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Sample records for b-naphthoflavone induce cellular

  1. IN VIVO MODULATION OF 17B-ESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN SYNTHESIS AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) LIVER CELLS BY B-NAPHTHOFLAVONE. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Cellular Basis for ADT-Induced Acceleration of Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0454 TITLE: Cellular Basis for ADT-Induced Acceleration of Sarcopenia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joe V...AND SUBTITLE Cellular Basis for ADT-Induced Acceleration of Sarcopenia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0454 5c. PROGRAM...cell function and thereby regenerative capability contribute to the acceleration of sarcopenia observed in prostate cancer patients undergoing ADT

  3. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldawud, Reem; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications. (paper)

  4. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-02-26

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications.

  5. Resveratrol Attenuates Copper-Induced Senescence by Improving Cellular Proteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Matos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfate-induced premature senescence (CuSO4-SIPS consistently mimetized molecular mechanisms of replicative senescence, particularly at the endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis level. In fact, disruption of protein homeostasis has been associated to age-related cell/tissue dysfunction and human disorders susceptibility. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with proved antiaging properties under particular conditions. In this setting, we aimed to evaluate resveratrol ability to attenuate cellular senescence induction and to unravel related molecular mechanisms. Using CuSO4-SIPS WI-38 fibroblasts, resveratrol is shown to attenuate typical senescence alterations on cell morphology, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, and cell proliferation. The mechanisms implicated in this antisenescence effect seem to be independent of senescence-associated genes and proteins regulation but are reliant on cellular proteostasis improvement. In fact, resveratrol supplementation restores copper-induced increased protein content, attenuates BiP level, and reduces carbonylated and polyubiquitinated proteins by autophagy induction. Our data provide compelling evidence for the beneficial effects of resveratrol by mitigating CuSO4-SIPS stressful consequences by the modulation of protein quality control systems. These findings highlight the importance of a balanced cellular proteostasis and add further knowledge on molecular mechanisms mediating resveratrol antisenescence effects. Moreover, they contribute to identifying specific molecular targets whose modulation will prevent age-associated cell dysfunction and improve human healthspan.

  6. Cytomegalovirus: pathophysiological mechanisms of the cytomegalovirus-induced cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokta, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of fibroblasts of human origin is associated with a cascade of morphologic cellular responses which in other systems have been associated with regulation of intracellular free (IF) [Ca ++ ]. In the present study, the relationship of specific ion fluxes (Ca ++ , Na + ) to the development of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced morphologic cellular responses was investigated. An influx of Ca ++ was observed by the first hour after CMV infection (PI), and total calcium sequestered by infected cells was enhanced by 5 hr Pl. A gradual rise in intracellular free (IF) [Ca ++ ] was observed that continued through 48 hour postinfection (hr Pl). The IF [Ca ++ ] response to CMV infection was shown to be multiplicity dependent, require viable virus, and occur under conditions consistent with the expression of immediate early CMV genes. Development and progression of cytomegaly was found to be independent of CMV DNA synthesis and appeared to be dependent on the IF [Ca ++ ] response. Ca ++ influx blockers (e.g. verapamil) and cyclic nucleotide modulators (e.g. papaverine) inhibited both Ca ++ responses and cytomegaly. Quabain-sensitive 86 Rb uptake and sequestering of Ca ++ increased in parallel with development of cytomegaly. There may be a relationship between Ca ++ influx, IF [Ca ++ ], activation of the Na + /H + exchanger, induction of Na + , Cl - , HCO 3 cotransport, Na + entry, Na + /K + ATPase activity and development of CMV-induced morphologic cellular responses including cytomegaly

  7. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  8. Plant polyphenols against UV-C-induced cellular death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Vladimir; Potapovich, Alla; Suhan, Tatiana; De Luca, Chiara; Pressi, Giovanna; Dal Toso, Roberto; Korkina, Liudmila

    2008-04-01

    The glycosylated phenylpropanoid verbascoside isolated from cultured cells of the medicinal plant Syringa vulgaris (Oleaceae) has previously been characterized as an effective scavenger of biologically active free radicals such as hydroxyl, superoxide, and nitric oxide, as a chelator of redox active transition metal ions (Fe (2+), Fe (3+), Cu (2+), and Ni (2+)), and an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. In the present work, we have compared the cytoprotective effects of the biotechnologically produced verbascoside with two commercially available polyphenols (the glycosylated flavonoid rutin and its aglycone quercetin) against free radical-mediated UVC-induced cellular death in cultures of human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and breast cancer cells (MCF 7). We have shown that all the polyphenols studied afforded effective protection against UVC-induced necrosis and did not prevent UVC-induced apoptosis in both normal and tumor cell lines. The cytoprotection did not correlate either with UVC absorbance by polyphenols or with their superoxide radical scavenging properties. However, UVC protection strongly depended on the lipid peroxidation inhibiting and Fe (2+) chelating properties of polyphenols. We suggest that these plant polyphenols could be feasible for a photoprotection of human skin.

  9. MSC/ECM Cellular Complexes Induce Periodontal Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takewaki, M; Kajiya, M; Takeda, K; Sasaki, S; Motoike, S; Komatsu, N; Matsuda, S; Ouhara, K; Mizuno, N; Fujita, T; Kurihara, H

    2017-08-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess self-renewing properties and multipotency, into a periodontal defect is thought to be a useful option for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, developing more reliable and predictable implantation techniques is still needed. Recently, we generated clumps of an MSC/extracellular matrix (ECM) complex (C-MSC), which consisted of cells and self-produced ECM. C-MSCs can regulate their cellular functions in vitro and can be grafted into a defect site, without any artificial scaffold, to induce bone regeneration. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of C-MSC transplantation on periodontal tissue regeneration in beagle dogs. Seven beagle dogs were employed to generate a premolar class III furcation defect model. MSCs isolated from dog ilium were seeded at a density of 7.0 × 10 4 cells/well into 24-well plates and cultured in growth medium supplemented with 50 µg/mL ascorbic acid for 4 d. To obtain C-MSCs, confluent cells were scratched using a micropipette tip and were then torn off as a cellular sheet. The sheet was rolled up to make round clumps of cells. C-MSCs were maintained in growth medium or osteoinductive medium (OIM) for 5 or 10 d. The biological properties of C-MSCs were evaluated in vitro, and their periodontal tissue regenerative activity was tested by using a dog class III furcation defect model. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that type I collagen fabricated the form of C-MSCs. OIM markedly elevated calcium deposition in C-MSCs at day 10, suggesting its osteogenic differentiation capacity. Both C-MSCs and C-MSCs cultured with OIM transplantation without an artificial scaffold into the dog furcation defect induced periodontal tissue regeneration successfully compared with no graft, whereas osteogenic-differentiated C-MSCs led to rapid alveolar bone regeneration. These findings suggested that the use of C-MSCs refined by self-produced ECM may represent a novel

  10. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M.; Verzosa, Grace C.; Stout, Michael B.; Mazula, Daniel L.; Palmer, Allyson K.; Baker, Darren J.; Jensen, Michael D.; Torbenson, Michael S.; Miller, Jordan D.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M.; Kirkland, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16INK4a promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  11. Cellular mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabi, Arwa; Keithley, Elizabeth M; Housley, Gary D; Ryan, Allen F; Wong, Ann C-Y

    2017-06-01

    Exposure to intense sound or noise can result in purely temporary threshold shift (TTS), or leave a residual permanent threshold shift (PTS) along with alterations in growth functions of auditory nerve output. Recent research has revealed a number of mechanisms that contribute to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The principle cause of NIHL is damage to cochlear hair cells and associated synaptopathy. Contributions to TTS include reversible damage to hair cell (HC) stereocilia or synapses, while moderate TTS reflects protective purinergic hearing adaptation. PTS represents permanent damage to or loss of HCs and synapses. While the substrates of HC damage are complex, they include the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the active stimulation of intracellular stress pathways, leading to programmed and/or necrotic cell death. Permanent damage to cochlear neurons can also contribute to the effects of NIHL, in addition to HC damage. These mechanisms have translational potential for pharmacological intervention and provide multiple opportunities to prevent HC damage or to rescue HCs and spiral ganglion neurons that have suffered injury. This paper reviews advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms that contribute to NIHL and their potential for therapeutic manipulation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and PKC activity, should be further exploited to develop suitable and novel drugs for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic .... determine their cancer-promoting and anticancer activi- ties, respectively. PKC contains .... cellular p53 protein by curcumin in colorectal carcinoma cells; Mol. Carcinog. 17 224–234.

  14. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, M.J.; White, T.A.; Evans, G.; Tonne, J.M.; Verzosa, G.C.; Stout, M.B.; Mazula, D.L.; Palmer, A.K.; Baker, D.J.; Jensen, M.D.; Torbenson, M.S.; Miller, J.D.; Ikeda, Y.; Tchkonia, T.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Kirkland, J.L.; LeBrasseur, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the

  15. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Cytokine expression and signaling in drug-induced cellular senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Hubáčková, Soňa; Košař, Martin; Janderová-Rossmeislová, Lenka; Dobrovolná, Jana; Vašicová, Pavla; Vančurová, Markéta; Hořejší, Zuzana; Hozák, Pavel; Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2010), s. 273-284 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390501; GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:EC(XE) TRIREME Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cellular senescence * cytokines * JAK/STAT signaling pathway Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.414, year: 2010

  17. Cellular proton dynamics in Elodea canadensis leaves induced by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq Javed, M; Lindberg, Sylvia; Greger, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Our earlier investigations showed that Elodea canadensis shoots, grown in the presence of cadmium (Cd), caused basification of the surrounding medium. The present study was aimed to examine the proton dynamics of the apoplastic, cytosolic and vacuolar regions of E. canadensis leaves upon Cd exposure and to establish possible linkage between cellular pH changes and the medium basification. The changes in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2+)]cyt was also investigated as the [Ca(2+)]cyt and [pH]cyt homeostasis are closely linked. The cellular H(+) and Ca(2+) concentrations were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and ion-specific fluorescent dyes. Cadmium concentration of leaf-cell walls was measured after plant cultivation at different fixed levels of starting pH. The protoplasts from E. canadensis leaves were isolated by use of a newly developed enzymatic method. Upon Cd addition, both cytosolic and vacuolar pH of leaf protoplasts increased with a concomitant rise in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Time course studies revealed that changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt and [pH]cyt followed similar dynamics. Cadmium (0.5 μM) exposure decreased the apoplastic pH by 0.85 units. The maximum cell wall bound Cd-contents were obtained in plants grown at low starting pH. It is concluded that Cd treatment causes apoplastic acidosis in E. canadensis leaves associated with enhanced Cd binding to the cell walls and, consequently, reduced Cd influx into the cytosol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The data obtained provide insight into the mechanism of cell proliferation action of endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the effectiveness of melanoma treatment. Keywords: Apoptosis, Human melanoma cells, Inducible nitric oxide ...

  19. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO•) and influence of p53 status during apoptosis induced by a ... endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the ..... agents, further research will be required to define more specifically the ...

  20. Cellular neoplastic transformation induced by 916 MHz microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wang, Minglian; Zeng, Yi; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2012-08-01

    There has been growing concern about the possibility of adverse health effects resulting from exposure to microwave radiations, such as those emitted by mobile phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular neoplastic transformation effects of electromagnetic fields. 916 MHz continuous microwave was employed in our study to simulate the electromagnetic radiation of mobile phone. NIH/3T3 cells were adopted in our experiment due to their sensitivity to carcinogen or cancer promoter in environment. They were divided randomly into one control group and three microwave groups. The three microwave groups were exposed to 916 MHz EMF for 2 h per day with power density of 10, 50, and 90 w/m(2), respectively, in which 10 w/m(2) was close to intensity near the antenna of mobile phone. The morphology and proliferation of NIH/3T3 cells were examined and furthermore soft agar culture and animal carcinogenesis assay were carried out to determine the neoplastic promotion. Our experiments showed NIH/3T3 cells changed in morphology and proliferation after 5-8 weeks exposure and formed clone in soft agar culture after another 3-4 weeks depending on the exposure intensity. In the animal carcinogenesis study, lumps developed on the back of SCID mice after being inoculated into exposed NIH/3T3 cells for more than 4 weeks. The results indicate that microwave radiation can promote neoplastic transformation of NIH/3T3cells.

  1. PTTG1 attenuates drug-induced cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Tong

    Full Text Available As PTTG1 (pituitary tumor transforming gene abundance correlates with adverse outcomes in cancer treatment, we determined mechanisms underlying this observation by assessing the role of PTTG1 in regulating cell response to anti-neoplastic drugs. HCT116 cells devoid of PTTG1 (PTTG1(-/- exhibited enhanced drug sensitivity as assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation in vitro. Apoptosis, mitosis catastrophe or DNA damage were not detected, but features of senescence were observed using low doses of doxorubicin and TSA. The number of drug-induced PTTG1(-/- senescent cells increased ∼4 fold as compared to WT PTTG1-replete cells (p<0.001. p21, an important regulator of cell senescence, was induced ∼3 fold in HCT116 PTTG1(-/- cells upon doxorubicin or Trichostatin A treatment. Binding of Sp1, p53 and p300 to the p21 promoter was enhanced in PTTG1(-/- cells after treatment, suggesting transcriptional regulation of p21. p21 knock down abrogated the observed senescent effects of these drugs, indicating that PTTG1 likely suppresses p21 to regulate drug-induced senescence. PTTG1 also regulated SW620 colon cancer cells response to doxorubicin and TSA mediated by p21. Subcutaneously xenografted PTTG1(-/- HCT116 cells developed smaller tumors and exhibited enhanced responses to doxorubicin. PTTG1(-/- tumor tissue derived from excised tumors exhibited increased doxorubicin-induced senescence. As senescence is a determinant of cell responses to anti-neoplastic treatments, these findings suggest PTTG1 as a tumor cell marker to predict anti-neoplastic treatment outcomes.

  2. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) associates with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-1 (FGFR1). However, the biological significance of this interaction remains largely elusive. In this study, we show that NCAM induces a specific, FGFR1-mediated cellular response that is remarkably...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  3. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  4. [Cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yongchang; Du, Shunda; Xu, Haifeng; Xu, Yiyao; Zhao, Haitao; Chi, Tianyi; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Mao, Yilei

    2014-11-18

    To systemically explore the cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells with bioinformatics tools. Published microarray dataset of TNF-α-induced HepG2, human transcription factor database HTRI and human protein-protein interaction database HPRD were used to construct and analyze the signal transduction network. In the signal transduction network, MYC and SP1 were the key nodes of signaling transduction. Several genes from the network were closely related with cellular adhesion.Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a possible key gene of effectively regulating cellular adhesion during the induction of TNF-α. EGFR is a possible key gene for TNF-α-induced metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Cellular autophagocytosis induced by X-irradiation and vinblastine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamberg, H.

    1983-01-01

    Autophagocytosis was induced in cultured, human glial cells by X-irradiation or exposure to vinblastine sulphate. A transmission electron microscopic investigation of the origin of the segregating membranes in the autophagic process was performed by labelling of endocytotic vacuoles and lysosomes with electron-dense marker particles (native and cationized ferritin, celloidal gold and thorium dioxide). Cytochemical demonstration of the lysosomal marker enzyme acid phosphatase and serial sectioning of the cells were also carried out. The majority of newly formed, double-membrane bounded autophagic vacuoles were devoid of markers for both lysosomes and endocytotic vacuoles. Moreover, no evidence of origin from the endoplasmic reticulum was found and the segregating membranes of this type of autophagic vacuoles were, by process of elimination, considered likely to be derived from Golgi vacuoles or, possibly, assembled de novo. Autophagy also appeared to be effected through an alternative pathway involving a lysosomal wrapping or microautophagic mechanism. (author)

  6. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of cellular reprogramming to induced pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hurk, Mark; Kenis, Gunter; Bardy, Cedric; van den Hove, Daniel L; Gage, Fred H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Rutten, Bart P

    2016-08-01

    Enforced ectopic expression of a cocktail of pluripotency-associated genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The remarkable proliferation ability of iPSCs and their aptitude to redifferentiate into any cell lineage makes these cells a promising tool for generating a variety of human tissue in vitro. Yet, pluripotency induction is an inefficient process, as cells undergoing reprogramming need to overcome developmentally imposed epigenetic barriers. Recent work has shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that drive the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs. Here, we present current knowledge on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of pluripotency induction and discuss how variability in epigenetic states impacts iPSCs' inherent biological properties.

  7. Compression induced intercellular shaping for some geometric cellular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonai Gimenez Calbo

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The wall perimeter fraction, which contact neighboring cells, was named compression ratio (alpha. A zero compression ratio indicates maximum intercellular (air volume (vG, v/v and neglectable contact among cells, while alpha=1 indicates complete adherence between neighboring cells and no vG in the lattice. The maximum intercellular air volume (beta, v/v, when alpha=0, was 0.593 for triangular, 0.2146 for square and 0,0931 for hexagonal lattices. The equation alpha=1- (vG/beta½ was derived to relate alpha, beta and vG in the studied lattices. The relation (P S=p/alpha between cell turgor (P S and the tissue aggregating pressure (p, defined as the compression to keep in place a layer of cells, was demonstrated using the compression ratio concept. Intercellular deformations of Ipomea batatas L. roots obtained with pressure chamber were used to test alpha, vG, p and P S as a function of compression. Volumetric and transversal elastic extensibilities and the lamella media tearing forces were obtained and alpha constancy was considered as a criteria of cellular shape stability.A fração do perímetro da parede celular em contato com células vizinha foi denominada razão de compressão (alfa. Razão de compressão zero indica volume intercelular (vG, v/v máximo e contato neglível entre as células, enquanto alfa=1 ocorre quando há completa aderência com as células vizinhas (vG=0. O volume (gasoso intercelular máximo (beta, v/v, quando alfa=0, foi 0,593, 0,2146 e 0,0931 para látices triangulares, quadradas e hexagonais. A equação derivada para relacionar alfa, beta and vG nas látices estudadas foi alfa=1- (vG/beta½. A razão de compressão foi em seguida empregada para estabelecer a relação P S=p/alfa entre a pressão de turgescência (P S e a pressão de agregação (p, definida com a compressão para manter uma camada de células no seu lugar. As deformações intercelulares de batata-doce obtidas com procedimentos de c

  8. The Role of Autophagy in Nanoparticles-Induced Toxicity and Its Related Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Ju, Dianwen

    2018-01-01

    In the past decades, nanoparticles have been widely used in industry and pharmaceutical fields for drug delivery, anti-pathogen, and diagnostic imaging purposes because of their unique physicochemical characteristics such as special ultrastructure, dispersity, and effective cellular uptake properties. But the nanotoxicity has been raised over the extensive applications of nanoparticles. Researchers have elucidated series of mechanisms in nanoparticles-induced toxicity, including apoptosis, necrosis, oxidative stress, and autophagy. Among upon mechanisms, autophagy was recently recognized as an important cell death style in various nanoparticles-induced toxicity, but the role of autophagy and its related cellular and molecular mechanisms during nanoparticles-triggered toxicity were still confusing. In the chapter, we briefly introduced the general process of autophagy, summarized the different roles of autophagy in various nanoparticle-treated different in vitro/in vivo models, and deeply analyzed the physicochemical and biochemical (cellular and molecular) mechanisms of autophagy during nanoparticles-induced toxicity through listing and summarizing representative examples. Physicochemical mechanisms mainly include dispersity, size, charge, and surface chemistry; cellular mechanisms primarily focus on lysosome impairment, mitochondria dysfunction, mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress and endoplasmic reticulum autophagy; while molecular mechanisms were mainly including autophagy related signaling pathways, hypoxia-inducible factor, and oxidative stress. This chapter highlighted the important role of autophagy as a critical mechanism in nanoparticles-induced toxicity, and the physicochemical and biochemical mechanisms of autophagy triggered by nanoparticles might be useful for establishing a guideline for the evaluation of nanotoxicology, designing and developing new biosafety nanoparticles in the future.

  9. Cocaine-Induced Adaptations in Cellular Redox Balance Contributes to Enduring Behavioral Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine–glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first det...

  10. Cellular stress induces a protective sleep-like state in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew J; Mansfield, Richard; Lopez, Jessie M N G; Raizen, David M; Van Buskirk, Cheryl

    2014-10-20

    Sleep is recognized to be ancient in origin, with vertebrates and invertebrates experiencing behaviorally quiescent states that are regulated by conserved genetic mechanisms. Despite its conservation throughout phylogeny, the function of sleep remains debated. Hypotheses for the purpose of sleep include nervous-system-specific functions such as modulation of synaptic strength and clearance of metabolites from the brain, as well as more generalized cellular functions such as energy conservation and macromolecule biosynthesis. These models are supported by the identification of synaptic and metabolic processes that are perturbed during prolonged wakefulness. It remains to be seen whether perturbations of cellular homeostasis in turn drive sleep. Here we show that under conditions of cellular stress, including noxious heat, cold, hypertonicity, and tissue damage, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans engages a behavioral quiescence program. The stress-induced quiescent state displays properties of sleep and is dependent on the ALA neuron, which mediates the conserved soporific effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand overexpression. We characterize heat-induced quiescence in detail and show that it is indeed dependent on components of EGF signaling, providing physiological relevance to the behavioral effects of EGF family ligands. We find that after noxious heat exposure, quiescence-defective animals show elevated expression of cellular stress reporter genes and are impaired for survival, demonstrating the benefit of stress-induced behavioral quiescence. These data provide evidence that cellular stress can induce a protective sleep-like state in C. elegans and suggest that a deeply conserved function of sleep is to mitigate disruptions of cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sub-cellular distribution of two salt-induced peptides in roots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... environment. Targeting of these proteins to specific location within or outside the cell may also yield important clues to their function. In such a pursuit, ten days old seedlings of a ... harvested, ground, and fractionated in to sub-cellular components. ... Many of the identified polypeptides are induced in gly-.

  12. MicroRNA Regulation of Oxidative Stress-Induced Cellular Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Sophia; Cavinato, Maria; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a time-related process of functional deterioration at cellular, tissue, organelle, and organismal level that ultimately brings life to end. Cellular senescence, a state of permanent cell growth arrest in response to cellular stress, is believed to be the driver of the aging process and age-related disorders. The free radical theory of aging, referred to as oxidative stress (OS) theory below, is one of the most studied aging promoting mechanisms. In addition, genetics and epigenetics also play large roles in accelerating and/or delaying the onset of aging and aging-related diseases. Among various epigenetic events, microRNAs (miRNAs) turned out to be important players in controlling OS, aging, and cellular senescence. miRNAs can generate rapid and reversible responses and, therefore, are ideal players for mediating an adaptive response against stress through their capacity to fine-tune gene expression. However, the importance of miRNAs in regulating OS in the context of aging and cellular senescence is largely unknown. The purpose of our article is to highlight recent advancements in the regulatory role of miRNAs in OS-induced cellular senescence. PMID:28593022

  13. Clonal deletion and clonal anergy in the thymus induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.L.; Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that immune tolerance can be achieved in the thymus both by clonal deletion and by clonal inactivation, but that the two tolerant states are induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities. TCR engagement of self antigens on bone marrow-derived, radiation-sensitive (presumably dendritic) cells induces clonal deletion of developing thymocytes, whereas TCR engagement of self antigens on radiation-resistant cellular elements, such as thymic epithelium, induces clonal anergy. The nondeleted, anergic thymocytes can express IL-2-Rs but are unable to proliferate in response to either specific antigen or anti-TCR antibodies, and do develop into phenotypically mature cells that emigrate out of the thymus and into the periphery

  14. A synthetic ion transporter that disrupts autophagy and induces apoptosis by perturbing cellular chloride concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschaert, Nathalie; Park, Seong-Hyun; Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Yoon Pyo; Park, Jinhong; Howe, Ethan N. W.; Hiscock, Jennifer R.; Karagiannidis, Louise E.; Marques, Igor; Félix, Vítor; Namkung, Wan; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Gale, Philip A.; Shin, Injae

    2017-07-01

    Perturbations in cellular chloride concentrations can affect cellular pH and autophagy and lead to the onset of apoptosis. With this in mind, synthetic ion transporters have been used to disturb cellular ion homeostasis and thereby induce cell death; however, it is not clear whether synthetic ion transporters can also be used to disrupt autophagy. Here, we show that squaramide-based ion transporters enhance the transport of chloride anions in liposomal models and promote sodium chloride influx into the cytosol. Liposomal and cellular transport activity of the squaramides is shown to correlate with cell death activity, which is attributed to caspase-dependent apoptosis. One ion transporter was also shown to cause additional changes in lysosomal pH, which leads to impairment of lysosomal enzyme activity and disruption of autophagic processes. This disruption is independent of the initiation of apoptosis by the ion transporter. This study provides the first experimental evidence that synthetic ion transporters can disrupt both autophagy and induce apoptosis.

  15. Light-activated hypericin induces cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Hypericin from Hypericum perforatum plants shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that light-activated hypericin induced the cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The result showed that hypericin resulted in a drug- and light-dose dependent cytotoxicity in the CNE-2 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of hypericin depends on both of the drug concentration (0 - 2.5 μM) and light-doses (1 - 8 J/cm2). We further investigated the apoptosis of the CNE-2 cells 8 hours after photosensitization of hypericin using fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI staining was used to analyze early and late apoptosis. These data demonstrated that light-activated hypericin could significantly lead to the cellular destruction of the CNE-2 cells and induce early apoptosis as a prominent mode of cell death.

  16. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-01-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  17. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@jcbose.ac.in

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  18. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hag Dong [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Chang-Young [Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Jeong Min [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Institute of Molecular Medicine and Nutrition, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Jeongwon, E-mail: biojs@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Institute of Molecular Medicine and Nutrition, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon, E-mail: joonkim@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  19. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes

  20. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-11-24

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  1. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Balentova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  2. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  3. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Furfural induces reactive oxygen species accumulation and cellular damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slininger Patricia J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofuels offer a viable alternative to petroleum-based fuel. However, current methods are not sufficient and the technology required in order to use lignocellulosic biomass as a fermentation substrate faces several challenges. One challenge is the need for a robust fermentative microorganism that can tolerate the inhibitors present during lignocellulosic fermentation. These inhibitors include the furan aldehyde, furfural, which is released as a byproduct of pentose dehydration during the weak acid pretreatment of lignocellulose. In order to survive in the presence of furfural, yeast cells need not only to reduce furfural to the less toxic furan methanol, but also to protect themselves and repair any damage caused by the furfural. Since furfural tolerance in yeast requires a functional pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, and the PPP is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS tolerance, we decided to investigate whether or not furfural induces ROS and its related cellular damage in yeast. Results We demonstrated that furfural induces the accumulation of ROS in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, furfural was shown to cause cellular damage that is consistent with ROS accumulation in cells which includes damage to mitochondria and vacuole membranes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear chromatin. The furfural-induced damage is less severe when yeast are grown in a furfural concentration (25 mM that allows for eventual growth after an extended lag compared to a concentration of furfural (50 mM that prevents growth. Conclusion These data suggest that when yeast cells encounter the inhibitor furfural, they not only need to reduce furfural into furan methanol but also to protect themselves from the cellular effects of furfural and repair any damage caused. The reduced cellular damage seen at 25 mM furfural compared to 50 mM furfural may be linked to the observation that at 25 mM furfural yeast were able to exit the furfural-induced

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual

  6. Cellular Development Associated with Induced Mycotoxin Synthesis in the Filamentous Fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Jon; Weber, Jakob; Broz, Karen; Kistler, H. Corby

    2013-01-01

    Several species of the filamentous fungus Fusarium colonize plants and produce toxic small molecules that contaminate agricultural products, rendering them unsuitable for consumption. Among the most destructive of these species is F. graminearum, which causes disease in wheat and barley and often infests the grain with harmful trichothecene mycotoxins. Synthesis of these secondary metabolites is induced during plant infection or in culture in response to chemical signals. Our results show that trichothecene biosynthesis involves a complex developmental process that includes dynamic changes in cell morphology and the biogenesis of novel subcellular structures. Two cytochrome P-450 oxygenases (Tri4p and Tri1p) involved in early and late steps in trichothecene biosynthesis were tagged with fluorescent proteins and shown to co-localize to vesicles we provisionally call “toxisomes.” Toxisomes, the inferred site of trichothecene biosynthesis, dynamically interact with motile vesicles containing a predicted major facilitator superfamily protein (Tri12p) previously implicated in trichothecene export and tolerance. The immediate isoprenoid precursor of trichothecenes is the primary metabolite farnesyl pyrophosphate. Changes occur in the cellular localization of the isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase when cultures non-induced for trichothecene biosynthesis are transferred to trichothecene biosynthesis inducing medium. Initially localized in the cellular endomembrane system, HMG CoA reductase, upon induction of trichothecene biosynthesis, increasingly is targeted to toxisomes. Metabolic pathways of primary and secondary metabolism thus may be coordinated and co-localized under conditions when trichothecene biosynthesis occurs. PMID:23667578

  7. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C; Hermine, Olivier

    2010-04-12

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML.

  8. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML. PMID:20368581

  9. Complex ordered patterns in mechanical instability induced geometrically frustrated triangular cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Kosmrlj, Andrej; Noorduin, Wim; Shian, Samuel; Weaver, James; Clarke, David; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-03-01

    Geometrical frustration arises when a local order cannot propagate throughout the space due to geometrical constraints. It plays a major role in many natural and synthetic systems including water ice, spin ice, and metallic glasses. All of these geometrically frustrated systems are degenerate and tend to form disordered ground-state configurations. Here, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the behavior of buckling-induced geometrically frustrated triangular cellular structures. To our surprise, we find that mechanical instabilities induce complex ordered patterns with tunability. For structures with low porosity, an ordered symmetric pattern emerges, which shows striking correlations with the ideal spin solid. In contrast, for high porosity systems, an ordered chiral pattern forms with a new spin configuration. Our analysis using a spin-like model reveals that the connected geometry of the cellular structure plays a crucial role in the formation of ordered states in this system. Since in our study geometrical frustration is induced by a mechanical instability that is scale-independent, our findings can be extended to different materials, stimuli, and length scales, providing a general strategy to study and visualize the physics of frustration.

  10. Accelerated Telomere Shortening in Acromegaly; IGF-I Induces Telomere Shortening and Cellular Senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusaku Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Patients with acromegaly exhibit reduced life expectancy and increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Telomere shortening is reportedly associated with reduced life expectancy and increased prevalence of these age-related diseases.We measured telomere length in patients with acromegaly using quantitative PCR method. The effect of GH and IGF-I on telomere length and cellular senescence was examined in human skin fibroblasts.Patients with acromegaly exhibited shorter telomere length than age-, sex-, smoking-, and diabetes-matched control patients with non-functioning pituitary adenoma (0.62 ± 0.23 vs. 0.75 ± 0.35, respectively, P = 0.047. In addition, telomere length in acromegaly was negatively correlated with the disease duration (R2 = 0.210, P = 0.003. In vitro analysis revealed that not GH but IGF-I induced telomere shortening in human skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, IGF-I-treated cells showed increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and expression of p53 and p21 protein. IGF-I-treated cells reached the Hayflick limit earlier than GH- or vehicle-treated cells, indicating that IGF-I induces cellular senescence.Shortened telomeres in acromegaly and cellular senescence induced by IGF-I can explain, in part, the underlying mechanisms by which acromegaly exhibits an increased morbidity and mortality in association with the excess secretion of IGF-I.

  11. Enhancing repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA as a radiotherapeutic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Protection of mammalian organisms including man from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is of paramount importance and development of effective approaches to combat radiation damages using non-toxic radioprotectors is of considerable interest for defence, nuclear industries, radiation accidents, space travels, etc., besides the protection of normal tissues during radiotherapy of tumours. Many synthetic as well as natural compounds have been investigated in the recent past for their efficacy to protect the biological systems from radiation induced damages. They include sulfhydryl compounds, antioxidants, plant extracts, immune-modulators, and other agents. However, the inherent toxicity of many of the synthetic agents at the effective radio-protective concentration warranted further search for safer and more effective radio-protectors. In this context, therapeutic radioprotectors which are effective on post irradiation administration are of special relevance. One of the property that can be applied while screening for such radiation protective therapeutics is their ability to enhance repair of radiation-induced lesions in cellular DNA in terms of cellular repair index based on the parameters of the DNA following comet assay. Post irradiation administration of some natural and synthetic agents have shown their potential to enhance repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA in mice. These include phytoceuticals such as gallic acid, sesamol etc., extracts of medicinal plants such as Andrographis panniculata, and a few synthetic compounds such as tocopherol-mono-glucoside. The talk will give an overview of the work on DNA repair enhancement by a few natural and synthetic agents. (author)

  12. Stimulation of prolactin receptor induces STAT-5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharusi, Amira; Yu, Shengze; Landázuri, Natalia; Zadjali, Fahad; Davodi, Belghis; Nyström, Thomas; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Rahbar, Afsar; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2016-11-29

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is characterized with poor outcome. In this study, we investigated components of prolactin (Prl) system in cell models of GBM and in histological tissue sections obtained from GBM patients. Expression of Prolactin receptor (PrlR) was detected at high levels in U251-MG, at low levels in U87-MG and barely detectable in U373 cell lines and in 66% of brain tumor tissues from 32 GBM patients by immunohistochemical technique. In addition, stimulation of U251-MG and U87-MG cells but not U373 with Prl resulted in increased STAT5 phosphorylation and only in U251-MG cells with increased cellular invasion. Furthermore, STAT5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion induced in Prl stimulated cells were significantly reduced by using a Prl receptor antagonist that consists of Prl with four amino acid replacements. We conclude that Prl receptor is expressed at different levels in the majority of GBM tumors and that blocking of PrlR in U251-MG cells significantly reduce cellular invasion.

  13. Cellular mechanism of eccentric-induced muscle injury and its relationship with sarcomere heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-08-01

    Activity-induced muscle injury and dysfunction have been identified as key components of musculoskeletal injuries. These injuries often occur following eccentric contractions, when the muscle is under tension and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle. Many daily activities require muscles to perform eccentric contractions, including walking (or running) downhill or down stairs, lowering heavy objects, and landing from a jump. Injuries often occur when these activities are performed at high intensity or for prolonged periods of time. General features of eccentric-induced muscle injury are well documented and include disruption of intracellular muscle structure, prolonged muscle weakness and dysfunction, a delayed-onset muscle soreness, and inflammation. Several weeks are required for the affected tissue to fully regenerate and recover from eccentric-induced muscle injury. Possible mechanisms responsible for eccentric-induced muscle injury are activation impairment and structural disruption of the sarcomere. These two factors seem to be the main sources of eccentric-induced muscle injury. Rather than being separate mechanisms they may be complimentary and interact with each other. Therefore, in this review we will focus on the two main cellular mechanism of muscle cell injury following accustomed eccentric contraction.

  14. PDGF-AA-induced filamentous mitochondria benefit dermal papilla cells in cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifude, C; Kaseda, K

    2015-06-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPCs) play essential roles in hair follicular morphogenesis and postnatal hair growth cycles. Previous reports demonstrated that platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) enhanced the formation of dermal condensates in hair follicular development. Additionally, PDGF-AA induces/maintains the anagen phase of the hair cycle. It is likely that mitochondrial morphology and functions are tightly coupled with maintenance of these energy-demanding activities. However, little is known about the mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. Thus, we investigated the PDGF-involved mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. The mitochondrial morphologies of HDPCs were examined in the presence or absence of PDGF-AA under a fluorescent microscope. ATP production and cellular motility were investigated. The relationship between mitochondrial morphology and the cellular functions was discussed. We observed that primary HDPCs contained mitochondria with filamentous and/or rounded morphologies. Both types of mitochondria showed similar membrane potentials. Interestingly, in the presence of PDGF-AA, but not PDGF-BB, the balance between the two morphologies shifted towards the filamentous form. Concomitantly, both mitochondrial enzymatic activity and total cellular ATP level were augmented by PDGF-AA. These two parameters were closely correlated, suggesting the mitochondrial involvement in the PDGF-augmented ATP production. Moreover, PDGF-AA accelerated the migration of HDPCs in a gap-filling assay, but did not change the rate of cellular proliferation. Notably, filamentous mitochondria dominated migrating HDPCs. PDGF-AA benefits HDPCs in the process of migration, by increasing the number of filamentous mitochondria. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  15. Tracing Dynamics and Clonal Heterogeneity of Cbx7-Induced Leukemic Stem Cells by Cellular Barcoding

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    Karin Klauke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate monitoring of tumor dynamics and leukemic stem cell (LSC heterogeneity is important for the development of personalized cancer therapies. In this study, we experimentally induced distinct types of leukemia in mice by enforced expression of Cbx7. Simultaneous cellular barcoding allowed for thorough analysis of leukemias at the clonal level and revealed high and unpredictable tumor complexity. Multiple LSC clones with distinct leukemic properties coexisted. Some of these clones remained dormant but bore leukemic potential, as they progressed to full-blown leukemia after challenge. LSC clones could retain multilineage differentiation capacities, where one clone induced phenotypically distinct leukemias. Beyond a detailed insight into CBX7-driven leukemic biology, our model is of general relevance for the understanding of tumor dynamics and clonal evolution.

  16. Cellular membrane accommodation of copper-induced oxidative conditions in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chuan-Ho; Lin, Ching-Yu; Lee, Shu-Hui; Wang, Wei-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Coral cells alter membrane lipid to accommodate copper-induce oxidative conditions • Coral membrane repair occur due to lipid alterations • Zooxanthellae release results from membrane repair by symbiosome fusion • Copper-induced lipid alterations perturb membrane-related functions in coral cells • Copper chronic effect on coral fitness are related to long-term membrane perturbation - Abstract: Oxidative stress has been associated with copper-induced toxicity in scleractinian corals. To gain insight into the accommodation of the cellular membrane to oxidative conditions, a pocilloporid coral, Seriatopora caliendrum, was exposed to copper at distinct, environmentally relevant dose for various lengths of time. Glycerophosphocholine profiling of the response of the coral to copper exposure was characterized using a validated method. The results indicate that coral lipid metabolism is programmed to induce membrane alterations in response to the cellular deterioration that occurs during the copper exposure period. Decreasing lyso-phosphatidylcholines and exchanging polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines for polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines were the initial actions taken to prevent membrane permeabilization. To relax/resist the resulting membrane strain caused by cell/organelle swelling, the coral cells inversely exchanged polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines for polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and further increased the levels of monounsaturated glycerophosphocholines. At the same time, the levels of saturated phosphatidylcholines were also increased to increase membrane rigidity and protect against oxidative attack. Interestingly, such alterations in lipid metabolism were also required for membrane fusion to repair the deteriorated membranes by repopulating them with proximal lipid reservoirs, similar to symbiosome membranes. Additionally, increasing saturated and monounsaturated plasmanylcholines and inhibiting the suppression of saturated lyso

  17. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

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    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  18. Xenoestrogens modulate genotoxic (UVB)-induced cellular responses in estrogen receptors positive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargouët, Maëlle; Bimbot, Maya; Levi, Yves; Perdiz, Daniel

    2006-07-01

    Human populations and wildlife are exposed to mixtures of both anthropogenic and natural chemicals. Some of these compounds are known to interact principally with the endocrine function, whereas others act mainly on genomic DNA. Given this evidence, we wanted to address the question of whether concomitant exposure of such chemicals was able to interact at the cellular level. We have previously shown that 17β-Estradiol (E(2)) modulates the DNA repair capacity of cells. In this work, we wanted to examine if other xenoestrogens (i.e. industrial compounds, pesticides or pharmaceuticals) were able to interact with the UVB-induced cellular response as E(2) does. Here, we show that xenoestrogens modulate the capacity of cells to repair their DNA damage according to the type of compounds. For example, the oral contraceptive 17α-Ethinylestradiol down-regulated the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage whereas the UV filter Eusolex 6007 up-regulated this pathway. The notion that xenoestrogens could interact with a genotoxic stress is reinforced by the modulation of the estrogens-dependent luciferase reporter gene expression when cells are UVB-irradiated. Finally, these observations suggested the potential role of xenoestrogens in carcinogenesis by their capacity to modulate cells responses to genotoxic stress.

  19. High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Change of Cellular Metabolism Leads to Decreases of Immunity and Imbalance of Cellular Activities in Rumen Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyan Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In animals, the immune and cellular processes of tissue largely depend on the status of local metabolism. However, in the rumen epithelium, how the cellular metabolism affects epithelial immunity, and cellular processes, when the diet is switched from energy-rich to energy-excess status, with regard to animal production and health, have not as yet been reported. Methods: RNA-seq was applied to compare the biological processes altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 10% to 35% with those altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 35% to 65% (dietary concentrate: the non-grass component in diet, including corn, soya bean meal and additive. High concentrate diet composed of 35% grass, 55% corn, 8% soya bean meal and 2% additive. In addition to the functional analysis of enriched genes in terms of metabolism, the immune system, and cellular process, the highly correlated genes to the enriched metabolism genes were identified, and the function and signaling pathways related to the differentially expressed neighbors were compared among the groups. Results: The variation trends of molar proportions of ruminal SCFAs and those of enriched pathways belonging to metabolism, immune system, and cellular process were altered with the change of diets. With regard to metabolism, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism were most affected. According to the correlation analysis, both innate and adaptive immune responses were promoted by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. However, the majority of immune responses were suppressed under the 35% concentrate diet. Moreover, the exclusive upregulation of cell growth and dysfunction of cellular transport and catabolism were induced by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. On the contrary, a balanced regulation of cellular processes was detected under the 35% concentrate diet. Conclusions: These results indicated that the

  20. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2006-01-01

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  1. [Involvement of cellular immunity and humoral immunity in mixed allergy induced by trichloroethylene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyun; Li, Xueyu; Liu, Yuefeng

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether cellular immunity and humoral immunity are involved in trichlorethylene (TCE)-induced mixed allergy, then provide the scientific basis for the mechanism of this disease. Guinea pigs and rats were tested for this study by application of guinea pig maximization test (GPMT), the animals were randomly divided into negative control, positive control and TCE treatment groups. Animals of these groups were administrated with olive oil, 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and TCE, respectively, by intradermal injection. After TCE administration, rat peripheral blood samples were collected by flow cytometry to detect lymphocytes CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD8⁺. Guinea pig peripheral blood samples were collected to detect the levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, and the spleens were taken out from guinea pigs after various treatment, mRNA expression of GATA3, T-bet, CTLA4 and Foxp3 in lymphocytes of guinea pig spleen was detected by real-time fluorescent PCR assay. Additionally, TCE allergic dermatitis patients were selected for the study, the peripheral blood samples were collected from the TCE patients group and control group, quantitative PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of immune-related genes Foxp3, GATA3, CTLA4, T-bet. TCE induced obvious skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs, the sensitization rate was 83.3%, IgG levels in TCE group and positive control increased significantly. Additionally, mRNA expression levels of GATA3, T-bet, CTLA4 significantly elevated in TCE group and positive control, but Foxp3 mRNA levels decreased. The lymphocytes CD3⁺ ratio in TCE group and positive control of rats was higher than that in negative control, we found that there was no statistical difference of CD4⁺, CD8⁺, CD4⁺/CD8⁺ between TCE group and negative control of rats. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, GATA3, CTLA4 in TCE patients increased by 115%, 97%, 241%, respectively as compared with the control, T-bet levels decreased by 47%when compared with the

  2. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  3. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  4. Fungicidal Drugs Induce a Common Oxidative-Damage Cellular Death Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin, miconazole, and ciclopirox are antifungal agents from three different drug classes that can effectively kill planktonic yeast, yet their complete fungicidal mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to identify a common oxidative-damage cellular death pathway triggered by these representative fungicides in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mechanism utilizes a signaling cascade involving the GTPases Ras1 and Ras2 and protein kinase A, and it culminates in death through the production of toxic reactive oxygen species in a tricarboxylic-acid-cycle- and respiratory-chain-dependent manner. We also show that the metabolome of C. albicans is altered by antifungal drug treatment, exhibiting a shift from fermentation to respiration, a jump in the AMP/ATP ratio, and elevated production of sugars; this coincides with elevated mitochondrial activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that DNA damage plays a critical role in antifungal-induced cellular death and that blocking DNA-repair mechanisms potentiates fungicidal activity.

  5. Inducing repetitive action potential firing in neurons via synthesized photoresponsive nanoscale cellular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2013-02-01

    Recently we reported an analysis that examined the potential of synthesized photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons. Here we extend the analysis to delineate the requirements on the electronic energy levels and the attendant photophysical properties of the PVFANs to induce repetitive action potential under continuous light, a capability essential for the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses to compensate for loss of photoreceptors. We find that repetitive action potential firing demands two basic characteristics in the electronic response of the PVFANs: an exponential dependence of the PVFAN excited state decay rate on the membrane potential and a three-state system such that, following photon absorption, the electron decay from the excited state to the ground state is via intermediate state(s) whose lifetime is comparable to the refractory time following an action potential. In this study, the potential of synthetic photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) is examined under continuous light to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons with the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNA-122:a novel hepatocyte-enriched in vitro marker of drug-induced cellular toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Richard; Kelly, Lorna; Sison-Young, Rowena L C; Zhang, Fang; Pridgeon, Chris S; Heslop, James A; Metcalfe, Pete; Kitteringham, Neil R; Baxter, Melissa; Harrison, Sean; Hanley, Neil A; Burke, Zoë D; Storm, Mike P; Welham, Melanie J; Tosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Emerging hepatic models for the study of drug-induced toxicity include pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) and complex hepatocyte-non-parenchymal cellular coculture to mimic the complex multicellular interactions that recapitulate the niche environment in the human liver. However, a specific marker of hepatocyte perturbation, required to discriminate hepatocyte damage from non-specific cellular toxicity contributed by non-hepatocyte cell types or immature differentiated...

  7. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  8. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  9. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Al-Griw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  10. Expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor distinguishes transitional cancer states in therapy-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P C; Wang, Q; Dong, Z M; Chu, E; Roberson, R S; Ivanova, I C; Wu, D Y

    2010-09-02

    Therapy-induced cellular senescence describes the phenomenon of cell cycle arrest that can be invoked in cancer cells in response to chemotherapy. Sustained proliferative arrest is often overcome as a contingent of senescent tumor cells can bypass this cell cycle restriction. The mechanism regulating cell cycle re-entry of senescent cancer cells remains poorly understood. This is the first report of the isolation and characterization of two distinct transitional states in chemotherapy-induced senescent cells that share indistinguishable morphological senescence phenotypes and are functionally classified by their ability to escape cell cycle arrest. It has been observed that cell surface expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is downregulated in cancer cells treated with chemotherapy. We show the novel use of surface CAR expression and adenoviral transduction to differentiate senescent states and also show in vivo evidence of CAR downregulation in colorectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study suggests that CAR is a candidate biomarker for senescence response to antitumor therapy, and CAR expression can be used to distinguish transitional states in early senescence to study fundamental regulatory events in therapy-induced senescence.

  11. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

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    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  12. Cellular Changes during Renal Failure-Induced Inflammatory Aortic Valve Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mony Shuvy

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification (AVC secondary to renal failure (RF is an inflammation-regulated process, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. We sought to assess the cellular processes that are involved in the early phases of aortic valve disease using a unique animal model of RF-associated AVC.Aortic valves were obtained from rats that were fed a uremia-inducing diet exclusively for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks as well as from controls. Pathological examination of the valves included histological characterization, von Kossa staining, and antigen expression analyses.After 2 weeks, we noted a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels, reflecting RF. RF parameters exacerbated until the Week 5 and plateaued. Whereas no histological changes or calcification was observed in the valves of any study group, macrophage accumulation became apparent as early as 2 weeks after the diet was started and rose after 3 weeks. By western blot, osteoblast markers were expressed after 2 weeks on the diet and decreased after 6 weeks. Collagen 3 was up-regulated after 3 weeks, plateauing at 4 weeks, whereas collagen 1 levels peaked at 2 and 4 weeks. Fibronectin levels increased gradually until Week 5 and decreased at 6 weeks. We observed early activation of the ERK pathway, whereas other pathways remained unchanged.We concluded that RF induces dramatic changes at the cellular level, including macrophage accumulation, activation of cell signaling pathway and extracellular matrix modification. These changes precede valve calcification and may increase propensity for calcification, and have to be investigated further.

  13. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  14. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Xu, C. Wilson, E-mail: wxu@nvcancer.org [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular

  15. MicroRNA-29 induces cellular senescence in aging muscle through multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaoyong; Klein, Janet D; Mitch, William E; Zhang, Liping; Martinez, Ivan; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of aging-induced muscle atrophy are unclear. By microRNA array and individual qPCR analyses, we found significant up-regulation of miR-29 in muscles of aged rodents vs. results in young. With aging, p85α, IGF-1 and B-myb muscle levels were lower while the expression of certain cell arrest proteins (p53, p16 and pRB) increased. When miR-29 was expressed in muscle progenitor cells (MPC), their proliferation was impaired while SA-βgal expression increased signifying the development of senescence. Impaired MPC proliferation resulted from interactions between miR-29 and the 3'-UTR of p85a, IGF-1 and B-myb, suppressing the translation of these mediators of myoblast proliferation. In vivo, electroporation of miR-29 into muscles of young mice suppressed the proliferation and increased levels of cellular arrest proteins, recapitulating aging-induced responses in muscle. A potential stimulus of miR-29 expression is Wnt-3a since we found that exogenous Wnt-3a stimulated miR-29 expression 2.7-fold in primary cultures of MPCs. Thus, aging-induced muscle senescence results from activation of miR-29 by Wnt-3a leading to suppressed expression of several signaling proteins (p85α, IGF-1 and B-myb) that act coordinately to impair the proliferation of MPCs contributing to muscle atrophy. The increase in miR-29 provides a potential mechanism for aging-induced sarcopenia.

  16. Radiation and surgical stress induce a significant impairment in cellular immunity in patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Yoshiki; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Arai, Mitsuhiro; Akagi, Masanobu (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    The effects of preoperative radiation plus surgical stress on immunity were examined in 29 patients with esophageal cancer, including 14 patients who experienced radiation therapy and 15 who did not, as well as 15 age-, sex- and body weight-matched control subjects. Absolute numbers of the total lymphocytes and OKT3 (all T cells), OKT4 (helper/inducer T cells) and OKT8 (suppressor/cytotoxic T cells) positive lymphocytes were almost the same in both patient groups before treatment. Both the in vitro response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were depressed in the patients when compared to the controls before treatment. Dual treatment of radiation and surgery led to a marked reduction of lymphocytes in the numbers and activities of PHA and ADCC, when compared to findings in the non-radiation group. Especially, the number of OKT4 positive lymphocytes and the OKT4 to OKT8 ratio decreased most and recovery was slow. While ADCC activity in the non-radiation group recovered at 28 postoperative days (POD), the response to PHA did not return to the pretreatment levels. Serum levels of IgG, IgM and IgA were within normal limits throughout the course of treatment. The B1 (all B cells) positive lymphocytes significantly decreased after the treatments. These results suggest that radiation plus surgery shifts the host immunity toward immunosuppression and induces a significant impairment of cellular immunity in patients with esophageal cancer. (author).

  17. Correlation of binding efficacies of DNA to flavonoids and their induced cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Asmita; Majumder, Debashis; Saha, Chabita

    2017-05-01

    Flavonoids are dietary intakes which are bestowed with several health benefits. The most studied property of flavonoids is their antioxidant efficacy. Among the chosen flavonoids Quercetin, Kaempferol and Myricetin is catagorized as flavonols whereas Apigenin and Luteolin belong to the flavone group. In the present study anti-cancer properties of flavonoids are investigated on the basis of their binding efficacy to ct-DNA and their ability to induce cytotoxicity in K562 leukaemic cells. The binding affinities of the flavonoids with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) are in the order Quercetin>Myricetin>Luteolin>Kaempferol>Apigenin. Quercetin with fewer OH than myricetin has higher affinity towards DNA suggesting that the number and position of OH influence the binding efficacies of flavonoids to ct-DNA. CD spectra and EtBr displacement studies evidence myricetin and apigenin to be stronger intercalators of DNA compared to quercetin. From comet assay results it is observed that quercetin and myricetin when used in combination induce higher DNA damage in K562 leukemic cells than when tested individually. Higher binding efficacy has been recorded for quercetin to DNA at lower pH, which is the micro environment of cancerous cells, and hence quercetin can act as a potential anti-cancer agent. Presence of Cu also increases cellular damage as recorded by comet assay. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Nuclear ARRB1 induces pseudohypoxia and cellular metabolism reprogramming in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchini, Vincent; Madhu, Basetti; Russell, Roslin; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Warren, Anne; Gaude, Edoardo; Borlido, Joana; Stark, Rory; Ireland-Zecchini, Heather; Rao, Roheet; Scott, Helen; Boren, Joan; Massie, Charlie; Asim, Mohammad; Brindle, Kevin; Griffiths, John; Frezza, Christian; Neal, David E; Mills, Ian G

    2014-01-01

    Tumour cells sustain their high proliferation rate through metabolic reprogramming, whereby cellular metabolism shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, even under normal oxygen levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF1A) is a major regulator of this process, but its activation under normoxic conditions, termed pseudohypoxia, is not well documented. Here, using an integrative approach combining the first genome-wide mapping of chromatin binding for an endocytic adaptor, ARRB1, both in vitro and in vivo with gene expression profiling, we demonstrate that nuclear ARRB1 contributes to this metabolic shift in prostate cancer cells via regulation of HIF1A transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions through regulation of succinate dehydrogenase A (SDHA) and fumarate hydratase (FH) expression. ARRB1-induced pseudohypoxia may facilitate adaptation of cancer cells to growth in the harsh conditions that are frequently encountered within solid tumours. Our study is the first example of an endocytic adaptor protein regulating metabolic pathways. It implicates ARRB1 as a potential tumour promoter in prostate cancer and highlights the importance of metabolic alterations in prostate cancer. PMID:24837709

  19. Cellular therapy to treat ionizing radiation-induced cutaneous radiation syndrome: 2 cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.; Chapel, A.; Trompier, F.; Clairand, I.; Bottolier-Depois, J.F.; Gourmelon, P.; Bey, E.; Lataillade, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Localized irradiation at high dose exposition could induce severe radiation burns characterized by the occurrence of unpredictable successive inflammatory waves leading to the extension in surface and depth of necrotic processes. The medical management of these severe radiation burns remains today a challenging issue unresolved by the classical therapeutical approach. For the first time, two victims (accident of Chile, 2006 and accident of Senegal, 2007) accidentally exposed to an iridium gammagraphy radioactive source experienced a new and innovative therapeutic strategy combining dosimetry-guided surgery lesion excision and injection of MSC. The clinical evolution was remarkable. The clinical transfer of this therapeutic option was possible based on the research perform in the Institute and the IRSN/Percy hospital cooperation. Our data suggested that cellular therapy based on Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) injection could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of human MSC (hMSC) in order to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Our pre-clinical data suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. The understanding of the precise healing mechanisms of hMSC in animal model is under investigation. These results will be helpful to generalize this innovative therapy to the treatment of other radiological complications. (author)

  20. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

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    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  1. Correlation of radiation induced cellular signal transduction events with LET-selective thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerweger, C.; Hajek, M.; Vana, N.; Kodym, R.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-01-01

    In order to obtain a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism controlling the cellular response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation we observed early signal transduction events after low dose exposure to charged particles. Normal human fibroblasts were irradiated with ions of varying energy and LET (Helium, Carbon, Neon, Silicon and Iron, from 2, 2 up to 300 keV/μm) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)-Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC)-facility. For exposure, a low particle fluence of approx. 7, 3 * 10 4 particles/cm 2 (corresponding to 1 hit nucleus in 7 cells) was chosen. Doses and LET were verified with thermoluminescence detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti) evaluated according to the high-temperature-ratio (HTR)-method. In FY 2005, we focused on investigating the activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and several of its substrates 2-3 hours after irradiation using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining techniques. So far, we found that the number of pATM (S1981)-foci per nucleus was higher in cells irradiated with higher-LET beams. Especially Fe-ions (500 MeV/u) yielded twice the number of foci than mock or He (150 MeV/u) irradiated cells. Furthermore, for Fe-ions the number of cells with radiation induced γH2aX-foci exceeded the number of cells with nucleus hits, indicating a bystander effect. These data show that the early cellular response to high-LET radiation is modulated by the energy deposition of the particle. (author)

  2. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species generation: novel therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanyam, M; Koteswari, A Adaikala; Kumar, R Sampath; Monickaraj, S Finny; Maheswari, J Uma; Mohan, V

    2003-12-01

    There is evidence for increased levels of circulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in diabetics, as indirectly inferred by the findings of increased lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant status. Direct measurements of intracellular generation of ROS using fluorescent dyes also demonstrate an association of oxidative stress with diabetes. Although phenolic compounds attenuate oxidative stress-related tissue damage, there are concerns over toxicity of synthetic phenolic antioxidants and this has considerably stimulated interest in investigating the role of natural phenolics in medicinal applications. Curcumin (the primary active principle in turmeric, Curcuma longa Linn.) has been claimed to represent a potential antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent with phytonutrient and bioprotective properties. However there are lack of molecular studies to demonstrate its cellular action and potential molecular targets. In this study the antioxidant effect of curcumin as a function of changes in cellular ROS generation was tested. Our results clearly demonstrate that curcumin abolished both phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) and thapsigargin-induced ROS generation in cells from control and diabetic subjects. The pattern of these ROS inhibitory effects as a function of dose-dependency suggests that curcumin mechanistically interferes with protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium regulation. Simultaneous measurements of ROS and Ca2+ influx suggest that a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ may be a trigger for increased ROS generation. We suggest that the antioxidant and antiangeogenic actions of curcumin, as a mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+ entry and PKC activity, should be further exploited to develop suitable and novel drugs for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic complications.

  3. The cellular environment in computer simulations of radiation-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V.V.; Hamm, R.N.; Waker, A.J.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks were modeled for 660 keV photon radiation and scavenger capacity mimicking the cellular environment. Atomistic representation of DNA in B form with a first hydration shell was utilized to model direct and indirect damage. Monte Carlo generated electron tracks were used to model energy deposition in matter and to derive initial spatial distributions of species which appear in the medium following radiolysis. Diffusion of species was followed with time, and their reactions with DNA and each other were modeled in an encounter-controlled manner. Three methods to account for hydroxyl radical diffusion in cellular environment were tested: assumed exponential survival, time-limited modeling and modeling of reactions between hydroxyl radicals and scavengers in an encounter-controlled manner. Although the method based on modeling scavenging in an encounter-controlled manner is more precise, it requires substantially more computer resources than either the exponential or time-limiting method. Scavenger concentrations of 0.5 and 0.15 M were considered using exponential and encounter-controlled methods with reaction rate set at 3x10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s-1. Diffusion length and strand break yields, predicted by these two methods for the same scavenger molarity, were different by 20%-30%. The method based on limiting time of chemistry follow-up to 10 -9 s leads to DNA damage and radical diffusion estimates similar to 0.5 M scavenger concentration in the other two methods. The difference observed in predictions made by the methods considered could be tolerated in computer simulations of DNA damage. (author)

  4. Palliative effects of lutein intervention in gamma-radiation-induced cellular damages in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Vidya; Tenkanidiyoor, Yogish Somayaji; Radhakrishna, Vishakh; Shivappa, Pooja; Lakshman, Srikanth Patil; Fernandes, Ronald; Patali, Krishna Ananthapura

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced hematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic damages to the normal cells are major concerns in the field of radiotherapy. The carotenoids and their derivatives have been the source of antioxidants with wide range of medicinal applications. The objective is to evaluate the protective effects of lutein, a carotenoid, against radiation-induced cellular and tissue damages. Swiss albino mice were grouped into 5, 50, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. of lutein treatment groups, a sham and vehicle control group. The groups were irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy y'-radiation. The mortality was recorded for 30 days to optimize the protective dose against radiation. The mice were administered with the compound orally for 15 consecutive days and irradiated with a sublethal dose of 6Gy. The hematological changes in blood and antioxidant parameters were determined in liver, kidney homogenates, and hemolysate/serum. The hematological parameters were recorded using an automated cell counter. The antioxidants such as malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were spectrophotometrically determined. The red blood cell, white blood cell count, lymphocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet levels, and hematocrit value were found to be decreased in the irradiated groups. Lutein pretreatment maintains near-normal levels of these parameters indicating resistance/recovery from the radiation-induced damages. The antioxidant levels were found to be reduced in all the irradiated groups. However, lutein pretreatment (50 mg/kg b.wt.) has increased the catalase activity of hemolysate. Lutein pretreatment has reduced the MDA levels in hemolysate, when administered at doses of 5, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. in comparison to its control. The study demonstrates the radioprotective potential of lutein by maintaining the hematological and antioxidant homeostasis.

  5. Electronic cigarette aerosols suppress cellular antioxidant defenses and induce significant oxidative DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengatesh Ganapathy

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarette (EC aerosols contain unique compounds in addition to toxicants and carcinogens traditionally found in tobacco smoke. Studies are warranted to understand the public health risks of ECs.The aim of this study was to determine the genotoxicity and the mechanisms induced by EC aerosol extracts on human oral and lung epithelial cells.Cells were exposed to EC aerosol or mainstream smoke extracts and DNA damage was measured using the primer anchored DNA damage detection assay (q-PADDA and 8-oxo-dG ELISA assay. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured using standard methods. mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively.EC aerosol extracts induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner, but independently of nicotine concentration. Overall, EC aerosol extracts induced significantly less DNA damage than mainstream smoke extracts, as measured by q-PADDA. However, the levels of oxidative DNA damage, as indicated by the presence of 8-oxo-dG, a highly mutagenic DNA lesion, were similar or slightly higher after exposure to EC aerosol compared to mainstream smoke extracts. Mechanistically, while exposure to EC extracts significantly increased ROS, it decreased TAC as well as the expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1, an enzyme essential for the removal of oxidative DNA damage.Exposure to EC aerosol extracts suppressed the cellular antioxidant defenses and led to significant DNA damage. These findings emphasize the urgent need to investigate the potential long-term cancer risk of exposure to EC aerosol for vapers and the general public.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Induces Cellular Senescence of Articular Chondrocytes via Negative Regulation of SIRT1 by p38 Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Hee; Hwang, Sang Gu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Senescent cells exhibit irreversible growth arrest, large flat morphology, and up-regulated senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase activity at pH 6.0. Several conditions, including oncogenic stress, oxidative stress, and DNA damage are associated with cellular senescence. Massive acute DNA double-strand breaks occurring as a result of mechanical and chemical stress can be repaired, but some DNA damage persists, eventually triggering premature senescence. Since ionizing radiation directly induces DBS, it is possible that cellular senescence is activated under these conditions. The biological events in chondrocytes following irradiation are poorly understood, and limited information is available on the molecular signal transduction mechanisms of cellular senescence at present. In this study, we identify SIRT1 as a target molecule of p38 kinase and demonstrate that the interactions between p38 kinase and SIRT1 protein play an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence in response to IR.

  7. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in endotoxemic rat hepatocytes is dependent on the cellular glutathione status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, TA; van Goor, H; Tuyt, L; de Jager-Krikken, A; Leuvenink, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter contains nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding sites. NF-kappa B activation is determined, in part, by the intracellular redox status, The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the cellular glutathione status in relation to

  8. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Navarro-Zaragoza

    Full Text Available Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA. The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27, after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA. Drinking in the dark (DID procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC; TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone.

  9. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone. PMID:26509576

  10. RGS6 Suppresses Ras-induced Cellular Transformation by Facilitating Tip60-mediated Dnmt1 Degradation and Promoting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Hagen, Jussara; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Yang, Jianqi; Quelle, Dawn E.; Brenner, Charles; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    The RAS protooncogene plays a central role in regulation of cell proliferation, and point mutations leading to oncogenic activation of Ras occur in a large number of human cancers. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is essential for oncogenic cellular transformation by Ras, and Dnmt1 is over-expressed in numerous human cancers. Here we provide new evidence that the pleiotropic Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) family member RGS6 suppresses Ras-induced cellular transformation by facilitating Tip60-mediated degradation of Dmnt1 and promoting apoptosis. Employing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild type (WT) and RGS6−/− mice, we found that oncogenic Ras induced up-regulation of RGS6, which in turn blocked Ras-induced cellular transformation. RGS6 functions to suppress cellular transformation in response to oncogenic Ras by down regulating Dnmt1 protein expression leading to inhibition of Dnmt1-mediated anti-apoptotic activity. Further experiments showed that RGS6 functions as a scaffolding protein for both Dnmt1 and Tip60 and is required for Tip60-mediated acetylation of Dnmt1 and subsequent Dnmt1 ubiquitylation and degradation. The RGS domain of RGS6, known only for its GAP activity toward Gα subunits, was sufficient to mediate Tip60 association with RGS6. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action for RGS6 in negative regulation of oncogene-induced transformation and provides new insights into our understanding of the mechanisms underlying Ras-induced oncogenic transformation and regulation of Dnmt1 expression. Importantly, these findings identify RGS6 as an essential cellular defender against oncogenic stress and a potential therapeutic target for developing new cancer treatments. PMID:23995786

  11. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  12. Age-Dependent Cellular and Behavioral Deficits Induced by Molecularly Targeted Drugs Are Reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Ritter, Jonathan; Talbot, Brooke M; Edwards, Jorge; Chew, Li-Jin; Gallo, Vittorio

    2018-04-15

    Newly developed targeted anticancer drugs inhibit signaling pathways commonly altered in adult and pediatric cancers. However, as these pathways are also essential for normal brain development, concerns have emerged of neurologic sequelae resulting specifically from their application in pediatric cancers. The neural substrates and age dependency of these drug-induced effects in vivo are unknown, and their long-term behavioral consequences have not been characterized. This study defines the age-dependent cellular and behavioral effects of these drugs on normally developing brains and determines their reversibility with post-drug intervention. Mice at different postnatal ages received short courses of molecularly targeted drugs in regimens analagous to clinical treatment. Analysis of rapidly developing brain structures important for sensorimotor and cognitive function showed that, while adult administration was without effect, earlier neonatal administration of targeted therapies attenuated white matter oligodendroglia and hippocampal neuronal development more profoundly than later administration, leading to long-lasting behavioral deficits. This functional impairment was reversed by rehabilitation with physical and cognitive enrichment. Our findings demonstrate age-dependent, reversible effects of these drugs on brain development, which are important considerations as treatment options expand for pediatric cancers. Significance: Targeted therapeutics elicit age-dependent long-term consequences on the developing brain that can be ameliorated with environmental enrichment. Cancer Res; 78(8); 2081-95. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Anatomical, animal, and cellular evidence for Zika-induced pathogenesis of fetal microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Guo, Xin-Hua; Xu, Dian-Guo

    2017-04-01

    Several recent articles published by Brain and Development in 2016 demonstrated some rare, but innovative, genetic mechanisms for microcephaly. This concise mini-review presented another novel pathogenic mechanism for microcephaly, which has actually been a worldwide medical challenge since the World Health Organization (WHO) defined the outbreak of the Zika virus (ZIKV) as an International Public Health Emergency on 1 Feb, 2016. As a recent noteworthy clinical phenomenon, the ZIKV outbreak was accompanied by a dramatically increased number of microcephalus fetuses. However, no direct evidence supporting the suspected pathogenic effects of ZIKV on fetal microcephaly was shown previously before 2016. Herein, we evaluated the most important human pathological, animal developmental, and neuro-cytotoxic findings released in 2016, and highlighted the original experimental evidence that strengthens the potential link between ZIKV and the high incidence of microcephaly in new-born babies. Because killing mosquitoes via insecticides is currently the only effective way to suppress ZIKV-induced disorders, the animal and cellular models described in this mini-review are very beneficial to anti-ZIKV drug development and vaccine assessment. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of magma-induced stress within a cellular automaton model of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Olivia J.; Sarson, Graeme R.; Bushby, Paul J.

    2017-07-01

    The cellular automaton model of Piegari, Di Maio, Scandone and Milano, J. Volc. Geoth. Res., 202, 22-28 (2011) is extended to include magma-induced stress (i.e. a local magma-related augmentation of the stress field). This constitutes a nonlinear coupling between the magma and stress fields considered by this model, which affects the statistical distributions of eruptions obtained. The extended model retains a power law relation between eruption size and frequency for most events, as expected from the self-organised criticality inspiring this model; but the power law now applies for a reduced range of size, and there are new peaks of relatively more frequent eruptions of intermediate and large size. The cumulative frequency of repose time between events remains well modelled by a stretched exponential function of repose time (approaching a pure exponential distribution only for the longest repose times), but the time scales of this behaviour are slightly longer, reflecting the increased preference for larger events. The eruptions are relatively more likely to have high volatile (water) content, so would generally be more explosive. The new model also naturally favours a central 'axial' transport conduit, as found in many volcano systems, but which otherwise must be artificially imposed within such models.

  15. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA — improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds – is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10 mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14 days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. - Highlights: • Mechanical stabilization of β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds by PLA infiltration • Hybrid scaffolds with higher cell attraction due to plasma polymerized allylamine • 3D perfusion in vitro model for observation of cell migration inside scaffolds • Enhanced cell migration within plasma polymer coated TCP hybrid scaffolds

  16. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Claudia [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Cornelsen, Matthias [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Quade, Antje [Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [INNOVENT e.V., Biomaterials Department, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Rebl, Henrike [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Weißmann, Volker [Institute for Polymer Technologies (IPT) e.V., Alter Holzhafen 19, D-23966 Wismar (Germany); Seitz, Hermann [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Nebe, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.nebe@med.uni-rostock.de [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA — improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds – is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10 mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14 days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. - Highlights: • Mechanical stabilization of β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds by PLA infiltration • Hybrid scaffolds with higher cell attraction due to plasma polymerized allylamine • 3D perfusion in vitro model for observation of cell migration inside scaffolds • Enhanced cell migration within plasma polymer coated TCP hybrid scaffolds.

  17. Atomic force microscopic neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography for boron imaging in detailed cellular histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, K.; Takahashi, H.; Fujita, K.; Nakazawa, M.; Yanagie, H.; Eriguchi, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Sakurai, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The information on subcellular microdistribution of 10 B compounds a cell is significant to evaluate the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) because the damage brought by the released alpha/lithium particles is highly localized along their path, and radiation sensitivity is quite different among each cell organelles. In neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography (NIAR) technique, 10 B can be measured as tracks for the energetic charged particles from 10 B(n, alpha) 7 Li reactions in solid state track detectors. To perform the NIAR at intracellular structure level for research of 10 B uptake and/or microdosimetry in BNCT, we have developed high-resolution NIAR method with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM has been used for analyses of biological specimens such as proteins, DNAs and surface of living cells have, however, intracellular detailed histology of cells has been hardly resolved with AFM since flat surface of sectioned tissue has quite less topographical contrast among each organelle. In our new sample preparation method using UV processing, materials that absorb UV in a semi-thin section are selectively eroded and vaporized by UV exposure, and then fine relief for cellular organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, filament structure and so on reveals on flat surface of the section, which can be observed with an AFM. The imaging resolution was comparable to TEM imaging of cells. This new method provides fast and cost-effective observation of histological sections with an AFM. Combining this method with NIAR technique, intracellular boron mapping would be possible. (author)

  18. Perturbation of gut bacteria induces a coordinated cellular immune response in the purple sea urchin larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch Ho, Eric; Buckley, Katherine M; Schrankel, Catherine S; Schuh, Nicholas W; Hibino, Taku; Solek, Cynthia M; Bae, Koeun; Wang, Guizhi; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-10-01

    The purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome sequence contains a complex repertoire of genes encoding innate immune recognition proteins and homologs of important vertebrate immune regulatory factors. To characterize how this immune system is deployed within an experimentally tractable, intact animal, we investigate the immune capability of the larval stage. Sea urchin embryos and larvae are morphologically simple and transparent, providing an organism-wide model to view immune response at cellular resolution. Here we present evidence for immune function in five mesenchymal cell types based on morphology, behavior and gene expression. Two cell types are phagocytic; the others interact at sites of microbial detection or injury. We characterize immune-associated gene markers for three cell types, including a perforin-like molecule, a scavenger receptor, a complement-like thioester-containing protein and the echinoderm-specific immune response factor 185/333. We elicit larval immune responses by (1) bacterial injection into the blastocoel and (2) seawater exposure to the marine bacterium Vibrio diazotrophicus to perturb immune state in the gut. Exposure at the epithelium induces a strong response in which pigment cells (one type of immune cell) migrate from the ectoderm to interact with the gut epithelium. Bacteria that accumulate in the gut later invade the blastocoel, where they are cleared by phagocytic and granular immune cells. The complexity of this coordinated, dynamic inflammatory program within the simple larval morphology provides a system in which to characterize processes that direct both aspects of the echinoderm-specific immune response as well as those that are shared with other deuterostomes, including vertebrates.

  19. Perturbation of gut bacteria induces a coordinated cellular immune response in the purple sea urchin larva

    Science.gov (United States)

    CH Ho, Eric; Buckley, Katherine M; Schrankel, Catherine S; Schuh, Nicholas W; Hibino, Taku; Solek, Cynthia M; Bae, Koeun; Wang, Guizhi; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    The purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome sequence contains a complex repertoire of genes encoding innate immune recognition proteins and homologs of important vertebrate immune regulatory factors. To characterize how this immune system is deployed within an experimentally tractable, intact animal, we investigate the immune capability of the larval stage. Sea urchin embryos and larvae are morphologically simple and transparent, providing an organism-wide model to view immune response at cellular resolution. Here we present evidence for immune function in five mesenchymal cell types based on morphology, behavior and gene expression. Two cell types are phagocytic; the others interact at sites of microbial detection or injury. We characterize immune-associated gene markers for three cell types, including a perforin-like molecule, a scavenger receptor, a complement-like thioester-containing protein and the echinoderm-specific immune response factor 185/333. We elicit larval immune responses by (1) bacterial injection into the blastocoel and (2) seawater exposure to the marine bacterium Vibrio diazotrophicus to perturb immune state in the gut. Exposure at the epithelium induces a strong response in which pigment cells (one type of immune cell) migrate from the ectoderm to interact with the gut epithelium. Bacteria that accumulate in the gut later invade the blastocoel, where they are cleared by phagocytic and granular immune cells. The complexity of this coordinated, dynamic inflammatory program within the simple larval morphology provides a system in which to characterize processes that direct both aspects of the echinoderm-specific immune response as well as those that are shared with other deuterostomes, including vertebrates. PMID:27192936

  20. Detection, characterization and measure of a new radiation-induced damage in isolated and cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulus, P.

    2006-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains the genetic information and chemical injury to this macromolecule may have severe biological consequences. We report here the detection of 4 new radiation-induced DNA lesions by using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) approach. For that purpose, the characteristic fragmentation of most 2'-deoxy-ribo nucleosides, the loss of 116 Da corresponding to the loss of the 2-deoxyribose moiety, was used in the so-called neutral loss mode of the HPLC-MS/MS. One of the newly detected lesions, named dCyd341 because it is a 2'-deoxycytidine modification exhibiting a molecular weight of 341 Da, was also detected in cellular DNA. Characterization of this modified nucleoside was performed using NMR and exact mass determination of the product obtained by chemical synthesis. A mechanism of formation was then proposed, in which the first event is the H-abstraction at the C4 position of a 2-deoxyribose moiety. Then, the sugar modification produced exhibits a reactive aldehyde that, through reaction with a vicinal cytosine base, gives rise to dCyd341. dCyd341 could be considered as a complex damage since its formation involves a DNA strand break and a cross-link between a damaged sugar residue and a vicinal cytosine base located most probably on the complementary DNA strand. In addition to its characterization, preliminary biological studies revealed that cells are able to remove the lesion from DNA. Repair studies have revealed the ability of cells to excise the lesion. Identification of the repair systems involved could represent an interesting challenge. (author)

  1. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening

  2. Analysis of tanshinone IIA induced cellular apoptosis in leukemia cells by genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA is a diterpene quinone extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Chinese traditional herb. Although previous studies have reported the anti-tumor effects of Tan IIA on various human cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The current study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Tan IIA's apoptotic effects on leukemia cells in vitro. Methods The cytotoxicity of Tan IIA on different types of leukemia cell lines was evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5]-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay on cells treated without or with Tan IIA at different concentrations for different time periods. Cellular apoptosis progression with and without Tan IIA treatment was analyzed by Annexin V and Caspase 3 assays. Gene expression profiling was used to identify the genes regulated after Tan IIA treatment and those differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Confirmation of these expression regulations was carried out using real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA. The antagonizing effect of a PXR inhibitor L-SFN on Tan IIA treatment was tested using Colony Forming Unit Assay. Results Our results revealed that Tan IIA had different cytotoxic activities on five types of leukemia cells, with the highest toxicity on U-937 cells. Tan IIA inhibited the growth of U-937 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Annexin V and Caspase-3 assays showed that Tan IIA induced apoptosis in U-937 cells. Using gene expression profiling, 366 genes were found to be significantly regulated after Tan IIA treatment and differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Among these genes, CCL2 was highly expressed in untreated U-937 cells and down-regulated significantly after Tan IIA treatment in a dose-dependent manner. RT-qPCR analyses validated the expression regulation of 80% of genes. Addition of L- sulforaphane (L-SFN, an inhibitor of Pregnane × receptor (PXR significantly

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced myocardial injury: prevention by vitamin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains one of the major killers in modern society. One strong risk factor of CVD is cigarette smoking that causes myocardial injury and leads to the genesis of pathological cardiovascular events. However, the exact toxic component(s of cigarette smoke (CS and its molecular and cellular mechanisms for causing myocardial injury leading to heart damage and its prevention are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a guinea pig model, here we show that chronic exposure to CS produces myocardial injury that is prevented by vitamin C. Male guinea pigs were fed either vitamin C-deficient (0.5 mg/day or vitamin C-sufficient (15 mg/day diet and subjected to CS exposure from 5 Kentucky Research cigarettes (3R4F/day (6 days/week in a smoke chamber up to 8 weeks. Pair-fed sham controls were subjected to air exposure instead of CS exposure under similar conditions. Myocardial injury was produced in CS-exposed marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs as evidenced by release of cardiac Troponin-T and I in the serum, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, thrombosis and collagen deposition in the myocardium. Treatment of rat cardiomyocyte cells (H9c2 in vitro and guinea pigs in vivo with p-benzoquinone (p-BQ in amounts derived from CS revealed that p-BQ was a major factor responsible for CS-induced myocardial damage. A moderately large dose of vitamin C (15 mg/day prevented CS/p-BQ-induced myocardial injury. Population based studies indicated that plasma vitamin C levels of smokers without disease were significantly lower (p = 0,0000 than that of non-smokers. Vitamin C levels of CS-related cardiovascular patients were further lower (p = 0.0000 than that of smokers without disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that dietary supplementation of vitamin C may be a novel and simple therapy for the prevention of pathological cardiovascular events in habitual smokers.

  4. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah F L King

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice.Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity.These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines.

  5. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na + -K + ATPase, Ca 2+ ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na + -K + ATPase and Ca 2+ ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  6. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposure in A549 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ju

    Full Text Available The wide application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT has raised serious concerns about their safety on human health and the environment. However, the potential harmful effects of MWCNT remain unclear and contradictory. To clarify the potentially toxic effects of MWCNT and to elucidate the associated underlying mechanisms, the effects of MWCNT on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined at both the cellular and the protein level. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were examined, followed by a proteomic analysis (2-DE coupled with LC-MS/MS of the cellular response to MWCNT. Our results demonstrate that MWCNT induces cytotoxicity in A549 cells only at relatively high concentrations and longer exposure time. Within a relatively low dosage range (30 µg/ml and short time period (24 h, MWCNT treatment does not induce significant cytotoxicity, cell cycle changes, apoptosis, or DNA damage. However, at these low doses and times, MWCNT treatment causes significant changes in protein expression. A total of 106 proteins show altered expression at various time points and dosages, and of these, 52 proteins were further identified by MS. Identified proteins are involved in several cellular processes including proliferation, stress, and cellular skeleton organization. In particular, MWCNT treatment causes increases in actin expression. This increase has the potential to contribute to increased migration capacity and may be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS.

  7. Exposure to low infective doses of HCV induces cellular immune responses without consistently detectable viremia or seroconversion in chimpanzees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Tricoche, Nancy; Perkus, Marion; Tom, Darley; Brotman, Betsy; McCormack, Patricia; Pfahler, Wolfram; Lee, Dong-Hun; Tobler, Leslie H.; Busch, Michael; Prince, Alfred M.

    2003-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, there is accumulating data suggesting the presence of cellular immune responses to HCV in exposed but seemingly uninfected populations. Some studies have suggested cross-reactive antigens rather than prior HCV exposure as the main reason for the immune responses. In this study we address this question by analyzing the immune response of chimpanzees that have been sequentially exposed to increasing doses of HCV virions. The level of viremia, as well as the immune responses to HCV at different times after virus inoculation, were examined. Our data indicate that HCV infective doses as low as 1-10 RNA (+) virions induce detectable cellular immune responses in chimpanzees without consistently detectable viremia or persistent seroconversion. However, increasing the infective doses of HCV to 100 RNA (+) virions overcame the low-inoculum-induced immune response and produced high-level viremia followed by seroconversion

  8. Translation-dependent mechanisms lead to PML upregulation and mediate oncogenic K-RAS-induced cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Scaglioni, Pier Paolo; Rabellino, Andrea; Yung, Thomas M; Bernardi, Rosa; Choi, Sooyeon; Konstantinidou, Georgia; Nardella, Caterina; Cheng, Ke; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Expression of oncogenic K-RAS in primary cells elicits oncogene-induced cellular senescence (OIS), a form of growth arrest that potently opposes tumourigenesis. This effect has been largely attributed to transcriptional mechanisms that depend on the p53 tumour suppressor protein. The PML tumour suppressor was initially identified as a component of the \\(PML-RAR\\alpha\\) oncoprotein of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL). PML, a critical OIS mediator, is upregulated by oncogenic K-RAS in vivo a...

  9. Aluminium-induced excessive ROS causes cellular damage and metabolic shifts in black gram Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowra, Umakanta; Yanase, Emiko; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Aluminium-induced oxidative damage caused by excessive ROS production was evaluated in black gram pulse crop. Black gram plants were treated with different aluminium (Al 3+ ) concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μM with pH 4.7) and further the effects of Al 3+ were characterised by means of root growth inhibition, histochemical assay, ROS content analysis, protein carbonylation quantification and 1 H-NMR analysis. The results showed that aluminium induces excessive ROS production which leads to cellular damage, root injury, stunt root growth and other metabolic shifts. In black gram, Al 3+ induces cellular damage at the earliest stage of stress which was characterised from histochemical analysis. From this study, it was observed that prolonged stress can activate certain aluminium detoxification defence mechanism. Probably excessive ROS triggers such defence mechanism in black gram. Al 3+ can induce excessive ROS initially in the root region then transported to other parts of the plant. As much as the Al 3+ concentration increases, the rate of cellular injury and ROS production also increases. But after 72 h of stress, plants showed a lowered ROS level and cellular damage which indicates the upregulation of defensive mechanisms. Metabolic shift analysis also showed that the black gram plant under stress has less metabolic content after 24 h of treatment, but gradually, it was increased after 72 h of treatment. It was assumed that ROS played the most important role as a signalling molecule for aluminium stress in black gram.

  10. Effects of trypsin on cellular, chromosomal and DNA damage induced by X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunt, Elizabeth A.

    When cells are trypsinized before irradiation, potentiation of cell killing is seen; this is known as the 'trypsin effect'. The trypsin effect is re-examined here in the light of experiments in which enzymatic modifications of DNA in permeabilized cells has become a powerful experimental tool (Bryant et al, 1978, Ahnstrom and Bryant,1982; Natarajan et al, 1980; Bryant, 1984, 1985; Natarajan and Obe, 1984) and where in some cases it is suspected that trypsinization as part of the technique could significantly alter cell membrane permeability and chromatin structure (Obe et al, 1985; Obe and Winkel, 1985; Bryant and Christie, 1989). The trypsin effect was investigated at various cellular levels, assaying for cell survival (to verify the potentiation), anaphase chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and repair and lastly using a nucleoid assay to investigate the effect of trypsin on DNA-nuclear matrix interactions. Each of these are considered in separate chapters as individual studies, then all compared in the final discussion. A small potentiation effect of X-ray damage on cell killing was seen when using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells but no potentiating effect was found in the murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cell line. Trypsinization was found to increase the number of X-ray induced chromosomal anaphase abnormalities in EAT cells. To investigate the possibility that the basis of the trypsin effect lies in its action at the DNA level, further experiments were performed to monitor DNA damage and repair using the DNA unwinding and neutral elution techniques. No difference was seen in the unwinding kinetics or in the DNA unwinding dose-effect curves for induction of DNA single strand breakage (ssb); when using neutral elution however. treatment of cells with trypsin or buffer alone increased the incidence of X-ray induced double strand breaks (dsb) at higher doses. Trypsinized EAT cells were found to repair ssb after 12 Gy less rapidly than those treated with

  11. Ascorbic acid inhibits TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation by decreasing cellular H₂O₂ and ERK phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiang, Giou-Teng; Chen, Jen-Ni; Wu, Tsai-Kun; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Hung, Yu-Ting; Chang, Wei-Jung; Chen, Chinshuh; Wei, Chyou-Wei; Yu, Yung-Luen

    2015-10-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), vitamin D and 12-O‑tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) can induce HL-60 cells to differentiate into granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages, respectively. Similar to RA and vitamin D, ascorbic acid also belongs to the vitamin family. High‑dose ascorbic acid (>100 µM) induces HL‑60 cell apoptosis and induces a small fraction of HL‑60 cells to express the granulocyte marker, CD66b. In addition, ascorbic acid exerts an anti‑oxidative stress function. Oxidative stress is required for HL‑60 cell differentiation following treatment with TPA, however, the effect of ascorbic acid on HL‑60 cell differentiation in combination with TPA treatment remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cellular effects of ascorbic acid treatment on TPA-differentiated HL-60 cells. TPA-differentiated HL-60 cells were used for this investigation, this study and the levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), caspase activity and ERK phosphorylation were determined following combined treatment with TPA and ascorbic acid. The results demonstrated that low‑dose ascorbic acid (5 µM) reduced the cellular levels of H2O2 and inhibited the differentiation of HL‑60 cells into macrophages following treatment with TPA. In addition, the results of the present study further demonstrated that low‑dose ascorbic acid inactivates the ERK phosphorylation pathway, which inhibited HL‑60 cell differentiation following treatment with TPA.

  12. Irradiation With Carbon Ion Beams Induces Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Cellular Senescence in a Human Glioma-Derived Cell Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Wada, Seiichi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Mori, Takahisa; Saha, Manujendra N.; Hoque, Ariful S.; Islam, Salequl; Kogure, Kimitaka; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined biological responses of human glioma cells to irradiation with carbon ion beams (C-ions). Methods and Materials: A human glioma-derived cell line, NP-2, was irradiated with C-ions. Apoptotic cell nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342. Induction of autophagy was examined either by staining cells with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or by Western blotting to detect conversion of microtuble-associated protein light chain 3 (MAP-LC3) (LC3-I) to the membrane-bound form (LC3-II). Cellular senescence markers including induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) were examined. The mean telomere length of irradiated cells was determined by Southern blot hybridization. Expression of tumor suppressor p53 and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 WAF1/CIP1 in the irradiated cells was analyzed by Western blotting. Results: When NP-2 cells were irradiated with C-ions at 6 Gy, the major population of the cells died of apoptosis and autophagy. The residual fraction of attached cells ( WAF1/CIP1 was induced in NP-2 cells after irradiation. Furthermore, we found that irradiation with C-ions induced cellular senescence in a human glioma cell line lacking functional p53. Conclusions: Irradiation with C-ions induced apoptosis, autophagy, and cellular senescence in human glioma cells.

  13. Posintro™-HBsAg, a modified ISCOM including HBsAg, induces strong cellular and humoral responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiött, Asa; Larsson, Kristina; Manniche, Søren

    2011-01-01

    HBsAg vaccine formulation, Posintro™-HBsAg, was compared to two commercial hepatitis B vaccines including aluminium or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and the two adjuvant systems MF59 and QS21 in their efficiency to prime both cellular and humoral immune responses. The Posintro™-HBsAg induced...... of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and CD4(+) T-cell proliferation. In addition, Posintro™-HBsAg was the only vaccine tested that also induced a strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, with high levels of antigen specific CD8 T-cells secreting IFN-gamma mediating cytolytic activity...

  14. The induced expression of heat shock proteins as a part of the early cellular response to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova, K.; Ivanova, K.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of stressful stimuli including gamma radiation can induce increase in the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsp). This family of molecular chaperones includes members with molecular masses ranging from 10 to 150 kDa and has been identified in all organisms from bacteria to humans. Hsp70 chaperones are very important. The present study aimed to characterize the radiation-induced changes in Hsp70 synthesis in human lymphocytes as a part of the early cellular response to gamma irradiation. The expression of Hsp70 was determined with Western blot and the radiation-induced apoptotic changes were registered by staining with fluorescent dyes. Part of the experiments were performed in the presence of the organic solvent DMSO. At low concentrations this reagent shows antioxidant activity and can reduce the level of the radiation-induced oxidant stress which determines the predominant biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Irradiation with 0.5 to 8 Gy caused statistically significant increase in the synthesis of Hsp70 which was strongest after irradiation with 4 Gy. In the range 0.5-2 Gy the enhancement of the radiation-induced synthesis of Hsp70 reached 60%. Our experimental results characterize changes in the Hsp70 synthesis after gamma irradiation as a part of the early cellular stress response in lymphocytes. (authors)

  15. MERTK Inhibition Induces Polyploidy and Promotes Cell Death and Cellular Senescence in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sufit

    Full Text Available MER receptor tyrosine kinase (MERTK is expressed in a variety of malignancies, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Our previous work demonstrated that inhibition of MERTK using RNA interference induced cell death and chemosensitivity in GBM cells, implicating MERTK as a potential therapeutic target. Here we investigate whether a novel MERTK-selective small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, UNC2025, has similar anti-tumor effects in GBM cell lines.Correlations between expression of GAS6, a MERTK ligand, and prognosis were determined using data from the TCGA database. GBM cell lines (A172, SF188, U251 were treated in vitro with increasing doses of UNC2025 (50-400nM. Cell count and viability were determined by trypan blue exclusion. Cell cycle profiles and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometric analysis after BrdU or Po-Pro-1/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Polyploidy was detected by propidium iodide staining and metaphase spread. Cellular senescence was determined by β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory cytokine analysis.Decreased overall survival significantly correlated with high levels of GAS6 expression in GBM, highlighting the importance of TAM kinase signaling in GBM tumorigenesis and/or therapy resistance and providing strong rationale for targeting these pathways in the clinic. All three GBM cell lines exhibited dose dependent reductions in cell number and colony formation (>90% at 200nM after treatment with UNC2025. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase and development of polyploidy. After extended exposure, 60-80% of cells underwent apoptosis. The majority of surviving cells (65-95% were senescent and did not recover after drug removal. Thus, UNC2025 mediates anti-tumor activity in GBM by multiple mechanisms.The findings described here provide further evidence of oncogenic roles for MERTK in GBM, demonstrate the importance of kinase activity for

  16. Radiation induced microvascular damage in the rat spinal cord: cellular and secretory factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Siegal, Tali; Meltzer, A; Shezen, E; Ovadia, Haim

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To investigate the short and long-term effect of radiation on micro vessel permeability, endothelin and nitric oxide production, and cellular profile in the spinal cord of rats and to evaluate the influence of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (r-hMnSOD) on these effects. Materials and Methods: The thoracolumbar spinal cord of Fischer rats was irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. At various times afterwards the rats were killed and the spinal cord was excised. Endothelin and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and microvascular permeability were assayed quantitatively. Astrocytes, microglia, vascular basal membrane and neuro filaments were immunohistochemically evaluated. Results: None of the rats developed signs of neurological dysfunction. Endothelin concentrations in the spinal cord were significantly reduced 18 hours after irradiation and continued to decrease until after 10 days (p=<0.007). After 56 days endothelin concentration returned to normal and then rose to markedly elevated levels at 120 and 180 days (p=<0.002). NOS activity was reduced soon after irradiation and remained very low throughout the period of observation despite the changes in endothelin. Vascular permeability was markedly increased after 18 hours and again after 120 and 180 days. Treatment with r-hMnSOD had no effect on normal vascular permeability but abolished the increase in vascular permeability seen after irradiation. Standard microscopic examination revealed no changes in the irradiated spinal cord. Immunohistochemical stains showed a progressive increase in the number of microglial cells per field after 120 and 180 days (p=<0.0003). An increase in astrocytic cells was seen after 180 days with an earlier short lasting peak after 14 days. No abnormalities were found in blood vessel configuration, density and diameter. Vascular basal membrane and neuro filaments were unchanged throughout the study. Conclusions: Following radiation to the spinal cord there

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a cellular model for studying Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS, or Trisomy 21 Syndrome, is one of the most common genetic diseases. It is a chromosomal abnormality caused by a duplication of chromosome 21. DS patients show the presence of a third copy (or a partial third copy of chromosome 21 (trisomy, as result of meiotic errors. These patients suffer of many health problems, such as intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, duodenal stenosis, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, immune system deficiencies, muscle hypotonia and motor disorders. About one in 1000 babies born each year are affected by DS. Alterations in the dosage of genes located on chromosome 21 (also called HSA21 are responsible for the DS phenotype. However, the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of DS triggering are still not understood; newest evidences suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. For obvious ethical reasons, studies performed on DS patients, as well as on human trisomic tissues are limited. Some authors have proposed mouse models of this syndrome. However, not all the features of the syndrome are represented. Stem cells are considered the future of molecular and regenerative medicine. Several types of stem cells could provide a valid approach to offer a potential treatment for some untreatable human diseases. Stem cells also represent a valid system to develop new cell-based drugs and/or a model to study molecular disease pathways. Among stem cell types, patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells offer some advantages for cell and tissue replacement, engineering and studying: self-renewal capacity, pluripotency and ease of accessibility to donor tissues. These cells can be reprogrammed into completely different cellular types. They are derived from adult somatic cells via reprogramming with ectopic expression of four transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4; or, Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin28. By reprogramming cells from DS patients, it is possible to obtain new tissue with

  18. Lactobacillus GG restoration of the gliadin induced epithelial barrier disruption: the role of cellular polyamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is characterized by enhanced intestinal paracellular permeability due to alterations of function and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins including ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin. Polyamines are pivotal in the control of intestinal barrier function and are also involved in the regulation of intercellular junction proteins. Different probiotic strains may inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects and the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) is effective in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Aims of the study were to establish in epithelial Caco-2 cells whether i) gliadin affects paracellular permeability and polyamine profile; ii) co-administration of viable L.GG, heat-killed L.GG (L.GG-HK) or its conditioned medium (L.GG-CM) preserves the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Additionally, the effects of L.GG on TJ protein expression were tested in presence or absence of polyamines. Results Administration of gliadin (1 mg/ml) to Caco-2 cells for 6 h caused a significant alteration of paracellular permeability as demonstrated by the rapid decrease in transepithelial resistance with a concomitant zonulin release. These events were followed by a significant increase in lactulose paracellular transport and a slight lowering in ZO-1 and Occludin expression without affecting Claudin-1. Besides, the single and total polyamine content increased significantly. The co-administration of viable L.GG (108 CFU/ml), L.GG-HK and L.GG-CM with gliadin significantly restored barrier function as demonstrated by transepithelial resistance, lactulose flux and zonulin release. Viable L.GG and L.GG-HK, but not L.GG-CM, led to a significant reduction in the single and total polyamine levels. Additionally, only the co-administration of viable L.GG with gliadin significantly increased ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin gene expression compared to control cells. When Caco-2 cells treated with viable L.GG and gliadin were deprived in the polyamine

  19. Lactobacillus GG restoration of the gliadin induced epithelial barrier disruption: the role of cellular polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Antonella; Linsalata, Michele; Notarnicola, Maria; Tutino, Valeria; Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-31

    Celiac disease is characterized by enhanced intestinal paracellular permeability due to alterations of function and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins including ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin. Polyamines are pivotal in the control of intestinal barrier function and are also involved in the regulation of intercellular junction proteins. Different probiotic strains may inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects and the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) is effective in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Aims of the study were to establish in epithelial Caco-2 cells whether i) gliadin affects paracellular permeability and polyamine profile; ii) co-administration of viable L.GG, heat-killed L.GG (L.GG-HK) or its conditioned medium (L.GG-CM) preserves the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Additionally, the effects of L.GG on TJ protein expression were tested in presence or absence of polyamines. Administration of gliadin (1 mg/ml) to Caco-2 cells for 6 h caused a significant alteration of paracellular permeability as demonstrated by the rapid decrease in transepithelial resistance with a concomitant zonulin release. These events were followed by a significant increase in lactulose paracellular transport and a slight lowering in ZO-1 and Occludin expression without affecting Claudin-1. Besides, the single and total polyamine content increased significantly. The co-administration of viable L.GG (10(8) CFU/ml), L.GG-HK and L.GG-CM with gliadin significantly restored barrier function as demonstrated by transepithelial resistance, lactulose flux and zonulin release. Viable L.GG and L.GG-HK, but not L.GG-CM, led to a significant reduction in the single and total polyamine levels. Additionally, only the co-administration of viable L.GG with gliadin significantly increased ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin gene expression compared to control cells. When Caco-2 cells treated with viable L.GG and gliadin were deprived in the polyamine content by

  20. ATR controls cellular adaptation to hypoxia through positive regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, F; Britton, S; Nieto, L; Salles, B; Muller, C

    2013-09-12

    Tumor cells adaptation to severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) plays a major role in tumor progression. The transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), whose α-subunit is stabilized under hypoxic conditions is a key component of this process. Recent studies showed that two members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), regulate the hypoxic-dependent accumulation of HIF-1. These proteins initiate cellular stress responses when DNA damage occurs. In addition, it has been demonstrated that extreme hypoxia induces a replicative stress resulting in regions of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks and the activation of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related protein), another member of the PIKKs family. Here, we show that even less severe hypoxia (0.1% O2) also induces activation of ATR through replicative stress. Importantly, in using either transiently silenced ATR cells, cells expressing an inactive form of ATR or cells exposed to an ATR inhibitor (CGK733), we demonstrate that hypoxic ATR activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 independently of the checkpoint kinase Chk1. We show that ATR kinase activity regulates HIF-1α at the translational level and we find that the elements necessary for the regulation of HIF-1α translation are located within the coding region of HIF-1α mRNA. Finally, by using three independent cellular models, we clearly show that the loss of ATR expression and/or kinase activity results in the decrease of HIF-1 DNA binding under hypoxia and consequently affects protein expression levels of two HIF-1 target genes, GLUT-1 and CAIX. Taken together, our data show a new function for ATR in cellular adaptation to hypoxia through regulation of HIF-1α translation. Our work offers new prospect for cancer therapy using ATR inhibitors with the potential to decrease cellular adaptation in hypoxic

  1. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, Jan-Jong, E-mail: petehung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  2. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. → Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. → Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  3. Cell lysis-free quantum dot multicolor cellular imaging-based mechanism study for TNF-α-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-01-27

    TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in insulin resistance observed in obesity and chronic inflammation. Many cellular components involved in insulin signaling cascade are known to be inhibited by TNF-α. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 is one of the major targets in TNF-α-induced insulin resistance. The serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 enables the inhibition of insulin signaling. Until now, many studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanism of TNF-α-induced insulin resistance based on Western blot. Intracellular protein kinase crosstalk is commonly encountered in inflammation-associated insulin resistance. The crosstalk among the signaling molecules obscures the precise role of kinases in insulin resistance. We have developed a cell lysis-free quantum dots (QDots) multicolor cellular imaging to identify the biochemical role of multiple kinases (p38, JNK, IKKβ, IRS1ser, IRS1tyr, GSK3β, and FOXO1) in inflammation-associated insulin resistance pathway with a single assay in one run. QDot-antibody conjugates were used as nanoprobes to simultaneously monitor the activation/deactivation of the above seven intracellular kinases in HepG2 cells. The effect of the test compounds on the suppression of TNF-α-induced insulin resistance was validated through kinase monitoring. Aspirin, indomethacin, cinnamic acid, and amygdalin were tested. Through the measurement of the glycogen level in HepG2 cell treated with TNF-α, it was found that aspirin and indomethacin increased glycogen levels by almost two-fold compared to amygdalin and cinnamic acid. The glucose production assay proved that cinnamic acid was much more efficient in suppressing glucose production, compared with MAP kinase inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. QDot multicolor cellular imaging demonstrated that amygdalin and cinnamic acid selectively acted via the JNK1-dependent pathway to suppress the inflammation-induced insulin resistance and improve

  4. Boundary Induced Phase Transition in Cellular Automata Models of Pedestrian Flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bukáček, M.; Hrabák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2016), s. 327-338 ISSN 1557-5969 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Adaptive time-span * Cellular automata model * Floor-field * Pedestrian flow * Phase transition * Principle of bonds Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.696, year: 2016

  5. Lysosomal Re-acidification Prevents Lysosphingolipid-Induced Lysosomal Impairment and Cellular Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Folts

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are severe and untreatable, and mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction are poorly understood. We found that toxic lipids relevant to three different LSDs disrupt multiple lysosomal and other cellular functions. Unbiased drug discovery revealed several structurally distinct protective compounds, approved for other uses, that prevent lysosomal and cellular toxicities of these lipids. Toxic lipids and protective agents show unexpected convergence on control of lysosomal pH and re-acidification as a critical component of toxicity and protection. In twitcher mice (a model of Krabbe disease [KD], a central nervous system (CNS-penetrant protective agent rescued myelin and oligodendrocyte (OL progenitors, improved motor behavior, and extended lifespan. Our studies reveal shared principles relevant to several LSDs, in which diverse cellular and biochemical disruptions appear to be secondary to disruption of lysosomal pH regulation by specific lipids. These studies also provide novel protective strategies that confer therapeutic benefits in a mouse model of a severe LSD.

  6. The role of nanosecond electric pulse-induced mechanical stress in cellular nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.

    Background: Exposures of cells to very short (less than 1 microsecond) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause a multitude of effects, both physical and molecular in nature. Physically, nanosecond electrical pulse exposure can disrupt the plasma membrane, leading to a phenomenon known as nanoporation. Nanoporation is the production of nanometer sized holes (less than 2 nanometers in diameter) that can persist for up to fifteen minutes, allowing the flow of ions into and out of the cell. Nanoporation can lead to secondary physical effects, such as cellular swelling, shrinking and blebbing. Molecularly, nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to activate signaling pathways, produce oxidative stress, stimulate hormone secretion and induce both apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause molecular changes is unknown; however, it is thought the flow of ions, such as calcium, into the cell via nanopores, could be a major cause. The ability of nanosecond electrical pulses to cause membranes to become permeable and to induce apoptosis makes the technology a desirable modality for cancer research; however, the lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause nanoporation impedes further development of this technology. This dissertation documents the genomic and proteomic responses of cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses and describes in detail the biophysical effects of these electrical pulses, including the demonstration for the first time of the generation of acoustic pressure transients capable of disrupting plasma membranes and possibly contributing to nanoporation. Methods: Jurkat, clone E6-1 (human lymphocytic cell line), U937 (human lymphocytic cell line), Chinese hamster ovarian cells and adult primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses were subjected to a variety of molecular assays, including flow cytometry

  7. High-resolution sub-cellular imaging by correlative NanoSIMS and electron microscopy of amiodarone internalisation by lung macrophages as evidence for drug-induced phospholipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haibo; Passarelli, Melissa K; Munro, Peter M G; Kilburn, Matt R; West, Andrew; Dollery, Colin T; Gilmore, Ian S; Rakowska, Paulina D

    2017-01-26

    Correlative NanoSIMS and EM imaging of amiodarone-treated macrophages shows the internalisation of the drug at a sub-cellular level and reveals its accumulation within the lysosomes, providing direct evidence for amiodarone-induced phospholipidosis. Chemical fixation using tannic acid effectively seals cellular membranes aiding intracellular retention of diffusible drugs.

  8. Pummelo Protects Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiac Cell Death by Reducing Oxidative Stress, Modifying Glutathione Transferase Expression, and Preventing Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chularojmontri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus flavonoids have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risks prominently due to their antioxidant effects. Here we investigated the protective effect of pummelo (Citrus maxima, CM fruit juice in rat cardiac H9c2 cells against doxorubicin (DOX- induced cytotoxicity. Four antioxidant compositions (ascorbic acid, hesperidin, naringin, and gallic acid were determined by HPLC. CM significantly increased cardiac cell survival from DOX toxicity as evaluated by MTT assay. Reduction of cellular oxidative stress was monitored by the formation of DCF fluorescent product and total glutathione (GSH levels. The changes in glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity and expression were determined by enzyme activity assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. Influence of CM on senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity (SA-β-gal was also determined. The mechanisms of cytoprotection involved reduction of intracellular oxidative stress, maintaining GSH availability, and enhanced GST enzyme activity and expression. DOX-induced cellular senescence was also attenuated by long-term CM treatment. Thus, CM fruit juice can be promoted as functional fruit to protect cells from oxidative cell death, enhance the phase II GSTP enzyme activity, and decrease senescence phenotype population induced by cardiotoxic agent such as DOX.

  9. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues

  10. Dynamic Monitoring of Cellular Remodeling Induced by the Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staršíchová Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The plasticity of differentiated adult cells could have a great therapeutic potential, but at the same time, it is characteristic of progression of serious pathological states such as cancer and fibrosis. In this study, we report on the application of a real-time noninvasive system for dynamic monitoring of cellular plasticity. Analysis of the cell impedance profile recorded as cell index using a real-time cell analyzer revealed its significant increase after the treatment of prostate epithelial cells with the transforming growth factor-β1. Changes in the cell index profile were paralleled with cytoskeleton rebuilding and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition and negatively correlated with cell proliferation. This novel application of such approach demonstrated a great potential of the impedance-based system for noninvasive and real-time monitoring of cellular fate.

  11. Dynamic Monitoring of Cellular Remodeling Induced by the Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubala Lukáš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The plasticity of differentiated adult cells could have a great therapeutic potential, but at the same time, it is characteristic of progression of serious pathological states such as cancer and fibrosis. In this study, we report on the application of a real-time noninvasive system for dynamic monitoring of cellular plasticity. Analysis of the cell impedance profile recorded as cell index using a real-time cell analyzer revealed its significant increase after the treatment of prostate epithelial cells with the transforming growth factor-β1. Changes in the cell index profile were paralleled with cytoskeleton rebuilding and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition and negatively correlated with cell proliferation. This novel application of such approach demonstrated a great potential of the impedance-based system for noninvasive and real-time monitoring of cellular fate.

  12. Inhibition of CIP2A attenuates tumor progression by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting cellular senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Qu, Kai; Tao, Jie; Yin, Guozhi; Han, Shaoshan; Liu, Qingguang; Sun, Hao

    2018-01-08

    CIP2A is a recent identified oncogene that inhibits protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and stabilizes c-Myc in cancer cells. To investigate the potential oncogenic role and prognostic value of CIP2A, we comprehensively analyzed the CIP2A expression levels in pan-cancer and observed high expression level of CIP2A in majority cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on a validation cohort including 60 HCC and 20 non-tumorous tissue samples, we further confirmed the high mRNA and protein expression levels of CIP2A in HCC, and found high CIP2A mRNA expression level was associated with unfavorable overall and recurrence-free survival in patients with HCC. Mechanistic investigations revealed that inhibition of CIP2A significantly attenuated cellular proliferation in vitro and tumourigenicity in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that CIP2A might be involved in regulating cell cycle. Our experimental data further confirmed CIP2A knockdown induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. We found accumulated cellular senescence in HCC cells with CIP2A knockdown, companying expression changes of senescence associated proteins (p21, CDK2, CDK4, cyclin D1, MCM7 and FoxM1). Mechanistically, CIP2A knockdown repressed FoxM1 expression and induced FoxM1 dephosphorylation. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by phosphatase inhibitor rescued the repression of FoxM1. Taken together, our results showed that CIP2A was highly expressed in HCC. Inhibition of CIP2A induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular senescence via repressing FoxM1 transcriptional activity, suggesting a potential anti-cancer target for patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The zebrafish miR-462/miR-731 cluster is induced under hypoxic stress via hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and functions in cellular adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Xiao; Chen, Nan; Wu, Xin-Jie; Huang, Cui-Hong; He, Yan; Tang, Rong; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia, a unique and essential environmental stress, evokes highly coordinated cellular responses, and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 in the hypoxia signaling pathway, an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway, acts as a master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxic stress. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a major class of posttranscriptional gene expression regulators, also play pivotal roles in orchestrating hypoxia-mediated cellular adaptations. Here, global miRNA expression profiling and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the up-regulation of the miR-462/miR-731 cluster in zebrafish larvae is induced by hypoxia. It was further validated that miR-462 and miR-731 are up-regulated in a Hif-1α-mediated manner under hypoxia and specifically target ddx5 and ppm1da, respectively. Overexpression of miR-462 and miR-731 represses cell proliferation through blocking cell cycle progress of DNA replication, and induces apoptosis. In situ detection revealed that the miR-462/miR-731 cluster is highly expressed in a consistent and ubiquitous manner throughout the early developmental stages. Additionally, the transcripts become restricted to the notochord, pharyngeal arch, liver, and gut regions from postfertilization d 3 to 5. These data highlight a previously unidentified role of the miR-462/miR-731 cluster as a crucial signaling mediator for hypoxia-mediated cellular adaptations and provide some insights into the potential function of the cluster during embryonic development. © FASEB.

  14. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Prasana, E-mail: prasanasahoo@gmail.com [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Murthy, P. Sriyutha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Venugopalan, V. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga{sup 3+} (ionic radius {approx}0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe{sup 2+} (ionic radius {approx}0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism.

  15. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasana; Murthy, P. Sriyutha; Dhara, S.; Venugopalan, V. P.; Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga 3+ (ionic radius ∼0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe 2+ (ionic radius ∼0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism

  16. The involvement of epigenetic silencing of Foxa2 in cellular replicative and premature senescence induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Ji, W; Yang, L; Yao, L; Wang, G; Xuan, A; Zhuang, Z

    2013-04-01

    Foxa2 is one member of the Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors which has been found to play important roles in multiple stages of mammalian life, beginning with early development, continuing during organogenesis, and finally in metabolism and homeostasis in the adult. To explore the involvement of Foxa2 and its epigenetic regulations in cellular senescence, we established the premature senescence model induced by hydrogen peroxide in comparison with replicative senescence. The mRNA level of Foxa2 was downregulated in both replicative and premature senescent cells. We further found the increased DNA methylation level and new methylation at CpG sites in the promoter with 43.6% of methylated CpG islands in premature senescence, while only 5.7% and 17.1% in young cells and replicative senescence separately. Moreover, we noted the alterations of histone modifications including decreased histone H3 acetylation, increased H4 (Lys-20) trimethylation at the Foxa2 CpG islands in the promoter in replicative or premature senescence, while decreased histone H3 (Lys-4) trimethylation across the transcription start regions in cellular senescence. Taken together, epigenetic silencing of Foxa2 is associated with an increased DNA methylation level and histone H4 (Lys-20) trimethylation, decreased histone H3 acetylation and histone H3 (Lys-4) trimethylation, involved in cellular replicative or premature senescence.

  17. The role of cellular oxidases and catalytic iron in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, S.; Jayatilleke, E. (V.A. Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States) Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Free radical generation and catalytic iron have been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury but the source of free radicals is a subject of controversy. The mechanism of ethanol-induced liver injury was investigated in isolated hepatocytes from a rodent model of iron loading in which free radical generation was measured by the determination of alkane production. Iron loading increased hepatic non-heme iron 3-fold, increased the prooxidant activity of cytosolic ultrafiltrates 2-fold and doubled ethanol-induced alkane production. The role of cellular oxidases as a source of ethanol induced free radicals was studied through the use of selective inhibitors. In both the presence and absence of iron loading, selective inhibition of xanthine oxidase with oxipurinol diminished ethanol-induced alkane production 0-40%, inhibition of aldehyde oxidase with menadione diminished alkane production 36-75%, while the inhibition of aldehyde and xanthine oxidase by feeding tungstate virtually abolished alkane production. Addition of acetaldehyde to hepatocytes generated alkanes at rates comparable to those achieved with ethanol indicating the importance of acetaldehyde metabolism in free radical generation.

  18. Bacille Calmette-Guerin can induce cellular apoptosis of urothelial cancer directly through toll-like receptor 7 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dah-Shyong Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG instillation is the mainstay treatment modality for superficial urothelial cancer (UC through toll-like receptor (TLR activation of cognitive immune response. We investigated the roles of TLR7 in the activation of apoptosis in UC cells after BCG treatment. The in vitro cytotoxicity effect of BCG on UC cells was measured by a modified 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazo-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium assay. Expressions of TLR7 mRNA and protein in native UC cells prior to and after BCG treatment were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot methods. Phagocytotic processes after BCG treatment in UC cells were observed microscopically using a specific immunostain, subsequent cellular apoptosis-related signals induced by TLR7 were analyzed by western blot. Low-grade UC cells, TSGH8301, showed significant cellular death (4.23-fold higher than the high-grade UC cells T24 and J82 when treated with BCG and the BCG cytotoxicity was displayed in a dose–time-dependent manner. TSGH8301 cells had the highest content of TLR7 mRNA, 7.2- and 4.5-fold higher than that of T24 and J82 cells, respectively. TLR7 protein expression was also significantly increased in TSGH8301 cells. Phagocytosis-related markers, including beclin 1, ATG2, and LC3, were increased when TSGH8301 cells were treated by BCG. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 2 and 4 were also increased markedly in TSGH8301 cells. On the contrary, cellular apoptosis of TSGH8301 cells decreased by 34% when TLR7 activation was suppressed by the TLR antagonist IRS661 after BCG treatment. Our findings suggest that well differentiated TCC cells have higher expression of TLR7 and BCG can drive cellular death of TCC cells directly via TLR7 activation and related apoptotic pathway.

  19. Defects in cellular sorting and retroviral assembly induced by GGA overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashima Kunio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that overexpression of Golgi-localized, γ-ear containing, Arf-binding (GGA proteins inhibits retrovirus assembly and release by disrupting the function of endogenous ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs. GGA overexpression led to the formation of large, swollen vacuolar compartments, which in the case of GGA1 sequestered HIV-1 Gag. Results In the current study, we extend our previous findings to characterize in depth the GGA-induced compartments and the determinants for retroviral Gag sequestration in these structures. We find that GGA-induced structures are derived from the Golgi and contain aggresome markers. GGA overexpression leads to defects in trafficking of transferrin receptor and recycling of cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Additionally, we find that compartments induced by GGA overexpression sequester Tsg101, poly-ubiquitin, and, in the case of GGA3, Hrs. Interestingly, brefeldin A treatment, which leads to the dissociation of endogenous GGAs from membranes, does not dissociate the GGA-induced compartments. GGA mutants that are defective in Arf binding and hence association with membranes also induce the formation of GGA-induced structures. Overexpression of ubiquitin reverses the formation of GGA-induced structures and partially rescues HIV-1 particle production. We found that in addition to HIV-1 Gag, equine infectious anemia virus Gag is also sequestered in GGA1-induced structures. The determinants in Gag responsible for sequestration map to the matrix domain, and recruitment to these structures is dependent on Gag membrane binding. Conclusion These data provide insights into the composition of structures induced by GGA overexpression and their ability to disrupt endosomal sorting and retroviral particle production.

  20. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of cellular MAPK/phosphatase levels and increasing hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2014-03-01

    Here we describe a novel strategy for mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by suppressing the activity of MKP3, resulting in ERK activation and enhanced abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, using the antioxidant flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone). It offered complete protection to mouse splenic lymphocytes against radiation-induced cell death. Inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 could significantly abrogate baicalein-mediated radioprotection in lymphocytes. Baicalein inhibited phosphatase MKP3 and thereby enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and its downstream proteins such as Elk and Nrf-2. It also increased the nuclear levels of Nrf-2 and the mRNA levels of its dependent genes. Importantly, baicalein administration to mice before radiation exposure led to significant recovery of loss of bone marrow cellularity and also inhibited cell death. Administration of baicalein increased the hematopoietic stem cell frequency as measured by side-population assay and also by antibody staining. Further, baicalein offered significant protection against whole-body irradiation (WBI; 7.5Gy)-induced mortality in mice. Interestingly, we found that baicalein works by activating the same target molecules ERK and Nrf-2 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (inhibitor of Nrf-2) significantly abrogated baicalein-mediated protection against WBI-induced mortality in mice. Thus, in contrast to the generalized conception of antioxidants acting as radioprotectors, we provide a rationale that antioxidants exhibit pleiotropic effects through the activation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ASPL-TFE3 Oncoprotein Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Induces Cellular Senescence by Up-Regulating p21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Ishiguro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar soft part sarcoma is an extremely rare soft tissue sarcoma with poor prognosis. It is characterized by the unbalanced recurrent chromosomal translocation der(17t(X;17(p11;q25, resulting in the generation of an ASPL-TFE3 fusion gene. ASPL-TFE3 oncoprotein functions as an aberrant transcriptional factor and is considered to play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of alveolar soft part sarcoma. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we identified p21 (p21WAF1/CIP1 as a direct transcriptional target of ASPL-TFE3. Ectopic ASPL-TFE3 expression in 293 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant increases in protein and mRNA levels of p21. ASPL-TFE3 activated p21 expression in a p53-independent manner through direct transcriptional interactions with the p21 promoter region. When ASPL-TFE3 was expressed in human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells in a tetracycline-inducible manner, we observed the up-regulation of p21 expression and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Suppression of p21 significantly decreased the induction of ASPL-TFE3-mediated cellular senescence. Furthermore, ASPL-TFE3 expression in mesenchymal stem cells resulted in a significant up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines associated with senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. These results show that ASPL-TFE3 regulates cell cycle progression and induces cellular senescence by up-regulating p21 expression. In addition, our data suggest a potential mechanism by which ASPL-TFE3-induced senescence may play a role in tumorigenesis by inducing SASP, which could promote the protumorigenic microenvironment.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bromate-induced cytotoxicity in human and rat kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; De Silva, Dilhara; Sun, Bin; Fisher, Jeffery; Bull, Richard J.; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Cummings, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of bromate (BrO 3 - )-induced toxicity in Normal Rat Kidney (NRK) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were investigated. BrO 3 - (added as KBrO 3 ) induced concentration-dependent decreases in 3-(4, dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) staining after 48 h. BrO 3 - -induced necrosis based on tandem increases in annexin V and PI staining. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BrO 3 - also induced G2/M arrest and nuclear fragmentation, prior to alterations in MTT staining or annexin V and PI staining. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the G2/M arrest correlated to induction of phosphorylated (p)-p53, p21, cyclin B1 and p-cdc2. Further, BrO 3 - induced time-dependent increases in the activity of the mitogen activated protein kinases p38 and ERK1/2. Treatment of cells with the p38 inhibitor SB202190, but not the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, partially reversed BrO 3 - -induced G2/M arrest and decreased BrO 3 - -induced p-p53, p21 and cyclin B1 expression. In addition, BrO 3 - treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) based on increases in CM-H 2 DCFDA fluorescence. The antioxidant ascorbic acid inhibited BrO 3 - -induced p38 activation, G2/M arrest, p-p53, p21 and cyclin B1 expression; however, ascorbic acid had no effect on BrO 3 - -induced formation of 8-OHdG, a marker of DNA oxidative damage, whose increases preceded cell death by 24 h. These data suggest that ROS mediated MAPK activation is involved in the molecular mechanisms of BrO 3 - -induced cell cycle arrest, which occurs independently of 8-OH-dG production. The similar mode of action in both NRK and HEK293 cells suggests that the mechanisms of BrO 3 - -induced renal cell death are model-independent.

  3. A study on the cellular structure during stress solicitation induced by BioMEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, Raffaella; Maggiolino, Stefano; Codan, Barbara; Lazzarino, Marco; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of single cells is a topic in continuous evolution. The complexity of the cellular matrix, the huge variety of cells, the interaction of one cell with the other are all factors that must be taken into consideration in the study of the cellular structure and mechanics. In this project, we developed different types of bioMEMS for cell's stretching, both transparent devices based on silicon nitride and non-transparent silicon based. While the use of silicon devices is limited to reflection microscopes, transparent bioMEMS can be used with transmission and reflection microscopes but can also be easily coupled with other tools such as patch clamp analyzers or atomic force microscope. This improvement will open brand new possibilities in the biological investigation field. We used these two BioMEMS to stretch a single cell in a controlled way and, as a first investigation, we focused on its morphology. We noticed that during a controlled stretch, cells react to the applied deformation. A hysteretic behavior on the ratio between area and perimeter has been highlighted.

  4. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  5. Silver nanoparticles do not alter human osteoclastogenesis but induce cellular uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Pauksch

    2014-01-01

    In conclusion, our results indicate nanosilver-induced cell stress at higher concentrations. For this reason antibacterial benefits and possible health risks should be weighed in more detail in further studies.

  6. Discovery and identification of potential biomarkers for alcohol-induced oxidative stress based on cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qingping; Wei, Jianteng; Liu, Yewei; Fei, Xiulan; Hao, Yuwei; Pei, Dong; Di, Duolong

    2017-07-01

    Biomarkers involved in alcohol-induced oxidative stress play an important role in alcoholic liver disease prevention and diagnosis. Alcohol-induced oxidative stress in human liver L-02 cells was used to discover the potential biomarkers. Metabolites from L-02 cells induced by alcohol were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Fourteen metabolites that allowed discrimination between control and model groups were discovered by multivariate statistical data analysis (i.e. principal components analysis, orthogonal partial least-squares discriminate analysis). Based on the retention time, UV spectrum and LC-MS findings of the samples and compared with the authentic standards, eight biomarkers involved in alcohol-induced oxidative stress, namely, malic acid, oxidized glutathione, γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, adenosine triphosphate, phenylalanine, adenosine monophosphate, nitrotyrosine and tryptophan, were identified. These biomarkers offered important targets for disease diagnosis and other researches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Circumvention of camptothecin-induced resistance during the adaptive cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Vovou, Ioanna; Delitheos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Camptothecin-11 (CPT-11) induces the adaptive stress response in yeast, conferring resistance via not fully characterized mechanisms. This study aimed at exploring, pharmacologically, the mechanisms underlying the CPT-11-induced resistance in yeast. Post-logarithmic yeast cultures were submitted to heat shock following preconditioning with suramin and with CPT-11, either alone or in combination with suramin, cycloheximide, sodium molybdate, okadaic acid, or verapamil. The stress response was evaluated by determining cell viability after heat shock. Preconditioning with CPT-11 or suramin conferred thermotolerance to yeast cells. Co-administration of CPT-11 with suramin, cycloheximide or okadaic acid reversed the CPT-11-induced thermotolerant phenotype, while sodium molybdate and verapamil had no effect on CPT-11-induced resistance. The antagonistic effect of the thermotolerance-inducers and the possible contribution of topoisomerase II activity and post-translational modifications mediated by the phosphatases PP1/2A in CPT-11-induced resistance may have important implications on the acquisition of resistance to stress in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Neurological and cellular regulation of visceral hypersensitivity induced by chronic stress and colonic inflammation in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinghong; Winston, John H.; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation in inducing visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) in ulcerative colitis patients remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that acute ulcerative colitis-like inflammation does not induce VHS. However, it sets up molecular conditions such that chronic stress following inflammation exaggerates single unit afferent discharges to colorectal distension. We used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce ulcerative colitis-like inflammation and a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress protocol in rats. DSS upregulated Nav1.8 mRNA in colon-responsive DRG neurons, TRPV1 in colonic muscularis externae (ME) and BDNF in spinal cord without affecting the spike frequency in spinal afferents or VMR to CRD. By contrast, chronic stress did not induce inflammation but it downregulated Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 mRNA in DRG neurons, and upregulated TRPA1 and NGF in ME, which mediated the increase of spike frequency and VMR to CRD. Chronic stress following inflammation exacerbated spike frequency in spinal afferent neurons. TRPA1 antagonist suppressed the sensitization of afferent neurons. DSS-inflammation did not affect the composition or excitation thresholds of low-threshold and high-threshold fibers. Chronic stress following inflammation increased the percent composition of high-threshold fibers and lowered the excitation threshold of both types of fibers. We conclude that not all types of inflammation induce VHS, whereas chronic stress induces VHS in the absence of inflammation. PMID:23806714

  9. Metabolomics Reveals that Dietary Xenoestrogens Alter Cellular Metabolism Induced by Palbociclib/Letrozole Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Raffeiner, Philipp; Granados, Ana; Huan, Tao; Fang, Mingliang; Forsberg, Erica M; Benton, H Paul; Goetz, Laura; Johnson, Caroline H; Siuzdak, Gary

    2018-03-15

    Recently, the palbociclib/letrozole combination therapy was granted accelerated US FDA approval for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Since the underlying metabolic effects of these drugs are yet unknown, we investigated their synergism at the metabolome level in MCF-7 cells. As xenoestrogens interact with the ER, we additionally aimed at deciphering the impact of the phytoestrogen genistein and the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone. A global metabolomics approach was applied to unravel metabolite and pathway modifications. The results clearly showed that the combined effects of palbociclib and letrozole on cellular metabolism were far more pronounced than that of each agent alone and potently influenced by xenoestrogens. This behavior was confirmed in proliferation experiments and functional assays. Specifically, amino acids and central carbon metabolites were attenuated, while higher abundances were observed for fatty acids and most nucleic acid-related metabolites. Interestingly, exposure to model xenoestrogens appeared to counteract these effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mixed allogeneic chimerism to induce tolerance to solid organ and cellular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, B G; Acholonu, I N; Bergheim, M; Mueller, Y M; Ildstad, S T

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of solid organs and cellular grafts has become clinical routine in the last 30 years. However, the requirement for life-long immunosuppression is associated with infections, malignancies and end-organ toxicity. Moreover, the treatment fails to prevent chronic rejection. The induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance would solve these problems, but has remained an elusive goal. One approach to achieve transplantation tolerance is through hematopoietic chimerism. This review outlines different concepts of hematopoietic chimerism focusing on macrochimerism. Mixed allogeneic chimerism, also known as macrochimerism, is defined as engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells achieved by bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It discusses the advantages and limitations of the BMT as well as approaches to overcome these limitations in the future.

  11. Participation of ATM in cellular response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xiangbing; Song Yi; Mao Jianping; Gong Bo; Dong Yan; Liu Bin; Sun Zhixian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To clone ATM full length cDNA and cDNA fragments containing some functional domains and to identify proteins that interact with ATM and mediate DNA damage signal transduction in cellular response to DNA damage. Methods: ATM cDNA was amplified from MarthomTM-Ready cDNA kit of human leukocytes by LD-PCR. ATM-interacting proteins were screened by yeast two hybrid system. Results: ATM full-length cDNA and cDNA fragments containing PI3K kinase domain, leucine zipper and proline rich region were amplified from human cDNAs. Several candidate clones that interacted with ATM PI3K domain were identified. Conclusion: ATM mediates DNA damage signal transduction by interacting with many proteins

  12. Bupivacaine-induced cellular entry of QX-314 and its contribution to differential nerve block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneis, C; Kistner, K; Puopolo, M; Jo, S; Roberson, DP; Sisignano, M; Segal, D; Cobos, EJ; Wainger, BJ; Labocha, S; Ferreirós, N; Hehn, C; Tran, J; Geisslinger, G; Reeh, PW; Bean, BP; Woolf, C J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Selective nociceptor fibre block is achieved by introducing the cell membrane impermeant sodium channel blocker lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (QX-314) through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels into nociceptors. We screened local anaesthetics for their capacity to activate TRP channels, and characterized the nerve block obtained by combination with QX-314. Experimental Approach: We investigated TRP channel activation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings, and cellular QX-314 uptake by MS. To characterize nerve block, compound action potential (CAP) recordings from isolated nerves and behavioural responses were analysed. Key Results: Of the 12 compounds tested, bupivacaine was the most potent activator of ruthenium red-sensitive calcium entry in DRG neurons and activated heterologously expressed TRPA1 channels. QX-314 permeated through TRPA1 channels and accumulated intracellularly after activation of these channels. Upon sciatic injections, QX-314 markedly prolonged bupivacaine's nociceptive block and also extended (to a lesser degree) its motor block. Bupivacaine's blockade of C-, but not A-fibre, CAPs in sciatic nerves was extended by co-application of QX-314. Surprisingly, however, this action was the same in wild-type, TRPA1-knockout and TRPV1/TRPA1-double knockout mice, suggesting a TRP-channel independent entry pathway. Consistent with this, high doses of bupivacaine promoted a non-selective, cellular uptake of QX-314. Conclusions and Implications: Bupivacaine, combined with QX-314, produced a long-lasting sensory nerve block. This did not require QX-314 permeation through TRPA1, although bupivacaine activated these channels. Regardless of entry pathway, the greatly extended duration of block produced by QX-314 and bupivacaine may be clinically useful. PMID:24117225

  13. Early changes in staurosporine-induced differentiated RGC-5 cells indicate cellular injury response to nonlethal blue light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Minshu

    2015-06-01

    Blue light has been previously demonstrated to induce injury of retinal cells. The cellular responses to nonlethal blue light exposure for each type of retinal cell are of particular interest but remain undetermined. Based on the doses of blue light reported in previous research to be nonlethal to retinal pigment epithelial cells, here we investigated whether and to what extent such doses of blue light are cytotoxic to staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were differentiated for 24 hours using 200 nM staurosporine. The resulting cells were cultured and exposed to blue light at three different energy levels (1, 10, and 50 J cm(-2)). Cellular morphologies were investigated with an inverted microscope and cell viability was assessed with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by H2DCFDA. After loading of MitoTracker Green FM dye, the mitochondrial contents were analyzed using flow cytometry. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the media were also measured. The level of lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA). Treatment of the cells for 24 hours with 200 nM staurosporine successfully induced the differentiation of RGC-5 cells. No morphological changes were observed in the ssdRGC-5 cells exposed to blue light at 50 J cm(-2), which was the highest energy level tested. Exposure of the ssdRGC-5 cells to this energy level of blue light did, however, decrease their numbers by approximately 72.1% compared to the numbers of such cells found after being left in the dark. Remarkably, the levels of ROS generation and mitochondrial contents were, respectively, increased to 142% and 118% of those of the control by a 10 J cm(-2) exposure of blue light. The LDH activities and MDA levels exhibited no obvious changes in the blue light-exposed ssdRGC-5 cells compared to the control cells. In vitro nonlethal blue light exposure led to cellular

  14. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  15. Tyrphostin AG-related compounds attenuate H2O2-induced TRPM2-dependent and -independent cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Toda, Takahiro; Yonezawa, Ryo; Negoro, Takaharu; Shimizu, Shunichi

    2017-05-01

    TRPM2 is a Ca 2+ -permeable channel that is activated by H 2 O 2 . TRPM2-mediated Ca 2+ signaling has been implicated in the aggravation of inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the development of TRPM2 inhibitors to prevent the aggravation of these diseases is expected. We recently reported that some Tyrphostin AG-related compounds inhibited the H 2 O 2 -induced activation of TRPM2 by scavenging the intracellular hydroxyl radical. In the present study, we examined the effects of AG-related compounds on H 2 O 2 -induced cellular responses in human monocytic U937 cells, which functionally express TRPM2. The effects of AG-related compounds on H 2 O 2 -induced changes in intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, and CXCL8 secretion were assessed using U937 cells. Ca 2+ influxes via TRPM2 in response to H 2 O 2 were blocked by AG-related compounds. AG-related compounds also inhibited the H 2 O 2 -induced activation of ERK, and subsequent secretion of CXCL8 mediated by TRPM2-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our results show that AG-related compounds inhibit H 2 O 2 -induced CXCL8 secretion following ERK activation, which is mediated by TRPM2-dependent and -independent mechanisms in U937 cells. We previously reported that AG-related compounds blocked H 2 O 2 -induced TRPM2 activation by scavenging the hydroxyl radical. The inhibitory effects of AG-related compounds on TRPM2-independent responses may be due to scavenging of the hydroxyl radical. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lysophosphatidylserine-induced release of intra-cellular amines in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Bigon, E.; Bruni, A.; Mietto, L.; Toffano, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the presence of mouse plasma, lysophosphatidylserine stimulates histamine secretion from isolated mast cells. The extensive modification of carbohydrate metabolism produced by lysophosphatidylserine in mice was largely prevented by the antihistaminic drug, pyrilamine. However, to prevent completely the change in carbohydrate metabolism induced by lysophosphatidylserine the administration of an antihistamine and an adrenoceptor antagonist was required. It is concluded that the effect of lys...

  17. Unraveling cellular pathways contributing to drug-induced liver injury by dynamical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, I.A.; Yang, H.; Water, van de B.; Beltman, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant threat to human health and a major problem in drug development. It is hard to predict due to its idiosyncratic nature and which does not show up in animal trials. Hepatic adaptive stress response pathway activation is generally observed

  18. Inflammation-induced endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles modulate the cellular status of pericytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Niida, Shumpei; Azuma, Erika; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masashi; Huang, Ting Ting; Sagara, Hiroshi; Higaki, Sayuri; Ikutani, Masashi; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Kenji; Hamashima, Takeru; Mori, Hisashi; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-02-17

    Emerging lines of evidence have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate cell-to-cell communication by exporting encapsulated materials, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), to target cells. Endothelial cell-derived EVs (E-EVs) are upregulated in circulating blood in different pathological conditions; however, the characteristics and the role of these E-EVs are not yet well understood. In vitro studies were conducted to determine the role of inflammation-induced E-EVs in the cell-to-cell communication between vascular endothelial cells and pericytes/vSMCs. Stimulation with inflammatory cytokines and endotoxin immediately induced release of shedding type E-EVs from the vascular endothelial cells, and flow cytometry showed that the induction was dose dependent. MiRNA array analyses revealed that group of miRNAs were specifically increased in the inflammation-induced E-EVs. E-EVs added to the culture media of cerebrovascular pericytes were incorporated into the cells. The E-EV-supplemented cells showed highly induced mRNA and protein expression of VEGF-B, which was assumed to be a downstream target of the miRNA that was increased within the E-EVs after inflammatory stimulation. The results suggest that E-EVs mediate inflammation-induced endothelial cell-pericyte/vSMC communication, and the miRNAs encapsulated within the E-EVs may play a role in regulating target cell function. E-EVs may be new therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  19. MicroRNA-122: a novel hepatocyte-enriched in vitro marker of drug-induced cellular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Richard; Kelly, Lorna; Sison-Young, Rowena L C; Zhang, Fang; Pridgeon, Chris S; Heslop, James A; Metcalfe, Pete; Kitteringham, Neil R; Baxter, Melissa; Harrison, Sean; Hanley, Neil A; Burke, Zoë D; Storm, Mike P; Welham, Melanie J; Tosh, David; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Edsbagge, Josefina; Starkey Lewis, Philip J; Bonner, Frank; Harpur, Ernie; Sidaway, James; Bowes, Joanne; Fenwick, Stephen W; Malik, Hassan; Goldring, Chris E P; Park, B Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Emerging hepatic models for the study of drug-induced toxicity include pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) and complex hepatocyte-non-parenchymal cellular coculture to mimic the complex multicellular interactions that recapitulate the niche environment in the human liver. However, a specific marker of hepatocyte perturbation, required to discriminate hepatocyte damage from non-specific cellular toxicity contributed by non-hepatocyte cell types or immature differentiated cells is currently lacking, as the cytotoxicity assays routinely used in in vitro toxicology research depend on intracellular molecules which are ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cell types. In this study, we demonstrate that microRNA-122 (miR-122) detection in cell culture media can be used as a hepatocyte-enriched in vitro marker of drug-induced toxicity in homogeneous cultures of hepatic cells, and a cell-specific marker of toxicity of hepatic cells in heterogeneous cultures such as HLCs generated from various differentiation protocols and pluripotent stem cell lines, where conventional cytotoxicity assays using generic cellular markers may not be appropriate. We show that the sensitivity of the miR-122 cytotoxicity assay is similar to conventional assays that measure lactate dehydrogenase activity and intracellular adenosine triphosphate when applied in hepatic models with high levels of intracellular miR-122, and can be multiplexed with other assays. MiR-122 as a biomarker also has the potential to bridge results in in vitro experiments to in vivo animal models and human samples using the same assay, and to link findings from clinical studies in determining the relevance of in vitro models being developed for the study of drug-induced liver injury. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http

  20. Damage to cellular and isolated DNA induced by a metabolite of aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: s-oikawa@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); JSPS Research Fellow (Japan); Isono, Yoshiaki [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan)

    2009-02-10

    Aspirin has been proposed as a possible chemopreventive agent. On the other hand, a recent cohort study showed that aspirin may increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. To clarify whether aspirin is potentially carcinogenic, we investigated the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), which is correlated with the incidence of cancer, in cultured cells treated with 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA), a metabolite of aspirin. 2,3-DHBA induced 8-oxodG formation in the PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA single-strand breaks were also revealed by comet assay using PANC-1 cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that 2,3-DHBA increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PANC-1 cells. The 8-oxodG formation and ROS generation were also observed in the HL-60 leukemia cell line, but not in the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-resistant clone HP100 cells, suggesting the involvement of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In addition, an hprt mutation assay supported the mutagenicity of 2,3-DHBA. We investigated the mechanism underlying the 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA damage using {sup 32}P-labeled DNA fragments of human tumor suppressor genes. 2,3-DHBA induced DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. DNA damage induced by 2,3-DHBA was enhanced by the addition of histone peptide-6 [AKRHRK]. Interestingly, 2,3-DHBA and histone peptide-6 caused base damage in the 5'-ACG-3' and 5'-CCG-3' sequences, hotspots of the p53 gene. Bathocuproine, a Cu(I) chelator, and catalase inhibited the DNA damage. Typical hydroxyl radical scavengers did not inhibit the DNA damage. These results suggest that ROS derived from the reaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with Cu(I) participate in the DNA damage. In conclusion, 2,3-DHBA induces oxidative DNA damage and mutations, which may result in carcinogenesis.

  1. Damage to cellular and isolated DNA induced by a metabolite of aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shinji; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Isono, Yoshiaki; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2009-01-01

    Aspirin has been proposed as a possible chemopreventive agent. On the other hand, a recent cohort study showed that aspirin may increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. To clarify whether aspirin is potentially carcinogenic, we investigated the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), which is correlated with the incidence of cancer, in cultured cells treated with 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA), a metabolite of aspirin. 2,3-DHBA induced 8-oxodG formation in the PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA single-strand breaks were also revealed by comet assay using PANC-1 cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that 2,3-DHBA increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PANC-1 cells. The 8-oxodG formation and ROS generation were also observed in the HL-60 leukemia cell line, but not in the hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-resistant clone HP100 cells, suggesting the involvement of H 2 O 2 . In addition, an hprt mutation assay supported the mutagenicity of 2,3-DHBA. We investigated the mechanism underlying the 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA damage using 32 P-labeled DNA fragments of human tumor suppressor genes. 2,3-DHBA induced DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. DNA damage induced by 2,3-DHBA was enhanced by the addition of histone peptide-6 [AKRHRK]. Interestingly, 2,3-DHBA and histone peptide-6 caused base damage in the 5'-ACG-3' and 5'-CCG-3' sequences, hotspots of the p53 gene. Bathocuproine, a Cu(I) chelator, and catalase inhibited the DNA damage. Typical hydroxyl radical scavengers did not inhibit the DNA damage. These results suggest that ROS derived from the reaction of H 2 O 2 with Cu(I) participate in the DNA damage. In conclusion, 2,3-DHBA induces oxidative DNA damage and mutations, which may result in carcinogenesis

  2. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus transmission. The

  3. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in antimyelin antibody-induced oligodendrocyte damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot-Wenk, M; Griot, C; Pfister, H; Vandevelde, M

    1991-08-01

    Treatment of dissociated murine brain cell cultures with an antibody recognizing galactocerebroside (GalC) led to degeneration of oligodendrocytes with loss of their cell processes. F(ab')2 fragments prepared from this antibody showed no effect. The anti-GalC antibody--but not its F(ab')2 fragments b2 was able to stimulate macrophages in these cultures as seen in a chemiluminescence assay. Therefore, antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes stimulated nearby macrophages by interacting with their Fc receptors. The oligodendroglial damage coincided with the release of toxic compounds by the stimulated macrophages, since treatment of the cultures with the anti-GalC antibody and a variety of other macrophage stimulating agents led to secretion of reactive oxygen species and--in some experiments--tumor necrosis factor, both known to be toxic for oligodendrocytes. These in vitro experiments show evidence that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism of tissue destruction in inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

  4. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  5. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees

  6. Cellular bases of radiation-induced residual insufficiency in the haematopoietic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangenheim, K.H. v.; Peterson, H.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Following radiation exposure, man's survival and further well-being largely depends on the degree of damage to his heamatopietic system. Stem cells are particualarly sensitive to radiation. Over and beyond acute radiation damge, residual radiation damage is of significance since it reduces the performance of the haematopietic system and enhances the risk of leukaemia. Knowledge concerning cellular bases may be important for preventive and therapeutic measures. The measurement method presented is based on the fact that stem cells from transfused bone marrow will settle in the spleen of highly irradiated mice and be able to reconstruct the haematopietic system. Initally individual colonies can be observed which originate from a single stem cell and the proliferation of its descendants. Counting these colonies will give the number of stem cells. The reduction of the proliferation factor measured in the stem-cell quality test apparently is not due to a shift in the age structure of the stem cell compartment but to a damage which is located within a more or less substantial proportion of the stem cells themselves. This damage is the cause of stem cell descendant growth retarded on an average. It is probable that recovery observed after irradiation is brought about by less-damaged or undamaged stem cells replacing damaged ones. Initial results point to the fact that this replacement can be influenced by treatment after irradiation. (orig./MG) [de

  7. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

  8. Stress-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in microalgae - Molecular, cellular and physiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Du, Zhi-Yan; Ma, Wei; Vollheyde, Katharina; Benning, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae have promise as biofuel feedstock. Under certain conditions, they produce substantial amounts of neutral lipids, mainly in the form of triacylglycerols (TAGs), which can be converted to fuels. Much of our current knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of algal neutral lipid metabolism derives mainly from studies of plants, i.e. seed tissues, and to a lesser extent from direct studies of algal lipid metabolism. Thus, the knowledge of TAG synthesis and the cellular trafficking of TAG precursors in algal cells is to a large extent based on genome predictions, and most aspects of TAG metabolism have yet to be experimentally verified. The biofuel prospects of microalgae have raised the interest in mechanistic studies of algal TAG biosynthesis in recent years and resulted in an increasing number of publications on lipid metabolism in microalgae. In this review we summarize the current findings on genetic, molecular and physiological studies of TAG accumulation in microalgae. Special emphasis is on the functional analysis of key genes involved in TAG synthesis, molecular mechanisms of regulation of TAG biosynthesis, as well as on possible mechanisms of lipid droplet formation in microalgal cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Marianne S.; Arthurs, Benjamin J.; Estes, Brian J.; Morgan, William F.

    2006-03-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizingradiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resat, Marianne S.; Arthurs, Benjamin J.; Estes, Brian J.; Morgan, william F.

    2006-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizing radiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation

  11. Study on cellular genotoxicities induced by alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Cao Zhenshan; Mi Na; Chen Zhongmin; Liu Gang; Wei Han; Li Huiying; Zhu Maoxiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cellular genotoxicities of aplha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment. Methods: Exponentially growing immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells were divided into the normal control group (NC), alpha particles irradiation (α), NNK administration group (NNK), NNK administration (100 μg/ml) followed by alpha particles irradiation group (NNK + α), and alpha particles irradiation followed by NNK administration (100 μg/ml) group (μ + NNK). DNA damage were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE); multinuclear cell assay was used to detect the frequency of the HPRT gene mutation; cell micronucleus frequency were detected by cytogenetic methods. Results: In the group exposed to both alpha particles irradiation and NNK, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency, and cell micronucleus frequency were significantly higher than those in the same dose groups irradiated with alpha particles or NNK administration alone. Subtracted the NNK effect, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency and cell micronucleus frequency in the group irradiated by alpha particles in combination with NNK administration were significantly higher than those of alpha particles irradiation alone. Conclusion: The genotoxicity of alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK administration had synergistic effect. (authors)

  12. Diet-induced cellular neuroinflammation in the hypothalamus: Mechanistic insights from investigation of neurons and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dean Q; Tse, Erika K; Kim, Mun Heui; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-12-15

    Diet-induced obesity can lead to detrimental chronic disorders. The severity of this global epidemic has encouraged ongoing research to characterize the mechanisms underlying obesity and its comorbidities. Recent evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) in high-fat diets rapidly generate inflammation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), which centrally regulates whole-body energy homeostasis. Herein, we will review the roles of hypothalamic neurons and resident microglia in the initiation of SFA-induced hypothalamic inflammation. Particularly, we focus on neuronal and microglial free fatty acid-sensing and capacity to produce inflammatory signaling. We also outline a potential role of peripherally-derived monocytes in this inflammation. And finally, we explore synaptic plasticity as a mechanism through which hypothalamic inflammation can modulate ARC circuitry, and thus disrupt energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery of novel inducers of cellular differentiation using HL-60 promyelocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Greenwood, E; Ito, A; Westenburg, H; Cui, B; Mehta, R G; Kinghorn, A D; Pezzuto, J M

    2001-01-01

    Non-physiological inducers of terminal differentiation have been used as novel therapies for the prevention and therapy of cancer. We have used cultured HL-60 promyelocytic cells to monitor differentiation, proliferation and cell death events as induced by a large set of extracts derived from plants. Screening of more than 1400 extracts led to the discovery of 34 with potent activity (ED50 Petiveria alliacea, and desmethylrocaglamide from Aglaia ponapensis. Zapotin demonstrated the most favorable biological profile in that induction of differentiation correlated with proliferation arrest, and a lack of cytotoxicity. We conclude that the HL-60 cell model is a useful system for the discovery of novel pharmacophores with potential to suppress the process of carcinogenesis, and that flavonoids may be especially useful in this capacity.

  14. Nick translation detection in situ of cellular DNA strand break induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Y.; Anai, H.; Kusumoto, T.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sugimachi, K.

    1989-01-01

    DNA strand break in HeLa cells induced by radiation was detected using the in situ nick translation method. The cells were exposed to radiation of 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 Gy in Lab-Tek tissue culture chamber/slides and were fixed with ethanol/acetic acid on the slide glass. The break sites in DNA were translated artificially in the presence of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and [ 3 H]-labeled dTTP. Autoradiographic observation was made of the level of break sites in the DNA. The DNA strand break appeared even with a 3 Gy exposure, increased 8.6 times at 24 Gy compared with the control cells, and this level correlated reciprocally to change in cell viability. This nick translation method provides a rapid in situ assay for determining radiation-induced DNA damage of cultured cells, in a semi-quantitative manner

  15. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  16. The ROSA26-iPSC Mouse: A Conditional, Inducible, and Exchangeable Resource for Studying Cellular (DeDifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieven Haenebalcke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Control of cellular (dedifferentiation in a temporal, cell-specific, and exchangeable manner is of paramount importance in the field of reprogramming. Here, we have generated and characterized a mouse strain that allows iPSC generation through the Cre/loxP conditional and doxycycline/rtTA-controlled inducible expression of the OSKM reprogramming factors entirely from within the ROSA26 locus. After reprogramming, these factors can be replaced by genes of interest—for example, to enhance lineage-directed differentiation—with the use of a trap-coupled RMCE reaction. We show that, similar to ESCs, Dox-controlled expression of the cardiac transcriptional regulator Mesp1 together with Wnt inhibition enhances the generation of functional cardiomyocytes upon in vitro differentiation of such RMCE-retargeted iPSCs. This ROSA26-iPSC mouse model is therefore an excellent tool for studying both cellular reprogramming and lineage-directed differentiation factors from the same locus and will greatly facilitate the identification and ease of functional characterization of the genetic/epigenetic determinants involved in these complex processes.

  17. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein; Nunes, Maria Eugenia S.

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  18. miR-494-3p Induces Cellular Senescence and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hung Weng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the most common malignancy of head and neck. Although radiotherapy is used for OSCC treatment, the occurrence of radioresistant cancer cells limits its efficiency. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs with lengths of 18–25 base pairs and known to be involved in carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that by targeting B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi1, miR-494-3p functions as a putative tumor suppressor miRNA in OSCC. In this study, we further discovered that miR-494-3p could enhance the radiosensitivity of SAS OSCC cells and induce cellular senescence. The overexpression of miR-494-3p in SAS cells increased the population of senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells, the expression of p16INK4a and retinoblastoma 1 (RB1, as well as downregulated Bmi1. The knockdown of Bmi1 by lentiviral-mediated delivery of specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs also enhanced the radiosensitivity of SAS cells and the activation of the senescence pathway. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between Bmi1 and miR-494-3p expression was observed among OSCC tissues. Results suggest that miR-494-3p could increase the radiosensitivity of OSCC cells through the induction of cellular senescence caused by the downregulation of Bmi1.

  19. In vitro gene transfer by the application of laser-induced stress wave: effect of cellular heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Shunichi; Ogura, Makoto; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Masaki, Yoshinori; Uenoyama, Maki; Wakisaka, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-07-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that simultaneous application of laser-induced stress wave (LISW) and cellular heating enhanced the uptake of the probe molecule into the cytoplasm. The idea was based on the fact that heating can increase the fluidity of the plasma membrane. In this study, we attempted to apply this technique to in vitro gene transfer. Delivery of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vectors to NIH-3T3 cells was investigated. The cultured cells in a well were kept in a temperature-controlled water bath at temperatures of 310K and 316K. LISW was generated by irradiation of a polymer target attached to the back of the well with a 532-nm, nanosecond single laser pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The maximum laser energy used was 140 mJ, the corresponding laser fluence on the target being ~ 2 J/cm2. Twenty-four hours after laser irradiation, we observed expression of EGFP in the cells with a confocal laser scanning microscope. In the cells exposed to LISW at 316K, we observed gene expression, while gene expression was very limited in the cells treated at 310K, indicating the effect of cellular heating on the gene permeability.

  20. Ionizing radiation induces upregulation of cellular procoagulability and tissue factor expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin-Lang, Petra; Niebergall, Florian; Antoniak, Silvio; Szotowski, Bjoern; Rosenthal, Peter; Pels, Klaus; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    The therapeutic application of ionizing radiation is associated with thrombotic events, but the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of blood coagulation, is essentially involved in the pathophysiology of thrombosis. Circulating monocytes have been identified to upregulate TF under inflammatory conditions and, thereby, enhance blood thrombogenicity. The study examines the effect of irradiation on the cellular procoagulability and TF protein expression of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) in a time period of 7 days. Human PBMNCs were irradiated with 20 Gy. Procoagulability of PBMNCs, released microparticles and microparticle-free cell supernatant was analyzed by a chromogenic assay and TF protein expression quantified by TF ELISA. To determine whether irradiated PBMNCs and shed microparticles initiate plasma clotting, a one stage clotting assay was performed. We found a significant increase of PBMNC-associated procoagulant activity over a time period of 7 days post irradiation. Moreover, 3 days post irradiation PBMNCs initiated the plasma clotting faster than non-irradiated cells. An enhanced cellular TF protein concentration was persistently observed throughout the investigated time up to 7 days post irradiation. Microparticle-associated TF activity significantly increased 3 days post irradiation compared with the non-irradiated controls. PBMNC-derived microparticles post irradiation also initiated the plasma clotting faster than microparticles derived from controls. The results show irradiation to induce TF expression and to increase procoagulability of PBMNCs and cell-derived microparticles. This could be a possible mechanism by which ionizing radiation enhances blood thrombogenicity.

  1. Tensin2 is a novel mediator in thrombopoietin (TPO)-induced cellular proliferation by promoting Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Andre Scott; Kaushansky, Alexis; Macbeath, Gavin; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor c-Mpl are essential in the regulation of the hematopoietic stem and progenitors cells as well as for the differentiation of megakaryocytes into mature platelets. Once TPO binds to its receptor, an intracellular signaling process is initiated through Janus kinase (JAK-2)-induced phosphorylation of the c-Mpl intracellular domain. Although some protein mediators that transmit the effects of TPO have been identified, many remain undiscovered. Using an unbiased approach with peptide microarrays that contained virtually every Src Homology (SH)2 and Phosphotyrosine Binding (PTB) domains in the human genome, we discovered a previously unreported interaction between c-Mpl at phospho-Tyrosine631 (pY 631) and Tensin2, a protein for which limited information is available. Confirming the findings of the microarrays, we discovered that Tensin2 co-precipitates with a pY 631 bearing peptide. Furthermore, we found that Tensin2 becomes phosphorylated in a TPO dependent manner. The functional consequence of Tensin2 was tested via knockdown of Tensin2, which dramatically decreased TPO-dependent cellular proliferation of UT7-TPO cell line as well as their activation of Akt signaling. These studies affirm the use of these arrays as an unbiased screening tool of protein-protein interactions. We conclude that Tensin2 is an important new mediator in TPO/c-Mpl pathway and has a positive affect on cellular growth, at least in part through its effect on the PI3K/Akt signaling.

  2. Cellular vacuoles induced by Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin originate from Rab9-associated compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Coreen; Kannan, T R; Baseman, Joel B

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we identified an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin in Mycoplasma pneumoniae designated Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin. In this study we show that vacuoles induced by recombinant CARDS (rCARDS) toxin are acidic and derive from the endocytic pathway as determined by the uptake of neutral red and the fluid-phase marker, Lucifer yellow, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that the formation of rCARDS toxin-associated cytoplasmic vacuoles is inhibited by the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, and the ionophore, monensin. To examine the ontogeny of these vacuoles, we analyzed the distribution of endosomal and lysosomal membrane markers during vacuole formation and observed the enrichment of the late endosomal GTPase, Rab9, around rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles. Immunogold-labeled Rab9 and overexpression of green fluorescent-tagged Rab9 further confirmed vacuolar association. The late endosomal- and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, LAMP1 and LAMP2, also localized to the vacuolar membranes, while the late endosomal protein, Rab7, and early endosomal markers, Rab5 and EEA1, were excluded. HeLa cells expressing dominant-negative (DN) Rab9 exhibited markedly reduced vacuole formation in the presence of rCARDS toxin, in contrast to cells expressing DN-Rab7, highlighting the importance of Rab9 function in rCARDS toxin-induced vacuolation. Our findings reveal the unique Rab9-association with rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles and its possible relationship to the characteristic histopathology that accompanies M. pneumoniae infection.

  3. Cellular origins of cold-induced brown adipocytes in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Petkova, Anelia P; Konkar, Anish A; Granneman, James G

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated how cold stress induces the appearance of brown adipocytes (BAs) in brown and white adipose tissues (WATs) of adult mice. In interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), cold exposure increased proliferation of endothelial cells and interstitial cells expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor, α polypeptide (PDGFRα) by 3- to 4-fold. Surprisingly, brown adipogenesis and angiogenesis were largely restricted to the dorsal edge of iBAT. Although cold stress did not increase proliferation in inguinal white adipose tissue (ingWAT), the percentage of BAs, defined as multilocular adipocytes that express uncoupling protein 1, rose from undetectable to 30% of total adipocytes. To trace the origins of cold-induced BAs, we genetically tagged PDGFRα(+) cells and adipocytes prior to cold exposure, using Pdgfra-Cre recombinase estrogen receptor T2 fusion protein (CreER(T2)) and adiponectin-CreER(T2), respectively. In iBAT, cold stress triggered the proliferation and differentiation of PDGFRα(+) cells into BAs. In contrast, all newly observed BAs in ingWAT (5207 out of 5207) were derived from unilocular adipocytes tagged by adiponectin-CreER(T2)-mediated recombination. Surgical denervation of iBAT reduced cold-induced brown adipogenesis by >85%, whereas infusion of norepinephrine (NE) mimicked the effects of cold in warm-adapted mice. NE-induced de novo brown adipogenesis in iBAT was eliminated in mice lacking β1-adrenergic receptors. These observations identify a novel tissue niche for brown adipogenesis in iBAT and further define depot-specific mechanisms of BA recruitment. © FASEB.

  4. Lipid Rafts and Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling in Cholesterol Induced Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Catalgol, Betul; Kartal Ozer, Nesrin

    2010-01-01

    Redox mediated signaling mechanisms play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. Atherosclerosis is one of the most important disorders induced mainly by hypercholesterolemia. Oxidation products and related signaling mechanisms are found within the characteristic biomarkers of atherosclerosis. Several studies have shown that redox signaling via lipid rafts play a significant role in the regulation of pathogenesis of many diseases including atherosclerosis. This r...

  5. Loss of lamin B receptor is necessary to induce cellular senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukášová, Emilie; Kovařík, Aleš; Bačíková, Alena; Falk, Martin; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 474 (2017), s. 281-300 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : oncogene-induced senescence * inner nuclear-membrane * dna-damage response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  6. The senescence-associated secretory phenotype induces cellular plasticity and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschka, Birgit; Storer, Mekayla; Mas, Alba; Heinzmann, Florian; Ortells, Mari Carmen; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Zender, Lars; Keyes, William M

    2017-01-15

    Senescence is a form of cell cycle arrest induced by stress such as DNA damage and oncogenes. However, while arrested, senescent cells secrete a variety of proteins collectively known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which can reinforce the arrest and induce senescence in a paracrine manner. However, the SASP has also been shown to favor embryonic development, wound healing, and even tumor growth, suggesting more complex physiological roles than currently understood. Here we uncover timely new functions of the SASP in promoting a proregenerative response through the induction of cell plasticity and stemness. We show that primary mouse keratinocytes transiently exposed to the SASP exhibit increased expression of stem cell markers and regenerative capacity in vivo. However, prolonged exposure to the SASP causes a subsequent cell-intrinsic senescence arrest to counter the continued regenerative stimuli. Finally, by inducing senescence in single cells in vivo in the liver, we demonstrate that this activates tissue-specific expression of stem cell markers. Together, this work uncovers a primary and beneficial role for the SASP in promoting cell plasticity and tissue regeneration and introduces the concept that transient therapeutic delivery of senescent cells could be harnessed to drive tissue regeneration. © 2017 Ritschka et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuyo [Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Adhikari, Rewati [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection.

  8. Solid bioneedle-delivered influenza vaccines are highly thermostable and induce both humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Soema

    Full Text Available The potential of bioneedles to deliver influenza vaccines was investigated. Four influenza vaccine formulations were screened to determine the optimal formulation for use with bioneedles. The stability of the formulations after freeze-drying was checked to predict the stability of the influenza vaccines in the bioneedles. Subunit, split, virosomal and whole inactivated influenza (WIV vaccine were formulated and lyophilized in bioneedles, and subsequently administered to C57BL/6 mice. Humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed after vaccination. The thermostability of lyophilized vaccines was determined after one-month storage at elevated temperatures. Bioneedle influenza vaccines induced HI titers that are comparable to those induced by intramuscular WIV vaccination. Delivery by bioneedles did not alter the type of immune response induced by the influenza vaccines. Stability studies showed that lyophilized influenza vaccines have superior thermostability compared to conventional liquid vaccines, and remained stable after one-month storage at 60°C. Influenza vaccines delivered by bioneedles are a viable alternative to conventional liquid influenza vaccines. WIV was determined to be the most potent vaccine formulation for administration by bioneedles. Lyophilized influenza vaccines in bioneedles are independent of a cold-chain, due to their increased thermostability, which makes distribution and stockpiling easier.

  9. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects

  10. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan West

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage.

  11. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sulforaphane inhibits damage-induced poly (ADP-ribosyl)ation via direct interaction of its cellular metabolites with PARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piberger, Ann Liza; Keil, Claudia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Hartwig, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane, a major breakdown product of the broccoli glucosinolate glucoraphanin, has frequently been proposed to exert anticarcinogenic properties. Potential underlying mechanisms include a zinc release from Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 followed by the induction of detoxifying enzymes. This suggests that sulforaphane may also interfere with other zinc-binding proteins, e.g. those essential for DNA repair. Therefore, we explored the impact of sulforaphane on poly (ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), poly (ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), and DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) in cell culture. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that sulforaphane diminished H2 O2 -induced PARylation in HeLa S3 cells starting from 15 μM despite increased lesion induction under these conditions. Subcellular experiments quantifying the damage-induced incorporation of (32) P-ADP-ribose by PARP-1 displayed no direct impact of sulforaphane itself, but cellular metabolites, namely the glutathione conjugates of sulforaphane and its interconversion product erucin, reduced PARP-1 activity concentration dependently. Interestingly, this sulforaphane metabolite-induced PARP-1 inhibition was prevented by thiol compounds. PARP-1 is a stimulating factor for DNA SSBR-rate and we further demonstrated that 25 μM sulforaphane also delayed the rejoining of H2 O2 -induced DNA strand breaks, although this might be partly due to increased lesion frequencies. Sulforaphane interferes with damage-induced PARylation and SSBR, which implies a sulforaphane-dependent impairment of genomic stability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of vitamin D3 protection in experimental prednisolone-induced osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Shymanskyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis is the most common side effect of glucocorticoid (GC therapy. Vitamin D is known to play a crucial role in bone remodeling, but the precise molecular mechanisms of its action on GC-induced impairments of cytokine systems, in particular RANK (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/RANKL (RANK ligand/OPG (osteoprotegerin, are still controversial. Thus, the purpose of the study was to evaluate GC-induced changes in the RANK/RANKL/OPG system and osteocalcin synthesis in rat bone depending on vitamin D bioavailability and vitamin D receptor (VDR expression. Materials and methods. Female Wistar rats received prednisolone (5 mg/kg b.w. with or without 100 IU of vitamin D3 (for 30 days. The levels of VDR, osteocalcin, RANK, RANKL and OPG in bone tissue were determined by western blotting. Blood serum 25OHD was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of Ca2+, Pi, activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP and its bone isoenzyme were determined using spectrophotometry. Results. Prednisolone significantly lowered 25OHD content in the blood serum and VDR level in bone tissue that has been accompanied by an elevation of the AP bone isoenzyme activity in the blood serum, hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia. A significant decrease in the expression of osteocalcin, a well-known marker of bone formation, was also observed. GC-induced disturbances in vitamin D status led to a reduction of the RANK and OPG level, while RANKL level was unaffected. Vitamin D3 administration restored 25OHD and VDR levels that resulted in amelioration of GC-induced changes in bone tissue and normalization of mineral metabolism through elevation of RANK, OPG and osteocalcin levels. Conclusions. Prednisolone-induced imbalance in the RANK/RANKL/OPG and osteocalcin systems is related to the reduction of vitamin D bioavailability and impairments in VDR signaling. Thus, normalization of vitamin D bioavailability might be perspective in reducing the

  14. Potential of Radiation-Induced Cellular Stress for Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 and Killing of Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-02-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV-1 for last two decades has reduced mortality of patients through extension of nonsymptomatic phase of infection. However, HIV-1 can be preserved in long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals, and potentially in macrophages and astrocytes. Reactivation of viral replication is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus (shock and kill strategy). In this opinion piece, we consider potential application of therapeutic doses of irradiation, the well-known and effective stress signal that induces DNA damage and activates cellular stress response, to resolve two problems: activate HIV-1 replication and virion production in persistent reservoirs under cART and deplete infected cells through selective cell killing using DNA damage responses.

  15. Electric currents and fields induced in cells in the human brain by radiation from hand-held cellular telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronold W. P.

    2000-01-01

    After a review of recent work on the interaction of electromagnetic fields from cellular telephones with the human head, the structural and radiating properties of two common types of transceivers are determined. These include the impedance and current amplitude distribution of the antennas. The tangential electric field maintained by the antennas on the adjacent surface of the head is next determined. From this, the electric field propagating through the skull into the brain is analyzed and, from it, the electric field in spherical and long cylindrical cells is determined. It ranges from 27 to 13.5 V/m in the first 3 cm inside the skull. Of interest is the fact that the induced field in the interior of all cells, regardless of their shape, is the same as the incident field in the brain. It is hoped that biomedical scientists will review these results and determine possible biological effects.

  16. Reversal of Cellular Phenotypes in Neural Cells Derived from Huntington’s Disease Monkey-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Carter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of glutamine residues in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT protein. The disease results in progressive neuronal loss, leading to motor, cognitive, and psychiatric impairment. Here, we report the establishment of neural progenitor cell (NPC lines derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of transgenic HD monkeys. Upon differentiation to neurons, HD neural cells develop cellular features of HD, including the formation of nuclear inclusions and oligomeric mutant HTT (mHTT aggregates, as well as increased apoptosis. These phenotypes are rescued by genetic suppression of HTT and pharmacological treatment, demonstrating the ability of our HD cell model to respond to therapeutic treatment. The development and reversal of HD-associated phenotypes in neural cells from HD monkeys provides a unique nonhuman primate (NHP model for exploring HD pathogenesis and evaluating therapeutics that could be assessed further in HD monkeys.

  17. The zebrafish miR-125c is induced under hypoxic stress via hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and functions in cellular adaptations and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Huang, Chun-Xiao; Chen, Nan; Wu, Meng; Huang, Yan; Liu, Hong; Tang, Rong; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2017-09-26

    Hypoxia is a unique environmental stress. Hypoxia inducible factor-lα (HIF-lα) is a major transcriptional regulator of cellular adaptations to hypoxic stress. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) as posttranscriptional gene expression regulators occupy a crucial role in cell survival under low-oxygen environment. Previous evidences suggested that miR-125c is involved in hypoxia adaptation, but its precise biological roles and the regulatory mechanism underlying hypoxic responses remain unknown. The present study showed that zebrafish miR-125c is upregulated by hypoxia in a Hif-lα-mediated manner in vitro and in vivo . Dual-luciferase assay revealed that cdc25a is a novel target of miR-125c. An inverse correlation between miR-125c and cdc25a was further confirmed in vivo , suggesting miR-125c as a crucial physiological inhibitor of cdc25a which responds to cellular hypoxia. Overexpression of miR-125c suppressed cell proliferation, led to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase in ZF4 cells and induced apoptotic responses during embryo development. More importantly, miR-125c overexpression resulted in severe malformation and reduction of motility during zebrafish embryonic development. Taken together, we conclude that miR-125c plays a pivotal role in cellular adaptations to hypoxic stress at least in part through the Hif-1α/miR-125c/cdc25a signaling and has great impact on zebrafish early embryonic development.

  18. Estradiol-induced promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka: Relationship of foci of cellular alteration to neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In some laboratory and field studies, female fish have higher prevalences of liver tumors than do males. The authors hypothesize gender and site-specific differences in prevalence are due to variable exposures of previously initiated fish to tumor modulating compounds. Estradiol, a growth promoter, increases incidences of hepatic tumors in carcinogen-treated rainbow trout and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Estradiol also increases incidences of hepatic foci of cellular alteration (FCA) in medaka. FCA are found in subadults of tumor-bearing feral populations. Lack of knowledge about the relationship of various phenotypes of FCA to eventual tumors, however, has prevented use of FCA as a biomarker. The authors examined fate and growth of liver FCA using a 2-step, initiation-promotion protocol. Three week old medaka were exposed to 200 ppm diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for 24 hr. and then fed 0.1 ppm 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) continuously through sampling at weeks 4--26. Percent volume of FCA and morphometric characteristics of normal and focal hepatocytes, including numerical density and average hepatocyte volume were quantified using computer-assisted stereology. E2 increased percentage of liver occupied by DEN-initiated amphophilic, basophilic and eosinophilic FCA in both sexes. Focal parameters of young, DEN-initiated and estradiol-treated medaka were not reached until much later in fish given only DEN. Non-focal hepatocytes in estradiol-treated medaka were smaller and more numerous than in DEN-only counterparts. Morphometric analysis is quantitatively tracking the fate of specific phenotypes of FCA to determine their role in progression to cancer.

  19. Molecular and Cellular Effects Induced in Mytilus galloprovincialis Treated with Oxytetracycline at Different Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Banni

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the interactive effects of temperature (16°C and 24°C and a 4-day treatment with the antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC at 1 and 100 μg/L on cellular and molecular parameters in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS, a sensitive biomarker of impaired health status in this organism, was assessed in the digestive glands. In addition, oxidative stress markers and the expression of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in antioxidant defense (catalase (cat and glutathione-S-transferase (gst and the heat shock response (hsp90, hsp70, and hsp27 were evaluated in the gills, the target tissue of soluble chemicals. Finally, cAMP levels, which represent an important cell signaling pathway related to oxidative stress and the response to temperature challenges, were also determined in the gills. Exposure to heat stress as well as to OTC rendered a decrease in LMS and an increase in malonedialdehyde accumulation (MDA. CAT activity was not significantly modified, whereas GST activity decreased at 24°C. Cat and gst expression levels were reduced in animals kept at 24°C compared to 16°C in the presence or absence of OTC. At 16°C, treatment with OTC caused a significant increase in cat and gst transcript levels. Hsp27 mRNA was significantly up-regulated at all conditions compared to controls at 16°C. cAMP levels were increased at 24°C independent of the presence of OTC. PCA analysis showed that 37.21% and 25.89% of the total variance was explained by temperature and OTC treatment, respectively. Interestingly, a clear interaction was observed in animals exposed to both stressors increasing LMS and MDA accumulation and reducing hsp27 gene expression regulation. These interactions may suggest a risk for the organisms due to temperature increases in contaminated seawaters.

  20. Overexpression of cellular glutathione peroxidase rescues homocyst(e)ine-induced endothelial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Norbert; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Heydrick, Stanley; Bierl, Charlene; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Homocyst(e)ine (Hcy) inhibits the expression of the antioxidant enzyme cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) in vitro and in vivo, which can lead to an increase in reactive oxygen species that inactivate NO and promote endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of GPx-1 can restore the normal endothelial phenotype in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic states. Heterozygous cystathionine β-synthase-deficient (CBS(−/+)) mice and their wild-type littermates (CBS(+/+)) were crossbred with mice that overexpress GPx-1 [GPx-1(tg+) mice]. GPx-1 activity was 28% lower in CBS(−/+)/GPx-1(tg−) compared with CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg−) mice (P < 0.05), and CBS(−/+) and CBS(+/+) mice overexpressing GPx-1 had 1.5-fold higher GPx-1 activity compared with GPx-1 nontransgenic mice (P < 0.05). Mesenteric arterioles of CBS(−/+)/GPx-1(tg−) mice showed vasoconstriction to superfusion with β-methacholine and bradykinin (P < 0.001 vs. all other groups), whereas nonhyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice [CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg−) and CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg+) mice] demonstrated dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. Overexpression of GPx-1 in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice restored the normal endothelium-dependent vasodilator response. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were transiently transfected with GPx-1 and incubated with dl-homocysteine (HcyH) or l-cysteine. HcyH incubation decreased GPx-1 activity in sham-transfected BAEC (P < 0.005) but not in GPx-1-transfected cells. Nitric oxide release from BAEC was significantly decreased by HcyH but not cysteine, and GPx-1 overexpression attenuated this decrease. These findings demonstrate that overexpression of GPx-1 can compensate for the adverse effects of Hcy on endothelial function and suggest that the adverse vascular effects of Hcy are at least partly mediated by oxidative inactivation of NO. PMID:11606774

  1. 17AAG Treatment Accelerates Doxorubicin Induced Cellular Senescence: Hsp90 Interferes with Enforced Senescence of Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Sarangi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 chaperone has been identified as an attractive pharmacological target to combat cancer. However, some metastatic tumors either fail to respond to Hsp90 inhibition or show recovery necessitating irreversible therapeutic strategies. In response to this enforced senescence has been proposed as an alternate strategy. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting Hsp90 with 17AAG sensitizes human neuroblastoma to DNA damage response mediated cellular senescence. Among individual and combination drug treatments, 17AAG pre-treatment followed by doxorubicin treatment exhibited senescence-like characteristics such as increased nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, cell cycle arrest, SA- β -gal staining and the perpetual increase in SAHF. Doxorubicin induced senescence signaling was mediated by p53-p21 CIP/WAF-1 and was accelerated in the absence of functional Hsp90. Sustained p16 INK4a and H3K4me3 expressions correlating with unaffected telomerase activation annulled replicative senescence and appraised stress induced senescence. Despite increases in [(ROSi] and [(Ca 2+ i], a concomitant increase in cellular antioxidant defense system suggested oxidation independent senescence activation. Sustained activation of survival (Akt and proliferative (ERK1/2 kinases fosters robustness of cells. Invigorating senescent cells with growth factor or snooping with mTOR or PI3 kinase inhibitors compromised cell survival but not senescence. Intriguingly, senescence-associated secretory factors from the senescence cells manifested established senescence in neuroblastoma, which offers clinical advantage to our approach. Our study discusses tumor selective functions of Hsp90 and discusses irrefutable strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in anticancer treatments.

  2. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: cellular and molecular drug targets for glucocorticoid-induced-osteoporosis via osteocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiantian; Yu, Xijie; He, Chengqi

    2018-04-04

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat varieties of allergic and autoimmune diseases, however, long-term application results in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). Inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) play important regulatory roles in bone metabolism, but their roles in GIOP remain largely unknown. Osteocytes can modulate the formation and function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, directly via gap junctions, or indirectly by transferring molecule signaling. Apoptotic osteocytes release RANKL, HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, osteocytes can secrete FGF23 to regulate bone metabolism. Exposure to high levels of GCs can drive osteocyte apoptosis and influence gap junctions, leading to bone loss. GCs treatment is regarded to produce more FGF23 to inhibit bone mineralization. GCs also disrupt the vascular to decrease osteocyte feasibility and mineral appositional rate, resulting in a decline in bone strength. Apoptotic bodies from osteocytes induced by GCs treatment can enhance production of TNF-α and IL-6. On the other hand, TNF-α and IL-6 show synergistic effects by altering osteocytes signaling towards osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In addition, TNF-α can induce osteocyte apoptosis and attribute to a worsened bone quality in GCs. IL-6 and osteocytes may interact with each other. Therefore, we hypothesize that GCs regulate osteocyteogenesis through TNF-α and IL-6, which are highly expressed around osteocyte undergoing apoptosis. In the present review, we summarized the roles of osteocytes in regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Furthermore, the mechanism of GCs altered relationship between osteocytes and osteoblasts/osteoclasts. In addition, we discussed the roles of TNF-α and IL-6 in GIOP by modulating osteocytes. Lastly, we discussed the possibility of using pro-inflammatory signaling pathway as therapeutic targets to develop drugs for GIOP. Copyright

  3. Nigella sativa oil Ameliorates ionizing Radiation induced cellular injury in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, E.T.; El-Kady, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nigella sativa (NS), commonly known as black seed, is a plant spices in which thymoquinone is the main active ingredient isolated from the black seeds. The seeds of Nigella sativa are used in herbal medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases. The aim of this study was focused on investigating the possible protective effect of NS against gamma radiation induced nephrotoxicity and inflammatory changes in male albino rats. Twenty four albino rats were divided into four equal groups as follows: control group, irradiated group (animals subjected to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy), treated group (rats treated with 0.2 ml/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks), and treated irradiated group (animals treated with 0.2 mL/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks then exposed to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy). The obtained results revealed that the administration of Nigella sativa oil to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in kidney antioxidant system; catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. Also, NS oil restored the kidney function indices (urea and creatinine) near normal level when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. In addition, the changes in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) activities were markedly improved compared to the corresponding values of irradiated group. The histopathological results showed distinctive pattern of ischemic renal injury in irradiated group, while in treated- irradiated group the renal tissues showed relatively well-preserved architecture with or without focal degeneration. In conclusion, NS acts in the kidney as a potent scavenger of free radicals to prevent or ameliorates the toxic effects of gamma irradiation as shown in the biochemical and histopathological study and also NS oil might provide substantial protection against

  4. Studies of cellular damage induced by X-rays and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Kinn, G.; Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    DNA-damage in cells has been studied by use of spectrophotometry and fluorometry. The method is based on the differential fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorochrome Hoechst 33258 when bound to single and double stranded DNA, respectively. DNA-damage by doses of X-rays below 2 Gy was clearly detectable. Blue light from phototherapy lamps induced DNA-damage in human TMG-1 glioblastoma, but no significant effect could be observed after irradiation with green lamps. In the presence of bilirubin the amount of DNA-damage was increased, notably at high bilirubin concentration and by blue light. 9 refs; 12 figs

  5. Long-term potentiation in bone – a role for glutamate in strain-induced cellular memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genever Paul G

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adaptive response of bone cells to mechanical strain is a primary determinant of skeletal architecture and bone mass. In vivo mechanical loading induces new bone formation and increases bone mineral density whereas disuse, immobilisation and weightlessness induce bone loss. The potency of mechanical strain is such that a single brief period of loading at physiological strain magnitude is able to induce a long-lasting osteogenic response that lasts for days. Although the process of mechanotransduction in bone is incompletely understood, observations that responses to mechanical strain outlast the duration of stimulation necessitate the existence of a form of cellular memory through which transient strain episodes are recorded, interpreted and remembered by bone cells. Recent evidence supports the existence of a complex multicellular glutamate-signalling network in bone that shares functional similarities to glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. In neurones, these signalling molecules coordinate synaptic communication required to support learning and memory formation, through a complex process of long-term potentiation. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesise that osteoblasts use a cellular mechanism similar or identical to neuronal long-term potentiation in the central nervous system to mediate long-lasting changes in osteogenesis following brief periods of mechanical strain. Testing the hypothesis N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonism should inhibit the saturating response of mechanical strain and reduce the enhanced osteogenicity of segregated loading to that of an equivalent period of uninterrupted loading. Changes in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole propionate (AMPA receptor expression, localisation and electrophysiological responses should be induced by mechanical strain and inhibited by modulators of neuronal long-term potentiation. Implications of the hypothesis If true

  6. A Novel Agonist of the TRIF Pathway Induces a Cellular State Refractory to Replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryke, Kara M; Abraham, Jinu; Sali, Tina M; Gall, Bryan J; Archer, Iris; Liu, Andrew; Bambina, Shelly; Baird, Jason; Gough, Michael; Chakhtoura, Marita; Haddad, Elias K; Kirby, Ilsa T; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N; Hirsch, Alec J; Smith, Jessica L; DeFilippis, Victor R

    2017-05-02

    The ongoing concurrent outbreaks of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses in Latin America and the Caribbean highlight the need for development of broad-spectrum antiviral treatments. The type I interferon (IFN) system has evolved in vertebrates to generate tissue responses that actively block replication of multiple known and potentially zoonotic viruses. As such, its control and activation through pharmacological agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for simultaneously impairing growth of multiple virus types and rendering host populations resistant to virus spread. In light of this strategy's potential, we undertook a screen to identify novel interferon-activating small molecules. Here, we describe 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-isopropyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,2-dihydrochromeno[2,3- c ]pyrrole-3,9-dione, which we termed AV-C. Treatment of human cells with AV-C activates innate and interferon-associated responses that strongly inhibit replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses. By utilizing genome editing, we investigated the host proteins essential to AV-C-induced cellular states. This showed that the compound requires a TRIF-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent expression and secretion of type I interferon to elicit antiviral responses. The other canonical IRF3-terminal adaptor proteins STING and IPS-1/MAVS were dispensable for AV-C-induced phenotypes. However, our work revealed an important inhibitory role for IPS-1/MAVS, but not TRIF, in flavivirus replication, implying that TRIF-directed viral evasion may not occur. Additionally, we show that in response to AV-C, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines that are linked with establishment of adaptive immunity to viral pathogens. Ultimately, synthetic innate immune activators such as AV-C may serve multiple therapeutic purposes, including direct antimicrobial responses and facilitation of pathogen

  7. Sublethal concentrations of waterborne copper induce cellular stress and cell death in zebrafish embryos and larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Hernandez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential ion that forms part of the active sites of many proteins. At the same time, an excess of this metal produces free radicals that are toxic for cells and organisms. Fish have been used extensively to study the effects of metals, including copper, present in food or the environment. It has been shown that different metals induce different adaptive responses in adult fish. However, until now, scant information has been available about the responses that are induced by waterborne copper during early life stages of fish. Here, acute toxicity tests and LC50 curves have been generated for zebrafish larvae exposed to dissolved copper sulphate at different concentrations and for different treatment times. We determined that the larvae incorporate and accumulate copper present in the medium in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in changes in gene expression. Using a transgenic fish line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the hsp70 promoter, we monitored tissue-specific stress responses to waterborne copper by following expression of the reporter. Furthermore, TUNEL assays revealed which tissues are more susceptible to cell death after exposure to copper. Our results establish a framework for the analysis of whole-organism management of excess external copper in developing aquatic animals.

  8. Fungal peptides from pneumonitis hypersensitivity etiologic agents are able to induce specific cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Lignon, Thibaud; Godet, Yann; Rognon, Bénédicte; Reboux, Gabriel; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Borg, Christophe; Millon, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immunoallergic disease due to chronic exposure to high quantities of different microorganisms such as Mycobacterium immunogenum (Mi), a mycobacterium, and Lichtheimia corymbifera (Lc), a filamentous fungus. It has recently been demonstrated that the protein DLDH (dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase), is common to these microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the immune potential of overlapping peptide pools covering the MiDLDH and LcDLDH. A selection of 34 peptides, from the MiDLDH and LcDLDH, able to interact with Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) 1 and MHC 2, was obtained using three different epitope prediction websites. By means of ELISPOT assays, we compared the frequency of Interferon gamma (IFNγ) secreting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after stimulation with overlapping peptide pools. Tests were performed using cells from 35 healthy blood donors. One peptide pool containing five peptides from MiDLDH and able to interact with MHC 2 induced a marked IFNγ specific immune response (Pool F, ptest). This study demonstrated that peptides from microorganisms involved in HP were able to induce a high IFNγ specific immune response after stimulation of PBMCs from healthy blood donors which could be useful to develop an effective prevention strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep Loss as a Factor to Induce Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hurtado-Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping occurs chronically in modern society. Clinical and experimental studies in humans and animal models have shown that immune function is impaired when sleep loss is experienced. Sleep loss exerts a strong regulatory influence on peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators of the immune response. An increasing number of research projects support the existence of reciprocal regulation between sleep and low-intensity inflammatory response. Recent studies show that sleep deficient humans and rodents exhibit a proinflammatory component; therefore, sleep loss is considered as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. Circulating levels of proinflammatory mediators depend on the intensity and duration of the method employed to induce sleep loss. Recognizing the fact that the concentration of proinflammatory mediators is different between acute and chronic sleep-loss may expand the understanding of the relationship between sleep and the immune response. The aim of this review is to integrate data from recent published reports (2002–2013 on the effects of sleep loss on the immune response. This review may allow readers to have an integrated view of the mechanisms involved in central and peripheral deficits induced by sleep loss.

  10. Plant cell death and cellular alterations induced by ozone: Key studies in Mediterranean conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faoro, Franco; Iriti, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    An account of histo-cytological and ultrastructural studies on ozone effect on crop and forest species in Italy is given, with emphasis on induced cell death and the underlying mechanisms. Cell death phenomena possibly due to ambient O 3 were recorded in crop and forest species. In contrast, visible O 3 effects on Mediterranean vegetation are often unclear. Microscopy is thus suggested as an effective tool to validate and evaluate O 3 injury to Mediterranean vegetation. A DAB-Evans blue staining was proposed to validate O 3 symptoms at the microscopic level and for a pre-visual diagnosis of O 3 injury. The method has been positively tested in some of the most important crop species, such as wheat, tomato, bean and onion and, with some restriction, in forest species, and it also allows one to gain some very useful insights into the mechanisms at the base of O 3 sensitivity or tolerance. - Ozone-induced cell death is a frequent phenomenon in Mediterranean conditions, not only in the most sensitive crops but also in forest species.

  11. Gamma radiation induced micronuclei and erythrocyte cellular abnormalities in the fish Catla catla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbumani, S. [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Mohankumar, Mary N., E-mail: marynmk@rediffmail.com [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2012-10-15

    Ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in fishes is a scarcely studied topic and very few studies are available in fishes exposed to ionizing radiation using the erythrocyte micronucleus assay under laboratory conditions. Since radionuclides released accidentally or during a nuclear disaster can contaminate inland water bodies, biomonitoring methods are required for assessing the impacts of high and low levels of radiation that may ultimately result in ionizing radiation exposure to both humans and non-human biota. Fresh water fish, Catla catla were subjected to protracted (0.002 Gy/min) and acute (3.2 Gy/min) gamma radiation to a total dose of 5 Gy. Peripheral blood samples were collected at different intervals (days 3, 6, 12, 18, 30, 45, 90, 135, 202) and analyzed by the erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Nuclear anomalies observed were micronuclei (MN), deformed nuclei (DN), nuclear bud (NBu), nuclear bridge (NBr), vacuolated nucleus (VN), binucleated cell (BNC), apoptotic cells (AC) while cytoplasmic abnormalities detected were vacuolated cytoplasm (VC), anisochromasia (AN), echinocytes (EC) and enucleus (EN). Both exposures caused a statistically significant increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities that correlated with micronucleus and other nuclear anomalies. However, the extent of damage is higher after an acute exposure lasting for a longer period leading to apoptosis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities are the resultants of gamma radiation induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  12. Human RON receptor tyrosine kinase induces complete epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but causes cellular senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, Marceline; Miller, A. Dusty; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2007-01-01

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a member of the MET proto-oncogene family and is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and cancer development. Here, we created a series of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell clones that express different levels of RON, and have investigated their biological properties. While low levels of RON correlated with little morphological change in MDCK cells, high levels of RON expression constitutively led to morphological scattering or complete and stabilized epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Unexpectedly, MDCK clones expressing higher levels of RON exhibited retarded proliferation and senescence, despite increased motility and invasiveness. RON was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in MDCK cells expressing high levels of RON and undergoing EMT, and the MAPK signaling pathway was activated. This study reveals for the first time that RON alone is sufficient to induce complete and stabilized EMT in MDCK cells, and overexpression of RON does not cause cell transformation but rather induces cell cycle arrest and senescence, leading to impaired cell proliferation

  13. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, B.N.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  14. p53 pathway determines the cellular response to alcohol-induced DNA damage in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Howard, Erin W.; Guo, Zhiying; Parris, Amanda B.; Yang, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased breast cancer risk; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to mammary tumor initiation and progression are unclear. Alcohol is known to induce oxidative stress and DNA damage; likewise, p53 is a critical modulator of the DNA repair pathway and ensures genomic integrity. p53 mutations are frequently detected in breast and other tumors. The impact of alcohol on p53 is recognized, yet the role of p53 in alcohol-induced mammary carcinogenesis remains poorly defined. In our study, we measured alcohol-mediated oxidative DNA damage in MCF-7 cells using 8-OHdG and p-H2AX foci formation assays. p53 activity and target gene expression after alcohol exposure were determined using p53 luciferase reporter assay, qPCR, and Western blotting. A mechanistic study delineating the role of p53 in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest was based on isogenic MCF-7 cells stably transfected with control (MCF-7/Con) or p53-targeting siRNA (MCF-7/sip53), and MCF-7 cells that were pretreated with Nutlin-3 (Mdm2 inhibitor) to stabilize p53. Alcohol treatment resulted in significant DNA damage in MCF-7 cells, as indicated by increased levels of 8-OHdG and p-H2AX foci number. A p53-dependent signaling cascade was stimulated by alcohol-induced DNA damage. Moderate to high concentrations of alcohol (0.1–0.8% v/v) induced p53 activation, as indicated by increased p53 phosphorylation, reporter gene activity, and p21/Bax gene expression, which led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, compared to MCF-7/Con cells, alcohol-induced DNA damage was significantly enhanced, while alcohol-induced p21/Bax expression and cell cycle arrest were attenuated in MCF-7/sip53 cells. In contrast, inhibition of p53 degradation via Nutlin-3 reinforced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 control cells. Our study suggests that functional p53 plays a critical role in cellular responses to alcohol-induced DNA damage, which protects the cells from DNA damage

  15. Modeling hypothermia induced effects for the heterogeneous ventricular tissue from cellular level to the impact on the ECG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Kienast

    Full Text Available Hypothermia has a profound impact on the electrophysiological mechanisms of the heart. Experimental investigations provide a better understanding of electrophysiological alterations associated with cooling. However, there is a lack of computer models suitable for simulating the effects of hypothermia in cardio-electrophysiology. In this work, we propose a model that describes the cooling-induced electrophysiological alterations in ventricular tissue in a temperature range from 27°C to 37°C. To model the electrophysiological conditions in a 3D left ventricular tissue block it was essential to consider the following anatomical and physiological parameters in the model: the different cell types (endocardial, M, epicardial, the heterogeneous conductivities in longitudinal, transversal and transmural direction depending on the prevailing temperature, the distinct fiber orientations and the transmural repolarization sequences. Cooling-induced alterations on the morphology of the action potential (AP of single myocardial cells thereby are described by an extension of the selected Bueno-Orovio model for human ventricular tissue using Q10 temperature coefficients. To evaluate alterations on tissue level, the corresponding pseudo electrocardiogram (pECG was calculated. Simulations show that cooling-induced AP and pECG-related parameters, i.e. AP duration, morphology of the notch of epicardial AP, maximum AP upstroke velocity, AP rise time, QT interval, QRS duration and J wave formation are in good accordance with literature and our experimental data. The proposed model enables us to further enhance our knowledge of cooling-induced electrophysiological alterations from cellular to tissue level in the heart and may help to better understand electrophysiological mechanisms, e.g. in arrhythmias, during hypothermia.

  16. Quantitative measurement of ultraviolet-induced damage in cellular DNA by an enzyme immunodot assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakizaka, A.; Nishizawa, Y.; Aiba, N.; Okuhara, E.; Takahashi, S.

    1989-02-01

    A simple enzyme immunoassay procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of 254-nm uv-induced DNA damage in cells. With the use of specific antibodies to uv-irradiated DNA and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody to rabbit IgG, the extent of damaged DNA in uv-irradiated rat spleen mononuclear cells was quantitatively measurable. Through the use of this method, the amount of damaged DNA present in 2 X 10(5) cells irradiated at a dose of 75 J/m2 was estimated to be 7 ng equivalents of the standard uv-irradiated DNA. In addition, when the cells, irradiated at 750 J/m2, were incubated for 1 h, the antigenic activity of DNA decreased by 40%, suggesting that a repair of the damaged sites in DNA had proceeded to some extent in the cells.

  17. Prodrugs of Fluoro-Substituted Benzoates of EGC as Tumor Cellular Proteasome Inhibitors and Apoptosis Inducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Ping Dou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The most potent catechin in green tea is (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate [(-- EGCG], which, however, is unstable under physiological conditions. To discover more stable and more potent polyphenol proteasome inhibitors, we synthesized several novel fluoro-substituted (--EGCG analogs, named F-EGCG analogs, as well as their prodrug forms with all of -OH groups protected by acetate. We report that the prodrug form of one F-EGCG analog exhibited greater potency than the previously reported peracetate of (-- EGCG to inhibit proteasomal activity, suppress cell proliferation, and induce apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat T cells, demonstrating the potential of these compounds to be developed into novel anti-cancer and cancer-preventive agents.

  18. Oxidative stress-induced proteome alterations target different cellular pathways in human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2011-01-01

    Although increased oxidative stress has been associated with the impairment of proliferation and function of adult human muscle stem cells, proteins either involved in the stress response or damaged by oxidation have not been identified. A parallel proteomics approach was performed for analyzing...... the protein expression profile as well as proteins preferentially oxidized upon hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Fifteen proteins involved in the oxidative stress response were identified. Among them, protein spots identified as peroxiredoxins 1 and 6, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase......, and α-enolase were shifted to a more acidic isoelectric point upon oxidative stress, indicating posttranslational modifications. Oxidized proteins were evidenced by immunodetection of derivatized carbonyl groups followed by identification by mass spectrometry. The carbonylated proteins identified...

  19. Zinc modulates aluminium-induced oxidative stress and cellular injury in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2014-10-01

    Dysregulation of metal homeostasis has been perceived as one of the key factors in the progression of neurodegeneration. Aluminium (Al) has been considered as a major risk factor, which is linked to several neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease, whereas zinc (Zn) has been reported as a vital dietary element, which regulates a number of physiological processes in central nervous system. The present study was conducted to explore the protective potential of zinc, if any, in ameliorating neurotoxicity induced by aluminium. Male Sprague Dawley rats received either aluminium chloride (AlCl3) orally (100 mg kg(-1) b.wt. per day), zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) at a dose level of 227 mg L(-1) in drinking water or combined treatment of aluminium and zinc for 8 weeks. Aluminium treatment significantly elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase, which however were decreased following Zn co-treatment of Al-treated rats. In contrast, Al treatment decreased the activities of glutathione-S-transferase as well as the levels of reduced glutathione, oxidised glutathione and total glutathione, but co-administration of Zn to Al-treated animals increased these levels. Furthermore, Al treatment caused a significant increase in the levels of Fe and Mn as well as of Al but decreased the Zn and metallothionein levels. In the Zn-supplemented animals, the levels of Al, Fe, Mn were found to be significantly decreased, whereas the levels of metallothionein as well as Zn were increased. Moreover, histopathological alterations such as vacuolization and loss of Purkinje cells were also evident following Al treatment, which showed improvement upon Zn supplementation. Therefore, zinc has the potential to alleviate aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

  20. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, a pro-oxidant, ameliorated radiation induced gastro-intestinal injury through perturbation of cellular redox and activation of Nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh

    Detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are observed at the doses above 1 Gy. Treatment modalities are available up to doses of 6 Gy including bonemarrow transplantation and administration of antibiotics. However, exposure to IR doses above 8 Gy results in gastro-intestinal (GI) syndrome characterised by denudated villi, apoptosis of crypt cells and elevated inflammatory responses. Multiple strategies have been employed to investigate novel agents to protect against IR induced injury. Since cellular redox homeostasis plays a pivotal role in deciding the cell fate, present study was undertaken to explore the potential of 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), a pro-oxidant, to ameliorate IR induced GI syndrome. NQ protected INT 407 cells against IR induced cell death of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. NQ induced perturbation in cellular redox status and induced the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Thiol antioxidant and inhibitors of Nrf2 pathway abrogated the radioprotection offered by NQ. Further, knocking down Nrf2 rescind the NQ mediated protection against IR induced cell death. In conclusion, NQ protects against IR radiation induced GI syndrome in vitro by perturbing cellular redox and activating Nrf2 pathway. This is the first report highlighting the potential of a pro-oxidant to ameliorate IR induced GI injury.

  1. Histamine protects bone marrow against cellular damage induced by Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Vanina; Sambuco, Lorena; Massari, Noelia; Cricco, Graciela; Martin, Gabriela; Bergoc, Rosa; Rivera, Elena S.

    2008-01-01

    After surgery, radiotherapy is arguably one of the most important treatments for cancer, especially for localized disease that has not spread. However, ionizing radiation is toxic not only to tumor cells but also to healthy tissues causing serious adverse effects to patients. We have recently reported that histamine prevents ionizing radiation-induced toxicity on mouse small intestine. The aim of the present work was to determine whether histamine is able to protect bone marrow cells against ionizing radiation damage. For that purpose 56 mice were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and Histamine-10Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 20 hours before irradiation and continued till the end of experimental period; untreated group received saline. Histamine-10Gy and untreated-10Gy groups were irradiated with a single dose on whole-body using Cesium-137 source (7 Gy/min) and were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Bone marrow was removed, fixed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The number of megacariocytes per 40x field, bone marrow tropism, edema, vascular damage, and other histological characteristics of bone marrow cells were evaluated. We further determined by immunohistochemistry the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cells in the S phase of the cell cycle were identified by immunohistochemical detection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results indicate that histamine treatment substantially reduced the grade of aplasia, the edema and the vascular damage induced by ionizing radiation on bone marrow. Additionally, histamine preserved medullar components increasing significantly the number of megacariocytes per field (5.4 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 in Control-10 Gy, P<0.01). This effect was associated with an increased proliferation rate determined by the augmented PCNA expression and BrdU incorporation of bone marrow cells. On the basis of these results, we conclude that histamine

  2. Histamine protects bone marrow against cellular damage induced by ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Vanina A; Croci, Máximo; Carabajal, Eliana; Bergoc, Rosa M; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-04-01

    Based on our previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on small intestine, in the present work we aimed to determine whether histamine is able to protect bone marrow cells against ionising radiation damage. 56 mice and 40 rats were divided into four groups. Histamine and histamine-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed three days after irradiation. We evaluated the number of medullar components, bone marrow trophism, oedema, vascular damage, and other histological characteristics and also proliferation markers by immunohistochemistry. Histamine treatment substantially reduced the grade of aplasia, the oedema and vascular damage induced by ionising radiation on bone marrow of mice and rats. Additionally, histamine preserved medullar components increasing the number of megakaryocytes (14.0 +/- 1.0 vs. 7.3 +/- 1.0 in mice; and 9.9 +/- 1.3 vs. 4.1 +/- 1.0 in rats, P effect was associated with an increased proliferation rate of bone marrow cells. Histamine reduces ionising radiation toxicity on bone marrow cells being a suitable candidate for use as radioprotector, especially for patients undergoing radiotherapy who are at the risk of bone marrow or small intestine damage.

  3. Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate induce similar cellular responses in a fibroblast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral Nuñez, Camila M; Bosomworth, Helen J; Field, Claire; Whitworth, John M; Valentine, Ruth A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cell viability and messenger RNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-6 in 3T3 fibroblast cells when in direct contact with Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur de Fossés, France) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Biodentine and MTA were coated onto coverslips and allowed to set. An uncoated coverslip and one coated with GC Fuji IX (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) were used as controls. Coverslips were cultured with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Cell viability was assessed quantitatively using AlamarBlue dye (Serotec, Oxford, UK) after 3, 6, 24, and 72 hours. Morphologic cell changes of 3T3 cells in contact with BD and MTA were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and cytokine expression was assessed at the messenger RNA level by semiquantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction after 3 and 24 hours of direct contact with the materials. Cells in contact with Biodentine and MTA showed similar viability to untreated control cells at all time points, with the exception of 6 hours when viability was decreased with both treatments. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed cells adhering to most of the Biodentine surface after 24 hours. However, for MTA samples, significantly fewer cells were observed. The messenger RNA expression of IL-1α and IL-6 by cells in contact with Biodentine was similar to cells in contact with MTA. Biodentine and MTA showed similar cytotoxicity and induced a similar pattern of cytokine expression. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  5. Shock wave-induced ATP release from osteosarcoma U2OS cells promotes cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Baochang; Yu, Tiecheng; Wang, Chengxue; Wang, Tiejun; Yao, Jihang; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Deng, Pengfei; Xia, Yongning; Junger, Wolfgang G; Sun, Dahui

    2016-10-03

    Osteosarcoma is the most prevalent primary malignant bone tumor, but treatment is difficult and prognosis remains poor. Recently, large-dose chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcome but this approach can cause many side effects. Minimizing the dose of chemotherapeutic drugs and optimizing their curative effects is a current goal in the management of osteosarcoma patients. In our study, trypan blue dye exclusion assay was performed to investigate the optimal conditions for the sensitization of osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Cellular uptake of the fluorophores Lucifer Yellow CH dilithium salt and Calcein was measured by qualitative and quantitative methods. Human MTX ELISA Kit and MTT assay were used to assess the outcome for osteosarcoma U2OS cells in the present of shock wave and methotrexate. To explore the mechanism, P2X7 receptor in U2OS cells was detected by immunofluorescence and the extracellular ATP levels was detected by ATP assay kit. All data were analyzed using SPSS17.0 statistical software. Comparisons were made with t test between two groups. Treatment of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells with up to 450 shock wave pulses at 7 kV or up to 200 shock wave pulses at 14 kV had little effect on cell viability. However, this shock wave treatment significantly promoted the uptake of Calcein and Lucifer Yellow CH by osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Importantly, shock wave treatment also significantly enhanced the uptake of the chemotherapy drug methotrexate and increased the rate of methotrexate-induced apoptosis. We found that shock wave treatment increased the extracellular concentration of ATP and that KN62, an inhibitor of P2X7 receptor reduced the capacity methotrexate-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that shock wave treatment promotes methotrexate-induced apoptosis by altering cell membrane permeability in a P2X7 receptor-dependent manner. Shock wave treatment may thus represent a possible adjuvant therapy for osteosarcoma.

  6. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2018-01-01

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient...... of inducing antibodies with ADCC activity did not necessarily induce neutralizing activity and vice versa. Nevertheless, we identified vaccine candidates that were able to concurrently induce both types of responses and that had ADCC activity that was cross-reactive between different subtypes. When searching...

  7. A Novel Agonist of the TRIF Pathway Induces a Cellular State Refractory to Replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Sali, Tina M.; Gall, Bryan J.; Archer, Iris; Liu, Andrew; Bambina, Shelly; Baird, Jason; Gough, Michael; Chakhtoura, Marita; Haddad, Elias K.; Kirby, Ilsa T.; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Smith, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ongoing concurrent outbreaks of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses in Latin America and the Caribbean highlight the need for development of broad-spectrum antiviral treatments. The type I interferon (IFN) system has evolved in vertebrates to generate tissue responses that actively block replication of multiple known and potentially zoonotic viruses. As such, its control and activation through pharmacological agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for simultaneously impairing growth of multiple virus types and rendering host populations resistant to virus spread. In light of this strategy’s potential, we undertook a screen to identify novel interferon-activating small molecules. Here, we describe 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-isopropyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,2-dihydrochromeno[2,3-c]pyrrole-3,9-dione, which we termed AV-C. Treatment of human cells with AV-C activates innate and interferon-associated responses that strongly inhibit replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses. By utilizing genome editing, we investigated the host proteins essential to AV-C-induced cellular states. This showed that the compound requires a TRIF-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent expression and secretion of type I interferon to elicit antiviral responses. The other canonical IRF3-terminal adaptor proteins STING and IPS-1/MAVS were dispensable for AV-C-induced phenotypes. However, our work revealed an important inhibitory role for IPS-1/MAVS, but not TRIF, in flavivirus replication, implying that TRIF-directed viral evasion may not occur. Additionally, we show that in response to AV-C, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines that are linked with establishment of adaptive immunity to viral pathogens. Ultimately, synthetic innate immune activators such as AV-C may serve multiple therapeutic purposes, including direct antimicrobial responses and facilitation of

  8. A Novel Agonist of the TRIF Pathway Induces a Cellular State Refractory to Replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara M. Pryke

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing concurrent outbreaks of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses in Latin America and the Caribbean highlight the need for development of broad-spectrum antiviral treatments. The type I interferon (IFN system has evolved in vertebrates to generate tissue responses that actively block replication of multiple known and potentially zoonotic viruses. As such, its control and activation through pharmacological agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for simultaneously impairing growth of multiple virus types and rendering host populations resistant to virus spread. In light of this strategy’s potential, we undertook a screen to identify novel interferon-activating small molecules. Here, we describe 1-(2-fluorophenyl-2-(5-isopropyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl-1,2-dihydrochromeno[2,3-c]pyrrole-3,9-dione, which we termed AV-C. Treatment of human cells with AV-C activates innate and interferon-associated responses that strongly inhibit replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses. By utilizing genome editing, we investigated the host proteins essential to AV-C-induced cellular states. This showed that the compound requires a TRIF-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3-dependent expression and secretion of type I interferon to elicit antiviral responses. The other canonical IRF3-terminal adaptor proteins STING and IPS-1/MAVS were dispensable for AV-C-induced phenotypes. However, our work revealed an important inhibitory role for IPS-1/MAVS, but not TRIF, in flavivirus replication, implying that TRIF-directed viral evasion may not occur. Additionally, we show that in response to AV-C, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines that are linked with establishment of adaptive immunity to viral pathogens. Ultimately, synthetic innate immune activators such as AV-C may serve multiple therapeutic purposes, including direct antimicrobial responses and facilitation

  9. Deciphering the role of ferulic acid against streptozotocin-induced cellular stress in the cardiac tissue of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sayantani; Ghosh, Sumit; Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C

    2016-11-01

    The cardiomyocytes are one of the major sources of hyperglycemia induced ROS generation. The present study focuses on the ameliorative role of ferulic acid in combating cardiac complications in diabetic rats. Induction of diabetes by STZ in male Wistar rats (at a dose of 50 mg kg -1  body wt, i.p.) reduced body weight and plasma insulin level, enhanced blood glucose, disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries and disintegrated the normal radiation pattern of cardiac muscle fibers. Induction of ER stress (up-regulation in the levels of CHOP, GRP78, eIF2α signaling, increased calpain-1 expression), caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation were evidenced from immunoblot analyses and DNA fragmentation assay. However, ferulic acid administration, (at a dose of 50 mg kg -1  body wt, orally for eight weeks) in post-hyperglycemia could reverse such adverse effects. Also, the molecule increased GLUT-4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of PI3Kinase, AKT and inactivation of GSK-3β thereby altering the hyperglycemic condition in the cardiac tissue of diabetic rats. Therefore, as a potential therapeutic, ferulic acid, exhibiting antioxidant and hypoglycemic effects, may hold promise in circumventing stress mediated diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Metabolomic Analyses of Ipomoea lacunosa Biotypes with Contrasting Glyphosate Tolerance Captures Herbicide-Induced Differential Perturbations in Cellular Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroli, Amith S; Nandula, Vijay K; Duke, Stephen O; Gerard, Patrick; Tharayil, Nishanth

    2018-02-28

    Glyphosate-tolerant Ipomoea lacunosa is emerging as a problematic weed in the southeastern United States. Metabolomic profiling was conducted to examine the innate physiology and the glyphosate induced perturbations in two biotypes of I. lacunosa (WAS and QUI) that had contrasting glyphosate tolerance. Compared to the less tolerant QUI-biotype, the innate metabolism of the more tolerant WAS-biotype was characterized by a higher abundance of amino acids, and pyruvate; whereas the sugar profile of the QUI biotype was dominated by the transport sugar sucrose. Glyphosate application (80 g ae/ha) caused similar shikimate accumulation in both biotypes. Compared to QUI, in WAS, the content of aromatic amino acids was less affected by glyphosate treatment, and the content of Ala, Val, Ile, and Pro increased. However, the total sugars decreased by ∼75% in WAS, compared to ∼50% decrease in QUI. The innate, higher proportional abundance, of the transport-sugar sucrose in QUI coud partly explain the higher translocation and greater sensitivity of this biotype to glyphosate. The decrease in sugars, accompanied by an increase in amino acids could delay feedback regulation of upstream enzymes of the shikimate acid pathway in WAS, which could contribute to a greater glyphosate tolerance. Our study, through a metabolomics approach, provides complementary data that elucidates the cellular physiology of herbicide tolerance in Ipomoea lacunosa biotypes.

  11. Asbestos-Induced Cellular and Molecular Alteration of Immunocompetent Cells and Their Relationship with Chronic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Maeda, Megumi; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Kojima, Yoko; Tabata, Rika; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos causes lung fibrosis known as asbestosis as well as cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos is a mineral silicate containing iron, magnesium, and calcium with a core of SiO2. The immunological effect of silica, SiO2, involves the dysregulation of autoimmunity because of the complications of autoimmune diseases found in silicosis. Asbestos can therefore cause alteration of immunocompetent cells to result in a decline of tumor immunity. Additionally, due to its physical characteristics, asbestos fibers remain in the lung, regional lymph nodes, and the pleural cavity, particularly at the opening sites of lymphatic vessels. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation in these areas due to the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. As a consequence, immunocompetent cells can have their cellular and molecular features altered by chronic and recurrent encounters with asbestos fibers, and there may be modification by the surrounding inflammation, all of which eventually lead to decreased tumor immunity. In this paper, the brief results of our investigation regarding reduction of tumor immunity of immunocompetent cells exposed to asbestos in vitro are discussed, as are our findings concerned with an investigation of chronic inflammation and analyses of peripheral blood samples derived from patients with pleural plaque and mesothelioma that have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:22500091

  12. Aged induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) as a new cellular model for studying premature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Stefania; Borghi, Rossella; D'Oria, Valentina; Restaldi, Fabrizia; Moreno, Sandra; Novelli, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Compagnucci, Claudia

    2017-05-31

    Nuclear integrity and mechanical stability of the nuclear envelope (NE) are conferred by the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments composed of A- and B-type lamins, supporting the inner nuclear membrane and playing a pivotal role in chromatin organization and epigenetic regulation. During cell senescence, nuclear alterations also involving NE architecture are widely described. In the present study, we utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) upon prolonged in vitro culture as a model to study aging and investigated the organization and expression pattern of NE major constituents. Confocal and four-dimensional imaging combined with molecular analyses, showed that aged iPSCs are characterized by nuclear dysmorphisms, nucleoskeletal components (lamin A/C-prelamin isoforms, lamin B1, emerin, and nesprin-2) imbalance, leading to impaired nucleo-cytoplasmic MKL1 shuttling, actin polymerization defects, mitochondrial dysfunctions, SIRT7 downregulation and NF-kBp65 hyperactivation. The observed age-related NE features of iPSCs closely resemble those reported for premature aging syndromes (e.g., Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) and for somatic cell senescence. These findings validate the use of aged iPSCs as a suitable cellular model to study senescence and for investigating therapeutic strategies aimed to treat premature aging.

  13. Cell-based assay for the detection of chemically induced cellular stress by immortalized untransformed transgenic hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vezzoni Paolo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary hepatocytes, one of the most widely used cell types for toxicological studies, have a very limited life span and must be freshly derived from mice or even humans. Attempts to use stable cell lines maintaining the enzymatic pattern of liver cells have been so far unsatisfactory. Stress proteins (heat shock proteins, HSPs have been proposed as general markers of cellular injury and their use for environmental monitoring has been suggested. The aim of this work is to develop a bi-transgenic hepatocyte cell line in order to evaluate the ability of various organic and inorganic chemicals to induce the expression of the HSP70 driven reporter gene. We previously described transgenic mice (Hsp70/hGH secreting high levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH following exposure to toxic compounds in vivo and in vitro in primary cultures derived from different organs. In addition, we also reported another transgenic model (AT/cytoMet allowing the reproducible immortalization of untransformed hepatocytes retaining in vitro complex liver functions. Results The transgenic mouse line Hsp70/hGH was crossed with the AT/cytoMet transgenic strain permitting the reproducible immortalization of untransformed hepatocytes. From double transgenic animals we derived several stable hepatic cell lines (MMH-GH which showed a highly-differentiated phenotype as judged from the retention of epithelial cell polarity and the profile of gene expression, including hepatocyte-enriched transcription factors and detoxifying enzymes. In these cell lines, stresses induced by exposure to inorganic [Sodium Arsenite (NaAsO2 and Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2], and organic [Benzo(aPyrene (BaP, PentaChloroPhenol (PCP, TetraChloroHydroQuinone (TCHQ, 1-Chloro-2,4-DiNitro-Benzene (CDNB] compounds, specifically induced hGH release in the culture medium. Conclusions MMH-GH, an innovative model to evaluate the toxic potential of chemical and physical xenobiotics, provides a simple

  14. Macrophage traits in cancer cells are induced by macrophage-cancer cell fusion and cannot be explained by cellular interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabo, Ivan; Midtbö, Kristine; Andersson, Henrik; Åkerlund, Emma; Olsson, Hans; Wegman, Pia; Gunnarsson, Cecilia; Lindström, Annelie

    2015-11-20

    Cell fusion is a natural process in normal development and tissue regeneration. Fusion between cancer cells and macrophages generates metastatic hybrids with genetic and phenotypic characteristics from both maternal cells. However, there are no clinical markers for detecting cell fusion in clinical context. Macrophage-specific antigen CD163 expression in tumor cells is reported in breast and colorectal cancers and proposed being caused by macrophages-cancer cell fusion in tumor stroma. The purpose of this study is to examine the cell fusion process as a biological explanation for macrophage phenotype in breast. Monocytes, harvested from male blood donor, were activated to M2 macrophages and co-cultured in ThinCert transwell system with GFP-labeled MCF-7 cancer cells. MCF7/macrophage hybrids were generated by spontaneous cell fusion, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, short tandem repeats analysis and flow cytometry. CD163 expression was evaluated in breast tumor samples material from 127 women by immunohistochemistry. MCF-7/macrophage hybrids were generated spontaneously at average rate of 2 % and showed phenotypic and genetic traits from both maternal cells. CD163 expression in MCF-7 cells could not be induced by paracrine interaction with M2-activated macrophages. CD163 positive cancer cells in tumor sections grew in clonal collection and a cutoff point >25 % of positive cancer cells was significantly correlated to disease free and overall survival. In conclusion, macrophage traits in breast cancer might be caused by cell fusion rather than explained by paracrine cellular interaction. These data provide new insights into the role of cell fusion in breast cancer and contributes to the development of clinical markers to identify cell fusion.

  15. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk [Research and Development Center, VENTEX Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats.

  16. Antioxidant properties of Taraxacum officinale fruit extract are involved in the protective effect against cellular death induced by sodium nitroprusside in brain of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Dirleise; Arantes, Letícia Priscilla; Rauber, Ricardo; de Mattos, Sérgio Edgar Campos; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira da; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2012-07-01

    Taraxacum officinale Weber (Asteraceae), known as dandelion, is used for medicinal purposes due to its choleretic, diuretic, antitumor, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. We sought to investigate the protective activity of T. officinale fruit extract against sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced decreased cellular viability and increased lipid peroxidation in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats in vitro. To explain the mechanism of the extract's antioxidant activity, its putative scavenger activities against NO, DPPH·, OH·, and H(2)O(2) were determined. Slices of cortex, hippocampus, and striatum were treated with 50 μM SNP and T. officinale fruit ethanolic extract (1-20 µg/mL) to determine cellular viability by MTT reduction assay. Lipid peroxidation was measure in cortical, hippocampal and striatal slices incubates with SNP (5 µM) and T. officinale fruit extract (1-20 µg/mL). We also determined the scavenger activities of T. officinale fruit extract against NO·, DPPH·, OH·, and H(2)O(2), as well as its iron chelating capacity. The extract (1, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL) protected against SNP-induced decreases in cellular viability and increases in lipid peroxidation in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The extract had scavenger activity against DPPH· and NO· at low concentrations and was able to protect against H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+)-induced deoxyribose oxidation. T. officinale fruit extract has antioxidant activity and protects brain slices against SNP-induced cellular death. Possible mechanisms of action include its scavenger activities against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), which are attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds in the extract.

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived limbal epithelial cells (LiPSC) as a cellular alternative for in vitro ocular toxicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Aberdam, Edith; Petit, Isabelle; Sangari, Linda; Aberdam, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great potential to produce unlimited amount of differentiated cells as cellular source for regenerative medicine but also for in vitro drug screening and cytotoxicity tests. Ocular toxicity testing is mandatory to evaluate the risks of drugs and cosmetic products before their application to human patients by preventing eye irritation or insult. Since the global ban to use animals, many human-derived alternatives have been proposed, from ex-vivo enucleated p...

  18. [H2 receptor mediates the protective effect of histamine against the cellular edema and viability reduction induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yi-lu; Wang, Meng-ling; Chen, Li-ping; Liu, Lu-ying; Zhang, Li-hui; Chen, Zhong; Wei, Er-qing

    2006-04-01

    To determine the effect of histamine on ischemia-induced cellular edema and viability reduction in rat hippocampal slices, and the involved subtypes of histamine receptor in this effect. In vitro ischemic injury of hippocampal slices was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The slice injury was determined by real-timely measuring the changes of light transmittance (LT) for the cellular edema in CA1 region of the hippocampal slice, and by detecting the product of 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), formazan, for the slice viability. The effect of histamine at various concentrations on the slice injury was observed, and the blockage by antagonists of histamine receptors was also investigated. Histamine (0.01-10 micromol x L(-1)) inhibited the peak value of LT during OGD in hippocampal slices and improved the reduced viability after OGD. Diphenhydramine (0.1-10 micromol x L(-1)), an H1 receptor antagonist, did not affect the effect of histamine, while cimetidine (0.1-10 micromol x L(-1)), an H2 receptor antagonist, partly abolished the protective effect of histamine. Histamine protects hippocampal slices against ischemia-induced cellular edema and viability reduction; this effect might be mediated via, at least partly, H2 receptor.

  19. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  20. A single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cellular response similar to that induced by a natural infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Morgado, Lucas Nóbrega; Santiago, Marta Almeida; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Hasselmann, Bárbara; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca

    2015-07-31

    Based on current studies on the effects of single dose vaccines on antibody production, Latin American countries have adopted a single dose vaccine program. However, no data are available on the activation of cellular response to a single dose of hepatitis A. Our study investigated the functional reactivity of the memory cell phenotype after hepatitis A virus (HAV) stimulation through administration of the first or second dose of HAV vaccine and compared the response to that of a baseline group to an initial natural infection. Proliferation assays showed that the first vaccine dose induced HAV-specific cellular response; this response was similar to that induced by a second dose or an initial natural infection. Thus, from the first dose to the second dose, increase in the frequencies of classical memory B cells, TCD8 cells, and central memory TCD4 and TCD8 cells were observed. Regarding cytokine production, increased IL-6, IL-10, TNF, and IFNγ levels were observed after vaccination. Our findings suggest that a single dose of HAV vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cell response similar to that induced by a natural infection. The HAV-specific T cell immunity induced by primary vaccination persisted independently of the protective plasma antibody level. In addition, our results suggest that a single dose immunization system could serve as an alternative strategy for the prevention of hepatitis A in developing countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nickel, lead, and cadmium induce differential cellular responses in sea urchin embryos by activating the synthesis of different HSP70s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, Fabiana; Pinsino, Annalisa; Turturici, Guiseppina; Savona, Rosalia; Giudice, Giovanni; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with heavy metals, such as nickel, lead or cadmium, elicits different cellular stress responses according to the metal used and the length of treatment. In Paracentrotus lividus embryos the inducible forms of HSP70 (HSP70/72) are different in molecular mass from the constitutively expressed HSP75, and they can be used as markers of cellular stress. Even a short treatment with each metal induces the synthesis of HSP70/72 which remain stable for at least 20 h and differ little in their isoelectric points. Continuous treatment from fertilization with nickel or lead produces late irregular pluteus embryos, with peak HSP70/72 synthesis at blastula followed by the arrest of synthesis by pluteus. On the contrary, the same treatment with cadmium induces continuous HSP70/72 synthesis and produces irregular gastrula embryos which then degenerate. Moreover, a long treatment induces over control embryos a slight increase in the amount of constitutive HSP75 during development while lead treatment depresses constitutive HSP75 at early stages and doubles its quantity at late stages

  2. Tumor growth accelerated by chemotherapy-induced senescent cells is suppressed by treatment with IL-12 producing cellular vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, Jana; Sapega, Olena; Imrichová, Terezie; Štěpánek, Ivan; Kyjacová, Lenka; Mikyšková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan; Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk; Reiniš, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 34 (2016), s. 54952-54964 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA MZd NT14461 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cellular senescence * cancer chemotherapy * docetaxel * IL-12 * cell therapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  3. Downregulation of the non-integrin laminin receptor reduces cellular viability by inducing apoptosis in lung and cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiashanee Moodley

    Full Text Available The non-integrin laminin receptor, here designated the 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR, is involved in many physiologically relevant processes, as well as numerous pathological conditions. The overexpression of LRP/LR on various cancerous cell lines plays critical roles in tumour metastasis and angiogenesis. This study investigated whether LRP/LR is implicated in the maintenance of cellular viability in lung and cervical cancer cell lines. Here we show a significant reduction in cellular viability in the aforementioned cell lines as a result of the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LRP. This reduction in cellular viability is due to increased apoptotic processes, reflected by the loss of nuclear integrity and the significant increase in the activity of caspase-3. These results indicate that LRP/LR is involved in the maintenance of cellular viability in tumorigenic lung and cervix uteri cells through the blockage of apoptosis. Knockdown of LRP/LR by siRNA might represent an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung and cervical cancer.

  4. Cellular Senescence Is Induced by the Environmental Neurotoxin Paraquat and Contributes to Neuropathology Linked to Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinta, Shankar J; Woods, Georgia; Demaria, Marco; Rane, Anand; Zou, Ying; McQuade, Amanda; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Limbad, Chandani; Madden, David T; Campisi, Judith; Andersen, Julie K

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to the herbicide paraquat (PQ) is associated with an increased risk of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Therapies based on PQ's presumed mechanisms of action have not, however, yielded effective disease therapies. Cellular senescence is an anticancer mechanism that arrests proliferation

  5. H2O2 generation by BCG induces the cellular oxidative stress response required for BCG’s direct effects on urothelial carcinoma tumor biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gopitkumar; Zielonka, Jacek; Chen, Fanghong; Zhang, Guangjian; Cao, YanLi; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; See, William

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Exposure of urothelial carcinoma (UC) cells to Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) affects cellular redox status and tumor cell biology but mechanism(s) remains unclear. This study examined free radical production by BCG, and in tumor cells in response to BCG, using global profiling of Reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). The relationship between free radical generation and downstream cellular events was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS Using fluorescent probes, global profiling of ROS/RNS was carried out in Heat killed (hk) BCG, viable BCG, and in two UC cell lines post BCG exposure (253J and T24). Inhibition of BCG internalization and pharmacologic scavenging of H2O2 was studied for their effect on cellular ROS/RNS generation and various physiological end points. RESULTS Viable BCG produced H2O2 (Hydrogen peroxide) and O2− (Superoxides) but did not show NO (Nitric oxide) generation. Loss of viability decreased production of H2O2 by 50% compared to viable BCG. BCG internalization was necessary for BCG induced ROS/RNS generation in UC cells. Pharmacologic H2O2 scavenging reversed the ROS/RNS mediated signaling in UC cells. BCG dependent alterations in tumor biology including intracellular signaling, gene expression and cytotoxicity were dependent on free radical generation. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the importance of free radical generation by BCG, and intracellular generation of Cellular oxidative stress (COS), on the UC cell response to BCG. Manipulation of the BCG induced COS represents a potential target for increasing BCG efficacy. PMID:24928267

  6. Comparisons of the humoral and cellular immunity induced by live A16R attenuated spore and AVA-like anthrax vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jin; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Lu, Xun; Zhang, Hao; Wei, Lin; Gao, Jun; Hu, Bin; Hu, Wen-Wei; Hu, Dun-Zhong; Jia, Na; Feng, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The live attenuated anthrax vaccine and anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) are two main types of anthrax vaccines currently used in human. However, the immunoprotective mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we compared humoral and cellular immunity induced by live A16R spore vaccine and A16R strain derived AVA-like vaccine in mice peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow. Both A16R spores and AVA-like vaccines induced a sustained IgG antibody response with IgG1/IgG2b subtype dominance. However, A16R spores vaccine induced higher titer of IgG2a compared with AVA-like vaccine, indicating a stronger Th1 response to A16R spores. Using antigen-specific ELISpot assay, we observed a significant response of ASCs (antibody secreting cells) and IL4-CSCs (cytokine secreting cells) in mice. Specially, there was a positive correlation between the frequencies of antigen specific ASCs and IL4-CSCs in bone marrow derived cells, either by A16R spore or AVA-like vaccine vaccination. Moreover, we also found A16R spore vaccine, not AVA-like vaccine, could induce sustained frequency of IFN-γ-CSCs in bone marrow derived cells. Collectively, both the vaccines induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response with Th2 dominance in mice and A16R spore vaccine might provide a more comprehensive protection because of humoral and cellular immunity induced in bone marrow. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cellular stress-induced up-regulation of FMRP promotes cell survival by modulating PI3K-Akt phosphorylation cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most commonly inherited mental retardation and single gene cause of autistic spectrum disorder, occurs when the Fmr1 gene is mutated. The product of Fmr1, fragile X linked mental retardation protein (FMRP is widely expressed in HeLa cells, however the roles of FMRP within HeLa cells were not elucidated, yet. Interacting with a diverse range of mRNAs related to cellular survival regulatory signals, understanding the functions of FMRP in cellular context would provide better insights into the role of this interesting protein in FXS. Using HeLa cells treated with etoposide as a model, we tried to determine whether FMRP could play a role in cell survival. Methods Apoptotic cell death was induced by etoposide treatment on Hela cells. After we transiently modulated FMRP expression (silencing or enhancing by using molecular biotechnological methods such as small hairpin RNA virus-induced knock down and overexpression using transfection with FMRP expression vectors, cellular viability was measured using propidium iodide staining, TUNEL staining, and FACS analysis along with the level of activation of PI3K-Akt pathway by Western blot. Expression level of FMRP and apoptotic regulator BcL-xL was analyzed by Western blot, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results An increased FMRP expression was measured in etoposide-treated HeLa cells, which was induced by PI3K-Akt activation. Without FMRP expression, cellular defence mechanism via PI3K-Akt-Bcl-xL was weakened and resulted in an augmented cell death by etoposide. In addition, FMRP over-expression lead to the activation of PI3K-Akt signalling pathway as well as increased FMRP and BcL-xL expression, which culminates with the increased cell survival in etoposide-treated HeLa cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that FMRP expression is an essential part of cellular survival mechanisms through the modulation of PI3K, Akt, and Bcl-xL signal

  8. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  9. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  10. EBER2 RNA-induced transcriptome changes identify cellular processes likely targeted during Epstein Barr Virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Bernd-Joachim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the physiological role of the EBER1 and 2 nuclear RNAs during Epstein Barr viral infection. The EBERs are transcribed by cellular RNA Polymerase III and their strong expression results in 106 to 107 copies per EBV infected cell, making them reliable diagnostic markers for the presence of EBV. Although the functions of most of the proteins targeted by EBER RNAs have been studied, the role of EBERs themselves still remains elusive. Findings The cellular transcription response to EBER2 expression using the wild-type and an internal deletion mutant was determined. Significant changes in gene expression patterns were observed. A functional meta-analysis of the regulated genes points to inhibition of stress and immune responses, as well as activation of cellular growth and cytoskeletal reorganization as potential targets for EBER2 RNA. Different functions can be assigned to different parts of the RNA. Conclusion These results provide new avenues to the understanding of EBER2 and EBV biology, and set the grounds for a more in depth functional analysis of EBER2 using transcriptome activity measurements.

  11. HIVIS-DNA or HIVISopt-DNA priming followed by CMDR vaccinia-based boosts induce both humoral and cellular murine immune responses to HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hinkula

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: HIVIS-DNA was modified to obtain HIVISopt-DNA that had fewer plasmids, and additional epitopes. Even with one DNA prime followed by two MVA-CMDR boosts, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were readily induced by priming with either DNA construct composition. Priming by HIV-DNA augmented neutralizing antibody responses revealed by boosting with the vaccinia-based heterologous sequences. Cellular and antibody responses covered selected strains representing HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE. We assume this is related to the inclusion of heterologous full genes in the vaccine schedule.

  12. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Song

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC and polyethyleneimine (PEI, through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza.

  13. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza.

  14. Giant Cellular Vacuoles Induced by Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticles are Abnormally Enlarged Endo/Lysosomes and Promote mTOR-Dependent TFEB Nucleus Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Ji-Qian; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yun; Jin, Pei-Pei; Wei, Peng-Fei; Shi, Rong-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Long-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Many nanomaterials are reported to disrupt lysosomal function and homeostasis, but how cells sense and then respond to nanomaterial-elicited lysosome stress is poorly understood. Nucleus translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) plays critical roles in lysosome biogenesis following lysosome stress induced by starvation. The authors previously reported massive cellular vacuolization, along with autophagy induction, in cells treated with rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Here, the authors identify these giant cellular vacuoles as abnormally enlarged and alkalinized endo/lysosomes whose formation is dependent on macropinocytosis. This vacuolization causes deactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a TFEB-interacting kinase that resides on the lysosome membrane. Subsequently, TFEB is dephosphorylated at serine 142 and translocated into cell nucleus. This nucleus translocation of TFEB is observed only in vacuolated cells and it is critical for maintaining lysosome homeostasis after REO nanoparticle treatment, as knock-down of TFEB gene significantly compromises lysosome function and enhances cell death in nanoparticle-treated cells. Our results reveal that cellular vacuolization, which is commonly observed in cells treated with REOs and other nanomaterials, represents a condition of profound lysosome stress, and cells sense and respond to this stress by facilitating mTOR-dependent TFEB nucleus translocation in an effort to restore lysosome homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mercuric chloride-induced autoimmunity in the brown Norway rat. Cellular kinetics and major histocompatibility complex antigen expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J.; Bosman, C. B.; Rozing, J.; Stijnen, T.; Hoedemaeker, P. J.; Weening, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    HgCl2 induces an autoimmune syndrome in Brown Norway rats that involves synthesis of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and development of nephritis with high proteinuria. HgCl2-induced changes in the composition of leukocyte populations and in the expression of MHC antigens in

  16. Cellular and humoral responses induced by Leishmania histone H2B and its divergent and conserved parts in cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis patients, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddeb-Garnaoui, A; Toumi, A; Ghelis, H; Mahjoub, M; Louzir, H; Chenik, M

    2010-02-17

    Leishmania histone H2B has been reported to be a promising candidate for both vaccination and serodiagnosis. We evaluated the cellular immune responses induced by H2B and its divergent amino-terminal (H2B-N) and conserved carboxy-terminal (H2B-C) regions in individuals with a history of Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (LCL) due to Leishmania (L.) major. H2B induced significantly high PBMC proliferation and IFNgamma levels in LCL individuals whereas significantly lower proliferation and IFNgamma levels were observed with the divergent part of the protein. All proteins induced IL10 in LCL and healthy individuals. We also evaluated the humoral responses induced by these proteins in patients with Mediterranean Visceral Leishmaniasis (MVL) due to L. infantum. H2B and H2B-N were highly recognized by MVL sera. Our results show that the entire H2B protein is more efficient than its amino- and carboxy-terminal regions in inducing a dominant Th1 profile in cured LCL subjects and suggest that this protein may constitute a potential vaccine against leishmaniasis. Furthermore, H2B and H2B-N are interesting antigens for serodiagnosis of MVL. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Follicular lymphoma: in vitro effects of combining lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab- and obinutuzumab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, Ricardo; López-Díaz-de-Cerio, Ascensión; Feliu, Jesus; Panizo, Angel; Giraldo, Pilar; Rodríguez-Calvillo, Mercedes; Grande, Carlos; Pena, Esther; Olave, Mayte; Panizo, Carlos; Inogés, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a disease of paradoxes-incurable but with a long natural history. We hypothesized that a combination of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and monoclonal antibodies might provide a robust synergistic treatment and tested this hypothesis in a phase II clinical trial (NCT01329354). In this trial, in addition to R-CHOP, we alternated the administration of only rituximab with rituximab and autologous LAK cells that were expanded ex vivo. Our objective was to determine the in vitro capability of LAK cells generated from FL patients to produce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines and to determine rituximab- and obinutuzumab-induced cytotoxicity via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. We analyzed the LAK cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab (R)- and obinutuzumab (GA101)-induced ADCC activity. We show that LAK cells generated from FL patients induce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines. R and GA101 enhance cytolysis through ADCC activity of LAK cells. Impaired LAK cell cytotoxicity and ADCC activity were detected in 50 % of patients. Percentage of NK cells in LAK infusions were correlated with the R- and GA101-induced ADCC. Our results indicate that the combination of R or GA101 and LAK cells should be an option as frontline maintenance therapy in patients with FL.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, cellular uptake and apoptosis-inducing properties of two highly cytotoxic cyclometalated ruthenium(II) β-carboline complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jincan; Peng, Fa; Zhang, Yao; Li, Baojun; She, Ji; Jie, Xinming; Zou, Zhilin; Chen, Man; Chen, Lanmei

    2017-11-10

    Two new cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes of the general formula [Ru(N-N) 2 (1-Ph-βC)](PF 6 ), where N-N = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmb, Ru1), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, Ru2), and 1-Ph-βC (1-phenyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole) is a β-carboline alkaloids derivatives, have been synthesized and characterized. The in vitro cytotoxicities, cellular uptake and localization, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis-inducing mechanisms of these complexes have been extensively explored by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), flow cytometry, comet assay, inverted fluorescence microscope as well as western blotting experimental techniques. Notably, Ru1 and Ru2 exhibit potent antiproliferative activities against selected human cancer cell lines with IC 50 values lower than those of cisplatin and other non-cyclometalated Ru(II) β-carboline complexes. The cellular uptake and localization exhibit that these complexes can accumulate in the cell nuclei. Further antitumor mechanism studies show that Ru1 and Ru2 can cause cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase by regulating cell cycle relative proteins and induce apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and ROS-mediated DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived limbal epithelial cells (LiPSC as a cellular alternative for in vitro ocular toxicity testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Aberdam

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great potential to produce unlimited amount of differentiated cells as cellular source for regenerative medicine but also for in vitro drug screening and cytotoxicity tests. Ocular toxicity testing is mandatory to evaluate the risks of drugs and cosmetic products before their application to human patients by preventing eye irritation or insult. Since the global ban to use animals, many human-derived alternatives have been proposed, from ex-vivo enucleated postmortem cornea, primary corneal cell culture and immortalized corneal epithelial cell lines. All of them share limitations for their routine use. Using an improved protocol, we derived limbal epithelial cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells, named LiPSC, that are able to be passaged and differentiate further into corneal epithelial cells. Comparative RT-qPCR, immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry analysis and zymography assays demonstrate that LiPSC are morphologically and molecularly similar to the adult stem cells. Moreover, contrary to HCE, LiPSC and primary limbal cells display similarly sensitive to cytotoxicity treatment among passages. Our data strongly suggest that LiPSC could become a powerful alternative cellular model for cosmetic and drug tests.

  20. A cellular model of memory reconsolidation involves reactivation-induced destabilization and restabilization at the sensorimotor synapse in Aplysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue-Hyun; Kwak, Chuljung; Shim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Sun-Lim; Kim, Hyoung F.; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Kyungmin; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Young-Don; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Bailey, Craig H.; Kandel, Eric R.; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-01-01

    The memory reconsolidation hypothesis suggests that a memory trace becomes labile after retrieval and needs to be reconsolidated before it can be stabilized. However, it is unclear from earlier studies whether the same synapses involved in encoding the memory trace are those that are destabilized and restabilized after the synaptic reactivation that accompanies memory retrieval, or whether new and different synapses are recruited. To address this issue, we studied a simple nonassociative form of memory, long-term sensitization of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia, and its cellular analog, long-term facilitation at the sensory-to-motor neuron synapse. We found that after memory retrieval, behavioral long-term sensitization in Aplysia becomes labile via ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent protein degradation and is reconsolidated by means of de novo protein synthesis. In parallel, we found that on the cellular level, long-term facilitation at the sensory-to-motor neuron synapse that mediates long-term sensitization is also destabilized by protein degradation and is restabilized by protein synthesis after synaptic reactivation, a procedure that parallels memory retrieval or retraining evident on the behavioral level. These results provide direct evidence that the same synapses that store the long-term memory trace encoded by changes in the strength of synaptic connections critical for sensitization are disrupted and reconstructed after signal retrieval. PMID:22893682

  1. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  2. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-01-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals

  3. Cellular RNA Helicase DDX1 Is Involved in Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus nsp14-Induced Interferon-Beta Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanrong; Wu, Wei; Xie, Lilan; Wang, Dang; Ke, Qiyun; Hou, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaoli; Fang, Ying; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo; Fang, Liurong

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), an enteropathogenic coronavirus (CoV) of porcine, causes lethal watery diarrhea and severe dehydration in piglets and leads to severe economic losses in the swine industry. Unlike most CoVs that antagonize type I interferon (IFN) production, previous studies showed that TGEV infection induces IFN-I production both in vivo and in vitro . However, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that TGEV infection significantly facilitated IFN-β production as well as activation of the transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) in porcine kidney (PK-15) cells. Screening of TGEV-encoded proteins demonstrated that non-structural protein 14 (nsp14) was the most potent IFN-β inducer and induced IFN-β production mainly by activating NF-κB but not IRF3. Further analysis showed that nsp14 interacted with DDX1, a member of the DExD/H helicase family. Knockdown of DDX1 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreased nsp14-induced IFN-β production and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TGEV-induced IFN-β production and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression were decreased in cells transfected with DDX1-specific siRNA, indicating the vital role of DDX1 to TGEV-induced IFN-β responses. In summary, our data revealed a potential coactivator role of host RNA helicase DDX1 to the induction of IFN-β response initiated by TGEV and demonstrated that nsp14 is an important IFN inducer among the TGEV-encoded proteins.

  4. Cellular RNA Helicase DDX1 Is Involved in Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus nsp14-Induced Interferon-Beta Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanrong Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, an enteropathogenic coronavirus (CoV of porcine, causes lethal watery diarrhea and severe dehydration in piglets and leads to severe economic losses in the swine industry. Unlike most CoVs that antagonize type I interferon (IFN production, previous studies showed that TGEV infection induces IFN-I production both in vivo and in vitro. However, the underlying mechanism(s remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that TGEV infection significantly facilitated IFN-β production as well as activation of the transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB in porcine kidney (PK-15 cells. Screening of TGEV-encoded proteins demonstrated that non-structural protein 14 (nsp14 was the most potent IFN-β inducer and induced IFN-β production mainly by activating NF-κB but not IRF3. Further analysis showed that nsp14 interacted with DDX1, a member of the DExD/H helicase family. Knockdown of DDX1 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly decreased nsp14-induced IFN-β production and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TGEV-induced IFN-β production and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression were decreased in cells transfected with DDX1-specific siRNA, indicating the vital role of DDX1 to TGEV-induced IFN-β responses. In summary, our data revealed a potential coactivator role of host RNA helicase DDX1 to the induction of IFN-β response initiated by TGEV and demonstrated that nsp14 is an important IFN inducer among the TGEV-encoded proteins.

  5. Oral administration of type-II collagen peptide 250-270 suppresses specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Li, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Hong-Kun; Jia, Jun-Feng; Zheng, Zhao-Hui; Ding, Jin; Fan, Chun-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Oral antigen is an attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Establishment of immune markers and methods in evaluating the effects of antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses will help the application of oral tolerance in the treatment of human diseases. The present article observed the effects of chicken collagen II (CII), the recombinant polymerized human collagen II 250-270 (rhCII 250-270) peptide and synthesized human CII 250-270 (syCII 250-270) peptide on the induction of antigen-specific autoimmune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on the specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and mice fed with CII (250-270) prior to immunization with CII. In the study, proliferation, activation and intracellular cytokine production of antigen-specific T lymphocytes were simultaneously analyzed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry at the single-cell level. The antigen-specific antibody and antibody-forming cells were detected by ELISA and ELISPOT, respectively. CII (250-270) was found to have stimulated the response of specific lymphocytes in PBMC from RA patients, including the increase expression of surface activation antigen marker CD69 and CD25, and DNA synthesis. Mice, fed with CII (250-270) before CII immunization, had significantly lower arthritic scores than the mice immunized with CII alone, and the body weight of the former increased during the study period. Furthermore, the specific T cell activity, proliferation and secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma in spleen cells were actively suppressed in CII (250-270)-fed mice, and the serum anti-CII, anti-CII (250-270) antibody activities and the frequency of specific antibody-forming spleen cells were significantly lower in CII (250-270)-fed mice than in mice immunized with CII alone. These observations suggest that oral administration of CII (250-270) can

  6. NaDC3 Induces Premature Cellular Senescence by Promoting Transport of Krebs Cycle Intermediates, Increasing NADH, and Exacerbating Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Du, Xuan; Fu, Bo; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter 3 (NaDC3) is a key metabolism-regulating membrane protein responsible for transport of Krebs cycle intermediates. NaDC3 is upregulated as organs age, but knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which NaDC3 modulates mammalian aging is limited. In this study, we showed that NaDC3 overexpression accelerated cellular senescence in young human diploid cells (MRC-5 and WI-38) and primary renal tubular cells, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and increased expression of senescent biomarkers, senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and carbonyl were significantly enhanced, and activities of respiratory complexes I and III and ATP level were significantly decreased in NaDC3-infected cells. Stressful premature senescent phenotypes induced by NaDC3 were markedly ameliorated via treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and Tempol. High expression of NaDC3 caused a prominent increase in intracellular levels of Krebs cycle intermediates and NADH. Exogenous NADH and NAD(+) may aggravate and attenuate the aging phenotypes induced by NaDC3, respectively. These results suggest that NaDC3 can induce premature cellular senescence by promoting the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates, increasing generation of NADH and reactive oxygen species and leading to oxidative damage. Our results clarify the aging signaling pathway regulated by NaDC3. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21ras, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-κB pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-01-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-κB, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-κB DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-κB, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements

  8. [Suppressive Effects of Extract of Cedar Wood on Heat-induced Expression of Cellular Heat Shock Protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Junji; Matsubara, Eri; Narita, Eijiro; Koyama, Shin; Shimizu, Yoko; Kawai, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

     In recent years, highly antimicrobial properties of cedar heartwood essential oil against the wood-rotting fungi and pathogenic fungi have been reported in several papers. Antimicrobial properties against oral bacteria by hinokitiol contained in Thujopsis have been also extensively studied. The relation of naturally derived components and human immune system has been studied in some previous papers. In the present study, we focused on Japanese cedar, which has the widest artificial afforestation site in the country among various tree species. Extract oil was obtained from mixture of sapwood and heartwood of about 40-year cedar grown in Oguni, Kumamoto, Japan. We examined the influence of extract components from Japanese cedar woods on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) during heating, and on the micronucleus formation induced by the treatment of bleomycin as a DNA damaging agent. Cell lines used in this study were human fetal glial cells (SVGp12) and human glioma cells (MO54). Remarkable suppression of the Hsp70 expression induced by heating at 43°C was detected by the treatment of cedar extract in both SVGp12 and MO54 cells. We also found that cedar extract had an inhibitory tendency to reduce the micronucleus formation induced by bleomycin. From these results, the extract components from Japanese cedar woods would have an inhibitory effect of the stress response as a suppression of the heat-induced Hsp70 expression, and might have a reductive effect on carcinogenicity.

  9. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya E Chorna

    Full Text Available Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN, the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  10. Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition on hyperoxaluria-induced oxidative stress: influence on cellular ROS sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Rishi; Tandon, Chanderdeep; Dhawan, Devinder K; Kaur, Tanzeer

    2017-12-01

    Hyperoxaluria-induced calcium oxalate crystallisation is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as an organelle which could influence mitochondrial functioning and ROS generation. Plugging an upstream pathway of mitochondrial and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS generation may have better prophylaxis. Therefore, we propose to investigate the linkage of hyperoxaluria-induced ROS generation with ER stress by inhibiting the later with 4-Phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). Male wistar rats were divided into three groups: a normal control group, an ethylene glycol with ammonium chloride-induced hyperoxaluric group (EA) and a third group which has hyperoxaluric animals given 4-PBA at a dose of 300 mg/kg. After 9 days of treatment, animals were sacrificed and renal tissues were analysed for histopathological examination, ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress markers, inflammatory markers and NADPH oxidase subunits expression. Hyperoxaluric rats exhibited a significant increase in the levels of ROS, subsequently up-regulated levels of ER stress markers, inflammatory indicators, NADPH oxidase subunits and compromised mitochondrial functioning. However, ER stress amelioration appreciably curtailed the alterations caused by hyperoxaluric abuse. Therefore, suggesting the major role of ER in hyperoxaluric manifestations thereby providing an opportunity to target ER stress for future therapeutic interventions.

  11. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  12. Barrier protective effects of withaferin A in HMGB1-induced inflammatory responses in both cellular and animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wonhwa; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Min, Kyoung-jin; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2012-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA), an active compound from Withania somnifera, is widely researched for its anti-inflammatory, cardioactive and central nervous system effects. In this study, we first investigated the possible barrier protective effects of WFA against pro-inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice induced by high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the associated signaling pathways. The barrier protective activities of WFA were determined by measuring permeability, leukocytes adhesion and migration, and activation of pro-inflammatory proteins in HMGB1-activated HUVECs. We found that WFA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-mediated barrier disruption, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and adhesion/transendothelial migration of leukocytes to human endothelial cells. WFA also suppressed acetic acid-induced hyperpermeability and carboxymethylcellulose-induced leukocytes migration in vivo. Further studies revealed that WFA suppressed the production of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by HMGB1. Collectively, these results suggest that WFA protects vascular barrier integrity by inhibiting hyperpermeability, expression of CAMs, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a therapy for vascular inflammatory diseases. -- Highlights: ► Withaferin A inhibited LPS induced HMGB1 release. ► Withaferin A reduced HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated adhesion and migration of leukocytes. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated activation of NF-κB, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  13. Barrier protective effects of withaferin A in HMGB1-induced inflammatory responses in both cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonhwa [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hoon [Department of Herbal Medicinal Pharmacology, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Sae-Kwang [Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Oriental Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyoung-jin [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Shik [School of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Taeg Kyu [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong-Sup, E-mail: baejs@knu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Withaferin A (WFA), an active compound from Withania somnifera, is widely researched for its anti-inflammatory, cardioactive and central nervous system effects. In this study, we first investigated the possible barrier protective effects of WFA against pro-inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice induced by high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the associated signaling pathways. The barrier protective activities of WFA were determined by measuring permeability, leukocytes adhesion and migration, and activation of pro-inflammatory proteins in HMGB1-activated HUVECs. We found that WFA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-mediated barrier disruption, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and adhesion/transendothelial migration of leukocytes to human endothelial cells. WFA also suppressed acetic acid-induced hyperpermeability and carboxymethylcellulose-induced leukocytes migration in vivo. Further studies revealed that WFA suppressed the production of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by HMGB1. Collectively, these results suggest that WFA protects vascular barrier integrity by inhibiting hyperpermeability, expression of CAMs, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a therapy for vascular inflammatory diseases. -- Highlights: ► Withaferin A inhibited LPS induced HMGB1 release. ► Withaferin A reduced HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated adhesion and migration of leukocytes. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated activation of NF-κB, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  14. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (Long Form contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition in human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular FLICE-Inhibitory Protein (long form, c-FLIPL is a critical negative regulator of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIPL has been reported in many cancer cell lines and is associated with chemoresistance. In contrast, down-regulation of c-FLIP may drive cancer cells into cellular apoptosis. This study aims to demonstrate that inhibition of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 either by inhibitors geldanamycin/17-N-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (GA/17-AAG or siRNA technique in human lung cancer cells induces c-FLIPL degradation and cellular apoptosis through C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP-mediated mechanisms. Methods Calu-1 and H157 cell lines (including H157-c-FLIPL overexpressing c-FLIPL and control cell H157-lacZ were treated with 17-AAG and the cell lysates were prepared to detect the given proteins by Western Blot and the cell survival was assayed by SRB assay. CHIP and Hsp90 α/β proteins were knocked down by siRNA technique. CHIP and c-FLIPL plasmids were transfected into cells and immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to testify the interactions between c-FLIPL, CHIP and Hsp90. Results c-FLIPL down-regulation induced by 17-AAG can be reversed with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which suggested that c-FLIPL degradation is mediated by a ubiquitin-proteasome system. Inhibition of Hsp90α/β reduced c-FLIPL level, whereas knocking down CHIP expression with siRNA technique inhibited c-FLIPL degradation. Furthermore, c-FLIPL and CHIP were co-precipitated in the IP complexes. In addition, overexpression of c-FLIPL can rescue cancer cells from apoptosis. When 17-AAG was combined with an anti-cancer agent celecoxib(CCB, c-FLIPL level declined further and there was a higher degree of caspase activation. Conclusion We have elucidated c-FLIPL degradation contributes to apoptosis induced by Hsp90 inhibition, suggesting c-FLIP and Hsp90 may be the promising combined targets

  15. Using cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging to measure real-time changes in cellular adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin D; Thomas, Shane R

    2015-02-19

    Cell-matrix adhesion plays a key role in controlling cell morphology and signaling. Stimuli that disrupt cell-matrix adhesion (e.g., myeloperoxidase and other matrix-modifying oxidants/enzymes released during inflammation) are implicated in triggering pathological changes in cellular function, phenotype and viability in a number of diseases. Here, we describe how cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging approaches can be readily employed to accurately quantify real-time changes in cell adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification (using endothelial cells and myeloperoxidase as a pathophysiological matrix-modifying stimulus) with high temporal resolution and in a non-invasive manner. The xCELLigence cell-substrate impedance system continuously quantifies the area of cell-matrix adhesion by measuring the electrical impedance at the cell-substrate interface in cells grown on gold microelectrode arrays. Image analysis of time-lapse differential interference contrast movies quantifies changes in the projected area of individual cells over time, representing changes in the area of cell-matrix contact. Both techniques accurately quantify rapid changes to cellular adhesion and de-adhesion processes. Cell-substrate impedance on microelectrode biosensor arrays provides a platform for robust, high-throughput measurements. Live cell imaging analyses provide additional detail regarding the nature and dynamics of the morphological changes quantified by cell-substrate impedance measurements. These complementary approaches provide valuable new insights into how myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidative modification of subcellular extracellular matrix components triggers rapid changes in cell adhesion, morphology and signaling in endothelial cells. These approaches are also applicable for studying cellular adhesion dynamics in response to other matrix-modifying stimuli and in related adherent cells (e.g., epithelial cells).

  16. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  17. Gall-forming root-knot nematodes hijack key plant cellular functions to induce multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favery, Bruno; Quentin, Michaël; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Among plant-parasitic nematodes, the root-knot nematodes (RKNs) of the Meloidogyne spp. are the most economically important genus. RKN are root parasitic worms able to infect nearly all crop species and have a wide geographic distribution. During infection, RKNs establish and maintain an intimate relationship with the host plant. This includes the creation of a specialized nutritional structure composed of multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells, which result from the redifferentiation of vascular root cells. Giant cells constitute the sole source of nutrients for the nematode and are essential for growth and reproduction. Hyperplasia of surrounding root cells leads to the formation of the gall or root-knot, an easily recognized symptom of plant infection by RKNs. Secreted effectors produced in nematode salivary glands and injected into plant cells through a specialized feeding structure called the stylet play a critical role in the formation of giant cells. Here, we describe the complex interactions between RKNs and their host plants. We highlight progress in understanding host plant responses, focusing on how RKNs manipulate key plant processes and functions, including cell cycle, defence, hormones, cellular scaffold, metabolism and transport. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy induces misfolding of alleged prion-resistant species cellular prion protein without altering its pathobiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Fondevila, Dolors; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-05-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions were responsible for an unforeseen epizootic in cattle which had a vast social, economic, and public health impact. This was primarily because BSE prions were found to be transmissible to humans. Other species were also susceptible to BSE either by natural infection (e.g., felids, caprids) or in experimental settings (e.g., sheep, mice). However, certain species closely related to humans, such as canids and leporids, were apparently resistant to BSE. In vitro prion amplification techniques (saPMCA) were used to successfully misfold the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) of these allegedly resistant species into a BSE-type prion protein. The biochemical and biological properties of the new prions generated in vitro after seeding rabbit and dog brain homogenates with classical BSE were studied. Pathobiological features of the resultant prion strains were determined after their inoculation into transgenic mice expressing bovine and human PrP(C). Strain characteristics of the in vitro-adapted rabbit and dog BSE agent remained invariable with respect to the original cattle BSE prion, suggesting that the naturally low susceptibility of rabbits and dogs to prion infections should not alter their zoonotic potential if these animals became infected with BSE. This study provides a sound basis for risk assessment regarding prion diseases in purportedly resistant species.

  19. Development of an on-line exposure system to determine freshly produced diesel engine emission-induced cellular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Papaioannou, Eleni; Chasapidis, Leonidas; Akritidis, Theofylaktos; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Duschl, Albert

    2013-09-01

    Diesel engine emission particle filters are often placed at exhaust outlets to remove particles from the exhaust. The use of filters results in the exposure to a reduced number of nanometer-sized particles, which might be more harmful than the exposure to a larger number of micrometer-sized particles. An in vitro exposure system was established to expose human alveolar epithelial cells to freshly generated exhaust. Computer simulations were used to determine the optimal flow characteristics and ensure equal exposure conditions for each well of a 6-well plate. A selective particle size sampler was used to continuously deliver diesel soot particles with different particle size distributions to cells in culture. To determine, whether the system could be used for cellular assays, alterations in cytokine production and cell viability of human alveolar A549 cells were determined after 3h on-line exposure followed by a 21-h conventional incubation period. Data indicated that complete diesel engine emission slightly affected pre-stimulated cells, but naive cells were not affected. The fractions containing large or small particles never affected the cells. The experimental set-up allowed a reliable exposure of the cells to the complete exhaust fraction or to the fractions containing either large or small diesel engine emission particles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Suspended C{sub 60} nanoparticles protect against short-term UV and fluoranthene photo-induced toxicity, but cause long-term cellular damage in Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.Y. [Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Edelmann, R.E. [Electron Microscopy Facility, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Oris, J.T., E-mail: orisjt@muohio.edu [Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The increased production of nanotechnology materials is a potential source of nano-sized particles (NSPs) in aquatic ecosystems. Meanwhile, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in the presence of ecologically relevant levels of ultraviolet radiation (UV), can be acutely toxic to aquatic species including fish and invertebrates. Considering that suspended carbon-based NSPs (e.g., C{sub 60} fullerenes) may act in similar ways as dissolved organic matter (DOM) by altering the bioavailability of PAHs, the objective of this research was to determine the effect of suspended C{sub 60} on the photo-induced toxicity of fluoranthene. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the presence of C{sub 60} protected cellular components (e.g., mitochondria, microvilli, and basal infoldings) in organisms exposed to UV and fluoranthene phototoxicity in short-term exposures. However, we found that long-term exposure (21 d) of low-level C{sub 60} caused significant cellular damage in the Daphnia magna alimentary canal. This paper highlights the importance of examining the interactions between existing stressors and nanoparticles in the aquatic environment.

  1. Anthocyanins Protect SK-N-SH Cells Against Acrolein-Induced Toxicity by Preserving the Cellular Redox State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacemi, Abdenour; Ramassamy, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, by-products of lipid peroxidation such as acrolein accumulated in vulnerable regions of the brain. We have previously shown that acrolein is a highly reactive and neurotoxic aldehyde and its toxicity involves the alteration of several redox-sensitive pathways. Recently, protein-conjugated acrolein in cerebrospinal fluid has been proposed as a biomarker to distinguish between MCI and AD. With growing evidence of the early involvement of oxidative stress in AD etiology, one would expect that a successful therapy should prevent brain oxidative damage. In this regard, several studies have demonstrated that polyphenol-rich extracts exert beneficial effect on cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. We have recently demonstrated the efficacy of an anthocyanin formulation (MAF14001) against amyloid-β-induced oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MAF14001 as a mixture of anthocyanins, a particular class of polyphenols, against acrolein-induced oxidative damage in SK-N-SH neuronal cells. Our results demonstrated that MAF14001, from 5μM, was able to efficiently protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein-induced cell death. MAF14001 was able to lower reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl levels induced by acrolein. Moreover, MAF1401 prevented glutathione depletion and positively modulated, in the presence of acrolein, some oxidative stress-sensitive pathways including the transcription factors NF-κB and Nrf2, the proteins γ-GCS and GSK3β, and the protein adaptator p66Shc. Along with its proven protective effect against amyloid-β toxicity, these results demonstrate that MAF14001 could target multiple mechanisms and could be a promising agent for AD prevention.

  2. Mitochondrial fragmentation is an important cellular event induced by ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanxin; Fu, Xiaoyan; Li, Hong; Chen, Bolai; Guo, Yuhai; Su, Guoyi; Zhang, Hu; Ning, Feipeng; Lin, Yongpeng; Mei, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-04-01

    A series of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activities. The results showed that ruthenium polypyridyl complexes, especially [Ru(bpy)2 (p-tFPIP)](2+) (2 a; bpy=bipyridine, tFPIP=2-(2-trifluoromethane phenyl)imidazole[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline), exhibited novel anticancer activity against human cancer cell lines, but with less toxicity to a human normal cell line. The results of flow cytometry and caspase activities analysis indicated that the 2 a-induced growth inhibition against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells was mainly caused by mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation as detected by TUNEL-DAPI co-staining further confirmed 2 a-induced apoptotic cell death. Further, fluorescence imaging revealed that ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes could target mitochondria to induce mitochondrial fragmentation, accompanied by depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these findings suggest a potential application of theses ruthenium(II) complexes in the treatment of cancers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1 Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1 is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5′ untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5′ UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES. Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La, which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5′ UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions.

  4. Structures and short linear motif of disordered transcription factor regions provide clues to the interactome of the cellular hub radical-induced cell death1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Staby, Lasse; Bendsen, Sidsel Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure, but often facilitate key protein functions. Some interactions between IDRs and folded protein domains rely on short linear motifs (SLiMs). These motifs are challenging to identify, but once found can...... point to larger networks of interactions, such as with proteins that serve as hubs for essential cellular functions. The stress-associated plant protein Radical-Induced Cell Death1 (RCD1) is one such hub, interacting with many transcription factors via their flexible IDRs. To identify the SLiM bound...... by RCD1, we analyzed the IDRs in three protein partners - DREB2A, ANAC013, and ANAC046 - considering parameters such as disorder, context, charges, and pI. Using a combined bioinformatics and experimental approach, we have identified the bipartite RCD1-binding SLiM as [DE]-x(1,2)-[YF]-x(1,4)-[DE...

  5. [Antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 prevents cellular senescence program reactivation induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in E1A and cHa-ras transformed rat fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Bykova, T V; Zubova, S G; Aksenov, N D; Pospelova, T V

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the role of apoptosis resistance gene bcl-2 in the activation of cellular senescence program induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate (NaBut) in transformed rat fibroblasts. This study was conducted in a resistant to apoptosis induction cell line of rat embryo fibroblasts transfor- med by oncogenes E1A, cHa-ras and bcl-2 (ERasBcl). The parent cell line transformed with only EJA and cHa-ras (ERas) was used as a control. It has been found that NaBut reduces proliferation rate of ERasBcl cells significantly weaker than of ERas transformed cells, despite the fact that the G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in both cell lines. After NaBut treatment, hypertrophy of the apoptosis resistant transformants ERasBcl also was reduced compared to parent cell line ERas, due to less activation of mTORC1, which is known to control the synthesis of protein and ribosome biogenesis. The degree of mTORC1 activation was as.sessed by its target proteins phosphorylation: the ribosomal S6 protein and 4E-BP1--inhibitor of translation initiation factor eIF4E. Since cell senescence process may be associated with changes in autophagy regulation, we analyzed the dynamics of one of the main autophagosome formation markers--protein LC3. The accumulation of lipid-bound form LC3-II changes significantly in ERasBcl cells after NaBut treatment and has transient nature. The set of analyzed cellular senescence markers suggests that a high level of apoptosis resistance gene bcl-2 expression prevents the realization of tumor-suppressor senescence program induced by HDACi sodium butyrate treatment.

  6. Cellular prion protein contributes to LS 174T colon cancer cell carcinogenesis by increasing invasiveness and resistance against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Cornelius Kwang-Lee; Say, Yee-How

    2015-09-01

    As the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we aimed to investigate the effects of cancer cell-specific PrP(C) overexpression from the invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis aspects, by performing cell motility assays, cell proliferation assays under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions, and apoptosis evasion when subjected to multiple anti-cancer drugs. Overexpression of PrP(C) in LS 174T was achieved by stable transfection. PrP(C) overexpression was shown to increase cell proliferation in anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent manners, as shown by more viable cells in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, more colonies formed in soft agar assay and increased resistance to anoikis in poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-coated surface. PrP(C) overexpression also increased cell motility and invasiveness of LS 174T. Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix using collagen- and fibronectin-coated surfaces revealed increased cell attachment in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C). Analysis of apoptotic and necrotic cells by propidium iodide/annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate microscopy and 7-amino-actinomycin D/annexin V-phycoerythrin flow cytometry revealed that PrP(C) overexpression attenuated doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Human apoptosis antibody array with 35 apoptosis-related proteins revealed that three inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs)-survivin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP-1)-were upregulated in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C) in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the overexpression of PrP(C) could enhance the invasiveness and survival of LS 174T colorectal cancer cells, indicating that PrP(C) plays a role in colorectal cancer biology.

  7. Unlike physical exercise, modified environment increases the lifespan of SOD1G93A mice however both conditions induce cellular changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick N Gerber

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is characterized by a gradual muscular paralysis resulting from progressive motoneurons death. ALS etiology remains unknown although it has been demonstrated to be a multifactorial disease involving several cellular partners. There is currently no effective treatment. Even if the effect of exercise is under investigation for many years, whether physical exercise is beneficial or harmful is still under debate.We investigated the effect of three different intensities of running exercises on the survival of SOD1(G93A mice. At the early-symptomatic stage (P60, males were isolated and randomly assigned to 5 conditions: 2 sedentary groups ("sedentary" and "sedentary treadmill" placed on the inert treadmill, and 3 different training intensity groups (5 cm/s, 10 cm/s and 21 cm/s; 15 min/day, 5days/week. We first demonstrated that an appropriate "control" of the environment is of the utmost importance since comparison of the two sedentary groups evidenced an 11.6% increase in survival in the "sedentary treadmill" group. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry that this increased lifespan is accompanied with motoneurons survival and increased glial reactivity in the spinal cord. In a second step, we showed that when compared with the proper control, all three running-based training did not modify lifespan of the animals, but result in motoneurons preservation and changes in glial cells activation.We demonstrate that increase in survival induced by a slight daily modification of the environment is associated with motoneurons preservation and strong glial modifications in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A. Using the appropriate control, we then demonstrate that all running intensities have no effect on the survival of ALS mice but induce cellular modifications. Our results highlight the critical importance of the control of the environment in ALS studies and may explain discrepancy in the literature regarding the

  8. Alterations in macrophage cellular proteome induced by calcium oxalate crystals: the association of HSP90 and F-actin is important for phagosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhto, Nilubon; Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-08-02

    The presence of macrophages in renal interstitium is the key feature of progressive renal inflammation in kidney stone disease. However, response of macrophages to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the major crystalline composition of kidney stone, remained unclear. This study aimed to investigate alterations in the cellular proteome of macrophages induced by COM crystals using a proteomics approach. U937-derived macrophages (by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate activation) were incubated without or with 100 μg/mL COM crystals for 24 h. Their cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE (n = 10 gels; 5 were derived from 5 independent cultures in each group) and visualized with Deep Purple fluorescent dye. Spot matching, quantitative intensity analysis, and statistics revealed 18 differentially expressed protein spots, which were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of α-tubulin, β-actin and ezrin were validated by Western blot analysis. Protein interaction network analysis using STRING software showed that 90 kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) was associated with β-actin and α-tubulin (all these three proteins were increased in the COM-treated macrophages). Multiple immunofluorescence stainings confirmed the associations of HSP90 with filamentous form of actin (F-actin) and α-tubulin. However, only the association between HSP90 and F-actin was found on the phagosome membrane surrounding COM crystal, indicating that the association of HSP90 with F-actin, but not with α-tubulin, is important for phagosome formation. Silencing of HSP90 (siHSP90) reduced expression of cytoskeletal proteins and phagosome marker (Rab5) and successfully diminished COM crystal-induced phagocytosis and migration of macrophages. Our findings enlightened the significant role of these altered proteins, especially HSP90, in enhanced phagocytic activity of the COM-exposed macrophages.

  9. A small-molecule inhibitor suppresses the tumor-associated mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme (ME2) and induces cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Li, Shao-Yu; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2015-08-21

    Here, we found a natural compound, embonic acid (EA), that can specifically inhibit the enzymatic activity of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P)-ME, ME2) either in vitro or in vivo. The in vitro IC50 value of EA for m-NAD(P)-ME was 1.4 ± 0.4 μM. Mutagenesis and binding studies revealed that the putative binding site of EA on m-NAD(P)-ME is located at the fumarate binding site or at the dimer interface near the site. Inhibition studies reveal that EA displayed a non-competitive inhibition pattern, which demonstrated that the binding site of EA was distinct from the active site of the enzyme. Therefore, EA is thought to be an allosteric inhibitor of m-NAD(P)-ME. Both EA treatment and knockdown of m-NAD(P)-ME by shRNA inhibited the growth of H1299 cancer cells. The protein expression and mRNA synthesis of m-NAD(P)-ME in H1299 cells were not influenced by EA, suggesting that the EA-inhibited H1299 cell growth occurs through the suppression of in vivo m-NAD(P)-ME activity EA treatment further induced the cellular senescence of H1299 cells. However, down-regulation of the enzyme-induced cellular senescence was not through p53. Therefore, the EA-evoked senescence of H1299 cells may occur directly through the inhibition of ME2 or a p53-independent pathway.

  10. The outcome of coxsackievirus B3-(CVB3-) induced myocarditis is influenced by the cellular immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipner, C; Grün, K; Borchers, M; Stelzner, A

    2000-05-01

    Mice develop a marked age-related susceptibility to myocardial coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infections. The lesions observed in mice resemble closely those seen in the human disease. Experimental murine models of CVB3-induced myocarditis have shown that both, host and viral genetic factors, can influence susceptibility to the infection as well as the persistence and progression of the disease. Recently, we have shown that CD4 T cell-deficient MHC Class II knockout mice develop a strong fibrosis with virus persistence in the heart tissue and without production of neutralizing antibodies. To examine the role of CD4+ T cells and especially the role of the T helper 1 cell response for the outcome and pathogenesis of CVB3-induced myocarditis in more detail, 2 different mouse strains with identical genetic background (H-2b) were infected with CVB3-Mü/J (Nancy strain). Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice and mice with targeted disruption of interleukin (IL-)4 gene (IL-4-/- mice) developed a severe acute myocarditis on day 7 post infection (p.i.). The CVB3-induced inflammation was cured until the 21st day p.i. in hearts of C57BL/6 mice. IL-4-/- mice with insufficient T helper-2 cell immune response developed a severe myocardial damage between day 7 and 21 p.i. with prolonged virus persistence in the heart tissue. Therefore, we suggest that despite an obvious normal T helper-1 cell cytokine pattern, IL-4-/- mice are more susceptible to long-term heart muscle injuries after infection with CVB3.

  11. APOL1 kidney disease risk variants cause cytotoxicity by depleting cellular potassium and inducing stress-activated protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Opeyemi A.; Zhang, Jia-Yue; VerPlank, Lynn; Zahler, Nathan; DiBartolo, Salvatore; Heneghan, John F.; Schlöndorff, Johannes S.; Suh, Jung Hee; Yan, Paul; Alper, Seth L.; Friedman, David J.; Pollak, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Two specific genetic variants of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) gene are responsible for the high rate of kidney disease in people of recent African ancestry. Expression in cultured cells of these APOL1 risk variants, commonly referred to as G1 and G2, results in significant cytotoxicity. The underlying mechanism of this cytotoxicity is poorly understood. We hypothesized that this cytotoxicity is mediated by APOL1 risk variant-induced dysregulation of intracellular signaling relevant for cell survival. To test this hypothesis, we conditionally expressed WT human APOL1 (G0), the APOL1 G1 variant, or the APOL1 G2 variant in human embryonic kidney cells (T-REx-293) using a tetracycline-mediated (Tet-On) system. We found that expression of either G1 or G2 APOL1 variants increased apparent cell swelling and cell death compared with G0-expressing cells. These manifestations of cytotoxicity were preceded by G1 or G2 APOL1-induced net efflux of intracellular potassium as measured by X-ray fluorescence, resulting in the activation of stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), p38 MAPK, and JNK. Prevention of net K+ efflux inhibited activation of these SAPKs by APOL1 G1 or G2. Furthermore, inhibition of SAPK signaling and inhibition of net K+ efflux abrogated cytotoxicity associated with expression of APOL1 risk variants. These findings in cell culture raise the possibility that nephrotoxicity of APOL1 risk variants may be mediated by APOL1 risk variant-induced net loss of intracellular K+ and subsequent induction of stress-activated protein kinase pathways. PMID:26699492

  12. Cellular mechanism of primary anti-Thy-1 antibody responses in vitro induced by uniquely immunogenic thymocyte antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, K I; Nakashima, I; Nagase, F; Kato, N; Mizoguchi, K; Kawashima, K; Lake, P

    1984-03-01

    Thy-1 antigens are the only cell membrane antigens known to be able to induce primary antibody responses in vitro. We have shown that antigens from the thymocytes of mice and rats were highly immunogenic in cultures of murine spleen cells for the induction of Thy-1.1-specific plaque-forming cell responses, whereas antigens from other tissues, including brains and bone marrow, were poorly immunogenic, if at all. The thymocyte-specific Thy-1 immunogenicity was carried by disrupted cell membranes, and the specific activity for inducing responses was closely linked to Thy-1. We then tried to determine the mechanism of anti-Thy-1 antibody responses in vitro that were induced by the uniquely immunogenic thymocyte antigens. The thymocyte Thy-1 antigens behaved as T cell-independent class 2 (TI-2) antigens: they induced responses in athymic nude mice but not in CBA/N mice with a B cell defect. The apparent TI-2 responses to thymocyte Thy-1 did, however, require Thy-1+ cells in the responder, similar to anti-DNP-Ficoll responses. The full development of the anti-Thy-1 responses required the participation of splenic adherent cells (SAC). Nevertheless, the mechanism of the SAC dependency of anti-Thy-1 responses did not involve antigen presentation to lymphocytes by antigen-pulsed SAC, which contrasted with the finding that the presentation of antigen by live SAC to lymphocytes was indispensable for responses to DNP-Ficoll. The poor Thy-1 responsiveness of SAC-depleted spleen cells was fully restored by the addition of soluble factors (IL 1-like molecules) released from SAC into the culture, which did not replace the SAC-requirement of responses to DNP-Ficoll. It was concluded from these results that Thy-1 or Thy-1-linked structures on thymocyte membranes have an intrinsic activity to directly signal either TI-2 B cells or immature T cells, or both, for activation in the presence of soluble factors released from adherent accessory cells. This conclusion is discussed in

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of the Ganoderma applanatum extracts induces apoptosis on SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jieqiong; Liu, Chanmin; Chen, Yongqiang; Jiang, Jihong; Qin, Zhihong

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the inhibition effect of Ganoderma applanatum extract (GAEAE) on human gastric cancer cell lines and apoptosis mechanism, Alamar Blue assay was used to assess the inhibition and apoptosis-inducing effect of the GAEAE on proliferation of SGC-7901 cells, the DNA ladders of the apoptosis cells was done, the mRNA expression of p53, Bax, Bcl-2 and JNK were analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The levels of the Cyt C and the p53, Bax/Bcl-2, JNK proteins and the caspase-3 activity in the SGC-7901 cells were measured with ELISA kits. Our data showed that the GAEAE markedly inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of Bcl-2 protein was down-regulated and Bax, c-jun, p53 protein expressions were up-regulated by the GAEAE treatment in SGC-7901 cells. The activity of caspase-3 was markedly increased and the Cty C was markedly released into cytoplasm from the mitochondria after GAEAE action. In conclusion, our results indicated that the GAEAE could enhance the sensitivity of SGC-7901 cells to the c-jun, p53, Bax and Bcl-2 induced apoptosis and provided a promising approach to anti-human gastric cancer therapy with Ganoderma applanatum. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. In vitro cellular transformation induced by the hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro-03-8799 and RSU-1069

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.K.; Hall, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Two experimental hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, Ro-03-8799 and RSU-1069 were investigated for their ability to induce in vitro oncogenic transformation using the C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cell system. Logarithmic phase cultures of C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cells were plated at a density that allowed for approximately 400 to 500 cells per dish to survive the treatment with drug or radiation or the combination of both. All drug treatments were performed under aerated condition; for times ranging from 1 to 3 days. Following treatment, each dish was washed twice with phosphate-buffered saline and then replenished with fresh medium. The cultures were maintained for a total of six weeks after which time they were fixed, stained and type II and III foci were scored as transformants. Ro-03-8799 and particularly RSU-1069 were found to be significantly more cytotoxic than equivalent dosages of Misonidazole or SR-2508. In addition, they also induced significant transformation frequencies. RSU-1069 at a concentration of 0.03 mM; and Ro-03-8799 at a concentration of 1 mM produced a transformation incidence roughly comparable to 2 Gy of γ-rays. When combined with γ-rays, both sensitizers produced transformation frequencies larger than with either drug or radiation alone, and this potentiation appeared to be additive rather than synergistic

  15. Epithelial Adhesion Mediated by Pilin SpaC Is Required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-Induced Cellular Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, Courtney S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E.; Powell, Domonica N.; Jones, Rheinallt M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely used probiotic, and the strain's salutary effects on the intestine have been extensively documented. We previously reported that strain GG can modulate inflammatory signaling, as well as epithelial migration and proliferation, by activating NADPH oxidase 1-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit. By comparing strain GG to an isogenic mutant that lacks SpaC (strain GGΩspaC), we establish that SpaC is necessary for strain GG to adhere to gut mucosa, that SpaC contributes to strain GG-induced epithelial generation of ROS, and that SpaC plays a role in strain GG's capacity to stimulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling in enterocytes. In addition, we show that SpaC is required for strain GG-mediated stimulation of cell proliferation and protection against radiologically inflicted intestinal injury. The identification of a critical surface protein required for strain GG to mediate its probiotic influence advances our understanding of the molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between some commensal bacteria of the gut lumen and enterocytes. Further insights into this relationship are critical for the development of novel approaches to treat intestinal diseases. PMID:24928883

  16. Epithelial adhesion mediated by pilin SpaC is required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-induced cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, Courtney S; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E; Powell, Domonica N; Jones, Rheinallt M; Neish, Andrew S

    2014-08-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely used probiotic, and the strain's salutary effects on the intestine have been extensively documented. We previously reported that strain GG can modulate inflammatory signaling, as well as epithelial migration and proliferation, by activating NADPH oxidase 1-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit. By comparing strain GG to an isogenic mutant that lacks SpaC (strain GGΩspaC), we establish that SpaC is necessary for strain GG to adhere to gut mucosa, that SpaC contributes to strain GG-induced epithelial generation of ROS, and that SpaC plays a role in strain GG's capacity to stimulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling in enterocytes. In addition, we show that SpaC is required for strain GG-mediated stimulation of cell proliferation and protection against radiologically inflicted intestinal injury. The identification of a critical surface protein required for strain GG to mediate its probiotic influence advances our understanding of the molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between some commensal bacteria of the gut lumen and enterocytes. Further insights into this relationship are critical for the development of novel approaches to treat intestinal diseases. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Nine μg intradermal influenza vaccine and 15 μg intramuscular influenza vaccine induce similar cellular and humoral immune responses in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarede, Nolwenn; Bisceglia, Hélène; Rozières, Aurore; Goujon, Catherine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Vanbervliet, Beatrice; Rodet, Karen; Hennino, Ana; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Intanza® 9 μg (Sanofi Pasteur), a trivalent split-virion vaccine administered by intradermal (ID) injection, was approved in Europe in 2009 for the prevention of seasonal influenza in adults 18 to 59 years. Here, we examined the immune responses induced in adults by the ID 9 μg vaccine and the standard trivalent intramuscular (IM) vaccine (Vaxigrip® 15 μg, Sanofi Pasteur). This trial was a randomized, controlled, single-center, open-label study in healthy adults 18 to 40 years of age during the 2007/8 influenza season. Subjects received a single vaccination with the ID 9 μg (n=38) or IM 15 μg (n=42) vaccine. Serum, saliva, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected up to 180 days post-vaccination. Geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers, seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and pre-vaccination-to-post-vaccination ratios of geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers did not differ between the two vaccines. Compared with pre-vaccination, the vaccines induced similar increases in vaccine-specific circulating B cells at day 7 but did not induce significant increases in vaccine-specific memory B cells at day 180. Cell-mediated immunity to all three vaccine strains, measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, was high at baseline and not increased by either vaccine. Neither vaccine induced a mucosal immune response. These results show that the humoral and cellular immune responses to the ID 9 μg vaccine are similar to those to the standard IM 15 μg vaccine.

  18. The Docosanoid Neuroprotectin D1 Induces TH-Positive Neuronal Survival in a Cellular Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandria, Jorgelina M; Sharp, Michelle W; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) does not manifest clinically until 80 % of striatal dopamine is reduced, thus most neuronal damage takes place before the patient presents clinical symptoms. Therefore, it is important to develop preventive strategies for this disease. In the experimental models of PD, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) and rotenone induce toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) displays neuroprotection in cells undergoing proteotoxic and oxidative stress. In the present report, we established an in vitro model using a primary neuronal culture from mesencephalic embryonic mouse tissue in which 17-20 % of neurons were TH-positive when differentiated in vitro. NPD1 (100 nM) rescued cells from apoptosis induced by MPP+ and rotenone, and the dendritic arbor of surviving neurons was examined using Sholl analysis. Rotenone, as well as MPP+ and its precursor 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), severely promoted retraction of dendritic arbor distal segments, thus decreasing the maximum branch order reached. On average, NPD1 counteracted the effects of MPP+ on the dendritic arborization, but failed to do so in the rotenone-treated neurons. However, rotenone did decrease the Sholl intersection number from radii 25 to 125 µm, and NPD1 did restore the pattern to control levels. Similarly, NPD1 partially reverted the dendrite retraction caused by MPP+ and MPTP. These results suggest that the apoptosis occurring in mesencephalic TH-positive neurons is not a direct consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction alone and that NPD1 signaling may be counteracting this damage. These findings lay the groundwork for the use of the in vitro model developed for future studies and for the search of specific molecular events that NPD1 targets to prevent early neurodegeneration in PD.

  19. Loss of Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Actions Induce Preterm Cellular and Structural Remodeling of the Cervix and Premature Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellon, Steven M.; Dobyns, Abigail E.; Beck, Hailey L.; Kurtzman, James T.; Garfield, Robert E.; Kirby, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term. PMID:24339918

  20. Increased acellular and cellular surface mineralization induced by nanogrooves in combination with a calcium-phosphate coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymov, Alexey; Song, Jiankang; Cai, Xinjie; Te Riet, Joost; Leeuwenburgh, Sander; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2016-02-01

    The current work evaluated the influence of nanoscale surface-topographies in combination with a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating on acellular and cellular surface mineralization. Four groups of substrates were produced, including smooth, grooved (940nm pitch, 430nm groove width, 185nm depth), smooth coated, and grooved coated. The substrates were characterized by scanning/transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Osteoblast-like MC3T3 cells were cultured on the substrates for a period up to 35days under osteogenic conditions. Differentiation was observed by alkaline phosphatase assay and PCR of collagen I (COLI), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), bone-morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2), and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Mineralization was quantified by a calcium assay and Alizarin Red staining. In addition, acellular mineralization was determined after incubation of substrates in just cell culture medium without cells. Results showed that a reproducible nano-metric (∼50nm) CaP-layer could be applied on the substrates, without losing the integrity of the topographical features. While no relevant differences were found for cell viability, cells on smooth surfaces proliferated for a longer period than cells on grooved substrates. In addition, differentiation was affected by topographies, as indicated by an increased expression of OC, OPN and ALP activity. Deposition of a CaP coating significantly increased the acellular mineralization of smooth as well grooved substrate-surfaces. However, this mineralizing effect was strongly reduced in the presence of cells. In the cell seeded situation, mineralization was significantly increased by the substrate topography, while only a minor additive effect of the coating was observed. In conclusion, the model presented herein can be exploited for experimental evaluation of cell-surface interaction processes and optimization of bone-anchoring capability of implants. The model showed that substrates modified with Ca

  1. Alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage, formation of topoisomerase I- and II-DNA complexes and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Austin, Caroline A; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2013-09-12

    The alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone are part of the chemical structure of a variety of naturally occurring compounds (e.g., cardenolides, bufadienolides, acetogenins, coumarins, and food-flavoring furanones), some of which have shown anticancer activity and/or DNA damaging effects. Here we report that 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage (assessed by the comet assay and the gamma-H2AX focus assay) and the formation of topoisomerase I- and topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in cells (visualized and quantified in situ by the TARDIS assay). Cells mutated in BRCA2 (deficient in homologous recombination repair) were significantly hypersensitive to the cytotoxic activity of 2-pyrone, therefore suggesting that BRCA2 plays an important role in the repair of DNA damage induced by this lactone. Both lactones were cytotoxic in A549 lung cancer cells at lower concentrations than in MRC5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts. The possible involvement of 2-furanone and 2-pyrone in the anticancer and DNA-damaging activities of compounds containing these lactones is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Maternal obesity induced by a high fat diet causes altered cellular development in fetal brains suggestive of a predisposition of offspring to neurological disorders in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Ewa K; Srinivasan, Malathi; Stachowiak, Michal K; Patel, Mulchand S

    2013-12-01

    Fetal development in an obese maternal intrauterine environment has been shown to predispose the offspring for a number of metabolic disorders in later life. The observation that a large percentage of women of child-bearing age in the US are overweight/obese during pregnancy is therefore a source of concern. A high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity in female rats has been used as a model for maternal obesity. The objective of this study was to determine cellular development in brains of term fetuses of obese rats fed a HF diet from the time of weaning. Fetal brains were dissected out on gestational day 21 and processed for immunohistochemical analysis in the hypothalamic as well as extra-hypothalamic regions. The major observation of this study is that fetal development in the obese HF female rat induced several alterations in the HF fetal brain. Marked increases were observed in orexigenic signaling and a significant decrease was observed for anorexigenic signaling in the vicinity of the 3rd ventricle in HF brains. Additionally, our results indicated diminished migration and maturation of stem-like cells in the 3rd ventricular region as well as in the brain cortex. The results from the present study indicate developmental alterations in the hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic regions in the HF fetal brain suggestive of a predisposition for the development of obesity and possibly neurodevelopmental abnormalities in the offspring.

  3. Cellular Ontogeny and Hierarchy Influence the Reprogramming Efficiency of Human B Cells into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, Álvaro; van Roon, Eddy H J; Romero-Moya, Damià; López-Millan, Belén; Stam, Ronald W; Colomer, Dolors; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bueno, Clara; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Although B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming into pluripotency, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been very recently generated, at very low efficiency, from human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20 + B cells using nonintegrative tetracistronic OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus (SeV). Here, we addressed whether cell ontogeny and hierarchy influence the reprogramming efficiency of the B-cell compartment. We demonstrate that human fetal liver (FL)-derived CD19 + B cells are 110-fold easier to reprogram into iPSCs than those from CB/PB. Similarly, FL-derived CD34+CD19 + B progenitors are reprogrammed much easier than mature B cells (0.46% vs. 0.11%). All FL B-cell iPSCs carry complete VDJH rearrangements while 55% and 45% of the FL B-progenitor iPSCs carry incomplete and complete VDJH rearrangements, respectively, reflecting the reprogramming of developmentally different B progenitors (pro-B vs. pre-B) within a continuous differentiation process. Finally, our data suggest that successful B-cell reprogramming relies on active cell proliferation, and it is MYC-dependent as identical nonintegrative polycistronic SeV lacking MYC (OSKL or OSKLN) fail to reprogram B cells. The ability to efficiently reprogram human fetal primary B cells and B precursors offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B-lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignances. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Scaffold-Free Fabrication of Osteoinductive Cellular Constructs Using Mouse Gingiva-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Hiroko Okawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cell constructs are expected to provide osteoinductive materials to develop cell-based therapies for bone regeneration. The proliferation and spontaneous aggregation capability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs thus prompted us to fabricate a scaffold-free iPSC construct as a transplantation vehicle. Embryoid bodies of mouse gingival fibroblast-derived iPSCs (GF-iPSCs were seeded in a cell chamber with a round-bottom well made of a thermoresponsive hydrogel. Collected ball-like cell constructs were cultured in osteogenic induction medium for 30 days with gentle shaking, resulting in significant upregulation of osteogenic marker genes. The constructs consisted of an inner region of unstructured cell mass and an outer osseous tissue region that was surrounded by osteoblast progenitor-like cells. The outer osseous tissue was robustly calcified with elemental calcium and phosphorous as well as hydroxyapatite. Subcutaneous transplantation of the GF-iPSC constructs into immunodeficient mice contributed to extensive ectopic bone formation surrounded by teratoma tissue. These results suggest that mouse GF-iPSCs could facilitate the fabrication of osteoinductive scaffold-free 3D cell constructs, in which the calcified regions and surrounding osteoblasts may function as scaffolds and drivers of osteoinduction, respectively. With incorporation of technologies to inhibit teratoma formation, this system could provide a promising strategy for bone regenerative therapies.

  5. Resveratrol Enhances Exercise-Induced Cellular and Functional Adaptations of Skeletal Muscle in Older Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Stephen E; McCrory, Jean L; Kearcher, Kalen; Vickers, Austen; Frear, Benjamin; Gilleland, Diana L; Bonner, Daniel E; Thomas, James M; Donley, David A; Lively, Mathew W; Mohamed, Junaith S

    2017-11-09

    Older men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) 65-80 years of age completed 12 weeks of exercise and took either a placebo or resveratrol (RSV) (500 mg/d) to test the hypothesis that RSV treatment combined with exercise would increase mitochondrial density, muscle fatigue resistance, and cardiovascular function more than exercise alone. Contrary to our hypothesis, aerobic and resistance exercise coupled with RSV treatment did not reduce cardiovascular risk further than exercise alone. However, exercise added to RSV treatment improved the indices of mitochondrial density, and muscle fatigue resistance more than placebo and exercise treatments. In addition, subjects that were treated with RSV had an increase in knee extensor muscle peak torque (8%), average peak torque (14%), and power (14%) after training, whereas exercise did not increase these parameters in the placebo-treated older subjects. Furthermore, exercise combined with RSV significantly improved mean fiber area and total myonuclei by 45.3% and 20%, respectively, in muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of older subjects. Together, these data indicate a novel anabolic role of RSV in exercise-induced adaptations of older persons and this suggests that RSV combined with exercise might provide a better approach for reversing sarcopenia than exercise alone. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for cellular reprogramming and targeted gene insertion in induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabundzija, Ivana; Wang, Jichang; Sebe, Attila; Erdei, Zsuzsanna; Kajdi, Robert; Devaraj, Anantharam; Steinemann, Doris; Szuhai, Károly; Stein, Ulrike; Cantz, Tobias; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Sarkadi, Balázs; Ivics, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of direct cell reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology opened up new avenues for the application of non-viral, transposon-based gene delivery systems. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is highly advanced for versatile genetic manipulations in mammalian cells. We established iPS cell reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human foreskin fibroblasts by transposition of OSKM (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc) and OSKML (OSKM + Lin28) expression cassettes mobilized by the SB100X hyperactive transposase. The efficiency of iPS cell derivation with SB transposon system was in the range of that obtained with retroviral vectors. Co-expression of the miRNA302/367 cluster together with OSKM significantly improved reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the temporal kinetics of reprogramming. The iPS cells displayed a stable karyotype, and hallmarks of pluripotency including expression of stem cell markers and the ability to differentiate into embryoid bodies in vitro. We demonstrate Cre recombinase-mediated exchange allowing simultaneous removal of the reprogramming cassette and targeted knock-in of an expression cassette of interest into the transposon-tagged locus in mouse iPS cells. This strategy would allow correction of a genetic defect by site-specific insertion of a therapeutic gene construct into ‘safe harbor’ sites in the genomes of autologous, patient-derived iPS cells. PMID:23275558

  7. Immunogenetic analysis of cellular interactions governing the recruitment of T lymphocytes and monocytes in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced immunopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, P.C.; Ceredig, R.; Allan, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Lyt2+ class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted virus-immune T cells that induce murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) are targeted onto radiation-resistant cells in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice. The use of appropriate bone marrow radiation chimeras as LCM virus-infected, (immunosuppressed recipients for immune T-cell transfer has established that, though bone marrow-derived cells can stimulate virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in spleen, they do not reconstitute the barrier to T-cell recruitment from blood to cerebrospinal fluid. This is true for chimeras made up to 8 months previously, even though the inflammatory monocytes and macrophages in such chimeras are all of donor bone marrow origin. Radiation-resistant cells in the spleens of these chimeras are also still able to further stimulate virus-immune CTL. There is no requirement for H-2 compatibility between virus-immune T lymphocytes and secondarily recruited monocytes, or T cells of an inappropriate specificity. The key event in LCM immunopathology may thus be localization of T cells to the antigen-presenting endothelium in brain, leading to the secretion of mediators that promote the nonspecific recruitment of monocytes and other T cells

  8. Investigation of quercetin-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis-associated cellular biophysical alterations by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Li, Baole; Tu, Lvying; Zhu, Haiyan; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Bai, Haihua; Cai, Huaihong; Cai, Jiye

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a wildly distributed bioflavonoid, has been proved to possess excellent antitumor activity on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, the biophysical properties of HepG2 cells were qualitatively and quantitatively determined using high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to understand the anticancer effects of quercetin on HCC cells at nanoscale. The results showed that quercetin could induce severe apoptosis in HepG2 cells through arrest of cell cycle and disruption of mitochondria membrane potential. Additionally, the nuclei and F-actin structures of HepG2 cells were destroyed by quercetin treatment as well. AFM morphological data showed some typical apoptotic characterization of HepG2 cells with increased particle size and roughness in the ultrastructure of cell surface upon quercetin treatment. As an important biophysical property of cells, the membrane stiffness of HepG2 cells was further quantified by AFM force measurements, which indicated that HepG2 cells became much stiffer after quercetin treatment. These results collectively suggest that quercetin can be served as a potential therapeutic agent for HCC, which not only extends our understanding of the anticancer effects of quercetin against HCC cells into nanoscale, but also highlights the applications of AFM for the investigation of anticancer drugs. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Curcumin and Its Analogue Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Have Additive Effects with Bortezomib in Cellular and Xenograft Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination therapy of bortezomib with other chemotherapeutics is an emerging treatment strategy. Since both curcumin and bortezomib inhibit NF-κB, we tested the effects of their combination on leukemia cells. To improve potency, a novel Mannich-type curcumin derivative, C-150, was synthesized. Curcumin and its analogue showed potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on the human leukemia cell line, HL60, with different potency but similar additive properties with bortezomib. Additive antiproliferative effects were correlated well with LPS-induced NF-κB inhibition results. Gene expression data on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes, obtained by high-throughput QPCR, showed that curcumin and its analogue act through similar signaling pathways. In correlation with in vitro results similar additive effect could be obsereved in SCID mice inoculated systemically with HL60 cells. C-150 in a liposomal formulation given intravenously in combination with bortezomib was more efficient than either of the drugs alone. As our novel curcumin analogue exerted anticancer effects in leukemic cells at submicromolar concentration in vitro and at 3 mg/kg dose in vivo, which was potentiated by bortezomib, it holds a great promise as a future therapeutic agent in the treatment of leukemia alone or in combination.

  10. MSCs ameliorates DPN induced cellular pathology via [Ca2+]ihomeostasis and scavenging the pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramoorthy, Harish C; Bin-Jaliah, Ismaeel; Karari, Hussian; Rajagopalan, Prasanna; Ahmed Shariff, Mohammed Eajaz; Al-Hakami, Ahmed; Al-Humayad, Suliman M; Baptain, Fawzi A; Ahmed, Humeda Suekit; Yassin, Hanaa Z; Haidara, Mohamed A

    2018-02-01

    The MSCs of various origins are known to ameliorate or modulate cell survival strategies. We investigated, whether UCB MSCs could improve the survival of the human neuronal cells and/or fibroblast assaulted with DPN sera. The results showed, the co-culture of UCB MSCs with human neuronal cells and/or fibroblasts could effectively scavenge the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-ɤ and IL - 12 and control the pro-apoptotic expression of p53/Bax. Further co-culture of UCB MSCs have shown to induce anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β and anti-apoptotic Bclxl/Bcl2 expression in the DPN sera stressed cells. Amelioration of elevated [Ca 2+ ] i and cROS, the portent behind the NFκB/Caspase-3 mediated inflammation in DPN rescued the cells from apoptosis. The results of systemic administration of BM MSCs improved DPN pathology in rat as extrapolated from human cell model. The BM MSCs ameliorated prolonged distal motor latency (control: 0.70 ± 0.06, DPN: 1.29 ± 0.13 m/s DPN + BM MSCs: 0.89 ± 0.02 m/s, p cytokine signaling and [Ca 2+ ] i homeostasis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Encina, Carolina A; Canales, Cesar P; Cao, Lei; Molina, Jessica; Kairath, Pamela; Young, Juan I; Walz, Katherina

    2010-08-25

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains.

  12. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1 mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona-Mora Paulina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1. Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains.

  13. Tribulus terrestris (Linn.) Attenuates Cellular Alterations Induced by Ischemia in H9c2 Cells Via Antioxidant Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshma, P L; Lekshmi, V S; Sankar, Vandana; Raghu, K G

    2015-06-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. was evaluated for its cardioprotective property against myocardial ischemia in a cell line model. Initially, methanolic extract was prepared and subjected to sequential extraction with various solvents. The extract with high phenolic content (T. terrestris L. ethyl acetate extract-TTME) was further characterized for its chemical constituents and taken forward for evaluation against cardiac ischemia. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of phenolic compounds like caffeic acid (12.41 ± 0.22 mg g(-1)), chlorogenic acid (0.52 ± 0.06 mg g(-1)) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (0.60 ± 0.08 mg g(-1)). H9c2 cells were pretreated with TTME (10, 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) for 24 h before the induction of ischemia. Then ischemia was induced by exposing cells to ischemia buffer, in a hypoxic chamber, maintained at 0.1% O2, 95% N2 and 5% CO2, for 1 h. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in reactive oxygen species generation (56%), superoxide production (18%), loss of plasma membrane integrity, dissipation of transmembrane potential, permeability transition pore opening and apoptosis had been observed during ischemia. However, pretreatment with TTME was found to significantly (p ≤ 0.05) attenuate the alterations caused by ischemia. The overall results of this study partially reveal the scientific basis of the use of T. terrestris L. in the traditional system of medicine for heart diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  15. Expression of R132H mutational IDH1 in human U87 glioblastoma cells affects the SREBP1a pathway and induces cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Cui, Gang; Chen, Ming; Xu, Qinian; Wang, Xiuyun; Zhou, Dai; Lv, Shengxiang; Fu, Linshan; Wang, Zhong; Zuo, Jianling

    2013-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a (SREBP1a) is a member of the SREBP family of transcription factors, which mainly controls homeostasis of lipids. SREBP1a can also activate the transcription of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) by binding to its promoter region. IDH1 mutations, especially R132H mutation of IDH1, are a common feature of a major subset of human gliomas. There are few data available on the relationship between mutational IDH1 expression and SREBP1a pathway. In this study, we investigated cellular effects and SREBP1a pathway alterations caused by R132H mutational IDH1 expression in U87 cells. Two glioma cell lines, stably expressing mutational (U87/R132H) or wild type (U87/wt) IDH1, were established. A cell line, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+) (U87/vector), was generated as a control. Click-iT EdU assay, sulforhodamine B assay, and wound healing assay respectively showed that the expression of R132H induced cellular proliferation, cell growth, and cell migration. Western blot revealed that SREBP1 was increased in U87/R132H compared with that in U87/wt. Elevated SREBP1a and several its target genes, but not SREBP1c, were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in U87/R132H. All these findings indicated that R132H mutational IDH1 is involved in the regulation of proliferation, growth, and migration of glioma cells. These effects may partially be mediated by SREBP1a pathway.

  16. Paraquat induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like cellular response resulting in fibrogenesis and the prevention of apoptosis in human pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yamada

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying delayed progressive pulmonary fibrosis, a characteristic of subacute paraquat (PQ poisoning. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT has been proposed as a cause of organ fibrosis, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is suggested to be a powerful mediator of EMT. We thus examined the possibility that EMT is involved in pulmonary fibrosis during PQ poisoning using A549 human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. The cells were treated with various concentrations of PQ (0-500 μM for 2-12 days. Short-term (2 days high-dose (>100 μM treatments with PQ induced cell death accompanied by the activation of caspase9 as well as a decrease in E-cadherin (an epithelial cell marker, suggesting apoptotic cell death with the features of anoikis (cell death due to the loss of cell-cell adhesion. In contrast, long-term (6-12 days low-dose (30 μM treatments with PQ resulted in a transformation into spindle-shaped mesenchymal-like cells with a decrease of E-cadherin as well as an increase of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. The mesenchymal-like cells also secreted the extracellular matrix (ECM protein fibronectin into the culture medium. The administration of a TGF-β1 receptor antagonist, SB431542, almost completely attenuated the mesenchymal transformation as well as fibronectin secretion, suggesting a crucial role of TGF-β1 in EMT-like cellular response and subsequent fibrogenesis. It is noteworthy that despite the suppression of EMT-fibrogenesis, apoptotic death was observed in cells treated with PQ+SB431542. EMT-like cellular response and subsequent fibrogenesis were also observed in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells exposed to PQ in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. Taken together, our experimental model reflects well the etiology of PQ poisoning in human and shows the involvement of EMT-like cellular response in both fibrogenesis and resistance to cell death during

  17. P2X7 Cell Death Receptor Activation and Mitochondrial Impairment in Oxaliplatin-Induced Apoptosis and Neuronal Injury: Cellular Mechanisms and In Vivo Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Massicot

    Full Text Available Limited information is available regarding the cellular mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced painful neuropathy during exposure of patients to this drug. We therefore determined oxidative stress in cultured cells and evaluated its occurrence in C57BL/6 mice. Using both cultured neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y and macrophage (RAW 264.7 cell lines and also brain tissues of oxaliplatin-treated mice, we investigated whether oxaliplatin (OXA induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. Cultured cells were treated with 2-200 µM OXA for 24 h. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative stress or inflammation (N-acetyl cysteine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen were also tested. Inhibitors were added 30 min before OXA treatment and then in combination with OXA for 24 h. In SH-SY5Y cells, OXA caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability, a large increase in ROS and NO production, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment as assessed by a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, which are deleterious for the cell. An increase in levels of negatively charged phospholipids such as cardiolipin but also phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, was also observed. Additionally, OXA caused concentration-dependent P2X7 receptor activation, increased chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation associated with TNF-α and IL-6 release. The majority of these toxic effects were equally observed in Raw 264.7 which also presented high levels of PGE2. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with pharmacological inhibitors significantly reduced or blocked all the neurotoxic OXA effects. In OXA-treated mice (28 mg/kg cumulated dose significant cold hyperalgesia and oxidative stress in the tested brain areas were shown. Our study suggests that targeting P2X7 receptor activation and mitochondrial impairment might be a potential therapeutic strategy against OXA-induced neuropathic pain.

  18. Influence of cellular ERalpha/ERbeta ratio on the ERalpha-agonist induced proliferation of human T47D breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoca, Ana M Covaleda; van den Berg, Hans; Vervoort, Jacques; van der Saag, Paul; Ström, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Rietjens, Ivonne; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-10-01

    Breast cancer cells show overexpression of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha relative to ERbeta compared to normal breast tissues. This observation has lead to the hypothesis that ERbeta may modulate the proliferative effect of ERalpha. This study investigated how variable cellular expression ratios of the ERalpha and ERbeta modulate the effects on cell proliferation induced by ERalpha or ERbeta agonists, respectively. Using human osteosarcoma (U2OS) ERalpha or ERbeta reporter cells, propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT) was shown to be a selective ERalpha and diarylpropionitrile (DPN) a preferential ERbeta modulator. The effects of these selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and of the model compound E2 on the proliferation of T47D human breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent expression of ERbeta (T47D-ERbeta) were characterized. E2-induced cell proliferation of cells in which ERbeta expression was inhibited was similar to that of the T47D wild-type cells, whereas this E2-induced cell proliferation was no longer observed when ERbeta expression in the T47D-ERbeta cells was increased. In the T47D-ERbeta cell line, DPN also appeared to be able to suppress cell proliferation when levels of ERbeta expression were high. In the T47D-ERbeta cell line, PPT was unable to suppress cell proliferation at all ratios of ERalpha/ERbeta expression, reflecting its ability to activate only ERalpha and not ERbeta. It is concluded that effects of estrogen-like compounds on cell proliferation are dependent on the actual ERalpha/ERbeta expression levels in these cells or tissues and the potential of the estrogen agonists to activate ERalpha and/or ERbeta.

  19. APE1 modulates cellular responses to organophosphate pesticide-induced oxidative damage in non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Shweta; Dhiman, Monisha; Mantha, Anil K

    2018-04-01

    Monocrotophos (MCP) and chlorpyrifos (CP) are widely used organophosphate pesticides (OPPs), speculated to be linked with human pathologies including cancer. Owing to the fact that lung cells are most vulnerable to the environmental toxins, the development and progression of lung cancer can be caused by the exposure of OPPs. The present study investigates the oxidative DNA damage response evoked by MCP and CP in human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells. A549 cells were exposed to MCP and CP; cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured to select the non-toxic dose. In order to establish whether MCP and CP can initiate the DNA repair and cell survival signalling pathways in A549 cells, qRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques were used to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of DNA base excision repair (BER)-pathway enzymes and transcription factors (TFs) involved in cell survival mechanisms. A significant increase in cell viability and ROS generation was observed when exposed to low and moderate doses of MCP and CP at different time points (24, 48 and 72 h) studied. A549 cells displayed a dose-dependent accumulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after 24 h exposure to MCP advocating for the activation of AP endonuclease-mediated DNA BER-pathway. Cellular responses to MCP- and CP-induced oxidative stress resulted in an imbalance in the mRNA and protein expression of BER-pathway enzymes, viz. PARP1, OGG1, APE1, XRCC1, DNA pol β and DNA ligase III α at different time points. The treatment of OPPs resulted in the upregulation of TFs, viz. Nrf2, c-jun, phospho-c-jun and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Immunofluorescent confocal imaging of A549 cells indicated that MCP and CP induces the translocation of APE1 within the cytoplasm at an early 6 h time point, whereas it promotes nuclear localization after 24 h of treatment, which suggests that APE1 subcellular distribution is dynamically regulated in response to

  20. Cellular reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technology was first established more than 50 years ago. It can rejuvenate somatic cells by erasing the epigenetic memories and reconstructing a new pluripotent order. The recent discovery reviewed here that induced pluripotency can be achieved by a small set of transcription factors has opened up unprecedented opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry, the clinic, and laboratories. This technology allows us to access pathological studies by using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In addition, iPS cells are also expected to be a rising star for regenerative medicine, as sources of transplantation therapy.

  1. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Ewert

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT. In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07, a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE, compound action potentials (CAP, and cochlear microphonics (CM. The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea.

  2. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Donald; Hu, Ning; Du, Xiaoping; Li, Wei; West, Matthew B; Choi, Chul-Hee; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard D

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT). In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), compound action potentials (CAP), and cochlear microphonics (CM). The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP) and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea.

  3. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  4. Cellular Metabolomics Revealed the Cytoprotection of Amentoflavone, a Natural Compound, in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Injury of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Yao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amentoflavone is one of the important bioactive flavonoids in the ethylacetate extract of “Cebaiye”, which is a blood cooling and hematostatic herb in traditional Chinese medicine. The previous work in our group has demonstrated that the ethylacetate extract of Cebaiye has a notable antagonistic effect on the injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The present investigation was designed to assess the effects and possible mechanism of cytoprotection of amentoflavone via metabolomics. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOF-MS coupled with multivariate data analysis was used to characterize the variations in the metabolites of HUVECs in response to exposure to LPS and amentoflavone treatment. Seven putative metabolites (glycine, argininosuccinic acid, putrescine, ornithine, spermidine, 5-oxoproline and dihydrouracil were discovered in cells incubated with LPS and/or amentoflavone. Functional pathway analysis uncovered that the changes of these metabolites related to various significant metabolic pathways (glutathione metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, β-alanine metabolism and glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, which may explain the potential cytoprotection function of amentoflavone. These findings also demonstrate that cellular metabolomics through UPLC/QTOF-MS is a powerful tool for detecting variations in a range of intracellular compounds upon toxin and/or drug exposure.

  5. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  6. The right choice of antihypertensives protects primary human hepatocytes from ethanol- and recombinant human TGF-β1-induced cellular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehnert S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Ehnert,1 Teresa Lukoschek,2 Anastasia Bachmann,2 Juan J Martínez Sánchez,1 Georg Damm,3 Natascha C Nussler,4 Stefan Pscherer,5 Ulrich Stöckle,1 Steven Dooley,2 Sebastian Mueller,6 Andreas K Nussler11Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, BG Trauma Center, Tübingen, Germany; 2Mol Hepatology - Alcohol Associated Diseases, Department of Medicine II, Medical Faculty, Mannheim, Germany; 3Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 4Clinic for General, Visceral, Endocrine Surgery and Coloproctology, Clinic Neuperlach, Städtisches Klinikum München GmbH, Munich, Germany; 5Department of Diabetology, Klinikum Traunstein, Kliniken Südostbayern AG, Traunstein, Germany; 6Department of Medicine, Salem Medical Center, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Heidelberg, GermanyBackground: Patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD often suffer from high blood pressure and rely on antihypertensive treatment. Certain antihypertensives may influence progression of chronic liver disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the commonly used antihypertensives amlodipine, captopril, furosemide, metoprolol, propranolol, and spironolactone on alcohol-induced damage toward human hepatocytes (hHeps.Methods: hHeps were isolated by collagenase perfusion. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured by fluorescence-based assays. Cellular damage was determined by lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH-leakage. Expression analysis was performed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β signaling was investigated by a Smad3/4-responsive luciferase-reporter assay.Results: Ethanol and TGF-β1 rapidly increased ROS in hHeps, causing a release of 40%–60% of total LDH after 72 hours. All antihypertensives dose dependently reduced ethanol-mediated oxidative stress and cellular damage. Similar results were observed for TGF-β1-dependent

  7. HIVIS-DNA or HIVISopt-DNA priming followed by CMDR vaccinia-based boosts induce both humoral and cellular murine immune responses to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkula, J; Petkov, S; Ljungberg, K; Hallengärd, D; Bråve, A; Isaguliants, M; Falkeborn, T; Sharma, S; Liakina, V; Robb, M; Eller, M; Moss, B; Biberfeld, G; Sandström, E; Nilsson, C; Markland, K; Blomberg, P; Wahren, B

    2017-06-01

    In order to develop a more effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine it is important optimize the components, improve Envelope glycoprotein immunogenicity as well as to explore prime-boost immunization schedules. It is also valuable to include several HIV-1 subtype antigens representing the world-wide epidemic. HIVIS-DNA plasmids which include Env genes of subtypes A, B and C together with Gag subtypes A and B and RTmut/Rev of subtype B were modified as follows: the Envelope sequences were shortened, codon optimized, provided with an FT4 sequence and an immunodominant region mutated. The reverse transcriptase (RT) gene was shortened to contain the most immunogenic N-terminal fragment and fused with an inactivated viral protease vPR gene. HIVISopt-DNA thus contains fewer plasmids but additional PR epitopes compared to the native HIVIS-DNA. DNA components were delivered intradermally to young Balb/c mice once, using a needle-free Biojector® immediately followed by dermal electroporation. Vaccinia-based MVA-CMDR boosts including Env gene E and Gag-RT genes A were delivered intramuscularly by needle, once or twice. Both HIVIS-DNA and HIVISopt-DNA primed humoral and cell mediated responses well. When boosted with heterologous MVA-CMDR (subtypes A and E) virus inhibitory neutralizing antibodies were obtained to HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and AE. Both plasmid compositions boosted with MVA-CMDR generated HIV-1 specific cellular responses directed against HIV-1 Env, Gag and Pol, as measured by IFNγ ELISpot. It was shown that DNA priming augmented the vector MVA immunological boosting effects, the HIVISopt-DNA with a trend to improved (Env) neutralization, the HIVIS-DNA with a trend to better (Gag) cell mediated immune reponses. HIVIS-DNA was modified to obtain HIVISopt-DNA that had fewer plasmids, and additional epitopes. Even with one DNA prime followed by two MVA-CMDR boosts, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were readily induced by priming with either DNA construct

  8. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Perez, M.R. Del; Michelin, S.C.; Gisone, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  9. Weight loss-induced cellular stress in subcutaneous adipose tissue and the risk for weight regain in overweight and obese adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roumans, N.J.T.; Vink, R.G.; Bouwman, F.G.; Fazelzadeh, P.; Baak, van M.A.; Mariman, E.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective: Weight loss is often followed by weight regain after the dietary intervention (DI). Cellular stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese individuals. However, the relation between cellular stress and weight regain is unclear. Previously, we observed increased adipose

  10. CX3CL1 (fractalkine and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Tomas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukeyprimes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain

  11. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events.

  12. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, S.-H.; Chen, S.-J.; Peng, C-H.; Chang, Y.-L.; Ku, H.-H.; Hsu, W.-M.; Ho, Larry L.-T.; Lee, C.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 μM fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression

  13. Evaluation of cellular viability by quantitative autoradiographic study of myocardial uptake of a fatty acid analogue in isoproterenol-induced focal rat heart necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, T.; Luu-Duc, C.; Comet, M.; Demenge, P.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies led us to hypothesize that a fatty acid analogue, 15-p-iodophenyl-β-methyl pentadecanoic acid (IMPPA or BMIPP), which is taken up but not quickly metabolized by heart cells, would be a more suitable tracer of cellular viability that 201 Tl. Biodistribution studies of 1- 14 C-IMPPA in conscious, freely moving rats showed that the concentration ratio of radioactivity in the heart with respect to the blood was about 8 for at least 60 min after intravenous administration, permitting its use as a putative tracer in these conscious, freely moving rats. Thereafter, the myocardial uptake of 14 C-IMPPA was studied in isoproterenol-treated rats (daily treatment for 10 days in order to induce cardiac hypertrophy and necrotic foci) with respect to control ones. Comparison of myocardial localizations by quantitative autoradiography of the uptake of 201 Tl and 14 C-IMPPA with that of triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining enabled comparative evaluation of nutritional blood flow, localization and uptake of 14 C-IMPPA and necrotic foci size. Distributions of 14 C-IMPPA and 201 Tl in control rats' hearts were homogenous, like TTC staining. In infarcted hearts, areas of decreased 14 C-IMPPA uptake were nearly the same (100%±5%) as those unstained by TTC. These areas were larger than those showing a decrease in thallium uptake (about 70%±5% of the total scar size). Therefore, IMPPA seems to be a more accurate and sensitive indicator of necrosis localization compared with thallium. It may be a useful agent for assessment of myocardial viability by single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. (orig.)

  14. T cells' immunological synapses induce polarization of brain astrocytes in vivo and in vitro: a novel astrocyte response mechanism to cellular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Carlos; Sanderson, Nicholas S R; Barrett, Robert J; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Kroeger, Kurt M; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2008-08-20

    Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown. Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes. Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1, HSV-1 or LCMV infection), anti

  15. T cells' immunological synapses induce polarization of brain astrocytes in vivo and in vitro: a novel astrocyte response mechanism to cellular injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barcia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown.Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes.Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1, HSV-1 or LCMV

  16. Epitope-based vaccines with the Anaplasma marginale MSP1a functional motif induce a balanced humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Santos

    Full Text Available Bovine anaplasmosis is a hemoparasitic disease that causes considerable economic loss to the dairy and beef industries. Cattle immunized with the Anaplasma marginale MSP1 outer membrane protein complex presents a protective humoral immune response; however, its efficacy is variable. Immunodominant epitopes seem to be a key-limiting factor for the adaptive immunity. We have successfully demonstrated that critical motifs of the MSP1a functional epitope are essential for antibody recognition of infected animal sera, but its protective immunity is yet to be tested. We have evaluated two synthetic vaccine formulations against A. marginale, using epitope-based approach in mice. Mice infection with bovine anaplasmosis was demonstrated by qPCR analysis of erythrocytes after 15-day exposure. A proof-of-concept was obtained in this murine model, in which peptides conjugated to bovine serum albumin were used for immunization in three 15-day intervals by intraperitoneal injections before challenging with live bacteria. Blood samples were analyzed for the presence of specific IgG2a and IgG1 antibodies, as well as for the rickettsemia analysis. A panel containing the cytokines' transcriptional profile for innate and adaptive immune responses was carried out through qPCR. Immunized BALB/c mice challenged with A. marginale presented stable body weight, reduced number of infected erythrocytes, and no mortality; and among control groups mortality rates ranged from 15% to 29%. Additionally, vaccines have significantly induced higher IgG2a than IgG1 response, followed by increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This is a successful demonstration of epitope-based vaccines, and protection against anaplasmosis may be associated with elicitation of effector functions of humoral and cellular immune responses in murine model.

  17. Proteomic characterization of an isolated fraction of synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells might offer clues to aggresomes as a cellular defensive response against proteasome inhibition by PSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing'an

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cooperation of constituents of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS with chaperone proteins in degrading proteins mediate a wide range of cellular processes, such as synaptic function and neurotransmission, gene transcription, protein trafficking, mitochondrial function and metabolism, antioxidant defence mechanisms, and apoptotic signal transduction. It is supposed that constituents of the UPS and chaperone proteins are recruited into aggresomes where aberrant and potentially cytotoxic proteins may be sequestered in an inactive form. Results To determinate the proteomic pattern of synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells after proteasome inhibition by PSI, we analyzed a fraction of PSI-induced inclusions. A proteomic feature of the isolated fraction was characterized by identification of fifty six proteins including twenty previously reported protein components of Lewy bodies, twenty eight newly identified proteins and eight unknown proteins. These proteins, most of which were recognized as a profile of proteins within cellular processes mediated by the UPS, a profile of constituents of the UPS and a profile of chaperone proteins, are classed into at least nine accepted categories. In addition, prolyl-4-hydroxylase beta polypeptide, an endoplasmic reticulum member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, was validated in the developmental process of PSI-induced inclusions in the cells. Conclusions It is speculated that proteomic characterization of an isolated fraction of PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells might offer clues to appearance of aggresomes serving as a cellular defensive response against proteasome inhibition.

  18. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens introduced to dendritic cells (DCs) generated in vitro. This may in part result from suboptimal maturation of DCs leading to insufficient production of IL-12, a key driver of cellular immunity. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been put into the design of maturation cocktails that are able...... of tolerogenic molecules and activation-induced dendritic cell death should be avoided. Thus, compounds such as IFN-γ may initially induce immunity but later on tolerance. Maturation with PGE(2) obviously promotes migration via expression of CCR7 but on the down side PGE(2) limits the production of IL-12...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  19. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  20. Deletion of mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreased cellular and mitochondrial ATP levels under non-nutritional conditions and induced a respiration-deficient cell-type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y M; Miyazawa, K; Yamaguchi, K; Nowaki, K; Iwatsuki, H; Wakamatsu, Y; Ichikawa, N; Hashimoto, T

    2001-12-01

    T(1), a mutant yeast lacking three regulatory proteins of F(1)F(o)ATPase, namely ATPase inhibitor, 9K protein and 15K protein, grew on non-fermentable carbon source at the same rate as normal cells but was less viable when incubated in water. During the incubation, the cellular ATP content decreased rapidly in the T(1) cells but not in normal cells, and respiration-deficient cells appeared among the T(1) cells. The same mutation was also induced in D26 cells lacking only the ATPase inhibitor. Overexpression of the ATPase inhibitor in YC63 cells, which were derived from the D26 strain harboring an expression vector containing the gene of the ATPase inhibitor, prevented the decrease of cellular ATP level and the mutation. Isolated T(1) mitochondria exhibited ATP hydrolysis for maintenance of membrane potential when antimycin A was added to the mitochondrial suspension, while normal and YC63 mitochondria continued to show low hydrolytic activity and low membrane potential. Thus, it is likely that deletion of the ATPase inhibitor induces ATPase activity of F(1)F(o)ATPase to create a dispensable membrane potential under the non-nutritional conditions and that this depletes mitochondrial and cellular ATP. The depletion of mitochondrial ATP in turn leads to occurrence of aberrant DNA in mitochondria.

  1. Auxin and Cellular Elongation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  2. Influence of cellular ER alpha/ER beta ratio on the ER alpha-agonist induced proliferation of human T47D breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotoca Covaleda, A.M.; Berg, van den H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Saag, van der P.; Strom, A.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer cells show overexpression of estrogen receptor (ER) relative to ERß compared to normal breast tissues. This observation has lead to the hypothesis that ERß may modulate the proliferative effect of ER. This study investigated how variable cellular expression ratios of the ER and ERß

  3. Reflections Lederberg and the 'Cellularity' of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    He tried to observe bacterial mating and the details of conjugation at the cellular level [3]. (reproduced in the Classics section), processes that are still being investigated [4]. He made the important discovery that penicillin induces the formation of spheroplasts. The announcing. Lederberg and the 'Cellularity' of Bacteria.

  4. Study of apoptotic mechanisms induced by all-trans retinoic acid and its 13-cis isomer on cellular lines of human hepato carcinoma Hep3B and HepG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce Vargas, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Two cellular lines of liver cancer (Hep3B and HepG2) were incubated during different periods of time with some concentrations of two retinoic acid isomers (ATRA and 13-cis AR) and with 5-fu chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and paclitaxel. It was determined if these substances leaded cytotoxicity, apoptosis and if they modified the expression of different genes related to cellular death by apoptosis, in order to explain the hepatocellular carcinoma resistance to these drugs. HepG2 cells showed more resistance than Hep3B cells to 72 hours of treatment, as much ATRA as the 13-cis AR were toxic and produced apoptosis in two cellular lines. This type of cellular death seems to be mediated by a decrease in Bcl-xL concentration in Hep3B cells treated with both retinoids an increase in bax concentration in HepG2 cells treated with 13-cis AR. It were observed 3 and 8 proteolysis of procaspase in Hep3B cells, suggesting extrinsic via activation of the apoptosis, while cellular death in HepG2 cells seems to be independent of caspases. Cisplatin and paclitaxel leaded cytotoxicity to 48 hours of treatment, with significant differences between two cellular lines only in case of paclitaxel. Hep3B cells treated with cisplatin and HepG2 cells treated with paclytaxel suffered apoptosis. 5-FU produced toxicity only when it was used to high concentrations and the mechanism of cellular death induced by this agent seems to be primarily necrosis in Hep3B cells and apoptosis in HepG2. There was decrease in the Bcl-xL concentration in two cellular lines when it was treated with cisplatin and in HepG2 cells treated with 5-FU. Bax concentration there no was modified with no treatment. Activation of the 3 caspases seems to happen only in HepG2 cells with 5-FU and paclytaxel. These two agents, also, decreased the survivin concentration of HepG2 cells. Treatments of the three drugs produced an increase in the expression of this gen in Hep3B cells, which might explain partially the resistance

  5. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  6. Rat testicular impairment induced by electromagnetic radiation from a conventional cellular telephone and the protective effects of the antioxidants vitamins C and E

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Damegh, Mona Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of electromagnetic radiation from conventional cellular phone use on the oxidant and antioxidant status in rat blood and testicular tissue and determine the possible protective role of vitamins C and E in preventing the detrimental effects of electromagnetic radiation on the testes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The treatment groups were exposed to an electromagnetic field, electromagnetic field plus vitamin C (40 mg/kg/day) or...

  7. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  8. Flat Cellular (UMTS) Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Samuel, L.G.; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, P.; Rittenhouse, G.

    Traditionally, cellular systems have been built in a hierarchical manner: many specialized cellular access network elements that collectively form a hierarchical cellular system. When 2G and later 3G systems were designed there was a good reason to make system hierarchical: from a cost-perspective

  9. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  10. SM22α-induced activation of p16INK4a/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of γ-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan; Paik, Sang Gi; Cho, Eun Wie; Kim, In Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of γ-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. → SM22α overexpression elevates p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. → SM22α-induced MT-1G activates p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22α) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22α overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22α overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of γ-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 μg/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21 WAF1/Cip1 induction or p16 INK4a /retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22α overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22α modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22α are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  11. Small airway epithelial cells exposure to printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles induces cellular effects on human microvascular endothelial cells in an alveolar-capillary co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisler, Jennifer D; Pirela, Sandra V; Friend, Sherri; Farcas, Mariana; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Shvedova, Anna; Castranova, Vincent; Demokritou, Philip; Qian, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The printer is one of the most common office equipment. Recently, it was reported that toner formulations for printing equipment constitute nano-enabled products (NEPs) and contain engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) that become airborne during printing. To date, insufficient research has been performed to understand the potential toxicological properties of printer-emitted particles (PEPs) with several studies using bulk toner particles as test particles. These studies demonstrated the ability of toner particles to cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in animal models. However, the toxicological implications of inhalation exposures to ENMs emitted from laser printing equipment remain largely unknown. The present study investigates the toxicological effects of PEPs using an in vitro alveolar-capillary co-culture model with Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells (SAEC) and Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMVEC). Our data demonstrate that direct exposure of SAEC to low concentrations of PEPs (0.5 and 1.0 µg/mL) caused morphological changes of actin remodeling and gap formations within the endothelial monolayer. Furthermore, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and angiogenesis were observed in the HMVEC. Analysis of cytokine and chemokine levels demonstrates that interleukin (IL)-6 and MCP-1 may play a major role in the cellular communication observed between SAEC and HMVEC and the resultant responses in HMVEC. These data indicate that PEPs at low, non-cytotoxic exposure levels are bioactive and affect cellular responses in an alveolar-capillary co-culture model, which raises concerns for potential adverse health effects.

  12. Biochanin-A antagonizes the interleukin-1β-induced catabolic inflammation through the modulation of NFκB cellular signaling in primary rat chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ji-Su [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok [Department of Dental Bioengineering, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); You, Jae-Seek [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Sang-Joun [Department of Periodontology, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyeong-Je [Department of Prosthodontics, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yo-Seob [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung [Pre-Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Gwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young-Woo [Korea Basic Science Institute, Gwangju Center, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Hee-Jeong [Department of Biochemistry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, 60612 (United States); Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: js_kim@chosun.ac.kr [Pre-Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-02

    Biochanin-A, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, protected from the IL-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans through the suppression of matrix degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, MMP-1, and ADAMTS-5 in primary rat chondrocytes and the knee articular cartilage. It also suppressed the expression of IL-1β-induced catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase 2, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, and inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, biochanin-A suppressed the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NFκB, and inhibited its nuclear translocation in primary rat chondrocytes. These results indicate that biochanin-A antagonizes the IL-1β-induced catabolic effects through its anti-inflammatory activity that involves the modulation of NFκB signaling. - Highlights: • Biochanin-A is a phytoestrogen derived from medicinal plants. • It suppressed the IL-1β-induced matrix degrading enzymes and catabolic factors. • It inhibited IL-1β-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrocytes and cartilage tissues. • Its anti-catabolic effects were mediated by modulation of NFκB signaling. • It may be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  13. The proximal pathway of metabolism of the chlorinated signal molecule differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) in the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Morandini, P; Offer, J; Traynor, D; Nayler, O; Neuhaus, D; Taylor, G W; Kay, R R

    1995-01-01

    Stalk cell differentiation during development of the slime mould Dictyostelium is induced by a chlorinated alkyl phenone called differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1). Inactivation of DIF-1 is likely to be a key element in the DIF-1 signalling system, and we have shown previously that this is accomplished by a dedicated metabolic pathway involving up to 12 unidentified metabolites. We report here the structure of the first four metabolites produced from DIF-1, as deduced by m.s., n.m.r. an...

  14. Cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells induced by a plant lignan, arctigenin: evaluation of cellular DNA content using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Hee Ju; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Jho, Eun Hye; Kim, Chul Young; Kim, Minkyun; Nho, Chu Won

    2011-08-01

    Arctigenin is a natural plant lignan previously shown to induce G(2)/M arrest in SW480 human colon cancer cells as well as AGS human gastric cancer cells, suggesting its use as a possible cancer chemopreventive agent. Changes in cell and nuclear size often correlate with the functionality of cancer-treating agents. Here, we report that arctigenin induces cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells. Arctigenin clearly induced the formation of giant nuclear shapes in SW480, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopic observation and quantitative determination of nuclear size. Cell and nuclear size were further assessed by flow cytometric analysis of light scattering and fluorescence pulse width after propidium iodide staining. FSC-H and FL2-W values (parameters referring to cell and nuclear size, respectively) significantly increased after arctigenin treatment; the mean values of FSC-H and FL2-W in arctigenin-treated SW480 cells were 572.6 and 275.1, respectively, whereas those of control cells were 482.0 and 220.7, respectively. Our approach may provide insights into the mechanism behind phytochemical-induced cell and nuclear enlargement as well as functional studies on cancer-treating agents.

  15. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Methods Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. Results HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3

  16. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  17. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  18. Rat testicular impairment induced by electromagnetic radiation from a conventional cellular telephone and the protective effects of the antioxidants vitamins C and E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Abdullah Al-Damegh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of electromagnetic radiation from conventional cellular phone use on the oxidant and antioxidant status in rat blood and testicular tissue and determine the possible protective role of vitamins C and E in preventing the detrimental effects of electromagnetic radiation on the testes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The treatment groups were exposed to an electromagnetic field, electromagnetic field plus vitamin C (40 mg/kg/day or electromagnetic field plus vitamin E (2.7 mg/kg/day. All groups were exposed to the same electromagnetic frequency for 15, 30, and 60 min daily for two weeks. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules with a disorganized seminiferous tubule sperm cycle interruption in the electromagnetism-exposed group. The serum and testicular tissue conjugated diene, lipid hydroperoxide, and catalase activities increased 3-fold, whereas the total serum and testicular tissue glutathione and glutathione peroxidase levels decreased 3-5 fold in the electromagnetism-exposed animals. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that the adverse effect of the generated electromagnetic frequency had a negative impact on testicular architecture and enzymatic activity. This finding also indicated the possible role of vitamins C and E in mitigating the oxidative stress imposed on the testes and restoring normality to the testes.

  19. Rat testicular impairment induced by electromagnetic radiation from a conventional cellular telephone and the protective effects of the antioxidants vitamins C and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Damegh, Mona Abdullah

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of electromagnetic radiation from conventional cellular phone use on the oxidant and antioxidant status in rat blood and testicular tissue and determine the possible protective role of vitamins C and E in preventing the detrimental effects of electromagnetic radiation on the testes. The treatment groups were exposed to an electromagnetic field, electromagnetic field plus vitamin C (40 mg/kg/day) or electromagnetic field plus vitamin E (2.7 mg/kg/day). All groups were exposed to the same electromagnetic frequency for 15, 30, and 60 min daily for two weeks. There was a significant increase in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules with a disorganized seminiferous tubule sperm cycle interruption in the electromagnetism-exposed group. The serum and testicular tissue conjugated diene, lipid hydroperoxide, and catalase activities increased 3-fold, whereas the total serum and testicular tissue glutathione and glutathione peroxidase levels decreased 3-5 fold in the electromagnetism-exposed animals. Our results indicate that the adverse effect of the generated electromagnetic frequency had a negative impact on testicular architecture and enzymatic activity. This finding also indicated the possible role of vitamins C and E in mitigating the oxidative stress imposed on the testes and restoring normality to the testes.

  20. Measurement of the intra and extra cellular 8-OHdG induced by heavy-ion irradiation in human glioblastoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, Takashi; Anzai, Kazunori; Ikota, Nobuo; Ando, Koichi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Tsuboi, Koji

    2004-01-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the oxidative DNA damage caused by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, the levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the extracted cellular DNA as well as in the cell culture media were measured before and after irradiation. Glioblastoma cells (U87MG) were suspended in the culture media at a concentration of 5.0 x 10 6 cells/ml. They were irradiated with 0-400 Gy of X-ray or 0-300 Gy of 290 MeV/u carbon beams with LET's of 20, 40 and 80 keV/μm. The 8-OHdG levels in the extracted DNA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an electrochemical detector (ECD), and those in the culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Although the levels of 8-OHdG in the extracted DNA increased dose-dependently after X-ray or carbon-ion irradiation, there was no such correlation in the culture media. The levels of 8-OHdG in the DNA extracted 15 and 30 minutes after irradiation were significantly low, which was supposed to be due to self-repair process on the oxidative damage. (author)

  1. FTIR spectroscopic evaluation of changes in the cellular biochemical composition of the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata induced by extracts of some Greek medicinal and aromatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotti, Efstathia; Kountouri, Sophia; Bouchagier, Pavlos; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I.; Polissiou, Moschos; Tarantilis, Petros A.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the biological activity of aquatic extracts of selected Greek medicinal and aromatic plants to the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata was investigated. Lamiaceae species (Hyssopus officinalis L., Melissa officinalis L., Origanum dictamnus L., Origanum vulgare L. and Salvia officinalis L.) were found to enhance significantly the mycelium growth whereas Crocus sativus appears to inhibit it slightly. M. officinalis and S. officinalis caused the highest stimulation in mycelium growth (+97%) and conidia production (+65%) respectively. In order to further investigate the bioactivity of plant extracts to A. alternata, we employed Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Differences of original spectra were assigned mainly to amides of proteins. The second derivative transformation of spectra revealed changes in spectral regions corresponding to absorptions of the major cellular constituents such as cell membrane and proteins. Principal component analysis of the second derivative transformed spectra confirmed that fatty acids of the cell membranes, amides of proteins and polysaccharides of the cell wall had the major contribution to data variation. FTIR band area ratios were found to correlate with fungal mycelium growth.

  2. Towards a validation of a cellular biomarker suite in native and transplanted zebra mussels: A 2-year integrative field study of seasonal and pollution-induced variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerlet, Edwige [Laboratoire Ecotoxicite, Sante Environnementale, CNRS UMR 7146, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Rue General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Ledy, Karine [Laboratoire Ecotoxicite, Sante Environnementale, CNRS UMR 7146, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Rue General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Meyer, Antoinette [Laboratoire Ecotoxicite, Sante Environnementale, CNRS UMR 7146, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Rue General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Giamberini, Laure [Laboratoire Ecotoxicite, Sante Environnementale, CNRS UMR 7146, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Rue General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France)]. E-mail: giamb@univ-metz.fr

    2007-03-30

    Two of the questions raised in the validation process of biomarkers are their relevance in the identification and discrimination of environmental perturbations, and the influence of seasonal factors on these biological endpoints. Determining the advantages and restrictions associated with the use of native or transplanted animals and comparing their responses is also needed. To obtain this information, a 2-year integrative field study was conducted in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant in northeastern France. A station was located in the reservoir receiving the cooling waters of the plant, and two other sites were studied 2 km upstream and 5 km downstream from the reservoir's discharge in the Moselle river. Elevated temperatures, copper contamination and a 1.4-fold-concentration factor of dissolved salts affected water quality of the reservoir. Native and transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected monthly and their digestive glands were processed for histochemical determinations of the lysosomal and peroxisomal systems and of the lipofuscin and neutral lipid contents. The responses were quantified using automated image analysis and stereology. Apart from neutral lipid contents, there were no systematic seasonal patterns in mussel populations or from 1 year to another. Principal Component Analyses showed a general higher discrimination potential of biological responses in transplanted organisms compared to native ones. They also pointed out the relationships between the cellular and physiological markers and abiotic factors. The present multiple biomarker integrative approach in transplanted D. polymorpha brings promising elements in their validation process as relevant biomonitoring tools.

  3. Towards a validation of a cellular biomarker suite in native and transplanted zebra mussels: A 2-year integrative field study of seasonal and pollution-induced variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerlet, Edwige; Ledy, Karine; Meyer, Antoinette; Giamberini, Laure

    2007-01-01

    Two of the questions raised in the validation process of biomarkers are their relevance in the identification and discrimination of environmental perturbations, and the influence of seasonal factors on these biological endpoints. Determining the advantages and restrictions associated with the use of native or transplanted animals and comparing their responses is also needed. To obtain this information, a 2-year integrative field study was conducted in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant in northeastern France. A station was located in the reservoir receiving the cooling waters of the plant, and two other sites were studied 2 km upstream and 5 km downstream from the reservoir's discharge in the Moselle river. Elevated temperatures, copper contamination and a 1.4-fold-concentration factor of dissolved salts affected water quality of the reservoir. Native and transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected monthly and their digestive glands were processed for histochemical determinations of the lysosomal and peroxisomal systems and of the lipofuscin and neutral lipid contents. The responses were quantified using automated image analysis and stereology. Apart from neutral lipid contents, there were no systematic seasonal patterns in mussel populations or from 1 year to another. Principal Component Analyses showed a general higher discrimination potential of biological responses in transplanted organisms compared to native ones. They also pointed out the relationships between the cellular and physiological markers and abiotic factors. The present multiple biomarker integrative approach in transplanted D. polymorpha brings promising elements in their validation process as relevant biomonitoring tools

  4. Exosomal Proteome Profiling: A Potential Multi-Marker Cellular Phenotyping Tool to Characterize Hypoxia-Induced Radiation Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani N. Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and drug resistance are significant challenges in the treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that contribute to mortality. Clinically, radiotherapy requires oxygen to generate cytotoxic free radicals that cause DNA damage and allow that damage to become fixed in the genome rather than repaired. However, approximately 40% of all breast cancers have hypoxic tumor microenvironments that render cancer cells significantly more resistant to irradiation. Hypoxic stimuli trigger changes in the cell death/survival pathway that lead to increased cellular radiation resistance. As a result, the development of noninvasive strategies to assess tumor hypoxia in breast cancer has recently received considerable attention. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have roles in paracrine signaling during breast tumor progression, including tumor-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and immunosuppression. The recent development of protocols to isolate and purify exosomes, as well as advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have facilitated the comprehensive analysis of exosome content and function. Using these tools, studies have demonstrated that the proteome profiles of tumor-derived exosomes are indicative of the oxygenation status of patient tumors. They have also demonstrated that exosome signaling pathways are potentially targetable drivers of hypoxia-dependent intercellular signaling during tumorigenesis. This article provides an overview of how proteomic tools can be effectively used to characterize exosomes and elucidate fundamental signaling pathways and survival mechanisms underlying hypoxia-mediated radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Apoptosis in Lymphoblastoid T-Cell-Line-Expressing Wild-Type and Mutated CD4 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutouh, Laure; Estaquier, Jérôme; Richman, Douglas D.; Corbeil, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the presence of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail is critical for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced apoptosis (J. Corbeil, M. Tremblay, and D. D. Richman, J. Exp. Med. 183:39–48, 1996). We have pursued our investigation of the role of the CD4 transduction pathway in HIV-induced apoptosis. To do this, wild-type and mutant forms of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail were stably expressed in the lymphoblastoid T-cell line A2.01. Apoptosis was prevented when CD4 truncated at residue 402 was expressed; however, cells expressing mutated receptors that do not associate with p56lck (mutated at the dicysteine motif and truncated at residue 418) but which conserved proximal domains of the cytoplasmic tail underwent apoptosis like wild-type CD4. The differences between wild-type and mutated receptors in the induction of apoptosis were not related to levels of p56lck or NF-κB activation. Initial signaling through the CD4 receptor played a major role in the sensitization of HIV-infected T cells to undergo apoptosis. Incubation of HIV-infected cells with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, which binds to CD4 in a region critical for dimerization of the receptor, prevented apoptosis without inhibiting HIV replication. Moreover, the apoptotic process was not related to Fas-Fas ligand interaction; however, an antagonistic anti-Fas MAb (ZB-4) enhanced apoptosis in HIV-infected cells without inducing apoptosis in uninfected cells. These observations demonstrate that CD4 signaling mediates HIV-induced apoptosis by a mechanism independent of Fas-Fas ligand interaction, does not require p56lck signaling, and may involve a critical region for CD4 dimerization. PMID:9733846

  6. The Fruits of Wampee Inhibit H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in PC12 Cells via the NF-κB Pathway and Regulation of Cellular Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Zeng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wampee (Clausena lansium fruits (CLS, whose pulp can be used to prepare fruit cups, desserts, jam, or jelly, can be eaten along with the peel. In this study, a PC12 cell model was built to observe the protective effect of CLS against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. We found that pretreatment with CLS increased cell viability and inhibited cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activity and DNA condensation. CLS also attenuated the increase in ROS production and MMP reduction. Moreover, we attempted to determine whether CLS suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. Western blot and immunostaining assay revealed that CLS inhibited H2O2-induced up-regulation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65. And CLS significantly suppressed the translocation of NF-κB p65 and pNF-κB p65 from cytoplasm to nuclear. Also, seven major compounds including a new flavanoid, luteolin-4'-O-β-d-gluco-pyranoside (3 and six known compounds 1,2, 4–7 were isolated and identified from CLS. Their antioxidative and H2O2-induced PC12 cell apoptosis-reversing activity were determined. These findings suggest that CLS and its major constituents (flavanoids may be potential antioxidant agents and should encourage further research into their use as a functional food for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Effect of radiomodifying agents on the ratios of X-ray-induced lesions in cellular DNA: use in lethal lesion determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of three radiomodifying agents, cysteamine, hyperthermia, and hypoxia, on the induction of the major classes of X-ray-induced DNA lesions, was studied using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells. The use of filter elution techniques allowed most of these studies to be conducted at X-ray doses within the survival-curve range. Cysteamine was found to protect against DNA single-strand breakage (ssb), DNA base damage, and DNA-protein crosslinkage. Hyperthermia had no effect on the level of DNA ssb or DNA base damage, but in L cells (but not in V79 cells) it increased the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. Hypoxia protected against DNA ssb, had no significant effect on the level of DNA base damage, and enhanced the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. These results support the previous suggestion that the X-ray-induced lethal lesion is DNA double-strand breakage. Implications of these findings for the mechanisms of formation of X-ray-induced DNA lesions are also discussed. (author)

  8. Cellular Adjuvant Properties, Direct Cytotoxicity of Re-differentiated Vα24 Invariant NKT-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Kitayama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vα24 invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes implicated in the regulation of broad immune responses. They recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d on antigen-presenting cells and induce both innate and adaptive immune responses, which enhance effective immunity against cancer. Conversely, reduced iNKT cell numbers and function have been observed in many patients with cancer. To recover these numbers, we reprogrammed human iNKT cells to pluripotency and then re-differentiated them into regenerated iNKT cells in vitro through an IL-7/IL-15-based optimized cytokine combination. The re-differentiated iNKT cells showed proliferation and IFN-γ production in response to α-galactosylceramide, induced dendritic cell maturation and downstream activation of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells, and exhibited NKG2D- and DNAM-1-mediated NK cell-like cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. The immunological features of re-differentiated iNKT cells and their unlimited availability from induced pluripotent stem cells offer a potentially effective immunotherapy against cancer.

  9. Linearizable cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobe, Atsushi; Yura, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    The initial value problem for a class of reversible elementary cellular automata with periodic boundaries is reduced to an initial-boundary value problem for a class of linear systems on a finite commutative ring Z 2 . Moreover, a family of such linearizable cellular automata is given

  10. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by purified iridoid mixture that inhibits penetration of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae upon topical treatment of mice tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahgat, Mahmoud; Shalaby, Nagwa M M; Ruppel, Andreas; Maghraby, Amany S

    2005-08-01

    When tested for possible blocking effect on the cercarial, serine proteinase, elastase (CE) activity, an iridoid mixture extracted from leaves of Citharexylum quadrangular abolished 31% of the enzyme activity at final concentration 15 microg. When formulated in jojoba oil and applied to mice tails followed by infection with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, the iridoid mixture blocked cercarial penetration and caused significant reducetion (94%; P < 0.05) in worm burden in treated mice in comparison to controls. Also, immunomodulatory effects of iridoid mixture, iridoid-treated S. mansoni worm homogenate on mice were studied by measuring IgG and IgM levels against E. coli lysates (ECL), solube S. mansoni worm antigenic preparation (SWAP) and cancer bladder homogenates (CBH) as antigens by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were studied by calculating mean percent of CD4+, CD8(+)-T, B-mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNC) and CD4+, CD8(+)-T thymocytes by direct immunofluorescence staining in treated mice as compared to untreated homogenate given mice or untreated mice. Injecting mice with serial dilutions of iridoid mixture resulted in fluctuation, peaks and troughs, in both IgG and IgM responses against the above mentioned antigens. 1st and 2nd immunizations with iridoid mixture treated homogenate resulted in significantly elevated (P < 0.05). IgM and IgG levels against the 3 used antigens in comparison with sera from control mice. Immunized mice with homogenate treated with iridoid mixture showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CD4+T thymocytes, a non significant increase in CD8+T thymocytes, a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CD4+T lymphocytes (MLNC) and a non significant increase in CD8+ T- and B-lymphocytes (MLNC) compared with mice immunized with untreated homogenate or non-injected normal mice.

  11. Relaxation of cellular K+gradients by valinomycin induces diatoxanthin accumulation in Cyclotella meneghiniana cells and alters FCPa fluorescence yield in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rana A; Dietzel, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting involves all major thylakoid membrane complexes. One important factor is the proton motive force (pmf) driving ATP production. Its proton gradient (ΔpH) component regulates the high energy quenching. Potassium ions largely contribute to the formation of the electric field (ΔΨ). ΔΨ and ΔpH partially compensate each other to form pmf. Whilst in plants considerable progress has been made in analyzing the interplay of H + and K + gradients, in diatoms knowledge in this field is still scarce. We relaxed cellular K + gradients by valinomycin in Cyclotella meneghiniana. We observed a slow decrease of PSII maximum quantum yield in the dark upon valinomycin addition correlating with diatoxanthin accumulation which we attribute to the breakdown of organellar K + gradients (either plastid or mitochondria) which might compensate for the loss of the K + gradient by adjustment of the thylakoid pH in a secondary step. This response is reversible when ΔpH is relaxed. Similarly, we found higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) caused by higher DT accumulation in the steady state in valinomycin-treated cells. In vitro fucoxanthin chlorophyll a (FCPa) antenna complexes in liposomes with natural lipid composition showed a decrease in fluorescence yield if a K + gradient is built up. The effect reversed by relaxing the gradient. We interpret these fluorescence changes with surface charge dynamics and FCPa organization in the membrane rather than a direct influence of K + gradients on FCPa complexes. Both experiments reveal that K + gradients might contribute to fine tuning of light harvesting capacity in relation to pmf in diatoms. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. Role of galactose in cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzi, David J; Song, Meihua; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been proposed to play critical roles in tumor suppression and organismal aging, but the molecular mechanism of senescence remains incompletely understood. Here we report that a putative lysosomal carbohydrate efflux transporter, Spinster, induces cellular senescence in human primary fibroblasts. Administration of d-galactose synergistically enhanced Spinster-induced senescence and this synergism required the transporter activity of Spinster. Intracellular d-galactose is metabolized to galactose-1-phosphate by galactokinase. Galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts, which accumulate intracellular d-galactose, displayed increased baseline senescence. Senescence of galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts was further enhanced by d-galactose administration and was diminished by restoration of wild-type galactokinase expression. Silencing galactokinase in normal fibroblasts also induced senescence. These results suggest a role for intracellular galactose in the induction of cellular senescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ferulic Acid Attenuates TGF-β1-Induced Renal Cellular Fibrosis in NRK-52E Cells by Inhibiting Smad/ILK/Snail Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-gang Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis is a common cause of renal dysfunction with chronic kidney disease. Central to this process is epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT of proximal tubular epithelial cells driven by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 signaling. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Ferulic acid (FA on EMT of renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line (NRK-52E induced by TGF-β1 and to elucidate its underlying mechanism against EMT related to TGF-β1/Smads pathway. The NRK-52E cells were treated for 48 h with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL in different concentrations of FA (0 to 200 µM. Fibronectin, a mesenchymal marker, was assessed by western blotting. Western blotting was also used to examine the EMT markers (E-cadherin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, signal transducer (p-Smad2/3, and EMT initiator (Snail. ILK was also assayed by western blotting. The results showed that TGF-β1 induced spindle-like morphological transition in NRK-52E cells. Smad2/3 signaling pathway activation, increased fibronectin, α-SMA, ILK, and Snail expression, and decreased E-cadherin expression in TGF-β1-treated NRK-52E cells. FA efficiently blocked P-Smad2/3 activation and attenuated all these EMT changes induced by TGF-β1. These findings suggest that FA may serve as a potential fibrosis antagonist for renal proximal tubule cells by inhibiting EMT process.

  14. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably...... are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection....

  15. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the proform of the nerve growth factor (proNGF) is crucial for eliminating superfluous cells during neuronal development it also promotes apoptosis following brain trauma and neuronal injury. The apoptotic signal is elicited upon formation of a trimeric receptor complex also containing th...... use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75(NTR) can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death....

  16. A polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine applied by needle-free intradermal delivery induces cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses, and the infection is widely prevalent in swine herds throughout the world. Current commercial influenza vaccines for pigs induce a narrow immune response and are not very effective against antigenically diverse viruses. To control...... with the optimized DNA vaccine resulted in specific, dose-dependent immunity down to the lowest dose (200μg DNA/vaccination). Both the antibody-mediated and the recall lymphocyte immune responses demonstrated high reactivity against vaccine-specific strains and cross-reactivity to vaccine-heterologous strains...

  17. Reduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 viremia by a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immunity after experimental PCV2 challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hwi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the present study was to elucidate the humoral and cellular immune response mechanisms by which a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine reduces the PCV2 viremia. Forty PCV2 seronegative 3-week-old pigs were randomly divided into the following four groups: vaccinated challenged (T01, vaccinated non-challenged (T02, non-vaccinated challenged (T03, and non-vaccinated non-challenged (T04 animals. The pigs in groups T01 and T02 were immunized with a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine (Fostera™ PCV; Pfizer Animal Health administered as a 2.0 ml dose at 21 days of age. At 35 days of age (0 days post-challenge, the pigs in groups T01 and T03 were inoculated intranasally with 2 ml each of PCV2b. Results A reduction of PCV2 viremia coincided with the appearance of both PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA and interferon-γ-secreting cells (IFN-γ-SCs in the vaccinated animals. However, the presence of anti-PCV2 IgG antibodies did not correlate with the reduction of PCV2 viremia. Lymphocyte subset analysis indicated that the numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased in vaccinated animals but the numbers of CD4+ cells decreased transiently in non-vaccinated animals. The observation of a delayed type hypersensitivity response in only the vaccinated animals also supports a CD4+ cell-associated protective cellular immune response induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine. Conclusions The induction of PCV2-specific NA and IFN-γ-SCs, and CD4+ cells by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine is the important protective immune response leading to reduction of the PCV2 viremia and control of the PCV2 infection. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of protective humoral and cellular immunity induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine and its effect on reduction of PCV2 viremia by vaccination.

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Hesperidin, a Plant Flavanone, on Rotenone-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in a Cellular Model for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppusamy Tamilselvam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone a widely used pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I has been used to investigate the pathobiology of PD both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have shown that the neurotoxicity of rotenone may be related to its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to neuronal apoptosis. The current study was carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of hesperidin, a citrus fruit flavanol, against rotenone-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We assessed cell death, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, ATP levels, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione (GSH levels, and the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx using well established assays. Apoptosis was determined in normal, rotenone, and hesperidin treated cells, by measuring the protein expression of cytochrome c (cyt c, caspases 3 and 9, Bax, and Bcl-2 using the standard western blotting technique. The apoptosis in rotenone-induced SK-N-SH cells was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation, the depletion of GSH, enhanced activities of enzymatic antioxidants, upregulation of Bax, cyt c, and caspases 3 and 9, and downregulation of Bcl-2, which were attenuated in the presence of hesperidin. Our data suggests that hesperidin exerts its neuroprotective effect against rotenone due to its antioxidant, maintenance of mitochondrial function, and antiapoptotic properties in a neuroblastoma cell line.

  19. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian W Plank

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  20. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  1. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  2. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  3. Schisandrin B inhibits cell growth and induces cellular apoptosis and autophagy in mouse hepatocytes and macrophages: implications for its hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yi Zhang,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2 Hua Jin,2 Chengbin Hu,2 Zhi-Xu He,3 Zhi-Ling Yu,4 Kam-Ming Ko,5 Tianxin Yang,6 Xueji Zhang,7 Si-Yuan Pan,1 Shu-Feng Zhou2 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino–US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 5Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah and Salt Lake Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 7Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A number of drugs and herbal compounds have been documented to cause ­hepatoxicity. Schisandrin B (Sch B is an active dibenzocyclooctadiene isolated from Schisandrae fructus, with a wide array of pharmacological activities. However, the potential hepatotoxicity of Sch B is a major safety concern, and the underlying mechanism for Sch B-induced liver toxic effects is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the liver toxic effects and the molecular mechanisms of Sch B in mouse liver and macrophage cells. The results have shown that Sch B exhibits potent grow inhibitory, proapoptotic, and proautophagic effects in AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells. Sch B markedly arrested cells in G1 phase in both cell lines, accompanied by the down-regulation of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 and cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p27

  4. Radiation-induced mouse chimeras: a cellular analysis of the major lymphoid compartments, factors affecting lethal graft versus host disease and host-tumor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.

    1981-01-01

    The major lymphoid compartments of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were evaluated for the extent of cell chimerism and distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells. These chimeras contained lymphoid cell primarily of donor origin. The bone marrow compartment was a mixture of host and donor origin cells. The distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells was similar as in normal mice. The effect of adult thymectomy alone or followed by whole-body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution on the distribution of the Thy 1 positive cells was also investigated. Thymectomy with or without WBI and bone marrow reconstitution significantly lowered the number of Thy 1 bearing cells in the blood and spleen. The number of la bearing cells did not appear to be affected by thymectomy. The role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras was studied. Mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow from bled donors had a statistically lower incidence of GVHD than those reconstituted with bone marrow from unbled donors. Addition of mature peripheral lymphocytes from blood to the reconstituting bone marrow cells from bled donors reduplicated the high incidence of lethal GVHD. It was demonstrated that the bone marrow of mice not exsanguinated prior to harvesting of bone marrow contained significant numbers of peripheral contaminating cells in the harvested bone marrow. The role of suppressor cell elimination in resisting tumor growth was investigated using radiation induced mouse chimeras. Local effects of irradiation alone at the site of tumor inoculation could account for this lack of growth

  5. Hexavalent chromium-induced apoptosis of granulosa cells involves selective sub-cellular translocation of Bcl-2 members, ERK1/2 and p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banu, Sakhila K.; Stanley, Jone A.; Lee, JeHoon; Stephen, Sam D.; Arosh, Joe A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Burghardt, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) has been widely used in industries throughout the world. Increased usage of CrVI and atmospheric emission of CrVI from catalytic converters of automobiles, and its improper disposal causes various health hazards including female infertility. Recently we have reported that lactational exposure to CrVI induced a delay/arrest in follicular development at the secondary follicular stage. In order to investigate the underlying mechanism, primary cultures of rat granulosa cells were treated with 10 μM potassium dichromate (CrVI) for 12 and 24 h, with or without vitamin C pre-treatment for 24 h. The effects of CrVI on intrinsic apoptotic pathway(s) were investigated. Our data indicated that CrVI: (i) induced DNA fragmentation and increased apoptosis, (ii) increased cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to cytosol, (iii) downregulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, HSP70 and HSP90; upregulated pro-apoptotic BAX and BAD, (iv) altered translocation of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, BAX, BAD, HSP70 and HSP90 to the mitochondria, (v) upregulated p-ERK and p-JNK, and selectively translocated p-ERK to the mitochondria and nucleus, (vi) activated caspase-3 and PARP, and (vii) increased phosphorylation of p53 at ser-6, ser-9, ser-15, ser-20, ser-37, ser-46 and ser-392, increased p53 transcriptional activation, and downregulated MDM-2. Vitamin C pre-treatment mitigated CrVI effects on apoptosis and related pathways. Our study, for the first time provides a clear insight into the effect of CrVI on multiple pathways that lead to apoptosis of granulosa cells which could be mitigated by vitamin C.

  6. Altering endoplasmic reticulum stress in a model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury controls cellular fate and ameliorates neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Flint Logsdon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal injury following blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI increases the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, yet the pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB disruption, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and apoptosis have all been implicated in bTBI. Microvessel compromise is a primary effect of bTBI and is postulated to cause subcellular secondary effects such as ER stress. What remains unclear is how these secondary effects progress to personality disorders in humans exposed to head trauma. To investigate this we exposed male rats to a clinically relevant bTBI model we have recently developed. The study examined initial BBB disruption using Evan’s blue, ER stress mechanisms, apoptosis and impulsive-like behavior measured with elevated plus maze (EPM. Large BBB openings were observed immediately following bTBI, and persisted for at least 6 h. Data showed increased mRNA abundance of stress response genes at 3 h, with subsequent increases in the ER stress markers C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34 at 24 h. Caspase-12 and Caspase-3 were both cleaved at 24 h following bTBI. The ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal (SAL, was administered (1mg/kg i.p. to investigate its’ effects on neuronal injury and impulsive-like behavior associated with bTBI. SAL reduced CHOP protein expression, and diminished Caspase-3 cleavage, suggesting apoptosis attenuation. Interestingly, SAL also ameliorated impulsive-like behavior indicative of head trauma. These results suggest SAL plays a role in apoptosis regulation and the pathology of chronic disease. These observations provide evidence that bTBI involves ER stress and that the UPR is a promising molecular target for the attenuation of neuronal injury.

  7. Differential humoral and cellular immunity induced by vaccination using plasmid DNA and protein recombinant expressing the NS3 protein of dengue virus type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Melgoza, M L; Ramos-Ligonio, A; Álvarez-Rodríguez, L M; Meza-Menchaca, T; López-Monteon, A

    2016-12-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serine-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work we evaluated the potential of the NS3 (protease domain) as a protective antigen by comparing the administration of a recombinant protein versus a DNA vaccine in the mouse model. BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant protein NS3-DEN3 via intraperitoneal and with plasmid pcDNA3/NS3-DEN3 intramuscularly and the immune response was evaluated. The activity of T lymphocytes was analyzed by the MTT assay, and cells of mice immunized with the recombinant protein showed no activity when stimulated with the homologous protein. However, cells from mice immunized with DNA, responded to stimulation with the recombinant protein. When the expression (RT-PCR) and cytokine production (ELISA) was evaluated in the splenocytes, different behavior depending on the type of immunization was observed, splenocytes of mice immunized with the recombinant protein expressed cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 and produced high concentrations of IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα. Splenocytes from mice immunized with DNA expressed IL-2 and IFNγ and did not produce IL-6. In addition, immunization with the recombinant protein induced the production of antibodies that are detected up to a dilution 1:3200 by ELISA and Western blot assays, however, the serum of mice immunized with DNA presented no detectable antibody titers. The results obtained in this study show that administration of pcDNA3/NS3-DEN3 induces a favorable response in the activation of T lymphocytes with low production of specific

  8. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  9. Cellular MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Modo; Mathias Hoehn; Jeff W.M. Bulte

    2005-01-01

    Cellular MR imaging is a young field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. In order to provide a different signal intensity of the targeted cell, they are either labeled with MR contrast agents in vivo or prelabeled in vitro. Either (ultrasmall) superparamagnetic iron oxide [(U)SPIO] particles or (polymeric) paramagnetic chelates can be used for this purpose. For in vivo cellular labeling, Gd3+- and Mn2+- chelates have mainly been used for targeted hepatobiliary imaging, ...

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1990-01-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  11. Chemical and cellular oxidant production induced by naphthalene secondary organic aerosol (SOA): effect of redox-active metals and photochemical aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuet, Wing Y; Chen, Yunle; Fok, Shierly; Gao, Dong; Weber, Rodney J; Champion, Julie A; Ng, Nga L

    2017-11-09

    Exposure to air pollution is a leading global health risk. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitute a large portion of ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study, the water-soluble oxidative potential (OP) determined by dithiothreitol (DTT) consumption and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production was measured for SOA generated from the photooxidation of naphthalene in the presence of iron sulfate and ammonium sulfate seed particles. The measured intrinsic OP varied for aerosol formed using different initial naphthalene concentrations, however, no trends were observed between OP and bulk aerosol composition or seed type. For all experiments, aerosol generated in the presence of iron-containing seed induced higher ROS/RNS production compared to that formed in the presence of inorganic seed. This effect was primarily attributed to differences in aerosol carbon oxidation state [Formula: see text]. In the presence of iron, radical concentrations are elevated via iron redox cycling, resulting in more oxidized species. An exponential trend was also observed between ROS/RNS and [Formula: see text] for all naphthalene SOA, regardless of seed type or aerosol formation condition. This may have important implications as aerosol have an atmospheric lifetime of a week, over which [Formula: see text] increases due to continued photochemical aging, potentially resulting in more toxic aerosol.

  12. Evaluation of the radioprotective and curative role of a natural antioxidant against cellular ultrastructural hazards induced in rats by gamma radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Azeem, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa known as black seed in the amelioration of the histological disorders that occur in different tissues of albino rats exposed to 8 Gy whole body gamma irradiation, delivered as a single dose. Nigella sativa oil was administered daily to rats at a dose of 30 mg / 100 g body weight by gavage, 10 days before irradiation and to another group 10 days after irradiation. Experimental investigations performed one day after radiation for the first group and ten days after radiation for the second group showed that Nigella sativa treatment exerted a radioprotective and curative role on the fine structure of the renal tissue detected as swelling and cristalysis of mitochondria, fragmentation and dilatation damage in the rough endoplasmic reticulum which exhibited in various degrees such as active lysosomes, irregular nuclear membrane, clumped marginal chromatin, pyknotic nucleus with abnormal brush border, absence of infolding and irregularity of basement membrane. Moreover, the radiated hepatic cells showed dilation and thickness in membrane of blood sinasoid as well as lysis of cytoplasmic matrix. Treatment of rats with Nigella sativa during 10 consecutive days either before or after exposure to 8 Gy single dose led to partial improvement of hepatic and kidney cells.The results of the current study indicated that Nigella sativa oil exerted an important protective and curative role against radiation-induced damage in the ultrastructure configuration of kidney and liver cells

  13. Investigation of microstructure, mechanical properties and cellular viability of poly(L-lactic acid) tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by different thermally induced phase separation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud; Medley, John; Kwon, Hyock Ju

    2013-01-01

    Two thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) methods have been used to fabricate biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) tissue engineering scaffolds each with fibrous (F-TIPS) and porous (P-TIPS) microstructures. Three levels of PLLA concentration (3, 5 and 7 wt%) were employed in each fabrication method and both wet and dry specimens were studied. Simple compression testing revealed that an elastic-plastic representation of the mechanical behavior was possible for all specimens. Both elastic and plastic moduli were higher for the P-TIPS, for higher polymer concentration, and might be somewhat higher for dry as opposed to wet specimens. For F-TIPS specimens, permanent deformation occurred successively during cyclic deformation but a "memory effect" simplified the behavior. Although F-TIPS microstructure better resembled the natural extracellular matrix, human osteosarcoma fibroblast cells showed more consistent viability in the P-TIPS scaffolds under our unloaded test protocols. Biodegradation in cell culture medium resulted in a decreased elastic moduli for F-TIPS specimens. Information presented regarding the microstructure, mechanical properties and cell viability of these PLLA scaffolds that should help reduce the number of iterations involved in developing tissue engineering products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Attenuated Strain SPY1 with an Artificial Mineral Shell Induces Humoral and Th17 Cellular Immunity and Protects Mice against Pneumococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen leading to substantial morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent S. pneumoniae infection. SPY1 is a pneumococcal vaccine candidate strain obtained in our previous study. To improve its stability and immunogencity, in this study, we constructed the SPY1ΔlytA strain that lacks autolysin activity and was coated with an artificial exterior surface calcium phosphate shell by in situ mineralization. The resulting strain SPY1ΔlytACaPi displayed enhanced thermal stability enabling storage at 37°C for 1 week. Furthermore, mucosal and subcutaneous immunization with the SPY1ΔlytACaPi strain induced better protective effects than SPY1ΔlytA in anti-colonization after challenging with 19F and anti-invasion by D39 in mice. Subcutaneous immunization with SPY1ΔlytACaPi elicited higher IgG level while mucosal immunization primarily elicited an immune response which is supposed to be related to Th17 cells. Taken together, the mineralized strain may be a promising candidate for an attenuated S. pneumoniae vaccine.

  15. A trifunctional dextran-based nanovaccine targets and activates murine dendritic cells, and induces potent cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Shen

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs constitute an attractive target for specific delivery of nanovaccines for immunotherapeutic applications. Here we tested nano-sized dextran (DEX particles to serve as a DC-addressing nanocarrier platform. Non-functionalized DEX particles had no immunomodulatory effect on bone marrow (BM-derived murine DCs in vitro. However, when adsorbed with ovalbumine (OVA, DEX particles were efficiently engulfed by BM-DCs in a mannose receptor-dependent manner. A DEX-based nanovaccine containing OVA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a DC stimulus induced strong OVA peptide-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell proliferation both in vitro and upon systemic application in mice, as well as a robust OVA-specific humoral immune response (IgG1>IgG2a in vivo. Accordingly, this nanovaccine also raised both a more pronounced delayed-type hypersensitivity response and a stronger induction of cytotoxic CD8(+ T cells than obtained upon administration of OVA and LPS in soluble form. Therefore, DEX-based nanoparticles constitute a potent, versatile and easy to prepare nanovaccine platform for immunotherapeutic approaches.

  16. Loss of Sfrp2 in the Niche Amplifies Stress-Induced Cellular Responses, and Impairs the In Vivo Regeneration of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Franziska; Schreck, Christina; Wagner, Alina; Grziwok, Sandra; Pagel, Charlotta; Romero, Sandra; Kieslinger, Matthias; Shimono, Akihiko; Peschel, Christian; Götze, Katharina S; Istvanffy, Rouzanna; Oostendorp, Robert A J

    2016-09-01

    Sfrp2 is overexpressed in stromal cells which maintain hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during in vitro culture. We here showed, that coculture of hematopoetic cells with stromal cells with reduced expression of Sfrp2 increases the number lineage-negative Kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LSK) and progenitor cells in vitro. The LSK cells from these cocultures showed activation of canonical Wnt signaling, higher levels of Ki-67, BrdU incorporation, and the number of γH2A.X positive foci. Total repopulating activity of these cultures was, however, diminished, indicating loss of HSC. To extend these in vitro data, we modelled stress in vivo, i.e., by aging, or 5-FU treatment in Sfrp2(-) (/) (-) mice, or replicative stress in regeneration of HSCs in Sfrp2(-) (/) (-) recipients. In all three in vivo stress situations, we noted an increase of LSK cells, characterized by increased levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. In the transplantation experiments, the increase in LSK cells in primary recipients was subsequently associated with a progressive loss of HSCs in serial transplantations. Similar to the in vitro coculture stress, in vivo genotoxic stress in 5-FU-treated Sfrp2(-) (/) (-) mice increased cell cycle activity of LSK cells with higher levels of BrdU incorporation, increased expression of Ki-67, and canonical Wnt signaling. Importantly, as noted in vitro, increased cycling of LSKs in vivo was accompanied by a defective γH2A.X-dependent DNA damage response and depolarized localization of acetylated H4K16. Our experiments support the view that Sfrp2 expression in the niche is required to maintain the HSC pool by limiting stress-induced DNA damage and attenuating canonical Wnt-mediated HSC activation. Stem Cells 2016;34:2381-2392. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovadinova, Iva; Babica, Pavel; Böke, Hatice; Kumar, Esha; Wilke, Andrew; Park, Joon-Suk; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC. the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap junction channels

  18. Microglial inhibitory mechanism of Coenzyme Q10 against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunctions: possible behavioral, biochemical, cellular and histopathological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti eSingh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a debilitating disease with complex pathophysiology. Amyloid beta (Aβ (1-42 is a reliable model of AD that recapitulates many aspects of human AD. Objective: The present study has been designed to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and its modulation with minocycline (microglial inhibitor against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunction in rats. Method: Intrahippocampal (i.h. Aβ (1-42 (1µg/µl; 4µl/site were administered followed by drug treatment with galantamine (2 mg/kg, CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg, minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg and their combinations for a period of 21 days. Various neurobehavioral parameters followed by biochemical, acetylcholinesterase (AChE level, proinflammatory markers (TNF-α, mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes (I-IV and histopathological examinations were assessed.Results: Aβ (1-42 administration significantly impaired cognitive performance in Morris water maze (MWM performance test, causes oxidative stress, raised AChE level, caused neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and histopathological alterations as compared to sham treatment. Treatment with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg and minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg alone for 21days significantly improved cognitive performance as evidenced by reduced transfer latency and increased time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ, reduced AChE activity, oxidative damage (reduced LPO, nitrite level and restored SOD, catalase and GHS levels, TNF-α level, restored mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complex (I, II, III, IV activities and histopathological alterations as compared to control (Aβ (1-42 treated animals group. Further, combination of minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg significantly modulate the protective effect of CoQ10 as compared to their effect alone. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 could be due to its microglia inhibitory

  19. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Sovadinova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC.the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap

  20. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  1. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  2. Recent advances in cellular glycomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-02-21

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed.

  3. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  4. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic stability during cellular reprogramming: Mission impossible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joest, Mathieu von; Búa Aguín, Sabela; Li, Han, E-mail: han.li@pasteur.fr

    2016-06-15

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult somatic cells is one of the most exciting discoveries in recent biomedical research. It holds tremendous potential in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, a series of reports highlighting genomic instability in iPSCs raises concerns about their clinical application. Although the mechanisms cause genomic instability during cellular reprogramming are largely unknown, several potential sources have been suggested. This review summarizes current knowledge on this active research field and discusses the latest efforts to alleviate the genomic insults during cellular reprogramming to generate iPSCs with enhanced quality and safety.

  6. Radiopharmaceutical cellular uptake mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Cipriana; Rusu, V.

    1996-01-01

    Cellular radiopharmaceutical specificity depends mainly of the uptake mechanisms. Usually, this can be one of the classical membrane transport type (a passive or active transport, a receptor mediated one or a combination of them). It can also be an electrochemical gradient dependent membrane transport in relation with Nernst equation, as in case of 99m Tc MIBI, the representative molecule of a widely studied family tracers, with applications in cardiac and oncological scintigraphy. Another mechanism can be an ATP dependent active transport, that results in the most important 201 Tl inflow. 201 Tl inflow is also an example of multiple mechanisms involved in cellular ionic inflow. Over 30% of 201 Tl transport imply other ways, like Na + - K + - Cl - co-transport. For a given tracer, the mechanism may depend also on the cell type. In conclusion, knowledge of the radiotracer uptake mechanisms allows finding the 'ideal' radiotracer with high specificity for the tissue to be visualized. (authors)

  7. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  8. Nested cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasthoff, U.

    1985-07-01

    Cellular automata by definition consist of a finite or infinite number of cells, say of unit length, with each cell having the same transition function. These cells are usually considered as the smallest elements and so the space filled with these cells becomes discrete. Nevertheless, large pictures created by such cellular automata look very fractal. So we try to replace each cell by a couple of smaller cells, which have the same transition functions as the large ones. There are automata where this replacement does not destroy the macroscopic structure. In these cases this nesting process can be iterated. The paper contains large classes of automata with the above properties. In the case of one dimensional automata with two states and next neighbour interaction and a nesting function of the same type a complete classification is given. (author)

  9. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling

  10. Cellular-automata method for phase unwrapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Mastin, G.A.; Romero, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Research into two-dimensional phase unwrapping has uncovered interesting and troublesome inconsistencies that cause path-dependent results. Cellular automata, which are simple, discrete mathematical systems, offered promise of computation in nondirectional, parallel manner. A cellular automaton was discovered that can unwrap consistent phase data in n dimensions in a path-independent manner and can automatically accommodate noise-induced (pointlike) inconsistencies and arbitrary boundary conditions (region partitioning). For data with regional (nonpointlike) inconsistencies, no phase-unwrapping algorithm will converge, including the cellular-automata approach. However, the automata method permits more simple visualization of the regional inconsistencies. Examples of its behavior on one- and two-dimensional data are presented

  11. Wavefront cellular learning automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  12. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  13. Detection, characterization and measure of a new radiation-induced damage in isolated and cellular DNA; Detection, caracterisation et mesure d'un nouveau dommage radio-induit de l'ADN isole et cellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulus, P

    2006-10-15

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains the genetic information and chemical injury to this macromolecule may have severe biological consequences. We report here the detection of 4 new radiation-induced DNA lesions by using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) approach. For that purpose, the characteristic fragmentation of most 2'-deoxy-ribo nucleosides, the loss of 116 Da corresponding to the loss of the 2-deoxyribose moiety, was used in the so-called neutral loss mode of the HPLC-MS/MS. One of the newly detected lesions, named dCyd341 because it is a 2'-deoxycytidine modification exhibiting a molecular weight of 341 Da, was also detected in cellular DNA. Characterization of this modified nucleoside was performed using NMR and exact mass determination of the product obtained by chemical synthesis. A mechanism of formation was then proposed, in which the first event is the H-abstraction at the C4 position of a 2-deoxyribose moiety. Then, the sugar modification produced exhibits a reactive aldehyde that, through reaction with a vicinal cytosine base, gives rise to dCyd341. dCyd341 could be considered as a complex damage since its formation involves a DNA strand break and a cross-link between a damaged sugar residue and a vicinal cytosine base located most probably on the complementary DNA strand. In addition to its characterization, preliminary biological studies revealed that cells are able to remove the lesion from DNA. Repair studies have revealed the ability of cells to excise the lesion. Identification of the repair systems involved could represent an interesting challenge. (author)

  14. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders.

  15. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  16. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  17. Cellular communication through light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source) as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials) allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more) frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  18. Review of cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning

    2017-06-01

    Living cells and tissues experience physical forces and chemical stimuli in the human body. The process of converting mechanical forces into biochemical activities and gene expression is mechanochemical transduction or mechanotransduction. Significant advances have been made in understanding mechanotransduction at the cellular and molecular levels over the last two decades. However, major challenges remain in elucidating how a living cell integrates signals from mechanotransduction with chemical signals to regulate gene expression and to generate coherent biological responses in living tissues in physiological conditions and diseases.

  19. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  20. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  1. Cellular reprogramming for clinical cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Britta J.H.; Logie, Colin; Vonk, Lucienne A.

    2017-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage needs a sufficient number of chondrocytes to replace the defect tissue, and therefore, expansion of cells is generally required. Chondrocytes derived by cellular reprogramming may provide a solution to the limitations of current (stem) cell-based therapies. In this article, two distinct approaches?induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-mediated reprogramming and direct lineage conversion?are analysed and compared according to criteria that encompass the qualifi...

  2. Cellular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of this research program: relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio of silicon ion beams; heavy ion effects on the cell cycle; the potentiation effect (2 doses of high LET heavy-ion radiations separated by 2 to 3 hours); potentially lethal damage in actively growing cells and plateau growth cells; radiation induced macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry; lethal effects of dual radiation; and the development of a biophysical repair/misrepair model

  3. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  4. Temporal expression and cellular origin of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 in the central nervous system: insight into mechanisms of MOG-induced EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericsson-Dahlstrand Anders

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 are critical for the recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Mononuclear phagocytes are effector cells capable of phagocytosing myelin and damaging axons. In this study, we characterize the regional, temporal and cellular expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord of rats with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (MOG-EAE. While resembling human MS, this animal model allows unique access to CNS-tissue from various time-points of relapsing neuroinflammation and from various lesional stages: early active, late active, and inactive completely demyelinated lesions. Methods The expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was studied with in situ hybridization using radio labelled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining for phenotypic cell markers. Spinal cord sections from healthy rats and rats with MOG-EAE (acute phase, remission phase, relapse phase were analysed. In defined lesion stages, the number of cells expressing CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was determined. Data were statistically analysed by the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. Results In MOG-EAE rats, extensive up-regulation of CCR1 and CCR5 mRNA, and moderate up-regulation of CCR2 mRNA, was found in the spinal cord during episodes of active inflammation and demyelination. Double staining with phenotypic cell markers identified the chemokine receptor mRNA-expressing cells as macrophages/microglia. Expression of all three receptors was substantially reduced during clinical remission, coinciding with diminished inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. Healthy control rats did not show any detectable expression of CCR1, CCR2 or CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the acute and chronic-relapsing phases of MOG

  5. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  6. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abkarian, Manouk [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, Universite de Montpellier, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Faivre, Magalie [CEA-LETI, Division of Technology for Biology and Health, 17, Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Horton, Renita; Stone, Howard A [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smistrup, Kristian [MIC, Department of Micro and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Best-Popescu, Catherine A [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of individual cells in confined geometries, the development and use of a 'differential manometer' for evaluating the mechanical response of individual cells or other objects flowing in confined geometries, and the cross-streamline drift of cells that pass through a constriction. In particular, we show how fluid mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors.

  7. DNA mismatch repair and the cellular response to UVC radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, Viola

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the cellular response to several genotoxic agents is described. We show that MMR plays an important role in the protection against UVC-induced mutagenesis in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. UVC was shown to induce six times more mutations in

  8. YAP/TEAD-mediated transcription controls cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Chen, Jing; Feng, Han; Peng, Shengyi; Adams, Ursula; Bai, Yujie; Huang, Li; Li, Ji; Huang, Junjian; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2013-06-15

    Transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identify a new role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence. We find that the expression levels of YAP proteins decrease following the replication-induced cellular senescence in IMR90 cells. Silencing of YAP inhibits cell proliferation and induces premature senescence. In additional experiments, we observe that cellular senescence induced by YAP deficiency is TEAD- and Rb/p16/p53-dependent. Furthermore, we show that Cdk6 is a direct downstream target gene of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence, and the expression of Cdk6 is through the YAP-TEAD complex. Ectopic expression of Cdk6 rescued YAP knockdown-induced senescence. Finally, we find that downregulation of YAP in tumor cells increases senescence in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and YAP or Cdk6 expression rescues cellular senescence. Taken together, our findings define the critical role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence and provide a novel insight into a potential chemotherapeutic avenue for tumor suppression. ©2013 AACR.

  9. Re: Epigenetics of Cellular Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL COMMENT Cells have some specific molecular and physiological properties that act their functional process. However, many cells have an ability of efficient transition from one type to another. This ability is named plasticity. This process occurs due to epigenetic reprogramming that involves changes in transcription and chromatin structure. Some changes during reprogramming that have been identified in recent years as genomic demethylation (both histone and DNA, histone acetylation and loss of heterochromatin during the development of many diseases such as infertility and cancer progression. In this review, the authors focused on the latest work addressing the mechanisms surrounding the epigenetic regulation of various types of reprogramming, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion and transcription factor- and microRNA-induced pluripotency. There are many responsible factors such as genes, cytokines, proteins, co-factors (i.e. vitamin C in this local area network. The exact mechanisms by which these changes are achieved and the detailed interplay between the players responsible, however, remain relatively unclear. In the treatment of diseases, such as infertility, urooncology, reconstructive urology, etc., epigenetic changes and cellular reprogramming will be crucial in the near future. Central to achieving that goal is a more thorough understanding of the epigenetic state of fully reprogrammed cells. By the progress of researches on this topic, new treatment modalities will be identified for these diseases.

  10. Statistical mechanics of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, S.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular automata are used as simple mathematical models to investigate self-organization in statistical mechanics. A detailed analysis is given of ''elementary'' cellular automata consisting of a sequence of sites with values 0 or 1 on a line, with each site evolving deterministically in discrete time steps according to p definite rules involving the values of its nearest neighbors. With simple initial configurations, the cellular automata either tend to homogeneous states, or generate self-similar patterns with fractal dimensions approx. =1.59 or approx. =1.69. With ''random'' initial configurations, the irreversible character of the cellular automaton evolution leads to several self-organization phenomena. Statistical properties of the structures generated are found to lie in two universality classes, independent of the details of the initial state or the cellular automaton rules. More complicated cellular automata are briefly considered, and connections with dynamical systems theory and the formal theory of computation are discussed

  11. Molecular aspects of cellular responses to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnold, John

    1997-01-01

    Advances have been made in unravelling the molecular chains of cause and effect that determine cellular responses to radiotherapy, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. To begin with, cells must have mechanisms that enable them to sense DNA damage. Little was known about this until recently, when a DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PK) system for detecting radiation-induced strand breaks was described. The ataxia telengiectasia (ATM) gene has amino acid sequence similarities to DNA-PK, raising the possibility that the ATM protein also functions in some way as a sensor of DNA damage. However, just knowing the DNA damage is present is not enough. Signals must be transmitted via afferent biochemical pathways to proteins, such as p53, that determine which cellular responses are activated. The responses include cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair, all of which relate closely to loss of clonogenic capacity and the outcome of treatment in our patients

  12. Inhibition of cholesterol recycling impairs cellular PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilch, Sabine; Bach, Christian; Lutzny, Gloria; Vorberg, Ina; Sch?tzl, Hermann M.

    2009-01-01

    The infectious agent in prion diseases consists of an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPc), termed PrPSc, which accumulates in brains of affected individuals. Studies on prion-infected cultured cells indicate that cellular cholesterol homeostasis influences PrPSc propagation. Here, we demonstrate that the cellular PrPSc content decreases upon accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, as induced by NPC-1 knock-down or treatment with U18666A. PrPc trafficking, lip...

  13. Roles of Apoptosis and Cellular Senescence in Cancer and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerella, Claudia; Grandjenette, Cindy; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and aging are two similar processes representing the final outcome of timedependent accumulation of various irreversible dysfunctions, mainly caused by stress-induced DNA and cellular damages. Apoptosis and senescence are two types of cellular response to damages that are altered in both cancer and aging, albeit through different mechanisms. Carcinogenesis is associated with a progressive reduction in the ability of the cells to trigger apoptosis and senescence. In contrast, in aging tissues, there is an increased accumulation of senescent cells, and the nature of apoptosis deregulation varies depending on the tissue. Thus, the prevailing model suggests that apoptosis and cellular senescence function as two essential tumor-suppressor mechanisms, ensuring the health of the individual during early and reproductive stages of life, but become detrimental and promote aging later in life. The recent discovery that various anticancer agents, including canonical inducers of apoptosis, act also as inducers of cellular senescence indicates that pro-senescence strategies may have applications in cancer prevention therapy. Therefore, dissection of the mechanisms mediating the delicate balance between apoptosis and cellular senescence will be beneficial in the therapeutic exploitation of both processes in the development of future anticancer and anti-aging strategies, including minimizing the side effects of such strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of apoptosis and cellular senescence in cancer and aging.

  14. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  15. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  16. AMPK-sensitive cellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dërmaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Abazi, Sokol; Faggio, Caterina; Kolgeci, Jehona; Sopjani, Mentor

    2014-03-01

    The energy sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance through stimulating catabolic ATP-generating and suppressing anabolic ATP-consuming pathways thereby helping cells survive during energy depletion. The kinase has previously been reported to be either directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of several carriers, channels and pumps of high significance in cellular physiology. Thus AMPK provides a necessary link between cellular energy metabolism and cellular transport activity. Better understanding of the AMPK role in cellular transport offers a potential for improved therapies in various human diseases and disorders. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the role and function of AMPK in transport regulation under physiological and pathological states.

  17. Cellular automata analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hadeler, Karl-Peter

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on a coherent representation of the main approaches to analyze the dynamics of cellular automata. Cellular automata are an inevitable tool in mathematical modeling. In contrast to classical modeling approaches as partial differential equations, cellular automata are straightforward to simulate but hard to analyze. In this book we present a review of approaches and theories that allow the reader to understand the behavior of cellular automata beyond simulations. The first part consists of an introduction of cellular automata on Cayley graphs, and their characterization via the fundamental Cutis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorems in the context of different topological concepts (Cantor, Besicovitch and Weyl topology). The second part focuses on classification results: What classification follows from topological concepts (Hurley classification), Lyapunov stability (Gilman classification), and the theory of formal languages and grammars (Kůrka classification). These classifications suggest to cluster cel...

  18. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  19. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... to induce IL-12 secreting type 1 polarized DCs mimicing pathogen-derived molecular activation of DCs. Correct timing and potential synergisms of clinical-grade toll-like receptor ligands, interferons (IFN) and CD40L enhance IL-12 production in DCs. However, cytokine exhaustion, predominant expression...... especially following encounter with CD40L-expressing cells and furthermore, PGE(2) imprints DCs for preferential interaction with tolerogenic T cells. In addition, type 1 polarized DCs matured without PGE(2) also seem to be capable of migrating in vivo, although concomitant production of CCL19 seems...

  20. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  1. Thermal expansion behavior in fabricated cellular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oruganti, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Mazumder, J.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal expansion behavior of cellular structures is of interest in applications where undesirable deformation and failure are caused by thermal expansion mismatch. This report describes the role of processing-induced effects and metallurgical aspects of melt-processed cellular structures, such as a bi-material structure designed to contract on heating, as well as uni-material structures of regular and stochastic topology. This bi-material structure utilized the principle of internal geometric constraints to alter the expansion behavior of the internal ligaments to create overall contraction of the structure. Homogenization design method was used to design the structure, and fabrication was by direct metal deposition by laser melting of powder in another part of a joint effort. The degree of porosity and grain size in the fabricated structure are characterized and related to the laser deposition parameters. The structure was found to contract upon heating over a short range of temperature subsequent to which normal expansion ensued. Also examined in this report are uni-material cellular structures, in which internal constraints arise from residual stress variations caused by the fabrication process, and thereby alter their expansion characteristics. A simple analysis of thermal strain of this material supports the observed thermal expansion behavior

  2. Cellular arsenic transport pathways in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbeck, Barbara A; Banerjee, Mayukh; Leslie, Elaine M

    2016-11-01

    Natural contamination of drinking water with arsenic results in the exposure of millions of people world-wide to unacceptable levels of this metalloid. This is a serious global health problem because arsenic is a Group 1 (proven) human carcinogen and chronic exposure is known to cause skin, lung, and bladder tumors. Furthermore, arsenic exposure can result in a myriad of other adverse health effects including diseases of the cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, reproductive, and endocrine systems. In addition to chronic environmental exposure to arsenic, arsenic trioxide is approved for the clinical treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, and is in clinical trials for other hematological malignancies as well as solid tumors. Considerable inter-individual variability in susceptibility to arsenic-induced disease and toxicity exists, and the reasons for such differences are incompletely understood. Transport pathways that influence the cellular uptake and export of arsenic contribute to regulating its cellular, tissue, and ultimately body levels. In the current review, membrane proteins (including phosphate transporters, aquaglyceroporin channels, solute carrier proteins, and ATP-binding cassette transporters) shown experimentally to contribute to the passage of inorganic, methylated, and/or glutathionylated arsenic species across cellular membranes are discussed. Furthermore, what is known about arsenic transporters in organs involved in absorption, distribution, and metabolism and how transport pathways contribute to arsenic elimination are described. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics...... by providing platforms that offer biocompatible surfaces for the cell culturing in lab-on-chip devices integrated with optimized nanosensors with high specificities and sensitivities towards cellular analytes. In this project, novel materials were investigated with a focus on providing suitable surface...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...

  4. Systems biology of cellular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, A; Gérard, C; Gonze, D; Leloup, J-C; Dupont, G

    2012-08-31

    Rhythms abound in biological systems, particularly at the cellular level where they originate from the feedback loops present in regulatory networks. Cellular rhythms can be investigated both by experimental and modeling approaches, and thus represent a prototypic field of research for systems biology. They have also become a major topic in synthetic biology. We review advances in the study of cellular rhythms of biochemical rather than electrical origin by considering a variety of oscillatory processes such as Ca++ oscillations, circadian rhythms, the segmentation clock, oscillations in p53 and NF-κB, synthetic oscillators, and the oscillatory dynamics of cyclin-dependent kinases driving the cell cycle. Finally we discuss the coupling between cellular rhythms and their robustness with respect to molecular noise.

  5. A Course in Cellular Bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    Gives an overview of a course in chemical engineering entitled "Cellular Bioengineering," dealing with how chemical engineering principles can be applied to molecular cell biology. Topics used are listed and some key references are discussed. Listed are 85 references. (YP)

  6. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-01-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  7. Cellular redox, cancer and human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gregorio, Alfredo; Manzo-Merino, Joaquín; Lizano, Marcela

    2018-02-15

    High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the causative agent of different human cancers. A persistent HR-HPV infection alters several cellular processes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune evasion, genomic instability and transformation. Cumulative evidence from past studies indicates that HR-HPV proteins are associated with oxidative stress (OS) and has been proposed as a risk factor for cancer development. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) regulate a plethora of processes inducing cellular proliferation, differentiation and death. Oxidative stress (OS) is generated when an imbalance in the redox state occurs due to deregulation of the oxidant and antioxidant systems, which, in turn, promotes the damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, allowing the accumulation of mutations and genome instability. OS has been associated with the establishment and development of different cancers, and it has recently been proposed as a co-factor in cervical cancer development. This review is focused on evidence regarding the association of OS with HR-HPV proteins, and the interplay of the viral proteins with different elements of the antioxidant and DNA damage response (DDR) systems, emphasizing the processes that might be required for the viral life cycle and viral DNA integration into the host genome, which is a key element in the carcinogenic process induced by HR-HPV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Overview of molecular, cellular, and genetic neurotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David R

    2005-05-01

    /toxin combinations is they can be detected and measured shortly following exposure and before overt neuroanatomic damage or lesions. Intervention at this point, shortly following exposure, may prevent or at least attenuate further damage to the individual. The use of peripheral biomarkers to assess toxin damage in the CNS has numerous advantages: time-course analysis may be performed, ethical concerns with the use of human subjects can partially be avoided, procedures to acquire samples are less invasive, and in general, peripheral studies are easier to perform. Genetic neurotoxicology comprises two focuses--toxin-induced alterations in genetic expression and genetic alterations that affect toxin metabolism, distribution, and clearance. These differences can be beneficial or toxic. Polymorphisms have been shown to result in altered metabolism of certain toxins (paraoxonase and paraoxon). Conversely, it is possible that some polymorphisms may be beneficial and help prevent the formation of a toxic by-product of an exogenous agent (resistance to ozone-induced lung inflammation). It has also become clear that interactions of potential toxins are not straightforward as interactions with DNA, causing mutations. There are numerous agents that cause epigenetic responses (cellular alterations that are not mutagenic or cytotoxic). This finding suggests that many agents that may originally have been thought of as nontoxic should be re-examined for potential "indirect" toxicity. With the advancement of the human genome project and the development of a human genome map, the effects of potential toxins on single or multiple genes can be identified. Although collectively, the field of neurotoxicology has recently come a long way, it still has a long way to go reach its full potential. As technology and methodology advances continue and cooperation with other disciplines such as neuroscience, biochemistry, neurophysiology, and molecular biology is improved, the mechanisms of toxin action will be

  9. 1,4-Naphthoquinones: From Oxidative Damage to Cellular and Inter-Cellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Oliver Klotz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  10. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking