Tri- and Pentasaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khebichat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates play vital roles in many biological processes, such as recognition, adhesion, and signalling between cells. The Lewis X determinant is a trisaccharide fragment implicated as a specific differentiation antigen, tumor antigen, and key component of the ligand for the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, so it is necessary or essential to determine and to know their conformational and structural properties. In this work, conformational analysis was performed using molecular dynamics (MD simulation with the AMBER10 program package in order to study the dynamic behavior of of the Lewis X trisaccharide (β-D-Gal-(1,4-[α-L-Fuc-(1,3]-β-D-GlcNAc-OMe and the Lewis X pentasaccharide (β-D-Gal-(1,4-[α-L-Fuc-(1,3]-β-D-GlcNAc-(1,3-β-D-Gal-(1,4-β-D-Glu-OMe in explicit water model at 300 K for 10 ns using the GLYCAM 06 force field.

  19. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-li; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10−5 in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10−5 in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method. PMID:27598161

  20. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-Li; Hu, Bin

    2016-09-02

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10(-5) in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10(-5) in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method.

  1. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauve, A D; Siebers, J V; Crimaldi, A J; Hagan, M P; Kealla, P J

    2006-06-01

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D95 and Dmean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D5 was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D5 was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the 5400 positioning errors

  2. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the β-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-01

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the β6.3-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed β4.4-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed β4.4-helix, right-handed and left-handed β6.3-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite β-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed β6.3-helix and β4.4-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these β-helix structures. The results suggested that β6.3-helix is more stable than β4.4-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the β6.3-helix conformation.

  3. Evolution of conformational changes in the dynamics of small biological molecules: a hybrid MD/RRK approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Elad; Grumbach, Mikael; Gerber, Robert Benny

    2006-11-14

    The dynamics of long timescale evolution of conformational changes in small biological molecules is described by a hybrid molecular dynamics/RRK algorithm. The approach employs classical trajectories for transitions between adjacent structures separated by a low barrier, and the classical statistical RRK approximation when the barrier involved is high. In determining the long-time dynamics from an initial structure to a final structure of interest, an algorithm is introduced for determining the most efficient pathways (sequence of the intermediate conformers). This method uses the Dijkstra algorithm for finding optimal paths on networks. Three applications of the method using an AMBER force field are presented: a detailed study of conformational transitions in a blocked valine dipeptide; a multiple reaction path study of the blocked valine tripeptide; and the evolution in time from the beta hairpin to alpha helix structure of a blocked alanine hexapeptide. Advantages and limitations of the method are discussed in light of the results. PMID:17066182

  4. Adding diverse noncanonical backbones to rosetta: enabling peptidomimetic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drew

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones, oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, [Formula: see text]-peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable

  5. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Photophysical and Photochemical Tools in Polymer Science : Conformation, Dynamics, Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    In 1980 the New York Academy of Sciences sponsored a three-day conference on luminescence in biological and synthetic macromolecules. After that meeting, Professor Frans DeSchryver and I began to discuss the possibility of organizing a different kind of meeting, with time for both informal and in-depth discussions, to examine certain aspects of the application of fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy to polymers. Our ideas developed through discussions with many others, particularly Professor Lucien Monnerie. By 1983, when we submitted our proposal to NATO for an Advanced Study Institute, the area had grown enormous ly. It is interesting in retrospect to look back on the points which emerged from these discussions as the basis around which the scientific program would be organized and the speakers chosen. We decided early on to focus on applications of these methods to provide information about polymer molecules and polymer systems: The topics would all relate to the conformation and dynamics of macro...

  6. Monitoring the conformational dynamics of a single potassium transporter by ALEX-FRET

    CERN Document Server

    Zarrabi, N; Greie, J C; Boersch, M

    2008-01-01

    Conformational changes of single proteins are monitored in real time by Forster-type resonance energy transfer, FRET. Two different fluorophores have to be attached to those protein domains, which move during function. The distance between the fluorophores is measured by relative fluorescence intensity changes of FRET donor and acceptor fluorophore, or by fluorescence lifetime changes of the FRET donor. The fluorescence spectrum of a single FRET donor fluorophore is influenced by local protein environment dynamics causing apparent fluorescence intensity changes on the FRET donor and acceptor detector channels. To discriminate between those spectral fluctuations and distance-dependent FRET, alternating pulsed excitation schemes (ALEX) have recently been introduced which simultaneously probe the existence of a FRET acceptor fluorophore. Here we employ single-molecule FRET measurements to a membrane protein. The membrane-embedded KdpFABC complex transports potassium ions across a lipid bilayer using ATP hydrolys...

  7. Mapping the Conformational Dynamics of E-selectin upon Interaction with its Ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr A

    2013-05-15

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selectin i.e.,E-selectin) occurs through spatio-temporally regulated interactions that are mediated by multiple intra- and inter-cellular components. The mechanism of cell adhesion is investigated primarily using ensemble-based experiments, which provides indirect information about how individual molecules work in such a complex system. Recent developments in single-molecule (SM) fluorescence detection allow for the visualization of individual molecules with a good spatio-temporal resolution nanometer spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution). Furthermore, advanced SM fluorescence techniques such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and super-resolution microscopy provide unique opportunities to obtain information about nanometer-scale conformational dynamics of proteins as well as nano-scale architectures of biological samples. Therefore, the state-of-the-art SM techniques are powerful tools for investigating complex biological system such as the mechanism of cell adhesion. In this project, several constructs of fluorescently labeled E-selectin will be used to study the conformational dynamics of E-selectin binding to its ligand(s) using SM-FRET and combination of SM-FRET and force microscopy. These studies will be beneficial to fully understand the mechanistic details of cell adhesion and migration of cells using the established model system of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) adhesion to the selectin expressing endothelial cells (such as the E-selectin expressing endothelial cells in the bone marrow).

  8. LOAD AWARE ADAPTIVE BACKBONE SYNTHESIS IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zheng Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are envisioned to support the wired backbone with a wireless Backbone Networks (BNet) for providing internet connectivity to large-scale areas.With a wide range of internet-oriented applications with different Quality of Service (QoS) requirement,the large-scale WMNs should have good scalability and large bandwidth.In this paper,a Load Aware Adaptive Backbone Synthesis (LAABS) algorithm is proposed to automatically balance the traffic flow in the WMNs.The BNet will dynamically split into smaller size or merge into bigger one according to statistic load information of Backbone Nodes (BNs).Simulation results show LAABS generates moderate BNet size and converges quickly,thus providing scalable and stable BNet to facilitate traffic flow.

  9. Role of the Subunits Interactions in the Conformational Transitions in Adult Human Hemoglobin: an Explicit Solvent Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    Yusuff, Olaniyi K; Bussi, Giovanni; Raugei, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin exhibits allosteric structural changes upon ligand binding due to the dynamic interactions between the ligand binding sites, the amino acids residues and some other solutes present under physiological conditions. In the present study, the dynamical and quaternary structural changes occurring in two unligated (deoxy-) T structures, and two fully ligated (oxy-) R, R2 structures of adult human hemoglobin were investigated with molecular dynamics. It is shown that, in the sub-microsecond time scale, there is no marked difference in the global dynamics of the amino acids residues in both the oxy- and the deoxy- forms of the individual structures. In addition, the R, R2 are relatively stable and do not present quaternary conformational changes within the time scale of our simulations while the T structure is dynamically more flexible and exhibited the T\\rightarrow R quaternary conformational transition, which is propagated by the relative rotation of the residues at the {\\alpha}1{\\beta}2 and {\\alpha}2{\\b...

  10. Conformations of some lower-size large-ring cyclodextrins derived from conformational search with molecular dynamics and principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Petko

    2012-02-01

    Computational studies were conducted on the conformations of some lower-size large-ring cyclodextrins, CDn (n = 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for post-processing of trajectories from conformational search based on 100.0 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The dominant PCA modes for concerted motions of the macroring atoms were monitored in a lower-dimensions subspace. The first six lowest indexed principal components contribute more than 90% of the total atomic motions in all cases, with about 70% (CD12) to 90% (CD17) contribution coming from the three highest-eigenvalue principal components. Representative average geometries of the cyclodextrin macrorings were also obtained for the whole simulation and for the ten 10.0 ns time intervals of the simulation. We concluded that the whole set of structures could be sorted into two clearly distinguished groups, separated by the figure-eight conformation of CD14: (i) open bent boat-like macrorings (CD11 to CD13), and (ii) two winded single helical strands (an anti-parallel double helix with foldbacks at each end), CD15 to CD17, shaped as number eight for the odd-number-residues cases, CD15 and CD17. CD13 and CD14 mark the borderline between lower and higher flexibilities of the lower-size LR-CDs macrorings.

  11. Instant Backbone.js application development

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is a practical, step-by-step tutorial that will teach you to build Backbone.js applications quickly and efficiently.This book is targeted towards developers. It is assumed that you have at least a basic understanding of JavaScript and jQuery selectors. If you are interested in building dynamic Single Page Applications that interact heavily with a backend server, then this is the book for you.

  12. Benchmark quantum-chemical calculations on a complete set of rotameric families of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and their comparison with modern density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mládek, Arnošt; Krepl, Miroslav; Svozil, Daniel; Cech, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Sponer, Jiří

    2013-05-21

    The DNA sugar-phosphate backbone has a substantial influence on the DNA structural dynamics. Structural biology and bioinformatics studies revealed that the DNA backbone in experimental structures samples a wide range of distinct conformational substates, known as rotameric DNA backbone conformational families. Their correct description is essential for methods used to model nucleic acids and is known to be the Achilles heel of force field computations. In this study we report the benchmark database of MP2 calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, MP2(T,Q), augmented by ΔCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ corrections. The calculations are performed in the gas phase as well as using a COSMO solvent model. This study includes a complete set of 18 established and biochemically most important families of DNA backbone conformations and several other salient conformations that we identified in experimental structures. We utilize an electronically sufficiently complete DNA sugar-phosphate-sugar (SPS) backbone model system truncated to prevent undesired intramolecular interactions. The calculations are then compared with other QM methods. The BLYP and TPSS functionals supplemented with Grimme's D3(BJ) dispersion term provide the best tradeoff between computational demands and accuracy and can be recommended for preliminary conformational searches as well as calculations on large model systems. Among the tested methods, the best agreement with the benchmark database has been obtained for the double-hybrid DSD-BLYP functional in combination with a quadruple-ζ basis set, which is, however, computationally very demanding. The new hybrid density functionals PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 yield outstanding results and even slightly outperform the computationally more demanding PWPB95 double-hybrid functional. B3LYP-D3 is somewhat less accurate compared to the other hybrids. Extrapolated MP2(D,T) calculations are not as

  13. Mechanism of Mcl-1 Conformational Regulation Upon Small Molecule Binding Revealed by Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anhui; Song, Ting; Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Yubo; Fan, Yudan; Zhang, Yahui; Zhang, Zhichao

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of interactions between Mcl-1 and proapoptotic proteins is considered to be a therapeutic strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we adopted molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to study the inhibition mechanism of three Mcl-1 inhibitors, compounds 1, 2 and 3. Analysis of energy components shows that the better binding free energy of compound 3 than compounds 1 and 2 is attributable to the van der Waals energy (ΔEvdw ) and non-polar solvation energy (ΔGnp ) upon binding. In addition to the excellent agreement with previous experimentally determined affinities, our simulation results further show a bend of helix 4 on Mcl-1 upon compound 3 binding, which is driven by hydrophobic interaction with residue Val(253) , leading to a narrowed BH3-binding groove to impede Puma(BH) (3) binding. The computational result is consistent with our competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays, which shows that the competitive ability of compound 3 toward Mcl-1/Puma(BH) (3) complex is improved beyond its direct binding affinity toward Mcl-1 itself, and compound 3 exhibits much more efficiency to compete with Puma(BH) (3) than compound 2. Our study provides a new strategy to improve inhibitory activity on Mcl-1 based on the conformational dynamic change. PMID:26518611

  14. Dosimetric effect on pediatric conformal treatment plans using dynamic jaw with Tomotherapy HDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Liang, Xiaoying; Hardee, Matthew; Morrill, Steve; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-10-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics—target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose—were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy.

  15. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lovera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics.

  16. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovera, Silvia; Morando, Maria; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L

    2015-11-01

    Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics.

  17. Conformation and translational diffusion of a xanthan polyelectrolyte chain: Brownian dynamics simulation and single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Myung-Suk; Kim, Chongyoup; Lee, Duck E.

    2009-05-01

    In our recent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation study, the structure and dynamics of anionic polyelectrolyte xanthan in bulk solution as well as confined spaces of slitlike channel were examined by applying a coarse-grained model with nonlinear bead-spring discretization of a whole chain [J. Jeon and M.-S. Chun, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 154904 (2007)]. This model goes beyond other simulations as they did not consider both long-range electrostatic and hydrodynamic interactions between pairs of beads. Simulation parameters are obtained from the viscometric method of rheology data on the native and sonicated xanthan polysaccharides, which have a contour length less than 1μm . The size of the semiflexible polyelectrolyte can be well described by the wormlike chain model once the electrostatic effects are taken into account by the persistence length measured at a long length scale. For experimental verifications, single molecule visualization was performed on fluorescein-labeled xanthan using an inverted fluorescence microscope, and the motion of an individual molecule was quantified. Experimental results on the conformational changes in xanthan chain in the electrolyte solution have a reasonable trend to agree with the prediction by BD simulations. In the translational diffusion induced by the Debye screening effect, the simulation prediction reveals slightly higher values compared to those of our measurements, although it agrees with the literature data. Considering the experimental restrictions, our BD simulations are verified to model the single polyelectrolyte well.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the STAS Domains of Rat Prestin and Human Pendrin Reveal Conformational Motions in Conserved Flexible Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok K. Sharma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular dynamics (MD simulations provide valuable information on the conformational changes that accompany time-dependent motions in proteins. The reported crystal structure of rat prestin (PDB 3LLO is remarkable for an α1-α2 inter-helical angle that differs substantially from those observed in bacterial STAS domains of SulP anion transporters and anti-sigma factor antagonists. However, NMR data on the rat prestin STAS domain in solution suggests dynamic features at or near the α1-α2 helical region (Pasqualetto et al JMB, 2010. We therefore performed a 100 ns 300K MD simulation study comparing the STAS domains of rat prestin and (modeled human pendrin, to explore possible conformational flexibility in the region of the α1 and α2 helices. Methods: The conformation of the loop missing in the crystal structure of rat prestin STAS (11 amino acids between helix α1 and strand β3 was built using Modeller. MD simulations were performed with GROMACSv4.6 using GROMOS96 53a6 all-atom force field. Results: A subset of secondary structured elements of the STAS domains exhibits significant conformational changes during the simulation time course. The conformationally perturbed segments include the majority of loop regions, as well as the α1 and α2 helices. A significant decrease in the α1-α2 inter-helical angle observed across the simulation trajectory leads to closer helical packing at their C-termini. The end-simulation conformations of the prestin and pendrin STAS domains, including their decreased α1-α2 inter-helical angles, resemble more closely the packing of corresponding helices in the STAS structures of bacterial SulP transporters Rv1739c and ychM, as well as those of the anti-sigma factor antagonists. Several structural segments of the modeled human pendrin STAS domain exhibit larger atomic motions and greater conformational deviations than the corresponding regions of rat prestin, predicting that the human pendrin STAS

  19. Self-assembly, Dynamics and Chirality of Conformational Switches on Metal Surfaces Studied by UHV-STM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli

    2013-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly is essential in the bottom-up design of nanostructures. Molecular conformational switches are highly interesting both from the basic science of view to enhance our understanding of molecular dynamics in adsorption systems, and also due to potential applications such as mol...

  20. [Dynamics of electron-conformational transitions in proteins and physical mechanisms of biomacromolecule function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaĭtan, K V

    1992-01-01

    The proteins can be considered as a microheterogeneous structured media possessing memory and feedback properties. The conformational energy surface depends on the chemical states of protein groups. Conformational motions are local diffusion with relaxation times much longer than vibrational relaxation times in condensed media. Owing to the hierarchy of relaxation times chemical reaction rates depend on conformation parametrically. Regulation of functional activity by conformational mobility is accomplished via transmission of information in the form of changes in the distribution functions of separate groups along the conformational substates. The interpretation of drastic effects on conformational mobility needs super-stochastic approaches. A possible mechanism of sharp conformational change are discussed in terms of the catastrophe theory.

  1. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  2. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Garcia, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesus Ignacio; Mendieta, Jesus [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' (CSIC/UAM), C/ Nicolas Cabrera, 1, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Biomol-Informatics SL, Parque Cientifico de Madrid, C/ Faraday, 7, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Puertas, Paulino, E-mail: pagomez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' (CSIC/UAM), C/ Nicolas Cabrera, 1, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRS domains of F protein form three single {alpha}-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from {beta}-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an {alpha}-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  3. Modeling signal propagation mechanisms and ligand-based conformational dynamics of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone full-length dimer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine "hot spots" involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a "conformational selection model" of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may

  4. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred

    2002-07-30

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  5. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  6. Prediction of protein secondary structure based on residue pair types and conformational states using dynamic programming algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Parto, Sahar; Arab, Shahriar; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2005-06-20

    We have used a statistical approach for protein secondary structure prediction based on information theory and simultaneously taking into consideration pairwise residue types and conformational states. Since the prediction of residue secondary structure by one residue window sliding make ambiguity in state prediction, we used a dynamic programming algorithm to find the path with maximum score. A score system for residue pairs in particular conformations is derived for adjacent neighbors up to ten residue apart in sequence. The three state overall per-residue accuracy, Q3, of this method in a jackknife test with dataset created from PDBSELECT is more than 70%. PMID:15936021

  7. On the Chern-Gauss-Bonnet Theorem and Conformally Twisted Spectral Triples for C∗-Dynamical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathizadeh, Farzad; Gabriel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The analog of the Chern–Gauss–Bonnet theorem is studied for a C ∗ -dynamical system consisting of a C ∗ -algebra A equipped with an ergodic action of a compact Lie group G. The structure of the Lie algebra g of G is used to interpret the Chevalley–Eilenberg complex with coef ficients in the smooth...... construction of a spectral triple on A and a twisted spectral triple on its opposite algebra. The conformal invariance of the Euler characteristic is interpreted as an indication of the Chern–Gauss–Bonnet theorem in this setting. The spectral triples encoding the conformally perturbed metrics are shown...

  8. Analyzing slowly exchanging protein conformations by ion mobility mass spectrometry: study of the dynamic equilibrium of prolyl oligopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Abraham; Vilaseca, Marta; Madurga, Sergio; Varese, Monica; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) is a biophysical technique that allows the separation of isobaric species on the basis of their size and shape. The high separation capacity, sensitivity and relatively fast time scale measurements confer IMMS great potential for the study of proteins in slow (µs-ms) conformational equilibrium in solution. However, the use of this technique for examining dynamic proteins is still not generalized. One of the major limitations is the instability of protein ions in the gas phase, which raises the question as to what extent the structures detected reflect those in solution. Here, we addressed this issue by analyzing the conformational landscape of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) - a model of a large dynamic enzyme in the µs-ms range - by native IMMS and compared the results obtained in the gas phase with those obtained in solution. In order to interpret the experimental results, we used theoretical simulations. In addition, the stability of POP gaseous ions was explored by charge reduction and collision-induced unfolding experiments. Our experiments disclosed two species of POP in the gas phase, which correlated well with the open and closed conformations in equilibrium in solution; moreover, a gas-phase collapsed form of POP was also detected. Therefore, our findings not only support the potential of IMMS for the study of multiple co-existing conformations of large proteins in slow dynamic equilibrium in solution but also stress the need for careful data analysis to avoid artifacts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434808

  9. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm3), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm3), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm3), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  10. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  11. Conformational Study of 8-C-glucosyl-prunetin by Dynamic NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By means of variable temperature NMR spectra, conformation of 8-C-glucosyl prunetin,isolated from the leaves of Dalbergia hainanensis (Leguminosae), was studied. The restricted rotation around the C (sp3)-C (sp2) bond in the C-glucosides isoflavonoid results in two main conformers (syn and anti). With the help of MM calculation, the preferred conformation A has H-I" gauche to the 7-OCH3. The barrier to rotation was 18.1 kcal/mol. This result agrees with the calculated value 16.2 kcal/mol of free energy of activation for the interconversion between the conformers.

  12. Conformational Study of 8—C—glucosyl—prunetin by Dynamic NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeiChengZHANG; YingHongWANG; 等

    2002-01-01

    By means of variable temperature NMR spectra,conformation of 8-C-glucosyl prunetin, isolated from the leaves of Dalbergia hainanensis (Leguminosae), was studied. The restricted rotation around the C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond in the C-glucosides isoflavonoid results in two main conformers (syn and anti). With the help of MM calculation, the preferred conformation A has H-1″ gauche to the 7-OCH3. The barrier to rotation was 18.1 kcal/mol. This result agrees with the calculated value 16.2 kcal/mol of free energy of activation for the interconversion between the conformers.

  13. On dynamical realizations of l-conformal Galilei and Newton–Hooke algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Galajinsky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In two recent papers (Aizawa et al., 2013 [15] and (Aizawa et al., 2015 [16], representation theory of the centrally extended l-conformal Galilei algebra with half-integer l has been applied so as to construct second order differential equations exhibiting the corresponding group as kinematical symmetry. It was suggested to treat them as the Schrödinger equations which involve Hamiltonians describing dynamical systems without higher derivatives. The Hamiltonians possess two unusual features, however. First, they involve the standard kinetic term only for one degree of freedom, while the remaining variables provide contributions linear in momenta. This is typical for Ostrogradsky's canonical approach to the description of higher derivative systems. Second, the Hamiltonian in the second paper is not Hermitian in the conventional sense. In this work, we study the classical limit of the quantum Hamiltonians and demonstrate that the first of them is equivalent to the Hamiltonian describing free higher derivative nonrelativistic particles, while the second can be linked to the Pais–Uhlenbeck oscillator whose frequencies form the arithmetic sequence ωk=(2k−1, k=1,…,n. We also confront the higher derivative models with a genuine second order system constructed in our recent work (Galajinsky and Masterov, 2013 [5] which is discussed in detail for l=32.

  14. On dynamical realizations of l-conformal Galilei and Newton-Hooke algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajinsky, Anton; Masterov, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    In two recent papers (Aizawa et al., 2013 [15]) and (Aizawa et al., 2015 [16]), representation theory of the centrally extended l-conformal Galilei algebra with half-integer l has been applied so as to construct second order differential equations exhibiting the corresponding group as kinematical symmetry. It was suggested to treat them as the Schrödinger equations which involve Hamiltonians describing dynamical systems without higher derivatives. The Hamiltonians possess two unusual features, however. First, they involve the standard kinetic term only for one degree of freedom, while the remaining variables provide contributions linear in momenta. This is typical for Ostrogradsky's canonical approach to the description of higher derivative systems. Second, the Hamiltonian in the second paper is not Hermitian in the conventional sense. In this work, we study the classical limit of the quantum Hamiltonians and demonstrate that the first of them is equivalent to the Hamiltonian describing free higher derivative nonrelativistic particles, while the second can be linked to the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator whose frequencies form the arithmetic sequence ωk = (2 k - 1), k = 1, …, n. We also confront the higher derivative models with a genuine second order system constructed in our recent work (Galajinsky and Masterov, 2013 [5]) which is discussed in detail for l =3/2.

  15. Probing conformational stability and dynamics of erythroid and nonerythroid spectrin: effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Patra

    Full Text Available We have studied the conformational stability of the two homologous membrane skeletal proteins, the erythroid and non-erythroid spectrins, in their dimeric and tetrameric forms respectively during unfolding in the presence of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl. Fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy have been used to study the changes of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, anisotropy, far UV-CD and extrinsic fluorescence of bound 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS. Chemical unfolding of both proteins were reversible and could be described as a two state transition. The folded erythroid spectrin and non-erythroid spectrin were directly converted to unfolded monomer without formation of any intermediate. Fluorescence quenching, anisotropy, ANS binding and dynamic light scattering data suggest that in presence of low concentrations of the denaturants (up-to 1M hydrogen bonding network and van der Waals interaction play a role inducing changes in quaternary as well as tertiary structures without complete dissociation of the subunits. This is the first report of two large worm like, multi-domain proteins obeying twofold rule which is commonly found in small globular proteins. The free energy of stabilization (ΔGuH20 for the dimeric spectrin has been 20 kcal/mol lesser than the tetrameric from.

  16. Probing Conformational Stability and Dynamics of Erythroid and Nonerythroid Spectrin: Effects of Urea and Guanidine Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conformational stability of the two homologous membrane skeletal proteins, the erythroid and non-erythroid spectrins, in their dimeric and tetrameric forms respectively during unfolding in the presence of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy have been used to study the changes of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, anisotropy, far UV-CD and extrinsic fluorescence of bound 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS). Chemical unfolding of both proteins were reversible and could be described as a two state transition. The folded erythroid spectrin and non-erythroid spectrin were directly converted to unfolded monomer without formation of any intermediate. Fluorescence quenching, anisotropy, ANS binding and dynamic light scattering data suggest that in presence of low concentrations of the denaturants (up-to 1M) hydrogen bonding network and van der Waals interaction play a role inducing changes in quaternary as well as tertiary structures without complete dissociation of the subunits. This is the first report of two large worm like, multi-domain proteins obeying twofold rule which is commonly found in small globular proteins. The free energy of stabilization (ΔGuH20) for the dimeric spectrin has been 20 kcal/mol lesser than the tetrameric from. PMID:25617632

  17. Probing conformational stability and dynamics of erythroid and nonerythroid spectrin: effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conformational stability of the two homologous membrane skeletal proteins, the erythroid and non-erythroid spectrins, in their dimeric and tetrameric forms respectively during unfolding in the presence of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy have been used to study the changes of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, anisotropy, far UV-CD and extrinsic fluorescence of bound 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS). Chemical unfolding of both proteins were reversible and could be described as a two state transition. The folded erythroid spectrin and non-erythroid spectrin were directly converted to unfolded monomer without formation of any intermediate. Fluorescence quenching, anisotropy, ANS binding and dynamic light scattering data suggest that in presence of low concentrations of the denaturants (up-to 1M) hydrogen bonding network and van der Waals interaction play a role inducing changes in quaternary as well as tertiary structures without complete dissociation of the subunits. This is the first report of two large worm like, multi-domain proteins obeying twofold rule which is commonly found in small globular proteins. The free energy of stabilization (ΔGuH20) for the dimeric spectrin has been 20 kcal/mol lesser than the tetrameric from. PMID:25617632

  18. Chiral phase transition at finite temperature and conformal dynamics in large Nf QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Kohtaroh

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the chiral phase transition at finite temperature (T) in colour SU(Nc=3) Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) with six species of fermions (Nf=6) in the fundamental representation by using lattice QCD with improved staggered fermions. By considering lattices with several temporal extensions Nt, we observe asymptotic scaling for Nt > 4. We then extract the dimensionless ratio Tc/Lambda_L (Lambda_L = Lattice Lambda-parameter) for Nf = 6 and Nf = 8, the latter relying on our earlier results. Further, we collect the critical couplings beta^c for the chiral phase transition at Nf = 0 (quenched), and Nf = 4 at a fixed Nt = 6. The results are consistent with enhanced fermionic screening at larger Nf. The Tc/Lambda_L depends very mildly on Nf in the Nf = 0 - 4 region, starts increasing at Nf = 6, and becomes significantly larger at Nf = 8, close to the edge of the conformal window. We discuss interpretations of these results as well as their possible interrelation with preconformal dynamics in the light of a f...

  19. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments drive many dynamic cellular processes, such as the regulation of shape by actin networks in eukaryotes and by the actin homolog MreB in rod-shaped bacteria. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate close parallels between the conformational dynamics of actin and MreB, in which polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits that restructures the ATP binding pocket to promote hydrolysis. We also find that ATP-bound MreB filaments are substan...

  20. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  1. Another way to view the chain conformation broadening of the line-width distribution measured in dynamic light scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴奇; 牛爱珍

    1999-01-01

    In dynamic laser light scattering (LLS), for a given polydisperse sample, a line-width distribution G(Γ) or the translational diffusion coefficient distribution G(D) can be obtained from the measured time correlation function. For rigid colloid particles, G(Γ) can be directly related to the hydrodynamic size distribution. However, for flexible polymer chains, G(Γ) depends not only on the chain length distribution, but also on the relaxation of the chain conformation; that is, even for a monodisperse polymer sample there still exists a chain conformation distribution. If the time scale of the chain conformation relaxation is comparable to that of the translational diffusion, such as in the case of a very long polymer chain, the conformation relaxation might lead to an additional broadening in G (Γ). This "conformation broadening" has been directly observed for the first time by comparing two G(Γ) s obtained from a poly(N-isopropyl-acrylamide) solution at~25℃ and~32℃ at which the solution is ther

  2. Speed of conformational change: comparing explicit and implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Walker, Ross C; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2015-03-10

    Adequate sampling of conformation space remains challenging in atomistic simulations, especially if the solvent is treated explicitly. Implicit-solvent simulations can speed up conformational sampling significantly. We compare the speed of conformational sampling between two commonly used methods of each class: the explicit-solvent particle mesh Ewald (PME) with TIP3P water model and a popular generalized Born (GB) implicit-solvent model, as implemented in the AMBER package. We systematically investigate small (dihedral angle flips in a protein), large (nucleosome tail collapse and DNA unwrapping), and mixed (folding of a miniprotein) conformational changes, with nominal simulation times ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds depending on system size. The speedups in conformational sampling for GB relative to PME simulations, are highly system- and problem-dependent. Where the simulation temperatures for PME and GB are the same, the corresponding speedups are approximately onefold (small conformational changes), between ∼1- and ∼100-fold (large changes), and approximately sevenfold (mixed case). The effects of temperature on speedup and free-energy landscapes, which may differ substantially between the solvent models, are discussed in detail for the case of miniprotein folding. In addition to speeding up conformational sampling, due to algorithmic differences, the implicit solvent model can be computationally faster for small systems or slower for large systems, depending on the number of solute and solvent atoms. For the conformational changes considered here, the combined speedups are approximately twofold, ∼1- to 60-fold, and ∼50-fold, respectively, in the low solvent viscosity regime afforded by the implicit solvent. For all the systems studied, 1) conformational sampling speedup increases as Langevin collision frequency (effective viscosity) decreases; and 2) conformational sampling speedup is mainly due to reduction in solvent viscosity rather than

  3. NMR-based conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide-repeating sulfated fucan substituted by different counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paulo A G; Queiroz, Ismael N L; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S; Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-11-01

    The sulfated fucan from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus is composed of the repetitive sequence [-3)-α-l-Fucp-4( OSO3-)-(1-3)-α-l-Fucp-2,4-di( OSO3-)-(1-3)-α-l-Fucp-2( OSO3-)-(1-3)-α-l-Fucp-2( OSO3-)-(1-]n . Conformation (of rings and chains) and dynamics of this tetrasaccharide-repeating sulfated fucan substituted by Na(+) , Ca(2+) , and Li(+) as counterions have been examined through experiments of liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Scalar coupling and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE)-based data have confirmed that all composing units occur as (1) C4 chair conformer regardless of the cation type, unit position within the repeating sequence, and sulfation type. Chain conformation determined by NOE signal pattern assisted by molecular modeling for a theoretical octasaccharide has shown a similar linear 3D structure for the three differently substituted forms. Data derived from spin-relaxation measurements have indicated a contribution of counterion type to dynamics. The calcium-based preparation has shown the highest mobility while the sodiated one showed the lowest mobility. The set of results from this work suggests that counterion type can affect the physicochemical properties of the structurally well-defined sulfated fucan. The counterion effect seems to impact more on the structural mobility than on average conformation of the studied sulfated glycan in solution. PMID:27434759

  4. A Native to Amyloidogenic Transition Regulated by a Backbone Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eakin,C.; Berman, A.; Miranker, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many polypeptides can self-associate into linear, aggregated assemblies termed amyloid fibers. High-resolution structural insights into the mechanism of fibrillogenesis are elusive owing to the transient and mixed oligomeric nature of assembly intermediates. Here, we report the conformational changes that initiate fiber formation by beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m) in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Access of beta2m to amyloidogenic conformations is catalyzed by selective binding of divalent cations. The chemical basis of this process was determined to be backbone isomerization of a conserved proline. On the basis of this finding, we designed a beta2m variant that closely adopts this intermediate state. The variant has kinetic, thermodynamic and catalytic properties consistent with its being a fibrillogenic intermediate of wild-type beta2m. Furthermore, it is stable and folded, enabling us to unambiguously determine the initiating conformational changes for amyloid assembly at atomic resolution.

  5. The EF loop in green proteorhodopsin affects conformation and photocycle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Michaela; Scholz, Frank; Ullrich, Sandra J; Mao, Jiafei; Braun, Markus; Brown, Lynda J; Brown, Richard C D; Fiedler, Sarah A; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Wachtveitl, Josef; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2013-07-16

    The proteorhodopsin family consists of retinal proteins of marine bacterial origin with optical properties adjusted to their local environments. For green proteorhodopsin, a highly specific mutation in the EF loop, A178R, has been found to cause a surprisingly large redshift of 20 nm despite its distance from the chromophore. Here, we analyze structural and functional consequences of this EF loop mutation by time-resolved optical spectroscopy and solid-state NMR. We found that the primary photoreaction and the formation of the K-like photo intermediate is almost pH-independent and slower compared to the wild-type, whereas the decay of the K-intermediate is accelerated, suggesting structural changes within the counterion complex upon mutation. The photocycle is significantly elongated mainly due to an enlarged lifetime of late photo intermediates. Multidimensional MAS-NMR reveals mutation-induced chemical shift changes propagating from the EF loop to the chromophore binding pocket, whereas dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced (13)C-double quantum MAS-NMR has been used to probe directly the retinylidene conformation. Our data show a modified interaction network between chromophore, Schiff base, and counterion complex explaining the altered optical and kinetic properties. In particular, the mutation-induced distorted structure in the EF loop weakens interactions, which help reorienting helix F during the reprotonation step explaining the slower photocycle. These data lead to the conclusion that the EF loop plays an important role in proton uptake from the cytoplasm but our data also reveal a clear interaction pathway between the EF loop and retinal binding pocket, which might be an evolutionary conserved communication pathway in retinal proteins.

  6. The EF loop in green proteorhodopsin affects conformation and photocycle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Michaela; Scholz, Frank; Ullrich, Sandra J; Mao, Jiafei; Braun, Markus; Brown, Lynda J; Brown, Richard C D; Fiedler, Sarah A; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Wachtveitl, Josef; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2013-07-16

    The proteorhodopsin family consists of retinal proteins of marine bacterial origin with optical properties adjusted to their local environments. For green proteorhodopsin, a highly specific mutation in the EF loop, A178R, has been found to cause a surprisingly large redshift of 20 nm despite its distance from the chromophore. Here, we analyze structural and functional consequences of this EF loop mutation by time-resolved optical spectroscopy and solid-state NMR. We found that the primary photoreaction and the formation of the K-like photo intermediate is almost pH-independent and slower compared to the wild-type, whereas the decay of the K-intermediate is accelerated, suggesting structural changes within the counterion complex upon mutation. The photocycle is significantly elongated mainly due to an enlarged lifetime of late photo intermediates. Multidimensional MAS-NMR reveals mutation-induced chemical shift changes propagating from the EF loop to the chromophore binding pocket, whereas dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced (13)C-double quantum MAS-NMR has been used to probe directly the retinylidene conformation. Our data show a modified interaction network between chromophore, Schiff base, and counterion complex explaining the altered optical and kinetic properties. In particular, the mutation-induced distorted structure in the EF loop weakens interactions, which help reorienting helix F during the reprotonation step explaining the slower photocycle. These data lead to the conclusion that the EF loop plays an important role in proton uptake from the cytoplasm but our data also reveal a clear interaction pathway between the EF loop and retinal binding pocket, which might be an evolutionary conserved communication pathway in retinal proteins. PMID:23870260

  7. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Ming; Yuanming Feng; Huan Liu; Ying Zhang; Li Zhou; Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercia...

  8. Considerations for a cosmological extension of modified Newtonian dynamics connections to conformal gravity and Rindler force theories

    OpenAIRE

    Pazy, Ehoud

    2013-01-01

    Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be obtained by modifying the entropic formulation of gravity, this is achieved by considering the quantum statistical nature of the degrees of freedom on the holographic screen. Through this frame work, we find some constraints on a cosmological extension for MOND, with no additional auxiliary fields. The connections between MOND to conformal gravity and Rindler force gravity are examined. These two alternative gravity theories are subsequently considere...

  9. Large-Scale Conformational Dynamics Control H5N1 Influenza Polymerase PB2 Binding to Importin α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Bouvignies, Guillaume; Bouvier, Denis; Boivin, Stephane; Salvi, Nicola; Maurin, Damien; Martel, Anne; Round, Adam; Lemke, Edward A; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Hart, Darren J; Blackledge, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A RNA polymerase complex is formed from three components, PA, PB1, and PB2. PB2 is independently imported into the nucleus prior to polymerase reconstitution. All crystallographic structures of the PB2 C-terminus (residues 536-759) reveal two globular domains, 627 and NLS, that form a tightly packed heterodimer. The molecular basis of the affinity of 627-NLS for importins remained unclear from these structures, apparently requiring large-scale conformational changes prior to importin binding. Using a combination of solution-state NMR, small-angle neutron scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we show that 627-NLS populates a temperature-dependent dynamic equilibrium between closed and open states. The closed state is stabilized by a tripartite salt bridge involving the 627-NLS interface and the linker, that becomes flexible in the open state, with 627 and NLS dislocating into a highly dynamic ensemble. Activation enthalpies and entropies associated with the rupture of this interface were derived from simultaneous analysis of temperature-dependent chemical exchange saturation transfer measurements, revealing a strong temperature dependence of both open-state population and exchange rate. Single-molecule FRET and SAXS demonstrate that only the open-form is capable of binding to importin α and that, upon binding, the 627 domain samples a dynamic conformational equilibrium in the vicinity of the C-terminus of importin α. This intrinsic large-scale conformational flexibility therefore enables 627-NLS to bind importin through conformational selection from a temperature-dependent equilibrium comprising both functional forms of the protein. PMID:26424125

  10. Interactions and dynamics of two extended conformation adapting phosphatidylcholines in model biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkavei, Mooud; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2016-02-01

    In order to obtain molecular level insight into the biophysics of the apoptosis promoting phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC) we studied its partitioning into different lipid phases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). To aid the interpretation of these data for PazePC, we additionally characterized by both ITC and fluorescence spectroscopy the fluorescent phospholipid analog 1-palmitoyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-C6-PC), which similarly to PazePC can adopt extended conformation in lipid bilayers. With the NBD-hexanoyl chain reversing its direction and extending into the aqueous space out of the bilayer, 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD) becomes accessible to the water soluble dithionite, which reduces to non-fluorescent product. Our results suggest that these phospholipid derivatives first partition and penetrate into the outer bilayer leaflet of liquid disordered phase liposomes composed of unsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Upon increase up to 2 mol% PazePC and NBD-C6-PC of the overall content, flip-flop from the outer into the inner bilayer leaflet commences. Interestingly, the presence of 40 mol% cholesterol in POPC liposomes did not abrogate the partitioning of PazePC into the liquid ordered phase. In contrast, only insignificant partitioning of PazePC and NBD-C6-PC into sphingomyelin/cholesterol liposomes was evident, highlighting a specific membrane permeability barrier function of this particular lipid composition against oxidatively truncated PazePC, thus emphasizing the importance of detailed characterization of the biophysical properties of membranes found in different cellular organelles, in terms of providing barriers for lipid-mediated cellular signals in processes such as apoptosis. Our data suggest NBD-C6-PC to represent useful fluorescent probe to study the cellular dynamics of oxidized phospholipid

  11. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  12. A unified conformal model for fundamental interactions without dynamical Higgs field

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, M; Marek Pawlowski; Ryszard Raczka

    1994-01-01

    A Higgsless model for strong, electro-weak and gravitational interactions is proposed. This model is based on the local symmetry group SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1)xC where C is the local conformal symmetry group. The natural minimal conformally invariant form of total lagrangian is postulated. It contains all Standard Model fields and gravitational interaction. Using the unitary gauge and the conformal scale fixing conditions we can eliminate all four real components of the Higgs doublet in this model. However the masses of vector mesons, leptons and quarks are automatically generated and are given by the same formulas as in the conventional Standard Model. The gravitational sector is analyzed and it is shown that the model admits in the classical limit the Einsteinian form of gravitational interactions. No figures.

  13. Couplings between hierarchical conformational dynamics from multi-time correlation functions and two-dimensional lifetime spectra: Application to adenylate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Junichi [Department of Theoretical and Computational Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Takada, Shoji [Department of Theoretical and Computational Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Biophysics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Saito, Shinji, E-mail: shinji@ims.ac.jp [Department of Theoretical and Computational Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    An analytical method based on a three-time correlation function and the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) lifetime spectrum is developed to elucidate the time-dependent couplings between the multi-timescale (i.e., hierarchical) conformational dynamics in heterogeneous systems such as proteins. In analogy with 2D NMR, IR, electronic, and fluorescence spectroscopies, the waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra can provide a quantitative description of the dynamical correlations between the conformational motions with different lifetimes. The present method is applied to intrinsic conformational changes of substrate-free adenylate kinase (AKE) using long-time coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the hierarchical conformational dynamics arise from the intra-domain structural transitions among conformational substates of AKE by analyzing the one-time correlation functions and one-dimensional lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances corresponding to single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments with the use of the principal component analysis. In addition, the complicated waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances is attributed to the fact that the time evolution of the couplings between the conformational dynamics depends upon both the spatial and temporal characters of the system. The present method is expected to shed light on the biological relationship among the structure, dynamics, and function.

  14. Children's Gender Identity Development: The Dynamic Negotiation Process between Conformity and Authenticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Britney G; Rabenstein, Kelly L.; Rosén, Lee A.; Zimmerman, Toni S.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, 45 girls and 41 boys participated in focus groups following a program designed to teach them about social justice. The children articulated the discrepancy between their own gender identity and gender role stereotypes and discussed potential problems with conforming to gender role expectations as well as consequences of…

  15. From flexibility to function: Molecular dynamics simulations of conformational changes in chaperones and photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Singhal

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are uniquely-shaped macromolecules that function as biological machines, and regulate a living cell’s behavior. Crucial to protein function is the folding of the polypeptide chain into a unique well-defined three-dimensional conformation. In complex cell environments, the spontaneous unassi

  16. Periodic orbits and 10 cases of unbounded dynamics for one Hamiltonian system defined by the conformally coupled field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E., E-mail: kstarkov@ipn.mx

    2015-07-03

    In this paper we study invariant domains with unbounded dynamics for one cosmological Hamiltonian system which is formed by the conformally coupled field; this system was introduced by Maciejewski et al. (2007). We find a few groups of conditions imposed on parameters of this system for which all trajectories are unbounded in both of time directions. Further, we present a few groups of other conditions imposed on system parameters under which we localize the invariant domain with unbounded dynamics; this domain is defined with help of bounds for values of the Hamiltonian level surface parameter. We describe one group of conditions when our system possesses two periodic orbits found explicitly. In some of rest cases we get localization bounds for compact invariant sets. - Highlights: • Equations for periodic orbits are got for many level sets. • Domains with unbounded dynamics are localized. • Localizations for compact invariant sets are obtained.

  17. Conformations of Carnosine in Aqueous Solutions by All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and 2D-NOSEY Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Zhang; Dan Wang; Wen-juan Wu

    2013-01-01

    All-atom molecular simulations and two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectrum have been used to study the conformations of carnosine in aqueous solution.Intramolecular distances,root-mean-square deviation,radius of gyration,and solvent-accessible surface are used to characterize the properties of the carnosine.Carnosine can shift between extended and folded states,but exists mostly in extended state in water.Its preference for extension in pure water has been proven by the 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment.The NMR experimental results are consistent with the molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Analyzing conformational dynamics of single P-glycoprotein transporters by Förster resonance energy transfer using hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Nawid; Ernst, Stefan; Verhalen, Brandy; Wilkens, Stephan; Börsch, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy (smFRET) transfer has become a powerful tool for observing conformational dynamics of biological macromolecules. Analyzing smFRET time trajectories allows to identify the state transitions occuring on reaction pathways of molecular machines. Previously, we have developed a smFRET approach to monitor movements of the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) during ATP hydrolysis driven drug transport in solution. One limitation of this initial work was that single-molecule photon bursts were analyzed by visual inspection with manual assignment of individual FRET levels. Here a fully automated analysis of Pgp smFRET data using hidden Markov models (HMM) for transitions up to 9 conformational states is applied. We propose new estimators for HMMs to integrate the information of fluctuating intensities in confocal smFRET measurements of freely diffusing lipid bilayer bound membrane proteins in solution. HMM analysis strongly supports that under conditions of steady state turnover, conformational states with short NBD distances and short dwell times are more populated compared to conditions without nucleotide or transport substrate present. PMID:23891547

  19. Conformational Interconversions of Amino Acid Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Exhaustive conformational interconversions including transition structure analyses of N-acetyl-l-glycine-N-methylamide as well as its alanine, serine, and cysteine analogues have been investigated at the MP2/6-31G** level, yielding a total of 142 transition states. Improved estimates of relative energies were obtained by separately extrapolating the Hartree-Fock and MP2 energies to the basis set limit and adding the difference between CCSD(T) and MP2 results with the cc-pVDZ basis set to the extrapolated MP2 results. The performance of eight empirical force fields (AMBER94, AMBER14SB, MM2, MM3, MMFFs, CHARMM22_CMAP, OPLS_2005, and AMOEBAPRO13) in reproducing ab initio energies of transition states was tested. Our results indicate that commonly used class I force fields employing a fixed partial charge model for the electrostatic interaction provide mean errors in the ∼10 kJ/mol range for energies of conformational transition states for amino acid conformers. Modern reparametrized versions, such as CHARMM22_CMAP, and polarizable force fields, such as AMOEBAPRO13, have slightly lower mean errors, but maximal errors are still in the 35 kJ/mol range. There are differences between the force fields in their ability for reproducing conformational transitions classified according to backbone/side-chain or regions in the Ramachandran angles, but the data set is likely too small to draw any general conclusions. Errors in conformational interconversion barriers by ∼10 kJ/mol suggest that the commonly used force field may bias certain types of transitions by several orders of magnitude in rate and thus lead to incorrect dynamics in simulations. It is therefore suggested that information for conformational transition states should be included in parametrizations of new force fields. PMID:26691979

  20. The broadband microwave spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol: Conformational landscape and internal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, D.; Shubert, V. A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Giuliano, B. M. [Center for Astrobiology, INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Schnell, M., E-mail: melanie.schnell@mpsd.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    The rotational spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol are reported in the frequency range 2–8.5 GHz, obtained with broadband Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. For carvacrol four different conformations were identified in the cold conditions of the molecular jet, whereas only three conformations were observed for thymol. The rotational constants and other molecular parameters are reported and compared with quantum chemical calculations. For both molecules, line splittings due to methyl group internal rotation were observed and the resulting barrier heights could be determined. The experimental barrier heights, 4.0863(25) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-A, 4.4024(16) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-B, and 0.3699(11) kJ/mol for trans-thymol-A, are compared with similar molecules.

  1. The broadband microwave spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol: Conformational landscape and internal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotational spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol are reported in the frequency range 2–8.5 GHz, obtained with broadband Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. For carvacrol four different conformations were identified in the cold conditions of the molecular jet, whereas only three conformations were observed for thymol. The rotational constants and other molecular parameters are reported and compared with quantum chemical calculations. For both molecules, line splittings due to methyl group internal rotation were observed and the resulting barrier heights could be determined. The experimental barrier heights, 4.0863(25) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-A, 4.4024(16) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-B, and 0.3699(11) kJ/mol for trans-thymol-A, are compared with similar molecules

  2. Conformation and dynamics of biopharmaceuticals: transition of mass spectrometry-based tools from academe to industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltashov, Igor A.; Bobst, Cedric E.; Abzalimov, Rinat R.; Berkowitz, Steven A; Houde, Damian

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a very visible role in biopharmaceutical industry, although its use in development, characterization and quality control of protein drugs is mostly limited to the analysis of covalent structure (amino acid sequence and post-translational modifications). Despite the centrality of protein conformation to biological activity, stability and safety of biopharmaceutical products, the expanding arsenal of mass spectrometry-based methods that are currently available to probe h...

  3. A novel D-leucine-containing Conus peptide: diverse conformational dynamics in the contryphan family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R B; Jimenez, E C; De la Cruz, R G; Gray, W R; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1999-08-01

    A Conus peptide family (the contryphans) is noteworthy because of the presence of a post-translationally modified D-amino acid in all members of the family. A new contryphan peptide, Leu-contryphan-P, was isolated from the venom of Conus purpurascens; the sequence of this peptide is: Gly-Cys-Val-D-Leu-Leu-Pro-Trp-Cys-OH. This is the first known occurrence of D-leucine in a Conus peptide. The discovery of Leu-contryphan-P suggests that there may be branches of the contryphan peptide family that diverge much more in sequence than previously anticipated. Several natural contryphans provide dramatic examples of interconversion between multiple conformational states in small constrained peptides. The contryphans that have 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan in positions 3 and 4, respectively, exhibit two peaks under reverse-phase HPLC conditions, indicating interconversion between two discrete conformations. However, [L-Trp4]contryphan-Sm (with L-Trp substituted for D-Trp) exhibits a single, broad peak that elutes later than the natural peptide, suggesting that D-Trp stabilizes a conformation in which hydrophobic residues are buried. Leucontryphan-P which has valine and D-leucine instead of 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan shows only a single peak that elutes much later than the other contryphans. PMID:10461743

  4. Finite-Size Conformational Transitions: A Unifying Concept Underlying Chromosome Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigating average thermodynamic quantities is not sufficient to understand conformational transitions of a finite-size polymer. We propose that such transitions are better described in terms of the probability distribution of some finite-size order parameter, and the evolution of this distribution as a control parameter varies. We demonstrate this claim for the coil-globule transition of a linear polymer and its mapping onto a two-state model. In a biological context, polymer models delineate the physical constraints experienced by the genome at different levels of organization, from DNA to chromatin to chromosome. We apply our finite-size approach to the formation of plectonemes in a DNA segment submitted to an applied torque and the ensuing helix-coil transition that can be numerically observed, with a coexistence of the helix and coil states in a range of parameters. Polymer models are also essential to analyze recent in vivo experiments providing the frequency of pairwise contacts between genomic loci. The probability distribution of these contacts yields quantitative information on the conformational fluctuations of chromosome regions. The changes observed in the shape of the distribution when the cell type or the physiological conditions vary may reveal an epigenetic modulation of the conformational constraints experienced by the chromosomes. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcmahon, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tung, Chang - Shung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  6. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  7. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation.

  8. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA.

  9. A wrench in the works of human acetylcholinesterase: soman induced conformational changes revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Bennion

    Full Text Available Irreversible inactivation of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE by organophosphorous pesticides (OPs and chemical weapon agents (CWA has severe morbidity and mortality consequences. We present data from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM and 80 classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations of the apo and soman-adducted forms of hAChE to investigate the effects on the dynamics and protein structure when the catalytic Serine 203 is phosphonylated. We find that the soman phosphonylation of the active site Ser203 follows a water assisted addition-elimination mechanism with the elimination of the fluoride ion being the highest energy barrier at 6.5 kcal/mole. We observe soman-dependent changes in backbone and sidechain motions compared to the apo form of the protein. These alterations restrict the soman-adducted hAChE to a structural state that is primed for the soman adduct to be cleaved and removed from the active site. The altered motions and resulting structures provide alternative pathways into and out of the hAChE active site. In the soman-adducted protein both side and back door pathways are viable for soman adduct access. Correlation analysis of the apo and soman adducted MD trajectories shows that the correlation of gorge entrance and back door motion is disrupted when hAChE is adducted. This supports the hypothesis that substrate and product can use two different pathways as entry and exit sites in the apo form of the protein. These alternative pathways have important implications for the rational design of medical countermeasures.

  10. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Naito, A.; T. Nagao; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, ...

  11. A data acquisition backbone core library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the new experiments at FAIR new concepts of data acquisition systems have to be developed like the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The data acquisition backbone core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. It provides the event building over networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. All kinds of data channels (front-end systems) are supported by program plug-ins into functional components of DABC like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, analysis and storage components. Commands and parameters of DABC and its application plug-ins are published by DIM servers. A Java based Graphical User Interface provides the dynamic control and visualization of these components. Application specific GUIs can be added. After a testing phase, DABC can be used to develop high performance data acquisition systems. Besides that DABC will be used for the implementation of various test beds needed for the final design of data acquisition systems at FAIR like detector tests, readout components test, and data flow investigations

  12. Conformal and non Conformal Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Enrique; Mart'\\in, C P

    2014-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of the gravitational field non-minimally coupled to an (also dynamical) scalar field is studied in the broken phase. For a particular value of the coupling the system is classically conformal, and can actually be understood as the group averaging of Einstein-Hilbert's action under conformal transformations. Contradicting cherished beliefs, a conformal anomaly is found in the trace of the equations of motion. To one loop order, this anomaly vanishes on shell. Arguments are given supporting the fact that this does not happen to two loop order, where the anomaly is argued to be a real physical effect.

  13. Structural analysis of prolyl oligopeptidases using molecular docking and dynamics: insights into conformational changes and ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP is considered as an important pharmaceutical target for the treatment of numerous diseases. Despite enormous studies on various aspects of POPs structure and function still some of the questions are intriguing like conformational dynamics of the protein and interplay between ligand entry/egress. Here, we have used molecular modeling and docking based approaches to unravel questions like differences in ligand binding affinities in three POP species (porcine, human and A. thaliana. Despite high sequence and structural similarity, they possess different affinities for the ligands. Interestingly, human POP was found to be more specific, selective and incapable of binding to a few planar ligands which showed extrapolation of porcine POP in human context is more complicated. Possible routes for substrate entry and product egress were also investigated by detailed analyses of molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the three proteins. Trajectory analysis of bound and unbound forms of three species showed differences in conformational dynamics, especially variations in β-propeller pore size, which was found to be hidden by five lysine residues present on blades one and seven. During simulation, β-propeller pore size was increased by ∼2 Å in porcine ligand-bound form which might act as a passage for smaller product movement as free energy barrier was reduced, while there were no significant changes in human and A. thaliana POPs. We also suggest that these differences in pore size could lead to fundamental differences in mode of product egress among three species. This analysis also showed some functionally important residues which can be used further for in vitro mutagenesis and inhibitor design. This study can help us in better understanding of the etiology of POPs in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  15. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  16. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can ...

  17. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Baker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon

  18. Implementation and evaluation of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique for lung SBRT patients following RTOG protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chengyu, E-mail: shicy1974@gmail.com [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Tazi, Adam; Fang, Deborah Xiangdong; Iannuzzi, Christopher [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2013-10-01

    To implement modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols in our clinic for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with Stage I/II non–small cell lung cancer. Five patients with non–small cell lung cancer have been treated with SBRT. All the patients were immobilized using CIVCO Body Pro-Lok system and scanned using GE 4-slice computed tomography. The MDCA technique that was previously published was adopted as our planning technique, and RTOG protocols for the lung SBRT were followed. The patients were treated on Novalis Tx system with cone-beam computed tomography imaging guidance. All the patient plans passed the RTOG criteria. The conformal index ranges from 0.99 to 1.12 for the planning target volume, and the biological equivalent dose for the planning target volume is overall 100 Gy. Critical structures (lung, spinal cord, brachial plexus, skin, and chest wall) also meet RTOG protocols or published data. A 6-month follow-up of one of the patients shows good local disease control. We have successfully implemented the MDCA technique into our clinic for the lung SBRT program. It shows that the MDCA is useful and efficient for the lung SBRT planning, with the plan quality meeting the RTOG protocols.

  19. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chengyu, E-mail: shicy1974@yahoo.com; Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.

  20. Analysis of cytochrome P450 CYP119 ligand-dependent conformational dynamics by two-dimensional NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N; Nishida, Clinton R; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2015-04-17

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of (15)N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states.

  1. Conformational Stability!? : Synthesis and Conformational Studies of Unnatural Backbone Modified Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Norgren, Anna S.

    2006-01-01

    The beauty of the wide functionality of proteins and peptides in Nature is determined by their ability to adopt three-dimensional structures. This thesis describes artificial molecules developed to mimic secondary structures similar to those found crucial for biological activities. In the first part of this thesis, we focused on post-translational modifications of a class of unnatural oligomers known as β-peptides. Through the design and synthesis of a glycosylated β3-peptide, the first such ...

  2. Assignment of Side-Chain Conformation Using Adiabatic Energy Mapping, Free Energy Perturbation, and Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, Thomas M.; Günther, Peter H.; Sørensen, Morten Dahl;

    1999-01-01

    adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)......adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)...

  3. Dynamic and Static Water Molecules Complement the TN16 Conformational Heterogeneity inside the Tubulin Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sarmistha; Maiti, Satyabrata; Ghosh Dastidar, Shubhra

    2016-01-19

    TN16 is one of the most promising inhibitors of α, β dimer of tubulin that occupies the cavity in the β-subunit located at the dimeric interface, known as the colchicine binding site. The experimentally determined structure of the complex (Protein Data Bank entry 3HKD) presents the conformation and position of the ligand based on the "best fit", keeping the controversy of other significant binding modes open for further investigation. Computation has already revealed that TN16 experiences fluctuations within the binding pocket, but the insight from that previous report was limited by the shorter windows of sampling and by the approximations on the surrounding environment by implicit solvation. This article reports that in most of the cases straightforward MMGBSA calculations of binding energy revealed a gradual loss of stabilization that was inconsistent with the structural observations, and thus, it indicated the lack of consideration of stabilizing factors with appropriate weightage. Consideration of the structurally packed water molecules in the space between the ligand and receptor successfully eliminated such discrepancies between the structure and stability, serving as the "litmus test" of the importance of explicit consideration of such structurally packed water in the calculations. Such consideration has further evidenced a quasi-degenerate character of the different binding modes of TN16 that has rationalized the observed intrinsic fluctuations of TN16 within the pocket, which is likely to be the most critical insight into its entropy-dominated binding. Quantum mechanical calculations have revealed a relay of electron density from TN16 to the protein via a water molecule in a concerted manner. PMID:26666704

  4. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eLindner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors.This review focuses on the potential of Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on the conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools.

  5. Conformational flexibility in calcitonin: The dynamic properties of human and salmon calcitonin in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the dynamic properties of human (h) and salmon (s) calcitonin (CT) in solution. For both hormones, distance geometry in torsion-angle space has been used to generate three-dimensional structures consistent with NMR data obtained in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles. For sCT and hCT we used, respectively, 356 and 275 interproton distances together with hydrogen-bonds as restraints. To better characterize their flexibility and dynamic properties two fully unrestrained 1100-ps molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in methanol were performed on the lowest-energy structures of both hormones. Statistical analyses of average geometric parameters and of their fluctuations performed in the last 1000 ps of the MD run show typical helical values for residues 9-19 of sCT during the whole trajectory. For hCT a shorter helix was observed involving residues 13-21, with a constant helical region in the range 13-19. Angular order parameters S(φ) and S(ψ) indicate that hCT exhibits a higher flexibility, distributed along the whole chain, including the helix, while the only flexible amino acid residues in sCT connect three well-defined domains. Finally, our study shows that simulated annealing in torsion-angle space can efficiently be extended to NMR-based three-dimensional structure calculations of helical polypeptides. Furthermore, provided that a sufficient number of NMR restraints describes the system, the method allows the detection of equilibria in solution. This identification occurs through the generation of 'spurious' high-energy structures, which, for right-handed α-helices, are likely to be represented by left-handed α-helices

  6. Bacterial Community Dynamics during Production of Registered Designation of Origin Salers Cheese as Evaluated by 16S rRNA Gene Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Duthoit, F.; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2003-01-01

    Microbial dynamics during processing and ripening of traditional cheeses such as registered designation of origin Salers cheese, an artisanal cheese produced in France, play an important role in the elaboration of sensory qualities. The aim of the present study was to obtain a picture of the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem of RDO Salers cheese by using culture-independent methods. This included DNA extraction, PCR, and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Bacterial and...

  7. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  8. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  9. Comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and dynamic conformal arc treatment planning for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier, Jessica; Kerr, Christine; Simeon, Sebastien; Ailleres, Norbert; Charissoux, Marie; Azria, David; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2016-01-08

    The aim was to analyze arc therapy techniques according to the number and position of the brain lesions reported by comparing dynamic noncoplanar conformal arcs (DCA), two coplanar full arcs (RAC) with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), multiple noncoplanar partial arcs with VMAT (RANC), and two full arcs with VMAT and 10° table rotation (RAT). Patients with a single lesion (n= 10), multiple lesions (n = 10) or a single lesion close to organs at risk (n = 5) and previously treated with DCA were selected. For each patient, the DCA treatment was replanned with all VMAT techniques. All DCA plans were compared with VMAT plans and evaluated in regard to the different quality indices and dosimetric parameters. For single lesion, homogeneity index (HI) better results were found for the RANC technique (0.17 ± 0.05) compared with DCA procedure (0.27± 0.05). Concerning conformity index (CI), the RAT technique gave higher and better values (0.85 ± 0.04) compared with those obtained with the DCA technique (0.77 ± 0.05). DCA improved healthy brain protection (8.35 ± 5.61 cc vs. 10.52 ± 6.40 cc for RANC) and reduced monitor unit numbers (3046 ± 374 MU vs. 4651 ± 736 for RANC), even if global room occupation was higher. For multiple lesions, VMAT techniques provided better HI (0.16) than DCA (0.24 ± 0.07). The CI was improved with RAT (0.8 ± 0.08 for RAT vs. 0.71 ± 0.08 for DCA). The V10Gy healthy brain was better protected with DCA (9.27 ± 4.57 cc). Regarding the MU numbers: RANC < RAT< RAC < DCA. For a single lesion close to OAR, RAT achieved high degrees of homogeneity (0.27 ± 0.03 vs. 0.53 ± 0.2 for DCA) and conformity (0.72± 0.06vs. 0.56 ± 0.13 for DCA) while sparing organs at risk (Dmax = 12.36 ± 1.05Gyvs. 14.12 ± 0.59 Gy for DCA, and Dmean = 3.96 ± 3.57Gyvs. 4.72 ± 3.28Gy for DCA). On the other hand, MU numbers were lower with DCA (2254 ± 190 MUvs. 3438 ± 457 MU for RANC) even if overall time was inferior with RAC. For a single lesion, DCA

  10. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4,  5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias

  11. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4, 5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias.

  12. Conformational dynamics of Rouse chains during creep/recovery processes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rouse model is a well-established model for non-entangled polymer chains and also serves as a fundamental model for entangled chains. The dynamic behaviour of this model under strain-controlled conditions has been fully analysed in the literature. However, despite the importance of the Rouse model, no analysis has been made so far of the orientational anisotropy of the Rouse eigenmodes during the stress-controlled, creep and recovery processes. For completeness of the analysis of the model, the Rouse equation of motion is solved to calculate this anisotropy for monodisperse chains and their binary blends during the creep/recovery processes. The calculation is simple and straightforward, but the result is intriguing in the sense that each Rouse eigenmode during these processes has a distribution in the retardation times. This behaviour, reflecting the interplay/correlation among the Rouse eigenmodes of different orders (and for different chains in the blends) under the constant stress condition, is quite different from the behaviour under rate-controlled flow (where each eigenmode exhibits retardation/relaxation associated with a single characteristic time). Furthermore, the calculation indicates that the Rouse chains exhibit affine deformation on sudden imposition/removal of the stress and the magnitude of this deformation is inversely proportional to the number of bond vectors per chain. In relation to these results, a difference between the creep and relaxation properties is also discussed for chains obeying multiple relaxation mechanisms (Rouse and reptation mechanisms). (topical review)

  13. Microsoft Operations Framework implementation for The Backbone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienhuis, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    Doel The Backbone ontwerpt, implementeert en beheert IT infrastructuren voor bedrijven en instellingen. Beheer wordt proactief uitgevoerd met behulp van Microsoft Operation Manager (MOM) 2005. MOM is een applicatie die de status en gebeurtenissen van systemen zichtbaar maakt vanuit één locatie. Om

  14. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...

  15. Water clusters adsorbed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Energetics and conformational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Aude; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present some classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and finite temperature infrared (IR) spectra of water clusters adsorbed on coronene (C24H12), a compact polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The potential energy surface is obtained within the self-consistent-charge density-functional based tight-binding approach with modifications insuring the correct description of water-water and water-PAH interactions. This scheme is benchmarked for the minimal energy structures of (C24H12)(H2O)n (n = 3-10) against density-functional theory (DFT) calculations and for the low-energy isomers of (H2O)6 and (C6H6)(H2O)3 against correlated wavefunction and DFT calculations. A detailed study of the low energy isomers of (C24H12)(H2O)3, 6 complexes is then provided. On-the-fly Born-Oppenheimer MD simulations are performed in the temperature T range 10-350 K for (C24H12)(H2O)n (n = 3-7) complexes. The description of the evolution of the systems with T is provided with emphasis on (C24H12)(H2O)n (n = 3,6). For T in the range 50-150 K, isomerisation processes are observed and when T increases, a solid-to-liquid phase-change like behavior is shown. The desorption of one water molecule is frequently observed at 300 K. The isomerisation processes are evidenced on the finite temperature IR spectra and the results are presented for (C24H12)(H2O)n (n = 3,6). A signature for the edge-coordination of the water cluster on the PAH is also proposed.

  16. Probing the ATP-induced conformational flexibility of the PcrA helicase protein using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhashal, Anil R; Choudhury, Chandan Kumar; Roy, Sudip

    2016-03-01

    Helicases are enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into its single-stranded components. It is important to understand the binding and unbinding of ATP from the active sites of helicases, as this knowledge can be used to elucidate the functionality of helicases during the unwinding of dsDNA. In this work, we investigated the unbinding of ATP and its effect on the active-site residues of the helicase PcrA using molecular dynamic simulations. To mimic the unbinding process of ATP from the active site of the helicase, we simulated the application of an external force that pulls ATP from the active site and computed the free-energy change during this process. We estimated an energy cost of ~85 kJ/mol for the transformation of the helicase from the ATP-bound state (1QHH) to the ATP-free state (1PJR). Unbinding led to conformational changes in the residues of the protein at the active site. Some of the residues at the ATP-binding site were significantly reoriented when the ATP was pulled. We observed a clear competition between reorientation of the residues and energy stabilization by hydrogen bonds between the ATP and active-site residues. We also checked the flexibility of the PcrA protein using a principal component analysis of domain motion. We found that the ATP-free state of the helicase is more flexible than the ATP-bound state. PMID:26860503

  17. Trapping conformational states along ligand-binding dynamics of peptide deformylase: the impact of induced fit on enzyme catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fieulaine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, molecular recognition has been considered one of the most fundamental processes in biochemistry. For enzymes, substrate binding is often coupled to conformational changes that alter the local environment of the active site to align the reactive groups for efficient catalysis and to reach the transition state. Adaptive substrate recognition is a well-known concept; however, it has been poorly characterized at a structural level because of its dynamic nature. Here, we provide a detailed mechanism for an induced-fit process at atomic resolution. We take advantage of a slow, tight binding inhibitor-enzyme system, actinonin-peptide deformylase. Crystal structures of the initial open state and final closed state were solved, as well as those of several intermediate mimics captured during the process. Ligand-induced reshaping of a hydrophobic pocket drives closure of the active site, which is finally "zipped up" by additional binding interactions. Together with biochemical analyses, these data allow a coherent reconstruction of the sequence of events leading from the encounter complex to the key-lock binding state of the enzyme. A "movie" that reconstructs this entire process can be further extrapolated to catalysis.

  18. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  19. Solution conformation of C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogues and modulation of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Rowley, Christopher N; Petrov, Ivan; Zhang, Tianyi; Afagh, Nicholas A; Woo, Tom K; Ben, Robert N

    2009-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are a unique class of proteins that are found in many organisms inhabiting subzero environments and ensure their survival by preventing ice growth in vivo. During the last several years, our laboratory has synthesized functional C-linked AFGP analogues (3 and 5) that possess custom-tailored antifreeze activity suitable for medical, commercial, and industrial applications. These compounds are potent inhibitors of ice recrystallization and do not exhibit thermal hysteresis. The current study explores how changes in the length of the amide-containing side chain between the carbohydrate moiety and the polypeptide backbone in 5 influences ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. Analogue 5 (n = 3, where n is the number of carbons in the side chain) was a potent inhibitor of ice recrystallization, while 4, 6, and 7 (n = 4, 2, and 1, respectively) exhibited no IRI activity. The solution conformation of the polypeptide backbone in C-linked AFGP analogues 4-7 was examined using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results suggested that all of the analogues exhibit a random coil conformation in solution and that the dramatic increase in IRI activity observed with 5 is not due to a change in long-range solution conformation. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies on truncated analogues 26-28 failed to elucidate the presence of persistent intramolecular bonds between the amide in the side chain and the peptide backbone. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on these analogues also failed to show persistent intramolecular hydrogen bonds. However, the simulations did indicate that the side chain of IRI-active analogue 26 (n = 3) adopts a unique short-range solution conformation in which it is folded back onto the peptide backbone, orienting the more hydrophilic face of the carbohydrate moiety away from the bulk solvent. In contrast, the solution conformation of IRI-inactive analogues 25, 27, and 28 had fully extended side chains

  20. Hamming distance geometry of a protein conformational space. Application to the clustering of a 4 ns molecular dynamics trajectory of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic core

    CERN Document Server

    Laboulais, C; Le Bret, M; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Laboulais, Cyril; Ouali, Mohammed; Bret, Marc Le; Gabarro-Arpa, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Protein structures can be encoded into binary sequences, these are used to define a Hamming distance in conformational space: the distance between two different molecular conformations is the number of different bits in their sequences. Each bit in the sequence arises from a partition of conformational space in two halves. Thus, the information encoded in the binary sequences is also used to characterize the regions of conformational space visited by the system. We apply this distance and their associated geometric structures, to the clustering and analysis of conformations sampled during a 4 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic core. The cluster analysis of the simulation shows a division of the trajectory into two segments of 2.6 and 1.4 ns length, which are qualitatively different: the data points to the fact that equilibration is only reached at the end of the first segment. Some length of the paper is devoted to compare the Hamming distance to the r.m.s. deviation measure. Th...

  1. Femtosecond Heterodyne Transient Grating Detection of Conformational Dynamics in the S0 (11Ag-) State of Carotenoids After Nonradiative Decay of the S2 (11Bu+) State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Jerome D.; Ghosh, Soumen; Bishop, Michael M.; Lafountain, Amy M.; Frank, Harry A.; Beck, Warren F.

    Transient grating spectroscopy was used to study the dynamics of nonradiative decay of the S1 (21Ag-) state in ß-carotene and peridinin after optical preparation of the S2) state. The kinetics of the recovery of the absorption and dispersion components of the third-order signal exhibit significantly different time constants. For β-carotene in benzonitrile, the absorption and dispersion recovery time constants are 11.6 and 10.2 ps. For peridinin in methanol, the time constants are 9.9 and 7.4 ps. These results indicate that the initial product of the decay of the S1 state is a conformationally displaced structure. The decay rate for the S1 state and the conformational relaxation rate are both slowed in peridinin as the polarity of the solvent decreases; in ethyl acetate, the conformational relaxation time constant is 45 ps, which rules out a dominant contribution from vibrational cooling. These results indicate that the S1 state develops intramolecular charge transfer character owing to distortions along torsional and out-of-plane coordinates, with a pyramidal structure favored as the most stable conformation. Recovery of the photoselected ground state conformation involves a reverse charge-transfer event followed by relaxation to a planar structure. Work supported by Photosynthetic Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0010847.

  2. Hydrocarbons depending on the chain length and head group adopt different conformations within a water-soluble nanocapsule: 1H NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajib; Barman, Arghya; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Ramamurthy, V

    2013-01-10

    In this study we have examined the conformational preference of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes) of different chain lengths included within a confined space provided by a molecular capsule made of two host cavitands known by the trivial name "octa acid" (OA). One- and two-dimensional (1)H NMR experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to probe the location and conformation of hydrocarbons within the OA capsule. In general, small hydrocarbons adopted a linear conformation while longer ones preferred a folded conformation. In addition, the extent of folding and the location of the end groups (methyl and phenyl) were dependent on the group (H(2)C-CH(2), HC═CH, and C≡C) adjacent to the phenyl group. In addition, the rotational mobility of the hydrocarbons within the capsule varied; for example, while phenylated alkanes tumbled freely, phenylated alkenes and alkynes resisted such a motion at room temperature. Combined NMR and MD simulation studies have confirmed that molecules could adopt conformations within confined spaces different from that in solution, opening opportunities to modulate chemical behavior of guest molecules.

  3. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng

    2016-07-28

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments. PMID:27475398

  4. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J.; He, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  5. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng

    2016-07-28

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  6. Toward structural dynamics: protein motions viewed by chemical shift modulations and direct detection of C'N multiple-quantum relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mirko; Kateb, Fatiha; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Piccioli, Mario; Abergel, Daniel

    2010-03-17

    Multiple quantum relaxation in proteins reveals unexpected relationships between correlated or anti-correlated conformational backbone dynamics in alpha-helices or beta-sheets. The contributions of conformational exchange to the relaxation rates of C'N coherences (i.e., double- and zero-quantum coherences involving backbone carbonyl (13)C' and neighboring amide (15)N nuclei) depend on the kinetics of slow exchange processes, as well as on the populations of the conformations and chemical shift differences of (13)C' and (15)N nuclei. The relaxation rates of C'N coherences, which reflect concerted fluctuations due to slow chemical shift modulations (CSMs), were determined by direct (13)C detection in diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. In well-folded proteins such as lanthanide-substituted calbindin (CaLnCb), copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP12), slow conformational exchange occurs along the entire backbone. Our observations demonstrate that relaxation rates of C'N coherences arising from slow backbone dynamics have positive signs (characteristic of correlated fluctuations) in beta-sheets and negative signs (characteristic of anti-correlated fluctuations) in alpha-helices. This extends the prospects of structure-dynamics relationships to slow time scales that are relevant for protein function and enzymatic activity.

  7. Conformational dynamics of cancer-associated MyD88-TIR domain mutant L252P (L265P) allosterically tilts the landscape toward homo-dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chendi; Qi, Ruxi; Wei, Guanghong; Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    MyD88 is an essential adaptor protein, which mediates the signaling of the toll-like and interleukin-1 receptors' superfamily. The MyD88 L252P (L265P) mutation has been identified in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The identification of this mutation has been a major advance in the diagnosis of patients with aldenstrom macroglobulinemia and related lymphoid neoplasms. Here we used computational methods to characterize the conformational effects of the mutation. Our molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the mutation allosterically quenched the global conformational dynamics of the toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain, and readjusted its salt bridges and dynamic community network. Specifically, the mutation changed the orientation and reduced the fluctuation of α-helix 3, possibly through eliminating/weakening ~8 salt bridges and enhancing the salt bridge D225-K258. Using the energy landscape of the TIR domains of MyD88, we identified two dynamic conformational basins, which correspond to the binding sites used in homo- and hetero-oligomerization, respectively. Our results indicate that the mutation stabilizes the core of the homo-dimer interface of the MyD88-TIR domain, and increases the population of homo-dimer-compatible conformational states in MyD88 family proteins. However, the dampened motion restricts its ability to heterodimerize with other TIR domains, thereby curtailing physiological signaling. In conclusion, the L252P both shifts the landscape toward homo-dimerization and restrains the dynamics of the MyD88-TIR domain, which disfavors its hetero-dimerization with other TIR domains. We further put these observations within the framework of MyD88-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27503954

  8. Net neutrality at internet backbone provider level

    OpenAIRE

    Baglioni, Laura; Calabrese, Armando; Ghiron, Nathan Levialdi

    2013-01-01

    This paper analysis the Internet interconnection market and combine the main technical (i.e. service quality) and economic aspects (i.e. profits and utility) characterizing relations between market players (end users, EUs; Internet Service Providers, ISPs; Internet Backbone Providers, IBPs) in order to determine possible economic outcomes in the strategic interaction between them. The proposed model enables a comparison to be made between expected values of social welfare (i.e. EU utility and...

  9. Phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with fully flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions is studied via molecular-dynamics simulations, using a coarse-grained bead-spring model and side chains of up to N = 40 effective monomers. We consider a symmetric model where side chains of type A and B are grafted alternately onto a flexible backbone. The aim of this study is to explore the phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brushes depending on parameters, such as as the grafting density σ, the backbone length Nb, the side-chain length N, and the temperature T. Based on a cluster analysis, we identify for our range of parameters the regimes of fully phase separated systems, i.e., A-type side chains form one cluster and B-type chains another, while the interface that separates these two clusters contains the backbone monomers. We find that pearl-necklace or Janus-like structures, which normally occur for bottle-brush polymers with rigid backbones under poor solvent conditions, are fully attributed to the backbone rigidity, and, therefore, such structures are unlikely in the case of bottle brushes with fully flexible backbones. Also, a comparative discussion with earlier work on the phase behaviour of single-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones is performed. (paper)

  10. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  11. Conformation dynamics and polarization effect of α,α-trehalose in a vacuum and in aqueous and salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Zigui; Yan, Xiufen; Ma, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Conformational changes of α,α-trehalose in a vacuum, water, and 0-20 wt % NaCl solutions were investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different levels of density function theory (DFT) and with fixed-charge nonpolarizable and variable-charge force fields (FFs), respectively. The relative thermodynamic stability of trehalose is enhanced by the formation of intercycle and/or intracycle hydrogen bonds, but some thermodynamically unfavorable structures can be sampled in the DFT-based ab initio MD simulation. The polarization effects of polar trehalose molecule in aqueous and NaCl solutions were studied by a series of MD simulations with both the conventional nonpolarizable and polarizable force field models. In the polarizable model, the partial charges of trehalose were updated every 2 ps using DFT calculations and fused with the other FF parameters for the energy calculation and MD simulation. Around the trehalose, water molecules located in an asymmetry model and trehalose have a stronger tendency to bind with water molecules than Na(+) and Cl(-) ions. When the trehalose concentration is increased from 3.26 to 6.31 wt % in salt aqueous solution, the two trehalose molecules periodically approach each other in a nearly anhydrate state and leave a way to keep the favorable hydration structure with the mean trehalose-trehalose distance of 8.6 Å. The similarity between the solvated dimer packing styles (shoulder-by-shoulder or head-to-head) and crystal stacking can be used to make an extrapolation to higher sugar concentrations and to rationalize the bioprotection function of trehalose in high salt concentration. PMID:25506668

  12. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s{sup -1}. Backbone amide {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41{epsilon}. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D{sub 2}O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long {sup 15}N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  13. RNABC: forward kinematics to reduce all-atom steric clashes in RNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyi; Kapral, Gary; Murray, Laura; Richardson, David; Richardson, Jane; Snoeyink, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Although accurate details in RNA structure are of great importance for understanding RNA function, the backbone conformation is difficult to determine, and most existing RNA structures show serious steric clashes (>or= 0.4 A overlap) when hydrogen atoms are taken into account. We have developed a program called RNABC (RNA Backbone Correction) that performs local perturbations to search for alternative conformations that avoid those steric clashes or other local geometry problems. Its input is an all-atom coordinate file for an RNA crystal structure (usually from the MolProbity web service), with problem areas specified. RNABC rebuilds a suite (the unit from sugar to sugar) by anchoring the phosphorus and base positions, which are clearest in crystallographic electron density, and reconstructing the other atoms using forward kinematics. Geometric parameters are constrained within user-specified tolerance of canonical or original values, and torsion angles are constrained to ranges defined through empirical database analyses. Several optimizations reduce the time required to search the many possible conformations. The output results are clustered and presented to the user, who can choose whether to accept one of the alternative conformations. Two test evaluations show the effectiveness of RNABC, first on the S-motifs from 42 RNA structures, and second on the worst problem suites (clusters of bad clashes, or serious sugar pucker outliers) in 25 unrelated RNA structures. Among the 101 S-motifs, 88 had diagnosed problems, and RNABC produced clash-free conformations with acceptable geometry for 71 of those (about 80%). For the 154 worst problem suites, RNABC proposed alternative conformations for 72. All but 8 of those were judged acceptable after examining electron density (where available) and local conformation. Thus, even for these worst cases, nearly half the time RNABC suggested corrections suitable to initiate further crystallographic refinement. The program is

  14. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    OpenAIRE

    Topham, Christopher M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the bindin...

  15. Dosimetric validation for an automatic brain metastases planning software using single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcsDosimetric validation for an automatic brain metastases planning software using single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haisong; Li, Jun; Pappas, Evangelos; Andrews, David; Evans, James; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Shi, Wenyin

    2016-01-01

    An automatic brain-metastases planning (ABMP) software has been installed in our institution. It is dedicated for treating multiple brain metastases with radiosurgery on linear accelerators (linacs) using a single-setup isocenter with noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs. This study is to validate the calculated absolute dose and dose distribution of ABMP. Three types of measurements were performed to validate the planning software: 1, dual micro ion chambers were used with an acrylic phantom to measure the absolute dose; 2, a 3D cylindrical phantom with dual diode array was used to evaluate 2D dose distribution and point dose for smaller targets; and 3, a 3D pseudo-in vivo patient-specific phantom filled with polymer gels was used to evaluate the accuracy of 3D dose distribution and radia-tion delivery. Micro chamber measurement of two targets (volumes of 1.2 cc and 0.9 cc, respectively) showed that the percentage differences of the absolute dose at both targets were less than 1%. Averaged GI passing rate of five different plans measured with the diode array phantom was above 98%, using criteria of 3% dose difference, 1 mm distance to agreement (DTA), and 10% low-dose threshold. 3D gel phantom measurement results demonstrated a 3D displacement of nine targets of 0.7 ± 0.4 mm (range 0.2 ~ 1.1 mm). The averaged two-dimensional (2D) GI passing rate for several region of interests (ROI) on axial slices that encompass each one of the nine targets was above 98% (5% dose difference, 2 mm DTA, and 10% low-dose threshold). Measured D95, the minimum dose that covers 95% of the target volume, of the nine targets was 0.7% less than the calculated D95. Three different types of dosimetric verification methods were used and proved the dose calculation of the new automatic brain metastases planning (ABMP) software was clinical acceptable. The 3D pseudo-in vivo patient-specific gel phantom test also served as an end-to-end test for validating not only the dose calculation, but the

  16. Dynamic Pricing with the Counter-Conformity, Conformity and Non-conformity of Consumer Behavior%考虑消费者从众特性的动态定价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓红; 陈莎

    2013-01-01

    面对掌握大量信息的消费者,厂商需考虑多方因素制定价格策略。研究运用经典的博弈模型,讨论不同消费者特性情况下厂商的定价机制。模型按从众特性和等待特性将消费者分为六类,并引入一个价格偏差变量,分析各类型消费者比例变化对厂商定价和利润的影响。结果显示,一般情况下降价幅度、消费者期望购买总数量和期望销售利润都随着反从众消费者比例的增大而增加。最后扩展分析了效益贴现率,反从众消费者比例和短视型消费者比例三因素对厂商总利润的影响,研究认为效益贴现率和从众消费者比例较高时,厂商利润会随着短视型消费者比例的降低而有所提高。因此,为使收益最大化,厂商在制定定价策略时需同时考虑贴现因素和消费者行为特性。%Confronted with well-informed consumers , firms have to take everything into consideration .Through the classic game theory , pricing mechanism is discussed with different characteristics of consumer behavior .The customer population is heterogeneous along two dimensions:they may have an inclination towards the obedience of the public and different degrees of patience .After introducing the price deviation variables , we demonstrate that heterogeneity in both inclination and patience is important because they jointly determine the structure of op-timal pricing policies .The numerical example shows that the markdown degree , the expected purchasing amount of consumers and the expected profits of the firm increase with the increase of the proportion of counter -conformity consumers .And we also examine whether the discount rate of capital , counter-conformity consumers and myopic consumers will have an impact on the sales .In particular , when the discount rate and the proportion of the con-formity customers are too high , the expected profits of the firm increase mildly with the increase of the

  17. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-09-19

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  18. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    -amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area......Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta...

  19. Understanding VoIP from Backbone Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Birke, Robert Rene' Maria; Petracca, Michele; Mellia, Marco

    2007-01-01

    VoIP has widely been addressed as the technology that will change the Telecommunication model opening the path for convergence. Still today this revolution is far from being complete, since the majority of telephone calls are originated by circuit-oriented networks. In this paper for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a large dataset of measurements collected from the FastWeb backbone, which is one of the first worldwide Telecom operator to offer VoIP and high-speed data ...

  20. Workers’ Conformism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ivantchev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conformism was studied among 46 workers with different kinds of occupations by means of two modified scales measuring conformity by Santor, Messervey, and Kusumakar (2000 – scale for perceived peer pressure and scale for conformism in antisocial situations. The hypothesis of the study that workers’ conformism is expressed in a medium degree was confirmed partly. More than a half of the workers conform in a medium degree for taking risk, and for the use of alcohol and drugs, and for sexual relationships. More than a half of the respondents conform in a small degree for anti-social activities (like a theft. The workers were more inclined to conform for risk taking (10.9%, then – for the use of alcohol, drugs and for sexual relationships (8.7%, and in the lowest degree – for anti-social activities (6.5%. The workers who were inclined for the use of alcohol and drugs tended also to conform for anti-social activities.

  1. Continuous wave W- and D-Band EPR spectroscopy offer “sweet-spots” for characterizing conformational changes and dynamics in intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Thomas M.; Liu, Zhanglong; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Pirman, Natasha L.; Milshteyn, Eugene; Fanucci, Gail E., E-mail: fanucci@chem.ufl.edu

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • W- and D-Band line shapes are sensitive to motions in the 0.1–2 ns time regime. • These frequencies effectively report on conformational dynamics of IDPs. • W-band spectra reflecting helical formation in IA{sub 3} is experimentally demonstrated. - Abstract: Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing conformational sampling and dynamics in biological macromolecules. Here we demonstrate that nitroxide spectra collected at frequencies higher than X-band (∼9.5 GHz) have sensitivity to the timescale of motion sampled by highly dynamic intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). The 68 amino acid protein IA{sub 3}, was spin-labeled at two distinct sites and a comparison of X-band, Q-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) spectra are shown for this protein as it undergoes the helical transition chemically induced by tri-fluoroethanol. Experimental spectra at W-band showed pronounced line shape dispersion corresponding to a change in correlation time from ∼0.3 ns (unstructured) to ∼0.6 ns (α-helical) as indicated by comparison with simulations. Experimental and simulated spectra at X- and Q-bands showed minimal dispersion over this range, illustrating the utility of SDSL EPR at higher frequencies for characterizing structural transitions and dynamics in IDPs.

  2. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  3. Different conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2 were analyzed by HDX-MS. • β-Strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • The middle loop was less dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • Upon pre-activation by the R169E mutation, β-arrestins became more dynamic. • Pre-activation affected a wider region of β-arrestin1 compared to β-arrestin2. - Abstract: Arrestins have important roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling including desensitization of GPCRs and G protein-independent signaling. There have been four arrestins identified: arrestin1, arrestin2 (e.g. β-arrestin1), arrestin3 (e.g. β-arrestin2), and arrestin4. β-Arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 are ubiquitously expressed and regulate a broad range of GPCRs, while arrestin1 and arrestin4 are expressed in the visual system. Although the functions of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 widely overlap, β-arrestin2 has broader receptor selectivity, and a few studies have suggested that β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 have distinct cellular functions. Here, we compared the conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We also used the R169E mutant as a pre-activation model system. HDX-MS data revealed that β-strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 in the basal state, while the middle loop was more dynamic in β-arrestin1. With pre-activation, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 became more flexible, but broader regions of β-arrestin1 became flexible compared to β-arrestin2. The conformational differences between β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in both the basal and pre-activated states might determine their different receptor selectivities and different cellular functions

  4. Different conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Dong Kyun [School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Min-Duk [College of Pharmacy & Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong-Man [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ka Young, E-mail: kychung2@skku.edu [School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • The conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2 were analyzed by HDX-MS. • β-Strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • The middle loop was less dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • Upon pre-activation by the R169E mutation, β-arrestins became more dynamic. • Pre-activation affected a wider region of β-arrestin1 compared to β-arrestin2. - Abstract: Arrestins have important roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling including desensitization of GPCRs and G protein-independent signaling. There have been four arrestins identified: arrestin1, arrestin2 (e.g. β-arrestin1), arrestin3 (e.g. β-arrestin2), and arrestin4. β-Arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 are ubiquitously expressed and regulate a broad range of GPCRs, while arrestin1 and arrestin4 are expressed in the visual system. Although the functions of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 widely overlap, β-arrestin2 has broader receptor selectivity, and a few studies have suggested that β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 have distinct cellular functions. Here, we compared the conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We also used the R169E mutant as a pre-activation model system. HDX-MS data revealed that β-strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 in the basal state, while the middle loop was more dynamic in β-arrestin1. With pre-activation, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 became more flexible, but broader regions of β-arrestin1 became flexible compared to β-arrestin2. The conformational differences between β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in both the basal and pre-activated states might determine their different receptor selectivities and different cellular functions.

  5. Ligand-dependent conformations and dynamics of the serotonin 5-HT(2A receptor determine its activation and membrane-driven oligomerization properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jufang Shan

    Full Text Available From computational simulations of a serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2AR model complexed with pharmacologically and structurally diverse ligands we identify different conformational states and dynamics adopted by the receptor bound to the full agonist 5-HT, the partial agonist LSD, and the inverse agonist Ketanserin. The results from the unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations show that the three ligands affect differently the known GPCR activation elements including the toggle switch at W6.48, the changes in the ionic lock between E6.30 and R3.50 of the DRY motif in TM3, and the dynamics of the NPxxY motif in TM7. The computational results uncover a sequence of steps connecting these experimentally-identified elements of GPCR activation. The differences among the properties of the receptor molecule interacting with the ligands correlate with their distinct pharmacological properties. Combining these results with quantitative analysis of membrane deformation obtained with our new method (Mondal et al, Biophysical Journal 2011, we show that distinct conformational rearrangements produced by the three ligands also elicit different responses in the surrounding membrane. The differential reorganization of the receptor environment is reflected in (i-the involvement of cholesterol in the activation of the 5-HT(2AR, and (ii-different extents and patterns of membrane deformations. These findings are discussed in the context of their likely functional consequences and a predicted mechanism of ligand-specific GPCR oligomerization.

  6. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, ``conformal infinity'' is related with almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved out of physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation and how it lends itself very naturally to solve radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  7. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  8. Dynamics and structural changes induced by ATP and/or substrate binding in the inward-facing conformation state of P-glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yurika; Hsu, Wei-Lin; Chiba, Shuntaro; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sakurai, Minoru

    2013-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a multidrug transporter that catalyzes the transport of a substrate. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of this type of substrate transport, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the X-ray crystal structure of P-gp, which has an inward-facing conformation. Our simulations indicated that the dimerization of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) is driven by the binding of ATP to the NBDs and/or the binding of the substrate to a cavity in the transmembrane domains (TMDs). Based on these results, we discuss a role of ATP in the allosteric communication that occurs between the NBDs and the TMDs.

  9. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  10. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  11. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  12. Extracting the information backbone in online system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers mainly dedicated to improve the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improve both of...

  13. Sofosbuvir as backbone of interferon free treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlière, Marc; Oules, Valèrie; Ansaldi, Christelle; Adhoute, Xavier; Castellani, Paul

    2014-12-15

    Sofosbuvir is the first-in-class NS5B nucleotide analogues to be launched for hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. Its viral potency, pangenotypic activity and high barrier to resistance make it the ideal candidate to become a backbone for several IFN-free regimens. Recent data demonstrated that sofosbuvir either with ribavirin alone or in combination with other direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) as daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir are able to cure HCV in at least 90% or over of patients. Treatment experienced genotype 3 population may remain the most difficult to treat population, but ongoing DAA combination studies will help to fill this gap. Safety profile of sofosbuvir or combination with other DAAs is good. Resistance to sofosbuvir did not appear as a significant issue. The rationale for using this class of drug and the available clinical data are reviewed.

  14. Quantum chemical benchmark study on 46 RNA backbone families using a dinucleotide unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Holger; Mladek, Arnost; Gkionis, Konstantinos; Hansen, Andreas; Grimme, Stefan; Sponer, Jiri

    2015-10-13

    We have created a benchmark set of quantum chemical structure-energy data denoted as UpU46, which consists of 46 uracil dinucleotides (UpU), representing all known 46 RNA backbone conformational families. Penalty-function-based restrained optimizations with COSMO TPSS-D3/def2-TZVP ensure a balance between keeping the target conformation and geometry relaxation. The backbone geometries are close to the clustering-means of their respective RNA bioinformatics family classification. High-level wave function methods (DLPNO-CCSD(T) as reference) and a wide-range of dispersion-corrected or inclusive DFT methods (DFT-D3, VV10, LC-BOP-LRD, M06-2X, M11, and more) are used to evaluate the conformational energies. The results are compared to the Amber RNA bsc0χOL3 force field. Most dispersion-corrected DFT methods surpass the Amber force field significantly in accuracy and yield mean absolute deviations (MADs) for relative conformational energies of ∼0.4-0.6 kcal/mol. Double-hybrid density functionals represent the most accurate class of density functionals. Low-cost quantum chemical methods such as PM6-D3H+, HF-3c, DFTB3-D3, as well as small basis set calculations corrected for basis set superposition errors (BSSEs) by the gCP procedure are also tested. Unfortunately, the presently available low-cost methods are struggling to describe the UpU conformational energies with satisfactory accuracy. The UpU46 benchmark is an ideal test for benchmarking and development of fast methods to describe nucleic acids, including force fields. PMID:26574283

  15. Geometry motivated alternative view on local protein backbone structures

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, Jan; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present an alternative to the classical Ramachandran plot (R-plot) to display local protein backbone structure. Instead of the (ϕ, ψ)-backbone angles relating to the chemical architecture of polypeptides generic helical parameters are used. These are the rotation or twist angle ϑ and the helical rise parameter d. Plots with these parameters provide a different view on the nature of local protein backbone structures. It allows to display the local structures in polar (d, ϑ)-coordinates, whi...

  16. Contralog: a Prolog conform forward-chaining environment and its application for dynamic programming and natural language parsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilián Imre

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The backward-chaining inference strategy of Prolog is inefficient for a number of problems. The article proposes Contralog: a Prolog-conform, forward-chaining language and an inference engine that is implemented as a preprocessor-compiler to Prolog. The target model is Prolog, which ensures mutual switching from Contralog to Prolog and back. The Contralog compiler is implemented using Prolog's de facto standardized macro expansion capability. The article goes into details regarding the target model.

  17. Backbone analysis and algorithm design for the quadratic assignment problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG He; ZHANG XianChao; CHEN GuoLiang; LI MingChu

    2008-01-01

    As the hot line in NP-hard problems research in recent years, backbone analysis is crucial for phase transition, hardness, and algorithm design. Whereas theoretical analysis of backbone and its applications in algorithm design are still at a begin-ning state yet, this paper took the quadratic assignment problem (QAP) as a case study and proved by theoretical analysis that it is NP-hard to find the backbone, l.e., no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a QAP in polynomial time. Results of this paper showed that it is reasonable to acquire approximate backbone by inter-section of local optimal solutions. Furthermore, with the method of constructing biased instances, this paper proposed a new meta-heuristic - biased instance based approximate backbone (BI-AB), whose basic idea is as follows: firstly, con-struct a new biased instance for every QAP instance (the optimal solution of the new instance is also optimal for the original one); secondly, the approximate backbone is obtained by intersection of multiple local optimal solutions computed by some existing algorithm; finally, search for the optimal solutions in the reduced space by fixing the approximate backbone. Work of the paper enhanced the re-search area of theoretical analysis of backbone. The meta-heuristic proposed in this paper provided a new way for general algorithm design of NP-hard problems as well.

  18. Deuterium NMR Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Gramicidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Andrew William

    1990-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the membrane peptide gramicidin are investigated by deuterium NMR. A specific structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the alpha carbon of the third alanine residue. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on this analog in oriented lipid bilayers indicate that the c_alpha- ^2H bond makes an angle relative to the helical axis that is in agreement with the bond angle predicted by the beta^{6.3} helical model. A second structural and dynamical question about the peptide backbone of gramicidin is investigated by deuterating the formyl group of two different analogs. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on these analogs show that the spectra of the two analogs are very similar. However, the analog possessing D-leucine as the second residue also appears to exist in a second, minor conformation which does not seem to exist for the analog possessing glycine as the second residue.

  19. What a Difference an OH Makes: Conformational Dynamics as the Basis for the Ligand Specificity of the Neomycin-Sensing Riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Gottstein-Schmidtke, Sina R; Weigand, Julia E; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Wurm, Jan-Philip; Hammann, Christian; Suess, Beatrix; Wöhnert, Jens

    2016-01-22

    To ensure appropriate metabolic regulation, riboswitches must discriminate efficiently between their target ligands and chemically similar molecules that are also present in the cell. A remarkable example of efficient ligand discrimination is a synthetic neomycin-sensing riboswitch. Paromomycin, which differs from neomycin only by the substitution of a single amino group with a hydroxy group, also binds but does not flip the riboswitch. Interestingly, the solution structures of the two riboswitch-ligand complexes are virtually identical. In this work, we demonstrate that the local loss of key intermolecular interactions at the substitution site is translated through a defined network of intramolecular interactions into global changes in RNA conformational dynamics. The remarkable specificity of this riboswitch is thus based on structural dynamics rather than static structural differences. In this respect, the neomycin riboswitch is a model for many of its natural counterparts.

  20. An Atomistic View of Amyloidogenic Self-assembly: Structure and Dynamics of Heterogeneous Conformational States in the Pre-nucleation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Brennecke, Julian T.; de Groot, Bert L.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of well-defined filamentous amyloid structures involves a polydisperse collection of oligomeric states for which relatively little is known in terms of structural organization. Here we use extensive, unbiased explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical features of oligomeric aggregates formed by a number of highly amyloidogenic peptides at atomistic resolution on the μs time scale. A consensus approach has been adopted to analyse the simulations in multiple force fields, yielding an in-depth characterization of pre-fibrillar oligomers and their global and local structure properties. A collision cross section analysis revealed structurally heterogeneous aggregate ensembles for the individual oligomeric states that lack a single defined quaternary structure during the pre-nucleation phase. To gain insight into the conformational space sampled in early aggregates, we probed their substructure and found emerging β-sheet subunit layers and a multitude of ordered intermolecular β-structure motifs with growing aggregate size. Among those, anti-parallel out-of-register β-strands compatible with toxic β-barrel oligomers were particularly prevalent already in smaller aggregates and formed prior to ordered fibrillar structure elements. Notably, also distinct fibril-like conformations emerged in the oligomeric state and underscore the notion that pre-nucleated oligomers serve as a critical intermediate step on-pathway to fibrils.

  1. Weyl-Conformally Invariant Light-Like p-Brane Theories: New Aspects in Black Hole Physics and Kaluza-Klein Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, E I; Nissimov, E; Pacheva, S

    2005-01-01

    We introduce and study in some detail the properties of a novel class of Weyl-conformally invariant p-brane theories which describe intrinsically light-like branes for any odd world-volume dimension. Their dynamics significantly differs from that of the ordinary (conformally non-invariant) Nambu-Goto p-branes. We present explicit solutions of the WILL-brane (Weyl-Invariant Light-Like brane)equations of motion in various gravitational models of physical relevance exhibiting various new phenomena. In D=4 the WILL-membrane serves as a material and charged source for gravity and electromagnetism in the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-WILL-membrane system; it automatically positions itself on (``straddles'') the common event horizon of the corresponding matching black hole solutions, thus providing an explicit dynamical realization of the membrane paradigm in black hole physics. In product spaces of interest in Kaluza-Klein theories the WILL-brane wrappes non-trivially around the compact (internal)dimensions and still de...

  2. An Atomistic View of Amyloidogenic Self-assembly: Structure and Dynamics of Heterogeneous Conformational States in the Pre-nucleation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Brennecke, Julian T; de Groot, Bert L

    2016-01-01

    The formation of well-defined filamentous amyloid structures involves a polydisperse collection of oligomeric states for which relatively little is known in terms of structural organization. Here we use extensive, unbiased explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical features of oligomeric aggregates formed by a number of highly amyloidogenic peptides at atomistic resolution on the μs time scale. A consensus approach has been adopted to analyse the simulations in multiple force fields, yielding an in-depth characterization of pre-fibrillar oligomers and their global and local structure properties. A collision cross section analysis revealed structurally heterogeneous aggregate ensembles for the individual oligomeric states that lack a single defined quaternary structure during the pre-nucleation phase. To gain insight into the conformational space sampled in early aggregates, we probed their substructure and found emerging β-sheet subunit layers and a multitude of ordered intermolecular β-structure motifs with growing aggregate size. Among those, anti-parallel out-of-register β-strands compatible with toxic β-barrel oligomers were particularly prevalent already in smaller aggregates and formed prior to ordered fibrillar structure elements. Notably, also distinct fibril-like conformations emerged in the oligomeric state and underscore the notion that pre-nucleated oligomers serve as a critical intermediate step on-pathway to fibrils. PMID:27616019

  3. Structural and mechanistic insight into substrate binding from the conformational dynamics in apo and substrate-bound DapE enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debodyuti; Mishra, Sabyashachi

    2016-01-21

    Conformational dynamics in large biomolecular systems is often associated with their physiological roles. The dynamics of a dimeric microbial enzyme, DapE, with great potential as an antibiotic target, has been studied employing long molecular dynamics simulations of the enzyme in apo form and in substrate bound complex form. The essential dynamics of the apo enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex are extracted from the principal component analysis of the simulations of these two systems where the first two principal components are analyzed in detail. The essential motion of the enzyme in the substrate bound form exhibits a folding motion of its two catalytic domains over the two dimerization domains, which results in repulsion of water molecules away from the active site of the enzyme-substrate complex. This folding motion also leads to a stabilizing binding free energy of the substrate arising from the favorable interaction of the substrate and side chains of the enzyme. The dynamics in the enzyme-substrate complex results in stronger interaction between the catalytic and dimerization domains reflected by an increased number of inter-domain hydrogen bonds. The substrate, located in the catalytic domain of DapE, establishes contacts with the side chains of the dimerization domain of DapE by extended chains of hydrogen bonds, which emphasizes the role of the dimerization domain in substrate binding.

  4. Use of the neutron diffraction - H/D exchange technique to determine the conformational dynamics of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reported here are studies analyzing the extent and nature of the inherent conformational fluctuations in trypsin by neutron diffraction - hydrogen exchange techniques. The pattern of exchange investigates systematic relationships between exchangeable sites and the structural and chemical properties of the molecule. Our findings that pH 7, 200 and 1 year of soaking all sites of trypsin are fully exchanged except those which are especially well protected by the structure. Essentially all the sites in which the peptide hydrogens are bonded directly to water molecules - either in the bulk solvent regions or in interior clusters - are fully exchanged. 41 references, 10 figures

  5. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2004-01-01

    An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... variabilis (A.v. PCu) (Ma, L.; Hass, M. A. S.; Vierick, N.; Kristensen, S. M.; Ulstrup, J.; Led, J. J. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 320-330). The R-1 and R-2 relaxation rates of the backbone N-15 nuclei were measured at a series of pH and temperatures on an 15N labeled sample of A.v. PCu, and the 15 N chemical...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  6. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided. PMID:26805793

  7. λ-backbone colorings along pairwise disjoint stars and matchings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, H.J.; Fujisawa, J.; Marchal, L.; Paulusma, D.; Salman, A.N.M.; Yoshimoto, K.

    2009-01-01

    Given an integer $\\lambda \\ge 2$, a graph $G=(V,E)$ and a spanning subgraph $H$ of $G$ (the backbone of $G$), a $\\lambda$-backbone coloring of $(G,H)$ is a proper vertex coloring $V\\to\\{1,2,\\ldots\\}$ of $G$, in which the colors assigned to adjacent vertices in $H$ differ by at least $\\lambda$. We st

  8. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Paradiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C2-symmetric and C1-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  9. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-20

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  10. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Ming Zhang

    Full Text Available Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  11. Extracting Backbones from Weighted Complex Networks with Incomplete Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The backbone is the natural abstraction of a complex network, which can help people understand a networked system in a more simplified form. Traditional backbone extraction methods tend to include many outliers into the backbone. What is more, they often suffer from the computational inefficiency—the exhaustive search of all nodes or edges is often prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we propose a backbone extraction heuristic with incomplete information (BEHwII to find the backbone in a complex weighted network. First, a strict filtering rule is carefully designed to determine edges to be preserved or discarded. Second, we present a local search model to examine part of edges in an iterative way, which only relies on the local/incomplete knowledge rather than the global view of the network. Experimental results on four real-life networks demonstrate the advantage of BEHwII over the classic disparity filter method by either effectiveness or efficiency validity.

  12. Side chain conformational averaging in human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lisa M; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-02-25

    The three-dimensional structures of the dihydrofolate reductase enzymes from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR or ecE) and Homo sapiens (hDHFR or hE) are very similar, despite a rather low level of sequence identity. Whereas the active site loops of ecDHFR undergo major conformational rearrangements during progression through the reaction cycle, hDHFR remains fixed in a closed loop conformation in all of its catalytic intermediates. To elucidate the structural and dynamic differences between the human and E. coli enzymes, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of side chain flexibility and dynamics in complexes of hDHFR that represent intermediates in the major catalytic cycle. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion experiments show that, in marked contrast to the functionally important motions that feature prominently in the catalytic intermediates of ecDHFR, millisecond time scale fluctuations cannot be detected for hDHFR side chains. Ligand flux in hDHFR is thought to be mediated by conformational changes between a hinge-open state when the substrate/product-binding pocket is vacant and a hinge-closed state when this pocket is occupied. Comparison of X-ray structures of hinge-open and hinge-closed states shows that helix αF changes position by sliding between the two states. Analysis of χ1 rotamer populations derived from measurements of (3)JCγCO and (3)JCγN couplings indicates that many of the side chains that contact helix αF exhibit rotamer averaging that may facilitate the conformational change. The χ1 rotamer adopted by the Phe31 side chain depends upon whether the active site contains the substrate or product. In the holoenzyme (the binary complex of hDHFR with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate), a combination of hinge opening and a change in the Phe31 χ1 rotamer opens the active site to facilitate entry of the substrate. Overall, the data suggest that, unlike ecDHFR, hDHFR requires minimal backbone conformational rearrangement as

  13. Hash: a program to accurately predict protein H{sup {alpha}} shifts from neighboring backbone shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jianyang, E-mail: zengjy@gmail.com [Tsinghua University, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences (China); Zhou Pei [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Donald, Bruce Randall [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Chemical shifts provide not only peak identities for analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, but also an important source of conformational information for studying protein structures. Current structural studies requiring H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts suffer from the following limitations. (1) For large proteins, the H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be difficult to assign using conventional NMR triple-resonance experiments, mainly due to the fast transverse relaxation rate of C{sup {alpha}} that restricts the signal sensitivity. (2) Previous chemical shift prediction approaches either require homologous models with high sequence similarity or rely heavily on accurate backbone and side-chain structural coordinates. When neither sequence homologues nor structural coordinates are available, we must resort to other information to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts using other obtainable information, such as the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms (i.e., adjacent atoms in the sequence), can remedy the above dilemmas, and hence advance NMR-based structural studies of proteins. By specifically exploiting the dependencies on chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms, we propose a novel machine learning algorithm, called Hash, to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Hash combines a new fragment-based chemical shift search approach with a non-parametric regression model, called the generalized additive model, to effectively solve the prediction problem. We demonstrate that the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms provide a reliable source of information for predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Our testing results on different possible combinations of input data indicate that Hash has a wide rage of potential NMR applications in structural and biological studies of proteins.

  14. Protonation–deprotonation of the glycine backbone as followed by Raman scattering and multiconformational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France); Kruglik, Sergei G. [Laboratoire Jean Perrin, FRE 3231, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), Case courrier 138, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ghomi, Mahmoud, E-mail: mahmoud.ghomi@univ-paris13.fr [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: • New pH-dependent Raman spectra in the middle wavenumber region (1800-300 cm{sup −1}). • New quantum mechanical calculations for exploring the Gly conformational landscape. • Construction of muticonformation based theoretical Raman spectra. - Abstract: Because of the absence of the side chain in its chemical structure and its well defined Raman spectra, glycine was selected here to follow its backbone protonation–deprotonation. The scan of the recorded spectra in the 1800–300 cm{sup −1} region led us to assign those obtained at pH 1, 6 and 12 to the cationic, zwitterionic and anionic species, respectively. These data complete well those previously published by Bykov et al. (2008) [16] devoted to the high wavenumber Raman spectra (>2500 cm{sup −1}). To reinforce our discussion, DFT calculations were carried out on the clusters of glycine + 5H{sub 2}O, mimicking reasonably the first hydration shell of the amino acid. Geometry optimization of 141 initial clusters, reflecting plausible combinations of the backbone torsion angles, allowed exploration of the conformational features, as well as construction of the theoretical Raman spectra by considering the most stable clusters containing each glycine species.

  15. Predicting the tolerated sequences for proteins and protein interfaces using RosettaBackrub flexible backbone design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Smith

    Full Text Available Predicting the set of sequences that are tolerated by a protein or protein interface, while maintaining a desired function, is useful for characterizing protein interaction specificity and for computationally designing sequence libraries to engineer proteins with new functions. Here we provide a general method, a detailed set of protocols, and several benchmarks and analyses for estimating tolerated sequences using flexible backbone protein design implemented in the Rosetta molecular modeling software suite. The input to the method is at least one experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structure or high-quality model. The starting structure(s are expanded or refined into a conformational ensemble using Monte Carlo simulations consisting of backrub backbone and side chain moves in Rosetta. The method then uses a combination of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm optimization methods to enrich for low-energy sequences for the individual members of the ensemble. To emphasize certain functional requirements (e.g. forming a binding interface, interactions between and within parts of the structure (e.g. domains can be reweighted in the scoring function. Results from each backbone structure are merged together to create a single estimate for the tolerated sequence space. We provide an extensive description of the protocol and its parameters, all source code, example analysis scripts and three tests applying this method to finding sequences predicted to stabilize proteins or protein interfaces. The generality of this method makes many other applications possible, for example stabilizing interactions with small molecules, DNA, or RNA. Through the use of within-domain reweighting and/or multistate design, it may also be possible to use this method to find sequences that stabilize particular protein conformations or binding interactions over others.

  16. Smooth, seamless, and structured grid generation with flexibility in resolution distribution on a sphere based on conformal mapping and the spring dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    A generation method for smooth, seamless, and structured triangular grids on a sphere with flexibility in resolution distribution is proposed. This method is applicable to many fields that deal with a sphere on which the required resolution is not uniform. The grids were generated using the spring dynamics method, and adjustments were made using analytical functions. The mesh topology determined its resolution distribution, derived from a combination of conformal mapping factors: polar stereographic projection (PSP), Lambert conformal conic projection (LCCP), and Mercator projection (MP). Their combination generated, for example, a tropically fine grid that had a nearly constant high-resolution belt around the equator, with a gradual decrease in resolution distribution outside of the belt. This grid can be applied to boundary-less simulations of tropical meteorology. The other example involves a regionally fine grid with a nearly constant high-resolution circular region and a gradually decreasing resolution distribution outside of the region. This is applicable to regional atmospheric simulations without grid nesting. The proposed grids are compatible with computer architecture because they possess a structured form. Each triangle of the proposed grids was highly regular, implying a high local isotropy in resolution. Finally, the proposed grids were examined by advection and shallow water simulations.

  17. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  18. Characterization of the conformational space of a triple-stranded beta-sheet forming peptide with molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto, P; Colombo, G

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a series of mutants of the 20 amino acid peptide Betanova in order to critically assess the ability of MD simulations to reproduce the folding and stability of small beta-sheet-forming peptides on currently accessible timescales. Simulations

  19. VIRTUAL BACKBONE CONTENT ROUTING IN WIRELESS AD-HOC NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longxiang Gao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We developed a new content routing based on the virtual backbone structure, which groups wireless nodes and contents into a virtual architecture. Our approach is scalable, works with local information,and does not rely on address information. The naming system uses flat naming to identify nodes and contents, and organizes these identifiers together. Backbone nodes can be selected automatically or predefined to direct their associated normal nodes in a local area. The normal nodes are guided by the backbone nodes to full fill the searching and routing processes. With a virtual structure, the searching performance can be improved by using the DHT technique.Experiments using ns2 simulator demonstrate that this virtual backbone routing architecture has the following significances: workable without being aware address in a mobile situation; scalable with the size of network; efficient in terms of the reduced hop counts and short end-to-end delay, and also resistant to the dead-end problem.

  20. 使用Backbone JS搭建SPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕婷

    2012-01-01

    Backbone JSR从2010年发布以来,受到了业界的广泛关注。“豆瓣说”和“豆瓣阅读(阅读器)”是两款以它为基础框架搭建的SPA,本文将结合这两款产品,向读者介绍BackboneJS的方方面面。

  1. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    -supported SOFC. The cathodes are obtained by infiltrating LSM into a sintered either thick (300 μm) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) backbone or a thin YSZ backbone (10-15 μm) integrated onto a thick (300 μm) porous strontium substituted lanthanum manganite (LSM) and YSZ composite. Fabrication challenges...... with infiltrated LSM nanoparticles is shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1. Cross section of LSM infiltrated cathode supported cell. [Formula]...

  2. Side chain and backbone ordering in a polypeptide

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Y; Hansmann, U H E

    2006-01-01

    We report results from multicanonical simulations of polyglutamic acid chains of length of ten residues. For this simple polypeptide we observe a decoupling of backbone and side-chain ordering in the folding process. While the details of the two transitions vary between the peptide in gas phase and in an implicit solvent, our results indicate that, independent of the specific surroundings, upon continuously lowering the temperature side-chain ordering occurs only after the backbone topology is completely formed.

  3. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelkmar, Pär; Niemelä, Perttu S; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how...... transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements...... process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros). Together with lipids binding in matching positions...

  4. The Cerebellum: New Computational Model that Reveals its Primary Function to Calculate Multibody Dynamics Conform to Lagrange-Euler Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtaj, Lavdim; Limani, Ilir; Shatri, Vjosa; Skeja, Avni

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellum is part of the brain that occupies only 10% of the brain volume, but it contains about 80% of total number of brain neurons. New cerebellar function model is developed that sets cerebellar circuits in context of multibody dynamics model computations, as important step in controlling balance and movement coordination, functions performed by two oldest parts of the cerebellum. Model gives new functional interpretation for granule cells-Golgi cell circuit, including distinct function ...

  5. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Topham, Christopher [University of Heidelberg

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  6. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  7. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  8. Phosphorylation-dependent changes in nucleotide binding, conformation, and dynamics of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Elvin D; Alvarez, Claudia P; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Sooklal, Clarissa R; Stagljar, Marijana; Kanelis, Voula

    2015-09-11

    The sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B) forms the regulatory subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in vascular smooth muscle. Phosphorylation of the SUR2B nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) by protein kinase A results in increased channel open probability. Here, we investigate the effects of phosphorylation on the structure and nucleotide binding properties of NBD1. Phosphorylation sites in SUR2B NBD1 are located in an N-terminal tail that is disordered. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data indicate that phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail affects multiple residues in NBD1, including residues in the NBD2-binding site, and results in altered conformation and dynamics of NBD1. NMR spectra of NBD1 lacking the N-terminal tail, NBD1-ΔN, suggest that phosphorylation disrupts interactions of the N-terminal tail with the core of NBD1, a model supported by dynamic light scattering. Increased nucleotide binding of phosphorylated NBD1 and NBD1-ΔN, compared with non-phosphorylated NBD1, suggests that by disrupting the interaction of the NBD core with the N-terminal tail, phosphorylation also exposes the MgATP-binding site on NBD1. These data provide insights into the molecular basis by which phosphorylation of SUR2B NBD1 activates KATP channels. PMID:26198630

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of the inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on aggregation of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Jiao; Pin Yang

    2007-01-01

    The inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The binding mode of copper(Ⅱ) with Aβ is characterized by the imidazole nitrogen atom, Nπ, of the histidine residue H13,acting as the anchoring site, and the backbone's deprotoned amide nitrogen atoms as the main binding sites. Drove by the coordination bonds and their induced hydrogen bond net, the conformations of Aβ converted from β-sheet non-β-sheet conformations, which destabilized the aggregation of Aβ into fibrils.

  10. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps...... density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined...

  11. Poly(meta-phenylene) Derivative with Rigid Twisted Biphenyl Units in Backbone: Synthesis, Structural Characterization,Photophysical Properties and Electroluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan; YANG Bing; ZHANG Hai-quan; LU Ping; SHEN Fang-zhong; LIU Lin-lin; XU Hai; YANG Guang-di; MA Yu-guang

    2007-01-01

    A soluble poly(meta-phenylene) derivative with rigid twisted biphenyl unit was synthesized by the Yamamoto coupling reaction. The polymer is soluble in common organic solvents, and the number-average molecular weight is about 6500. The UV-Vis and quantum chemical calculation indicate that the different conformation segments named "conformers" exist in the polymer backbones; it was also further confirmed by the single crystal X-ray diffraction study of the dimeric model compound. The π-π* transition of biphenyl segments of twisted and planar conformations made the polymer exhibit a strong absorption around 256 nm and a weak absorption at about 300 nm. Furthermore,the polymer exhibits a strong UV photoluminescence at 372 nm when the excitation wavelengths are longer than 300 nm. The ultraviolet-emitting electroluminescence(EL) device with the single layer structure shows EL λmax of the derivative at 370 nm.

  12. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Fourmann

    Full Text Available Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  13. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  14. Dynamic conformations of nucleophosmin (NPM1 at a key monomer-monomer interface affect oligomer stability and interactions with granzyme B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei D Duan-Porter

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1 is an abundant, nucleolar tumor antigen with important roles in cell proliferation and putative contributions to oncogenesis. Wild-type NPM1 forms pentameric oligomers through interactions at the amino-terminal core domain. A truncated form of NPM1 found in some hepatocellular carcinoma tissue formed an unusually stable oligomer and showed increased susceptibility to cleavage by granzyme B. Initiation of translation at the seventh methionine generated a protein (M7-NPM that shared all these properties. We used deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to perform a detailed structural analysis of wild-type NPM1 and M7-NPM, and found dynamic conformational shifts or local "unfolding" at a specific monomer-monomer interface which included the β-hairpin "latch." We tested the importance of interactions at the β-hairpin "latch" by replacing a conserved tyrosine in the middle of the β-hairpin loop with glutamic acid, generating Y67E-NPM. Y67E-NPM did not form stable oligomers and further, prevented wild-type NPM1 oligomerization in a dominant-negative fashion, supporting the critical role of the β-hairpin "latch" in monomer-monomer interactions. Also, we show preferential cleavage by granzyme B at one of two available aspartates (either D161 or D122 in M7-NPM and Y67E-NPM, whereas wild-type NPM1 was cleaved at both sites. Thus, we observed a correlation between the propensity to form oligomers and granzyme B cleavage site selection in nucleophosmin proteins, suggesting that a small change at an important monomer-monomer interface can affect conformational shifts and impact protein-protein interactions.

  15. A conformational analysis of mouse Nalp3 domain structures by molecular dynamics simulations, and binding site analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bikash R; Maharana, Jitendra; Bhoi, Gopal K; Lenka, Santosh K; Patra, Mahesh C; Dikhit, Manas R; Dubey, Praveen K; Pradhan, Sukanta K; Behera, Bijay K

    2014-05-01

    Scrutinizing various nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) genes in higher eukaryotes is very important for understanding the intriguing mechanism of the host defense against pathogens. The nucleotide-binding domain (NACHT), leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domains (PYD)-containing protein 3 (Nalp3), is an intracellular innate immune receptor and is associated with several immune system related disorders. Despite Nalp3's protective role during a pathogenic invasion, the molecular features and structural organization of this crucial protein is poorly understood. Using comparative modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structural architecture of Nalp3 domains, and characterized the dynamic and energetic parameters of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding in NACHT, and pathogen-derived ligands muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and imidazoquinoline with LRR domains. The results suggested that walker A, B and extended walker B motifs were the key ATP binding regions in NACHT that mediate self-oligomerization. The analysis of the binding sites of MDP and imidazoquinoline revealed LRR 7-9 to be the most energetically favored site for imidazoquinoline interaction. However, the binding free energy calculations using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) method indicated that MDP is incompatible for activating the Nalp3 molecule in its monomeric form, and suggest its complex interaction with NOD2 or other NLRs accounts for MDP recognition. The high binding affinity of ATP with NACHT was correlated to the experimental data for human NLRs. Our binding site prediction for imidazoquinoline in LRR warrants further investigation via in vivo models. This is the first study that provides ligand recognition in mouse Nalp3 and its spatial structural arrangements. PMID:24595807

  16. A Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Prenyl Synthases: Conformational Flexibility and Implications for Computer-aided Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meekyum Olivia; Feng, Xinxin; Feixas, Ferran; Zhu, Wei; Lindert, Steffen; Bogue, Shannon; Sinko, William; de Oliveira, César; Rao, Guodong; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, James Andrew

    2015-06-01

    With the rise in antibiotic resistance, there is interest in discovering new drugs active against new targets. Here, we investigate the dynamic structures of three isoprenoid synthases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis using molecular dynamics (MD) methods with a view to discovering new drug leads. Two of the enzymes, cis-farnesyl diphosphate synthase (cis-FPPS) and cis-decaprenyl diphosphate synthase (cis-DPPS), are involved in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, while the third, tuberculosinyl adenosine synthase (Rv3378c), is involved in virulence factor formation. The MD results for these three enzymes were then compared with previous results on undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) by means of active site volume fluctuation and principal component analyses. In addition, an analysis of the binding of prenyl diphosphates to cis-FPPS, cis-DPPS, and UPPS utilizing the new MD results is reported. We also screened libraries of inhibitors against cis-DPPS, finding ~1 μm inhibitors, and used the receiver operating characteristic-area under the curve (ROC-AUC) method to test the predictive power of X-ray and MD-derived cis-DPPS receptors. We found that one compound with potent M. tuberculosis cell growth inhibition activity was an IC(50) ~0.5- to 20-μm inhibitor (depending on substrate) of cis-DPPS, a ~660-nm inhibitor of Rv3378c as well as a 4.8-μm inhibitor of cis-FPPS, opening up the possibility of multitarget inhibition involving both cell wall biosynthesis and virulence factor formation. PMID:25352216

  17. Complete resonance assignment for the polypeptide backbone of interleukin 1β using three-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete sequence-specific assignment of the 15N and 1H backbone resonances of the NMR spectrum of recombinant human interleukin 1β has been obtained by using primarily 15N-1H heteronuclear three-dimensional (3D) NMR techniques in combination with 15N-1H heteronuclear and 1H homonuclear two-dimensional NMR. The fingerprint region of the spectrum was analyzed by using a combination of 3D heteronuclear 1H Hartmann-Hahn 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D HOHAHA-HMQC) and 3D heteronuclear 1H nuclear Overhauser 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopies. The authors show that the problems of amide NH and CαH chemical shift degeneracy that are prevalent for proteins of the size are readily overcome by using the 3D heteronuclear NMR technique. A doubling of some peaks in the spectrum was found to be due to N-terminal heterogeneity of the 15N-labeled protein, corresponding to a mixture of wild-type and des-Ala-1-interleukin 1β. The complete list of 15N and 1H assignments is given for all the amide NH and CαH resonances of all non-proline residues, as well as the 1H assignments for some of the amino acid side chains. This first example of the sequence-specific assignment of a protein using heteronuclear 3D NMR provides a basis for further conformational and dynamic studies of interleukin 1β

  18. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  19. Self-assembling dipeptides: conformational sampling in solvent-free coarse-grained simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Alessandra; Peter, Christine; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-03-28

    We discuss the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a hydrophobic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, in aqueous solution. The peptide backbone is described with two CG beads per amino acid, the side groups and charged end groups are each described with one CG bead. In the derivation of interaction functions between CG beads we follow a bottom-up strategy where we devise potentials such that the resulting CG simulation reproduces the conformational sampling and the intermolecular interactions observed in an atomistic simulation of the same peptide. In the CG model, conformational flexibility of the peptide is accounted for through a set of intra-molecular (bonded) potentials. The approach followed to obtain the bonded potentials is discussed in detail. The CG potentials for nonbonded interactions are based on potentials of mean force obtained by atomistic simulations in aqueous solution. Following this approach, solvent mediation effects are included in the effective bead-bead nonbonded interactions and computationally very efficient (solvent-free) simulations of self-assembly processes can be performed. We show that the conformational properties of the all-atom dipeptide in explicit solvent can be accurately reproduced with the CG model. Moreover, preliminary simulations of peptide self-assembly performed with the CG model illustrate good agreement with results obtained from all-atom, explicit solvent simulations. PMID:19280018

  20. Conformational Analysis of the Oligosaccharides Related to Side Chains of Holothurian Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey G. Gerbst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anionic polysaccharides fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCS from holothurian species were shown to affect various biological processes, such as metastasis, angiogenesis, clot formation, thrombosis, inflammation, and some others. To understand the mechanism of FCSs action, knowledge about their spatial arrangement is required. We have started the systematic synthesis, conformational analysis, and study of biological activity of the oligosaccharides related to various fragments of these types of natural polysaccharides. In this communication, five molecules representing distinct structural fragments of chondroitin sulfate have been studied by means of molecular modeling and NMR. These are three disaccharides and two trisaccharides containing fucose and glucuronic acid residues with one sulfate group per each fucose residue or without it. Long-range C–H coupling constants were used for the verification of the theoretical models. The presence of two conformers for both linkage types was revealed. For the Fuc–GlA linkage, the dominant conformer was the same as described previously in a literature as the molecular dynamics (MD average in a dodechasaccharide FCS fragment representing the backbone chain of the polysaccharide including GalNAc residues. This shows that the studied oligosaccharides, in addition to larger ones, may be considered as reliable models for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR studies to reveal pharmacophore fragments of FCS.

  1. Thermoresponsive Poly(2-oxazoline) Molecular Brushes by Living Ionic Polymerization: Kinetic Investigations of Pendant Chain Grafting and Cloud Point Modulation by Backbone and Side Chain Length Variation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-04-17

    Molecular brushes of poly(2-oxazoline)s were prepared by living anionic polymerization of 2-iso-propenyl-2-oxazoline to form the backbone and subsequent living cationic ring-opening polymerization of 2-n- or 2-iso-propyl-2-oxazoline for pendant chain grafting. In situ kinetic studies indicate that the initiation efficiency and polymerization rates are independent from the number of initiator functions per initiator molecule. This was attributed to the high efficiency of oxazolinium salt and the stretched conformation of the backbone, which is caused by the electrostatic repulsion of the oxazolinium moieties along the macroinitiator. The resulting molecular brushes showed thermoresponsive properties, that is, having a defined cloud point (CP). The dependence of the CP as a function of backbone and side chain length as well as concentration was studied. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Resolution of Two Sub-Populations of Conformers and Their Individual Dynamics by Time Resolved Ensemble Level FRET Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Rahamim

    Full Text Available Most active biopolymers are dynamic structures; thus, ensembles of such molecules should be characterized by distributions of intra- or intermolecular distances and their fast fluctuations. A method of choice to determine intramolecular distances is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements. Major advances in such measurements were achieved by single molecule FRET measurements. Here, we show that by global analysis of the decay of the emission of both the donor and the acceptor it is also possible to resolve two sub-populations in a mixture of two ensembles of biopolymers by time resolved FRET (trFRET measurements at the ensemble level. We show that two individual intramolecular distance distributions can be determined and characterized in terms of their individual means, full width at half maximum (FWHM, and two corresponding diffusion coefficients which reflect the rates of fast ns fluctuations within each sub-population. An important advantage of the ensemble level trFRET measurements is the ability to use low molecular weight small-sized probes and to determine nanosecond fluctuations of the distance between the probes. The limits of the possible resolution were first tested by simulation and then by preparation of mixtures of two model peptides. The first labeled polypeptide was a relatively rigid Pro7 and the second polypeptide was a flexible molecule consisting of (Gly-Ser7 repeats. The end to end distance distributions and the diffusion coefficients of each peptide were determined. Global analysis of trFRET measurements of a series of mixtures of polypeptides recovered two end-to-end distance distributions and associated intramolecular diffusion coefficients, which were very close to those determined from each of the pure samples. This study is a proof of concept study demonstrating the power of ensemble level trFRET based methods in resolution of subpopulations in ensembles of flexible macromolecules.

  4. Non-conformable, partial and conformable transposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Thomas; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    Although member states are obliged to transpose directives into domestic law in a conformable manner and receive considerable time for their transposition activities, we identify three levels of transposition outcomes for EU directives: conformable, partially conformable and non-conformable...... and the Commission regarding a directive’s outcome, play a much more strategic role than has to date acknowledged in the transposition literature. Whereas disagreement of a member state delays conformable transposition, it speeds up non-conformable transposition. Disagreement of the Commission only prolongs...

  5. Conformations of Prolyl-Peptide Bonds in the Bradykinin 1-5 Fragment in Solution and in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Liudmila; Masson, Antoine; Kamrath, Michael; Schubert, Franziska; Clemmer, David; Baldauf, Carsten; Rizzo, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    The dynamic nature of intrinsically disordered peptides makes them a challenge to characterize by solution-phase techniques. In order to gain insight into the relation between the disordered state and the environment, we explore the conformational space of the N-terminal 1-5 fragment of bradykinin (BK[1-5](2+)) in the gas phase by combining drift tube ion mobility, cold-ion spectroscopy, and first-principles simulations. The ion-mobility distribution of BK[1-5](2+) consists of two well-separated peaks. We demonstrate that the conformations within the peak with larger cross-section are kinetically trapped, while the more compact peak contains low-energy structures. This is a result of cis-trans isomerization of the two prolyl-peptide bonds in BK[1-5](2+). Density-functional theory calculations reveal that the compact structures have two very different geometries with cis-trans and trans-cis backbone conformations. Using the experimental CCSs to guide the conformational search, we find that the kinetically trapped species have a trans-trans configuration. This is consistent with NMR measurements performed in a solution, which show that 82% of the molecules adopt a trans-trans configuration and behave as a random coil. PMID:27366919

  6. Molecular dynamics characterization of the conformational landscape of small peptides: A series of hands-on collaborative practical sessions for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modelling and simulations are nowadays an integral part of research in areas ranging from physics to chemistry to structural biology, as well as pharmaceutical drug design. This popularity is due to the development of high-performance hardware and of accurate and efficient molecular mechanics algorithms by the scientific community. These improvements are also benefitting scientific education. Molecular simulations, their underlying theory, and their applications are particularly difficult to grasp for undergraduate students. Having hands-on experience with the methods contributes to a better understanding and solidification of the concepts taught during the lectures. To this end, we have created a computer practical class, which has been running for the past five years, composed of several sessions where students characterize the conformational landscape of small peptides using molecular dynamics simulations in order to gain insights on their binding to protein receptors. In this report, we detail the ingredients and recipe necessary to establish and carry out this practical, as well as some of the questions posed to the students and their expected results. Further, we cite some examples of the students' written reports, provide statistics, and share their feedbacks on the structure and execution of the sessions. These sessions were implemented alongside a theoretical molecular modelling course but have also been used successfully as a standalone tutorial during specialized workshops. The availability of the material on our web page also facilitates this integration and dissemination and lends strength to the thesis of open-source science and education. PMID:26751257

  7. The backbone of the climate network

    CERN Document Server

    Donges, Jonathan F; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Juergen; 10.1209/0295-5075/87/48007

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system, relying on the nonlinear mutual information of time series analysis and betweenness centrality of complex network theory. We show, that this approach reveals a rich internal structure in complex climate networks constructed from reanalysis and model surface air temperature data. Our novel method uncovers peculiar wave-like structures of high energy flow, that we relate to global surface ocean currents. This points to a major role of the oceanic surface circulation in coupling and stabilizing the global temperature field in the long term mean (140 years for the model run and 60 years for reanalysis data). We find that these results cannot be obtained using classical linear methods of multivariate data analysis, and have ensured their robustness by intensive significance testing.

  8. On Backbone Structure for a Future Multipurpose Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Cuevas, Ruben; Riaz, M. Tahir;

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all the curr......Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all...... the current and future services over the same infrastructure, offering high QoS levels. This paper analyzes different possibilities of a future backbone in order to find the best option among the studied ones. This option is a two level structure formed by the combination of N2R and Grid topologies which...

  9. Leaf growth is conformal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  10. Conformal transformations and conformal invariance in gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P; Blaschke, David B

    2008-01-01

    Conformal transformations are frequently used tools in order to study relations between various theories of gravity and Einstein relativity. Because of that, in this paper we discuss the rules of conformal transformations for geometric quantities in general relativity. In particular, we discuss the conformal transformations of the matter energy-momentum tensor. We thoroughly discuss the latter and show the subtlety of the conservation law (i.e., the geometrical Bianchi identity) imposed in one of the conformal frames in reference to the other. The subtlety refers to the fact that conformal transformation ``creates'' an extra matter term composed of the conformal factor which enters the conservation law. In an extreme case of the flat original spacetime the matter is ``created'' due to work done by the conformal transformation to bend the spacetime which was originally flat. We also discuss how to construct the conformally invariant gravity which, in the simplest version, is a special case of the Brans-Dicke t...

  11. SU-E-T-62: Cardiac Toxicity in Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, X; Zhang, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Feng, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhou, L [West China Hospital, Sichuan (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Deng, J [Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The cardiac toxicity for lung cancer patients, each treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DAT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is investigated. Methods: 120 lung patients were selected for this study: 25 treated with DAT, 50 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. For comparison, all plans were generated in the same treatment planning system, normalized such that the 100% isodose lines encompassed 95% of planning target volume. The plan quality was evaluated in terms of homogeneity index (HI) and 95% conformity index (%95 CI) for target dose coverage and mean dose, maximum dose, V{sub 30} Gy as well as V{sub 5} Gy for cardiac toxicity analysis. Results: When all the plans were analyzed, the VMAT plans offered the best target coverage with 95% CI = 0.992 and HI = 1.23. The DAT plans provided the best heart sparing with mean heart dose = 2.3Gy and maximum dose = 11.6Gy, as compared to 5.7 Gy and 31.1 Gy by IMRT as well as 4.6 Gy and 30.9 Gy by VMAT. The mean V30Gy and V5Gy of the heart in the DAT plans were up to 11.7% lower in comparison to the IMRT and VMAT plans. When the tumor volume was considered, the VMAT plans spared up to 70.9% more doses to the heart when the equivalent diameter of the tumor was larger than 4cm. Yet the maximum dose to the heart was reduced the most in the DAT plans with up to 139.8% less than that of the other two plans. Conclusion: Overall, the VMAT plans achieved the best target coverage among the three treatment modalities, and would spare the heart the most for the larger tumors. The DAT plans appeared advantageous in delivering the least maximum dose to the heart as compared to the IMRT and VMAT plans.

  12. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  13. Effect of the Spacer and Aliphatic Tail Length on the Conformation of “Side-on Fixed” Liquid Crystal Polyacrylates: “SANS” Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lecommandoux, S.; Noirez, L.; Richard, H.; Achard, M.; Strazielle, C.; Hardouin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The backbone conformation of two different “side-on fixed” liquid crystalline polyacrylates is studied by Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments in the nematic phase. We observe the influence of a very large spacer and a large aliphatic extremities length on the prolate anisotropy of the polymer backbone. In both situations we find a strong decrease in the conformation anisotropy of the main chain.

  14. Conformational Analysis of Indole Alkaloids Corynantheine and Dihydrocorynantheine by Dynamic 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Computational Methods: Steric Effects of Ethyl vs Vinyl Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Dan; Norrby, Per-Ola; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W.

    2001-01-01

    H-1 NMR (400 MHz) spectra of the indole alkaloid dihydrocorynantheine recorded at room temperature show the presence of two conformers near coalescence. Low temperature H-1 NMR allowed characterization of the conformational equilibrium, which involves rotation of the 3-methoxypropenoate side chai...

  15. PESI - a taxonomic backbone for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenberg, Juliana; Boumans, Louis; Hussey, Charles; Hyam, Roger; Nicolson, Nicola; Kirk, Paul; Paton, Alan; Michel, Ellinor; Guiry, Michael D.; Boegh, Phillip S.; Pedersen, Henrik Ærenlund; Enghoff, Henrik; von Raab-Straube, Eckhard; Güntsch, Anton; Geoffroy, Marc; Müller, Andreas; Kohlbecker, Andreas; Berendsohn, Walter; Appeltans, Ward; Arvanitidis, Christos; Vanhoorne, Bart; Declerck, Joram; Vandepitte, Leen; Hernandez, Francisco; Nash, Róisín; Costello, Mark John; Ouvrard, David; Bezard-Falgas, Pascale; Bourgoin, Thierry; Wetzel, Florian Tobias; Glöckler, Falko; Korb, Günther; Ring, Caroline; Hagedorn, Gregor; Häuser, Christoph; Aktaç, Nihat; Asan, Ahmet; Ardelean, Adorian; Borges, Paulo Alexandre Vieira; Dhora, Dhimiter; Khachatryan, Hasmik; Malicky, Michael; Ibrahimov, Shaig; Tuzikov, Alexander; De Wever, Aaike; Moncheva, Snejana; Spassov, Nikolai; Chobot, Karel; Popov, Alexi; Boršić, Igor; Sfenthourakis, Spyros; Kõljalg, Urmas; Uotila, Pertti; Olivier, Gargominy; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Tarkhnishvili, David; Chaladze, Giorgi; Tuerkay, Michael; Legakis, Anastasios; Peregovits, László; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur; Ólafsson, Erling; Lysaght, Liam; Galil, Bella Sarah; Raimondo, Francesco M.; Domina, Gianniantonio; Stoch, Fabio; Minelli, Alessandro; Spungis, Voldermars; Budrys, Eduardas; Olenin, Sergej; Turpel, Armand; Walisch, Tania; Krpach, Vladimir; Gambin, Marie Therese; Ungureanu, Laurentia; Karaman, Gordan; Kleukers, Roy M.J.C.; Stur, Elisabeth; Aagaard, Kaare; Valland, Nils; Moen, Toril Loennechen; Bogdanowicz, Wieslaw; Tykarski, Piotr; Węsławski, Jan Marcin; Kędra, Monika; M. de Frias Martins, Antonio; Abreu, António Domingos; Silva, Ricardo; Medvedev, Sergei; Ryss, Alexander; Šimić, Smiljka; Marhold, Karol; Stloukal, Eduard; Tome, Davorin; Ramos, Marian A.; Valdés, Benito; Pina, Francisco; Kullander, Sven; Telenius, Anders; Gonseth, Yves; Tschudin, Pascal; Sergeyeva, Oleksandra; Vladymyrov, Volodymyr; Rizun, Volodymyr Bohdanovych; Raper, Chris; Lear, Dan; Stoev, Pavel; Penev, Lyubomir; Rubio, Ana Casino; Backeljau, Thierry; Saarenmaa, Hannu; Ulenberg, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Reliable taxonomy underpins communication in all of biology, not least nature conservation and sustainable use of ecosystem resources. The flexibility of taxonomic interpretations, however, presents a serious challenge for end-users of taxonomic concepts. Users need standardised and continuously harmonised taxonomic reference systems, as well as high-quality and complete taxonomic data sets, but these are generally lacking for non-specialists. The solution is in dynamic, expertly curated web-based taxonomic tools. The Pan-European Species-directories Infrastructure (PESI) worked to solve this key issue by providing a taxonomic e-infrastructure for Europe. It strengthened the relevant social (expertise) and information (standards, data and technical) capacities of five major community networks on taxonomic indexing in Europe, which is essential for proper biodiversity assessment and monitoring activities. The key objectives of PESI were: 1) standardisation in taxonomic reference systems, 2) enhancement of the quality and completeness of taxonomic data sets and 3) creation of integrated access to taxonomic information. New information This paper describes the results of PESI and its future prospects, including the involvement in major European biodiversity informatics initiatives and programs. PMID:26491393

  16. Conformal mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gonera, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The SL(2,R) invariant Hamiltonian systems are discussed within the frame- work of the orbit method. It is shown that both dynamics and symmetry trans- formations are globally well-defined on phase space. The flexibility in the choice of time variable and Hamiltonian function described in the paper by de Alfaro et al. (Nuovo Cim. 34A (1976),569) is related to the nontrivial global structure of 1 + 0-dimensional space-time. The operational definition of time is discussed.

  17. Conformal isoparametric hypersurfaces with two distinct conformal principal curvatures in conformal space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The conformal geometry of regular hypersurfaces in the conformal space is studied.We classify all the conformal isoparametric hypersurfaces with two distinct conformal principal curvatures in the conformal space up to conformal equivalence.

  18. Performance of Flow-Aware Networking in LTE backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Soler, José

    2012-01-01

    technologies, such as Long Term Evolution (LTE). This paper proposes usage of a modified Flow Aware Networking (FAN) technique for enhancing Quality of Service (QoS) in the all-IP transport networks underlying LTE backbone. The results obtained with OPNET Modeler show that FAN, in spite of being relatively...

  19. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  20. Determination of backbone chain direction of PDA using FFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sadaharu; Okamoto, Kentaro; Takenaga, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    The effect of backbone chains on friction force was investigated on both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid and the (0 1 0) surfaces of single crystals of 2,4-hexadiene-1,6-diol using friction force microscopy (FFM). It was observed that friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the [0 0 1] direction in both samples. Moreover, friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the crystallographic [1 0 2], [1 0 1], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions in only the single crystals. For the LB films, the [0 0 1] direction corresponds to the backbone chain direction of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid. For the single crystals, both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 1] directions correspond to the backbone chain direction, and the [1 0 2], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions correspond to the low-index crystallographic direction. In both the LB films and single crystals, the friction force was minimized when the directions of scanning and the backbone chain were parallel.

  1. Deformation of redox-active polymer gel based on polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Ohta, Akira; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2014-12-01

    Redox-active polymer gels consisting of polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units have been designed and synthesized. The bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units, which undergo interconversion between cyclic form and opened dicationic form, have been incorporated into polysiloxane backbone via hydrosilylation of vinyl-terminated bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl derivative and poly(methylhydrosiloxane) (PMHS) or poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-hydrogenmethylsiloxane) (PDMS-co-PMHS), resulting in polymer gels cross-linked with bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units. After the incorporation of M1 into polysiloxane backbone, these polymer gels (P1 and P2) also exhibit redox responses associated with the electrochemical interconversion of the bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl moieties. The polymer gels show swelling behavior upon chemical oxidization, and bending behavior has been observed for the polymer gel immobilized poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVdF) film. These results provide a useful perspective for fabricating redox-triggered polymer gel actuators based on the conformational change of the functional molecular unit. PMID:25400032

  2. Interconverting conformations of variants of the human amyloidogenic protein beta2-microglobulin quantitatively characterized by dynamic capillary electrophoresis and computer simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Cheng, Lei;

    2006-01-01

    Capillary electrophoretic separation profiles of cleaved variants of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) reflect the conformational equilibria existing in solutions of these proteins. The characterization of these equilibria is of interest since beta2m is responsible for amyloid formation in dialysis......-related amyloidosis and thus is able to attain alternative conformations that lead to irreversible aggregation and precipitation. In this study, we quantitate the increased conformational instability of cleaved beta2m by extracting rate constants and activation energies by simulating the experimental data using...

  3. A Method for Extracting the Free Energy Surface and Conformational Dynamics of Fast-Folding Proteins from Single Molecule Photon Trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy holds the promise of providing direct measurements of protein folding free energy landscapes and conformational motions. However, fulfilling this promise has been prevented by technical limitations, most notably, the difficulty in analyzing the small packets of photons per millisecond that are typically recorded from individual biomolecules. Such limitation impairs the ability to accurately determine conformational distributions and resolve sub-millis...

  4. Inorganic backbone ionomers: Design and dielectric response of single-ion conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Joshua

    Ion-conducting polymers were studied primarily through the use of dielectric spectroscopy. The conclusions drawn from ion conduction models of the dielectric data are corroborated by additional independent experiments, including x-ray scattering, calorimetry, prism coupling, and DFT calculations. The broad concern of this dissertation is to understand and clarify a path forward in ion conducting polymer research. This is achieved by considering low-Tg ionomers and the advantages imparted by siloxane and phosphazene backbones. The most successful dielectric spectroscopy model for the materials studied is the electrode polarization model (EP), whereas other models, such as the Dyre random barrier model, fail to describe the experimental results. Seven nonionic ether oxygen (EO) containing polymers were studied in order to observe the effect that backbone chemistry has on dipole motion. Conventional carboncarbon backbone EO-containing polymers show no distinct advantage over similar EO-pendant polysiloxane or polyphosphazene systems. The mobility and effective backbone Tg imparted by the inorganic backbones are comparable. A short EO pendant results in a lower static dielectric constant due to restricted motion of dipoles close to the chain. The flexibility and chemical versatility of inorganic backbone polymers motivates further study of two ionomer systems. A polypohosphazene iodide conducting system was characterized by dielectric spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. Two end "tail" functionalization of the ammonium ion were used, a tail with two EOs and an alkyl tail of six carbons. This functional group plays an important role in ion dynamics and can wrap around the ion and self-solvate when EOs are present. The iodide-ammonium ionomers are observed to have unusually large high-frequency dielectric constants due to atomic polarization of ions. The strength of the atomic polarization scales with ion content. The aggregation state of ions is able to be determined from

  5. Solution structure and dynamics of the I214V mutant of the rabbit prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The conformational conversion of the host-derived cellular prion protein (PrP(C into the disease-associated scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc is responsible for the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Various single-point mutations in PrP(Cs could cause structural changes and thereby distinctly influence the conformational conversion. Elucidation of the differences between the wild-type rabbit PrP(C (RaPrP(C and various mutants would be of great help to understand the ability of RaPrP(C to be resistant to TSE agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the solution structure of the I214V mutant of RaPrP(C(91-228 and detected the backbone dynamics of its structured C-terminal domain (121-228. The I214V mutant displays a visible shift of surface charge distribution that may have a potential effect on the binding specificity and affinity with other chaperones. The number of hydrogen bonds declines dramatically. Urea-induced transition experiments reveal an obvious decrease in the conformational stability. Furthermore, the NMR dynamics analysis discloses a significant increase in the backbone flexibility on the pico- to nanosecond time scale, indicative of lower energy barrier for structural rearrangement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that both the surface charge distribution and the intrinsic backbone flexibility greatly contribute to species barriers for the transmission of TSEs, and thereby provide valuable hints for understanding the inability of the conformational conversion for RaPrP(C.

  6. Conformal transformations and conformal invariance in gravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P.; Garecki, Janusz; Blaschke, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Conformal transformations are frequently used tools in order to study relations between various theories of gravity and the Einstein relativity. In this paper we discuss the rules of these transformations for geometric quantities as well as for the matter energy-momentum tensor. We show the subtlety of the matter energy-momentum conservation law which refers to the fact that the conformal transformation "creates" an extra matter term composed of the conformal factor which enters the conservat...

  7. Simulation study of the effects of surface chemistry and temperature on the conformations of ssDNA oligomers near hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effects of the presence of a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic surface on the conformations and interactions of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligomer using atomistic molecular dynamics, umbrella sampling, and temperature-replica exchange. Our simulations capture the expected interactions between the ssDNA and the two surfaces (e.g., hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions), but we find that the surface chemistry does not strongly affect the exposure of the relatively hydrophobic nucleobases or the hydrophilic phosphate backbone in a 16-base ssDNA. Likewise, the surfaces do not strongly affect the preferred size of the ssDNA compared to bulk solution, although the hydrophilic surface does favor slightly more compact ssDNA conformations than the hydrophobic surface. In more compact conformations, the negative charge of the ssDNA is more concentrated, and the energetic interactions of the DNA and DNA-bound counterions with the hydrophilic surface are more favorable, which consequently favors smaller ssDNA sizes. Increasing temperature, regardless of the presence or chemistry of a surface, makes it less unfavorable for the ssDNA to assume both compact and extended conformations. With increasing temperature the free energy cost of assuming a compact conformation is reduced to a greater extent than the cost of assuming an extended conformation. The reason for this difference is the entropically favorable release of DNA-bound water molecules upon assuming a compact conformation. Increasing temperature decreases water-DNA interactions while surprisingly increasing counterion-DNA interactions, changes which are attributed to the relative balance of entropic and energetic contributions for water molecules and counterions bound to the ssDNA

  8. Primerjava JavaScript ogrodij Angular, Backbone in Ember

    OpenAIRE

    Simin, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo primerja tri JavaScript ogrodja za razvoj spletnih aplikacij, in sicer AngularJS, Ember.js in Backbone.js. V okviru dela smo primerjali njihovo implementacijo MVC arhitekturnega modela ali različice le-tega. Poleg implementacije MVC arhitekturnega modela smo primerjali njihove funkcionalnosti in lastnosti, kot so sistem predlog, implementacija usmerjevalnika, komunikacija s strežnikom, podatkovne povezave, prilagodljivosti, velikost in aktivnost skupnosti, kvaliteta obstoje...

  9. Comparison of JavaScript frameworks, Angular, Backbone, and Ember

    OpenAIRE

    Simin, Matija

    2016-01-01

    The thesis compares three JavaScript frameworks for developing web applications: AngularJS, Ember.js and Backbone.js. In the thesis we compared their implementation of the MVC design pattern and their subversions. Besides their implementation of MVC design pattern we compared their functionalities and features, such as templating system, routing implementation, communications with a server, data binding, adjustability, size and activity of the community, quality of existing documentation, pos...

  10. Backbone decomposition for continuous-state branching processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, A E Kyprianou Y-X

    2011-01-01

    In the spirit of Duqesne and Winkel (2007) and Berestycki et al. (2011) we show that supercritical continuous-state branching process with a general branching mechanism and general immigration mechanism is equal in law to a continuous-time Galton Watson process with immigration with Poissonian dressing. The result also characterises the limiting backbone decomposition which is predictable from the work on consistent growth of Galton-Watson trees with immigration in Cao and Winkel (2010).

  11. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  12. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie [Division of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Chen Sining [Department of Biostatistics, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/School of Public Health, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  13. Extracting the multiscale backbone of complex weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A large number of complex systems find a natural abstraction in the form of weighted networks whose nodes represent the elements of the system and the weighted edges identify the presence of an interaction and its relative strength. In recent years, the study of an increasing number of large-scale networks has highlighted the statistical heterogeneity of their interaction pattern, with degree and weight distributions that vary over many orders of magnitude. These features, along with the large number of elements and links, make the extraction of the truly relevant connections forming the network's backbone a very challenging problem. More specifically, coarse-graining approaches and filtering techniques come into conflict with the multiscale nature of large-scale systems. Here, we define a filtering method that offers a practical procedure to extract the relevant connection backbone in complex multiscale networks, preserving the edges that represent statistically significant deviations with respect to a null model for the local assignment of weights to edges. An important aspect of the method is that it does not belittle small-scale interactions and operates at all scales defined by the weight distribution. We apply our method to real-world network instances and compare the obtained results with alternative backbone extraction techniques. PMID:19357301

  14. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT) planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate) and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets) in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes) and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures) were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p < 0.001), similar nodal coverage (8/8 t-test comparisons; p = ns), higher and more homogenous pelvic tissue dose (6/6 t-test comparisons; p < 0.03), at the cost of slightly higher critical structure dose (Ddose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p < 0.03). The dIMRT/HT approaches were superior to 3DCRT in sparing organs at risk (22/24 t-test comparisons; p < 0.05). dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies

  15. Superspace conformal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quella, Thomas [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  16. Superspace conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  17. Unique optimal solution instance and computational complexity of backbone in the graph bi-partitioning problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an important tool for heuristic design of NP-hard problems, backbone analysis has become a hot spot in theoretical computer science in recent years. Due to the difficulty in the research on computational complexity of the backbone, many researchers analyzed the backbone by statistic ways. Aiming to increase the backbone size which is usually very small by the existing methods, the unique optimal solution instance construction (UOSIC) is proposed for the graph bi-partitioning problem (GBP). Also, we prove by using the UOSIC that it is NP-hard to obtain the backbone, i.e. no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a GBP in polynomial time under the assumption that P ( NP. Our work expands the research area of computational complexity of the backbone. And the UOSIC provides a new way for heuristic design of NP-hard problems.

  18. Radiation damage to DNA: electron scattering from the backbone subunits

    CERN Document Server

    Tonzani, S; Greene, Chris H.; Tonzani, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    In the context of damage to DNA by low-energy electrons, we carry out calculations of electron scattering from tetrahydrofuran and phosphoric acid, models of the subunits in the DNA backbone, as a first step in simulating the electron capture process that occurs in the cell. In the case of tetrahydrofuran, we also compare with previous theoretical and experimental data. A comparison of the shape of the resonant structures to virtual orbitals is also performed to gain insight into the systematic connections with electron scattering from similar molecules and dissociative electron attachment experiments.

  19. Application of Multicast-based Video Conference on CERNET Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Multicast-based video conference is a representative application in advanced network. In multi-point video conference using multicast can get better efficiency facilitated by inner-group broadcast mechanism. In the application, the multicast-based network resources assignment, management and security should be considered together. This paper presents a framework model of multicast-based video conferencing application with three layers. And a practical multicast-based video conferencing is implemented in CERNET(China Education and Research Network) backbone. The practice is valuable for the development of multicast-based video conferencing application in China.

  20. Resistance of Feynman diagrams and the percolation backbone dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, H K; Stenull, O; Oerding, K

    1999-06-01

    We present an alternative view of Feynman diagrams for the field theory of random resistor networks, in which the diagrams are interpreted as being resistor networks themselves. This simplifies the field theory considerably as we demonstrate by calculating the fractal dimension D(B) of the percolation backbone to three loop order. Using renormalization group methods we obtain D(B)=2+epsilon/21-172epsilon(2)/9261+2epsilon(3)[-74 639+22 680zeta(3)]/4 084 101, where epsilon=6-d with d being the spatial dimension and zeta(3)=1.202 057... .

  1. Conformational dynamics of human FXR-LBD ligand interactions studied by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry: Insights into the antagonism of the hypolipidemic agent Z-guggulsterone

    OpenAIRE

    YANG, LIPING; Broderick, David; Jiang, Yuan; Hsu, Victor; Maier, Claudia S.

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays a key role in the regulation of bile acids, lipid and glucose metabolisms. The regulative function of FXR is governed by conformational changes of the ligand binding domain (LBD) upon ligand binding. Although FXR is a highly researched potential therapeutic target, only a limited number of FXR-agonist complexes have been successfully crystallized and subsequently yielded high resolut...

  2. Conformational dynamics of human FXR-LBD ligand interactions studied by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry: insights into the antagonism of the hypolipidemic agent Z-guggulsterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Broderick, David; Jiang, Yuan; Hsu, Victor; Maier, Claudia S

    2014-09-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays a key role in the regulation of bile acids, lipid and glucose metabolisms. The regulative function of FXR is governed by conformational changes of the ligand binding domain (LBD) upon ligand binding. Although FXR is a highly researched potential therapeutic target, only a limited number of FXR-agonist complexes have been successfully crystallized and subsequently yielded high resolution structures. There is currently no structural information of any FXR-antagonist complexes publically available. We therefore explored the use of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry for characterizing conformational changes in the FXR-LBD upon ligand binding. Ligand-specific deuterium incorporation profiles were obtained for three FXR ligand chemotypes: GW4064, a synthetic non-steroidal high affinity agonist; the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), the endogenous low affinity agonist of FXR; and Z-guggulsterone (GG), an in vitro antagonist of the steroid chemotype. A comparison of the HDX profiles of their ligand-bound FXR-LBD complexes revealed a unique mode of interaction for GG. The conformational features of the FXR-LBD-antagonist interaction are discussed. PMID:24953769

  3. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  4. Constructing Battery-Aware Virtual Backbones in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Ma

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in battery-powered sensor networks is to construct energy efficient virtual backbones for network routing. Recent study in battery technology reveals that batteries tend to discharge more power than needed and reimburse the over-discharged power if they are recovered. In this paper we first provide a mathematical battery model suitable for implementation in sensor networks. We then introduce the concept of battery-aware connected dominating set (BACDS and show that in general the minimum BACDS (MBACDS can achieve longer lifetime than the previous backbone structures. Then we show that finding a MBACDS is NP-hard and give a distributed approximation algorithm to construct the BACDS. The resulting BACDS constructed by our algorithm is at most (8+Δopt size, where Δ is the maximum node degree and opt is the size of an optimal BACDS. Simulation results show that the BACDS can save a significant amount of energy and achieve up to 30% longer network lifetime than previous schemes.

  5. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Vanessa L; Andrade, Sónia C S; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M; Dunn, Casey W; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Taylor, John D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-02-22

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000-20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals.

  6. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  7. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential

  8. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org; Ding, Yi [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology (United States); Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential.

  9. High-resolution structures of the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp) DltC from Bacillus subtilis reveal equivalent conformations of apo- and holo-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Pfennig, Sabrina; Neumann, Piotr; Yonus, Huma; Weininger, Ulrich; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-08-19

    D-Alanylation of lipoteichoic acids plays an important role in modulating the properties of Gram-positive bacteria cell walls. The D-alanyl carrier protein DltC from Bacillus subtilis has been solved in apo- and two cofactor-modified holo-forms, whereby the entire phosphopantetheine moiety is defined in one. The atomic resolution of the apo-structure allows delineation of alternative conformations within the hydrophobic core of the 78 residue four helix bundle. In contrast to previous reports for a peptidyl carrier protein from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, no obvious structural differences between apo- and holo-DltC forms are observed. Solution NMR spectroscopy confirms these findings and demonstrates in addition that the two forms exhibit similar backbone dynamics on the ps-ns and ms timescales. PMID:26193422

  10. High-resolution structures of the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp) DltC from Bacillus subtilis reveal equivalent conformations of apo- and holo-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Pfennig, Sabrina; Neumann, Piotr; Yonus, Huma; Weininger, Ulrich; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-08-19

    D-Alanylation of lipoteichoic acids plays an important role in modulating the properties of Gram-positive bacteria cell walls. The D-alanyl carrier protein DltC from Bacillus subtilis has been solved in apo- and two cofactor-modified holo-forms, whereby the entire phosphopantetheine moiety is defined in one. The atomic resolution of the apo-structure allows delineation of alternative conformations within the hydrophobic core of the 78 residue four helix bundle. In contrast to previous reports for a peptidyl carrier protein from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, no obvious structural differences between apo- and holo-DltC forms are observed. Solution NMR spectroscopy confirms these findings and demonstrates in addition that the two forms exhibit similar backbone dynamics on the ps-ns and ms timescales.

  11. Conformal Bootstrap in Mellin Space

    CERN Document Server

    Gopakumar, Rajesh; Sen, Kallol; Sinha, Aninda

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach towards analytically solving for the dynamical content of Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) using the bootstrap philosophy. This combines the original bootstrap idea of Polyakov with the modern technology of the Mellin representation of CFT amplitudes. We employ exchange Witten diagrams with built in crossing symmetry as our basic building blocks rather than the conventional conformal blocks in a particular channel. Demanding consistency with the operator product expansion (OPE) implies an infinite set of constraints on operator dimensions and OPE coefficients. We illustrate the power of this method in the epsilon expansion of the Wilson-Fisher fixed point by computing operator dimensions and, strikingly, OPE coefficients to higher orders in epsilon than currently available using other analytic techniques (including Feynman diagram calculations). Our results enable us to get a somewhat better agreement of certain observables in the 3d Ising model, with the precise numerical values that...

  12. Trends for isolated amino acids and dipeptides: Conformation, divalent ion binding, and remarkable similarity of binding to calcium and lead

    CERN Document Server

    Ropo, Matti; Baldauf, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We derive structural and binding energy trends for twenty amino acids, their dipeptides, and their interactions with the divalent cations Ca$^{2+}$, Ba$^{2+}$, Sr$^{2+}$, Cd$^{2+}$, Pb$^{2+}$, and Hg$^{2+}$. The underlying data set consists of 45,892 first-principles predicted conformers with relative energies up to about 4 eV (about 400kJ/mol). We show that only very few distinct backbone structures of isolated amino acids and their dipeptides emerge as lowest-energy conformers. The isolated amino acids predominantly adopt structures that involve an acidic proton shared between the carboxy and amino function. Dipeptides adopt one of two intramolecular-hydrogen bonded conformations C$_5$ or equatorial C$_7$. Upon complexation with a divalent cation, the accessible conformational space shrinks and intramolecular hydrogen bonding is prevented due to strong electrostatic interaction of backbone and side chain functional groups with cations. Clear correlations emerge from the binding energies of the six divalent ...

  13. Imaging of conformational changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michl, Josef [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-03-13

    Control of intramolecular conformational change in a small number of molecules or even a single one by an application of an outside electric field defined by potentials on nearby metal or dielectric surfaces has potential applications in both 3-D and 2-D nanotechnology. Specifically, the synthesis, characterization, and understanding of designed solids with controlled built-in internal rotational motion of a dipole promises a new class of materials with intrinsic dielectric, ferroelectric, optical and optoelectronic properties not found in nature. Controlled rotational motion is of great interest due to its expected utility in phenomena as diverse as transport, current flow in molecular junctions, diffusion in microfluidic channels, and rotary motion in molecular machines. A direct time-resolved observation of the dynamics of motion on ps or ns time scale in a single molecule would be highly interesting but is also very difficult and has yet to be accomplished. Much can be learned from an easier but still challenging comparison of directly observed initial and final orientational states of a single molecule, which is the basis of this project. The project also impacts the understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and single-molecule spectroscopic detection, as well as the synthesis of solid-state materials with tailored properties from designed precursors.

  14. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone.

  15. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  16. Bioactivities of fish protein hydrolysates from defatted salmon backbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Slizyte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivities of bulk fish protein hydrolysates (FPH from defatted salmon backbones obtained with eight different commercial enzymes and their combinations were tested. All FPH showed antioxidative activity in vitro. DPPH scavenging activity increased, while iron chelating ability decreased with increasing time of hydrolysis. All FPH showed ACE inhibiting effect which depended on type of enzyme and increased with time of hydrolysis. The highest effect was found for FPH produced with Trypsin. Bromelain + Papain hydrolysates reduced the uptake of radiolabelled glucose into CaCo-2 cells, a model of human enterocytes, indicating a potential antidiabetic effect of FPH. FPH obtained by Trypsin, Bromelain + Papain and Protamex showed the highest ACE inhibitory, cellular glucose transporter (GLUT/SGLT inhibitory and in vitro antioxidative activities, respectively. Correlation was observed between the measured bioactivities, degree of hydrolysis and molecular weight profiles, supporting prolonged hydrolysis to obtain high bioactivities.

  17. Reconstruction of the Sunspot Group Number: the Backbone Method

    CERN Document Server

    Svalgaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    We have reconstructed the sunspot group count, not by comparisons with other reconstructions and correcting those where they were deemed to be deficient, but by a re-assessment of original sources. The resulting series is a pure solar index and does not rely on input from other proxies, e.g. radionuclides, auroral sightings, or geomagnetic records. 'Backboning' the data sets, our chosen method, provides substance and rigidity by using long-time observers as a stiffness character. Solar activity, as defined by the Group Number, appears to reach and sustain for extended intervals of time the same level in each of the last three centuries since 1700 and the past several decades do not seem to have been exceptionally active, contrary to what is often claimed.

  18. Conformal Bootstrap in Embedding Space

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain conformal blocks from embedding space with the help of the operator product expansion. The minimal conformal block originates from scalar exchange in a four-point correlation functions of four scalars. All remaining conformal blocks are simple derivatives of the minimal conformal block. With the help of the orthogonality properties of the conformal blocks, the analytic conformal bootstrap can be implemented directly in embedding space, leading to a Jacobi-like definition of conformal field theories.

  19. Conformal bootstrap in embedding space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Skiba, Witold

    2016-05-01

    It is shown how to obtain conformal blocks from embedding space with the help of the operator product expansion. The minimal conformal block originates from scalar exchange in a four-point correlation function of four scalars. All remaining conformal blocks are simple derivatives of the minimal conformal block. With the help of the orthogonality properties of the conformal blocks, the analytic conformal bootstrap can be implemented directly in embedding space, leading to a Jacobi-like definition of conformal field theories.

  20. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  1. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers.

  2. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Trandum, Christa; Larsen, Nanna Brink;

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (Tm) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal alpha-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  3. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.S.; Trandum, C.; Larsen, N.;

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (T-m) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal a-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  4. Conformal Gravity rotation curves with a conformal Higgs halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Keith

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the effect of a conformally coupled Higgs field on conformal gravity (CG) predictions for the rotation curves of galaxies. The Mannheim-Kazanas (MK) metric is a valid vacuum solution of CG's fourth-order Poisson equation if and only if the Higgs field has a particular radial profile, S(r) = S0 a/(r + a), decreasing from S0 at r = 0 with radial scalelength a. Since particle rest masses scale with S(r)/S0, their world lines do not follow time-like geodesics of the MK metric gμν, as previously assumed, but rather those of the Higgs-frame MK metric tilde{g}_{μ ν }=Ω ^2 g_{μ ν }, with the conformal factor Ω(r) = S(r)/S0. We show that the required stretching of the MK metric exactly cancels the linear potential that has been invoked to fit galaxy rotation curves without dark matter. We also formulate, for spherical structures with a Higgs halo S(r), the CG equations that must be solved for viable astrophysical tests of CG using galaxy and cluster dynamics and lensing.

  5. Polarizable protein model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Emanuel; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a novel polarizable protein model for the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique, a coarse-grained particle-based method widely used in modeling of fluid systems at the mesoscale. We employ long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators in combination with a newly developed polarizable water model. The protein in our model is resembled by a polarizable backbone and a simplified representation of the sidechains. We define the model parameters using the experimental structures of 2 proteins: TrpZip2 and TrpCage. We validate the model on folding of five other proteins and demonstrate that it successfully predicts folding of these proteins into their native conformations. As a perspective of this model, we will give a short outlook on simulations of protein aggregation in the bulk and near a model membrane, a relevant process in several Amyloid diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's and Diabetes II.

  6. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  7. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    KAUST Repository

    Narayanan Nair, Arun Kumar

    2014-10-07

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  8. Locally conformal symplectic manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izu Vaisman

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A locally conformal symplectic (l. c. s. manifold is a pair (M2n,Ω where M2n(n>1 is a connected differentiable manifold, and Ω a nondegenerate 2-form on M such that M=⋃αUα (Uα- open subsets. Ω/Uα=eσαΩα, σα:Uα→ℝ, dΩα=0. Equivalently, dΩ=ω∧Ω for some closed 1-form ω. L. c. s. manifolds can be seen as generalized phase spaces of Hamiltonian dynamical systems since the form of the Hamilton equations is, in fact, preserved by homothetic canonical transformations. The paper discusses first Hamiltonian vector fields, and infinitesimal automorphisms (i. a. on l. c. s. manifolds. If (M,Ω has an i. a. X such that ω(X≠0, we say that M is of the first kind and Ω assumes the particular form Ω=dθ−ω∧θ. Such an M is a 2-contact manifold with the structure forms (ω,θ, and it has a vertical 2-dimensional foliation V. If V is regular, we can give a fibration theorem which shows that M is a T2-principal bundle over a symplectic manifold. Particularly, V is regular for some homogeneous l. c. s, manifolds, and this leads to a general construction of compact homogeneous l. c. s, manifolds. Various related geometric results, including reductivity theorems for Lie algebras of i. a. are also given. Most of the proofs are adaptations of corresponding proofs in symplectic and contact geometry. The paper ends with an Appendix which states an analogous fibration theorem in Riemannian geometry.

  9. A Hub Location Problem with Fully Interconnected Backbone and Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy; Larsen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the design of two-layered fully interconnected networks. A two-layered network consists of clusters of nodes, each defining an access network and a backbone network. We consider the integrated problem of determining the access networks and the backbone network simultaneously...

  10. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or h

  11. Data acquisition backbone core DABC release v1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new experiments at FAIR require new concepts of data acquisition systems for the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework developed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. A DABC application consists of functional components like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, filter, analysis and storage which can be configured at runtime. Application specific code including the support of all kinds of data channels (front-end systems) is implemented by C++ program plug-ins. DABC is also well suited as environment for various detector and readout components test beds. A set of DABC plug-ins has been developed for the FAIR experiment CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) at GSI. This DABC application is used as DAQ system for test beamtimes. Front-end boards equipped with n-XYTER ASICs and ADCs are connected to read-out controller boards (ROC). From there the data is sent over Ethernet (UDP), or over optics and PCIe interface cards into Linux PCs. DABC does the controlling, event building, archiving and data serving. The first release of DABC was published in 2009 and is available under GPL license.

  12. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  13. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Epistasis analysis of 16S rRNA ram mutations helps define the conformational dynamics of the ribosome that influence decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lanqing; Fredrick, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The ribosome actively participates in decoding, with a tRNA-dependent rearrangement of the 30S A site playing a key role. Ribosomal ambiguity (ram) mutations have mapped not only to the A site but also to the h12/S4/S5 region and intersubunit bridge B8, implicating other conformational changes such as 30S shoulder rotation and B8 disruption in the mechanism of decoding. Recent crystallographic data have revealed that mutation G299A in helix h12 allosterically promotes B8 disruption, raising the question of whether G299A and/or other ram mutations act mainly via B8. Here, we compared the effects of each of several ram mutations in the absence and presence of mutation h8Δ2, which effectively takes out bridge B8. The data obtained suggest that a subset of mutations including G299A act in part via B8 but predominantly through another mechanism. We also found that G299A in h12 and G347U in h14 each stabilize tRNA in the A site. Collectively, these data support a model in which rearrangement of the 30S A site, inward shoulder rotation, and bridge B8 disruption are loosely coupled events, all of which promote progression along the productive pathway toward peptide bond formation.

  15. Studying the Conformation of a Silaffin-Derived Pentalysine Peptide Embedded in Bioinspired Silica using Solution and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Magic-Angle Spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Yasmin; Gottlieb, Hugo E; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Goobes, Gil

    2016-05-01

    Smart materials are created in nature at interfaces between biomolecules and solid materials. The ability to probe the structure of functional peptides that engineer biogenic materials at this heterogeneous setting can be facilitated tremendously by use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This sensitive NMR technique allows simple and quick measurements, often without the need for isotope enrichment. Here, it is used to characterize a pentalysine peptide, derived from a diatom's silaffin protein. The peptide accelerates the formation of bioinspired silica and gets embedded inside the material as it is formed. Two-dimensional DNP MAS NMR of the silica-bound peptide and solution NMR of the free peptide are used to derive its secondary structure in the two states and to pinpoint some subtle conformational changes that the peptide undergoes in order to adapt to the silica environment. In addition, interactions between abundant lysine residues and silica surface are identified, and proximity of other side chains to silica and to neighboring peptide molecules is discussed. PMID:26451953

  16. Improvements to robotics-inspired conformational sampling in rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Stein

    Full Text Available To accurately predict protein conformations in atomic detail, a computational method must be capable of sampling models sufficiently close to the native structure. All-atom sampling is difficult because of the vast number of possible conformations and extremely rugged energy landscapes. Here, we test three sampling strategies to address these difficulties: conformational diversification, intensification of torsion and omega-angle sampling and parameter annealing. We evaluate these strategies in the context of the robotics-based kinematic closure (KIC method for local conformational sampling in Rosetta on an established benchmark set of 45 12-residue protein segments without regular secondary structure. We quantify performance as the fraction of sub-Angstrom models generated. While improvements with individual strategies are only modest, the combination of intensification and annealing strategies into a new "next-generation KIC" method yields a four-fold increase over standard KIC in the median percentage of sub-Angstrom models across the dataset. Such improvements enable progress on more difficult problems, as demonstrated on longer segments, several of which could not be accurately remodeled with previous methods. Given its improved sampling capability, next-generation KIC should allow advances in other applications such as local conformational remodeling of multiple segments simultaneously, flexible backbone sequence design, and development of more accurate energy functions.

  17. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges

    2001-01-01

    The large-order behaviour of QCD is dominated by renormalons. On the other hand renormalons do not occur in conformal theories, such as the one describing the infrared fixed-point of QCD at small beta_0 (the Banks--Zaks limit). Since the fixed-point has a perturbative realization, all-order perturbative relations exist between the conformal coefficients, which are renormalon-free, and the standard perturbative coefficients, which contain renormalons. Therefore, an explicit cancellation of renormalons should occur in these relations. The absence of renormalons in the conformal limit can thus be seen as a constraint on the structure of the QCD perturbative expansion. We show that the conformal constraint is non-trivial: a generic model for the large-order behaviour violates it. We also analyse a specific example, based on a renormalon-type integral over the two-loop running-coupling, where the required cancellation does occur.

  18. [Conformers of carnosine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliuev, S A

    2006-01-01

    The geometric and energetic parameters of most stable conformations of carnosine were calculated by the semiempirical guantum-chemical method PM3. The carnosine-water-zinc (II) clusters were simulated. PMID:16909845

  19. Conformational dynamics is key to understanding loss-of-function of NQO1 cancer-associated polymorphisms and its correction by pharmacological ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnación, Medina-Carmona; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Esperanza, Padín-Gonzalez; Noel, Mesa-Torres; Salido, Eduardo; Timson, David J.; Pey, Angel L.

    2016-02-01

    Protein dynamics is essential to understand protein function and stability, even though is rarely investigated as the origin of loss-of-function due to genetic variations. Here, we use biochemical, biophysical, cell and computational biology tools to study two loss-of-function and cancer-associated polymorphisms (p.R139W and p.P187S) in human NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a FAD-dependent enzyme which activates cancer pro-drugs and stabilizes several oncosuppressors. We show that p.P187S strongly destabilizes the NQO1 dimer in vitro and increases the flexibility of the C-terminal domain, while a combination of FAD and the inhibitor dicoumarol overcome these alterations. Additionally, changes in global stability due to polymorphisms and ligand binding are linked to the dynamics of the dimer interface, whereas the low activity and affinity for FAD in p.P187S is caused by increased fluctuations at the FAD binding site. Importantly, NQO1 steady-state protein levels in cell cultures correlate primarily with the dynamics of the C-terminal domain, supporting a directional preference in NQO1 proteasomal degradation and the use of ligands binding to this domain to stabilize p.P187S in vivo. In conclusion, protein dynamics are fundamental to understanding loss-of-function in p.P187S, and to develop new pharmacological therapies to rescue this function.

  20. Synthesis and Conformation of cis-1,2-Disubstituted Cyclododecene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN,Xiang-Yu(韩翔宇); WANG,Ming-An(王明安); LIANG,Xiao-Mei(梁晓梅); WANG,Dao-Quan(王道全)

    2004-01-01

    Eight 1,2-disubstituted cyclododecenes were synthesized from a-alkoxycarbonyl-cyclododecanone and alkyl chloroformate. Their configuration and conformation determined by IR, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diftraction analysis showed that the carbon-carbon double bond of all of the synthesized compounds has cis-configuration, and the ring skeleton of their preferred conformation is [lene2333] in solid, and they may adopt two different [lene2333]conformations, which exist in a dynamic equilibrium in solution.

  1. Direct Formation of the C5′-Radical in the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone of DNA by High Energy Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA-strand scission and crosslinking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5′ (C5′•) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. Formation of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5′• found in DNA and of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• do not show an observable β-phosphorous hyperfine coupling (HFC). Further, C5′• found in DNA does not show a significant C4′-H β–proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorous HFC in CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• has a negligible β-phosphorous HFC. Based on these results, formation of radiation-induced C5′• is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone and rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5′• in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β proton or β phosphorous HFCs. PMID:22553971

  2. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Delineating the conformal window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Pickup, Thomas; Teper, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We identify and characterise the conformal window in gauge theories relevant for beyond the standard model building, e.g. Technicolour, using the criteria of metric confinement and causal analytic couplings, which are known to be consistent with the phase diagram of supersymmetric QCD from Seiberg...... duality. Using these criteria we find perturbation theory to be consistent throughout the predicted conformal window for several of these gauge theories and we discuss recent lattice results in the light of our findings....

  4. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-01-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  5. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  6. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally

  8. Binding, conformational transition and dimerization of amyloid-β peptide on GM1-containing ternary membrane: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutusi Manna

    Full Text Available Interactions of amyloid-β (Aβ with neuronal membrane are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to promote the structural conversion of Aβ and increase the rate of peptide aggregation; but the exact nature of interaction driving theses processes remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic-scale computer simulations (totaling 2.65 µs to investigate the behavior of Aβ monomer and dimers in GM1-containing raft-like membrane. The oligosaccharide head-group of GM1 was observed to act as scaffold for Aβ-binding through sugar-specific interactions. Starting from the initial helical peptide conformation, a β-hairpin motif was formed at the C-terminus of the GM1-bound Aβ-monomer; that didn't appear in absence of GM1 (both in fluid POPC and liquid-ordered cholesterol/POPC bilayers and also in aqueous medium within the simulation time span. For Aβ-dimers, the β-structure was further enhanced by peptide-peptide interactions, which might influence the propensity of Aβ to aggregate into higher-ordered structures. The salt-bridges and inter-peptide hydrogen bonds were found to account for dimer stability. We observed spontaneous formation of intra-peptide D(23-K(28 salt-bridge and a turn at V(24GSN(27 region - long been accepted as characteristic structural-motifs for amyloid self-assembly. Altogether, our results provide atomistic details of Aβ-GM1 and Aβ-Aβ interactions and demonstrate their importance in the early-stages of GM1-mediated Aβ-oligomerisation on membrane surface.

  9. Molecular dynamic study of MlaC protein in Gram-negative bacteria: conformational flexibility, solvent effect and protein-phospholipid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Miao, Yinglong; Munguia, Jason; Lin, Leo; Nizet, Victor; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The composition of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria is asymmetric, with the lipopolysaccharides found in the outer leaflet and phospholipids in the inner leaflet. The MlaC protein transfers phospholipids from the outer to inner membrane to maintain such lipid asymmetry in the Mla pathway. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations on apo and phospholipid-bound systems to study the dynamical properties of MlaC. Our simulations show that the phospholipid forms hydrophobic interactions with the protein. Residues surrounding the entrance of the binding site exhibit correlated motions to control the site opening and closing. Lipid binding leads to increase of the binding pocket volume and precludes entry of the water molecules. However, in the absence of the phospholipid, water molecules can freely move in and out of the binding site when the pocket is open. Dehydration occurs when the pocket closes. This study provides dynamic information of the MlaC protein and may facilitate the design of antibiotics against the Mla pathway of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27111825

  10. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  11. Resistance issues with new nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Mark A; Turner, Dan

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) remain an enduring feature of combination therapy. As NRTI/NtRTI options continue to expand, questions arise about how best to combine these agents to create effective dual NRTI/NtRTI backbones in antiretroviral regimens while avoiding treatment-emergent drug resistance. Clinicians must consider how NRTIs/NtRTIs such as tenofovir DF (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and emtricitabine (FTC), as well as new once-daily and coformulated NRTIs/NtRTIs, interact with older agents when combined in novel regimens and how sequencing the new NRTIs can preserve future treatment options. Resistance data from clinical trials have revealed important information on the patterns, prevalence, and effects of resistance seen among patients experiencing virologic failure. In recent years, the prevalence of some mutations such as M184V and Q151M has remained relatively constant, while the L74V mutation, the 69 insertions, and thymidine analogue mutations have decreased in prevalence. Other mutations such as K65R and Y115F, while still relatively uncommon, are increasing in prevalence. This increase may be due to the use of new treatment combinations that select for these mutations at a higher rate. Clinical trials suggest that new regimens containing TDF or ABC select for K65R and that this mutation is observed more frequently with TDF; in contrast, L74V is observed more frequently in ABC-containing regimens but is not commonly selected by TDF-containing regimens. Several lines of evidence are converging to suggest that the presence of zidovudine may decrease the risk of L74V and K65R in ABC- or TDF-containing regimens. This review summarizes the clinical implications of resistance profiles associated with new NRTI/NtRTI regimens in current use and in advanced clinical studies. PMID:15319668

  12. Conformational analysis on anti-HIV-1 peptide T22([Tyr5,12Lys7]-polyphemusinⅡ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The conformational scan of anti-HIV peptide T22 ([Tyr5,12, Lys7]-polyphemusin Ⅱ) backbone on a deformed potential energy surface (PES) was performed using the potential smoothing searching (PSS) protocol. All located minima were then transferred to the original PES using undeformed optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) potential function, and minimized by multi-conformer minimization (MCM). For solution-phase calculations, the GB/SA continuum model for water was used. This application of PSS integrated with MCM is proved a feasible method for solving the multiple-minimum problem in the conformational analysis of flexible molecules with cyclic structure.

  13. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs.

  14. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs. PMID:24013192

  15. Effects of calcium binding and the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy A8V mutation on the dynamic equilibrium between closed and open conformations of the regulatory N-domain of isolated cardiac troponin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu K; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2013-03-19

    Troponin C (TnC) is the calcium-binding subunit of the troponin complex responsible for initiating striated muscle contraction in response to calcium influx. In the skeletal TnC isoform, calcium binding induces a structural change in the regulatory N-domain of TnC that involves a transition from a closed to open structural state and accompanying exposure of a large hydrophobic patch for troponin I (TnI) to subsequently bind. However, little is understood about how calcium primes the N-domain of the cardiac isoform (cTnC) for interaction with the TnI subunit as the open conformation of the regulatory domain of cTnC has been observed only in the presence of bound TnI. Here we use paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) to characterize the closed to open transition of isolated cTnC in solution, a process that cannot be observed by traditional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Our PRE data from four spin-labeled monocysteine constructs of isolated cTnC reveal that calcium binding triggers movement of the N-domain helices toward an open state. Fitting of the PRE data to a closed to open transition model reveals the presence of a small population of cTnC molecules in the absence of calcium that possess an open conformation, the level of which increases substantially upon Ca(2+) binding. These data support a model in which calcium binding creates a dynamic equilibrium between the closed and open structural states to prime cTnC for interaction with its target peptide. We also used PRE data to assess the structural effects of a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy point mutation located within the N-domain of cTnC (A8V). The PRE data show that the Ca(2+) switch mechanism is perturbed by the A8V mutation, resulting in a more open N-domain conformation in both the apo and holo states.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of linear and comb-like polyelectrolytes in aqueous solution: effect of Ca2+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kefeng; Song, Xingfu; Sun, Shuying; Xu, Yanxia; Yu, Jianguo

    2014-08-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed to provide microscopic mechanism for the salt tolerance of polyelectrolytes dispersants. The conformational variation of polyelectrolytes and interactions between COO- groups and counterions/water molecules were also studied via radius of gyration and pair correlations functions. Sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) and sodium salts of poly(acrylic acid)-poly(ethylene oxide) (NaPA-PEO) were selected as the representative linear and comb-like polyelectrolyte, respectively. The results show that Ca2+ ions interact with COO- groups much stronger than Na+ ions and can bring ion-bridging interaction between intermolecular COO- groups in the NaPA systems. While in the NaPA-PEO systems, the introduced PEO side chains can prevent backbone chains from ion-bridging interactions and weaken the conformational changes. The present results can help in selecting and designing new-type efficient polyelectrolyte dispersants with good salt tolerance.

  17. Folding-induced modulation of excited-state dynamics in an oligophenylene-ethynylene-tethered spiral perylene bisimide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Minjung; Fimmel, Benjamin; Dehm, Volker; Würthner, Frank; Kim, Dongho

    2015-06-01

    The excited-state photophysical behavior of a spiral perylene bisimide (PBI) folda-octamer (F8) tethered to an oligophenylene-ethynylene scaffold is comprehensively investigated. Solvent-dependent UV/Vis and fluorescence studies reveal that the degree of folding in this foldamer is extremely sensitive to the solvent, thus giving rise to an extended conformation in CHCl(3) and a folded helical aggregate in methylcyclohexane (MCH). The exciton-deactivation dynamics are largely governed by the supramolecular structure of F8. Femtosecond transient absorption (TA) in the near-infrared region indicates a photoinduced electron-transfer process from the backbone to the PBI core in the extended conformation, whereas excitation power- and polarization-dependent TA measurements combined with computational modeling showed that excitation energy transfer between the unit PBI chromophores is the major deactivation pathway in the folded counterpart. PMID:25827823

  18. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N Experiment to Facilitate the Assignment of Backbone Resonances in Proteins Exhibiting High Backbone Shift Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H and 15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5,3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate (and/or to validate) the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide NH peaks. The experiment -encoding 5D spectral information- leads to a conventional 3D spectrum with significantly reduced spectral crowding and complexity. The impr...

  19. Computation-Guided Backbone Grafting of a Discontinuous Motif onto a Protein Scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoitei, Mihai L.; Correia, Bruno E.; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Carrico, Chris; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Chen, Lei; Schroeter, Alexandria; Huang, Po-Ssu; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Schief, William R. (UWASH); (FHCRC); (NIAID)

    2012-02-07

    The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.

  20. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  1. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  2. Amino acid preference against beta sheet through allowing backbone hydration enabled by the presence of cation

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    It is known that steric blocking by peptide sidechains of hydrogen bonding, HB, between water and peptide groups, PGs, in beta sheets accords with an amino acid intrinsic beta sheet preference. The present observations with Quantum Molecular Dynamics, QMD, simulation with quantum mechanical treatment of every water molecule solvating a beta sheet that would be transient in nature suggest that this steric blocking is not applicable in a hydrophobic region unless a cation is present, so that the amino acid beta sheet preference due to this steric blocking is only effective in the presence of a cation. We observed backbone hydration in a polyalanine and to a lesser extent polyvaline alpha helix without a cation being present, but a cation could increase the strength of these HBs. Parallel beta sheets have a greater tendency than antiparallel beta sheets of equivalent small size to retain regular structure in solvated QMD, and a 4 strand 4 inter-PG HB chain parallel beta sheet was used. Stability was reinforced b...

  3. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-09-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy.

  4. Conformational analysis of Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV derived cell penetrating peptide (CPP analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay G. Joshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to develop peptide analogs of Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD virus VP5 protein segment having cell penetrating ability to improve their interaction with cargo molecule (Nucleic acid without affecting the backbone conformation. Materials and Methods: IBDV VP5 protein segment designated as RATH peptide were synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis and their solution conformation was elucidated using CD spectroscopy in polar (water and apolar (TFE solvents. Cell penetrating ability of RATH-CONH2 was observed using FITC labeled peptide internalization in to HeLa cells under fluorescent microscopy. The efficacy of RATH analog interactions with nucleic acids was evaluated using FITC labeled oligonucleotides by fluorescence spectroscopy and plasmid constructs in gel retardation assay. Results: CD spectra of RATH analogs in water and apolar trifluroethanol (TFE helped to compare their secondary structures which were almost similar with dominant beta conformations suggesting successful induction of positive charge in the analogs without affecting back bone conformation of CPP designed. Cell penetrating ability of RATH CONH2 in HeLa cell was more than 90%. The fluorescence spectroscopy and plasmid constructs in gel retardation assay demonstrated successful interaction of amide analogs with nucleic acid. Conclusion: Intentional changes made in IBDV derived peptide RATH COOH to RATH CONH2 did not showed major changes in backbone conformation and such modifications may help to improve the cationic charge in most CPPs to interact with nucleic acid. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 307-312

  5. Proton Beam Therapy Versus Conformal Photon Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma: Multi-institutional Analysis of Outcomes, Cyst Dynamics, and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih [Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Kahalley, Lisa S. [Section of Psychology, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Cancer and Hematology Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We compared proton beam therapy (PBT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for pediatric craniopharyngioma in terms of disease control, cyst dynamics, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records from 52 children treated with PBT (n=21) or IMRT (n=31) at 2 institutions from 1996-2012. Endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control, cyst dynamics, and toxicity. Results: At 59.6 months' median follow-up (PBT 33 mo vs IMRT 106 mo; P<.001), the 3-year outcomes were 96% for OS, 95% for nodular failure-free survival and 76% for cystic failure-free survival. Neither OS nor disease control differed between treatment groups (OS P=.742; nodular failure-free survival P=.546; cystic failure-free survival P=.994). During therapy, 40% of patients had cyst growth (20% requiring intervention); immediately after therapy, 17 patients (33%) had cyst growth (transient in 14), more commonly in the IMRT group (42% vs 19% PBT; P=.082); and 27% experienced late cyst growth (32% IMRT, 19% PBT; P=.353), with intervention required in 40%. Toxicity did not differ between groups. On multivariate analysis, cyst growth was related to visual and hypothalamic toxicity (P=.009 and .04, respectively). Patients given radiation as salvage therapy (for recurrence) rather than adjuvant therapy had higher rates of visual and endocrine (P=.017 and .024, respectively) dysfunction. Conclusions: Survival and disease-control outcomes were equivalent for PBT and IMRT. Cyst growth is common, unpredictable, and should be followed during and after therapy, because it contributes to late toxicity. Delaying radiation therapy until recurrence may result in worse visual and endocrine function.

  6. The Effect of Conformational Variability of Phosphotriesterase upon N-acyl-L-homoserine Lactone and Paraoxon Binding: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongling Zhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The organophosphorous hydrolase (PTE from Brevundimonas diminuta is capable of degrading extremely toxic organophosphorous compounds with a high catalytic turnover and broad substrate specificity. Although the natural substrate for PTE is unknown, its loop remodeling (loop 7-2/H254R led to the emergence of a homoserine lactonase (HSL activity that is undetectable in PTE (kcat/km values of up to 2 × 104, with only a minor decrease in PTE paraoxonase activity. In this study, homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have been undertaken seeking to explain the reason for the substrate specificity for the wild-type and the loop 7-2/H254R variant. The cavity volume estimated results showed that the active pocket of the variant was almost two fold larger than that of the wild-type (WT enzyme. pKa calculations for the enzyme (the WT and the variant showed a significant pKa shift from WT standard values (ΔpKa = 3.5 units for the His254residue (in the Arg254 variant. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the displacement of loops 6 and 7 over the active site in loop 7-2/H254R variant is useful for N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL with a large aliphatic chain to site in the channels easily. Thence the expanding of the active pocket is beneficial to C4-HSL binding and has a little effect on paraoxon binding. Our results provide a new theoretical contribution of loop remodeling to the rapid divergence of new enzyme functions.

  7. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischewski, Andree, E-mail: lischews@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Mathematik, Rudower Chaussee 25, Room 1.310, D12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  8. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gaididei, Yu B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple phenomenological model for describing the conformational dynamics of biological macromolecules via the nonlinearity-induced instabilities is proposed. It is shown that the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom of closed molecular aggregates may act as drivers giving impetus to conformational dynamics of biopolymers. It is demonstrated that initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shapes and possible application to aggregates of bacter...

  9. Programmed Switching of Single Polymer Conformation on DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Madsen, Mikael; Knudsen, Jakob Bach; Gudnason, Daniel; Surareungchai, Werasak; Birkedal, Victoria; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2016-02-23

    DNA nanotechnology offers precise geometrical control of the positioning of materials, and it is increasingly also being used in the development of nanomechanical devices. Here we describe the development of a nanomechanical device that allows switching of the position of a single-molecule conjugated polymer. The polymer is functionalized with short single-stranded (ss) DNA strands that extend from the backbone of the polymer and serve as handles. The DNA polymer conjugate can be aligned on DNA origami in three well-defined geometries (straight line, left-turned, and right-turned pattern) by DNA hybridization directed by single-stranded guiding strands and ssDNA tracks extending from the origami surface and polymer handle. We demonstrate switching of a conjugated organic polymer conformation between left- and right-turned conformations of the polymer on DNA origami based on toehold-mediated strand displacement. The switching is observed by atomic force microscopy and by Förster resonance energy transfer between the polymer and two different organic dyes positioned in close proximity to the respective patterns. Using this method, the polymer conformation can be switched six times successively. This controlled nanomechanical switching of conjugated organic polymer conformation demonstrates unique control of the shape of a single polymer molecule, and it may constitute a new component for the development of reconfigurable nanophotonic and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26766635

  10. A Distributed Virtual Backbone Formation for Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong-tao; HE Chen; JIANG Ling-ge

    2007-01-01

    The virtual backbone is an approach for solving routing problems in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks. A connected dominating set (CDS) was proposed as a virtual backbone to improve the performance of wireless networks. The quality of a virtual backbone is measured not only by approximation factor, which is the ratio of its size to that of minimum CDS, but also time complexity and message complexity. In this paper, a distributed algorithm is presented to construct a minimum CDS for ad hoc and sensor networks. By destroying triangular loops in the virtual backbone, the proposed algorithm can effectively construct a CDS with smaller size. Moreover, our algorithm, which is fully localized, has a constant approximation ratio, linear message and time complexity, and low implementation complexity. The simulation results and theoretical analysis show that our algorithm has better efficiency and performance than conventional approaches.

  11. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  12. Conformal inflation coupled to matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We formulate new conformal models of inflation and dark energy which generalise the Higgs-Dilaton scenario. We embed these models in unimodular gravity whose effect is to break scale invariance in the late time Universe. In the early Universe, inflation occurs close to a maximum of both the scalar potential and the scalar coupling to the Ricci scalar in the Jordan frame. At late times, the dilaton, which decouples from the dynamics during inflation, receives a potential term from unimodular gravity and leads to the acceleration of the Universe. We address two central issues in this scenario. First we show that the Damour-Polyalov mechanism, when non-relativistic matter is present prior to the start of inflation, sets the initial conditions for inflation at the maximum of the scalar potential. We then show that conformal invariance implies that matter particles are not coupled to the dilaton in the late Universe at the classical level. When fermions acquire masses at low energy, scale invariance is broken and quantum corrections induce a coupling between the dilaton and matter which is still small enough to evade the gravitational constraints in the solar system

  13. Particle creation phenomenology and conformal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Berezin, Victor; Eroshenko, Yury

    2016-01-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the "usual" hydrodynamical description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by "the particle creation law", proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor (following the famous result by Ya. B. Zel`dovich and A. A.Starobinsky). Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the (Weyl)-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert-dilaton gravity action integral. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A. D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent. Some future developments of the theory are discussed in the Conclusion.

  14. Beta-scission of alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins can give rise to backbone cleavage and loss of side-chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 brings about multiple changes including side-chain oxidation, backbone fragmentation, cross-linking, unfolding, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes and formation of new reactive groups (e.g. hydroperoxides and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). All of these processes can result in loss of structural or enzymatic activity. The mechanisms that give rise to backbone cleavage are only partly understood. Whilst it is known that direct hydrogen atom abstraction at a-carbon sites gives backbone cleavages it has also been proposed that initial attack at side-chain sites might also give rise to backbone cleavage. In this study we have examined whether initial attack at the β- (C-3) position can give rise to α-carbon radicals (and hence backbone cleavage) via the formation, and subsequent β- scission, of C-3 alkoxyl radicals. This process has been observed previously with protected amino acids in organic solvents (J. Chem. Soc. Perkin Trans. 2, 1997, 503-507) but the occurrence of such reactions with proteins in aqueous solution has not been explored. Alkoxyl radicals were generated at the C-3 position of a variety of protected amino acids and small peptides by two methods: metal-ion catalysed decomposition of hydroperoxides formed as a result of γ-radiolysis in the presence of O2, and UV photolysis of nitrate esters. In most cases radicals have been detected by EPR spectroscopy using nitroso and nitrone spin traps, which can be assigned by comparison with literature data to α-carbon radicals; in some case assignments were confirmed by the generation of the putative species by other routes. With Ala peptide hydroperoxides and nitrate esters, and MNP as the spin trap, the major radical detected in each case has been assigned to the adduct of an α-carbon radical with partial structure - NH-.CH-C(O) - consistent with the rapid occurrence of the above reaction

  15. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr(215), effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr(215) can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  16. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr215, effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr215 can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  17. Conformal special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the information loss/recovery theorem based on the ADS/CFT correspondence is not consistent with the stability of the Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. Nonetheless, the conformal invariance of Yang-Mills theory points to new relativity principle compatible with quantum unitarity near those black holes

  18. Extende conformal field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taormina, A. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c{ge}1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification. (orig.).

  19. Extended conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  20. Conformal General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pervushin, V

    2001-01-01

    The inflation-free solution of problems of the modern cosmology (horizon, cosmic initial data, Planck era, arrow of time, singularity,homogeneity, and so on) is considered in the conformal-invariant unified theory given in the space with geometry of similarity where we can measure only the conformal-invariant ratio of all quantities. Conformal General Relativity is defined as the $SU_c(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$-Standard Model where the dimensional parameter in the Higgs potential is replaced by a dilaton scalar field described by the negative Penrose-Chernikov-Tagirov action. Spontaneous SU(2) symmetry breaking is made on the level of the conformal-invariant angle of the dilaton-Higgs mixing, and it allows us to keep the structure of Einstein's theory with the equivalence principle. We show that the lowest order of the linearized equations of motion solves the problems mentioned above and describes the Cold Universe Scenario with the constant temperature T and z-history of all masses with respect to an obser...

  1. A transformation process and mechanism between the α-conformation and β-conformation of conjugated polymer PFO in precursor solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Li, Tao; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lili; Bai, Zeming; Li, Xiaona; Huang, Xinan; Lu, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the solvent field and temperature are used to explore the mutual transformation dynamic process and mechanism between the α-conformation and β-conformation in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) precursor solution. The conformational transformation of the PFO chain is researched by UV-vis absorption spectra and the proportions of the β-conformation are quantitatively calculated. The corresponding variation trend of the aggregation structure is researched using a static and dynamic light scattering (SLS/DLS) method. It is found that the mutual transformation processes between the α-conformation and β-conformation are reversible in essence. Especially in the transformation processes, the complicated relationship between the β-conformation and the aggregation structure is understood, that is the aggregation structure promotes formation of the β-conformation under solvent field, then the conformational transformation of the β-conformation promotes the dissociation of the aggregation structure under temperature. The above results give an insight into the β-conformation and the aggregation structure of PFO in theory. Furthermore, under the temperature, we find that both two transformation steps have good linear correlations, which indicates that using temperature can be considered as a good method to accurately control the proportion of β-conformation in actual applications, and it will help us to get the desired proportion of the β-conformation in PFO precursor solution so as to make the charge carrier mobility of optoelectronic films increased and device performance better.

  2. n Silico Analysis of Envelope Dengue Virus-2 and Envelope Dengue Virus-3 Protein as the Backbone of Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine by Using Homology Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky I. Taufik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dengue fever, which was caused by Dengue virus infection, had became a major public health problem in the tropic and subtropical countries. Dengue virus (DENV had four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, based on their immunogenic in the human body. Preventive measure will be necessary to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, by developing modern vaccine. Approach: This research was focused on in silico study of dengue virus vaccines, by using envelope (E protein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 as their backbones. T cell epitope prediction was determined by using MULTIPRED server and B cell epitope prediction was determined by using Conformational Epitope Prediction server (CEP. Homology modeling study of E DENV-3 protein as the vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (HMM Vaccine 1-6. Moreover, homology modeling study of E DENV-2 protein as vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (ANN vaccine 1-6. Results: The BLAST analysis of HMM and ANN vaccines had produced 93% and 91% identity, respectively. The Ramachandran Plot of both vaccines had shown less than 15% non glycine residue in the disallowed region, therefore it showed the solid stability of the proteins. The VAST analysis of E DENV-3 backbone vaccines had determined, that HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-3. HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest VAST score of 64.5. Moreover, the VAST analysis of E DENV-2 backbone vaccines had determined, that ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-2. ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 have the highest VAST score of 64.7. Conclusion/Recommendation: It could be inferred from this research that HMM4; HMM6; ANN1; ANN3; ANN4; ANN5; and ANN6 were the best in silico vaccine design, based on their similarity with native E DENV Proteins. This research could be applied for the wet

  3. Technidilaton at the conformal edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Technidilaton (TD) was proposed long ago in the technicolor near criticality/conformality. To reveal the critical behavior of TD, we explicitly compute the nonperturbative contributions to the scale anomaly ⟨θμμ⟩ and to the technigluon condensate ⟨αGμν2⟩, which are generated by the dynamical mass m of the technifermions. Our computation is based on the (improved) ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation, with the gauge coupling α replaced by the two-loop running coupling α(μ) having the Caswell-Banks-Zaks infrared fixed point α*: α(μ)≃α=α* for the infrared region mHaba-Matsuzaki-Yamawaki. The decoupled TD can be a candidate of dark matter.

  4. Protein Conformational Populations and Functionally Relevant Sub-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Burger, Virginia [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Savol, Andrej [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Chennubhotla, Chakra [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA

    2013-01-01

    Functioning proteins do not remain fixed in a unique structure, but instead they sample a range of conformations facilitated by motions within the protein. Even in the native state, a protein exists as a collection of interconverting conformations driven by thermodynamic fluctuations. Motions on the fast time scale allow a protein to sample conformations in the nearby area of its conformational landscape, while motions on slower time scales give it access to conformations in distal areas of the landscape. Emerging evidence indicates that protein landscapes contain conformational substates with dynamic and structural features that support the designated function of the protein. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments provide information about conformational ensembles of proteins. X-ray crystallography allows researchers to identify the most populated states along the landscape, and computational simulations give atom-level information about the conformational substates of different proteins. This ability to characterize and obtain quantitative information about the conformational substates and the populations of proteins within them is allowing researchers to better understand the relationship between protein structure and dynamics and the mechanisms of protein function. In this Account, we discuss recent developments and challenges in the characterization of functionally relevant conformational populations and substates of proteins. In some enzymes, the sampling of functionally relevant conformational substates is connected to promoting the overall mechanism of catalysis. For example, the conformational landscape of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase has multiple substates, which facilitate the binding and the release of the cofactor and substrate and catalyze the hydride transfer. For the enzyme cyclophilin A, computational simulations reveal that the long time scale conformational fluctuations enable the enzyme to access conformational substates that allow

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of a single stranded (ss) DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Thakur, Siddarth; Burin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop an understanding of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to assist the development of new DNA-based biosensors. A ssDNA model containing twelve bases was constructed from the 130-145 codon sequence of the p53 gene. Various thermodynamic macroscopic observables such as temperature, energy distributions, as well as root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the nucleic acid backbone of the ssDNA were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The AMBER program was used for building the structural model of the ssDNA, and atomistic MD simulations in three different ensembles were carried out using the NAMD program. The microcanonical (NVE), conical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles were employed to compare the equilibrium characteristics of ssDNA in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the conformational stability of the ssDNA is dependent on the thermodynamic conditions.

  6. Simulation of infrared spectra for beta-hairpin peptides stabilized by an Aib-Gly turn sequence: correlation between conformational fluctuation and vibrational coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohyun; Huang, Rong; Kubelka, Jan; Bou Rcaron, Petr; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2006-11-23

    Vibrational spectra of a 12-residue beta-hairpin peptide, RYVEVBGKKILQ (HBG), stabilized by an Aib-Gly turn sequence (B = Aib) were investigated theoretically using a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Selected conformations of HBG were extracted from a classical MD trajectory and used for spectral simulations. DFT calculations, based on the Cartesian coordinate spectral property transfer protocol, were carried out for peptide structures in which all residues are replaced with Ala, except for the Aib and Gly residues, but the backbone (phi, psi, omega) structure of the original configuration is retained. The simulations provide a basis for interpretation of the HBG amide I infrared spectra in terms of structural variables such as detailed secondary structure and thermal conformational fluctuation as well as vibrational coupling as indicated by spectra of 13C isotope-labeled variants. The characteristic amide I band shape of such small beta-hairpin peptides appears to arise from the structure of the short antiparallel beta-sheet strands. The role of structural parameter fluctuation in vibrational coupling is evaluated by comparison of DFT-derived amide coupling constants for selected configurations and from transition dipole coupling calculations of coupling parameters between (13)C isotopically labeled residues for a MD-derived ensemble of configurations. Calculated results were compared with the experimentally obtained spectra for several (13)C isotope-labeled peptides of this sequence.

  7. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  8. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh, E-mail: dineshcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Raikwal, Nisha [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, CSIR, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Guleria, Anupam, E-mail: anuguleriaphy@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A reduced dimensionality experiment – referred as pseudo 5D HN(C)N- is presented. • Encodes highly resolved 5D spectral information in a 3D spectrum. • Superior in terms of peak dispersion. • Facilitates assignment of crowded HSQC spectra of moderately sized proteins. • Modulated {sup 15}N chemical shifts are used to break the amide shift degeneracy. - Abstract: Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment –(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. H{sub i}N{sub i} and H{sub i−1}N{sub i−1}) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide ({sup 1}H/{sup 15}N) and carbon ({sup 13}C{sup α}/{sup 13}C′) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  9. A Conformal Extension Theorem based on Null Conformal Geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Lübbe, Christian

    2008-01-01

    In this article we describe the formulation of null geodesics as null conformal geodesics and their description in the tractor formalism. A conformal extension theorem through an isotropic singularity is proven by requiring the boundedness of the tractor curvature and its derivatives to sufficient order along a congruence of null conformal geodesic. This article extends earlier work by Tod and Luebbe.

  10. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  11. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  12. Conformationally Gated Charge Transfer in DNA Three-Way Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Young, Ryan M; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Singh, Arunoday P N; Liu, Chaoren; Berlin, Yuri A; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Lewis, Frederick D; Ratner, Mark A; Renaud, Nicolas; Siriwong, Khatcharin; Voityuk, Alexander A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Beratan, David N

    2015-07-01

    Molecular structures that direct charge transport in two or three dimensions possess some of the essential functionality of electrical switches and gates. We use theory, modeling, and simulation to explore the conformational dynamics of DNA three-way junctions (TWJs) that may control the flow of charge through these structures. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum calculations indicate that DNA TWJs undergo dynamic interconversion among "well stacked" conformations on the time scale of nanoseconds, a feature that makes the junctions very different from linear DNA duplexes. The studies further indicate that this conformational gating would control charge flow through these TWJs, distinguishing them from conventional (larger size scale) gated devices. Simulations also find that structures with polyethylene glycol linking groups ("extenders") lock conformations that favor CT for 25 ns or more. The simulations explain the kinetics observed experimentally in TWJs and rationalize their transport properties compared with double-stranded DNA. PMID:26266714

  13. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  14. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  15. Hot Conformal Gauge Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We compute the nonzero temperature free energy up to the order g^6 \\ln(1/g) in the coupling constant for vector like SU(N) gauge theories featuring matter transforming according to different representations of the underlying gauge group. The number of matter fields, i.e. flavors, is arranged...... in such a way that the theory develops a perturbative stable infrared fixed point at zero temperature. Due to large distance conformality we trade the coupling constant with its fixed point value and define a reduced free energy which depends only on the number of flavors, colors and matter representation. We...... of flavors. Surprisingly this number, if computed to the order g^2, agrees with previous predictions for the lower boundary of the conformal window for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The higher order results tend to predict a higher number of critical flavors. These are universal properties, i...

  16. Conformal Complementarity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Barbón, José L F

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum cosmological models for certain classes of bang/crunch singularities, using the duality between expanding bubbles in AdS with a FRW interior cosmology and perturbed CFTs on de Sitter space-time. It is pointed out that horizon complementarity in the AdS bulk geometries is realized as a conformal transformation in the dual deformed CFT. The quantum version of this map is described in full detail in a toy model involving conformal quantum mechanics. In this system the complementarity map acts as an exact duality between eternal and apocalyptic Hamiltonian evolutions. We calculate the commutation relation between the Hamiltonians corresponding to the different frames. It vanishes only on scale invariant states.

  17. Conformable light emitting modules

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    As we become increasingly aware that there is more to light than the image it forms on our retina, and as we become more environmentally aware, the value of non-image-forming light increases along with the need for various new light related appliances. In particular, some lighting related applications are emerging which demand conformability (flexibility and stretchability). Well-being, automotive or wearable electronic applications are just a few examples where these trends can be observed. ...

  18. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  19. The conformal bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  20. Conformal boundaries of warped products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2006-01-01

    In this note we prove a result on how to determine the conformal boundary of a type of warped product of two length spaces in terms of the individual conformal boundaries. In the situation, that we treat, the warping and conformal distortion functions are functions of distance to a base point....... The result is applied to produce examples of CAT(0)-spaces, where the conformal and ideal boundaries differ in interesting ways....

  1. Random Conformal Weldings

    CERN Document Server

    Astala, K; Kupiainen, A; Saksman, E

    2009-01-01

    We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle. The homeomorphism is constructed using the exponential of $\\beta X$ where $X$ is the restriction of the two dimensional free field on the circle and the parameter $\\beta$ is in the "high temperature" regime $\\beta<\\sqrt 2$. The welding problem is solved by studying a non-uniformly elliptic Beltrami equation with a random complex dilatation. For the existence a method of Lehto is used. This requires sharp probabilistic estimates to control conformal moduli of annuli and they are proven by decomposing the free field as a sum of independent fixed scale fields and controlling the correlations of the complex dilation restricted to dyadic cells of various scales. For uniqueness we invoke a result by Jones and Smirnov on conformal removability of H\\"older curves. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

  2. Discovering conformational sub-states relevant to protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Ramanathan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA. QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function.

  3. Conformal Field Theory on R x S^3 from Quantized Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Ken-ji

    2008-01-01

    Conformal algebra on R x S^3 derived from quantized gravitational fields is examined. The model we study is a renormalizable quantum theory of gravity in four dimensions described by a combined system of the Weyl action for the traceless tensor mode and the induced Wess-Zumino action managing non-perturbative dynamics of the conformal factor in the metric field. It is shown that the residual diffeomorphism invariance in the radiation^+ gauge is equal to the conformal symmetry, and the conform...

  4. Molecular motions and conformational transition between different conformational states of HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein undergoes a series of conformational rearrangements while sequentially interacting with the receptor CD4 and coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4 on the surface of host cells to initiate virus entry. Both the crystal structures of the HIV-1 gp120 core bound by the CD4 and antigen 17b and the SIV gp120 core prebound by CD4 are known. Despite the wealth of knowledge on these static snapshots of molecular conformations, the details of molecular motions involved in conformational transition that are crucial to intervention remain elusive. We presented comprehensive comparative analyses of the dynamics behaviors of the gp120 in its CD4-complexed, CD4-free and CD4-unliganded states based on the homology models with modeled V3 and V4 loops by means of CONCOORD computer simulation to generate ensembles of feasible protein structures that were subsequently analysed by essential dynamics analyses to identify preferred concerted motions. The revealed collective fluctuations are dominated by complex modes of combinational motions of the rotation/twisting, flexing/closure, and shortness/elongation between or within the inner, outer, and bridging-sheet domains, and these modes are related to the CD4 association and HIV neutralization avoidance. Further essential subspace overlap analyses were performed to quantitatively distinguish the preference for conformational transitions between the three states, revealing that the unliganded gp120 has a greater potential to translate its conformation into the conformational state adopted by the CD4-complexed gp120 than by the CD4-free gp120, whereas the CD4-free gp120 has a greater potential to translate its conformation into the unliganded state than the CD4-complexed gp120 does. These dy-namics data of gp120 in its different conformations are helpful in understanding the relationship be-tween the molecular motion/conformational transition and the function of gp120, and in gp120-structure-based subunit

  5. Compact conformations of human protein disulfide isomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yang

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI composed of four thioredoxin-like domains a, b, b', and a', is a key enzyme catalyzing oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations starting from the crystal structures of human PDI (hPDI in the oxidized and reduced states were performed. The results indicate that hPDI adopts more compact conformations in solution than in the crystal structures, which are stabilized primarily by inter-domain interactions, including the salt bridges between domains a and b' observed for the first time. A prominent feature of the compact conformations is that the two catalytic domains a and a' can locate close enough for intra-molecular electron transfer, which was confirmed by the characterization of an intermediate with a disulfide between the two domains. Mutations, which disrupt the inter-domain interactions, lead to decreased reductase activity of hPDI. Our molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical experiments reveal the intrinsic conformational dynamics of hPDI and its biological impact.

  6. Integrated Data as backbone of e-Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Bergmann

    2013-01-01

    e-Navigation, a theme introduced but IMO to improve safety of navigation at sea, is starting to gain traction in various organizations. As the concept develops, the importance of data, both static as well as dynamic, is more and more realized. IALA and IHO, in their efforts to help making e-Navigation a reality, have agreed to propose the IHO GI Register (often known as S-100 Register) as the conceptual basis for the Common Maritime Data Structure (CMDS). Utilizing this common understanding o...

  7. Conformal Janus on Euclidean Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Dongsu; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2016-01-01

    We interpret Janus as an interface in a conformal field theory and study its properties. The Janus is created by an exactly marginal operator and we study its effect on the interface conformal field theory on the Janus. We do this by utilizing the AdS/CFT correspondence. We compute the interface free energy both from leading correction to the Euclidean action in the dual gravity description and from conformal perturbation theory in the conformal field theory. We find that the two results agree each other and that the interface free energy scales precisely as expected from the conformal invariance of the Janus interface.

  8. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  9. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-01

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature.

  10. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature. (paper)

  11. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Qun Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  12. Probing the Conformations of Single Molecule via Photon Counting Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Yonggang; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    We suggest an approach to detect the conformation of single molecule by using the photon counting statistics. The generalized Smoluchoswki equation is employed to describe the dynamical process of conformational change of single molecule. The resonant trajectories of the emission photon numbers $$ and the Mandel's $Q$ parameter, in the space of conformational coordinates $\\bm{\\mathcal{X}}$ and frequency $\\omega_L$ of external field ($\\bm{\\mathcal{X}}-\\omega_L$ space), can be used to rebuild the conformation of the single molecule. As an example, we consider Thioflavin T molecule. It demonstrates that the results of conformations extracted by employing the photon counting statistics is excellent agreement with the results of {\\it ab initio} computation.

  13. Conformance and Deviance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Neergaard, Peter; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni;

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses how large Danish companies are responding to new governmental regulation which requires them to report on corporate social responsibility (CSR). The paper is based on an analysis of 142 company annual reports required by the new Danish regulation regarding CSR reporting, plus ...... in CSR reporting practices. Finally, it is argued that non-conformance with the new regulatory requirements is not solely about conscious resistance but may also be caused by, for example, lack of awareness, resource limitations, misinterpretations, and practical difficulties....

  14. Impact of Backbone Fluorination on π-Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Leclerc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells have experienced a remarkable acceleration in performances in the last two decades, reaching power conversion efficiencies above 10%. This impressive progress is the outcome of a simultaneous development of more advanced device architectures and of optimized semiconducting polymers. Several chemical approaches have been developed to fine-tune the optoelectronics and structural polymer parameters required to reach high efficiencies. Fluorination of the conjugated polymer backbone has appeared recently to be an especially promising approach for the development of efficient semiconducting polymers. As a matter of fact, most currently best-performing semiconducting polymers are using fluorine atoms in their conjugated backbone. In this review, we attempt to give an up-to-date overview of the latest results achieved on fluorinated polymers for solar cells and to highlight general polymer properties’ evolution trends related to the fluorination of their conjugated backbone.

  15. INFLUENCE OF BACKBONE RIGIDITY ON THE LIQUID CRYSTALLINITY OF MESOGEN-CONTAINING POLYACETYLENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Two acetylene polymers containing cyanobiphenyl-based mesogens,poly{10-[((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)carbonyl]-1-decyne} (PA8CN), which has a relatively flexible polyalkyne backbone, and poly {[4-(((12-((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)dodecyl)oxy)carbonyl) phenyl]-acetylene} (PB12CN), which has a fairly rigid poly(phenylacetylene)backbone, were synthesized using respectively WCl6 and [Rh(nbd)Cl]2 as the catalysts.PA8CN exhibits enantiotropic interdigitated smectic A phase (SAd) over a temperature range as wide as ca. 100℃, whereas PB12CN is non-mesomorphic, demonstrating that the backbone rigidity plays an important role in determining the liquid crystallinity of the polyacetylenes.

  16. Probing backbone hydrogen bonding in PDZ/ligand interactions by protein amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Pedersen, Stine B; Anker, Louise;

    2014-01-01

    via backbone hydrogen bonds; however, little is known about the role of these hydrogen bonds due to experimental challenges with backbone mutations. Here we address this interaction by generating semisynthetic PDZ domains containing backbone amide-to-ester mutations and evaluating the importance...... of individual hydrogen bonds for ligand binding. We observe substantial and differential effects upon amide-to-ester mutation in PDZ2 of postsynaptic density protein 95 and other PDZ domains, suggesting that hydrogen bonding at the carboxylate-binding site contributes to both affinity and selectivity....... In particular, the hydrogen-bonding pattern is surprisingly different between the non-canonical and canonical interaction. Our data provide a detailed understanding of the role of hydrogen bonds in protein-protein interactions....

  17. Quantifying Conformance using the Skorokhod Metric (full version)

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, Jyotirmoy V.; Majumdar, Rupak; Prabhu, Vinayak S.

    2015-01-01

    The conformance testing problem for dynamical systems asks, given two dynamical models (e.g., as Simulink diagrams), whether their behaviors are "close" to each other. In the semi-formal approach to conformance testing, the two systems are simulated on a large set of tests, and a metric, defined on pairs of real-valued, real-timed trajectories, is used to determine a lower bound on the distance. We show how the Skorkhod metric on continuous dynamical systems can be used as the foundation for ...

  18. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26702948

  19. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  20. Density functional theory studies of MTSL nitroxide side chain conformations attached to an activation loop

    CERN Document Server

    Concilio, Maria Grazia; Bayliss, Richard; Burgess, Selena G

    2016-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical (QM) method rooted on density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to determine conformations of the methane-thiosulfonate spin label (MTSL) attached to a fragment extracted from the activation loop of Aurora-A kinase. The features of the calculated energy surface revealed low energy barriers between isoenergetic minima and the system could be described in a population of 76 rotamers that can be also considered for other systems since it was found that the X3, X4 and X5 do not depend on the previous two dihedral angles. Conformational states obtained were seen to comparable to those obtained in the {\\alpha}-helix systems studied previously, indicating that the protein backbone does not affect the torsional profiles significantly and suggesting the possibility to use determined conformations for other protein systems for further modelling studies.