WorldWideScience

Sample records for axion-like particle effects

  1. Collider probes of axion-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Martin; Neubert, Matthias; Thamm, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Axion-like particles (ALPs), which are gauge-singlets under the Standard Model (SM), appear in many well-motivated extensions of the SM. Describing the interactions of ALPs with SM fields by means of an effective Lagrangian, we discuss ALP decays into SM particles at one-loop order, including for the first time a calculation of the a → πππ decay rates for ALP masses below a few GeV. We argue that, if the ALP couples to at least some SM particles with couplings of order (0.01 - 1) TeV-1, its mass must be above 1 MeV. Taking into account the possibility of a macroscopic ALP decay length, we show that large regions of so far unconstrained parameter space can be explored by searches for the exotic, on-shell Higgs and Z decays h → Za, h → aa and Z → γa in Run-2 of the LHC with an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1. This includes the parameter space in which ALPs can explain the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Considering subsequent ALP decays into photons and charged leptons, we show that the LHC provides unprecedented sensitivity to the ALP-photon and ALP-lepton couplings in the mass region above a few MeV, even if the relevant ALP couplings are loop suppressed and the a → γγ and a → ℓ+ℓ- branching ratios are significantly less than 1. We also discuss constraints on the ALP parameter space from electroweak precision tests.

  2. Astrophysical hints of axion-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncadelli, M.; Galanti, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Bonnoli, G.

    2015-01-01

    After reviewing three astrophysical hints of the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs), we describe in more detail a new similar hint involving flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Detection of FSRQs above about 20GeV pose a challenge to very-high-energy (VHE) astrophysics, because at those energies the ultraviolet emission from their broad line region should prevent photons produced by the central engine to leave the source. Although a few astrophysical explanations have been put forward, they are totally ad hoc. We show that a natural explanation instead arises within the conventional models of FSRQs provided that photon-ALP oscillations occur inside the source. Our analysis takes the FSRQ PKR 1222+206 as an example, and it looks tantalizing that basically the same choice of the free model parameters adopted in this case is consistent with those that provide the other three hints of the existence of ALPs.

  3. Searching for axion-like-particles in the sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2009-06-15

    If dark energy couples to the fields of the standard model we can hope to detect or constrain it through non-gravitational effects. If the dark energy field couples to photons it behaves as an Axion-Like-Particle (ALP). ALPs mix with photons in the presence of magnetic fields and hence affect astronomical observations. We show that empirically established luminosity relations can be used as a new test for ALPs and that when applied to observations of active galactic nuclei this is highly suggestive of the existence of a very light ALP. (orig.)

  4. Searching for axion-like-particles in the sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, C.

    2009-06-01

    If dark energy couples to the fields of the standard model we can hope to detect or constrain it through non-gravitational effects. If the dark energy field couples to photons it behaves as an Axion-Like-Particle (ALP). ALPs mix with photons in the presence of magnetic fields and hence affect astronomical observations. We show that empirically established luminosity relations can be used as a new test for ALPs and that when applied to observations of active galactic nuclei this is highly suggestive of the existence of a very light ALP. (orig.)

  5. Axion-like particle searches with sub-THz photons

    CERN Document Server

    Capparelli, L.; Ferretti, J.; Giazotto, F.; Polosa, A.D.; Spagnolo, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a variation, based on very low energy and extremely intense photon sources, on the well established technique of Light-Shining-through-Wall (LSW) experiments for axion-like particle searches. With radiation sources at 30 GHz, we compute that present laboratory exclusion limits on axion-like particles might be improved by at least four orders of magnitude, for masses m_a <~ 0.01~meV. This could motivate research and development programs on dedicated single-photon sub-THz detectors.

  6. Axion like particles and the inverse seesaw mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvajal, C.D.R.; Dias, A.G.; Nishi, C.C.; Sánchez-Vega, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    Light pseudoscalars known as axion like particles (ALPs) may be behind physical phenomena like the Universe transparency to ultra-energetic photons, the soft γ-ray excess from the Coma cluster, and the 3.5 keV line. We explore the connection of these particles with the inverse seesaw (ISS) mechanism for neutrino mass generation. We propose a very restrictive setting where the scalar field hosting the ALP is also responsible for generating the ISS mass scales through its vacuum expectation value on gravity induced nonrenormalizable operators. A discrete gauge symmetry protects the theory from the appearance of overly strong gravitational effects and discrete anomaly cancellation imposes strong constraints on the order of the group. The anomalous U(1) symmetry leading to the ALP is an extended lepton number and the protective discrete symmetry can be always chosen as a subgroup of a combination of the lepton number and the baryon number.

  7. Axion like particles and the inverse seesaw mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvajal, C.D.R.; Dias, A.G. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas,Av. dos Estados, 5001, 09210-580, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Nishi, C.C. [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição,Av. dos Estados, 5001, 09210-580, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Sánchez-Vega, B.L. [Argonne National Laboratory,9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-13

    Light pseudoscalars known as axion like particles (ALPs) may be behind physical phenomena like the Universe transparency to ultra-energetic photons, the soft γ-ray excess from the Coma cluster, and the 3.5 keV line. We explore the connection of these particles with the inverse seesaw (ISS) mechanism for neutrino mass generation. We propose a very restrictive setting where the scalar field hosting the ALP is also responsible for generating the ISS mass scales through its vacuum expectation value on gravity induced nonrenormalizable operators. A discrete gauge symmetry protects the theory from the appearance of overly strong gravitational effects and discrete anomaly cancellation imposes strong constraints on the order of the group. The anomalous U(1) symmetry leading to the ALP is an extended lepton number and the protective discrete symmetry can be always chosen as a subgroup of a combination of the lepton number and the baryon number.

  8. The GammeV suite of experimental searches for axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design and results of the GammeV search for axion-like particles and for chameleon particles. We also discuss plans for an improved experiment to search for chameleon particles, one which is sensitive to both cosmological and power-law chameleon models. Plans for an improved axion-like particle search using coupled resonant cavities are also presented. This experiment will be more sensitive to axion-like particles than stellar astrophysical models or current helioscope experiments

  9. Searching for axion-like particles with active-galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2009-12-01

    Strong mixing between photons and axion-like particles in the magnetic fields of clusters of galaxies induces a scatter in the observed luminosities of compact sources in the cluster. This is used to construct a new test for axion-like particles; applied to observations of active galactic nuclei it is strongly suggestive of the existence of a light axion-like particle. (orig.)

  10. Searching for axion-like particles with active-galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Davis, Anne-Christine [Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics; Shaw, Douglas J. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom). Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences

    2009-12-15

    Strong mixing between photons and axion-like particles in the magnetic fields of clusters of galaxies induces a scatter in the observed luminosities of compact sources in the cluster. This is used to construct a new test for axion-like particles; applied to observations of active galactic nuclei it is strongly suggestive of the existence of a light axion-like particle. (orig.)

  11. Observational evidence for gravitationally trapped massive axion(-like) particles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, L

    2003-01-01

    Several unexpected astrophysical observations can be explained by gravitationally captured massive axions or axion-like particles, which are produced inside the Sun or other stars and are accumulated over cosmic times. Their radiative decay in solar outer space would give rise to a `self-irradiation' of the whole star, providing the time-independent component of the corona heating source (we do not address here the flaring Sun). In analogy with the Sun-irradiated Earth atmosphere, the temperature and density gradient in the corona$-$chromosphere transition region is suggestive for an omnipresent irradiation of the Sun, which is the strongest evidence for the generic axion-like scenario. The same mechanism is compatible with phenomena like the solar wind, the X-rays from the dark-side of the Moon, the X-Ray Background Radiation, the diffuse X-ray excesses (below $\\sim 1$ keV), the non-cooling of oldest Stars, etc. A temperature of $\\sim 10^6$ K is observed in various places, while the radiative decay of a popu...

  12. Alpenglow. A signature for chameleons in axion-like particle search experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, M.; Lindner, A.; Ringwald, A.; Schrempp, L.; Weniger, C.

    2007-10-01

    We point out that chameleon field theories might reveal themselves as an ''afterglow'' effect in axion-like particle search experiments due to chameleon-photon conversion in a magnetic field. We estimate the parameter space which is accessible by currently available technology and find that afterglow experiments could constrain this parameter space in a way complementary to gravitational and Casimir force experiments.In addition, one could reach photon-chameleon couplings which are beyond the sensitivity of common laser polarization experiments. We also sketch the idea of a Fabry-Perot cavity with chameleons which could increase the experimental sensitivity significantly. (orig.)

  13. Alpenglow. A signature for chameleons in axion-like particle search experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, M.; Lindner, A.; Ringwald, A.; Schrempp, L.; Weniger, C.

    2007-10-15

    We point out that chameleon field theories might reveal themselves as an ''afterglow'' effect in axion-like particle search experiments due to chameleon-photon conversion in a magnetic field. We estimate the parameter space which is accessible by currently available technology and find that afterglow experiments could constrain this parameter space in a way complementary to gravitational and Casimir force experiments.In addition, one could reach photon-chameleon couplings which are beyond the sensitivity of common laser polarization experiments. We also sketch the idea of a Fabry-Perot cavity with chameleons which could increase the experimental sensitivity significantly. (orig.)

  14. Axion-like particles: possible hints and constraints from the high-energy Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The high-energy Universe is potentially a great laboratory for searching new light bosons such as axion-like particles (ALPs). Cosmic sources are indeed the scene of violent phenomena that involve strong magnetic field and/or very long baselines, where the effects of the mixing of photons with ALPs could lead to observable effects. Two examples are archetypal of this fact, that are the Universe opacity to gamma-rays and the imprints of astrophysical magnetic turbulence in the energy spectra of high-energy sources. In the first case, hints for the existence of ALPs can be proposed whereas the second one is used to put constraints on the ALP mass and coupling to photons

  15. A signature for chameleons in axion-like particle search experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weniger, Christoph [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Scalar-Tensor theories are well known and viable generalizations of General Relativity. In recent publications, it was shown that these theories can satisfy all astronomical bounds even if the scalar field couples to matter much stronger than gravity. This is due to the fact that the effective mass of the scalar field strongly depends on the density of the ambient matter. We point out that these strongly coupled fields, which were dubbed chameleons, might reveal themselves as an aefterglow'' effect in axion-like particle search experiments due to chameleon photon conversion in a magnetic field. We estimate the parameter space which is accessible by currently available technology and find that afterglow experiments could constrain this parameter space in a way complementary to gravitational and Casimir force experiments.

  16. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Betz, Michael; Caspers, Fritz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Semertzidis, Yannis [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zioutas, Konstantin [Patras Univ. (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  17. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Oliver K.; Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas; Semertzidis, Yannis; Sikivie, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  18. Radio-loud magnetars as detectors for axions and axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, E.I.; Chelouche, D.

    2011-01-01

    We show that, by studying the arrival times of radio pulses from highly-magnetized transient beamed sources, it may be possible to detect light pseudo-scalar particles, such as axions and axion-like particles, whose existence could have considerable implications for the strong-CP problem of QCD as well as the dark matter problem in cosmology. Specifically, such light bosons may be detected with a much greater sensitivity, over a broad particle mass range, than is currently achievable by terrestrial experiments, and using indirect astrophysical considerations. The observable effect was discussed in Chelouche & Guendelman (2009), and is akin to the Stern-Gerlach experiment: the splitting of a photon beam naturally arises when finite coupling exists between the electro-magnetic field and the axion field. The splitting angle of the light beams linearly depends on the photon wavelength, the size of the magnetized region, and the magnetic field gradient in the transverse direction to the propagation direction of the photons. If radio emission in radio-loud magnetars is beamed and originates in regions with strong magnetic field gradients, then splitting of individual pulses may be detectable. We quantify the effect for a simplified model for magnetars, and search for radio beam splitting in the 2GHz radio light curves of the radio loud magnetar XTEJ1810-197. (author)

  19. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas [Theory group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Fischer, Tobias [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroc\\law, Pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wroc\\law (Poland); Giannotti, Maurizio, E-mail: alexandre.payez@desy.de, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: fischer@ift.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: alessandro.mirizzi@desy.de, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g{sub aγ} ∼< 5.3 × 10{sup -12} GeV{sup -1}, for m{sub a} ∼< 4.4 × 10{sup -10} eV, and we also give its dependence at larger ALP masses m{sub a}. Moreover, we discuss how much the Fermi-LAT satellite experiment could improve this bound, should a close-enough supernova explode in the near future.

  20. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Fischer, Tobias [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Giannotti, Maurizio [Barry Univ., Miami Shores, FL (United States). Physical Sciences

    2014-10-15

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g{sub aγ}

  1. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas; Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Fischer, Tobias; Giannotti, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g aγ -12 GeV -1 , for m a -10 eV, and we also give its dependence at larger ALP masses m a . Moreover, we discuss how much the Fermi-LAT satellite experiment could improve this bound, should a close-enough supernova explode in the near future.

  2. Search for solar Axion Like Particles in the low energy range at CAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantatore, G.; Karuza, M.; Lozza, V.; Raiteri, G.

    2010-01-01

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) could be continuously produced in the Sun via the Primakoff process. The ALP flux could be seen on Earth by observing the photons produced by the ALP decay. The expected energy distribution of reconverted photons is peaked at 3 keV. There could be, however, a low energy tail due to various processes active in the Sun. We report results of the first test measurements in the low energy range performed at CAST along with a description of the experimental setup. Future detector developments are discussed and preliminary results on a liquid nitrogen cooled Avalanche Photodiode are presented.

  3. Repeating pulsed magnet system for axion-like particle searches and vacuum birefringence experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T., E-mail: yamazaki@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inada, T.; Namba, T. [International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Asai, S. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuo, A.; Kindo, K. [The Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Nojiri, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    We have developed a repeating pulsed magnet system which generates magnetic fields of about 10 T in a direction transverse to an incident beam over a length of 0.8 m with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz. Its repetition rate is by two orders of magnitude higher than usual pulsed magnets. It is composed of four low resistance racetrack coils and a 30 kJ transportable capacitor bank as a power supply. The system aims at axion-like particle searches with a pulsed light source and vacuum birefringence measurements. We report on the details of the system and its performances.

  4. Searching for Axion-Like Particles with X-ray Polarimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Day

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available X-ray telescopes are an exceptional tool for searching for new fundamental physics. In particular, X-ray observations have already placed world-leading bounds on the interaction between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs. ALPs are hypothetical new ultra-light particles motivated by string theory models. They can also act as dark matter and dark energy, and provide a solution to the strong CP problem. In a background magnetic field, ALPs and photons may interconvert. This leads to energy dependent modulations in both the flux and polarisation of the spectra of point sources shining through large magnetic fields. The next generation of polarising X-ray telescopes will offer new detection possibilities for ALPs. Here we present techniques and projected bounds for searching for ALPs with X-ray polarimetry. We demonstrate that upcoming X-ray polarimetry missions have the potential to place world-leading bounds on ALPs.

  5. A 3.55 keV hint for decaying axion-like particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Joerg [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Redondo, Javier [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Recently, indications for an emission line at 3.55 keV have been found in the combined spectra of a large number of galaxy clusters and also in Andromeda. This line could not be identified with any known spectral line. It is tempting to speculate that it has its origin in the decay of a particle contributing all or part of the dark matter. In this note we want to point out that axion-like particles being all or part of the dark matter are an ideal candidate to produce such a feature. More importantly the parameter values necessary are quite feasible in extensions of the Standard Model based on string theory and could be linked up to a variety of other intriguing phenomena, which also potentially allow for new tests of this speculation.

  6. A 3.55 keV hint for decaying axion-like particle dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Ringwald, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Recently, indications for an emission line at 3.55 keV have been found in the combined spectra of a large number of galaxy clusters and also in Andromeda. This line could not be identified with any known spectral line. It is tempting to speculate that it has its origin in the decay of a particle contributing all or part of the dark matter. In this note we want to point out that axion-like particles being all or part of the dark matter are an ideal candidate to produce such a feature. More importantly the parameter values necessary are quite feasible in extensions of the Standard Model based on string theory and could be linked up to a variety of other intriguing phenomena, which also potentially allow for new tests of this speculation.

  7. Constraints on Massive Axion-Like Particles from X-ray Observations of NGC1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linhan; Conlon, Joseph P.

    2018-06-01

    If axion-like particles (ALPs) exist, photons can convert to ALPs on passage through regions containing magnetic fields. The magnetised intracluster medium of large galaxy clusters provides a region that is highly efficient at ALP-photon conversion. X-ray observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) located within galaxy clusters can be used to search for and constrain ALPs, as photon-ALP conversion would lead to energy-dependent quasi-sinusoidal modulations in the X-ray spectrum of an AGN. We use Chandra observations of the central AGN of the Perseus Cluster, NGC1275, to place bounds on massive ALPs up to ma ˜ 10-11eV, extending previous work that used this dataset to constrain massless ALPs.

  8. Axion-like particle imprint in cosmological very-high-energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez, A.; Sánchez-Conde, M.A.; Prada, F.

    2011-01-01

    Discoveries of very high energy (VHE) photons from distant blazars suggest that, after correction by extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption, there is a flatness or even a turn-up in their spectra at the highest energies that cannot be easily explained by the standard framework. Here, it is shown that a possible solution to this problem is achieved by assuming the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs) with masses ∼ 1 neV. The ALP scenario is tested making use of observations of the highest redshift blazars known in the VHE energy regime, namely 3C 279, 3C 66A, PKS 1222+216 and PG 1553+113. In all cases, better fits to the observed spectra are found when including ALPs rather than considering EBL only. Interestingly, quite similar critical energies for photon/ALP conversions are also derived, independently of the source considered

  9. Spin-dependent potentials, axion-like particles and Lorentz-symmetry violation. Beyond the Standard Model phenomenology at the low-energy frontier of physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti Malta, Pedro

    2017-06-27

    It is well known that the Standard Model is not complete and many of the theories that seek to extend it predict new phenomena that may be accessible in low-energy settings. This thesis deals with some of these, namely, novel spin-dependent interparticle potentials, axion-like particles and Lorentz-symmetry violation. In Part I we discuss the spin-dependent potentials that arise due to the exchange of a topologically massive mediator, and also pursue a comparative study between spin-1/2 and spin-1 sources. In Part II we treat massive axion-like particles that may be copiously produced in core-collapse supernovae, thus leading to a non-standard flux of gamma rays. Using SN 1987A and the fact that after its observation no extra gamma-ray signal was detected, we are able to set robust limits on the parameter space of axion-like particles with masses in the 10 keV - 100 MeV range. Finally, in Part III we investigate the effects of Lorentz-breaking backgrounds in QED. We discuss two scenarios: a modification in the Maxwell sector via the Carroll-Field-Jackiw term and a new non-minimal coupling between electrons and photons. We are able to set upper limits on the coefficients of the backgrounds by using laboratory-based measurements.

  10. Revised constraints and Belle II sensitivity for visible and invisible axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Kahlhoefer, Felix

    2017-09-01

    Light pseudoscalars interacting pre-dominantly with Standard Model gauge bosons (so-called axion-like particles or ALPs) occur frequently in extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we review and update existing constraints on ALPs in the keV to GeV mass region from colliders, beam dump experiments and astrophysics. We furthermore provide a detailed calculation of the expected sensitivity of Belle II, which can search for visibly and invisibly decaying ALPs, as well as long-lived ALPs. The Belle II sensitivity is found to be substantially better than previously estimated, covering wide ranges of relevant parameter space. In particular, Belle II can explore an interesting class of dark matter models, in which ALPs mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and dark matter. In these models, the relic abundance can be set via resonant freeze-out, leading to a highly predictive scenario consistent with all existing constraints but testable with single-photon searches at Belle II in the near future.

  11. Revised constraints and Belle II sensitivity for visible and invisible axion-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Matthew J. [Melbourne Univ. (Australia). ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale; Ferber, Torben [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hearty, Christopher [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Institute of Particle Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kahlhoefer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Light pseudoscalars interacting pre-dominantly with Standard Model gauge bosons (so-called axion-like particles or ALPs) occur frequently in extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we review and update existing constraints on ALPs in the keV to GeV mass region from colliders, beam dump experiments and astrophysics. We furthermore provide a detailed calculation of the expected sensitivity of Belle II, which can search for visibly and invisibly decaying ALPs, as well as long-lived ALPs. The Belle II sensitivity is found to be substantially better than previously estimated, covering wide ranges of relevant parameter space. In particular, Belle II can explore an interesting class of dark matter models, in which ALPs mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and dark matter. In these models, the relic abundance can be set via resonant freeze-out, leading to a highly predictive scenario consistent with all existing constraints but testable with single-photon searches at Belle II in the near future.

  12. Recent breakthrough and outlook in constraining the non-Newtonian gravity and axion-like particles from Casimir physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimchitskaya, G.L. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    The strongest constraints on the Yukawa-type corrections to Newton's gravitational law and on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons, following from recently performed experiments of Casimir physics, are presented. Specifically, the constraints obtained from measurements of the lateral and normal Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces, and from the isoelectronic experiment are considered, and the ranges of their greatest strength are refined. Minor modifications in the experimental setups are proposed which allow for strengthening the resultant constraints up to an order of magnitude. The comparison with some weaker constraints derived in the Casimir regime is also made. (orig.)

  13. Hints of an axion-like particle mixing in the GeV gamma-ray blazar data?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Olga [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2013-11-01

    Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), if exist in nature, are expected to mix with photons in the presence of an external magnetic field. The energy range of photons which undergo strong mixing with ALPs depends on the ALP mass, on its coupling with photons as well as on the external magnetic field and particle density configurations. Recent observations of blazars by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope in the 0.1–300 GeV energy range show a break in their spectra in the 1–10 GeV range. We have modeled this spectral feature for the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C454.3 during its November 2010 outburst, assuming that a significant fraction of the gamma rays convert to ALPs in the large scale jet of this blazar. Using theoretically motivated models for the magnetic field and particle density configurations in the kiloparsec scale jet, outside the broad-line region, we find an ALP mass m{sub a} ∼ (1−3)⋅10{sup −7} eV and coupling g{sub aγ} ∼ (1−3)⋅10{sup −10} GeV{sup −1} after performing an illustrative statistical analysis of spectral data in four different epochs of emission. The precise values of m{sub a} and g{sub aγ} depend weakly on the assumed particle density configuration and are consistent with the current experimental bounds on these quantities. We apply this method and ALP parameters found from fitting 3C454.3 data to another flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS1222+216 (4C+21.35) data up to 400 GeV, as a consistency check, and found good fit. We find that the ALP-photon mixing effect on the GeV spectra may not be washed out for any reasonable estimate of the magnetic field in the intergalactic media.

  14. Production and detection of axion-like particles in a HERA dipole magnet. Letter-of-intent for the ALPS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehret, K.; Knabbe, E.A.; Lindner, A.; Meyer, N.; Notz, D.; Ringwald, A.; Frede, M.; Kracht, D.; Wiedemann, G.

    2007-02-01

    Recently, the PVLAS collaboration has reported evidence for an anomalous rotation of the polarization of light in vacuum in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. This may be explained through the production of a new light spin-zero (axion-like) neutral particle coupled to two photons. In this letter-of-intent, we propose to test this hypothesis by setting up a photon regeneration experiment which exploits the photon beam of a high-power infrared laser, sent along the transverse magnetic field of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet. The proposed1 ALPS (Axion-Like Particle Search) experiment offers a window of opportunity for a rapid firm establishment or exclusion of the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomaly published by PVALS. It will also allow for the measurement of mass, parity, and coupling strength of this particle. (orig.)

  15. An axion-like scalar field environment effect on binary black hole merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Ji, Li-Wei; Hu, Bin; Cao, Zhou-Jian; Cai, Rong-Gen

    2018-06-01

    The environment, such as an accretion disk, could modify the signal of the gravitational wave from astrophysical black hole binaries. In this article, we model the matter field around intermediate-mass binary black holes by means of an axion-like scalar field and investigate their joint evolution. In detail, we consider equal mass binary black holes surrounded by a shell of axion-like scalar field both in spherically symmetric and non-spherically symmetric cases, and with different strengths of the scalar field. Our result shows that the environmental scalar field could essentially modify the dynamics. Firstly, in the spherically symmetric case, with increase of the scalar field strength, the number of circular orbits for the binary black hole is reduced. This means that the scalar field could significantly accelerate the merger process. Secondly, once the scalar field strength exceeds a certain critical value, the scalar field could collapse into a third black hole with its mass being larger than that of the binary. Consequently, the new black hole that collapses from the environmental scalar field could accrete the binary promptly and the binary collides head-on with each other. In this process, there is almost no quadrupole signal produced, and, consequently, the gravitational wave is greatly suppressed. Thirdly, when the scalar field strength is relatively smaller than the critical value, the black hole orbit could develop eccentricity through accretion of the scalar field. Fourthly, during the initial stage of the inspiral, the gravitational attractive force from the axion-like scalar field could induce a sudden turn in the binary orbits, hence resulting in a transient wiggle in the gravitational waveform. Finally, in the non-spherical case, the scalar field could gravitationally attract the binary moving toward the center of mass for the scalar field and slow down the merger process.

  16. Production and detection of axion-like particles at the VUV-FEL. Letter of intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetz, U.; Ringwald, A.; Tschentscher, T.

    2006-06-01

    Recently, the PVLAS collaboration has reported evidence for an anomalously large rotation of the polarization of light generated in vacuum in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. This may be explained through the production of a new light spin-zero particle coupled to two photons. In this Letter of Intent, we propose to test this hypothesis by setting up a photon regeneration experiment which exploits the photon beam of the Vacuum-UltraViolet Free-Electron Laser VUV-FEL, sent along the transverse magnetic field of a linear arrangement of dipole magnets of size B L ∼ 30 Tm. The high photon energies available at the VUV-FEL increase substantially the expected photon regeneration rate in the mass range implied by the PVLAS anomaly, in comparison to the rate expected at visible lasers of similar power. We find that the particle interpretation of the PVLAS result can be tested within a short running period. The pseudoscalar vs. scalar nature can be determined by varying the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the laser polarization. The mass of the particle can be measured by running at different photon energies. The proposed experiment offers a window of opportunity for a firm establishment or exclusion of the particle interpretation of the PVLAS anomaly before other experiments can compete. (Orig.)

  17. Phenomenology and Astrophysics of Gravitationally-Bound Condensates of Axion-Like Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua Armstrong [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Light, spin-0 particles are ubiquitous in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model, and many of these make good candidates for the identity of dark matter. One very well-motivated candidate of this type is the axion. Due to their small mass and adherence to Bose statistics, axions can coalesce into heavy, gravitationally-bound condensates known as boson stars, also known as axion stars (in particular). In this work, we outline our recent progress in attempts to determine the properties of axion stars. We begin with a brief overview of the Standard Model, axions, and bosonic condensates in general. Then, in the context of axion stars, we will present our recent work, which includes: numerical estimates of the macroscopic properties (mass, radius, and particle number) of gravitationally stable axion stars; a calculation of their decay lifetime through number-changing interactions; an analysis of the gravitational collapse process for very heavy states; and an investigation of the implications of axion stars as dark matter. The basic conclusions of our work are that weakly-bound axion stars are only stable up to some calculable maximum mass, whereas states with larger masses collapse to a small radius, but do not form black holes. During collapse, a rapidly increasing binding energy implies a fast rate of decay to relativistic particles, giving rise to a Bosenova. Axion stars that are otherwise stable could be caused to collapse either by accretion of free particles to masses above the maximum, or through astrophysical collisions; in the latter case, we estimate the rate of collisions and the parameter space relevant to induced collapse.

  18. Supernova 1987A Constraints on Sub-GeV Dark Sectors, Millicharged Particles, the QCD Axion, and an Axion-like Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jae Hyeok [YITP, Stony Brook; Essig, Rouven [YITP, Stony Brook; McDermott, Samuel D. [Fermilab

    2018-03-02

    We consider the constraints from Supernova 1987A on particles with small couplings to the Standard Model. We discuss a model with a fermion coupled to a dark photon, with various mass relations in the dark sector; millicharged particles; dark-sector fermions with inelastic transitions; the hadronic QCD axion; and an axion-like particle that couples to Standard Model fermions with couplings proportional to their mass. In the fermion cases, we develop a new diagnostic for assessing when such a particle is trapped at large mixing angles. Our bounds for a fermion coupled to a dark photon constrain small couplings and masses <200 MeV, and do not decouple for low fermion masses. They exclude parameter space that is otherwise unconstrained by existing accelerator-based and direct-detection searches. In addition, our bounds are complementary to proposed laboratory searches for sub-GeV dark matter, and do not constrain several "thermal" benchmark-model targets. For a millicharged particle, we exclude charges between 10^(-9) to a few times 10^(-6) in units of the electron charge; this excludes parameter space to higher millicharges and masses than previous bounds. For the QCD axion and an axion-like particle, we apply several updated nuclear physics calculations and include the energy dependence of the optical depth to accurately account for energy loss at large couplings. We rule out a hadronic axion of mass between 0.1 and a few hundred eV, or equivalently bound the PQ scale between a few times 10^4 and 10^8 GeV, closing the hadronic axion window. For an axion-like particle, our bounds disfavor decay constants between a few times 10^5 GeV up to a few times 10^8 GeV. In all cases, our bounds differ from previous work by more than an order of magnitude across the entire parameter space. We also provide estimated systematic errors due to the uncertainties of the progenitor.

  19. On a connection between the limit set of the Moebius-Klein transformation, periodic continued fractions, El Naschie's topological theory of high energy particle physics and the possibility of a new axion-like particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek-Crnjac, L.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work we first give a general representation of the derivatives of the irrational number phi, for instance ((1)/(phi)), ((1)/(phi 2 )), ((1)/(phi 3 )) etc., as periodic continued fractions. Any irrational number can then be expanded in an infinite continued fraction. The limit set of the Kleinian transformation acting on the E-infinity Cantorian spacetime turned out to be this set of periodic continued fractions, consequently the vacuum of the E-infinity is described by this limit set. As discussed by El Naschie, every particle can be interpreted geometrically as a scaling of another. This is done using the topology of hyperbolic Kleinian space of VAK, which is nothing but our limit set. Here we will present the ratios of the theoretical masses of certain elementary particles to that of some chosen particles in term of phi. Many of these masses are quite close to integer multiples of the mass of a chosen particle. Finally we discuss the possibility of new transfinite, axion-like particles as discussed recently by Krauss and El Naschie [Quintessence, Vintage, London, 1999

  20. Cosmological problems with multiple axion-like fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, Katherine J.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating the QCD axion and simultaneously satisfying current constraints on the dark matter density and isocurvature fluctuations requires non-minimal fine-tuning of inflationary parameters or the axion misalignment angle (or both) for Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scales f a > 10 12 GeV. To gauge the degree of tuning in models with many axion-like fields at similar symmetry-breaking scales and masses, as may occur in string theoretic models that include a QCD axion, we introduce a figure of merit F that measures the fractional volume of allowed parameter space: the product of the slow roll parameter ε and each of the axion misalignment angles, θ 0 . For a single axion, F∼ −11 is needed to avoid conflict with observations. We show that the fine tuning of F becomes exponentially more extreme in the case of numerous axion-like fields. Anthropic arguments are insufficient to explain the fine tuning because the bulk of the anthropically allowed parameter space is observationally ruled out by limits on the cosmic microwave background isocurvature modes. Therefore, this tuning presents a challenge to the compatibility of string-theoretic models with light axions and inflationary cosmology

  1. New ideas for axion like particle dark matter search

    CERN Multimedia

    Betz, Michael; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    In the context of finding suitable large magnets for RF and microwave axion search, the Tore supra ring had been proposed. This Tokamak which could probably be made available for DM search has a huge volume and a strong magnetic field (30000 liter and 4.5 Tesla). It appears on a first glance, as an interesting candidate for this kind of experiment. One can find a suitable microwave mode which meets the condition that the RF electric field is parallel to the magnetostatic field. The eigenfrequency field pattern and Q factor for this mode and a few adjacent ones are calculated the some field patterns shown graphically. The use of the torus type cavity is not restricted to the Tore Supra. It can in principle be applied to any torus type structure also scaled up toward smaller dimensions and higher frequencies. In the second part of the slide presentation some alternatives and other cavity magnet concepts are shown and discussed.

  2. Search for chameleon particles via photon regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Aaron S.; CCPP, New York U.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first results from the GammeV search for chameleon particles, which may be created via photon-photon interactions within a strong magnetic field. The chameleons are assumed to have matter effects sufficiently strong that they reflect from all solid surfaces of the apparatus, thus evading detection in our previous search for weakly-interacting axion-like particles. We implement a novel technique to create and trap the reflective particles within a jar and to detect them later via their afterglow as they slowly convert back into photons. These measurements provide the first experimental constraints on the couplings of chameleons to photons

  3. GammeV: a milli-eV particle search at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, William Carl III

    2008-01-01

    GammeV is an experiment conducted at Fermilab that employs the light shining through a wall technique to search for axion-like particles and employs a particle in a jar technique to search for dilaton-like chameleon particles. We obtain limits on the coupling of photons to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalars and pseudoscalars in the milli-eV mass range. We are able to exclude the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomalous PVLAS 2006 result by more than 5 standard deviations. We also present results on a search for chameleons and set limits on their possible coupling to photons

  4. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Turner, M.S.

    1982-06-01

    work is described in these areas: cosmological baryon production; cosmological production of free quarks and other exotic particle species; the quark-hadron transition in the early universe; astrophysical and cosmological constraints on particle properties; massive neutrinos; phase transitions in the early universe; and astrophysical implications of an axion-like particle

  5. Constraints on a very light CP-odd Higgs of the NMSSM and other axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreas, Sarah; Lebedev, Oleg; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul; Ringwald, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    In the NMSSM, a light CP-odd Higgs arises due to spontaneous breaking of approximate symmetries such as Peccei-Quinn or R-symmetry and is motivated by string theory. The case when it is heavier than two muons is well studied and constrained. We analyze various meson decay, g-2, beam dump and reactor bounds on the CP-odd Higgs with mass below the muon threshold, in particular, addressing the question how light a CP-odd Higgs can be. We nd that it has to be heavier than 210 MeV or have couplings to fermions 4 orders of magnitude below those of the Standard Model Higgs. Our analysis applies more generally to couplings of a light pseudoscalar to matter. (orig.)

  6. The low-energy frontier of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg

    2010-02-01

    Most embeddings of the Standard Model into a more unified theory, in particular the ones based on supergravity or superstrings, predict the existence of a hidden sector of particles which have only very weak interactions with the visible sector Standard Model particles. Some of these exotic particle candidates (such as e.g. ''axions'', ''axion-like particles'' and ''hidden U(1) gauge bosons'') may be very light, with masses in the sub-eV range, and have very weak interactions with photons. Correspondingly, these very weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) may lead to observable effects in experiments (as well as in astrophysical and cosmological observations) searching for light shining through a wall, for changes in laser polarisation, for non-linear processes in large electromagnetic fields and for deviations from Coulomb's law. We present the physics case and a status report of this emerging low-energy frontier of fundamental physics. (orig.)

  7. Search for a photophilic scalar mediator between standard model and dark sector particles in di-photon final states

    CERN Document Server

    Belfkir, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The strong CP violation and Dark matter are two important and theoretically compelling issues in modern particle physics and cosmology and the concept of axion-like particle (ALPs) is an elegant solution to both. To solve the CP violation problem we introduce a scalar field. The quanta associated to this field is the ALP.

  8. Heavy particle effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.P.

    1981-01-01

    There are two problems discussed, both of which have to do with dissimilar magnitudes in mass. Theoretically, we can devise the large difference in mass as observed by decreeing some vev, v/sub i/ to be much bigger than the other; or, we can assume that some couplings g/sub i/ are much stronger. These two different assumptions give rise to entirely different patterns of interaction in the resulting theory. The first way to generate a mass hierarchy can be called the soft way, because in the zeroth order, the large mass scale leaves its foot print merely in a few effective parameters of the residual theory. The effective theory is renormalizable, sans anomaly. In this limit, the heavy particles decouple. The second assumption (g/sub j/ much greater than g/sub j'/) to create mass hierarchy does a lot of violence to a theory. Effects of the large mass scale will be felt by the system left behind in many ways. An infinite number of parameters are needed to summarize the effects in this limit. This is called the hard limit. It follows that the resulting effective Lagrangian, if in fact it makes sense to construct one at all, will be non-polynomial and apparently non-renormalizable

  9. A two particle hidden sector and the oscillations with photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Pedro D. [Universidad de Antofagasta, Departamento de Fisica, Antofagasta (Chile); Arias, Paola; Maldonado, Carlos [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departmento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile)

    2018-01-15

    We present a detailed study of the oscillations and optical properties for vacuum, in a model for the dark sector that contains axion-like particles and hidden photons. We provide bounds for the couplings versus the mass, using current results from ALPS-I and PVLAS. We also discuss the challenges for the detection of models with more than one hidden particle in light shining trough wall-like experiments. (orig.)

  10. Health effects of exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlava, T.; Uuppo, M.; Niemi, S.

    2013-11-01

    This report introduces general information about diesel particles and their health effects. The purpose of this report is to introduce particulate matter pollution and present some recent studies made regarding the health effects of particulate matter. The aim is not to go very deeply into the science, but instead to keep the text understandable for the average layman. Particulate matter is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. These small particles are made up of a number of components that include for example acids, such as nitrates and sulphates, as well as organic chemicals, metals and dust particles from the soil. Particulate matter comes from several sources, such as transportation emissions, industrial emissions, forest fires, cigarette smoke, volcanic ash and climate variations. Particles are divided into coarse particles with diameters less than 10 ..m, fine particles with diameters smaller than 2.5 ..m and ultra-fine particles with diameters less than 0.1 ..m. The particulate matter in diesel exhaust gas is a highly complex mixture of organic, inorganic, solid, volatile and partly volatile compounds. Many of these particles do not form until they reach the air. Many carcinogenic compounds have been found in diesel exhaust gas and it is considered carcinogenic to humans. Particulate matter can cause several health effects, such as premature death in persons with heart or lung disease, cancer, nonfatal heart attacks, irregular heartbeat, aggravated asthma, decreased lung function and an increase in respiratory symptoms, such as irritation of the airways, coughing or difficulty breathing. It is estimated that in Finland about 1300 people die prematurely due to particles and the economic loss in the EU due to the health effects of particles can be calculated in the billions. Ultra-fine particles are considered to be the most harmful to human health. Ultrafine particles usually make the most of their quantity and surface area

  11. The low-energy frontier of particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Most embeddings of the Standard Model into a more unified theory, in particular the ones based on supergravity or superstrings, predict the existence of a hidden sector of particles which have only very weak interactions with the visible sector Standard Model particles. Some of these exotic particle candidates (such as e.g. ''axions'', ''axion-like particles'' and ''hidden U(1) gauge bosons'') may be very light, with masses in the sub-eV range, and have very weak interactions with photons. Correspondingly, these very weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) may lead to observable effects in experiments (as well as in astrophysical and cosmological observations) searching for light shining through a wall, for changes in laser polarisation, for non-linear processes in large electromagnetic fields and for deviations from Coulomb's law. We present the physics case and a status report of this emerging low-energy frontier of fundamental physics. (orig.)

  12. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; IJzendoorn, Leo J. van; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm

  13. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; van IJzendoorn, Leo J.; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems - BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm - and one single-core particle system - SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  14. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden); Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, D‐38106 Braunschweig Germany (Germany); IJzendoorn, Leo J. van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, D ‐18119 Rostock (Germany); Gehrke, Nicole [nanoPET Pharma GmbH, D ‐10115 Berlin Germany (Germany); Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Christer, E-mail: christer.johansson@acreo.se [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  15. Biological effects of particle radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1988-01-01

    Conventional radiations such as photons, gamma rays or electrons show several physical or biological disadvantages to bring tumors to cure, therefore, more and more attentions is being paid to new modalitie such as fast neutrons, protons, negative pions and heavy ions, which are expected to overcome some of the defects of the conventional radiations. Except for fast neutrons, these particle radiations show excellet physical dose localization in tissue, moreover, in terms of biological effects, they demonstrate several features compared to conventional radiations, namely low oxygen enhancement ratio, high value of relative biological effectiveness, smaller cellular recovery, larger therapeutic gain factor and less cell cycle dependency in radiation sensitivity. In present paper the biological effects of particle radiations are shown comparing to the effects of conventional radiations. (author)

  16. Biological effects of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, L.; Martins, B.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1991-01-01

    The usual definitions of biological dose and biological dosimetry do not fit in case of particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The dose corresponds to an average value which is not representative of the highly localized energy transfer due to heavy ions. Fortunately, up to now, a biological dosimetry following an exposure to high LET particles is necessary only for cosmonauts. In radiotherapy applications, one exactly knows the nature and energy of incident particle beams. The quality requirements for a good biodosimeter include reliable relation between dose and effect, weak sensitivity to individual variations, reliability and stability of acquired informations against the time delay between exposure and measurements. Nothing is better than the human lymphocyte to be used for measurements that fulfil these requirements. In the case of a manned spaceship, the irradiation dose corresponds to a wide range of radiation (protons, neutrons, heavy ions), and making a dosimetry as well as defining it are of current concern. As yet, there exist two possible definitions, which reduce the dose either to a proton or to a neutron equivalent one. However, such an approximation is not a faithful representation of the irradiation effects and in particular, the long-term effects may be quite different. In the future, it is reasonable to expect an evolution towards technics that enable identifying irradiated cells and quantifying precisely their radiation damage in order to reconstruct the spectrum of particles received by a given cosmonaut in a given time. Let us emphasize that the radiation hazards due to a short stay in space are quite minor, but in the case of a travel to Mars, they cannot be neglected [fr

  17. Health Effects of Ozone and Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: Health Effects of Ozone and Particle Pollution Two types of air pollution dominate in the ... So what are ozone and particle pollution? Ozone Pollution It may be hard to imagine that pollution ...

  18. Mixing of photons with light pseudoscalars in time-dependent magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola; Arza, Ariel; Gamboa, Jorge [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departmento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-11-15

    The effects of an external time-dependent magnetic field in the conversion probability of photon- to axion-like particles are studied. Our findings show that for a certain time regime, the amplitude of the produced axion-like field can be enlarged with respect to the static case, thus enhancing the probability of conversion. (orig.)

  19. Ultralight particle dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  20. Ultralight particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-15

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  1. Particle effects on fish gills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Cao; Kania, Per W.; Buchmann, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    Particles composed of inorganic, organic and/or biological materials occur in both natural water bodies and aquaculture facilities. They are expected to affect fish health through a direct chemical, mechanical and biological interaction with gills during ventilation but the nature of the reactions...... and the relative importance of mechanical versus chemical and biological stimulation are unknown. The present work presents an immune gene expression method for evaluation of gill disturbance and sets a baseline for the mechanical influence on fish gills of chemically inert spherical particles. The method may...... be applied to investigate particle impact at different combinations of temperature, fish size, water quality and particle composition. Spherical polystyrene particles (diameters 0.2 μm, 1 μm, 20 μm, 40 μm and 90 μm) were adopted as the particle model and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fingerlings...

  2. Primordial nucleosynthesis as a probe of particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author uses the success of the standard model of big-bang nucleosynthesis to examine the effects of interacting particle species and the effect of varying coupling constants, predicted by theories set in extra dimensions, on primordial nucleosynthesis. A review is given of the standard model and of the abundances of the light elements expected to be produced in the early Universe. The weakest piece of the concordance between the standard model of big-bang nucleosynthesis and observation is the production and primordial abundance of 7 Li. Therefore he discusses the production of 7 Li in astrophysical environments other than the early Universe and shows that the predictions of big-bang nucleosynthesis, when supplemented by those due to astrophysical sources, are in good agreement with observation. He then shows that the effect on big-bang nucleosynthesis of an additional particle species which remains coupled to either photons or light neutrinos can be quite different from that predicted by the equivalent number of neutrino species parameterization, which does work for decoupled additional species. In particular he considers the case of an additional axion-like particle and shows that its effect is to decrease the amount of 4 He produced in the big-bang. In addition, he considers the effects of varying coupling constants on 4 He production in the big-bang and shows that constraining Y p = 0.24 ± 0.01 leads to a constraint on the time variation of the fine-structure constant of |dln α/dt| ≤ x 10 -14

  3. Particle penetration and radiation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sigmund, Peter

    This book, which has evolved from the author’s lectures at the University of Copenhagen and the University of Southern Denmark, draws on his experience as an active researcher in the interaction of charged particles with matter over more than forty years. The emphasis is on the theoretical description of fundamental phenomena, and much attention has been given to classic topics such as: Rutherford scattering; the theory of particle stopping as developed by Bohr, Bethe, Bloch and Lindhard; the statistical description of energy loss as developed by Bohr, Bothe, Williams and Landau; and numerous more recent developments. An attempt has been made to provide at least one complete derivation of a theoretical description for all central aspects. The presentation is intended to respect the ideas of the original authors, but much effort has been invested in establishing a unified and appealing notation consistent with present-day standards. It is intended that this volume will satisfy a long-standing need for a text...

  4. EFFECTS OF EFFECTS OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The parameters examined were: moisture content, particle size distribution, total isture content, particle size distribution, total hydrocarbon content, soil pH, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, total heterotrophic bacteria and fungi count. The analysis of the soil characteristics throughout the remediation period showed ...

  5. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant ''fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite ω *i ). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs

  6. Effects of alpha particles on zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, E.H.W.; Choi, V.W.Y.; Yu, K.N.; Li, V.W.T.; Cheng, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation such as X-ray and alpha particles can damage cellular macromolecules, which can lead to DNA single- and double-strand breaks. In the present work, we studied the effects of alpha particles on dechorionated zebrafish embryos. Thin polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films with a thickness of 16 μm were prepared from commercially available PADC films (with thickness of 100 μm) by chemical etching and used as support substrates for holding zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation. These films recorded alpha-particle hit positions, quantified the number and energy of alpha particles actually incident on the embryo cells, and thus enabled the calculation of the dose absorbed by the embryo cells. Irradiation was made at 1.25 hours post fertilization (hpf) with various absorbed dose. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed on the embryos at different time stages after irradiation. Marked apoptosis was detected only in embryos at earlier time stages. The results showed that DNA double-strand break during zebrafish embryogenesis can be induced by alpha-particle irradiation, which suggests that zebrafish is a potential model for assessing the effects of alpha-particle radiation

  7. Gauge hierarchy, decoupling, and heavy particle effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, York-Peng

    1981-01-01

    This chapter examines the problems of a large gauge hierarchy and decoupling in theories with spontaneously broken symmetry. Attempts to show, with regard to all orders in the loop expansion, that: once a proper identification is made of the light particles and of the heavy particles at the tree level, then such a division will be maintained order by order in the loop expansion without the necessity of fine tuning; there is a local renormalizable effective Lagrangian, composed of light fields only, which can be used to reproduce all the one light particle irreducible Green's functions; and a set of renormalization group equations can be written down, wherein one stays in the lower energy region to correlate the two sets of parameters in the full and the effective light theories. The appendix gives an algebraic rearrangement method which can be efficiently used to calculate the muon effects on the electron anomalous magnetic moment

  8. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahrentorp, F.; Astalan, A.; Blomgren, J.; Jonasson, C.; Wetterskog, E.; Svedlindh, P.; Lak, A.; Ludwig, F.; Van IJzendoorn, L.J.; Westphal, F.; Grüttner, C.; Gehrke, N.; Gustafsson, S.; Olsson, E.; Johansson, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron

  9. Alpha particle effects on MHD ballooning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    During the period, as the first step towards the goal of detail understanding of the effects of alpha particle on MHD Ballooning Modes, a new numerical approach to investigate the stability of low-frequency fluctuations in high temperature tokamaks was developed by solving the gyrokinetic equations for the ion and electron directly as an initial value problem. The advantage of this approach is the inclusion of many important kinetic features of the problem without approximations and computationally more economical than particle-pushing simulation. The ion-temperature-gradient-mode was investigated to benchmark this new simulation technique. Previous results in literature were recovered. Both the adiabatic electron model and the full drift-kinetic electron model are studied. Numerical result shows that the full drift-kinetic electron model is more unstable. The development of subcycling technique to handle the fast electron bounce time is particularly significant to apply this new approach to the alpha particle problem since alpha particle bounce frequency is also significantly higher than the mode frequency. This new numerical technique will be the basis of future study of the microstability in high temperature tokamaks with alpha particles (or any energetic species). 15 refs., 13 figs

  10. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  11. Effects of HZE particles on astronauts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.; Townsend, L.W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Outside the effective shielding provided by Earth's magnetic field, space travelers will experience penetrating high-energy galactic cosmic rays, which reach the orbit of earth isotropically and with fluxes that vary smoothly over an 11-yr interval that is related to the 11-yr cycle of solar activity. This radiation consists of protons (Z=1) up to uranium (Z=92). There is an abundance of even--over odd-Z nuclei, with several local peaks in abundance when plotted as a function of Z. A prominent peak occurs in the iron abundance (Z=26) and is presumably related to the richness of iron in the galactic cosmic ray sources. The iron component is particularly important in a biological assessment of risk. High-energy particles with Z>2 have been called (high Z and energy) (HZE) particles. These particles are a concern in the evaluation of radiation risk because (a) they are highly ionizing and cause considerable damage as they penetrate biological tissue, and (b) they undergo nuclear interactions within the spacecraft shielding and the bodies of the astronauts themselves to produce lighter, more penetrating and sometimes highly ionizing secondaries. Considerably more ground-based cellular and animal experimentation is in order with high-energy heavy-ion beams before definitive statements can be made on the risk of HZE particles to humans outside the geomagnetosphere

  12. Effects of HZE particles on astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, S.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Townsend, L.W.; Wilson, J.W. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Outside the effective shielding provided by Earth's magnetic field, space travelers will experience penetrating high-energy galactic cosmic rays, which reach the orbit of earth isotropically and with fluxes that vary smoothly over an 11-yr interval that is related to the 11-yr cycle of solar activity. This radiation consists of protons (Z=1) up to uranium (Z=92). There is an abundance of even--over odd-Z nuclei, with several local peaks in abundance when plotted as a function of Z. A prominent peak occurs in the iron abundance (Z=26) and is presumably related to the richness of iron in the galactic cosmic ray sources. The iron component is particularly important in a biological assessment of risk. High-energy particles with Z>2 have been called (high Z and energy) (HZE) particles. These particles are a concern in the evaluation of radiation risk because (a) they are highly ionizing and cause considerable damage as they penetrate biological tissue, and (b) they undergo nuclear interactions within the spacecraft shielding and the bodies of the astronauts themselves to produce lighter, more penetrating and sometimes highly ionizing secondaries. Considerably more ground-based cellular and animal experimentation is in order with high-energy heavy-ion beams before definitive statements can be made on the risk of HZE particles to humans outside the geomagnetosphere.

  13. Coulomb effects in particle distributions inclusive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erazmus, B.; Martin, L.; Pluta, J.; Stavinky, A.

    1997-01-01

    Single pion distributions from central 158 A.GeV/c Pb + Pb collisions measured by the NA44 experiment show the effect of Coulomb interaction with the net charge produced during the reaction. Coulomb effects are analyzed with the help of the microscopic model RQMD and a model including the Coulomb interaction. Different sets of kinematical characteristics of the net charge have been used to reproduce the experimental data and a strong sensitivity to the charge value has been found. This study has evidenced the non-negligible influence of a Coulomb charge, present in the region of the central rapidity in heavy ion collisions on the inclusive distributions of the produced particles. A more thorough analysis of the data obtained from the experiment NA44 is now under way to take into account the hyperon decay that can modify the fraction of different particles, particularly at low transverse momenta

  14. Effects of Particles Collision on Separating Gas–Particle Two-Phase Turbulent Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Sihao, L. V.; Yang, Weihua; Li, Xiangli; Li, Guohui

    2013-01-01

    A second-order moment two-phase turbulence model incorporating a particle temperature model based on the kinetic theory of granular flow is applied to investigate the effects of particles collision on separating gas–particle two-phase turbulent

  15. Dyson Orbitals, Quasi-Particle effects and Compton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dyson orbitals play an important role in understanding quasi-particle effects in the correlated ground state of a many-particle system and are relevant for describing the Compton scattering cross section beyond the frameworks of the impulse approximation (IA) and the independent particle model (IPM). Here we discuss corrections to the Kohn-Sham energies due to quasi-particle effects in terms of Dyson orbitals and obtain a relatively simple local form of the exchange-correlation energy. Illust...

  16. Effect of particle shapes on effective strain gradient of SiC particle reinforced aluminum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X; Cao, D F; Mei, H; Liu, L S; Lei, Z T

    2013-01-01

    The stress increments depend not only on the plastic strain but also on the gradient of plastic strain, when the characteristic length scale associated with non-uniform plastic deformation is on the order of microns. In the present research, the Taylor-based nonlocal theory of plasticity (TNT plasticity), with considering both geometrically necessary dislocations and statistically stored dislocations, is applied to investigated the effect of particle shapes on the strain gradient and mechanical properties of SiC particle reinforced aluminum composites (SiC/Al composites). Based on this theory, a two-dimensional axial symmetry cell model is built in the ABAQUS finite element code through its USER-ELEMENT (UEL) interface. Some comparisons with the classical plastic theory demonstrate that the effective stress predicted by TNT plasticity is obviously higher than that predicted by classical plastic theory. The results also demonstrate that the irregular particles cause higher effective gradient strain which is attributed to the fact that angular shape particles give more geometrically.

  17. Effects of charged particles on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Itsukaichi, Hiromi; Murakami, Masahiro

    1995-01-01

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs 1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations. (author)

  18. Cytotoxic effect of galvanically coupled magnesium-titanium particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jua; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that reduction reactions at metallic biomaterial surfaces can induce significant killing of cells in proximity to the surface. To exploit this phenomenon for therapeutic purposes, for example, for cancer tumor killing or antibacterial effects (amongst other applications), magnesium metal particles, galvanically coupled to titanium by sputtering, have been evaluated for their cell-killing capability (i.e. cytotoxicity). Magnesium (Mg) particles large enough to prevent particle phagocytosis were investigated, so that only electrochemical reactions, and not particle toxicity per se, caused cytotoxic effects. Titanium (Ti) coated magnesium particles, as well as magnesium-only particles were introduced into MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblast cell cultures over a range of particle concentrations, and cells were observed to die in a dosage-dependent manner. Ti-coated magnesium particles killed more cells at lower particle concentration than magnesium alone (Pmagnesium and magnesium-titanium had no significant difference at similar particle concentrations. Complete cell killing occurred at 750μg/ml and 1500μg/ml for Mg-Ti and Mg, respectively. Thus, this work demonstrates that galvanically coupled Mg-Ti particles have a significant cell killing capability greater than Mg alone. In addition, when the pH associated with complete killing with particles was created using NaOH only (no particles), then the percentage of cells killed was significantly less (Pmagnesium-titanium microparticles kill cells more effectively than magnesium particles alone. The killing effect was shown to not be due to pH shifts since no differences were seen for different particle types and pH adjusted medium without particles did not exhibit the same level of killing. The significance of this work is the recognition of this killing effect with Mg particles and the potential therapeutic applications in infection control and cancer treatment that this process may provide. Copyright

  19. Ultrasonic control of ceramic membrane fouling: Effect of particle characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Weavers, Linda K; Walker, Harold W

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the effect of particle characteristics on the ultrasonic control of membrane fouling was investigated. Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to a cross-flow filtration system with gamma-alumina membranes in the presence of colloidal silica particles. Experimental results indicated that particle concentration affected the ability of ultrasound to control membrane fouling, with less effective control of fouling at higher particle concentrations. Measurements of sound wave intensity and images of the cavitation region indicated that particles induced additional cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source, which resulted in less turbulence reaching the membrane surface and subsequently less effective control of fouling. When silica particles were modified to be hydrophobic, greater inducement of cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source occurred for a fixed concentration, also resulting in less effective control of fouling. Particle size influenced the cleaning ability of ultrasound, with better permeate recovery observed with larger particles. Particle size did not affect sound wave intensity, suggesting that the more effective control of fouling by large particles was due to greater lift and cross-flow drag forces on larger particles compared to smaller particles.

  20. Effect of particle-particle shearing on the bioleaching of sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, N; Karamanev, D G; Margaritis, A

    2002-11-05

    The biological leaching of sulfide minerals, used for the production of gold, copper, zinc, cobalt, and other metals, is very often carried out in slurry bioreactors, where the shearing between sulfide particles is intensive. In order to be able to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching, it is of significant importance to know the effect of particle shearing on the rate of leaching. The recently proposed concept of ore immobilization allowed us to study the effect of particle shearing on the rate of sulfide (pyrite) leaching by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Using this concept, we designed two very similar bioreactors, the main difference between which was the presence and absence of particle-particle shearing. It was shown that when the oxygen mass transfer was not the rate-limiting step, the rate of bioleaching in the frictionless bioreactor was 2.5 times higher than that in a bioreactor with particle friction (shearing). The concentration of free suspended cells in the frictionless bioreactor was by orders of magnitude lower than that in the frictional bioreactor, which showed that particle friction strongly reduces the microbial attachment to sulfide surface, which, in turn, reduces the rate of bioleaching. Surprisingly, it was found that formation of a layer of insoluble iron salts on the surface of sulfide particles is much slower under shearless conditions than in the presence of particle-particle shearing. This was explained by the effect of particle friction on liquid-solid mass transfer rate. The results of this study show that reduction of the particle friction during bioleaching of sulfide minerals can bring important advantages not only by increasing significantly the bioleaching rate, but also by increasing the rate of gas-liquid oxygen mass transfer, reducing the formation of iron precipitates and reducing the energy consumption. One of the efficient methods for reduction of particle friction is ore immobilization in a porous matrix. Copyright 2002

  1. Redistribution of retained particles. Effect of hyperpnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valberg, P.A.; Wolff, R.K.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of postexposure hyperpnea on clearance of particles deposited in the lungs of adult male beagle dogs was examined. Sedated dogs inhaled an insoluble 67 Gg 2 O 3 (T 1/2 . 78 h) aerosol (0.12 micron AMD) for one half hour on three separate occasions. Following aerosol exposures 1 and 2, dogs were assigned to either an eupneic (EUP) or hyperpneic (HYP) group and clearance was followed noninvasively for 9 days by whole body counting and gamma camera analysis. After exposure 2, EUP and HYP assignments were interchanged so that each dog was studied under both conditions. Hyperpnea was induced by housing dogs in an atmosphere of 7% CO 2 in air, 6 h per day. Carbon dioxide inhalation increased VE a factor of 3.7 +/- 0.9 (SD). The authors found that pulmonary clearance was retarded by CO 2 -stimulated hyperpnea in 7 of 8 dogs. Following aerosol exposure 3, dogs were divided between EUP and HYP and subsequently were killed in pairs at 3 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days. Distribution of activity in body organs was examined, and translocation to the hilar lymph nodes was followed. Both retention distribution and removal of activity by saline lavage were measured in postmortem lungs. The percentage of lavaged activity associated with pulmonary macrophages increased from 44% at 3 h after exposure to 91% at 4 and 7 days after exposure. Examination of dried lung slices by autoradiography showed clearance of particles from airways and formation of a more punctate distribution in the retained activity at increasing times after exposure. Distinctive differences between HYP and EUP dogs were not seen

  2. Effects of Particles Collision on Separating Gas–Particle Two-Phase Turbulent Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Sihao, L. V.

    2013-10-10

    A second-order moment two-phase turbulence model incorporating a particle temperature model based on the kinetic theory of granular flow is applied to investigate the effects of particles collision on separating gas–particle two-phase turbulent flows. In this model, the anisotropy of gas and solid phase two-phase Reynolds stresses and their correlation of velocity fluctuation are fully considered using a presented Reynolds stress model and the transport equation of two-phase stress correlation. Experimental measurements (Xu and Zhou in ASME-FED Summer Meeting, San Francisco, Paper FEDSM99-7909, 1999) are used to validate this model, source codes and prediction results. It showed that the particles collision leads to decrease in the intensity of gas and particle vortices and takes a larger effect on particle turbulent fluctuations. The time-averaged velocity, the fluctuation velocity of gas and particle phase considering particles colli-sion are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Particle kinetic energy is always smaller than gas phase due to energy dissipation from particle collision. Moreover, axial– axial and radial–radial fluctuation velocity correlations have stronger anisotropic behaviors. © King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals 2013

  3. Particle size, magnetic field, and blood velocity effects on particle retention in magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Erica M; Maxim, Peter G; Eaton, John K

    2010-01-01

    A physics-based model of a general magnetic drug targeting (MDT) system was developed with the goal of realizing the practical limitations of MDT when electromagnets are the source of the magnetic field. The simulation tracks magnetic particles subject to gravity, drag force, magnetic force, and hydrodynamic lift in specified flow fields and external magnetic field distributions. A model problem was analyzed to determine the effect of drug particle size, blood flow velocity, and magnetic field gradient strength on efficiency in holding particles stationary in a laminar Poiseuille flow modeling blood flow in a medium-sized artery. It was found that particle retention rate increased with increasing particle diameter and magnetic field gradient strength and decreased with increasing bulk flow velocity. The results suggest that MDT systems with electromagnets are unsuitable for use in small arteries because it is difficult to control particles smaller than about 20 microm in diameter.

  4. Effective Lagrangians in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trahern, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Non-linear effective Lagrangians are constructed to represent the low energy phenomenology of elementary particles. As approximate descriptions of the dynamics of hadrons, these models simulate the expected (but unproven) behavior of more complex theories such as quantum Chromo-dynamics [QCD]. A general formalism for non-linear models was developed in the late 1960's by Coleman, Wess and Zumino. This dissertation utilizes and extends their work by incorporating some of the advances that have been made in the understanding of quantum field theories in the last decade. In particular the significance of spatial boundary conditions for interpreting the ground state behavior of the non-linear models is investigated. In addition the existence of a dual theory for the non-linear model is discussed. For experimental purposes duality refers to the possibility that in different enrgy regimes there may be wholly distinct kinds of excitations in the physical spectrum. Corresponding to these phenomenological distinctions are mutually exclusive mathematical descriptions. A familiar example is the duality of electric and magnetic charge in electro-dynamics. If magnetic charges do exist, they are expected to be extremely massive states that are unobservable up to very high energies. The analysis of such states within electrodynamics shows that one cannot describe both electric and magnetic charges without admitting the presence of singularities in the electric potential. A completely analogous form of duality is found and discussed for the non-linear models

  5. The effect of particle shape on hopper discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, P.W. [CSIRO, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Mathematical and Information Sciences

    1999-07-01

    Hopper flows are an important class of industrial particle flows. The inclusion of particle shape allows DEM models to replicate many features of real hopper flows that are not possible when using circular particles. Elongated particles can produce flow rates up to 30% lower than for circular particles and the flow patterns are quite different. The yielding of the particle microstructure resembles more the tearing of a continuum solid, with large scale quasi-stable voids being formed and large groups of particles moving together. The flow becomes increasingly concentrated in a relatively narrow funnel above the hopper opening. This is encouragement that DEM may be able to predict important problems such as bridging and rat-holing. Increasing the blockiness or angularity of the particles also increases resistance to flow and reduces flow rates by up to 28% but does not have any perceptible effect on the nature of the flow. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Effects of particles on macrophage migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.L.; Robinson, B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Random and directed migration of cells lavaged from the lungs of rats and dogs were studied in vitro using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) as a chemo attractant. Rats and dogs were intratracheally instilled with either saline (controls) or about 10 9 fluorescent polystyrene microspheres, and lungs were lavaged after 1 or 7 days. More rat cells than dog cells migrated at 1 day after both particle and saline instillations; at 7 days, only cells lavaged from rats after particle instillations showed enhanced migration abilities. FMLP caused a 1.5 to 2-fold enhancement compared to random migration in cell numbers counted on the lower sides of chemotactic membranes. Cells with low particle numbers were more likely to migrate than those with high numbers of ingested particles. (author)

  7. Statistical effect of interactions on particle creation in expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    The statistical effect of interactions which drives many-particle systems toward equilibrium is expected to change the qualitative and quantitative features of particle creation in expanding universe. To investigate this problem a simplified model called the finite-time reduction model is formulated and applied to the scalar particle creation in the radiation dominant Friedmann universe. The number density of created particles and the entropy production due to particle creation are estimated. The result for the number density is compared with that in the conventional free field theory. It is shown that the statistical effect increases the particle creation and lengthens the active creation period. As for the entropy production it is shown that it is negligible for scalar particles in the Friedmann universe. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation of the effect of particle concentration on particle measurement by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huafeng; Zhou, Binwu; Wu, Xuecheng; Wu, Yingchun; Gao, Xiang; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2014-04-01

    Digital holography plays a key role in particle field measurement, and appears to be a strong contender as the next-generation technology for diagnostics of 3D particle field. However, various recording parameters, such as the recording distance, the particle size, the wavelength, the size of the CCD chip, the pixel size and the particle concentration, will affect the results of the reconstruction, and may even determine the success or failure of a measurement. This paper presents a numerical investigation on the effect of particle concentration, the volume depth to evaluate the capability of digital holographic microscopy. Standard particles holograms with all known recording parameters are numerically generated by using a common procedure based on Lorenz-Mie scattering theory. Reconstruction of those holograms are then performed by a wavelet-transform based method. Results show that the reconstruction efficiency decreases quickly until particle concentration reaches 50×104 (mm-3), and decreases linearly with the increase of particle concentration from 50 × 104 (mm-3) to 860 × 104 (mm-3) in the same volume. The first half of the line waves larger than the second half. It also indicates that the increase of concentration leads the rise in average diameter error and z position error of particles. Besides, the volume depth also plays a key role in reconstruction.

  9. Effect of heavy particles in low-energy light-particle processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, L.H.; Hagiwara, T.; Ovrut, B.

    1979-01-01

    The ''decoupling theorem'' of Appelquist and Carazzone is found not always to be applicable to light-scalar-particle processes in spontaneously broken theories. If the Higgs scalar is considered to be light, then Higgs-scalar processes see the effect of heavy fermions and heavy vector gauge bosons at the one-loop level. If there is more than one scalar multiplet in a spontaneously broken gauge theory, the effect of a heavy Higgs particle in light-scalar-particle processes is significant at the tree level. In the latter case, such an effect can be absorbed completely into an effective phi 4 coupling constant, lambda/sub eff/, of the light particle provided that lambda/sub eff/ is positive definite

  10. Numerical investigation of adhesion effects on solid particles filtration efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffee, Amira; Luckham, Paul; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-11-01

    Our work investigate the effectiveness of particle filtration process, in particular using a fully-coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Discrete Element Method (DEM) approach involving poly-dispersed, adhesive solid particles. We found that an increase in particle adhesion reduces solid production through the opening of a wire-wrap type filter. Over time, as particle agglomerates continuously deposit on top of the filter, layer upon layer of particles is built on top of the filter, forming a particle pack. It is observed that with increasing particle adhesion, the pack height build up also increases and hence decreases the average particle volume fraction of the pack. This trend suggests higher porosity and looser packing of solid particles within the pack with increased adhesion. Furthermore, we found that the pressure drop for adhesive case is lower compared to non-adhesive case. Our results suggest agglomerating solid particles has beneficial effects on particle filtration. One important application of these findings is towards designing and optimizing sand control process for a hydrocarbon well with excessive sand production which is major challenge in oil and gas industry. Funding from PETRONAS and RAEng UK for Research Chair (OKM) gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Optimizing parameter of particle damping based on Leidenfrost effect of particle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaofei; Wu, Chengjun; Chen, Peng

    2018-05-01

    Particle damping (PD) has strongly nonlinearity. With sufficiently vigorous vibration conditions, it always plays excellent damping performance and the particles which are filled into cavity are on Leidenfrost state considered in particle flow theory. For investigating the interesting phenomenon, the damping effect of PD on this state is discussed by the developed numerical model which is established based on principle of gas and solid. Furtherly, the numerical model is reformed and applied to study the relationship of Leidenfrost velocity with characteristic parameters of PD such as particle density, diameter, mass packing ratio and diameter-length ratio. The results indicate that particle density and mass packing ratio can drastically improve the damping performance as opposed as particle diameter and diameter-length ratio, mass packing ratio and diameter-length ratio can low the excited intensity for Leidenfrost state. For discussing the application of the phenomenon in engineering, bound optimization by quadratic approximation (BOBYQA) method is employed to optimize mass packing ratio of PD for minimize maximum amplitude (MMA) and minimize total vibration level (MTVL). It is noted that the particle damping can drastically reduce the vibrating amplitude for MMA as Leidenfrost velocity equal to the vibrating velocity relative to maximum vibration amplitude. For MTVL, larger mass packing ratio is best option because particles at relatively wide frequency range is adjacent to Leidenfrost state.

  12. Planetary Produced Axionlike Particles and Gamma-Ray Flashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liolios, Anastasios

    2008-01-01

    Axion-like particles could be created in nuclear disintegrations and deexitations of natural radionuclides present in the interior of the planets. For the Earth and the other planets with a surrounding magnetosphere, axion production could result to gamma and X-ray emission, originating from axion to photon conversion in the planetary magnetic fields. The estimated planetary axion fluxes as well as the related gamma ray fluxes from Earth and the giant planets of our solar system are given along with the axion coupling to ordinary matter. A possible connection with the enigmatic Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) discovered in 1994 by CGRO/BATSE and also detected with the RHESSI satellite, is also discussed.

  13. The quantum brownian particle and memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britani, J.R.; Mizrahi, S.S.; Pimentel, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Quantum Brownian particle, immersed in a heat bath, is described by a statistical operator whose evolution is ruled by a Generalized Master Equation (GME). The heat bath degrees of freedom are considered to be either white noise or coloured noise correlated,while the GME is considered under either the Markov or Non-Markov approaches. The comparison between these considerations are fully developed and their physical meaning is discussed. (author)

  14. The low energy frontier: searches for ultra-light particles beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years theoretical studies and astrophysical observations have confirmed that unknown constituents of our universe like dark matter may find its explanation not only at large-scale experiments at highest energies, but could also show up at the opposite energy scale. In many laboratories world-wide searches for axions, axion-like particles, hidden photons, chameleons or other so-called WISPs with masses below the eV scale are ongoing. Examples at DESY are the experiments ALPS ("Any Light Particle Search") and SHIPS ("Solar HIdden Photon Search"). At CERN CAST and OSQAR take data. In all these experiments new particles could manifest themselves in a very spectacular manner. Light would apparently shine through thickest walls. The results of a first generation of laboratory and astrophysics experiments will be summarized and plans for future enterprises be discussed

  15. The CERN Resonant Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particle Search (CROWS)

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Michael; Gasior, Marek; Thumm, Manfred

    The subject of this thesis is the design, implementation and first results of the ``CERN Resonant WISP Search'' (CROWS) experiment, which probes the existence of Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles (WISPs) using microwave techniques. Axion Like Particles and Hidden Sector Photons are two well motivated members of the WISP family. Their existence could reveal the composition of cold dark matter in the universe and explain a large number of astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the discovery of an axion would solve a long standing issue in the standard model, known as the ``strong CP problem''. Despite their strong theoretical motivation, the hypothetical particles have not been observed in any experiment so far. One way to probe the existence of WISPs is to exploit their interaction with photons in a ``light shining through the wall'' experiment. A laser beam is guided through a strong magnetic field in the ``emitting region'' of the experiment. This provides photons, which can convert into hypothetical Axi...

  16. Shortwave radiative effects of unactivated aerosol particles in clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, T.; Baker, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    Clouds in some polluted areas may contain high concentrations of anthropogenic aerosol particles. The possible role of these particles in perturbing the optical and dynamical properties of the clouds is an important question for climate studies. The direct radiative effects of unactivated aerosol particles in stable stratus clouds have been calculated at lambda=0.5μm. Several simplifying asumptions have been made relating the behavior of such particles in the high humidity enviornment within the cloud to their physicochemical make-up. It is shown that the energy absorbed by particles within the clouds may be, for realistic concentrations, comparable to the latent heat released and thus may play a significant role in cloud dynamics in some areas. These results are shown to be relatively insensitive to the assumptions about the particle properties within the cloud

  17. Final state interaction effect on correlations in narrow particles pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the space-time dimensions of the particle production region is discussed. The basic formulae, taking into account he effects of quantum statistics and final state interaction, and the conditions of their applicability are given

  18. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different limestone particle sizes in layer diets on bone quality characteristics at end-of-lay hens. Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg DM) that is extensively used in commercial poultry diets was obtained from a specific South African source. Limestone particles were graded as ...

  19. Geometric effects in alpha particle detection from distributed air sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, L.R.; Leitao, R.M.S.; Marques, A.; Rivera, A.

    1994-08-01

    Geometric effects associated to detection of alpha particles from distributed air sources, as it happens in Radon and Thoron measurements, are revisited. The volume outside which no alpha particle may reach the entrance window of the detector is defined and determined analytically for rectangular and cylindrical symmetry geometries. (author). 3 figs

  20. Effect of limestone particle size on egg production and eggshell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different limestone particle sizes had no effect on any of the tested egg production and eggshell quality parameters. These results suggested that larger particles limestone are not necessarily essential to provide sufficient Ca2+ to laying hens for egg production and eggshell quality at end-of-lay, provided that the dietary Ca ...

  1. Single particle irradiation effect of digital signal processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Si'an; Chen Kenan

    2010-01-01

    The single particle irradiation effect of high energy neutron on digital signal processor TMS320P25 in dynamic working condition has been studied. The influence of the single particle on the device has been explored through the acquired waveform and working current of TMS320P25. Analysis results, test data and test methods have also been presented. (authors)

  2. Effect of particle size distribution on sintering of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.R.; Griffin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    To date, very little is known about the effect of the nature of the particle size distribution on sintering. It is reasonable that there should be an effect of size distribution, and theory and prior experimental work examining the effects of variations in bimodal and continuous distributions have shown marked effects on sintering. Most importantly, even with constant mean particle size, variations in distribution width, or standard deviation, have been shown to produce marked variations in microstructure and sintering rate. In the latter work, in which spherical copper powders were blended to produce lognormal distributions of constant geometric mean particle size by weight frequency, blends with larger values of geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, sintered more rapidly. The goals of the present study were to examine in more detail the effects of variations in the width of lognormal particle size distributions of tungsten powder and determine the effects of 1nσ on the microstructural evolution during sintering

  3. Hexagon POPE: effective particles and tree level resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Lucía [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy & Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute,University of Waterloo,Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2017-01-12

    We present the resummation of the full Pentagon Operator Product Expansion series of the hexagon Wilson loop in planar N=4 SYM at tree level. We do so by considering the one effective particle states formed by a fundamental flux tube excitation and an arbitrary number of the so called small fermions which are then integrated out. We derive the one effective particle measures at finite coupling. By evaluating these measures at tree level and summing over all one effective particle states we reproduce the full 6 point tree level amplitude.

  4. Impact of dynamic distribution of floc particles on flocculation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN Jun; HE Weipeng; Song Xinin; LI Guibai

    2009-01-01

    Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) was used as coagulant and suspended particles in kaolin water. Online instruments including turbidimeter and particle counter were used to monitor the flocculation process. An evaluation model for demonstrating the impact on the flocculation effect was established based on the multiple linear regression analysis method. The parameter of the index weight of channels quantitatively described how the variation of floc particle population in different size ranges cause the decrement of turbidity. The study showed that the floc particles in different size ranges contributed differently to the decrement of turbidity and that the index weight of channel could excellently indicate the impact degree of floc particles dynamic distribution on flocculation effect. Therefore, the parameter may significantly benefit the development of coagulation and sedimentation techniques as well as the optimal coagulant selection.

  5. Impact of dynamic distribution of floc particles on flocculation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jun; He, Weipeng; Song, Xinin; Li, Guibai

    2009-01-01

    Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) was used as coagulant and suspended particles in kaolin water. Online instruments including turbidimeter and particle counter were used to monitor the flocculation process. An evaluation model for demonstrating the impact on the flocculation effect was established based on the multiple linear regression analysis method. The parameter of the index weight of channels quantitatively described how the variation of floc particle population in different size ranges cause the decrement of turbidity. The study showed that the floc particles in different size ranges contributed differently to the decrease of turbidity and that the index weight of channel could excellently indicate the impact degree of floc particles dynamic distribution on flocculation effect. Therefore, the parameter may significantly benefit the development of coagulation and sedimentation techniques as well as the optimal coagulant selection.

  6. Stimulated-emission effects in particle creation near black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    It has recently been shown that if a black hole is formed by gravitational collapse, spontaneous particle creation will occur and a thermal spectrum of all species of particles will be emitted to infinity if the quantum matter was initially in the vacuum state. In this paper we investigate the stimulated-emission effects which occur if particles are present initially. We show in general that for a Hermitian scalar field in an external potential or in curved, asymptotically flat spacetime, stimulated-emission effects can occur precisely in those modes for which there is spontaneous particle creation from the vacuum. For the case of a Schwarzschild black hole, this result appears paradoxical, since spontaneous emission occurs at late times but there is no classical analog of stimulated emission at late times. The resolution of this paradox is that in order to induce emission of particles which emerge at late times one must send in particles at early times, so that they reach the black hole very near the instant of its formation. However, enormous energy is required of these incoming particles in order to stimulate emission of particles which emerge at late times. Thus, for a Schwarzschild black hole, even if particles are initially present (with limited energy) they will induce emission only at early times; at late times one will see only the spontaneously emitted blackbody thermal radiation. For the case of a Kerr black hole stimulated emission can be induced by particles sent in at late times with the appropriate frequencies and angular dependence. If the number of incoming particles is large, this quantum stimulated emission just gives the classical superradiant scattering

  7. Mass transfer effects in hygroscopic measurements of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA has been widely utilized to measure the hygroscopicity of laboratory-generated and atmospheric submicrometer particles. An important concern in investigating the hygroscopicity of the particles is if the particles have attained equilibrium state in the measurements. We present a literature survey to investigate the mass transfer effects in hygroscopicity measurements. In most TDMA studies, a residence time in the order of seconds is used for humidification (or dehumidification. NaCl and (NH42SO4 particles are usually used to verify the equilibrium measurements during this residence time, which is presumed to be sufficient for other particles. There have been observations that not all types of submicrometer particles, including atmospheric particles, attain their equilibrium sizes within this time scale. We recommend that experimentation with different residence times be conducted and that the residence time should be explicitly stated in future TDMA measurements. Mass transfer effects may also exist in the measurements of other properties related to the water uptake of atmospheric particles such as relative humidity dependent light scattering coefficients and cloud condensation nuclei activity.

  8. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies.

  9. Quantum effects for particles channeling in a bent crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feranchuk, Ilya, E-mail: iferanchuk@gmail.com [Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Research Group, Ton Duc Thang University, 19 Nguyen Huu Tho Str., Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, 19 Nguyen Huu Tho Str., Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosty Ave., 220030 Minsk (Belarus); San, Nguyen Quang [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosty Ave., 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-09-15

    Quantum mechanical theory for channeling of the relativistic charged particles in the bent crystals is considered in the paper. Quantum effects of under-barrier tunneling are essential when the radius of the curvature is closed to its critical value. In this case the wave functions of the quasi-stationary states corresponding to the particles captured in a channel are presented in the analytical form. The efficiency of channeling of the particles and their angular distribution at the exit crystal surface are calculated. Characteristic experimental parameters for observation the quantum effects are estimated.

  10. Effect of storage temperature on the activity of submitochondrial particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Francis G

    2008-12-01

    The submitochondrial particle (SMP) assay employs processed mammalian mitchondria to assess the toxicity of chemical contaminants in aqueous solutions. Particles and associated reagents are commercially available to support two individual procedures, the electron transfer (ETr) and reverse electron transfer (RET) assays. The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of storage temperature on SMP activity. One RET and one ETr assay were conducted with sodium dodecylsulfate on each of two vials of particles stored at -20 and -80 degrees C at periodic intervals over a six-month span. Results demonstrated that SMP could remain active in either assay through six months of storage at either temperature. However, there were isolated vials of particles stored at -20 degrees C that exhibited unacceptable reductions in activity for both the ETr and the RET assays that were not related to storage duration. These results were used to develop guidance in assessing the acceptability of particle activity in SMP assays.

  11. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shun, E-mail: shun.ogawa@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Aix Marseille Univ., Univ. Toulon, CNRS, CPT, Marseille (France); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel [Aix Marseille Univ., Univ. Toulon, CNRS, CPT, Marseille (France); Castillo-Negrete, Diego del [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  12. Small particles big effect? - Investigating ice nucleation abilities of soot particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, Fabian; David, Robert O.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Stopford, Chris; Wu, Zhijun; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric soot particles are primary particles produced by incomplete combustion of biomass and/or fossil fuels. Thus soot mainly originates from anthropogenic emissions, stemming from combustion related processes in transport vehicles, industrial and residential uses. Such soot particles are generally complex mixtures of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) (Bond et al., 2013; Petzold et al., 2013), depending on the sources and the interaction of the primary particles with other atmospheric matter and/or gases BC absorbs solar radiation having a warming effect on global climate. It can also act as a heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) and thus impact cloud-radiation interactions, potentially cooling the climate (Lohmann, 2002). Previous studies, however, have shown conflicting results concerning the ice nucleation ability of soot, limiting the ability to predict its effects on Earth's radiation budget. Here we present a laboratory study where we systematically investigate the ice nucleation behavior of different soot particles. Commercial soot samples are used, including an amorphous, industrial carbon frequently used in coatings and coloring (FW 200, Orion Engineered Carbons) and a fullerene soot (572497 ALDRICH), e.g. used as catalyst. In addition, we use soot generated from a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard Generator (miniCAST, JING AG), as a proxy for atmospheric soot particles. The ice nucleation ability of these soot types is tested on size-selected particles for a wide temperature range from 253 K to 218 K, using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC), a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) (Kanji and Abbatt, 2009). Ice nucleation results from these soot surrogates will be compared to chemically more complex real world samples, collected on filters. Filters will be collected during the 2016/2017 winter haze periods in Beijing, China and represent atmospheric soot particles with sources from both industrial and residential

  13. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  14. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  15. ESF collection effectiveness, a study in fine particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winegardner, W.K.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1985-04-01

    The characterization and dynamic behavior of fine particles are the main subjects of an ongoing investigation of the particle collection effectiveness of the engineered safety feature (ESF) systems in nuclear power plants. This investigation is part of a larger study of the release of radionuclides to the environment from such plants during postulated accidents that are severe but extremely unlikely. The ESF systems are installed to prevent the occurrence of severe accidents or mitigate their consequences. Several of these engineered systems can serve as particle collection devices. This report focuses on the analytical models that were developed to predict particle behavior in two systems that were not specifically designed for particle retention: the ice compartments of ice condenser containment systems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and the suppression pools of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The following section summarizes the topics considered in the development of models and computer codes for estimating the particle retention effectiveness of these two ESF systems. After the summary this paper describes the two ESF systems in more detail and discusses the behavior of particles in both situations

  16. Effective Ice Particle Densities for Cold Anvil Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Schmitt, Carl G.; Bansemer, Aaron; Baumgardner, Darrel; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Smith, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    This study derives effective ice particle densities from data collected from the NASA WB-57F aircraft near the tops of anvils during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE) in southern Florida in July 2002. The effective density, defined as the ice particle mass divided by the volume of an equivalent diameter liquid sphere, is obtained for particle populations and single sizes containing mixed particle habits using measurements of condensed water content and particle size distributions. The mean effective densities for populations decrease with increasing slopes of the gamma size distributions fitted to the size distributions. The population-mean densities range from near 0.91 g/cu m to 0.15 g/cu m. Effective densities for single sizes obey a power-law with an exponent of about -0.55, somewhat less steep than found from earlier studies. Our interpretations apply to samples where particle sizes are generally below 200-300 microns in maximum dimension because of probe limitations.

  17. Bandwagon effects and error bars in particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Monwhea

    2007-02-01

    We study historical records of experiments on particle masses, lifetimes, and widths, both for signs of expectation bias, and to compare actual errors with reported error bars. We show that significant numbers of particle properties exhibit "bandwagon effects": reported values show trends and clustering as a function of the year of publication, rather than random scatter about the mean. While the total amount of clustering is significant, it is also fairly small; most individual particle properties do not display obvious clustering. When differences between experiments are compared with the reported error bars, the deviations do not follow a normal distribution, but instead follow an exponential distribution for up to ten standard deviations.

  18. Bandwagon effects and error bars in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, Monwhea

    2007-01-01

    We study historical records of experiments on particle masses, lifetimes, and widths, both for signs of expectation bias, and to compare actual errors with reported error bars. We show that significant numbers of particle properties exhibit 'bandwagon effects': reported values show trends and clustering as a function of the year of publication, rather than random scatter about the mean. While the total amount of clustering is significant, it is also fairly small; most individual particle properties do not display obvious clustering. When differences between experiments are compared with the reported error bars, the deviations do not follow a normal distribution, but instead follow an exponential distribution for up to ten standard deviations

  19. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  20. Effect of particle shape on mechanical behaviors of rocks: a numerical study using clumped particle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Hou, Di; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied.

  1. Effect of HZE particles and space hadrons on bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurov, S.S.; Akoev, I.G.; Leonteva, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of particle radiation of the type encountered in space flight on bacteriophages are investigated. Survival and mutagenesis were followed in dry film cultures or liquid suspensions of T4Br(+) bacteriophage exposed to high-energy (HZE) particles during orbital flight, to alpha particles and accelerator-generated hardrons in the laboratory, and to high-energy cosmic rays at mountain altitudes. The HZE particles and high-energy hadrons are found to have a greater relative biological efficiency than standard gamma radiation, while exhibiting a highly inhomogeneous spatial structure in the observed biological and genetic effects. In addition, the genetic lesions observed are specific to the type of radiation exposure, consisting primarily of deletions and multiple lesions of low revertability, with mode of action depending on the linear energy transfer. 18 references

  2. Any Light Particle Search (ALPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aaron; Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    High power laser fields enabled by technologies developed for ground-based gravitational-wave observatories open up new opportunities for fundamental physics studies. One of these options is the search for axions and axion-like particles in a pure laboratory experiment. The axion is a solution to the strong CP-problem and a potential dark matter candidate. The axion has also been proposed as an additional channel to cool stars as well as a potential explanation for the TeV transparency problem. The German-US ALPS collaboration is setting up a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment at DESY. LSW experiments are based on the simple idea that a high power laser field traversing a static magnetic field will transform partly into a relativistic axion field. This axion field will travel through an opaque wall into a second static magnetic field region where it turns partly back into an electromagnetic wave field with the same frequency as the laser. The ALPS collaboration is working towards a large scale LSW experiment at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. I will report on the status of the ALPS experiment. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, PRISMA, the Helmholtz Association, the National Science Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  3. Size-dependent nonlocal effects in plasmonic semiconductor particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmons (LSP) in semiconductor particles are expected to exhibit spatial nonlocal response effects as the geometry enters the nanometer scale. To investigate these nonlocal effects, we apply the hydrodynamic model to nanospheres of two different semiconductor materials: intrinsic...... InSb and n-doped GaAs. Our results show that the semiconductors indeed display nonlocal effects, and that these effects are even more pronounced than in metals. In a 150 nm InSb particle at 300 K, the LSP frequency is blueshifted 35%, which is orders of magnitude larger than the blueshift in a metal...... particle of the same size. This property, together with their tunability, makes semiconductors a promising platform for experiments in nonlocal effects. Copyright (C)EPLA, 2017...

  4. Towards Measurements of Chiral Effects Using Identified Particles from STAR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wen, Lw.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 756-759 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * chiral magnetic effect * chiral magnetic wave * gamma correlation * k(K) parameter Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  5. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  6. Biological Effects of Individual Alpha Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. A. Braby; R. R. Ford

    2002-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative data on the mechanisms of intercellular communication leading to bystander effects in irradiated cell populations, a positive ion microbeam irradiation system was set up at Texas A and M University and the rate at which photobleached and active fluorescent molecules are exchanged between irradiated and unirradiated cells was studied. AG1522 human fibroblast cells were chosen as one of the lines in this study because they had been shown to be proficient at bystander effects, and because they exhibited scrape loading response and lindane inhibition of effects which suggest that gap junction communication was involved. Surprisingly, detailed measurements of recovery from photobleaching suggested that gap junction communication did not occur in these cells. More detailed studies with gap junction inhibitors and with immunohistochemistry assays for gap junctions seem to confirm that these cells do not communicate in this way. A cell line which does communicate by gap junctions, Clone 9, shows no change in communication rates before and after irradiation. Other techniques, such as assessment of nuclear cross section were developed to determine if bystander effects alter cell progression through the cell cycle and the growth of individual cells

  7. Photon structure functions with heavy particle mass effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Tsuneo, E-mail: uematsu@scphys.kyoto-u.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In the framework of the perturbative QCD we investigate heavy particle mass effects on the unpolarized and polarized photon structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup γ} and g{sub 1}{sup γ}, respectively. We present our basic formalism to treat heavy particle mass effects to NLO in perturbative QCD. We also study heavy quark effects on the QCD sum rule for the first moment of g{sub 1}{sup γ}, which is related to axial anomaly. The photon structure function in supersymmetric QCD is also briefly discussed.

  8. Numerical evaluation of high energy particle effects in magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Wu, Y.

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of high energy ions with magnetohydrodynamic modes is analyzed. A numerical code is developed which evaluates the contribution of the high energy particles to mode stability using orbit averaging of motion in either analytic or numerically generated equilibria through Hamiltonian guiding center equations. A dispersion relation is then used to evaluate the effect of the particles on the linear mode. Generic behavior of the solutions of the dispersion relation is discussed and dominant contributions of different components of the particle distribution function are identified. Numerical convergence of Monte-Carlo simulations is analyzed. The resulting code ORBIT provides an accurate means of comparing experimental results with the predictions of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics. The method can be extended to include self consistent modification of the particle orbits by the mode, and hence the full nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system

  9. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  10. Destabilizing effect of alpha particles in a Maxwellian plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Various plasma waves which are possibly excited by MeV alphas have been investigated. For a delta birth distribution it is found that: a) The right-circularly polarized Alfven wave can be excited. Its growth rate is linearly proportional to the α-particle density. b) The drift Alfven wave is stable against α-particles. c) For a uniform temperature, the plasma wave spectrum changes from three branches with n/sub α/ = 0 to four branches for n/sub α/ not equal to 0 case. d) α-particles can destabilize the ion drift acoustic wave even with uniform temperature. However, the ion acoustic wave appears to be stable against fusion products in a fusion grade plasma. e) If their effect on the background plasma spectrum is neglected, α-particles can excite the electromagnetic cyclotron wave in a range of harmonics (band structure). The growth rate is proportional to the square root of α-particle density. f) If the effect of α-particle on the plasma spectrum is included, we find that electromagnetic cyclotron wave is stable

  11. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs

  12. The memory effect for particle scattering in even spacetime dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David; Hollands, Stefan; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We explicitly calculate the gravitational wave memory effect for classical point particle sources in linearized gravity off an even dimensional Minkowski background. We show that there is no memory effect in d  >  4 dimensions, in agreement with the general analysis of Hollands et al (2016 arXiv:1612.03290).

  13. The Aharonov-Bohm effect as a particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costella, John.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect, as displayed conclusively in the experiment of Tonomura et. al., is calculated in classical electrodynamics. Comparison with the quantum prediction yields several new fundamental principles. It is also suggested that the properties of the AB effect may allow its use as a versatile particle accelerator. 14 refs

  14. Memory effect for particle scattering in odd spacetime dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishchandran, Gautam; Wald, Robert M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational memory effect for linearized perturbations off of Minkowski space in odd spacetime dimensions d by examining the effects of gravitational radiation from classical point particle scattering. We also investigate analogous memory effects for electromagnetic and scalar radiation. We find that there is no gravitational memory effect in all odd dimensions. For scalar and electromagnetic fields, there is no memory effect for d ≥7 ; for d =3 there is an infinite momentum memory effect, whereas for d =5 there is no momentum memory effect but the displacement of a test particle will grow unboundedly with time. Our results are further elucidated by analyzing the memory effect for any slowly moving source of compact spatial support in odd dimensions.

  15. Particle contamination effects in EUVL: enhanced theory for the analytical determination of critical particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Gerd; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2012-03-01

    Existing analytical and numerical methodologies are discussed and then extended in order to calculate critical contamination-particle sizes, which will result in deleterious effects during EUVL E-chucking in the face of an error budget on the image-placement-error (IPE). The enhanced analytical models include a gap dependant clamping pressure formulation, the consideration of a general material law for realistic particle crushing and the influence of frictional contact. We present a discussion of the defects of the classical de-coupled modeling approach where particle crushing and mask/chuck indentation are separated from the global computation of mask bending. To repair this defect we present a new analytic approach based on an exact Hankel transform method which allows a fully coupled solution. This will capture the contribution of the mask indentation to the image-placement-error (estimated IPE increase of 20%). A fully coupled finite element model is used to validate the analytical models and to further investigate the impact of a mask back-side CrN-layer. The models are applied to existing experimental data with good agreement. For a standard material combination, a given IPE tolerance of 1 nm and a 15 kPa closing pressure, we derive bounds for single particles of cylindrical shape (radius × height < 44 μm) and spherical shape (diameter < 12 μm).

  16. Effect of particle stratification on debris-bed dryout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pederson, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Significant work has been performed on debris-bed dryout on beds of either uniformly sized particles or particles of a wide size range which are well mixed. This work has provided an understanding of the mechanisms of dryout and an empirical basis for containment analysis. However, the debris bed resulting from a HCDA would not consist of uniformly sized particles and for certain scenarios the bed could be stratified rather than well mixed. Tests have been conducted on the effect of particle size distribution on dryout and concluded that not only is the mean particle size an important parameter but also the standard deviation of the distribution and change in porosity. The D6 in-pile test at Sandia with a 114-mm deep stratified bed resulted in a reduced dryout heat flux compared to a uniformly mixed bed. Because of the many questions concerning the dryout behavior of stratified beds of wide size distribution out-of-pile experiments in which metal particles in water pools are inductively heated were initiated at Argonne

  17. Improvements of the base bleed effect using reactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournot, Herve; Daniel, Eric [Polytech' Marseille, IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595, 5, rue E. Fermi, Technopole de Chateau Gombert, 13453 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Cayzac, Roxan [Giat Industries, 7, Route de Guerry, F-18023 Bourges cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    A numerical study of the base drag reduction of axisymmetric body projectiles in supersonic flight using a base bleed injection is presented in this paper. Unsteady computations of compressible viscous flow have been achieved in order to investigate the coupled effect of the bleed temperature and the bleed mass flow rate on the base pressure. The idea developed in the study, consists in the addition of metallic particles in the propellant composition used to provide the additional mass injected in order to obtain the lowest base drag. Indeed, for a low mass addition, a significant increase of the mixture energy is expected due to the particles combustion. Base flow with reactive two-phase injection is then simulated. Results show the ability of the method to describe such flows and the efficiency of the particles combustion to increase the base bleed reducing drag effect. (author)

  18. Modeling Correlation Effects in Nickelates with Slave Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Alexandru Bogdan; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Nickelate interfaces display interesting electronic properties including orbital ordering similar to that of cuprate superconductors and thickness dependent metal-insulator transitions. One-particle band theory calculations do not include dynamic localized correlation effects on the nickel sites and thus often incorrectly predict metallic systems or incorrect ARPES spectra. Building on two previous successful slave-particle treatments of local correlations, we present a generalized slave-particle method that includes prior models and allows us to produce new intermediate models. The computational efficiency of these slave-boson methods means that one can readily study correlation effects in complex heterostructures. We show some predictions of these methods for the electronic structure of bulk and thin film nickelates. Work supported by NSF Grant MRSEC DMR-1119826.

  19. X particle effect for 6Li reaction rates calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, G.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    The inferred primordial 6 L i-7 L i abundances are different from standard big bang nucleosynthesis results, 6 L i is 1000 times larger and 7 L i is 3 times smaller than the big bang prediction. In big bang nucleosynthesis, negatively charged massive X particles a possible solution to explain this primordial Li abundances problem [1]. In this study, we consider only X particle effect for nuclear reactions to obtain S-factor and reaction rates for Li. All S-factors calculated within the Optical Model framework for d(α,γ)6 L i system. We showed that the enhancement effect of massive negatively charged X particle for 6 L i system reaction rate.(author)

  20. Spin Hall effect and Berry phase of spinning particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, Alain; Mohrbach, Herve

    2006-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic evolution of the Dirac equation in order to compute its Berry curvature in momentum space. It is found that the position operator acquires an anomalous contribution due to the non-Abelian Berry gauge connection making the quantum mechanical algebra noncommutative. A generalization to any known spinning particles is possible by using the Bargmann-Wigner equation of motions. The noncommutativity of the coordinates is responsible for the topological spin transport of spinning particles similarly to the spin Hall effect in spintronic physics or the Magnus effect in optics. As an application we predict new dynamics for nonrelativistic particles in an electric field and for photons in a gravitational field

  1. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Memory effects in chaotic advection of inertial particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daitche, Anton; Tél, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the effect of the history force on particle advection is carried out for both heavy and light particles. General relations are given to identify parameter regions where the history force is expected to be comparable with the Stokes drag. As an illustrative example, a paradigmatic two-dimensional flow, the von Kármán flow is taken. For small (but not extremely small) particles all investigated dynamical properties turn out to heavily depend on the presence of memory when compared to the memoryless case: the history force generates a rather non-trivial dynamics that appears to weaken (but not to suppress) inertial effects, it enhances the overall contribution of viscosity. We explore the parameter space spanned by the particle size and the density ratio, and find a weaker tendency for accumulation in attractors and for caustics formation. The Lyapunov exponent of transients becomes larger with memory. Periodic attractors are found to have a very slow, t −1/2 type convergence towards the asymptotic form. We find that the concept of snapshot attractors is useful to understand this slow convergence: an ensemble of particles converges exponentially fast towards a snapshot attractor, which undergoes a slow shift for long times. (paper)

  3. Effects of Particle Size Distribution on Bioremediation of Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation has been proven to be the most effective method of cleaning up oil contaminated soils through the application of nutrients and microorganism. ... The parameters examined were: moisture content, particle size distribution, total hydrocarbon content, soil pH, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, total ...

  4. Effect of Particle Acceleration Process on the Flare Characteristics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2002) 23, 95–99. Effect of Particle Acceleration Process on the Flare Characteristics of. Blazars. S. Bhattacharyya, S. Sahayanathan & C. L. Kaul Nuclear Research Laboratory,. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. Abstract. Following the kinetic equation approach, we study the flare.

  5. Effect of particle size on mixing degree in dispensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Yoshitsugu; Sekiguchi, Hiroko; Ohtani, Michiteru; Kariya, Satoru; Uchino, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Iga, Tatsuji

    2004-03-01

    By using lactose colored with erythrocin, we examined the effect of particle size on mixing degree during the preparation of triturations with a mortar and pestle. We used powders with different distributions of particle sizes, i.e., powder that passed through 32-mesh but was trapped on a 42-mesh sieve (32/42-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 42-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 60-mesh sieve (42/60-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 60-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 100-mesh sieve (60/100-mesh powder), and powder that passes through a 100-mesh sieve (> 100-mesh powder). The mixing degree of colored powder and non-colored powder whose distribution of particle sizes was the same as that of the colored powder was excellent. The coefficient of variation (CV) value of the mixing degree was 6.08% after 40 rotations when colored powder was mixed with non-colored powder that both passed through a 100-mesh sieve. The CV value of the mixing degree was low in the case of mixing of colored and non-colored powders with different particle size distributions. After mixing, about 50% of 42/60-mesh powder had become smaller particles, whereas the distribution of particle sizes was not influenced by the mixing of 60/100-mesh powder. It was suggested that the mixing degree is affected by distribution of particle sizes. It may be important to determine the mixing degrees for drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges.

  6. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elsa

    2007-01-01

    distribution of wood smoke particles, essentially all will be contained in the PM2.5 fraction. In Denmark, recent results indicate that about 10,000 tonnes PM2.5 per year, about half of the total particle emission in Denmark, come from residential wood combustion. Based on a few measurement campaigns conducted...... in Denmark in selected residential areas with different kinds of heating, the annual average PM2.5 exposure from wood smoke can be estimated at 0.4–2 mg/m3 as a preliminary estimate for the whole Danish population. Epidemiological studies evaluating adverse health effects from ambient air pollution...

  7. Rice Starch Particle Interactions at Air/Aqueous Interfaces—Effect of Particle Hydrophobicity and Solution Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E.; Sato, Yu; Wiege, Berthold; Furikado, Ippei; Marefati, Ali; Nylander, Tommy; Kappl, Michael; Rayner, Marilyn

    2018-01-01

    Starch particles modified by esterification with dicarboxylic acids to give octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch is an approved food additive that can be used to stabilize oil in water emulsions used in foods and drinks. However, the effects of the OSA modification of the starch particle on the interfacial interactions are not fully understood. Here, we directly measured the packing of films of rice starch granules, i.e., the natural particle found inside the plant, at air/aqueous interfaces, and the interaction forces in that system as a function of the particle hydrophobicity and ionic strength, in order to gain insight on how starch particles can stabilize emulsions. This was achieved by using a combined Langmuir trough and optical microscope system, and the Monolayer Interaction Particle Apparatus. Native rice starch particles were seen to form large aggregates at air/water interfaces, causing films with large voids to be formed at the interface. The OSA modification of the rice starches particles decreased this aggregation. Increasing the degree of modification improved the particle packing within the film of particles at the air/water interface, due to the introduction of inter-particle electrostatic interactions within the film. The introduction of salt to the water phase caused the particles to aggregate and form holes within the film, due to the screening of the charged groups on the starch particles by the salt. The presence of these holes in the film decreased the stiffness of the films. The effect of the OSA modification was concluded to decrease the aggregation of the particles at an air/water interface. The presence of salts, however, caused the particles to aggregate, thereby reducing the strength of the interfacial film. PMID:29868551

  8. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  9. Multidimensional and memory effects on diffusion of a particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Jing-Dong

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion of an overdamped Brownian particle in the two-dimensional (2D) channel bounded periodically by a parabola is studied, where the particle is subject to an additive white or colored noise. The diffusion rate constant D * of the particle is evaluated by the quasi-2D approximation and the effective potential approach, and the theoretical result is compared with the Langevin simulation. The properties of the diffusion rate constant are stressed for weak and strong noise cases. It is shown that, in an entropy channel, the value of D * in units of Q decreases with increasing intensity of the colored noise. In the presence of energetic barriers, a nonmonotonic behavior of the reduced diffusion rate constant D * Q -1 as a function of the noise intensity is shown

  10. Hysteresis effects in the cores of particle accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086181; Schoerling, Daniel

    A study of the hysteresis effects in the cores of particle accelerator magnets has been performed in the framework of the work presented in this thesis. This study has been focused on normal conducting particle accelerator magnets whose cores are manufactured using ferromagnetic materials. The magnetic circuits have been modelled using the developed models: one model for the magnetic circuit and one for the magnetization of the material in the core. The parameters of the magnetic circuit model have been identified with the help of simulations which rely on the finite element method (Opera 3D), while the parameters of the magnetic hysteresis model have been identified through experimental measurements performed using a method developed in the framework of this work. The modelling results have been validated by means of experimental measurements performed on two magnets: one small size magnet which has been specifically designed and manufactured, and one magnet which is currently used in a particle accelerator ...

  11. Particle confinement and fueling effects on the Maryland spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filuk, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The spheromak plasma confinement concept provides the opportunity to study the evolution of a nearly force-free magnetic field configuration. The plasma currents and magnetic fields are produced self-consistently, making this type of device attractive as a possible fusion reactor. At present, spheromaks are observed to have poorer particle and magnetic confinement than expected from simple theory. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of plasma density in the decay of spheromaks produced in the Maryland Spheromak experiment. Density measurements are made with an interferometer and Langmuir probe, and results are correlated with those of other plasma diagnostics to understand the sources of plasma, the spheromak formation effects on the density, and the magnitude of particle loss during the spheromak decay. A power and particle balance computer model is constructed and applied to the spheromaks studied in order to assess the impact of high density and particle loss rate on the spheromak decay. The observations and model indicate that the decay of the spheromaks is at present dominated by impurity radiation loss. The model also predicts that high density and short particle confinement time play a critical role in the spheromak power balance when the impurity levels are reduced

  12. Particle Dark Matter constraints: the effect of Galactic uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, Maria; Bernal, Nicolás; Iocco, Fabio [ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research Instituto de Física Teórica - Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP Brazil (Brazil); Bozorgnia, Nassim; Calore, Francesca, E-mail: mariabenitocst@gmail.com, E-mail: nicolas.bernal@uan.edu.co, E-mail: n.bozorgnia@uva.nl, E-mail: calore@lapth.cnrs.fr, E-mail: fabio.iocco.astro@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, Institute for Theoretical Physics Amsterdam and Delta Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-01

    Collider, space, and Earth based experiments are now able to probe several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics which provide viable dark matter candidates. Direct and indirect dark matter searches rely on inputs of astrophysical nature, such as the local dark matter density or the shape of the dark matter density profile in the target in object. The determination of these quantities is highly affected by astrophysical uncertainties. The latter, especially those for our own Galaxy, are ill-known, and often not fully accounted for when analyzing the phenomenology of particle physics models. In this paper we present a systematic, quantitative estimate of how astrophysical uncertainties on Galactic quantities (such as the local galactocentric distance, circular velocity, or the morphology of the stellar disk and bulge) propagate to the determination of the phenomenology of particle physics models, thus eventually affecting the determination of new physics parameters. We present results in the context of two specific extensions of the Standard Model (the Singlet Scalar and the Inert Doublet) that we adopt as case studies for their simplicity in illustrating the magnitude and impact of such uncertainties on the parameter space of the particle physics model itself. Our findings point toward very relevant effects of current Galactic uncertainties on the determination of particle physics parameters, and urge a systematic estimate of such uncertainties in more complex scenarios, in order to achieve constraints on the determination of new physics that realistically include all known uncertainties.

  13. Experimental Study on Effects of Particle Shape and Operating Conditions on Combustion Characteristics of Single Biomass Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momeni, M.; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the ignition, devolatilization, and burnout of single biomass particles of various shapes and sizes under process conditions that are similar to those in an industrial combustor. A chargecoupled device (CCD) camera is used to record the whole...... combustion process. For the particles with similar volume (mass), cylindrical particles are found to lose mass faster than spherical particles and the burnout time is shortened by increasing the particle aspect ratio (surface area). The conversion times of cylindrical particles with almost the same surface...... area/volume ratio are very close to each other. The ignition, devolatilization, and burnout times of cylindrical particles are also affected by the oxidizer temperature and oxygen concentration, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced effect on the conversion times at lower...

  14. Taking account of the recoil effect under a light particle scattering on two heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peresypkin, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    Proceeding from the Faddeev equations the derivation of the Bruekner formula describing a light particle scattering by a system of two fixed force centers is presented. Using the zero-range two-particle potential and assuming the ratio of the incident particle mass to the heavy particle mass to be a small perturbation parameter the correction to the Bruekner formula is obtained taking into account the heavy particle recoil

  15. Effects of the quantum vacuum in particle physics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Juri

    2014-11-26

    In this work we investigate numerous effects of virtual particles on processes relevant for particle physics and cosmology. A central question is, whether radiative spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking can be combined with neutrino mass generation, we find that the answer is affirmative. We discuss the implication of the RSSB on the neutrino mass phenomenology and low-energy observables. Furthermore, by comparing the models to experimental data we find that several anomalies in the present observations favour particular scenarios over the pure Standard Model hypothesis. We are able to show, that the presence of sterile neutrinos with active-sterile mixing of order 10{sup -3} and masses in the TeV range leads to a reduced invisible decay width of the Z-boson and can bring the NuTeV observations in agreement with theoretical expectations. The models we discuss naturally incorporate long lived particles which can serve as dark matter candidates and we investigate this phenomenologically. We find that the combination of the requirements leads to interesting constraints on the model and parameter space. We find that loop induced electromagnetic moments for the neutral dark matter candidates, lead to interactions with charged particles. We use this and derive new constraints from existing XENON100 and LUX data. In addition we study how vacuum effects can backreact on a given geometry in electromagnetism and semiclassical gravity. We find that in the case of gravity the conformal set up plays a special role and indicate several ideas for further investigation of this topic.

  16. POTENTIAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF ULTRAFINE PARTICLE TOXIC EFFECTS IN HUMANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JASMINA JOVIĆ-STOŠIĆ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggested the association of the particulate matter ambient air pollution and the increased morbidity and mortality, mainly from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The size of particles has great influence on their toxicity, because it determines the site in the respiratory tract where they deposit. The most well established theory explaining the mechanisms behind the increased toxicity of ultrafine particles (UFP, < 0.1 µm is that it has to do with the increased surface area and/or the combination with the increased number of particles. Biological effects of UFP are also determined by their shape and chemical composition, so it is not possible to estimate their toxicity in a general way. General hypothesis suggested that exposure to inhaled particles induces pulmonary alveolar inflammation as a basic pathophysiological event, triggering release of various proinflammatory cytokines. Chronic inflammation is a very important underlying mechanism in the genesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. UFP can freely move through the circulation, but their effects on the secondary organs are not known yet, so more studies on recognizing toxicological endpoints of UFP are needed. Determination of UFP toxicity and the estimation of their internal and biologically active dose are necessary for the evidence based conclusions connecting air pollution by UFP and human diseases.

  17. Effects related to spacetime foam in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    It is found that the existence of spacetime foam leads to a situation in which the number of fundamental quantum bosonic fields is a variable quantity. The general aspects of an exact theory that allows for a variable number of fields are discussed, and the simplest observable effects generated by the foam are estimated. It is shown that in the absence of processes related to variations in the topology of space, the concept of an effective field can be reintroduced and standard field theory can be restored. However, in the complete theory the ground state is characterized by a nonvanishing particle number density. From the effective-field standpoint, such particles are 'dark'. It is assumed that they comprise dark matter of the universe. The properties of this dark matter are discussed, and so is the possibility of measuring the quantum fluctuation in the field potentials

  18. Gas interaction effects on lunar bonded particles and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, N.R.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the bonded particles of lunar soil samples separated upon exposure to reactive gases such as oxygen, water vapor, their mixtures, acids and bases have been studied. The bondings between particles susceptible to gas disruption seemed to be generally weak and appeared to have taken place via highly radiation-damaged layers at the particle surfaces. The amorphous layers with an average thickness of about 0.05 μm were produced by the solar wind exposure of about 2000 years. Therefore, the solar wind was responsible for the formation of these weak bondings and also probably responsible for disruption of these bondings. Apollo 11 and 12 landed in the equatorial region and about 1500 km apart. Thus, the solar wind effects on materials at these sites should have been about the same and the proportion of bonded particles separated by reactive gas exposure should also have been about the same; but the number of separations observed was about 2.7 (average) times greater in the Apollo 11 soil sample than in the Apollo 12 soil sample. This finding suggests that the number of weakly bonded particles and probably the solar-wind damaged amorphous layer particles at these sites was about in the same proportion. It is, therefore, considered that materials from certain depth (practically not exposed to the solar wind) of another site were transported and mixed during recent years (considerably less than 2000 years) with the original materials of the Apollo 12 site. This is consistent with the conclusions made by other investigators

  19. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sandip, E-mail: sandip.d.kulkarni@gmail.com [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Nacev, Alek [Weinberg Medical Physics, LLC (United States); Depireux, Didier [The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shimoji, Mika [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  20. Laser Probes of the Dark Sector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Dark matter, dark energy, and gravity are fundamental components of the standard cosmological model, and their macroscopic effects on the evolution of the universe are well documented. However, the quantum properties of these fields remain largely unknown. An ongoing suite of laser experiments at Fermilab have conducted searches for axion-like dark matter, tested particle models of dark energy, and plans to test certain predictions of black hole thermodynamics---namely the holographic principle. I will present the results from the GammeV search for milli-eV axion-like particles and will discuss in detail the recently completed CHASE search for chameleon dark energy.

  1. Effects of aerodynamic particle interaction in turbulent non-dilute particle-laden flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Fuchs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Aerodynamic four-way coupling models are necessary to handle two-phase flows with a dispersed phase in regimes in which the particles are neither dilute enough to neglect particle interaction nor dense enough to bring the mixture to equilibrium. We include an aerodynamic particle interaction model...... levels in the flow then decrease. The impact of the stochastic particle description on the four-way coupling model is shown to be relatively small. If particles are also allowed to break up according to a wave breakup model, the particles become polydisperse. An ad hoc model for handling polydisperse...

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of protons and heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kabachenko, A.

    1986-01-01

    The genetic effectiveness was studied of protons (9 GeB/nuclon, 0,72 Gy/min), α-particles (4 GeB/nuclon, 0,9 Gy/min) and carbon ions (4 GeB/nuclon 0,36 Gy/min). The translocation yield in mouse spermatogonia was used as indicator of radiation-induced genetic injury. Reciprocal translocation were registered six months after the irradiation on spermatocytes in diakinesmetaphase I. Comparison was made with gamma-irradiated animals from 60 Co source with dose rate 1,44 Gy/min. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was determined by comparing the regression coefficients from the linear dose translocation yield dependency. The values of the RBE coefficients were 0.8, 0.9 and 1.2, accordingly for protons, α-particles and carbon ions

  3. Giant Kovacs-Like Memory Effect for Active Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Sushkov, Vladimir; Ihle, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Dynamical properties of self-propelled particles obeying a bounded confidence rule are investigated by means of kinetic theory and agent-based simulations. While memory effects are observed in disordered systems, we show that they also occur in active matter systems. In particular, we find that the system exhibits a giant Kovacs-like memory effect that is much larger than predicted by a generic linear theory. Based on a separation of time scales we develop a nonlinear theory to explain this effect. We apply this theory to driven granular gases and propose further applications to spin glasses.

  4. Polymer-Particle Nanocomposites: Size and Dispersion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Joseph

    Polymer-particle nanocomposites are used in industrial processes to enhance a broad range of material properties (e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical and gas permeability properties). This dissertation will focus on explanation and quantification of mechanical property improvements upon the addition of nanoparticles to polymeric materials. Nanoparticles, as enhancers of mechanical properties, are ubiquitous in synthetic and natural materials (e.g. automobile tires, packaging, bone), however, to date, there is no thorough understanding of the mechanism of their action. In this dissertation, silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, both bare and grafted with polystyrene (PS), are studied in polymeric matrices. Several variables of interest are considered, including particle dispersion state, particle size, length and density of grafted polymer chains, and volume fraction of SiO2. Polymer grafted nanoparticles behave akin to block copolymers, and this is critically leveraged to systematically vary nanoparticle dispersion and examine its role on the mechanical reinforcement in polymer based nanocomposites in the melt state. Rheology unequivocally shows that reinforcement is maximized by the formation of a transient, but long-lived, percolating polymer-particle network with the particles serving as the network junctions. The effects of dispersion and weight fraction of filler on nanocomposite mechanical properties are also studied in a bare particle system. Due to the interest in directional properties for many different materials, different means of inducing directional ordering of particle structures are also studied. Using a combination of electron microscopy and x-ray scattering, it is shown that shearing anisotropic NP assemblies (sheets or strings) causes them to orient, one in front of the other, into macroscopic two-dimensional structures along the flow direction. In contrast, no such flow-induced ordering occurs for well dispersed NPs or spherical NP aggregates! This work

  5. The magnitude and effects of extreme solar particle events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiggens Piers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The solar energetic particle (SEP radiation environment is an important consideration for spacecraft design, spacecraft mission planning and human spaceflight. Herein is presented an investigation into the likely severity of effects of a very large Solar Particle Event (SPE on technology and humans in space. Fluences for SPEs derived using statistical models are compared to historical SPEs to verify their appropriateness for use in the analysis which follows. By combining environment tools with tools to model effects behind varying layers of spacecraft shielding it is possible to predict what impact a large SPE would be likely to have on a spacecraft in Near-Earth interplanetary space or geostationary Earth orbit. Also presented is a comparison of results generated using the traditional method of inputting the environment spectra, determined using a statistical model, into effects tools and a new method developed as part of the ESA SEPEM Project allowing for the creation of an effect time series on which statistics, previously applied to the flux data, can be run directly. The SPE environment spectra is determined and presented as energy integrated proton fluence (cm−2 as a function of particle energy (in MeV. This is input into the SHIELDOSE-2, MULASSIS, NIEL, GRAS and SEU effects tools to provide the output results. In the case of the new method for analysis, the flux time series is fed directly into the MULASSIS and GEMAT tools integrated into the SEPEM system. The output effect quantities include total ionising dose (in rads, non-ionising energy loss (MeV g−1, single event upsets (upsets/bit and the dose in humans compared to established limits for stochastic (or cancer-causing effects and tissue reactions (such as acute radiation sickness in humans given in grey-equivalent and sieverts respectively.

  6. Effects of Na and Ca on particle size; Effect of filtering on UV absorbance

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Effects of Na and Ca on particle size; Effect of filtering on UV absorbance. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Bouchard, D., C. Knightes, X....

  7. Effect of hot α-particles on ion cyclotron absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, R.A.; Kay, A.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Ion cyclotron heating involves mode conversion of the incident fast wave to a Bernstein mode, which is generally stongly damped and only propagates in a localized region of the plasma. The usual theoretical approach to this problem involves solution of fourth or higher order equations, but by treating the Bernstein mode as a driven response to the fast wave we obtain a simple second order equation. Comparison of its solutions with those of higher order equations shows that this approach gives good results. The same method can be used to consider the effect of a small population of hot α-particles on ion cyclotron heating, since it does away with the need for a small larmor radius expansion. The results indicate that a small concentration of α-particles can absorb a substantial fraction of the incident energy

  8. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  9. The Effective Chiral Lagrangian for a Light Dynamical "Higgs Particle"

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.; Yepes, J.

    2013-01-01

    We generalize the basis of CP-even chiral effective operators describing a dynamical Higgs sector, to the case in which the Higgs-like particle is light. Gauge and gauge-Higgs operators are considered up to mass dimension five. This analysis completes the tool needed to explore at leading order the connection between linear realizations of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism - whose extreme case is the Standard Model - and non-linear realizations with a light Higgs-like particle present. It may also provide a model-independent guideline to explore which exotic gauge-Higgs couplings may be expected, and their relative strength to Higgsless observable amplitudes. With respect to fermions, the analysis is reduced by nature to the consideration of those flavour-conserving operators that can be written in terms of pure-gauge or gauge-Higgs ones via the equations of motion, but for the standard Yukawa-type couplings.

  10. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelmann, A.

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density (∼ 10 9 protons/cm 3 ) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  11. ION EFFECTS IN THE APS PARTICLE ACCUMULATOR RING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvey, J.; Harkay, K.; Yao, CY.

    2017-06-25

    Trapped ions in the APS Particle Accumulator Ring (PAR) lead to a positive coherent tune shift in both planes, which increases along the PAR cycle as more ions accumulate. This effect has been studied using an ion simulation code developed at SLAC. After modifying the code to include a realistic vacuum profile, multiple ionization, and the effect of shaking the beam to measure the tune, the simulation agrees well with our measurements. This code has also been used to evaluate the possibility of ion instabilities at the high bunch charge needed for the APS-Upgrade.

  12. A new formulation of the effective theory for heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietti, U.; Capitani, S.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the effective theories for heavy particles with a functional integral approach by integrating away the states with high velocity and with high virtuality. This formulation is non-perturbative and has a close connection with the Wilson renormalization group transformation. The fixed point hamiltonian of our transformation coincides with the static hamiltonian and irrelevant operators can be identified with the usual 1/M corrections to the static theory. No matching condition has to be imposed between the full and the static theory operators with our approach. The values of the matching constants come out as a dynamical effect of the renormalization group flow. ((orig.))

  13. Cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Jose, J.G.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of heavy charged particles on the crystalline lens of the eye of mice are important because this tissue has proven susceptible to other forms of high-LET radiation. This report summarizes the results currently available from a prospectively designed study to explore the LET dependence of the cataractogenic process. The present results are consistent with a high cataractogenic effect at 100 keV/μm, because plateau argon 40 ions, with an LET in this range, produce higher average cataracts scores at 9, 11 and 13 months than do carbon 12 or neon 20 ions. In the electron micrographs, significant changes were observed from the controls

  14. The Bumper Boats Effect: Effect of Inertia on Self Propelled Active Particles Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chengyu; Bruss, Isaac; Glotzer, Sharon

    Active matter has been well studied using the standard Brownian dynamics model, which assumes that the self-propelled particles have no inertia. However, many examples of active systems, such as sub-millimeter bacteria and colloids, have non-negligible inertia. Using particle-based Langevin Dynamics simulation with HOOMD-blue, we study the role of particle inertia on the collective emergent behavior of self-propelled particles. We find that inertia hinders motility-induced phase separation. This is because the effective speed of particles is reduced due to particle-particle collisions-\\x9Dmuch like bumper boats, which take time to reach terminal velocity after a crash. We are able to fully account for this effect by tracking a particle's average rather than terminal velocity, allowing us to extend the standard Brownian dynamics model to account for the effects of momentum. This study aims to inform experimental systems where the inertia of the active particles is non-negligible. We acknowledge the funding support from the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  15. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias; Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-μm bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-μm bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean ± standard deviation, 3.19 ± 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 ± 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 ± 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 ± 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 ± 0.55 cm; P 3 ). At histology, 40-μm microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-μm microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-μm microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  16. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Monica E. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012), 10.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1 % . The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  17. Search for Spectral Irregularities due to Photon-Axionlike-Particle Oscillations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; Mirabal, N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on the search for spectral irregularities induced by oscillations between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs) in the gamma-ray spectrum of NGC 1275, the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster. Using 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find no evidence for ALPs and exclude couplings above 5 times 10 (sup -12) per gigaelectronvolt for ALP masses less than or approximately equal to 0.5 apparent magnitude (m (sub a)) less than or approximately equal to 5 nanoelectronvolts at 95 percent confidence. The limits are competitive withthe sensitivity of planned laboratory experiments, and, together with other bounds, strongly constrain thepossibility that ALPs can reduce the gamma-ray opacity of the Universe.

  18. Effects of Initial Particle Distribution on an Energetic Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Koneru, Rahul; Garno, Joshua; Durant, Bradford

    2017-11-01

    Accurate predictions of the late time solid particle cloud distribution ensuing an explosive dispersal of particles is an extremely challenging problem for compressible multiphase flow simulations. The source of this difficulty is twofold: (i) The complex sequence of events taking place. Indeed, as the blast wave crosses the surrounding layer of particles, compaction occurs shortly before particles disperse radially at high speed. Then, during the dispersion phase, complex multiphase interactions occurs between particles and detonation products. (ii) Precise characterization of the explosive and particle distribution is virtually impossible. In this numerical experiment, we focus on the sensitivity of late time particle cloud distributions relative to carefully designed initial distributions, assuming the explosive is well described. Using point particle simulations, we study the case of a bed of glass particles surrounding an explosive. Constraining our simulations to relatively low initial volume fractions to prevent reaching of the close packing limit, we seek to describe qualitatively and quantitatively the late time dependency of a solid particle cloud on its distribution before the energy release of an explosive. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  19. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  20. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S.

    2013-08-01

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  1. Efimov effect, Thomas effect and model dependence of three-particle observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Delfino, A.; Frederico, T.; Goldman, I.D.; Tomio, L.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the three-dimensional three-particle system that a divergence arising from essentially the same singularity structure of the Kernel of the scattering integral equation is responsible for both the Efimov and Thomas effects. The above divergence implies that the results of three-particle dynamical calculation be sensitive to the details of the two-particle interaction. In two-dimensional systems the above divergence is absent and consequently the three-particle observables become essentially model independent. (M.W.O.) [pt

  2. [Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the ''apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference

  3. Effects of energetic particle precipitation on the atmospheric electric circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, J.B.; Meyerott, R.E.; Evans, J.E.; Imhof, W.L.; Joiner, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The solar particle event (SPE) of August 1972 is one of the largest that has occurred in the last 20 years. Since it is so well documented, it can serve as a good example of a major perturbation to the atmospheric electric system. In this paper, ion production rates and conductivities from the ground to 80 km at the peak intensity of the event on August 4 and for 30, 35, and 40 km for the 6-day duration of the event are presented. At the peak of the event, the proton and electron precipitation currents, the ohmic current, and the vertical electric field are calculated inside the polar cap. The particle precipitation currents at this time greatly exceed the normal air earth current at altitudes above 30 km and produce reversals in the vertical electric field at 28 km and above. Calculations are presented of the vertical electric field at altitudes near 30 km where balloon measurements were made. Good agreement between the calculated and the measured vertical electric field verifies our ability to calculate disturbed conductivities at these altitudes from satellite measurements of proton spectra incident on the atmosphere. Despite the fact that at the peak of the event the vertical electric field near 30 km was shorted out by the solar particles and that the current carried by the solar particles exceeded the fair weather air-earth current density in the stratosphere by large factors, it is concluded that the largest effect of an SPE of this magnitude on the atmospheric electric circuit is due to the Forbush decrease in the galactic cosmic ray flux rather than to the large increase in solar proton flux

  4. Effect of indirect non-thermal plasma on particle size distribution and composition of diesel engine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linbo, GU; Yixi, CAI; Yunxi, SHI; Jing, WANG; Xiaoyu, PU; Jing, TIAN; Runlin, FAN

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effect of the gas source flow rate on the actual diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM), a test bench for diesel engine exhaust purification was constructed, using indirect non-thermal plasma technology. The effects of different gas source flow rates on the quantity concentration, composition, and apparent activation energy of PM were investigated, using an engine exhaust particle sizer and a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. The results show that when the gas source flow rate was large, not only the maximum peak quantity concentrations of particles had a large drop, but also the peak quantity concentrations shifted to smaller particle sizes from 100 nm to 80 nm. When the gas source flow rate was 10 L min-1, the total quantity concentration greatly decreased where the removal rate of particles was 79.2%, and the variation of the different mode particle proportion was obvious. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) improved the oxidation ability of volatile matter as well as that of solid carbon. However, the NTP gas source rate had little effects on oxidation activity of volatile matter, while it strongly influenced the oxidation activity of solid carbon. Considering the quantity concentration and oxidation activity of particles, a gas source flow rate of 10 L min-1 was more appropriate for the purification of particles.

  5. The effect of errors in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Residual errors in a charged particle optical system determine how well the performance of the system conforms to the theory on which it is based. Mathematically possible optical modes can sometimes be eliminated as requiring precisions not attainable. Other plans may require introduction of means of correction for the occurrence of various errors. Error types include misalignments, magnet fabrication precision limitations, and magnet current regulation errors. A thorough analysis of a beam optical system requires computer simulation of all these effects. A unified scheme for the simulation of errors and their correction is discussed

  6. Effect of particle size on degree of inversion in ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, M.; Butt, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites with the spinel structure are important materials because of their structural, magnetic and electrical properties. The suitability of these materials depends on both the intrinsic behavior of the material and the effects of the grain size. Moessbauer spectroscopy was employed to investigate the cation distribution and degree of inversion in bulk and nano sized particles of CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/, MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ ferrites. The Moessbauer spectra of all bulk ferrites showed complete magnetic behavior, whereas nanoparticle ferrites showed combination of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic components. Moreover, the cation distribution in nanoparticle materials was also found to be different to that of their bulk counterparts indicating the particle size dependency. The inversion of Cu and Ni ions in bulk sample was greater than that of nanoparticles; whereas the inversion of Mn ions was less in bulk material as compared to the nanoparticles. Hence the degree of inversion decreased in CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ samples whereas, it increased in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as the particle size decreased and thus showed the anomalous behavior in this case. The nanoparticle samples also showed paramagnetic behaviour due to superparamagnetism and this effect is more prominent in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Moessbauer spectra of bulk and nanoparticles CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ is shown. (Orig./A.B.)

  7. The effect of bed non-uniformities and porosity of particles on dryout in boiling particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Mogford, D.J.; Willshire, S.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report relates to an on-going experimental programme concerned with the coolability of beds of reactor core debris or rubble immersed in a liquid coolant, as might occur in an accident situation. The objectives are to develop experimental techniques, improve the understanding of bed cooling mechanisms, determine dry-out limitations of various bed configurations and particle shapes and sizes and devise ways of improving bed coolability. The report concentrates on a recently discovered effect on bed coolability of particle porosity, such as exists in fragmented UO 2 fuel pellets. It is shown that porosity can lower bed dry-out powers by a factor of 4 or 5. A mechanism which explains the effect is presented. The report also gives results of bed non-uniformities obtained by mixing glass particles with the dielectrically heated 'ferrite' particles used in the experiments. (author)

  8. Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopkar, M.; Sudarshan, S.; Das, P. K.; Manna, I.

    2008-07-01

    Nanofluids, containing nanometric metallic or oxide particles, exhibit extraordinarily high thermal conductivity. It is reported that the identity (composition), amount (volume percent), size, and shape of nanoparticles largely determine the extent of this enhancement. In the present study, we have experimentally investigated the impact of Al2Cu and Ag2Al nanoparticle size and volume fraction on the effective thermal conductivity of water and ethylene glycol based nanofluid prepared by a two-stage process comprising mechanical alloying of appropriate Al-Cu and Al-Ag elemental powder blend followed by dispersing these nanoparticles (1 to 2 vol pct) in water and ethylene glycol with different particle sizes. The thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid, measured using an indigenously developed thermal comparator device, shows a significant increase of up to 100 pct with only 1.5 vol pct nanoparticles of 30- to 40-nm average diameter. Furthermore, an analytical model shows that the interfacial layer significantly influences the effective thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid for the comparable amount of nanoparticles.

  9. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Elsa; Dybdahl, M [Technical Univ. of Denmark, National Food Institute, Dept. of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Soeborg (Denmark); Larsen, Poul Bo [Danish Environmental Protection Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2008-07-01

    The number of residential wood burning devices has increased in Denmark during the latest years and it has been estimated that there in 2005 were about 551,000 wood stoves and about 48,000 wood boilers in Denmark. This has resulted in an increased exposure of the general Danish population to pollutants associated with residential wood smoke. New Danish monitoring results on particulate matter (PM) in ambient air have shown elevated PM levels in areas with many wood stoves, particularly during wintertime when wood burning is common. Due to the size distribution of wood smoke particles essentially all will be contained in the PM{sub 2.5} fraction. It has been estimated that about 17,665 tonnes PM{sub 2.5} per year (2005) in Denmark come from residential wood combustion. Therefore, there is an increasing concern that adverse human health effects might be associated with the increased exposure to residential wood smoke. This project has been set up in order to review the scientific literature concerning adverse health effects of pollutants associated with residential wood smoke with the main focus on particulate matter and to quantify and evaluate, if possible, the impact on human health of the increased exposure to particles in residential wood smoke. (au)

  10. Morphological Evolution of Block Copolymer Particles: Effect of Solvent Evaporation Rate on Particle Shape and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, YongJoo; Yun, Hongseok; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2017-02-28

    Shape and morphology of polymeric particles are of great importance in controlling their optical properties or self-assembly into unusual superstructures. Confinement of block copolymers (BCPs) in evaporative emulsions affords particles with diverse structures, including prolate ellipsoids, onion-like spheres, oblate ellipsoids, and others. Herein, we report that the evaporation rate of solvent from emulsions encapsulating symmetric polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) determines the shape and internal nanostructure of micron-sized BCP particles. A distinct morphological transition from the ellipsoids with striped lamellae to the onion-like spheres was observed with decreasing evaporation rate. Experiments and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations showed that the evaporation rate affected the organization of BCPs at the particle surface, which determined the final shape and internal nanostructure of the particles. Differences in the solvent diffusion rates in PS and PB at rapid evaporation rates induced alignment of both domains perpendicular to the particle surface, resulting in ellipsoids with axial lamellar stripes. Slower evaporation rates provided sufficient time for BCP organization into onion-like structures with PB as the outermost layer, owing to the preferential interaction of PB with the surroundings. BCP molecular weight was found to influence the critical evaporation rate corresponding to the morphological transition from ellipsoid to onion-like particles, as well as the ellipsoid aspect ratio. DPD simulations produced morphologies similar to those obtained from experiments and thus elucidated the mechanism and driving forces responsible for the evaporation-induced assembly of BCPs into particles with well-defined shapes and morphologies.

  11. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  12. Resummation and renormalization in effective theories of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jakovac, Antal

    2015-01-01

    Effective models of strong and electroweak interactions are extensively applied in particle physics phenomenology, and in many instances can compete with large-scale numerical simulations of Standard Model physics. These contexts include but are not limited to providing indications for phase transitions and the nature of elementary excitations of strong and electroweak matter. A precondition for obtaining high-precision predictions is the application of some advanced functional techniques to the effective models, where the sensitivity of the results to the accurate choice of the input parameters is under control and the insensitivity to the actual choice of ultraviolet regulators is ensured. The credibility of such attempts ultimately requires a clean renormalization procedure and an error estimation due to a necessary truncation in the resummation procedure. In this concise primer we discuss systematically and in sufficient technical depth the features of a number of approximate methods, as applied to vario...

  13. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes

  14. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  15. Non-Maxwellian fast particle effects in gyrokinetic GENE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Siena, A.; Görler, T.; Doerk, H.; Bilato, R.; Citrin, J.; Johnson, T.; Schneider, M.; Poli, E.; JET Contributors

    2018-04-01

    Fast ions have recently been found to significantly impact and partially suppress plasma turbulence both in experimental and numerical studies in a number of scenarios. Understanding the underlying physics and identifying the range of their beneficial effect is an essential task for future fusion reactors, where highly energetic ions are generated through fusion reactions and external heating schemes. However, in many of the gyrokinetic codes fast ions are, for simplicity, treated as equivalent-Maxwellian-distributed particle species, although it is well known that to rigorously model highly non-thermalised particles, a non-Maxwellian background distribution function is needed. To study the impact of this assumption, the gyrokinetic code GENE has recently been extended to support arbitrary background distribution functions which might be either analytical, e.g., slowing down and bi-Maxwellian, or obtained from numerical fast ion models. A particular JET plasma with strong fast-ion related turbulence suppression is revised with these new code capabilities both with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. It appears that the fast ion stabilization tends to be less strong but still substantial with more realistic distributions, and this improves the quantitative power balance agreement with experiments.

  16. Thermal and particle size distribution effects on the ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, C.N.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal and particle size distribution effects on the ferromagnetic resonance of magnetic fluids were theoretically investigated, assuming negligible interparticle interactions and neglecting the viscosity of the carrier liquid. The model is based on the usual approach for the ferromagnetic resonance description of single-domain magnetic particle systems, which was amended in order to take into account the finite particle size effect, the particle size distribution and the orientation mobility of the particles within the magnetic fluid. Under these circumstances the shape of the resonance line, the resonance field and the line width are found to be strongly affected by the temperature and by the particle size distribution of magnetic fluids

  17. The effects of particle recycling on the divertor plasma: A particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mingyu; Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Zhenyue; Hu, Wanpeng; Wang, Dezhen

    2018-05-01

    A Particle-In-Cell (PIC) with Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) model is applied to study the effects of particle recycling on divertor plasma in the present work. The simulation domain is the scrape-off layer of the tokamak in one-dimension along the magnetic field line. At the divertor plate, the reflected deuterium atoms (D) and thermally released deuterium molecules (D2) are considered. The collisions between the plasma particles (e and D+) and recycled neutral particles (D and D2) are described by the MCC method. It is found that the recycled neutral particles have a great impact on divertor plasma. The effects of different collisions on the plasma are simulated and discussed. Moreover, the impacts of target materials on the plasma are simulated by comparing the divertor with Carbon (C) and Tungsten (W) targets. The simulation results show that the energy and momentum losses of the C target are larger than those of the W target in the divertor region even without considering the impurity particles, whereas the W target has a more remarkable influence on the core plasma.

  18. Vascular effects of ultrafine particles in persons with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes confers an increased risk for cardiovascular effects of airborne particles. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles (UFP) would activate blood platelets and vascular endothelium in people with type 2 diabetes. ...

  19. Atherogenic lipoprotein particle size and concentrations and the effect of pravastatin in children with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, Anouk; Rodenburg, Jessica; Vissers, Maud N.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Wiegman, Albert; Trip, Mieke D.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Wijburg, Frits A.; Otvos, James D.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine lipoprotein particle concentrations and size in children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and investigate the effect of pravastatin therapy on these measures. STUDY DESIGN: Lipoprotein particle concentrations and sizes were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

  20. Ratchet effect on a relativistic particle driven by external forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, Niurka R; Alvarez-Nodarse, Renato; Cuesta, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    We study the ratchet effect of a damped relativistic particle driven by both asymmetric temporal bi-harmonic and time-periodic piecewise constant forces. This system can be formally solved for any external force, providing the ratchet velocity as a nonlinear functional of the driving force. This allows us to explicitly illustrate the functional Taylor expansion formalism recently proposed for this kind of systems. The Taylor expansion reveals particularly useful to obtain the shape of the current when the force is periodic, piecewise constant. We also illustrate the somewhat counterintuitive effect that introducing damping may induce a ratchet effect. When the force is symmetric under time-reversal and the system is undamped, under symmetry principles no ratchet effect is possible. In this situation increasing damping generates a ratchet current which, upon increasing the damping coefficient eventually reaches a maximum and decreases toward zero. We argue that this effect is not specific of this example and should appear in any ratchet system with tunable damping driven by a time-reversible external force. (paper)

  1. Ratchet effect on a relativistic particle driven by external forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, Niurka R [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Universitaria Politecnica, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Sevilla (Spain); Alvarez-Nodarse, Renato [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo 1160, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Cuesta, Jose A, E-mail: niurka@us.es, E-mail: ran@us.es, E-mail: cuesta@math.uc3m.es [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-21

    We study the ratchet effect of a damped relativistic particle driven by both asymmetric temporal bi-harmonic and time-periodic piecewise constant forces. This system can be formally solved for any external force, providing the ratchet velocity as a nonlinear functional of the driving force. This allows us to explicitly illustrate the functional Taylor expansion formalism recently proposed for this kind of systems. The Taylor expansion reveals particularly useful to obtain the shape of the current when the force is periodic, piecewise constant. We also illustrate the somewhat counterintuitive effect that introducing damping may induce a ratchet effect. When the force is symmetric under time-reversal and the system is undamped, under symmetry principles no ratchet effect is possible. In this situation increasing damping generates a ratchet current which, upon increasing the damping coefficient eventually reaches a maximum and decreases toward zero. We argue that this effect is not specific of this example and should appear in any ratchet system with tunable damping driven by a time-reversible external force. (paper)

  2. Biosorbents prepared from wood particles treated with anionic polymer and iron salt: Effect of particle size on phosphate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Soo-Hong Min

    2008-01-01

    Biomass-based adsorbents have been widely studied as a cost-effective and environmentally-benign means to remove pollutants and nutrients from water. A two-stage treatment of aspen wood particles with solutions of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and ferrous chloride afforded a biosorbent that was effective in removing phosphate from test solutions. FTIR spectroscopy of...

  3. Evaluation of salt particle collection device for preventing SCC on canister - Effect on particle collection rate by electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.; Saegusa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Now, in Japan, while metal casks are used for spent nuclear fuel storage, a practical use of concrete casks is under review because of its cost effectiveness and procurement easiness. In reviewing the practical use, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a canister container in the concrete cask becomes an issue and is needed to be resolved soon. A natural ventilation system is generally adopted for the storage facilities, especially in Japan where facilities are built near coasts so that the cooling air includes sea salt particles. Therefore, the occurrence of SCC is concerned when the sea salt particles adhere to welded parts of the canisters. In this study, we proposed a salt particle collection device with low pressure loss which does not interfere with the air flow into the building or the concrete casks. The device is composed of a stack of 10 parallel stainless steel plates, the air is free to circulate in the space between them. Pressure loss tests in a laboratory and salt particle collection tests in the field have been performed. It has been clarified that the pressure loss of the device is one-thirtieth to one-twentieth of that of a commercial filter and 40% of the particles in the air could be collected and the device would not influence the heat removal performance. Moreover, we evaluated the effect of electric field on the particle collection under supposing the particle charge. In the case of electric field over 10 3 kV/m the particle collection rate could be improved dramatically

  4. Effect of particle size on the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature of a broad class of molecules is shown to depend on molecular size. This dependency results from the size dependence of the pair potential. A generalized equation of state is used to estimate how the volume fraction at the glass transition depends on the size of the molecule, for rigid molecule glass-formers. The model shows that at a given pressure and temperature there is a size-induced glass transition: For molecules larger than a critical size, the volume fraction required to support the effective pressure due to particle attractions is above that which characterizes the glassy state. This observation establishes the boundary between nanoparticles, which exist in liquid form only as dispersions in low molecular weight solvents and large molecules which form liquids that have viscosities below those characterized by the glassy state.

  5. Increasing effective number of neutrinos by decaying particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, K.; Kawasaki, M.; Nakayama, K.; Senami, M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    We present models of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario not only solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, but also provides a possible answer to deeper inconsistency in the estimation of the matter power spectrum amplitude at small scales, represented by {sigma}{sub 8}, between the WMAP and some small scale matter power measurements such as the Lyman-{alpha} forest and weak lensing. We consider (a) saxion decay into two axions; (b) gravitino decay into axino and axion; (c) Dirac right-handed sneutrino decay into gravitino and right-handed neutrino. (orig.)

  6. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescent response of hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Contreras, M. E.; Rivera M, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present the study of the structural characterization and the thermoluminescent response of the hydroxyapatite as a function of the calcination temperature and the effect of the particle size. For precipitation synthesis, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO_3)_2 and dibasic ammonium phosphate ((NH_4)_2HPO_4) were used as precursors and ammonium hydroxide (NH_4OH) as a ph controlling agent. The characterization of the samples was carried out by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The powders obtained are composed of hydroxyapatite, with a different degree of dehydroxylation. The thermoluminescent characterization indicates that at higher calcination temperature there is a higher thermoluminescent response, the calcined powders at 1300 degrees Celsius show a very well defined brightness curve with a higher intensity, with its maximum intensity located at a temperature of 210 degrees Celsius, which indicates that this material can be used as a dosimeter. (Author)

  7. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Khono, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using human embryonal carcinoma (Ntera2=NT2) and Human neuroblastoma cell (NB1). They exposed to heavy ions and X ray 80% confluent cells in culture bottles. The cells were different type about growth and differentiation in the neuron. The apoptosis profile was measured by AnnexinV-EGFP, PI stained and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after carbon- or iron-ion irradiation. Memory functions were rapidly decreased after irradiation both ions. Iron -ion group were recovered 20 weeks after irradiation C-ion group were recovered 25 weeks after irradiation. Tier memory were still keep at over 100 weeks after irradiation. (author)

  8. Health effects of exposure to diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, R O

    1987-01-01

    Diesel-powered vehicles emit substantially more particles than do gasoline-powered vehicles with contemporary emission control systems. The DEP are submicron in size and readily inhaled. Approximately one-fourth of the particle mass inhaled by people is deposited in the pulmonary region, some of which is retained with a half-life of several hundred days. In animal studies, exposure to high levels of DEP overwhelms the normal clearance mechanisms and results in lung burdens of DEP that exceed those predicted from observations at lower exposure concentrations. A variable amount of the mass of DEP is extractable with strong organic solvents. The extracted material contains more than a thousand individual compounds and is mutagenic in a number of bacterial and mammalian cell assays. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis of DEP had identified several hundred compounds. Many are PAHs, some of which are considered to have human carcinogenic potential. A number of nitrated compounds have been identified that account for a significant portion of the mutagenicity assayed in bacteria. The mutagenicity of the DEPE is generally reduced by addition of an S-9 cellular fraction or of serum proteins. Macrophages rapidly reduce the recoverable mutagenic activity associated with DEP. These findings support a hypothesis that detoxification of DEP-associated organics occurs rapidly in vivo. The association of benzo(a)pyrene and nitropyrene with DEP prolongs their retention in the lungs. This increased retention suggests the need to clarify the relative importance of competing mechanisms that detoxify particle-associated compounds and those that serve to enhance the retention of toxicologically important compounds. Some extracts of DEP evoke tumorigenic responses in skin-tumor bioassays, suggesting their carcinogenic potential in mammals. A number of large-scale studies have been conducted with laboratory rodents to evaluate the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to DE. An increased

  9. arXiv Black hole superradiance and polarization-dependent bending of light

    CERN Document Server

    Plascencia, Alexis D.

    2018-04-27

    An inhomogeneous pseudo-scalar field configuration behaves like an optically active medium. Consequently, if a light ray passes through an axion cloud surrounding a Kerr black hole, it may experience a polarization-dependent bending. We explore the size and relevance of such effect considering both the QCD axion and a generic axion-like particle.

  10. arXiv Black hole superradiance and polarization-dependent bending of light

    CERN Document Server

    Plascencia, Alexis D.

    2017-01-01

    An inhomogeneous pseudo-scalar field configuration behaves like an optically active medium. Consequently, if a light ray passes through an axion cloud surrounding a Kerr black hole, it may experience a polarization-dependent bending. We explore the size and relevance of such effect considering both the QCD axion and a generic axion-like particle.

  11. SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS AND THE KIPLINGER EFFECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    The Kiplinger effect is an observed association of solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events with a 'soft-hard-harder' (SHH) spectral evolution during the extended phases of the associated solar hard (E > 30 keV) X-ray (HXR) flares. Besides its possible use as a space weather predictor of SEP events, the Kiplinger effect has been interpreted as evidence of SEP production in the flare site itself, contradicting the widely accepted view that particles of large SEP events are predominately or entirely accelerated in shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We review earlier work to develop flare soft X-ray (SXR) and HXR spectra as SEP event forecast tools and then examine recent Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) evidence supporting the association of SHH HXR flares with large SEP events. We point out that ad hoc prediction criteria using the CME widths and SXR flare durations of associated RHESSI hard X-ray bursts (HXBs) can yield results comparable to those of the SHH prediction criteria. An examination of the RHESSI dynamic plots reveals several ambiguities in the determination of whether and when the SHH criteria are fulfilled, which must be quantified and applied consistently before an SHH-based predictive tool can be made. A comparative HXR spectral study beginning with the large population of relatively smaller SEP events has yet to be done, and we argue that those events will not be so well predicted by the SHH criteria. SHH HXR flares and CMEs are both components of large eruptive flare events, which accounts for the good connection of the SHH HXR flares with SEP events.

  12. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.

    1992-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV μm -1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p 3 n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p 3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p 3 n is high. (author)

  13. The effects of solar particle events on the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackman, C.H.; Douglass, A.R.; Meade, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) have been investigated since the late 1960's for possible effects on the middle atmosphere. Solar protons from SPEs produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations, and excitations in the middle atmosphere. The production of HO(x) and NO(x) and their subsequent effects on ozone can also be computed using energy deposition and photochemical models. The effects of SPE-produced HO(x) species on the odd nitrogen abundance of the middle atmosphere as well as the SPE-produced long term effects on ozone. Model computations indicate fairly good agreement with ozone data for the SPE-induced ozone depletion caused by NO(y) species connected with the August 1972 SPE. The model computations indicate that NO(y) will not be substantially changed over a solar cycle by SPEs. The changes are mainly at high latitudes and are on time scales of several months, after which the NO(y) drifts back to its ambient levels

  14. [Particle pollution effects on the risk of cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massamba, V K; Coppieters, Y; Mercier, G; Collart, P; Levêque, A

    2014-02-01

    The effects of air pollution on health are quite well-documented and the influence of particulate pollution on morbidity and mortality from myocardial infarction and stroke is increasingly evident. The objective of this literature review is to identify and synthesize articles on the impact of air pollution by PM10 and PM2.5 of myocardial infarction and stroke. A total of 14 studies were reported on the effects of PM10 and five on the effects of PM2.5. Nine out of 14 studies for PM10 and two studies of five for PM2.5 have found a significant association with myocardial infarction and/or stroke. Particle composition according to location, study period and population must be considered in interpreting the results on the health effects of air pollution. The integration of these elements is important for decision making in tune with social and economic conditions specific to each environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water: particle size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, G P; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T; Jefferson, B

    2008-02-01

    The impact of water quality on the ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water was investigated with reference to urban water reuse. Direct UV disinfection of grey water did not meet the stringent California State Title 22 criteria for unrestricted urban water reuse due to the presence of particulate material ranging from or = 2000 microm in size. Grey water was manipulated by settling to produce fractions of varying particle size distributions and blending was employed post-disinfection to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs). The efficacy of UV disinfection was found to be linked to the particle size of the grey water fractions. The larger particle size fractions with a mean particle size of 262 microm and above were observed to shield more coliforms from UV light than did the smaller particles with a mean particle size below 119 microm. Up to 70% of total coliforms in the larger particle size fractions were particle-associated following a UV dose (fluence) of 260 mJ.cm(-2) and would remain undetected by standard coliform enumeration techniques. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and recommendations made for grey water treatment to ensure removal of particle-associated indicator bacteria and pathogens prior to UV disinfection.

  16. Effects of oil dispersants on settling of marine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Jie; Liu, Wen; Fu, Kunming; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2017-01-15

    This work investigated effects of three model oil dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and SPC1000) on settling of fine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components in sediment-seawater systems. All three dispersants enhanced settling of sediment particles. The nonionic surfactants (Tween 80 and Tween 85) play key roles in promoting particle aggregation. Yet, the effects varied with environmental factors (pH, salinity, DOM, and temperature). Strongest dispersant effect was observed at neutral or alkaline pH and in salinity range of 0-3.5wt%. The presence of water accommodated oil and dispersed oil accelerated settling of the particles. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediment phase were increased from 6.9% to 90.1% in the presence of Corexit EC9527A, and from 11.4% to 86.7% for PAHs. The information is useful for understanding roles of oil dispersants in formation of oil-sediment aggregates and in sediment-facilitated transport of oil and PAHs in marine eco-systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect II: Effects of variations of the fuel particle diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shurong; Wang Qiming; Huo Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    In order to predict the irradiation mechanical behaviors of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the total burnup is divided into two stages: the initial stage and the increasing stage. At the initial stage, the thermal effects induced by the high temperature differences between the operation temperatures and the room temperature are mainly considered; and at the increasing stage, the intense mechanical interactions between the fuel particles and the matrix due to the irradiation swelling of fuel particles are focused on. The large-deformation thermo-elasto-plasticity finite element analysis is performed to evaluate the effects of particle diameters on the in-pile mechanical behaviors of fuel elements. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the fuel particle diameters; the effects of particle diameters on the maximum first principal stresses vary with burnup, and the considered case with the largest particle diameter holds the maximum values all along; (2) at the cladding near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding, the Mises stresses and the first principal stresses undergo major changes with increasing burnup, and different variations exist for different particle diameter cases; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles rise with the particle diameters.

  18. Thermomechanical interactions of particle bed-structural wall in a layered configuration. Pt. 1. Effect of particle bed thermal expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranian, F.

    1995-01-01

    Materials in the form of particle beds have been considered for shielding and tritium breeding as well as neutron multiplication in many of the conceptual reactor design studies. As the level of effort of the fusion blanket community in the area of out-of-pile and in-pile (ITER) testing of integrated test modules increases, so does the need for modelling capability for predicting the thermomechanical responses of the test modules under reactor environment.In this study, the thermomechanical responses of a particle bed-structural wall system in a layered configuration, subjected to bed temperature rise and/or external coolant pressure, were considered. Equations were derived which represent the dependence of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall contact forces and areas on the structural wall deformations and in turn on the thermomechanical loads. Using the derived equations, parametric analyses were performed to study the variations in the thermomechanical response quantities of a beryllium particle bed-stainless steel structural wall when subjected to thermomechanical loads. The results are presented in two parts. In Part I, presented in this paper, the derivation of the analytical equations and the effects of bed temperature rise are discussed. In Part II of this study, also presented in this symposium, the effects of external coolant pressure as well as the combined effects of bed temperature rise and coolant pressure on the thermomechanical responses are given.It is shown that, depending on the stiffness of the structural walls, uniform bed temperature rises in the range 100-400 C result in non-uniform effective thermal properties through the prticle bed and could increase the bed effective thermal conductivity by a factor of 2-5 and the bed-wall interface thermal conductance by even a larger factor. (orig.)

  19. Space Weather Effects Produced by the Ring Current Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Jaynes, Allison; Liemohn, Michael

    2017-11-01

    One of the definitions of space weather describes it as the time-varying space environment that may be hazardous to technological systems in space and/or on the ground and/or endanger human health or life. The ring current has its contributions to space weather effects, both in terms of particles, ions and electrons, which constitute it, and magnetic and electric fields produced and modified by it at the ground and in space. We address the main aspects of the space weather effects from the ring current starting with brief review of ring current discovery and physical processes and the Dst-index and predictions of the ring current and storm occurrence based on it. Special attention is paid to the effects on satellites produced by the ring current electrons. The ring current is responsible for several processes in the other inner magnetosphere populations, such as the plasmasphere and radiation belts which is also described. Finally, we discuss the ring current influence on the ionosphere and the generation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC).

  20. One-particle reducibility in effective scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereshagin, V.

    2016-01-01

    To construct the reasonable renormalization scheme suitable for the effective theories one needs to resolve the “problem of couplings” because the number of free parameters in a theory should be finite. Otherwise the theory would loose its predictive power. In the case of effective theory already the first step on this way shows the necessity to solve the above-mentioned problem for the 1-loop 2-leg function traditionally called self energy. In contrast to the customary renormalizable models the corresponding Feynman graph demonstrates divergencies that require introducing of an infinite number of prescriptions. In the recent paper [1] it has been shown that the way out of this difficulty requires the revision of the notion of one-particle reducibility. The point is that in effective scattering theory one can introduce two different notions: the graphic reducibility and the analytic one. Below we explain the main ideas of the paper [1] and recall some notions and definitions introduced earlier in [2] and [3

  1. Nonlinear effects of energetic particle driven instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruedgam, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In a tokamak plasma, a population of superthermal particles generated by heating methods can lead to a destabilization of various MHD modes. Due to nonlinear wave-particle interactions, a consequential fast particle redistribution reduces the plasma heating and can cause severe damages to the wall of the fusion device. In order to describe the wave-particle interaction, the drift-kinetic perturbative HAGIS code is applied which evolves the particle trajectories and the waves nonlinearly. For a simulation speed-up, the 6-d particle phase-space is reduced by the guiding centre approach to a 5-d description. The eigenfunction of the wave is assumed to be invariant, but its amplitude and phase is altered in time. A sophisticated δ/f-method is employed to model the change in the fast particle distribution so that numerical noise and the excessive number of simulated Monte-Carlo points are reduced significantly. The original code can only calculate the particle redistribution inside the plasma region. Therefore, a code extension has been developed during this thesis which enlarges the simulation region up to the vessel wall. By means of numerical simulations, this thesis addresses the problem of nonlinear waveparticle interactions in the presence of multiple MHD modes with significantly different eigenfrequencies and the corresponding fast particle transport inside the plasma. In this context, a new coupling mechanism between resonant particles and waves has been identified that leads to enhanced mode amplitudes and fast particle losses. The extension of the code provides for the first time the possibility of a quantitative and qualitative comparison between simulation results and recent measurements in the experiment. The findings of the comparison serve as a validation of both the theoretical model and the interpretation of the experimental results. Thus, a powerful interface tool has been developed for a deeper insight of nonlinear wave-particle interaction. (orig.)

  2. Nonlinear effects of energetic particle driven instabilities in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruedgam, Michael

    2010-03-25

    In a tokamak plasma, a population of superthermal particles generated by heating methods can lead to a destabilization of various MHD modes. Due to nonlinear wave-particle interactions, a consequential fast particle redistribution reduces the plasma heating and can cause severe damages to the wall of the fusion device. In order to describe the wave-particle interaction, the drift-kinetic perturbative HAGIS code is applied which evolves the particle trajectories and the waves nonlinearly. For a simulation speed-up, the 6-d particle phase-space is reduced by the guiding centre approach to a 5-d description. The eigenfunction of the wave is assumed to be invariant, but its amplitude and phase is altered in time. A sophisticated {delta}/f-method is employed to model the change in the fast particle distribution so that numerical noise and the excessive number of simulated Monte-Carlo points are reduced significantly. The original code can only calculate the particle redistribution inside the plasma region. Therefore, a code extension has been developed during this thesis which enlarges the simulation region up to the vessel wall. By means of numerical simulations, this thesis addresses the problem of nonlinear waveparticle interactions in the presence of multiple MHD modes with significantly different eigenfrequencies and the corresponding fast particle transport inside the plasma. In this context, a new coupling mechanism between resonant particles and waves has been identified that leads to enhanced mode amplitudes and fast particle losses. The extension of the code provides for the first time the possibility of a quantitative and qualitative comparison between simulation results and recent measurements in the experiment. The findings of the comparison serve as a validation of both the theoretical model and the interpretation of the experimental results. Thus, a powerful interface tool has been developed for a deeper insight of nonlinear wave-particle interaction

  3. Effect of particle breakage on cyclic densification of ballast: A DEM approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P K; Vinod, J S; Indraratna, B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of particle breakage on densification behaviour of ballast under cyclic loading using Discrete Element Method (DEM). Numerical simulations using PFC 2D have been carried out on an assembly of angular particles with and without incorporation of particle breakage. Two-dimensional projection of angular ballast particles were simulated using clusters of bonded circular particles. Degradation of the bonds within a cluster was considered to represent particle breakage. Clump logic was used to make the cluster of particles unbreakable. DEM simulation results highlight that the particle breakage has a profound influence on the cyclic densification behaviour of ballast. The deformation behaviour exhibited by the assembly with breakage is in good agreement with the laboratory experiments. In addition, the evolution of particle displacement vectors clearly explains the breakage mechanism and associated deformations during cyclic loading.

  4. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    and particles, and the scatter plotsof fluid-particle temperature differences are presented. In addition, the variations of different budgetterms for the turbulent kinetic energy equation and fluctuating temperature variance equation in thepresence of particles are reported. The fluid turbulent heat flux...... is reduced by the presence of particles,and in spite of the additional heat exchange between the carrier fluid and the particles, the total heattransfer rate stays always lower for particle-laden flows. To further clarify this issue, the total Nusseltnumber is split into a turbulence contribution...... and a particle contribution, and the effects of particles inertiaon fluid turbulent heat flux and fluid-particle heat transfer are examined in detail...

  5. Joint Effect of Particle Charge and Adsorbable Foreign Gases on Vapor Condensation on Fine Aerosol Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 10 (2008), s. 1246-1248 ISSN 0735-1933 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400720804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : charged particle * adsorption * condensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.332, year: 2008

  6. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Mantlíková, Alice; Nižňanský, D.; Kubíčková, Simona; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 20 (2016), 1-11, č. článku 206004. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * single-particle anisotropy * dipolar energy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  7. Contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets on collision with mineral dust particles: effect of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in the tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. However, the laboratory experiments of contact freezing are very challenging due to the number of factors affecting the probability of ice formation. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in the laminar flow of mineral dust particles acting as the contact freezing nuclei. By repeating the freezing experiment sufficient number of times we are able to reproduce statistical freezing behavior of large ensembles of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. We show that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei. In this contribution we investigate the relationship between the freezing probability and the size of mineral dust particle (represented by illite) and show that their IN efficiency scales with the particle size. Based on this observation, we discuss the similarity between the freezing of supercooled water droplets in immersion and contact modes and possible mechanisms of apparent enhancement of the contact freezing efficiency. [1] - K.C. Young, The role of contact nucleation in ice phase initiation in clouds, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 31, 1974

  8. Biological effects of particles from the paris subway system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoual, Rafik; Boczkowski, Jorge; Goven, Delphine; Amara, Nadia; Tabet, Lyes; On, Dinhill; Leçon-Malas, Véronique; Aubier, Michel; Lanone, Sophie

    2007-10-01

    Particulate matter (PM) from atmospheric pollution can easily deposit in the lungs and induce recruitment of inflammatory cells, a source of inflammatory cytokines, oxidants, and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which are important players in lung structural homeostasis. In many large cities, the subway system is a potent source of PM emission, but little is known about the biological effects of PM from this source. We performed a comprehensive study to evaluate the biological effects of PM sampled at two sites (RER and Metro) in the Paris subway system. Murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and C57Bl/6 mice, respectively, were exposed to 0.01-10 microg/cm2 and 5-100 microg/mouse subway PM or reference materials [carbon black (CB), titanium dioxide (TiO2), or diesel exhaust particles (DEPs)]. We analyzed cell viability, production of cellular and lung proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2), KC (the murin analog of interleukin-8), and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)], and mRNA or protein expression of MMP-2, -9, and -12 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Deferoxamine and polymixin B were used to evaluate the roles of iron and endotoxin, respectively. Noncytotoxic concentrations of subway PM (but not CB, TiO2, or DEPs) induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in TNFalpha and MIP-2 production by RAW 264.7 cells, in a manner involving, at least in part, PM iron content (34% inhibition of TNF production 8 h after stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with 10 microg/cm2 RER particles pretreated with deferoxamine). Similar increased cytokine production was transiently observed in vivo in mice and was accompanied by an increased neutrophil cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (84.83+/-0.98% of polymorphonuclear neutrophils for RER-treated mice after 24 h vs 7.33+/-0.99% for vehicle-treated animals). Subway PM induced an increased expression of MMP-12 and HO-1 both in vitro and in vivo. PM from the

  9. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Horwitz, Jeremy A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  10. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Khono, Yukio; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using mouse neonatal brain cells in culture exposed to heavy ions and X ray at fifth days of the culture. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and the survivability of neurons focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains with different genetic types, and linear energy transfer (LET) of the different nucleons. Of the three mouse strains tested, SCID, B6, B6C3F1 and C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive. Radiation sensitivity of these cells ware SCID>B6>B6C3F1>C3H to both X-ray and carbon ion (290 MeV/n) when compared by 10% apoptotic induction. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID cells exposing to different ions, (X, C, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed at higher dose than 1 Gy, an enhancement was observed in the high LET region and at lower dose than 0.5 Gy. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after localized carbon- or iron-ion irradiation to hippocampus area. Memory function were rapidly decrease after irradiation both ions. C-ion group were recovered 20 weeks after irradiation, but Iron group were different. (author)

  11. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Liu Cuihua; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2003-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using mouse neonatal brain cells in culture exposed to heavy ions and X ray at fifth days of the culture. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and the survivability of neurons focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains with different genetic types, and linear energy transfer (LET) of the different nucleons. Of the three mouse strains tested, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), B6 and C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to both X-ray and carbon ion (290 MeV/n) when compared by 10% apoptotic induction. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID cells exposing to different ions, (X, C, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed at higher dose than 1 Gy, an enhancement was observed in the high LET region and at lower dose than 0.5 Gy. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after localized carbon- or iron-ion irradiation to hippocampus area. (author)

  12. Effects of anti-glare particles on sedation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Hao, Shaojun; Liu, Xiaobin; Kong, Xuejun; Wang, Xidong; Li, Wenjun; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of anti-glare particles on sedation of mice, 60 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, were fed by Ant-dizzy Granule Suspension, saline, Yang Xue Qing Nao Granule suspension and the same volume of saline, and administered 1 times daily, for 7 days. The mice in the wilderness box, hang - 150W light bulbs in the box above, the light recording activities within 2 minutes. The wilderness box into the box after the number of mice, mice with limbs went to the 1 squares is around 1 in the same case, mouse location and method of wilderness case; each group was placed in the turn/bar with rotating speed of 40RPM, each time 5 Parallel experiment recorded the mouse stay time on the rotating rod, if the mouse fell within 2 minutes, immediately put it on the rotating rod to continue the experiment, recorded the mouse on the rotating rod accumulated stay time. If 10 minutes did not drop, press 10 minutes; eighty mice were divided into 5 groups. The number of each rat injected subthreshold dose of pentobarbital sodium in mice. The sleep recording liquid were recorded sleep latency and sleep time. The anti-vertigo granule can obviously reduce the spontaneous activity of mice (Pparticles have good sedative effect.

  13. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z. H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  14. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elsa; Dybdahl, Marianne; Larsen, Poul Bo

    551,000 wood stoves and 48,000 wood boilers and the particle emission from these sources make up the most dominant source of particle emission in DK. It is estimated that this emission contributes to an annual increased PM2.5 level of 0.6 microgram/m³. From the dose-response relationships used...

  15. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  16. Effects of polyacrylic acid additive on barium sulfate particle morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Dandan; Jiang, Hongkun; Wang, Jun; Jing, Xiaoyan; Chen, Rongrong [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhu, Wenting [Department of Gastroenterology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin 150081 (China); Han, Shihui [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Wanyou [College of Power and Energy Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, Hao, E-mail: weihao7512@126.com [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Power and Energy Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, polyacrylic acid (PAA) was used as a growth modifier to control micron-sized barium sulfate particles via a simple precipitation reaction between sodium sulfate and barium chloride at ambient temperature. The barium sulfate particles were exhibited various morphologies, such as monodisperse spheres, ellipsoids, rose-like aggregates, etc. To better understand the formation mechanisms of the various morphologies of these particles, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed. It was found that the PAA concentration, pH, and Ba{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions concentrations were the most important parameters controlling the morphology of the BaSO{sub 4} particles. These parameters affected the BaSO{sub 4} morphology by influencing the interactions between the PAA carboxyl groups and inorganic ions and the conformation change of the PAA molecular chains. Moreover, this work attempts to provide a preliminary understanding of the formation of the spherical BaSO{sub 4} particles with the randomly coiled conformation of the polymer. - Highlights: • Polyacrylic acid (PAA) was used as a growth modifier to control micron-sized BaSO{sub 4} particles. • The PAA/BaSO{sub 4} particles were exhibited various morphologies. • Provide a preliminary understanding of the formation mechanism of BaSO{sub 4} particles.

  17. The particle concentration effect on magnetic resonance linewidth for magnetic liquids with chain aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, C.N.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the assumption of particle chains formation within a magnetic liquid, computer simulation of the magnetic resonance line is presented. The dependence on particle concentration within a magnetic liquid of magnetic resonance linewidth is analyzed. The computer simulation demonstrates that the particles chaining has an important effect on the enlargement of the magnetic resonance line. Increasing the particle concentration within magnetic liquid leads to an increase in the linewidth. The agreement with some experimental findings is discussed

  18. Effective-range function methods for charged particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, David; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2018-04-01

    Different versions of the effective-range function method for charged particle collisions are studied and compared. In addition, a novel derivation of the standard effective-range function is presented from the analysis of Coulomb wave functions in the complex plane of the energy. The recently proposed effective-range function denoted as Δℓ [Ramírez Suárez and Sparenberg, Phys. Rev. C 96, 034601 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevC.96.034601] and an earlier variant [Hamilton et al., Nucl. Phys. B 60, 443 (1973), 10.1016/0550-3213(73)90193-4] are related to the standard function. The potential interest of Δℓ for the study of low-energy cross sections and weakly bound states is discussed in the framework of the proton-proton S10 collision. The resonant state of the proton-proton collision is successfully computed from the extrapolation of Δℓ instead of the standard function. It is shown that interpolating Δℓ can lead to useful extrapolation to negative energies, provided scattering data are known below one nuclear Rydberg energy (12.5 keV for the proton-proton system). This property is due to the connection between Δℓ and the effective-range function by Hamilton et al. that is discussed in detail. Nevertheless, such extrapolations to negative energies should be used with caution because Δℓ is not analytic at zero energy. The expected analytic properties of the main functions are verified in the complex energy plane by graphical color-based representations.

  19. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Somik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  20. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  1. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied...... properties. It was found that rapid exposition of pharmaceutical materials by water mist resulted in the improvement of powder technical properties. The evident changes in flowability of coarser lactose were obviously due to smoothing of particle surface and decreasing in the level of fines with very slight...... increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures...

  2. Allergy adjuvant effect of particles from wood smoke and road traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Mari; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Løvik, Martinus

    2008-04-18

    There is growing evidence that in addition to augmenting the severity of asthma and allergic diseases, particulate air pollution also increases the incidence of allergy and asthma. We studied the adjuvant effect of particles from wood smoke and road traffic on the immune response to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA). OVA with and without particles was injected into one hind footpad of Balb/cA mice. All particles together with OVA significantly increased the level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum, compared to groups given OVA or particles alone. Reference diesel exhaust particles (DEP) with OVA induced the highest levels of IgE, whereas no clear difference was observed between particles from road traffic and wood smoke. Road traffic particles collected in the autumn induced higher IgE values with OVA than corresponding particles collected during the winter season when studded tires are used, suggesting that studded tire-generated road pavement particles have less allergy adjuvant activity than exhaust particles. Compared to OVA or particles alone, all particles with OVA increased popliteal lymph node cell numbers, cell proliferation, ex vivo secretion of IL-4 and IL-10 after ConA stimulation, and the expression of several cell surface molecules (CD19, MHC class II, CD86 and CD23). Wood smoke particles with OVA induced somewhat higher cellular responses than road traffic particles, but less than DEP with OVA which seemed to be the most potent particle in inducing cellular as well as antibody responses. Thus, wood smoke particles had about the same capacity to enhance allergic sensitization as road traffic particles, but less than diesel exhaust particles.

  3. Allergy adjuvant effect of particles from wood smoke and road traffic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsen, Mari; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Lovik, Martinus

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that in addition to augmenting the severity of asthma and allergic diseases, particulate air pollution also increases the incidence of allergy and asthma. We studied the adjuvant effect of particles from wood smoke and road traffic on the immune response to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA). OVA with and without particles was injected into one hind footpad of Balb/cA mice. All particles together with OVA significantly increased the level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum, compared to groups given OVA or particles alone. Reference diesel exhaust particles (DEP) with OVA induced the highest levels of IgE, whereas no clear difference was observed between particles from road traffic and wood smoke. Road traffic particles collected in the autumn induced higher IgE values with OVA than corresponding particles collected during the winter season when studded tires are used, suggesting that studded tire-generated road pavement particles have less allergy adjuvant activity than exhaust particles. Compared to OVA or particles alone, all particles with OVA increased popliteal lymph node cell numbers, cell proliferation, ex vivo secretion of IL-4 and IL-10 after ConA stimulation, and the expression of several cell surface molecules (CD19, MHC class II, CD86 and CD23). Wood smoke particles with OVA induced somewhat higher cellular responses than road traffic particles, but less than DEP with OVA which seemed to be the most potent particle in inducing cellular as well as antibody responses. Thus, wood smoke particles had about the same capacity to enhance allergic sensitization as road traffic particles, but less than diesel exhaust particles

  4. Effect of nanosilica particles on polypropylene polymer modified asphalt mixture performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Bala

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of nanosilica particles on the performance characteristics of polymer modified asphalt binders. In this study, control 80/100 binder were modified with polypropylene polymer and nanosilica particles at concentration of 0%–4%. Both nanosilica particles and polypropylene polymer were added by weight of total bitumen content. The asphalt performance tests flexural four point beam fatigue test, indirect tensile strength, indirect tensile stiffness modulus and draindown tests are conducted to evaluate the effect of nanosilica particles. The results of the study shows that nanosilica particles improves the fatigue properties of polypropylene polymer modified binder. This indicates that nanosilica particles have significant effect on improving the performance properties of polymer modified binders. Also, the result reveals that thermoplastic polymer polypropylene with nanosilica particles when used as bitumen modifiers improve the performance and durability of asphalt mixtures. Keywords: Polypropylene, Fatigue cracking, Stiffness modulus, Modified asphalt, Draindown

  5. High-Throughput Particle Manipulation Based on Hydrodynamic Effects in Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic techniques are effective tools for precise manipulation of particles and cells, whose enrichment and separation is crucial for a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and chemistry. Recently, lateral particle migration induced by the intrinsic hydrodynamic effects in microchannels, such as inertia and elasticity, has shown its promise for high-throughput and label-free particle manipulation. The particle migration can be engineered to realize the controllable focusing and separation of particles based on a difference in size. The widespread use of inertial and viscoelastic microfluidics depends on the understanding of hydrodynamic effects on particle motion. This review will summarize the progress in the fundamental mechanisms and key applications of inertial and viscoelastic particle manipulation.

  6. Health impact of exposure to fine particles. Epidemiology of short-term effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Annette; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Univ. Muenchen; Heinrich, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on short-term effects of fine particles are investigating whether morbidity or mortality increase on days with high particle concentrations. Multi-center studies have shown on a daily basis that there is an increase in morbidity and/or mortality in association with particle concentrations. Studies on the effects of particles on the respiratory tract have indicated that there is an impact of particles at their place of deposition. In addition, numerous studies have revealed that particles also have effects on the cardiovascular system, including acute-phase reactions, increased hospital admissions, and also an increase in cardiovascular disease mortality in association with elevated particle concentrations. For PM 10 consistent effects were found. Furthermore, the analyses showed that no threshold value could be established, but a linear dose-effect relation. Studies measuring PM 2.5 point to fine particles being mainly responsible for these effects. Current studies show that in addition to fine particles, ultra-fine particles can cause further health effects. (orig.) [de

  7. Effect of particle size on iron nanoparticle oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Goberman, Daniel G.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Selecting catalyst particles is a very important part of carbon nanotube growth, although the properties of these nanoscale particles are unclear. In this article iron nanoparticles are analyzed through the use of atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to understand how the size affects the chemical composition of nanoparticles and thus their physical structure. Initially, atomic force microscopy was used to confirm the presence of iron particles, and to determine the average size of the particles. Next an analytical model was developed to estimate particle size as a function of deposition time using inputs from atomic force microscopy measurement. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was then performed with a focus on the spectra relating to the 2p Fe electrons to study the chemical state of the particles as a function of time. It was shown that as the size of nanoparticles decreased, the oxidation state of the particles changed due to a high proportion of atoms on the surface.

  8. Particle roughness in magnetorheology: effect on the strength of the field-induced structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereda, F; Segovia-Gutiérrez, J P; De Vicente, J; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on the effect of particle roughness on the strength of the field-induced structures of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in the quasi-static regime. We prepared one set of MR fluids with carbonyl iron particles and another set with magnetite particles, and in both sets we had particles with different degrees of surface roughness. Small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) magnetosweeps and steady shear (SS) tests were carried out on the suspensions to measure their elastic modulus (G′) and static yield stress (τ static ). Results for both the iron and the magnetite sets of suspensions were consistent: for the MR fluids prepared with rougher particles, G′ increased at smaller fields and τ static was ca. 20% larger than for the suspensions prepared with relatively smooth particles. In addition to the experimental study, we carried out finite element method calculations to assess the effect of particle roughness on the magnetic interaction between particles. These calculations showed that roughness can facilitate the magnetization of the particles, thus increasing the magnetic energy of the system for a given field, but that this effect depends on the concrete morphology of the surface. For our real systems, no major differences were observed between the magnetization cycles of the MR fluids prepared with particles with different degree of roughness, which implied that the effect of roughness on the measured G′ and τ static was due mainly to friction between the solid surfaces of adjacent particles. (paper)

  9. Effect of alpha particles on Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-11-01

    An overview is given of the analytic structure for the linear theory of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE), where multiple gap structures occur. A discussion is given of the alpha particle drive and the various dissipation mechanisms that can stabilize the system. A self-consistent calculation of the TAE mode, for a low-beta high-aspect-ratio plasma, indicates that though the alpha particle drive is comparable to the dissipation mechanisms, overall stability is still achieved for ignited ITER-like plasma. A brief discussion is given of the nonlinear theory for the TAE mode and how nonlinear alpha particle dynamics can be treated by mapping methods

  10. Perturbative effect of heavy particles in an effective-Lagrangian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, T.; Nakazawa, N.

    1981-01-01

    An effective-Lagrangian approach is summarized to estimate the perturbative effect of heavy-mass particles in the leading-logarithmic approximation: the logarithmic corrections to mass-suppressed amplitudes are given in a concise form. We apply the formalism to a simplified model with two scalar fields where one is heavy and the other is light. We derive an effective Lagrangian by calculating heavy-particle one-loop diagrams. Solving renormalization-group equations derived from the effective Lagrangian by light-particle one-loop corrections, we obtain logarithmic corrections to the mass-suppressed amplitudes. The results are confirmed by explicit two-loop calculation in the full theory, up to order O((1/M 2 )1nM 2 ), where M is a heavy scalar mass. It is found that the boundary condition for solving the renormalization-group equations must be specified by the renormalization at the heavy-particle mass. It must also be emphasized that in an effective-Lagrangian approach minimal subtraction is not a proper method of renormalization. The necessity to adopt the conventional momentum-shell subtraction is stressed. Several applications of this formalism are also mentioned

  11. Effect of particle nonsphericity on bidirectional reflectance of cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, M.I.; Rossow, W.B.; Macke, A.; Lacis, A.A. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the fractal ice particle method to study the differences in bidirectional reflectance caused by the differences in the single scattering phase functions of spherical water droplets and nonspherical ice crystals.

  12. Effect of particle size on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of alumina suspension in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Rosado, José Carlos; L'hermite, Daniel; Levi, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was proposed for the detection and the quantification of different elements in water even when the analyte is composed of particles in suspension. We have studied the effect of particle size on the LIBS signal during liquid analysis. In our study we used different particle sizes (from 2 μm to 90 μm) of Al 2 O 3 in suspension in water. The results were compared to the signal obtained in the case of dissolved aluminum. In the case of particles, a linear correlation between the LIBS signal versus concentration was found but a significant decrease in the slope of the calibration curve was found when the particle size increased. Several hypotheses have been tested and only a partial ablation of the particles might explain this decrease in signal intensity. This effect probably does not occur at smaller particle size. We estimated 860 nm/pulse as ablated thickness from the top of the particle. A statistical analysis over all data obtained allowed us to calculate 100 μm as ablated water column depth. - Highlights: ► We have identified a decrease of calibration curve when particle size increases. ► Partial particle ablation has been identified as the origin of this effect. ► The ablation rate on Al 2 O 3 particles in suspension in water has been estimated. ► We can determine the deepness of the interaction volume into the liquid.

  13. Particle creation by a black hole as a consequence of the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugayev, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Particle creation by a blackhole is investigated in terms of temperature corrections to the Casimir effect. The reduction of the Hawking effect to more familiar effects observed in the laboratory enables us to reveal the mechanism of particle creation. The blackbody nature of the Hawking radiation is due to the interaction of virtual particles with the surface of a ''cavity'' formed by the Schwarzschild gravitational field potential barrier. These particles are ''squeezed out'' by the contraction of the potential barrier and appear to an observer at J + as the real blackbody ones. (orig.)

  14. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  15. Effects of Ni particle morphology on cell performance of Na/NiCl2 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mangi; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Jung, Keeyoung; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Cho, Nam-ung; Lee, Heesoo; Choi, Joon-Hwan

    2017-11-01

    Electrochemical reaction of Ni particle, one of active cathode materials in the Na/NiCl2 battery, occurs on the particle surface. The NiCl2 layer formed on the Ni particle surface during charging can disconnect the electron conduction path through Ni particles because the NiCl2 layer has very low conductivity. The morphology and size of Ni particles, therefore, need to be controlled to obtain high charge capacity and excellent cyclic retention. Effects of the Ni particle size on the cell performance were investigated using spherical Ni particles with diameters of 0.5 μm, 6 μm, and 50 μm. The charge capacities of the cells with spherical Ni particles increased when the Ni particle size becomes smaller because of their higher surface area but their charge capacities were significantly decreased with increasing cyclic tests owing to the disconnection of electron conduction path. The inferior cyclic retention of charge capacity was improved using reticular Ni particles which maintained the reliable connection for the electron conduction in the Na/NiCl2 battery. The charge capacity of the cell with the reticular Ni particles was higher than the cell with the small-sized spherical Ni particles approximately by 26% at 30th cycle.

  16. Engineered nano particles: Nature, behavior, and effect on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Linee; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash; Das, Pallabi; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kumar, Sandeep; Adelodun, Adedeji A

    2017-07-01

    Increased application of engineered nano particles (ENPs) in production of various appliances and consumer items is increasing their presence in the natural environment. Although a wide variety of nano particles (NPs) are ubiquitously dispersed in ecosystems, risk assessment guidelines to describe their ageing, direct exposure, and long-term accumulation characteristics are poorly developed. In this review, we describe what is known about the life cycle of ENPs and their impact on natural systems and examine if there is a cohesive relationship between their transformation processes and bio-accessibility in various food chains. Different environmental stressors influence the fate of these particles in the environment. Composition of solid media, pore size, solution chemistry, mineral composition, presence of natural organic matter, and fluid velocity are some environmental stressors that influence the transformation, transport, and mobility of nano particles. Transformed nano particles can reduce cell viability, growth and morphology, enhance oxidative stress, and damage DNA in living organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clearance of iron oxide particles in rat liver: effect of hydrated particle size and coating material on liver metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Johansson, Lars O; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Haldorsen, Anita G; Bjørnerud, Atle; Fayad, Zahi A; Ahlstrom, Haakan K

    2006-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the particle size and coating material of various iron oxide preparations on the rate of rat liver clearance. The following iron oxide formulations were used in this study: dextran-coated ferumoxide (size = 97 nm) and ferumoxtran-10 (size = 21 nm), carboxydextran-coated SHU555A (size = 69 nm) and fractionated SHU555A (size = 12 nm), and oxidized-starch coated materials either unformulated NC100150 (size = 15 nm) or formulated NC100150 injection (size = 12 nm). All formulations were administered to 165 rats at 2 dose levels. Quantitative liver R2* values were obtained during a 63-day time period. The concentration of iron oxide particles in the liver was determined by relaxometry, and these values were used to calculate the particle half-lives in the liver. After the administration of a high dose of iron oxide, the half-life of iron oxide particles in rat liver was 8 days for dextran-coated materials, 10 days for carboxydextran materials, 14 days for unformulated oxidized-starch, and 29 days for formulated oxidized-starch. The results of the study indicate that materials with similar coating but different sizes exhibited similar rates of liver clearance. It was, therefore, concluded that the coating material significantly influences the rate of iron oxide clearance in rat liver.

  18. Effects of fuel particle size distributions on neutron transport in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Chao; Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of fuel particle size distributions on neutron transport are evaluated. • Neutron channeling is identified as the fundamental reason for the effects. • The effects are noticeable at low packing and low optical thickness systems. • Unit cells of realistic reactor designs are studied for different size particles. • Fuel particle size distribution effects are not negligible in realistic designs. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the fuel particle size distribution effects on neutron transport in three-dimensional stochastic media. Particle fuel is used in gas-cooled nuclear reactor designs and innovative light water reactor designs loaded with accident tolerant fuel. Due to the design requirements and fuel fabrication limits, the size of fuel particles may not be perfectly constant but instead follows a certain distribution. This brings a fundamental question to the radiation transport computation community: how does the fuel particle size distribution affect the neutron transport in particle fuel systems? To answer this question, size distribution effects and their physical interpretations are investigated by performing a series of neutron transport simulations at different fuel particle size distributions. An eigenvalue problem is simulated in a cylindrical container consisting of fissile fuel particles with five different size distributions: constant, uniform, power, exponential and Gaussian. A total of 15 parametric cases are constructed by altering the fissile particle volume packing fraction and its optical thickness, but keeping the mean chord length of the spherical fuel particle the same at different size distributions. The tallied effective multiplication factor (k eff ) and the spatial distribution of fission power density along axial and radial directions are compared between different size distributions. At low packing fraction and low optical thickness, the size distribution shows a noticeable effect on neutron

  19. Single particle train ordering in microchannel based on inertial and vortex effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liang-Liang; Yan, Qing; Zhe, Jiang; Zhao, Liang

    2018-06-01

    A new microfluidic device for microparticle focusing and ordering in a single particle train is reported. The particle focusing and ordering are based on inertial and vortex effects in a microchannel with a series of suddenly contracted and widely expanded structures on one side. In the suddenly contracted regions, particles located near the contracted structures are subjected to a strong wall-effect lift force and momentum-change-induced inertial force due to the highly curved trajectory, migrating to the straight wall. A horizontal vortex is generated downstream of the contracted structure, which prevents the particle from getting close to the wall. In the widely expanded regions, the streamline is curved and no vortex is generated. The shear-gradient lift force and the momentum-change-induced inertial force are dominant for particle lateral migration, driving particles towards the wall of the expanded structures. Eventually, particles are focused and ordered in a single particle train by the combination effects of the inertial forces and the vortex. In comparison with other single-stream particle focusing methods, this device requires no sheath flow, is easy for fabrication and operation, and can work over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from 19.1–142.9. The highly ordered particle chain could be potentially utilized in a variety of lab-chip applications, including micro-flow cytometer, imaging and droplet-based cell entrapment.

  20. Effects of the finite particle size in turbulent wall-bounded flows of dense suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2018-05-01

    We use interface-resolved simulations to study finite-size effects in turbulent channel flow of neutrally-buoyant spheres. Two cases with particle sizes differing by a factor of 2, at the same solid volume fraction of 20% and bulk Reynolds number are considered. These are complemented with two reference single-phase flows: the unladen case, and the flow of a Newtonian fluid with the effective suspension viscosity of the same mixture in the laminar regime. As recently highlighted in Costa et al. (PRL 117, 134501), a particle-wall layer is responsible for deviations of the statistics from what is observed in the continuum limit where the suspension is modeled as a Newtonian fluid with an effective viscosity. Here we investigate the fluid and particle dynamics in this layer and in the bulk. In the particle-wall layer, the near wall inhomogeneity has an influence on the suspension micro-structure over a distance proportional to the particle size. In this layer, particles have a significant (apparent) slip velocity that is reflected in the distribution of wall shear stresses. This is characterized by extreme events (both much higher and much lower than the mean). Based on these observations we provide a scaling for the particle-to-fluid apparent slip velocity as a function of the flow parameters. We also extend the flow scaling laws in to second-order Eulerian statistics in the homogeneous suspension region away from the wall. Finite-size effects in the bulk of the channel become important for larger particles, while negligible for lower-order statistics and smaller particles. Finally, we study the particle dynamics along the wall-normal direction. Our results suggest that 1-point dispersion is dominated by particle-turbulence (and not particle-particle) interactions, while differences in 2-point dispersion and collisional dynamics are consistent with a picture of shear-driven interactions.

  1. On the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837318; Radstake, P.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829587; Bezemer, G.L.; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435; Froseth, V.; Holmen, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2009-01-01

    The effects of metal particle size in catalysis are of prime scientific and industrial importance and call for a better understanding. In this paper the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch (FT) catalysis was studied. Steady-State Isotopic Transient Kinetic Analysis (SSITKA)

  2. Cost-effectiveness of particle therapy : Current evidence and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Pommier, Pascal; Lievens, Yolande

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Questions are being raised regarding the cost of particle therapy (PT), and with them criticism that PT is too expensive to allow the expected gain in effectiveness. This paper aims to get more insight in the cost and cost-effectiveness of particle therapy and to discuss a future strategy

  3. Cost-effectiveness of particle therapy : Current evidence and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Pommier, Pascal; Lievens, Yolande

    Purpose: Questions are being raised regarding the cost of particle therapy (PT), and with them criticism that PT is too expensive to allow the expected gain in effectiveness. This paper aims to get more insight in the cost and cost-effectiveness of particle therapy and to discuss a future strategy

  4. Effective potential in the problem of scattering of three charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvitsinskii, A.A.; Merkur'ev, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    We study the effective interaction potential in the scattering of a charged particle by a bound state of two other charged particles. Scattering by both the ground and excited states of the target is considered. Explicit representations describing the asymptotic structure of effective potentials are proved

  5. The effects of particle size distribution and induced unpinning during grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.S.; Rickman, J.M.; Harmer, M.P.; Holm, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a second-phase particle size distribution on grain boundary pinning was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Simulations were run using a constant number density of both whisker and rhombohedral particles, and the effect of size distribution was studied by varying the standard deviation of the distribution around a constant mean particle size. The results of present simulations indicate that, in accordance with the stereological assumption of the topological pinning model, changes in distribution width had no effect on the pinned grain size. The effect of induced unpinning of particles on microstructure was also studied. In contrast to predictions of the topological pinning model, a power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size was observed at T=0.0. Based on this, a systematic deviation to the stereological predictions of the topological pinning model is observed. The results of simulations at higher temperatures indicate an increasing power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size, with the slopes of the power law dependencies fitting an Arrhenius relation. The effect of induced unpinning of particles was also studied in order to obtain a correlation between particle/boundary concentration and equilibrium grain size. The results of simulations containing a constant number density of monosized rhombohedral particles suggest a strong power law correlation between the two parameters. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  6. Effects of Turbulence on Settling Velocities of Synthetic and Natural Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C.; Jendrassak, M.; Gurka, R.; Hackett, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    For large-scale sediment transport predictions, an important parameter is the settling or terminal velocity of particles because it plays a key role in determining the concentration of sediment particles within the water column as well as the deposition rate of particles onto the seabed. The settling velocity of particles is influenced by the fluid dynamic environment as well as attributes of the particle, such as its size, shape, and density. This laboratory study examines the effects of turbulence, generated by an oscillating grid, on both synthetic and natural particles for a range of flow conditions. Because synthetic particles are spherical, they serve as a reference for the natural particles that are irregular in shape. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed imaging systems were used simultaneously to study the interaction between the fluid mechanics and sediment particles' dynamics in a tank. The particles' dynamics were analyzed using a custom two-dimensional tracking algorithm used to obtain distributions of the particle's velocity and acceleration. Turbulence properties, such as root-mean-square turbulent velocity and vorticity, were calculated from the PIV data. Results are classified by Stokes number, which was based-on the integral scale deduced from the auto-correlation function of velocity. We find particles with large Stokes numbers are unaffected by the turbulence, while particles with small Stokes numbers primarily show an increase in settling velocity in comparison to stagnant flow. The results also show an inverse relationship between Stokes number and standard deviation of the settling velocity. This research enables a better understanding of the interdependence between particles and turbulent flow, which can be used to improve parameterizations in large-scale sediment transport models.

  7. Size-resolved chemical composition, effective density, and optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosol has an important impact on the global radiative budget. A better understanding of the correlations between the mixing states of biomass burning particles and their optical properties is the goal of a number of current studies. In this work, the effective density, chemical composition, and optical properties of rice straw burning particles in the size range of 50-400 nm were measured using a suite of online methods. We found that the major components of particles produced by burning rice straw included black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and potassium salts, but the mixing states of particles were strongly size dependent. Particles of 50 nm had the smallest effective density (1.16 g cm-3) due to a relatively large proportion of aggregate BC. The average effective densities of 100-400 nm particles ranged from 1.35 to 1.51 g cm-3 with OC and inorganic salts as dominant components. Both density distribution and single-particle mass spectrometry showed more complex mixing states in larger particles. Upon heating, the separation of the effective density distribution modes confirmed the external mixing state of less-volatile BC or soot and potassium salts. The size-resolved optical properties of biomass burning particles were investigated at two wavelengths (λ = 450 and 530 nm). The single-scattering albedo (SSA) showed the lowest value for 50 nm particles (0.741 ± 0.007 and 0.889 ± 0.006) because of the larger proportion of BC content. Brown carbon played an important role for the SSA of 100-400 nm particles. The Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) values for all particles were above 1.6, indicating the significant presence of brown carbon in all sizes. Concurrent measurements in our work provide a basis for discussing the physicochemical properties of biomass burning aerosol and its effects on the global climate and atmospheric environment.

  8. HFI energetic particle effects: characterization, removal, and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection, interpretation, and removal of the signal resulting from interactions of high energy particles with the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI). There are two types of interactions: heating of the 0.1 K bolometer plate; and glitches in each detector time stream. The tran...

  9. Particle creation amplification in curved space due to thermal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laciana, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A physical system composed by a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity and a thermal reservoir as in thermo field dynamics, all of them in curved space-time, is considered. When the formalism of thermo field dynamics is generalized to the above case, an amplification in the number of created particles is predicted

  10. Particles size distribution effect on 3D packing of nanoparticles in to a bounded region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzalipour Tabriz, M.; Salehpoor, P.; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, A.; Vaezi, M. R.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of two different Particle Size Distributions on packing behavior of ideal rigid spherical nanoparticles using a novel packing model based on parallel algorithms have been reported. A mersenne twister algorithm was used to generate pseudo random numbers for the particles initial coordinates. Also, for this purpose a nano sized tetragonal confined container with a square floor (300 * 300 nm) were used in this work. The Andreasen and the Lognormal Particle Size Distributions were chosen to investigate the packing behavior in a 3D bounded region. The effects of particle numbers on packing behavior of these two Particle Size Distributions have been investigated. Also the reproducibility and the distribution of packing factor of these Particle Size Distributions were compared

  11. Biological effects of functionalizing copolymer scaffolds with nanodiamond particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhe; Pedersen, Torbjorn O; Wu, Xujun; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Kloss, Frank R; Waag, Thilo; Krueger, Anke; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Mustafa, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    Significant evidence has indicated that poly(L-lactide)-co-(ɛ-caprolactone) [(poly(LLA-co-CL)] scaffolds could be one of the suitable candidates for bone tissue engineering. Oxygen-terminated nanodiamond particles (n-DP) were combined with poly(LLA-co-CL) and revealed to be positive for cell growth. In this study, we evaluated the influence of poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds modified by n-DP on attachment, proliferation, differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro, and on bone formation using a sheep calvarial defect model. BMSCs were seeded on either poly(LLA-co-CL)- or n-DP-coated scaffolds and incubated for 1 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy were used in addition to protein and DNA measurements to evaluate cellular attachment on the scaffolds. To determine the effect of n-DP on proliferation of BMSCs, cell/scaffold constructs were harvested after 3 days and evaluated by Bicinchoninic Acid (BCA) protein assay and SEM. In addition, the osteogenic differentiation of cells grown for 2 weeks on the various scaffolds and in a dynamic culture condition was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Unmodified and modified scaffolds were implanted into the calvaria of six-year-old sheep. The expression of collagen type I (COL I) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) after 4 weeks as well as the formation of new bone after 12 and 24 weeks were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and histology. Scaffolds modified with n-DP supported increased cell attachment and the mRNA expression of osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and BMP-2 were significantly increased after 2 weeks of culture. The BMSCs had spread well on the various scaffolds investigated after 3 days in the study with no significant difference in cell proliferation. Furthermore, the in vivo data revealed more positive staining of COL I and BMP-2 in relation to the n-DP-coated scaffolds after 4 weeks and presented more bone formation after 12 and 24 weeks. n

  12. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-08-10

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle-membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle "funneling" in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined.

  13. Effects of background neutral particles on a field-reversed configuration plasma in the translation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Yoshiki; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2008-01-01

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma was translated into a weakly ionized plasma and the effects of heating and particle buildup of the FRC plasma due to the background neutral particles and plasma injection in the translation process were investigated. Improvement of the particle and poloidal flux confinements and delay of onset of n=2 rotational instability were observed in the translation process. It was found that the internal structure of the plasma pressure (plasma temperature and density) at the separatrix and field null was deformed by the particle injection. FRC plasma translation through the background particles was equivalent to an end-on particle beam injection to the FRC plasma. Particles and energy were supplied during the translation. The results obtained for the phenomena of particle supply and plasma heating were also supported by the results of two-dimensional particle simulation. The effects of background particle injection appear to be a promising process for the regeneration of translation kinetic energy to plasma internal energy

  14. A facility to search for hidden particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristóbal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvêa, André; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P S; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Björn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F; Goodsell, Mark D; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Morrissey, David E; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (search for hidden particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, [Formula: see text] and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the standard model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals-scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the standard model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation.

  15. A facility to Search for Hidden Particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case

    CERN Document Server

    Alekhin, Sergey; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristobal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvea, Andre; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P.S.; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F.; Goodsell, Mark D.; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H.; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Morrissey, David E.; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W.; Zurek, Kathryn M.; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2016-10-24

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\\tau\\to 3\\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed....

  16. The effect of energetic trapped particles on the resistive internal Kink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; White, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of energetic trapped particles on the ideal and resistive internal Kink mode is analyzed including diamagnetic effects. The relation between different approaches to the problem is discussed

  17. Expert elicitation on ultrafine particles: likelihood of health effects and causal pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, A.B.; de Hartog, J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288354850; Boogaard, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406522; Slottje, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299345351; van der Sluijs, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073427489; Lebret, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071318917; Cassee, F.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143038990; Wardekker, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/306644398; Ayres, J.G.; Borm, P.; Brunekreef, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Donaldson, K.; Forastiere, F.; Holgate, S.T.; Kreyling, W.; Nemery, B.; Pekkanen, J.; Stone, V.; Wichmann, H.E.; Hoek, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Exposure to fine ambient particulate matter (PM) has consistently been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The relationship between exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) and health effects is less firmly established. If UFP cause health effects independently from

  18. Effect of quasi-particle injection on retrapping current of Josephson junction

    OpenAIRE

    Utsunomiya, K.; Yagi, Ryuta

    2006-01-01

    We report that the energy dissipation of Josephson junction can be controlled by quasi-particle injection. We fabricated two Josephson junctions on the narrow aluminum wire and controlled the energy dissipation of one junction by quasi-particle injection from the other. We observed the retrapping current increased as the quasi-particles were injected. We also studied the heating effect of our measurement.

  19. Effect of corn silage particle size and level of soybean oil on ruminal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the effects of two corn silage particle size (coarse particle with geometric mean of 5.83 ± 2.47 mm and fine particle with geometric mean of 4.74 ± 2.74 mm) and two levels of soybean oil (0 and 4% of DM) on ruminal mat composition, distribution and consistency, four two years fistulated ruminant Zel ewes (BW ...

  20. Synergistic effects in radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki

    1990-01-01

    A description is given on radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces, emphasizing synergistic effects arising from multi-species particle irradiation and from irradiation under complex environments. First, it is pointed out that synergisms can be treated by introducing the effects of material modification on radiation-induced particle ejection. As examples of the effects of surface modification on the sputtering induced by elastic encounters, sputtering of alloys and chemical sputtering of graphite are briefly discussed. Then the particle ejection induced by electronic encounters is explained emphasizing the difference in the behaviors from materials to materials. The possible synergistic effects of electronic and elastic encounters are also described. Lastly, we point out the importance of understanding the elementary processes of material-particle interaction and of developing computer codes describing material behaviors under irradiation. (author)

  1. Initiator Systems Effect on Particle Coagulation and Particle Size Distribution in One-Step Emulsion Polymerization of Styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baijun Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Particle coagulation is a facile approach to produce large-scale polymer latex particles. This approach has been widely used in academic and industrial research owing to its higher polymerization rate and one-step polymerization process. Our work was motivated to control the extent (or time of particle coagulation. Depending on reaction parameters, particle coagulation is also able to produce narrowly dispersed latex particles. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate the role of the initiator system in determining particle coagulation and particle size distribution. Under the optimal initiation conditions, such as cationic initiator systems or higher reaction temperature, the time of particle coagulation would be advanced to particle nucleation period, leading to the narrowly dispersed polymer latex particles. By using a combination of the Smoluchowski equation and the electrostatic stability theory, the relationship between the particle size distribution and particle coagulation was established: the earlier the particle coagulation, the narrower the particle size distribution, while the larger the extent of particle coagulation, the larger the average particle size. Combined with the results of previous studies, a systematic method controlling the particle size distribution in the presence of particle coagulation was developed.

  2. Test Particle Energization and the Anisotropic Effects of Dynamical MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of dynamical three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on test particle acceleration and compare how this evolving system affects particle energization by current sheet interaction, as opposed to frozen-in-time fields. To do this, we analyze the ensemble particle acceleration for static electromagnetic fields extracted from direct numerical simulations of the MHD equations, and compare it with the dynamical fields. We show that a reduction in particle acceleration in the dynamical model results from particle trapping in field lines, which forces the particles to be advected by the flow and suppresses long exposures to the strong electric field gradients that take place between structures and generate (among other effects) an efficient particle acceleration in the static case. In addition, we analyze the effect of anisotropy caused by the mean magnetic field. It is well known that for sufficiently strong external fields, the system experiences a transition toward a two-dimensional flow. This causes an increment in the size of the coherent structures, resulting in a magnetized state of the particles and a reduction in particle energization.

  3. Biological effects of alpha particles in lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Daschil, F.

    1985-01-01

    Allowing for concomitant cellular inactivation, the tumour incidence function can be written as the product of two probabilities, for malignant transformation and for not being killed. Cell survival of mammalian cells in culture after heavy ion irradiation has been described successfully by the formalism of track structure theory for cellular inactivation. Thus a transformation function is derived by extracting cellular radiosensitivity parameters from experimental data on mutation to thioguanine resistance. For defined conditions of radon daughter inhalation, from the fraction of inhaled radionuclides deposited and retained on bronchial airway surfaces are calculated. The LET distribution in sensitive bronchial stem cells hit by alpha particles depends on initial alpha particle energy, airway diameter, and stem cell depth. Applying the methodology of track structure theory and using cellular radiosensitivity parameters for cell killing and mutation, the radiation risk at a given stem cell depth is expressed by the probabilities for cellular survival, for mutation or transformation, and the joint probability for cancer induction. (author)

  4. Effects of Random Values for Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Ping Dai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is generally improved by adaptively adjusting the inertia weight or combining with other evolution algorithms. However, in most modified PSO algorithms, the random values are always generated by uniform distribution in the range of [0, 1]. In this study, the random values, which are generated by uniform distribution in the ranges of [0, 1] and [−1, 1], and Gauss distribution with mean 0 and variance 1 ( U [ 0 , 1 ] , U [ − 1 , 1 ] and G ( 0 , 1 , are respectively used in the standard PSO and linear decreasing inertia weight (LDIW PSO algorithms. For comparison, the deterministic PSO algorithm, in which the random values are set as 0.5, is also investigated in this study. Some benchmark functions and the pressure vessel design problem are selected to test these algorithms with different types of random values in three space dimensions (10, 30, and 100. The experimental results show that the standard PSO and LDIW-PSO algorithms with random values generated by U [ − 1 , 1 ] or G ( 0 , 1 are more likely to avoid falling into local optima and quickly obtain the global optima. This is because the large-scale random values can expand the range of particle velocity to make the particle more likely to escape from local optima and obtain the global optima. Although the random values generated by U [ − 1 , 1 ] or G ( 0 , 1 are beneficial to improve the global searching ability, the local searching ability for a low dimensional practical optimization problem may be decreased due to the finite particles.

  5. THE EFFECT OF COOLING ON PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AND ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Piran, Tsvi, E-mail: daniel.kagan@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-12-20

    The maximum synchrotron burnoff limit of 160 MeV represents a fundamental limit to radiation resulting from electromagnetic particle acceleration in one-zone ideal plasmas. In magnetic reconnection, however, particle acceleration and radiation are decoupled because the electric field is larger than the magnetic field in the diffusion region. We carry out two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to determine the extent to which magnetic reconnection can produce synchrotron radiation above the burnoff limit. We use the test particle comparison (TPC) method to isolate the effects of cooling by comparing the trajectories and acceleration efficiencies of test particles incident on such a reconnection region with and without cooling them. We find that the cooled and uncooled particle trajectories are typically similar during acceleration in the reconnection region, and derive an effective limit on particle acceleration that is inversely proportional to the average magnetic field experienced by the particle during acceleration. Using the calculated distribution of this average magnetic field as a function of uncooled final particle energy, we find analytically that cooling does not affect power-law particle energy spectra except at energies far above the synchrotron burnoff limit. Finally, we compare fully cooled and uncooled simulations of reconnection, confirming that the synchrotron burnoff limit does not produce a cutoff in the particle energy spectrum. Our results indicate that the TPC method accurately predicts the effects of cooling on particle acceleration in relativistic reconnection, and that, even far above the burnoff limit, the synchrotron energy of radiation produced in reconnection is not limited by cooling.

  6. THE EFFECT OF COOLING ON PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AND ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The maximum synchrotron burnoff limit of 160 MeV represents a fundamental limit to radiation resulting from electromagnetic particle acceleration in one-zone ideal plasmas. In magnetic reconnection, however, particle acceleration and radiation are decoupled because the electric field is larger than the magnetic field in the diffusion region. We carry out two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to determine the extent to which magnetic reconnection can produce synchrotron radiation above the burnoff limit. We use the test particle comparison (TPC) method to isolate the effects of cooling by comparing the trajectories and acceleration efficiencies of test particles incident on such a reconnection region with and without cooling them. We find that the cooled and uncooled particle trajectories are typically similar during acceleration in the reconnection region, and derive an effective limit on particle acceleration that is inversely proportional to the average magnetic field experienced by the particle during acceleration. Using the calculated distribution of this average magnetic field as a function of uncooled final particle energy, we find analytically that cooling does not affect power-law particle energy spectra except at energies far above the synchrotron burnoff limit. Finally, we compare fully cooled and uncooled simulations of reconnection, confirming that the synchrotron burnoff limit does not produce a cutoff in the particle energy spectrum. Our results indicate that the TPC method accurately predicts the effects of cooling on particle acceleration in relativistic reconnection, and that, even far above the burnoff limit, the synchrotron energy of radiation produced in reconnection is not limited by cooling.

  7. The Effect Of Organic Surfactants On The Properties Of Common Hygroscopic Particles: Effective Densities, Reactivity And Water Evaporation Of Surfactant Coated Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrarodriguez, L.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Ellison, B.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric aerosol compositions routinely show that organic compounds account for a very large fraction of the particle mass. The organic compounds that make up this aerosol mass represent a wide range of molecules with a variety of properties. Many of the particles are composed of hygroscopic salts like sulfates, nitrates and sea-salt internally mixed with organics. While the properties of the hygroscopic salts are known, the effect of the organic compounds on the microphysical and chemical properties which include CCN activity is not clear. .One particularly interesting class of internally mixed particles is composed of aqueous salts solutions that are coated with organic surfactants which are molecules with long aliphatic chain and a water soluble end. Because these molecules tend to coat the particles' surfaces, a monolayer might be sufficient to drastically alter their hygroscopic properties, their CCN activity, and reactivity. The aliphatic chains, being exposed to the oxidizing atmosphere are expected to be transformed through heterogeneous chemistry, yielding complex products with mixed properties. We will report the results from a series of observations on ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sea salt particles coated with three types of surfactant molecules: sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium oleate and laurtrimonium chloride. We have been able to measure the effective densities of internally mixed particles with a range of surfactant concentration that start below a monolayer and extend all the way to particles composed of pure surfactant. For many of the measurements the data reveal a rather complex picture that cannot be simply interpreted in terms of the known pure-compound densities. For unsaturated hydrocarbons we observed and quantified the effect of oxidation by ozone on particle size, effective density and individual particle mass spectral signatures. One of the more important properties of these surfactants is that they can form a

  8. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs

  9. Effect of seeds of heavy charged particles of galactic cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, Y.N.

    1985-01-01

    The experiments were carried out on Lactuca sativa seeds exposed for 20, 66, 123 and 308 days in a biostack also containing physical detectors of heavy charged particles. The yield of aberrant cells and its dependence on the exposure time and the site where particles hit the object were measured. The cytogenetic examination demonstrated a significant difference between the seeds that were or were not hit by heavy charged particles. A significant contribution of galactic cosmic radiation to the radiobiological effect is indicated. The yield of aberrant cells as a function of the localization of heavy charged particles in the seed is established. The most sensitive target is the root meristem

  10. Alpha-particle effects on high-n instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.

    1988-06-01

    Hot α-particles and thermalized helium ash particles in tokamaks can have significant effects on high toroidal mode number instabilities such as the trapped-electron drift mode and the kinetically calculated magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode. In particular, the effects can be stabilizing, destabilizing, or negligible, depending on the parameters involved. In high-temperature tokamaks capable of producing significant numbers of hot α-particles, the predominant interaction of the mode with the α-particles is through resonances of various sorts. In turn, the modes can cause significant anomalous transport of the α-particles and the helium ash. Here, results of comprehensive linear eigenfrequency-eigenfunction calculations are presented for relevant realistic cases to show these effects. 24 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Effect of large aspect ratio of biomass particles on carbon burnout in a utility boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Gera; M.P. Mathur; M.C. Freeman; Allen Robinson [Fluent, Inc./NETL, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2002-12-01

    This paper reports on the development and validation of comprehensive combustion sub models that include the effect of large aspect ratio of biomass (switchgrass) particles on carbon burnout and temperature distribution inside the particles. Temperature and carbon burnout data are compared from two different models that are formulated by assuming (i) the particles are cylindrical and conduct heat internally, and (ii) the particles are spherical without internal heat conduction, i.e., no temperature gradient exists inside the particle. It was inferred that the latter model significantly underpredicted the temperature of the particle and, consequently, the burnout. Additionally, some results from cofiring biomass (10% heat input) with pulverized coal (90% heat input) are compared with the pulverized coal (100% heat input) simulations and coal experiments in a tangentially fired 150 MW{sub e} utility boiler. 26 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The effect of particles in different sizes on the mechanical properties of spray formed steel composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenneth; Pedersen, A. S.; Pryds, N.

    2000-01-01

    particle size of 46 and 134 μm were carried out with respect to their mechanical properties e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength. It was found that the addition of Al2O3 particles to the steel improves its wear properties and reduces the elongation and tensile strength of the material......The main objective of the work was to investigate the effect of addition of ceramic particles with different size distributions on the mechanical properties, e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength, of spray formed materials. The experiments were carried out in a spray-forming unit at Risø...... National Laboratory, Denmark, where composites with a low alloyed boron steel (0.2 wt.% carbon) matrix containing alumina particles were produced. A comparison between cast hot-rolled material without particles, spray formed material without particles and the spray formed composites with an average ceramic...

  13. Effects of particle exhaust on neutral compression ratios in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Allen, S.L.; Greenfield, C.M.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, neutral particles in DIII-D are studied via their compression in the plenum and via particle exhaust. The compression of gas in the plena is examined in terms of the magnetic field configuration and wall conditions. DIII-D compression ratios are observed in the range from 1 to ≥ 1,000. Particle control ultimately depends on the exhaust of neutrals via plenum or wall pumping. Wall pumping or outgassing is calculated by means of a detailed particle balance throughout individual discharges, and its effect on particle control is discussed. It is demonstrated that particle control through wall conditioning leads to lower normalized densities. A two-region model shows that the gas compression ratio (C div = divertor plenum neutral pressure/torus neutral pressure) can be interpreted in relation to gas flows in the torus and divertor including the pumping speed of the plenum cryopumps, plasma pumping, and the pumping or outgassing of the walls

  14. Effect of Particle Association on 2,2'-Bipyridyl Adsorption onto Kaolinite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, A. K.; Ferreiro, E. A.; de Bussetti, S. G.

    2000-05-15

    The effect of particle concentration, in kaolin suspensions, on the adsorption of 2,2'-bipyridyl was studied. Adsorption expressed in units of micromoles per gram decreased as a result of the increase in particle concentration and also as a result of the presence of coagulant (0.25 M NaCl). Dispersion treatment with sodium hexametaphosphate increased the adsorption of bipyridyl. The decrease in adsorption with the increase in particle concentration suggests a possible relation between adsorption and flocculation phenomena. On the basis of classic flocculation theory a straight-line relation was obtained between the square root of the adsorption maximum (mmol/L) and particle concentration (g/L). It is concluded that particle association, which is a function of particle concentration, reduces the surface/aqueous interface and consequently the adsorption of bipyridyl. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Effect of Second Phase Particles on the Tensile Instability of a Nanostructured Al-1%Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Tian Lin; Wu, Gui Lin; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    A nanostructured Al-1%Si alloy containing dispersed Si particles was produced by heavily cold-rolling to study the effect of second phase particles on the tensile instability of nanostructured metals. Tensile tests were conducted on the as-deformed sample and the samples after recovery annealing ...

  16. Effect of particle size of granules on some mechanical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid dosage forms are invariably multiparticulate systems of heterogenous particle size distribution. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of particle size distribution of paracetamol granules on some tablet mechanical properties of paracetamol tablets. Granules were formed by wet massing paracetamol ...

  17. Effect of delta wing on the particle flow in a novel gas supersonic separator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    The present work presents numerical simulations of the complex particle motion in a supersonic separator with a delta wing located in the supersonic flow. The effect of the delta wing on the strong swirling flow is analysed using the Discrete Particle Method. The results show that the delta wings...

  18. Annealing effects on the charged particles registration characteristic of the CR-39 traces solid detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, M.M.

    1989-10-01

    CR-39 trace solid detectors samples, previously exposed to alpha particles and fission fragments from a Cf-252 source, were submitted to a annealing treatment to study his effects on the characteristics of charged particle traces registration. (L.C.J.A.)

  19. Wood smoke particle sequesters cell iron to impact a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological effect of an inorganic particle (i.e., silica) can be associated with a disruption in cell iron homeostasis. Organic compounds included in particles originating from combustion processes can also complex sources of host cell iron to disrupt metal homeostasis. We te...

  20. Effective electric and magnetic polarizabilities of pointlike spin-1/2 particles

    OpenAIRE

    Silenko, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Effective electric and magnetic polarizabilities of pointlike spin-1/2 particles possesing an anomalous magnetic moment are calculated with the transformation of an initial Hamiltonian to the Foldy-Wouthuysen representation. Polarizabilities of spin-1/2 and spin-1 particles are compared.

  1. Blocking effect and numerical study of polymer particles dispersion flooding in heterogeneous reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiyao; Li, Jianhui; Lou, Yu

    2018-02-01

    Polymer flooding has become an effective way to improve the sweep efficiency in many oil fields. Many scholars have carried out a lot of researches on the mechanism of polymer flooding. In this paper, the effect of polymer on seepage is analyzed. The blocking effect of polymer particles was studied experimentally, and the residual resistance coefficient (RRF) were used to represent the blocking effect. We also build a mathematical model for heterogeneous concentration distribution of polymer particles. Furthermore, the effects of polymer particles on reservoir permeability, fluid viscosity and relative permeability are considered, and a two-phase flow model of oil and polymer particles is established. In addition, the model was tested in the heterogeneous stratum model, and three influencing factors, such as particle concentration, injection volume and PPD (short for polymer particle dispersion) injection time, were analyzed. Simulation results show that PPD can effectively improve sweep efficiency and especially improve oil recovery of low permeability layer. Oil recovery increases with the increase of particle concentration, but oil recovery increase rate gradually decreases with that. The greater the injected amount of PPD, the greater oil recovery and the smaller oil recovery increase rate. And there is an optimal timing to inject PPD for specific reservoir.

  2. Phenomenological theory of size effects in ultrafine ferroelectric particles (PbTiO3-type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, B.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    A new phenomenological model is proposed and discussed to study the size effects on phase transitions in PbTiO 3 -type ferroelectric particles. This model, by taking size effects on the phenomenological Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire coefficients into consideration, can successfully explain the size effects on Curie temperature, c/a ratio, thermal and dielectric properties of lead-titanate-type ferroelectric particles. Theoretical and experimental results for PbTiO 3 fine particles are also compared and discussed. The relationship between the current model and the model of Zhong et al (Phys. Rev. B 50, 698 (1994)) is also presented. (authors)

  3. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  4. Radiations effects on polymeric materials used in CERN particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.

    1997-01-01

    For fundamental research on the basis structure of matter, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) operates several high-energy particle accelerators around which materials and components are exposed to ionizing radiation. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, the radiation behaviour of most of the components is systematically tested prior to their selection. The long-term radiation-test programme allows to assess the component lifetime in the environment or our accelerators where the absorbed doses are continuously recorded. This article presents organic materials in use at CERN, and some recent results are given on their behaviour under irradiation. (authors)

  5. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  6. Investigation of effective impact parameters in electron-ion temperature relaxation via Particle-Particle Coulombic molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjian

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at a high simulation accuracy, a Particle-Particle (PP) Coulombic molecular dynamics model is implemented to study the electron-ion temperature relaxation. In this model, the Coulomb's law is directly applied in a bounded system with two cutoffs at both short and long length scales. By increasing the range between the two cutoffs, it is found that the relaxation rate deviates from the BPS theory and approaches the LS theory and the GMS theory. Also, the effective minimum and maximum impact parameters (bmin* and bmax*) are obtained. For the simulated plasma condition, bmin* is about 6.352 times smaller than the Landau length (bC), and bmax* is about 2 times larger than the Debye length (λD), where bC and λD are used in the LS theory. Surprisingly, the effective relaxation time obtained from the PP model is very close to the LS theory and the GMS theory, even though the effective Coulomb logarithm is two times greater than the one used in the LS theory. Besides, this work shows that the PP model (commonly known as computationally expensive) is becoming practicable via GPU parallel computing techniques.

  7. Effect of particle size on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of alumina suspension in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rosado, Jose Carlos [CEA, DEN, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Univ. Paris Sud, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Public Health and Environment UMR 8079, 5 rue J.B. Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); National University of Engineering, Faculty of Science, P.O. Box 31-139, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru); L' hermite, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lhermite@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Levi, Yves [Univ. Paris Sud, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Public Health and Environment UMR 8079, 5 rue J.B. Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2012-08-15

    The analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was proposed for the detection and the quantification of different elements in water even when the analyte is composed of particles in suspension. We have studied the effect of particle size on the LIBS signal during liquid analysis. In our study we used different particle sizes (from 2 {mu}m to 90 {mu}m) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in suspension in water. The results were compared to the signal obtained in the case of dissolved aluminum. In the case of particles, a linear correlation between the LIBS signal versus concentration was found but a significant decrease in the slope of the calibration curve was found when the particle size increased. Several hypotheses have been tested and only a partial ablation of the particles might explain this decrease in signal intensity. This effect probably does not occur at smaller particle size. We estimated 860 nm/pulse as ablated thickness from the top of the particle. A statistical analysis over all data obtained allowed us to calculate 100 {mu}m as ablated water column depth. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have identified a decrease of calibration curve when particle size increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partial particle ablation has been identified as the origin of this effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation rate on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in suspension in water has been estimated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We can determine the deepness of the interaction volume into the liquid.

  8. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B.C., E-mail: Ben.Jaeschke@gmail.com [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Lind, O.C. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Bradshaw, C. [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Salbu, B. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h{sup −1}) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment

  9. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, B.C.; Lind, O.C.; Bradshaw, C.; Salbu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr/ 90 Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h −1 ) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment, for example

  10. Collective ratchet effects and reversals for active matter particles on quasi-one-dimensional asymmetric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Danielle; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-10-19

    Using computer simulations, we study a two-dimensional system of sterically interacting self-mobile run-and-tumble disk-shaped particles with an underlying periodic quasi-one-dimensional asymmetric substrate, and show that a rich variety of collective active ratchet behaviors arise as a function of particle density, activity, substrate period, and the maximum force exerted by the substrate. The net dc drift, or ratchet transport flux, is nonmonotonic since it increases with increased activity but is diminished by the onset of self-clustering of the active particles. Increasing the particle density decreases the ratchet transport flux for shallow substrates but increases the ratchet transport flux for deep substrates due to collective hopping events. At the highest particle densities, the ratchet motion is destroyed by a self-jamming effect. We show that it is possible to realize reversals of the direction of the net dc drift in the deep substrate limit when multiple rows of active particles can be confined in each substrate minimum, permitting emergent particle-like excitations to appear that experience an inverted effective substrate potential. We map out a phase diagram of the forward and reverse ratchet effects as a function of the particle density, activity, and substrate properties.

  11. Particle force model effects in a shock-driven multiphase instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W. J.; Denissen, N.; McFarland, J. A.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents simulations on a shock-driven multiphase instability (SDMI) at an initial particle volume fraction of 1% with the addition of a suite of particle force models applicable in dense flows. These models include pressure-gradient, added-mass, and interparticle force terms in an effort to capture the effects neighboring particles have in non-dilute flow regimes. Two studies are presented here: the first seeks to investigate the individual contributions of the force models, while the second study focuses on examining the effect of these force models on the hydrodynamic evolution of a SDMI with various particle relaxation times (particle sizes). In the force study, it was found that the pressure gradient and interparticle forces have little effect on the instability under the conditions examined, while the added-mass force decreases the vorticity deposition and alters the morphology of the instability. The relaxation-time study likewise showed a decrease in metrics associated with the evolution of the SDMI for all sizes when the particle force models were included. The inclusion of these models showed significant morphological differences in both the particle and carrier species fields, which increased as particle relaxation times increased.

  12. Effect of fuel particles' size variations on multiplication factor in pebble-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    The pebble-bed reactor (Pbr) spherical fuel element consists of two radial zones: the inner zone, in which the fissile material in form of the so-called TRISO particles is uniformly dispersed in graphite matrix and the outer zone, a shell of pure graphite. A TRISO particle is composed of a fissile kernel (UO 2 ) and several layers of carbon composites. The effect of TRISO particles' size variations and distance between them on PBR multiplication factor is studied using MCNP code. Fuel element is modelled in approximation of a cubical unit cell with periodic boundary condition. The multiplication factor of the fuel element depends on the size of the TRISO particles due to resonance self-shielding effect and on the inter-particle distance due to inter-kernel shadowing. (author)

  13. Combined effects of fretting and pollutant particles on the contact resistance of the electrical connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Kong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Usually, when electrical connectors operate in vibration environments, fretting will be produced at the contact interfaces. In addition, serious environmental pollution particles will affect contact resistance of the connectors. The fretting will worsen the reliability of connectors with the pollutant particles. The combined effects of fretting and quartz particles on the contact resistance of the gold plating connectors are studied with a fretting test system. The results show that the frequencies have obvious effect on the contact resistance. The higher the frequency, the higher the contact resistance is. The quartz particles cause serious wear of gold plating, which make the nickel and copper layer exposed quickly to increase the contact resistance. Especially in high humidity environments, water supply certain adhesion function and make quartz particles easy to insert or cover the contact surfaces, and even cause opening resistance.

  14. Effect of net surface charge on particle sizing and material recognition by using phase Doppler anemometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jun; Xie Li

    2011-01-01

    By taking net surface charge into consideration, the scattering field of particles illuminated by dual laser beams of phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) is computed based on Mie's theory, and the effect of net surface charge on the phase-diameter relationship and the phase ratio is studied. It is found that the phase-diameter relationship and the relationship between the phase ratio and the refractive index of charged particles could be significantly different from those of uncharged particles, which would lead to errors in particle sizing and the measurement of refractive indices. A method of recognizing charged particles and determining the value of their surface conductivity, which is related to net surface charge, is proposed by utilizing the effect of net surface charge on the measurement of refractive indices using PDA.

  15. Effect of net surface charge on particle sizing and material recognition by using phase Doppler anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jun; Xie Li

    2011-01-20

    By taking net surface charge into consideration, the scattering field of particles illuminated by dual laser beams of phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) is computed based on Mie's theory, and the effect of net surface charge on the phase-diameter relationship and the phase ratio is studied. It is found that the phase-diameter relationship and the relationship between the phase ratio and the refractive index of charged particles could be significantly different from those of uncharged particles, which would lead to errors in particle sizing and the measurement of refractive indices. A method of recognizing charged particles and determining the value of their surface conductivity, which is related to net surface charge, is proposed by utilizing the effect of net surface charge on the measurement of refractive indices using PDA.

  16. Effect of alloy deformation on the average spacing parameters of non-deforming particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.; Gurland, J.

    1980-02-01

    It is shown on the basis of stereological definitions and a few simple experiments that the commonly used average dispersion parameters, area fraction (A/sub A/)/sub β/, areal particle density N/sub Aβ/ and mean free path lambda/sub α/, remain invariant during plastic deformation in the case of non-deforming equiaxed particles. Directional effects on the spacing parameters N/sub Aβ/ and lambda/sub α/ arise during uniaxial deformation by rotation and preferred orientation of nonequiaxed particles. Particle arrangement in stringered or layered structures and the effect of deformation on nearest neighbor distances of particles and voids are briefly discussed in relation to strength and fracture theories

  17. On the Effects of Atmospheric Particles Contamination and Humidity on Tin Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Angelo, L.; Verdingovas, V.; Ferrero, L.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of hygroscopic atmospheric particles are investigated in relation to the corrosion of tin. Surface insulation resistance test boards were directly contaminated both with ambient particles sampled in the field at Milan, Italy, and with pure saline particles generated in the laboratory....... An innovative particle deposition device was used to uniformly coat circular spots on to the test board surfaces. Deliquescence and crystallization of the water-soluble compounds were detected by observing the impedance response to varying relative humidity (RH) conditions with a gradual and continuous ramps....... The effects of the adsorption/desorption kinetics and of the temperature on the deliquescence and crystallization RH values were also investigated. Leakage current measurements at 5-V dc highlighted the ability of atmospheric particles to promote corrosion and electrochemical migration at RH levels far below...

  18. The Effects of Fe-Particles on the Tensile Properties of Al-Si-Cu Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Bjurenstedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Fe-rich particles has been a topic for discussion in the aluminum casting industry because of the negative impact they exert on the mechanical properties. However, there are still contradictions on the effects of various morphologies of Fe-particles. In this study, microstructural characterization of tensile tested samples has been performed to reveal how unmodified and modified Fe-rich particles impact on the tensile behavior. Analysis of additions of Fe modifiers such as Mn and Cr, showed higher amounts of primary Fe-rich particles (sludge with increased porosity and, as result, degraded tensile properties. From the fracture analysis of tensile tested hot isostatic pressed (HIPed samples it could be concluded that the mechanical properties were mainly governed by the Fe-rich particles, which were fracturing through cleavage, not by the porosity.

  19. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small ( 2 at 70 μm depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC 2 isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs

  20. submitter Introduction to Collective Effects in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The beam intensity and the beam brightness of particle accelerators or colliders operated for high - energy physics were, and are, often severely limited by “collective effects” (e.g.[1]). By contrast, new light sources, such as linac - based free electron lasers, may even rely on collective instabilities to accomplish their mission! The term “collective effects” refers to the interaction of beam particles with each other through a variety of processes, e.g. (1) non-delayed self-fields and image fields present even for constant perfectly conducting and magnetic boundaries (direct and indirect “space - charge effects”), (2) longer - lived electro-magnetic “wake fields” due to a finite chamber resistivity or geometric variation in the beam - pipe cross section, which typically affect later parts of the beam, (3) coherent synchrotron radiation, which on a curved trajectory may even influence earlier parts of the beam, giving rise to “non-causal” wake fields, otherwise not normally encountered...

  1. Effect of neutral particles on density limits in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Morozov, D.Kh.; Bachmann, P.; Suender, D.

    1993-01-01

    The global stability and confinement of a tokamak plasma are significantly influenced by the boundary plasma parameters. The onset of density disruptions, which limit the maximum plasma density, is triggered by impurity radiation in the edge plasma and can be connected with the radiative thermal instability. At the density n c the total radiative power P rad is equal to the total input power P in into the plasma (S:=P rad /P in =1). Above n c (S>1) no steady state of the plasma column exists. Contrary to predictions made elsewhere, where neutral particle kinetics is not taken into consideration, experimental results show that disruptions can occur for S R as a function of the plasma temperature T, ξ N :=N/n and ξ i :=n i /n, where N, n i , n are the densities of hydrogen atoms, impurity ions and the plasma, respectively. We investigate the influence of the neutral particles on the critical densities and the stability of the system, taking into account ionization, charge exchange and impurity cooling. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. Bystander effect of alpha-particle irradiation on mutagenicity and its associated mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ying; Yang Zhihua; Cao Zhenshan; Fan Feiyue; Zhu Maoxiang

    2004-01-01

    The work is to investigate α-particle irradiation-induced bystander effects on the mutagenicity in human chromosome 11 in the human-hamster hybrid (A L cells) and its possible mechanism. A L cells were used for assaying mutation rates of human chromosome 11 through screening mutants in the presence of anti-CD59 surface antigen antibody (S1) and complement. A grid was interposed between α-particle source and the cells being irradiated, so as to fix proportion of the irradiated cells (15%) and the bystander effects on the mutagenicity were detected. Free radical scavenger DMSO and intercellular communication inhibitor Lindane were selected to investigate the potential mechanism of α-particle induced bystander effect. There was clear dose-dependent relationship between mutation rate and the dose of alpha particle radiation. However, the mutant fractions of cell population shielded by the grid in α-particle irradiation system were much higher than the expected levels of irradiated cells. Lindane, but not DMSO, could obviously decrease this bystander effect induced by α-particle irradiation. Alpha-particle irradiation can induce bystander effect on the mutagenicity, in which intercellular communication may play important roles

  3. Effect of uncertainty in nasal airway deposition of radioactive particles on effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Birchall, A.; Jarvis, N.S

    1998-07-01

    In the current ICRP human respiratory tract (RT) model (ICRP Publication 66), the deposition of particles in various regions of the RT during natural breathing is modelled by considering the RT as a series of filters, resulting in deposition probabilities for distal portions of the RT being dependent on those of the proximal segments. Thus, uncertainties in regional deposition in proximal segments of the RT are reflected or propagated in uncertainties in deposition in the distal segments of the lung. Experimental data on aerosol particle deposition have demonstrated significant variability in nasal airway (NA) deposition for different individuals studied. This report summarises the impact of introducing variability in NA deposition efficiency on the calculation of effective doses using the ICRP 66 model for selected radionuclides. The computer software LUDEP, modified for this purpose, was used to customise deposition patterns, and effective doses were calculated for several radionuclides ({sup 111}In, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 60}Co, {sup 210}Po, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu) chosen to represent isotopes with various decay schemes and half-lives. The results indicated significant but particle-size-specific effects of assumed NA deposition efficiencies on the calculated effective doses, which varied typically by factors of five to six. The majority of the variability was associated with direct effects on deposition patterns, but in some cases, alterations of radiation dose distribution within the various target organs also contributed to the variability. These results provide a basis for evaluating uncertainties due to inter-individual differences in deposition patterns for radiation protection and risk analysis. (author)

  4. Subcellular topological effect of particle monolayers on cell shapes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Manabu; Fujimoto, Keiji

    2006-12-01

    We studied topological effects of subcellular roughness displayed by a closely packed particle monolayer on adhesion and growth of endothelial cells. Poly(styrene-co-acrylamide) (SA) particles were prepared by soap-free emulsion copolymerization. Particle monolayers were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition using particles, which were 527 (SA053) and 1270 nm (SA127) in diameter. After 24-h incubation, cells tightly adhered on a tissue culture polystyrene dish and randomly spread. On the other hand, cells attached on particle monolayers were stretched into a narrow stalk-like shape. Lamellipodia spread from the leading edge of cells attached on SA053 monolayer to the top of the particles and gradually gathered to form clusters. This shows that cell-cell adhesion became stronger than cell-substrate interaction. Cells attached to SA127 monolayer extended to the reverse side of a particle monolayer and engulfed particles. They remained immobile without migration 24h after incubation. This shows that the inhibition of extensions on SA127 monolayer could inhibit cell migration and cell proliferation. Cell growth on the particle monolayers was suppressed compared with a flat TCPS dish. The number of cells on SA053 gradually increased, whereas that on SA127 decreased with time. When the cell seeding density was increased to 200,000 cells cm(-2), some adherent cells gradually became into contact with adjacent cells. F-actin condensations were formed at the frame of adherent cells and the thin filaments grew from the edges to connect each other with time. For the cell culture on SA053 monolayer, elongated cells showed a little alignment. Cells showed not arrangement of actin stress fibers but F-actin condensation at the contact regions with neighboring cells. Interestingly, the formed cell monolayer could be readily peeled from the particle monolayer. These results indicate that endothelial cells could recognize the surface roughness displayed by particle monolayers and

  5. Dilution effects on ultrafine particle emissions from Euro 5 and Euro 6 diesel and gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cédric; Liu, Yao; Martinet, Simon; D'Anna, Barbara; Valiente, Alvaro Martinez; Boreave, Antoinette; R'Mili, Badr; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; André, Michel

    2017-11-01

    Dilution and temperature used during sampling of vehicle exhaust can modify particle number concentration and size distribution. Two experiments were performed on a chassis dynamometer to assess exhaust dilution and temperature on particle number and particle size distribution for Euro 5 and Euro 6 vehicles. In the first experiment, the effects of dilution (ratio from 8 to 4 000) and temperature (ranging from 50 °C to 150 °C) on particle quantification were investigated directly from tailpipe for a diesel and a gasoline Euro 5 vehicles. In the second experiment, particle emissions from Euro 6 diesel and gasoline vehicles directly sampled from the tailpipe were compared to the constant volume sampling (CVS) measurements under similar sampling conditions. Low primary dilutions (3-5) induced an increase in particle number concentration by a factor of 2 compared to high primary dilutions (12-20). Low dilution temperatures (50 °C) induced 1.4-3 times higher particle number concentration than high dilution temperatures (150 °C). For the Euro 6 gasoline vehicle with direct injection, constant volume sampling (CVS) particle number concentrations were higher than after the tailpipe by a factor of 6, 80 and 22 for Artemis urban, road and motorway, respectively. For the same vehicle, particle size distribution measured after the tailpipe was centred on 10 nm, and particles were smaller than the ones measured after CVS that was centred between 50 nm and 70 nm. The high particle concentration (≈106 #/cm3) and the growth of diameter, measured in the CVS, highlighted aerosol transformations, such as nucleation, condensation and coagulation occurring in the sampling system and this might have biased the particle measurements.

  6. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaati, Roohollah, E-mail: r.jamaatikenari@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. {yields} When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. {yields} Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. {yields} First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 {mu}m were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 {mu}m particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 {mu}m particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 {mu}m up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 {mu}m particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  7. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. → When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. → Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. → First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 μm were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 μm particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 μm particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 μm particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 μm particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 μm particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 μm up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 μm particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 μm particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  8. Experimental investigation on improving the removal effect of WFGD system on fine particles by heterogeneous condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Jingjing; Yang, Linjun; Yan, Jinpei; Xiong, Guilong; Shen, Xianglin [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Heterogeneous condensation of water vapor as a preconditioning technique for the removal of fine particles from flue gas was investigated experimentally in a wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) system. A supersaturated vapor phase, necessary for condensational growth of fine particles, was achieved in the SO{sub 2} absorption zone and at the top of the wet FGD scrubber by adding steam in the gas inlet and above the scrubbing liquid inlet of the scrubber, respectively. The condensational grown droplets were then removed by the scrubbing liquid and a high-efficiency demister. The results show that the effectiveness of the WFGD system for removal of fine particles is related to the SO{sub 2} absorbent and the types of scrubber employed. Despite a little better effectiveness for the removal of fine particles in the rotating-stream-tray scrubber at the same liquid-to-gas ratio, The similar trends are obtained between the spray scrubber and rotating-stream-tray scrubber. Due to the formation of aerosol particles in the limestone and ammonia-based FGD processes, the fine particle removal efficiencies are lower than those for Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and water. The performance of the WFGD system for removal of fine particles can be significantly improved for both steam addition cases, for which the removal efficiency increases with increasing amount of added steam. A high liquid to gas ratio is beneficial for efficient removal of fine particles by heterogeneous condensation of water vapor.

  9. Influence of Asian dust particles on immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation in asthma model mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kurai

    Full Text Available An Asian dust storm (ADS contains airborne particles that affect conditions such as asthma, but the mechanism of exacerbation is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation induced by airborne particles collected on ADS days and the original ADS soil (CJ-1 soil in asthma model mice.Airborne particles were collected on ADS days in western Japan. NC/Nga mice were co-sensitized by intranasal instillation with ADS airborne particles and/or Dermatophagoides farinae (Df, and with CJ-1 soil and/or Df for 5 consecutive days. Df-sensitized mice were stimulated with Df challenge intranasally at 7 days after the last Df sensitization. At 24 hours after challenge, serum allergen specific antibody, differential leukocyte count and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were measured, and airway inflammation was examined histopathologically.Co-sensitization with ADS airborne particles and Df increased the neutrophil and eosinophil counts in BALF. Augmentation of airway inflammation was also observed in peribronchiolar and perivascular lung areas. Df-specific serum IgE was significantly elevated by ADS airborne particles, but not by CJ-1 soil. Levels of interleukin (IL-5, IL-13, IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 were higher in BALF in mice treated with ADS airborne particles.These results suggest that substances attached to ADS airborne particles that are not in the original ADS soil may play important roles in immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation.

  10. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  11. Predicting the Effects of Powder Feeding Rates on Particle Impact Conditions and Cold Spray Deposited Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozan C.; Widener, Christian A.; Carter, Michael J.; Johnson, Kyle W.

    2017-10-01

    As the industrial application of the cold spray technology grows, the need to optimize both the cost and the quality of the process grows with it. Parameter selection techniques available today require the use of a coupled system of equations to be solved to involve the losses due to particle loading in the gas stream. Such analyses cause a significant increase in the computational time in comparison with calculations with isentropic flow assumptions. In cold spray operations, engineers and operators may, therefore, neglect the effects of particle loading to simplify the multiparameter optimization process. In this study, two-way coupled (particle-fluid) quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamics simulations are used to test the particle loading effects under many potential cold spray scenarios. Output of the simulations is statistically analyzed to build regression models that estimate the changes in particle impact velocity and temperature due to particle loading. This approach eases particle loading optimization for more complete analysis on deposition cost and time. The model was validated both numerically and experimentally. Further numerical analyses were completed to test the particle loading capacity and limitations of a nozzle with a commonly used throat size. Additional experimentation helped document the physical limitations to high-rate deposition.

  12. Genetic effects of charged particles. Proceedings of conference; Geneticheskoe dejstvie korpuskulyarnykh izluchenij. Trudy rabochego soveshchaniya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Genetic Effects of Charged Particles held in Dubna, Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic June 1990. Selected presentations were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  13. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  14. Biological effects of single HZE-particles of the cosmic radiation: Free Flyer Biostack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Free Flyer Biostack is designed as a passive, longer term experiment for investigations into the dosimetry of cosmic HZE particles (high-charge energetic particles), the effects of single HZE particles on isolated biological samples, and the synergistic effects of conditions in space, as e.g. zero gravity and presence of a permanent, weakly ionizing component of the cosmic radiation. For the experiments summarized in this project report, the AgCl detector type developed in Frankfurt has been used, consisting of monocrystalline AgCl films, about 130-150 μm thick, and doped with 5000 ppm of Cd. (DG) With 9 figs [de

  15. Simulation study of effects of initial particle size distribution on dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Xu, D.S.; Ma, N.; Zhou, N.; Payton, E.J.; Yang, R.; Mills, M.J.; Wang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of γ' particles in binary Ni-Al alloys with different initial particle size distributions (PSD) is studied using a three-dimensional (3D) quantitative phase field model. By linking model inputs directly to thermodynamic and atomic mobility databases, microstructural evolution during dissolution is simulated in real time and length scales. The model is first validated against analytical solution for dissolution of a single γ' particle in 1D and numerical solution in 3D before it is applied to investigate the effects of initial PSD on dissolution kinetics. Four different types of PSD, uniform, normal, log-normal and bimodal, are considered. The simulation results show that the volume fraction of γ' particles decreases exponentially with time, while the temporal evolution of average particle size depends strongly on the initial PSD

  16. Effect study of multi-bubbles on stress distribution of fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yi; Wang Xiaomin; Long Chongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The finite element model was proposed to simulate the process of the UO_2 dispersion fuel particle sustaining the internal pressure of multi-bubbles, and the stress distribution of fuel particle with intra-bubbles was calculated. The results show that when the bubbles line equidistantly along x axis, the max normal stress along y axis increases with the number of bubbles, meanwhile, the increment of the normal stress gradually decreases. There is a limit that the effect of bubble's number imposes on the max normal stress in the fuel particle. When multi-column of bubbles exist, the max normal stress along x axis in the fuel particle increases, and the max normal stress along y axis decreases with the increase of the number of bubble column. The stress concentration in the fuel particle decreases with the spacing radius ratio increasing. (authors)

  17. Effect of milling time on the structure, particle size, and morphology of montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abareshi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, effect of milling on the structure, particle size and morphology of montmorillonite was investigated. For this purpose, the montmorillonite was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Then the montmorillonite was milled using high energy planetary ball mill at different milling times (1-60 hours). After that, the structure, particle size and morphology of all samples were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the ball milling causes the particle size reduction of clay and separation of the clay layers. Moreover, ball milling increases the overall structural disorder and transforms the crystalline structure into an amorphous phase. Also, the morphology of clay particle changes from layered to aggregates of almost rounded particles after 60 hours of milling.

  18. Individual particle motion and the effect of scattering in an axially symmetric magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garren, A; Riddell, R J; Smith, L; Henrich, L R [Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bing, G; Northrop, T G; Roberts, J E [Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1958-07-01

    The possibility of confining charged particles with magnetic mirrors has long been recognized. A mirror field has axial symmetry and a magnitude that increases along the axis away from a central region in which the particles are to be contained. Heretofore, the likelihood of confinement has been based on the approximate invariance of the magnetic moment as described by Alfven. If the magnetic moment of a particle with given energy is too small the particle escapes axially through the mirror. The moment can become small because it is not a rigorous constant of the motion or because of Coulomb scattering of the particle. Both these effects have been studied; the first by analytic and numerical methods and the second by numerical solution of the Fokker- Planck equation.

  19. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities

  20. The effect of particle size on sorption of estrogens, androgens and progestagens in aquatic sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, Jodi L.; Oke, Hugues; Zhang, Yun; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two sediments were used to evaluate the effects of particle size on steroid sorption. • Sorption capacity did not increase with decreasing particle size for all steroids. • Particle interactions affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. • Preferential sorption to fine particles was observed. - Abstract: There is growing concern about the biologic effects of steroid hormones in impacted waterways. There is increasing evidence of enhanced transport and biological effects stemming from steroid hormones associated with soils or sediments; however, there are limited studies evaluating how steroid hormone distribution between various particle sizes within whole sediments affects steroid fate. In this study, sorption of 17β-estradiol, estrone, progesterone, and testosterone was evaluated to different size fractions of two natural sediments, a silty loam and a sandy sediment, to determine the steroid sorption capacity to each fraction and distribution within the whole sediment. Sorption isotherms for all steroid hormones fit linear sorption models. Sorption capacity was influenced more by organic carbon content than particle size. Interactions between size fractions were found to affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. All four steroids preferentially sorbed to the clay and colloids in the silty loam sediment at the lowest aqueous concentration (1 ng/L) and as aqueous concentration increased, the distribution of sorbed steroid was similar to the distribution by weight of each size fraction within the whole sediment. In the sandy sediment, preferential sorption to fine particles was observed.

  1. The effect of particle size on sorption of estrogens, androgens and progestagens in aquatic sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangster, Jodi L.; Oke, Hugues; Zhang, Yun; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Two sediments were used to evaluate the effects of particle size on steroid sorption. • Sorption capacity did not increase with decreasing particle size for all steroids. • Particle interactions affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. • Preferential sorption to fine particles was observed. - Abstract: There is growing concern about the biologic effects of steroid hormones in impacted waterways. There is increasing evidence of enhanced transport and biological effects stemming from steroid hormones associated with soils or sediments; however, there are limited studies evaluating how steroid hormone distribution between various particle sizes within whole sediments affects steroid fate. In this study, sorption of 17β-estradiol, estrone, progesterone, and testosterone was evaluated to different size fractions of two natural sediments, a silty loam and a sandy sediment, to determine the steroid sorption capacity to each fraction and distribution within the whole sediment. Sorption isotherms for all steroid hormones fit linear sorption models. Sorption capacity was influenced more by organic carbon content than particle size. Interactions between size fractions were found to affect the distribution of steroids within the whole sediments. All four steroids preferentially sorbed to the clay and colloids in the silty loam sediment at the lowest aqueous concentration (1 ng/L) and as aqueous concentration increased, the distribution of sorbed steroid was similar to the distribution by weight of each size fraction within the whole sediment. In the sandy sediment, preferential sorption to fine particles was observed.

  2. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180°C and 210°C, a 5°C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 × 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260°C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods

  3. Effective Density and Mixing State of Aerosol Particles in a Near-Traffic Urban Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissler, Jenny; Nordin, Erik Z; Eriksson, Axel C

    2014-01-01

    -range transport from polluted continental areas. The effective density of each group was relatively stable over time, especially of the soot aggregates, which had effective densities similar to those observed in laboratory studies of fresh diesel exhaust emissions. When heated to 300 °C, the soot aggregate......In urban environments, airborne particles are continuously emitted, followed by atmospheric aging. Also, particles emitted elsewhere, transported by winds, contribute to the urban aerosol. We studied the effective density (mass-mobility relationship) and mixing state with respect to the density...... and more dense particles. Both groups were present at each size in varying proportions. Two types of temporal variability in the relative number fraction of the two groups were found: soot correlated with intense traffic in a diel pattern and dense particles increased during episodes with long...

  4. Centrifugal Pump Effect on Average Particle Diameter of Oil-Water Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A.; Eskin, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we review the process of oil-water emulsion particles fragmentation in a turbulent flow created by a centrifugal pump. We examined the influence of time necessary for oil-water emulsion preparation on the particle size of oil products and the dependence of a centrifugal pump emulsifying capacity on the initial emulsion dispersion. The investigated emulsion contained the brand fuel oil M-100 and tap water; it was sprayed with a nozzle in a gas-water flare. After preparation of the emulsion, the centrifugal pump was turned on and the emulsion samples were taken before and after the pump passing in 15, 30 and 45 minutes of spraying. To determine the effect the centrifugal pump has on the dispersion of the oil-water emulsion, the mean particle diameter of the emulsion particles was determined by the optical and microscopic method before and after the pump passing. A dispersion analysis of the particles contained in the emulsion was carried out by a laser diffraction analyzer. By analyzing the pictures of the emulsion samples, it was determined that after the centrifugal pump operation a particle size of oil products decreases. This result is also confirmed by the distribution of the obtained analyzer where the content of fine particles with a diameter less than 10 μm increased from 12% to 23%. In case of increasing emulsion preparation time, a particle size of petroleum products also decreases.

  5. Quantum Gravity Effect on the Tunneling Particles from 2 + 1-Dimensional New-Type Black Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganim Gecim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP effect on the Hawking temperature for the 2 + 1-dimensional new-type black hole by using the quantum tunneling method for both the spin-1/2 Dirac and the spin-0 scalar particles. In computation of the GUP correction for the Hawking temperature of the black hole, we modified Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations. We observed that the modified Hawking temperature of the black hole depends not only on the black hole properties, but also on the graviton mass and the intrinsic properties of the tunneling particle, such as total angular momentum, energy, and mass. Also, we see that the Hawking temperature was found to be probed by these particles in different manners. The modified Hawking temperature for the scalar particle seems low compared with its standard Hawking temperature. Also, we find that the modified Hawking temperature of the black hole caused by Dirac particle’s tunneling is raised by the total angular momentum of the particle. It is diminishable by the energy and mass of the particle and graviton mass as well. These intrinsic properties of the particle, except total angular momentum for the Dirac particle, and graviton mass may cause screening for the black hole radiation.

  6. The effects of sloshing energetic particles on ballooning modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Berk, H.L.

    1986-10-01

    Distributions that give rise to energetic trapped particle pressures peaked in the ''good curvature'' region of a tokamak (sloshing distributions) are examined in an attempt to find stable regimes for both the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and precessional modes. It is the precessional drift destabilization of ballooning modes that inhibits bridging the unstable gap to second stability by the use of deeply-trapped energetic particles unless the hot particles have an extremely large energy (∼0.35 MeV for a tokamak like PDX). Unfortunately, our calculations indicate that the sloshing particles do not have a significant stabilizing effect. An analytic treatment shows that complete stability can be found only if the sign of the energetic particle magnetic drift-frequency can be reversed from its value in vacuum bad curvature without hot species diamagnetism. This is difficult to do in a tokamak because of the destabilizing contribution of the geodesic curvature to the drift frequency. Furthermore, for each of the two sloshing distributions employed (one contains only trapped particles; the other includes trapped and passing particles), a new ''continuum instability'' (where asymptotically along the field line the mode is a propagating plane wave) is found to be driven by geodesic curvature. These results indicate that energetic sloshing particles are not able to bridge the unstable gap to second stability

  7. Memory effect on energy losses of charged particles moving parallel to solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwei, C.M.; Tu, Y.H.; Hsu, Y.H.; Tung, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical derivations were made for the induced potential and the stopping power of a charged particle moving close and parallel to the surface of a solid. It was illustrated that the induced potential produced by the interaction of particle and solid depended not only on the velocity but also on the previous velocity of the particle before its last inelastic interaction. Another words, the particle kept a memory on its previous velocity, v , in determining the stopping power for the particle of velocity v. Based on the dielectric response theory, formulas were derived for the induced potential and the stopping power with memory effect. An extended Drude dielectric function with spatial dispersion was used in the application of these formulas for a proton moving parallel to Si surface. It was found that the induced potential with memory effect lay between induced potentials without memory effect for constant velocities v and v. The memory effect was manifest as the proton changes its velocity in the previous inelastic interaction. This memory effect also reduced the stopping power of the proton. The formulas derived in the present work can be applied to any solid surface and charged particle moving with arbitrary parallel trajectory either inside or outside the solid

  8. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [I L U L ]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [I H U H ]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [I H U L ]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [I L U H ]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [I L U L ] and [I H U L ] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [I H U H ] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [I L U H ] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure

  9. Particle detection and identification through Cerenkov effect in silica aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, J.J.; Cantin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Cerenkov counters are largely used in high energy physics and in nuclear astrophysics to identify the charge of high energy particles and to measure their velocity. Good velocity resolution is obtained only near the Cerenkov threshold, which is directly dependent on the refractive index of the radiator. It is therefore very important to dispose of materials of various refractive indices. The silica aerogel allows to cover a range of indices between 1.015 and 1.2 which is intermediate between the indices given by gas and liquids. The samples most often built until now are hexagonal blocks of 1.06 refractive index and 0.24 g/cm 3 density. Blocks of one liter in volume have been assembled to form a mosaic of large dimension. For lower refractive indices, 1.015 for instance, the material becomes too brittle. So we have been led to use an aerogel sand made of aerogel grains of controlled granulometry. Radiators of both types blocks and sand are used in the franco-danish experiment to be launched aboard the NASA satellite HEAO-C in July 1979 [fr

  10. The effect of reducing alfalfa haylage particle size on cows in early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononoff, P J; Heinrichs, A J

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate effects of reducing forage particle size on cows in early lactation based on measurements of the Penn State Particle Separator (PSPS). Eight cannulated, multiparous cows averaging 19 +/- 4 d in milk and 642 +/- 45 kg BW were assigned to one of two 4 x 4 Latin Squares. During each of the 23-d periods, animals were offered one of four diets, which were chemically identical but included alfalfa haylage of different particle size; short (SH), mostly short (MSH), mostly long (MLG), and long (LG). Physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) was determined by measuring the amount of neutral detergent fiber retained on a 1.18 mm screen and was similar across diets (25.7, 26.2, 26.4, 26.7%) but the amount of particles >19.0 mm significantly decreased with decreasing particle size. Reducing haylage particle size increased dry matter intake linearly (23.3, 22.0, 20.9, 20.8 kg for SH, MSH, MLG, LG, respectively). Milk production and percentage fat did not differ across treatments averaging 35.5 +/- 0.68 kg milk and 3.32 +/- 0.67% fat, while a quadratic effect was observed for percent milk protein, with lowest values being observed for LG. A quadratic effect was observed for mean rumen pH (6.04, 6.15, 6.13, 6.09), while A:P ratio decreased linearly (2.75, 2.86, 2.88, 2.92) with decreasing particle size. Total time ruminating increased quadratically (467, 498, 486, 468 min/d), while time eating decreased linearly (262, 253, 298, 287 min/d) with decreasing particle size. Both eating and ruminating per unit of neutral detergent fiber intake decreased with reducing particle size (35.8, 36.7, 44.9, 45.6 min/kg; 19.9, 23.6, 23.5, 23.5 min/kg). Although chewing activity was closely related to forage particle size, effects on rumen pH were small, indicating factors other than particle size are critical in regulating pH when ration neutral detergent fiber met recommended levels. Feeding alfalfa haylage based rations of reduced

  11. EFFECT OF PARTICLE SIZE AND PACKING RATIO OF PID ON VIBRATION AMPLITUDE OF BEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Kachare

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Everything in the universe that has mass possesses stiffness and intrinsic damping. Owing to the stiffness property, mass will vibrate when excited and its intrinsic damping property will act to stop the vibration. The particle impact damper (PID is a very interesting damper that affects impact and friction effects of particles by means of energy dissipation. PID is a means for achieving high structural damping by using a particle-filled enclosure attached to a structure. The particles absorb the kinetic energy of the structure and convert it into heat through inelastic collisions between the particles themselves and between the particles and the walls of the enclosure. In this work, PID is measured for a cantilever mild steel beam with an enclosure attached to its free end; copper particles are used in this study. The PID is found to be highly nonlinear. The most useful observation is that for a very small weight penalty (about 7% to 8 %, the maximum damped amplitude of vibration at resonance with a PID, is about 9 to 10 times smaller than that without a PID. It is for more than that of with only intrinsic material damping of a majority of structural metals. A satisfactory comparison of damping with and without particles through experimentation is observed. The effect of the size of the particles on the damping performance of the beam and the effective packing ratio can be identified. It is also shown that as the packing ratio changes, the contributions of the phenomena of impact and friction towards damping also change. It is encouraging that despite its deceptive simplicity, the model captures the essential physics of PID.

  12. Physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles

    KAUST Repository

    Longhin, Eleonora

    2016-05-15

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Diesel combustion and solid biomass burning are the major sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in urbanized areas. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, are possible outcomes of combustion particles exposure, but differences in particles properties seem to influence their biological effects.Here the physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles, produced under controlled laboratory conditions, have been characterized. Diesel UFP were sampled from a Euro 4 light duty vehicle without DPF fuelled by commercial diesel and run over a chassis dyno. Biomass UFP were collected from a modern automatic 25 kW boiler propelled by prime quality spruce pellet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both diesel and biomass samples showed aggregates of soot particles, but in biomass samples ash particles were also present. Chemical characterization showed that metals and PAHs total content was higher in diesel samples compared to biomass ones.Human bronchial epithelial (HBEC3) cells were exposed to particles for up to 2 weeks. Changes in the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism were observed after exposure to both UFP already after 24 h. However, only diesel particles modulated the expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), increased the release of inflammatory mediators and caused phenotypical alterations, mostly after two weeks of exposure.These results show that diesel UFP affected cellular processes involved in lung and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Biomass particles exerted low biological activity compared to diesel UFP. This evidence emphasizes that the study of different emission sources contribution to ambient PM toxicity may have a fundamental role in the development of more effective strategies for air quality improvement.

  13. Magnetic field effect on flow parameters of blood along with magnetic particles in a cylindrical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shashi, E-mail: shashisharma1984@gmail.com; Singh, Uaday; Katiyar, V.K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of external uniform magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles is reported through a mathematical model using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approach. The fluid is acted upon by a varying pressure gradient and an external uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylindrical tube. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations were solved numerically and found that flow parameters are affected by the influence of magnetic field. Further, artificial blood (75% water+25% Glycerol) along with iron oxide magnetic particles were prepared and transported into a glass tube with help of a peristaltic pump. The velocity of artificial blood along with magnetic particles was experimentally measured at different magnetic fields ranging from 100 to 600 mT. The model results show that the velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under the influence of magnetic field, which is supported by our experimental results. - Highlights: • Effect of magnetic field on flow parameters of blood and magnetic particles is studied. • The velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under a magnetic field. • Experimental results of the velocity of magnetic particles within blood support the mathematical model results.

  14. Modelling of shear effects on thermal and particle transport in advanced Tokamak scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Baker, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Evolution of thermal and particle internal transport barriers (ITBs) is studied by modelling the time-dependent energy and particle balance in DIII-D plasmas with reversed magnetic shear configurations and in JET discharges with monotonic or slightly reversed q-profiles and large ExB rotation shear. Simulations are performed with semi-empirical models for anomalous diffusion and particle pinch. Stabilizing effects of magnetic and ExB rotation shears are included in anomalous particle and heat diffusivity. Shear effects on particle and thermal transport are compared. Improved particle and energy confinement with the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced in DIII-D plasmas during current ramp-up accompanied with neutral beam injection (NBI). These plasmas are characterized by strong reversed magnetic shear and large ExB rotation shear which provide the reduction of anomalous fluxes. The formation of ITB's in the optimized shear (OS) JET scenario starts with strong NBI heating in a target plasma with a flat or slightly reversed q-profile pre-formed during current ramp-up with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Our paper presents the modelling of particle and thermal transport for these scenarios. (authors)

  15. Systematic description of the effect of particle shape on the strength properties of granular media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azéma Emilien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore numerically the effect of particle shape on the mechanical behavior of sheared granular packings. In the framework of the Contact Dynamic (CDMethod, we model angular shape as irregular polyhedral particles, non-convex shape as regular aggregates of four overlapping spheres, elongated shape as rounded cap rectangles and platy shape as square-plates. Binary granular mixture consisting of disks and elongated particles are also considered. For each above situations, the number of face of polyhedral particles, the overlap of spheres, the aspect ratio of elongated and platy particles, are systematically varied from spheres to very angular, non-convex, elongated and platy shapes. The level of homogeneity of binary mixture varies from homogenous packing to fully segregated packings. Our numerical results suggest that the effects of shape parameters are nonlinear and counterintuitive. We show that the shear strength increases as shape deviate from spherical shape. But, for angular shapes it first increases up to a maximum value and then saturates to a constant value as the particles become more angular. For mixture of two shapes, the strength increases with respect of the increase of the proportion of elongated particles, but surprisingly it is independent with the level of homogeneity of the mixture. A detailed analysis of the contact network topology, evidence that various contact types contribute differently to stress transmission at the micro-scale.

  16. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of Particle Shape and Adhesion on the Segregation of Powder Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Behjani Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Segregation of granules is an undesired phenomenon in which particles in a mixture separate from each other based on the differences in their physical and chemical properties. It is, therefore, crucial to control the homogeneity of the system by applying appropriate techniques. This requires a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the effect of particle shape and cohesion has been analysed. As a model system prone to segregation, a ternary mixture of particles representing the common ingredients of home washing powders, namely, spray dried detergent powders, tetraacetylethylenediamine, and enzyme placebo (as the minor ingredient during heap formation is modelled numerically by the Discrete Element Method (DEM with an aim to investigate the effect of cohesion/adhesion of the minor components on segregation quality. Non-spherical particle shapes are created in DEM using the clumped-sphere method based on their X-ray tomograms. Experimentally, inter particle adhesion is generated by coating the minor ingredient (enzyme placebo with Polyethylene Glycol 400 (PEG 400. The JKR theory is used to model the cohesion/adhesion of coated enzyme placebo particles in the simulation. Tests are carried out experimentally and simulated numerically by mixing the placebo particles (uncoated and coated with the other ingredients and pouring them in a test box. The simulation and experimental results are compared qualitatively and quantitatively. It is found that coating the minor ingredient in the mixture reduces segregation significantly while the change in flowability of the system is negligible.

  17. An effective strong-coupling theory of composite particles in UV-domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    We briefly review the effective field theory of massive composite particles, their gauge couplings and characteristic energy scale in the UV-domain of UV-stable fixed point of strong four-fermion coupling, then mainly focus the discussions on the decay channels of composite particles into the final states of the SM gauge bosons, leptons and quarks. We calculate the rates of composite bosons decaying into two gauge bosons γγ, γZ 0, W + W -, Z 0 Z 0 and give the ratios of decay rates of different channels depending on gauge couplings only. It is shown that a composite fermion decays into an elementary fermion and a composite boson, the latter being an intermediate state decays into two gauge bosons, leading to a peculiar kinematics of final states of a quark (or a lepton) and two gauge bosons. These provide experimental implications of such an effective theory of composite particles beyond the SM. We also present some speculative discussions on the channels of composite fermions decaying into W W , W Z and ZZ two boson-tagged jets with quark jets, or to four-quark jets. Moreover, at the same energy scale of composite particles produced in high-energy experiments, composite particles are also produced by high-energy sterile neutrino (dark matter) collisions, their decays lead to excesses of cosmic ray particles in space and signals of SM particles in underground laboratories.

  18. An effective strong-coupling theory of composite particles in UV-domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, She-Sheng [ICRANet,Piazzale della Repubblica 10, 10-65122, Pescara (Italy); Physics Department, Sapienza University of Rome,Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2017-05-29

    We briefly review the effective field theory of massive composite particles, their gauge couplings and characteristic energy scale in the UV-domain of UV-stable fixed point of strong four-fermion coupling, then mainly focus the discussions on the decay channels of composite particles into the final states of the SM gauge bosons, leptons and quarks. We calculate the rates of composite bosons decaying into two gauge bosons γγ, γZ{sup 0}, W{sup +}W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0} and give the ratios of decay rates of different channels depending on gauge couplings only. It is shown that a composite fermion decays into an elementary fermion and a composite boson, the latter being an intermediate state decays into two gauge bosons, leading to a peculiar kinematics of final states of a quark (or a lepton) and two gauge bosons. These provide experimental implications of such an effective theory of composite particles beyond the SM. We also present some speculative discussions on the channels of composite fermions decaying into WW, WZ and ZZ two boson-tagged jets with quark jets, or to four-quark jets. Moreover, at the same energy scale of composite particles produced in high-energy experiments, composite particles are also produced by high-energy sterile neutrino (dark matter) collisions, their decays lead to excesses of cosmic ray particles in space and signals of SM particles in underground laboratories.

  19. The effect of wall geometry in particle-laden turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdehkakha, Hoora; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow plays a significant role in various industrial applications, as turbulence alters the exchange of momentum and energy between particles and fluid flow. In wall-bounded flows, inhomogeneity in turbulent properties is the primary cause of turbophoresis that leads the particles toward the walls. Conversely, shear-induced lift force on the particles can become important if large scale vortical structures are present. The objective of this study is to understand the effects of geometry on fluid flows and consequently on particles transport and concentration. Direct numerical simulations combined with point particle Lagrangian tracking are performed for several geometries such as a pipe, channel, square duct, and squircle (rounded-corners duct). In non-circular ducts, anisotropic and inhomogeneous Reynolds stresses are the most influential phenomena that produce the secondary flows. It has been shown that these motions can have a significant impact on transporting momentum, vorticity, and energy from the core of the duct to the corners. The main focus of the present study is to explore the effects of near the wall structures and secondary flows on turbophoresis, lift, and particle concentration.

  20. Effect of Particle Size on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Based Composite Reinforced with 10 Vol.% Mechanically Alloyed Mg-7.4%Al Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. Chaubey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Mg-7.4%Al reinforcement particle size on the microstructure and mechanical properties in pure Al matrix composites was investigated. The samples were prepared by hot consolidation using 10 vol.% reinforcement in different size ranges, D, 0 < D < 20 µm (0–20 µm, 20 ≤ D < 40 µm (20–40 µm, 40 ≤ D < 80 µm (40–80 µm and 80 ≤ D < 100 µm (80–100 µm. The result reveals that particle size has a strong influence on the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and percentage elongation. As the particle size decreases from 80 ≤ D < 100 µm to 0 < D < 20 µm, both tensile strength and ductility increases from 195 MPa to 295 MPa and 3% to 4% respectively, due to the reduced ligament size and particle fracturing. Wear test results also corroborate the size effect, where accelerated wear is observed in the composite samples reinforced with coarse particles.

  1. In vitro neurotoxic effects of 1 GeV/n iron particles assessed in retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M E; Kirk, E

    2000-01-01

    The heavy ion component of the cosmic radiation remains problematic to the assessment of risk in manned space flight. The biological effectiveness of HZE particles has yet to be established, particularly with regard to nervous tissue. Using heavy ions accelerated at the AGS of Brookhaven National Laboratory, we study the neurotoxic effects of iron particles. We exposed retinal explants, taken from chick embryos, to determine the dose response relationships for neurite outgrowth. Morphometric techniques were used to evaluate the in vitro effects of 1 GeV/a iron particles (LET 148 keV/micrometer). Iron particles produced a dose-dependent reduction of neurite outgrowth with a maximal effect achieved with a dose of 100 cGy. Doses as low as 10-50 cGy were able to induce reductions of the neurite outgrowth as compared to the control group. Neurite generation is a more sensitive parameter than neurite elongation, suggesting different mechanism of radiation damage in our model. These results showed that low doses/fluences of iron particles could impair the retinal ganglion cells' capacity to generate neurites indicating the highly neurotoxic capability of this heavy charged particle.

  2. Pairing fluctuation effects on the single-particle spectra for the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, P.; Pisani, L.; Strinati, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    Single-particle spectra are calculated in the superconducting state for a fermionic system with an attractive interaction, as functions of temperature and coupling strength from weak to strong. The fermionic system is described by a single-particle self-energy that includes pairing-fluctuation effects in the superconducting state. The theory reduces to the ordinary BCS approximation in weak coupling and to the Bogoliubov approximation for the composite bosons in strong coupling. Several features of the single-particle spectral function are shown to compare favorably with experimental data for cuprate superconductors

  3. Effect of particle velocity fluctuations on the inertia coupling in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Consistent forms for the interfacial force, the interfacial pressure, the Reynolds stresses and the particle stress have been derived for the inviscid, irrotational incompressible flow of fluid in a dilute suspension of spheres. The particles are assumed to have a velocity distribution, giving rise to an effective pressure and stress in the particle phase. The velocity fluctuations also contribute in the fluid Reynolds stress and in the (elastic) stress field inside the spheres. The relation of these constitutive equations to the force on an individual sphere is discussed

  4. Effects of ashes in solid fuels on fuel particle charging during combustion in an air stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, A.G.; Fialkov, B.S.; Mel' nichuk, A.Yu.; Khvan, L.A.

    1982-09-01

    Black coal from the Karaganda basin is mixed with sodium chloride and graphite. Coal characteristics are given in a table (density, ashes, content of silica, aluminium oxides, iron oxides, calcium oxides, potassium oxides and magnesium oxides). Effects of ash fluctuations on electric potential of fuel particles during combustion are analyzed. Analyses show that with increasing ash content electric potential of fuel particles decreases and reaches the minimum when ash content ranges from 70 to 80 %. Particles with electric potential are generated during chemical processes between carbon and oxygen when coal is burned in an air stream. (5 refs.) (In Russian)

  5. Prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles and effect on the male reproductive system in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Talsness, Chris

    2009-01-01

    In utero exposure to diesel exhaust particles may reduce sperm production in adulthood. We investigated the effect of prenatal exposure to diesel exhaust particles on the male reproductive system and assessed endocrine disruption and regulation of aquaporin expression as possible mechanisms...... of action. Dams inhaled 20 mg/m(3) of diesel exhaust particle standard reference material 2975 (SRM2975) or clean air for 1h/day on day 7-19 during pregnancy. Male offspring were killed on day 170 after birth. The dams that had inhaled SRM2975 delivered offspring, which in adulthood had reduced daily sperm...

  6. Quantum mechanics of relativistic particles in multiply connected spaces and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, J.; Rivelles, V.O.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the motion of free relativistic particles in multiply connected spaces. We show that if one of the spatial dimensions has the topology of a circle then the D dimensional spacetime is compactified to D-1 dimensions and the particle mass increases by an amount which is proportional to a quantum phase factor and inversely proportional to the radius of the circle. We also consider the relativistic Aharonov-Bohm effect and we show that the interference pattern is a universal characteristic due only to the topological properties of the experimental situation and not to the intrinsic properties of the particle. The propagators are calculated in both situations. (author) [pt

  7. Test particle method for incorporation of the kinetic effects into the envelope simulations of Raman backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-01-01

    A new test particle method is presented for self-consistent incorporation of the kinetic effects into the fluid three-wave model. One of the most important kinetic effects is the electron trapping and it has been found that the trapping affects significantly the behavior of Raman backscatter and Raman backward laser amplification. The conventional fluid three-wave model cannot reproduce the kinetic simulations in the trapping regime. The test particle scheme utilizes the same equations for the laser evolution as in the three-wave model. However, the plasma wave is treated by the envelope-kinetic equation, which consists of envelope evolution and the kinetic term. The core of the new scheme is employing test particles to compute the kinetic term self-consistently. The benchmarking results against the averaged particle-in-cell (aPIC) code show excellent agreements, and the computation speed gain over the aPIC is from 2 to 20 depending on parameters

  8. Effect of supercritical fluid density on nanoencapsulated drug particle size using the supercritical antisolvent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2012-01-01

    The reported work demonstrates and discusses the effect of supercritical fluid density (pressure and temperature of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide) on particle size and distribution using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) method in the purpose of drug encapsulation. In this study, paracetamol was encapsulated inside L-polylactic acid, a semicrystalline polymer, with different process parameters, including pressure and temperature, using the SAS process. The morphology and particle size of the prepared nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that increasing temperature enhanced mean particle size due to the plasticizing effect. Furthermore, increasing pressure enhanced molecular interaction and solubility; thus, particle size was reduced. Transmission electron microscopy images defined the internal structure of nanoparticles. Thermal characteristics of nanoparticles were also investigated via differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the changes in crystallinity structure during the SAS process. In vitro drug release analysis determined the sustained release of paracetamol in over 4 weeks.

  9. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  10. Chemical composition modulates the adverse effects of particles on the mucociliary epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiani Carvalho-Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:We compared the adverse effects of two types of real ambient particles; i.e., total suspended particles from an electrostatic precipitator of a steel mill and fine air particles from an urban ambient particulate matter of 2.5 µm, on mucociliary clearance.METHOD:Mucociliary function was quantified by mucociliary transport, ciliary beating frequency and the amount of acid and neutral mucous in epithelial cells through morphometry of frog palate preparations. The palates were immersed in one of the following solutions: total suspended particles (0.1 mg/mL, particulate matter 2.5 µm 0.1 mg/mL (PM0.1 or 3.0 mg/mL (PM3.0 and amphibian Ringer’s solution (control. Particle chemical compositions were determined by X-ray fluorescence and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.RESULTS:Exposure to total suspended particles and PM3.0 decreased mucociliary transport. Ciliary beating frequency was diminished by total suspended particles at all times during exposure, while particulate matter of 2.5 µm did not elicit changes. Particulate matter of 2.5 µm reduced epithelial mucous and epithelium thickness, while total suspended particles behaved similarly to the control group. Total suspended particles exhibited a predominance of Fe and no organic compounds, while the particulate matter 2.5 µm contained predominant amounts of S, Fe, Si and, to a lesser extent, Cu, Ni, V, Zn and organic compounds.CONCLUSION:Our results showed that different compositions of particles induced different airway epithelial responses, emphasizing that knowledge of their individual characteristics may help to establish policies aimed at controlling air pollution.

  11. The effect of particle size and concentration on the flow properties of a homogeneous slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, M.A.; Crowe, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the effects of particle size and concentration on the velocity distribution in the fully developed flow of a homogeneous slurry. The slurry consisted of chloroform and silica gel with matched index of refraction to enable Laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements through the mixture. Slurries with two particle sizes and solids concentration up to 30% by volume were studied. Measurements were made over a Reynolds number range of 1,200 to 30,000

  12. Effects of Particle Size and Shape on U-Mo/Al Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Tae-Won; Sohn, Dong-Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The thermal conductivity of atomized U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels was measured only by Lee et al. by laser-flash and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. For the U-Mo particles, they are deformed during manufacturing process such as hot rolling and during irradiation by the creep deformation. Fricke developed a model for the effective thermal conductivity of a dilute suspension of randomly oriented spheroidal particles. In general, the thermal conductivity of composite increase when the particle shape is not sphere. This model is also based on continuum theory which assumes both temperature and heat flux are continuous across the interface. Kapitza, however, showed that there is a discontinuity in temperature across the interface at metal/liquid helium interface. In general, the discontinuity is from the thermal resistance at the interface. If the thermal resistance has a significant impact on the thermal conductivity, particle size is one of the essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of composite materials. Every, et al modified Bruggeman model to consider the interfacial thermal resistance. The U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel thermal conductivity calculation can be improved by considering the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. There have been various works to analyze the thermal conductivity through Finite Element Method (FEM). Coulson developed a realistic FEM model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. This FEM model does not consider the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. Therefore, these effects can be evaluated by comparing the FEM calculated effective thermal conductivity with measured data. In this work, the FEM analysis was done and the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances was estimated. From this results, the particle shape and size effects will be discussed. Many thermal conductivity models for the particle dispersed composites have been

  13. Effects of Particle Size and Shape on U-Mo/Al Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae-Won; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of atomized U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels was measured only by Lee et al. by laser-flash and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. For the U-Mo particles, they are deformed during manufacturing process such as hot rolling and during irradiation by the creep deformation. Fricke developed a model for the effective thermal conductivity of a dilute suspension of randomly oriented spheroidal particles. In general, the thermal conductivity of composite increase when the particle shape is not sphere. This model is also based on continuum theory which assumes both temperature and heat flux are continuous across the interface. Kapitza, however, showed that there is a discontinuity in temperature across the interface at metal/liquid helium interface. In general, the discontinuity is from the thermal resistance at the interface. If the thermal resistance has a significant impact on the thermal conductivity, particle size is one of the essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of composite materials. Every, et al modified Bruggeman model to consider the interfacial thermal resistance. The U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel thermal conductivity calculation can be improved by considering the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. There have been various works to analyze the thermal conductivity through Finite Element Method (FEM). Coulson developed a realistic FEM model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. This FEM model does not consider the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. Therefore, these effects can be evaluated by comparing the FEM calculated effective thermal conductivity with measured data. In this work, the FEM analysis was done and the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances was estimated. From this results, the particle shape and size effects will be discussed. Many thermal conductivity models for the particle dispersed composites have been

  14. Study of effect of variables on particle size of telmisartan nanosuspensions using box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M R P; Bajaj, A

    2014-12-01

    Telmisartan, an orally active nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist is a BCS Class II drug having aqueous solubility of 9.9 µg/ml and hence oral bioavailability of 40%. The present study involved preparation of nanosuspensions by evaporative antisolvent precipitation technique to improve the saturation solubility and dissolution rate of telmisartan. Various stabilizers such as TPGS, PVPK 30, PEG 6000 were investigated of which TPGS was found to provide maximum decrease in particle size and accord greater stability to the nanosuspensions. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of independent variables like stabilizer concentration, time and speed of stirring on particle size of nanosuspensions. Pharmacodynamic studies using Goldblatt technique were undertaken to evaluate the effect of nano-sizing on the hypotensive effect of the drug. Concentration of TPGS and speed of rotation were found to play an important role in particle size of the nanosuspensions whereas time of stirring displayed an exponential relationship with particle size. Freeze dried nanocrystals obtained from nanosuspension of least particle size were found to have increased saturation solubility of telmisartan in different dissolution media. The reconstituted nanosuspension was found to reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure without affecting pulse pressure and heart rate. Statistical tools can be used to identify key process and formulation parameters which play a significant role in controlling the particle size in nanosuspensions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. High energy scattering phenomena in the accelerators and colliders, and a study in the role of the 'leading particle effect' on the multiplicity of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.

    1989-01-01

    The role of the leading particles in high energy scattering phenomena has assumed much importance in recent times but it has not been duly considered in some theoretical studies. This oversight is pointed out, and some other shortcomings and insufficiencies of most of the contemporary theoretical studies not only from considerations of the leading particle effect (LPE) but also from some other viewpoints are mentio ned. A revised comparative study on the behaviour of the average multiplicity by taking into account some of the competing theoretical models and the influence of the leading particle effect on them is also presented. (author). 33 refs

  16. Effects of Magnetic Particles Entrance Arrangements on Mixing Efficiency of a Magnetic Bead Micromixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Kamali; Seyed Alireza Shekoohi; Alireza Binesh

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a computer code is developed to numerically investigate a magnetic bead micromixer under different conditions. The micromixer consists of a microchannel and numerous micro magnetic particles which enter the micromixer by fluid flows and are actuated by an alternating magnetic field normal to the main flow. An important feature of micromixer which is not considered before by researchers is the particle entrance arrangement into the micromixer. This parameter could effectively affect the micromixer efficiency. There are two general micro magnetic particle entrance arrangements in magnetic bead micromixers: determined position entrance and random position entrance. In the case of determined position entrances, micro magnetic particles enter the micromixer at specific positions of entrance cross section. However, in a random position entrance,particles enter the microchannel with no order. In this study mixing efficiencies of identical magnetic bead micromixers which only differ in particle entrance arrangement are numerically investigated and compared.The results reported in this paper illustrate that the prepared computer code can be one of the most powerful and beneficial tools for the magnetic bead micromixer performance analysis. In addition, the results show that some features of the magnetic bead micromixer are strongly affected by the entrance arrangement of the particles.

  17. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-01-01

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity

  18. The effects of beryllium metal particles on the viability and function of cultured rat alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Lowther, W.T.; Hoover, M.D.; Brooks, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were exposed in vitro to beryllium metal particles. The particles used were relatively large (Be-II) and small (Be-V) size fractions of beryllium metal obtained from an aerosol cyclone, and a beryllium metal aerosol generated by laser vaporization of beryllium metal in an argon atmosphere (Be-L). Glass beads (GB) were used as a negative control particle. The endpoints examined included cell killing (trypan blue dye exclusion) and phagocytic ability (sheep red blood cell uptake). Phagocytic ability was inhibited by beryllium particles at concentrations that did not cause appreciable cell killing. Results based on the mass concentration of particles in culture medium were transformed by the amount of specific surface area of the particles to permit expression of toxicity on the basis of amount of surface area of particles per unit volume of culture medium. On a mass concentration basis, the order of cytotoxicity was Be-L > Be-V ∼ Be-II > GB; for inhibition of phagacytosis, the cytotoxicity order was Be-L ∼ Be-V > Be-II > GB. On a surface area concentration basis, the order of toxicity for viability was altered to Be-II > Be-L ∼ Be-V (with GB indeterminant) and to Be-V > Be-II ∼ Be-L > GB for inhibition of phagocytosis. We conclude that there are factors in addition to specific surface area that influence the expression of toxic effects in cultured PAM. (author)

  19. Theoretical aspects of effects of high-energy particles on MHD modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, L.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we adopt a global approach. The TAEs are computed globally in true toroidal geometry consistent with an ideal MHD equilibrium. Kinetic effects (damping and driving mechanisms) and fast particles are treated perturbatively. More precisely, we first obtain the global eigenmodes an then use these given eigenmode fields to evaluate the global overall wave-particle power transfer assuming given fast particle density profiles. The marginal stability point is obtained by scaling the number of fast particles so that the overall power transfer is zero. The wave-particle power transfers are evaluated using the drift-kinetic equations. The paper is structured as follows: In section two, the plasma model in toroidal geometry is briefly presented. The expressions for the DKE powers are derived for the various species in the companion paper in these proceedings. In section 3 we show the results of our model applied to a wide variety of plasma parameters. In particular, the critical volume-averaged fast particle beta corresponding to marginal stability, f > cr , is calculated for a wide range of bulk plasma parameters and fast particle profile widths. We discuss the results in section 4 and draw some conclusions in section 5.(author) 13 figs., 21 refs

  20. Micrometer-scale 3-D shape characterization of eight cements: Particle shape and cement chemistry, and the effect of particle shape on laser diffraction particle size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, S.T.; Nie, X.; Stutzman, P.E.; Garboczi, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Eight different portland cements were imaged on a synchrotron beam line at Brookhaven National Laboratory using X-ray microcomputed tomography at a voxel size of about 1 μm per cubic voxel edge. The particles ranged in size roughly between 10 μm and 100 μm. The shape and size of individual particles were computationally analyzed using spherical harmonic analysis. The particle shape difference between cements was small but significant, as judged by several different quantitative shape measures, including the particle length, width, and thickness distributions. It was found that the average shape of cement particles was closely correlated with the volume fraction of C 3 S (alite) and C 2 S (belite) making up the cement powder. It is shown that the non-spherical particle shape of the cements strongly influence laser diffraction results, at least in the sieve size range of 20 μm to 38 μm. Since laser diffraction particle size measurement is being increasingly used by the cement industry, while cement chemistry is always a main factor in cement production, these results could have important implications for how this kind of particle size measurement should be understood and used in the cement industry.

  1. A new balance formula to estimate new particle formation rate: reevaluating the effect of coagulation scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new balance formula to estimate new particle formation rate is proposed. It is derived from the aerosol general dynamic equation in the discrete form and then converted into an approximately continuous form for analyzing data from new particle formation (NPF field campaigns. The new formula corrects the underestimation of the coagulation scavenging effect that occurred in the previously used formulae. It also clarifies the criteria for determining the upper size bound in measured aerosol size distributions for estimating new particle formation rate. An NPF field campaign was carried out from 7 March to 7 April 2016 in urban Beijing, and a diethylene glycol scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a miniature cylindrical differential mobility analyzer was used to measure aerosol size distributions down to ∼ 1 nm. Eleven typical NPF events were observed during this period. Measured aerosol size distributions from 1 nm to 10 µm were used to test the new formula and the formulae widely used in the literature. The previously used formulae that perform well in a relatively clean atmosphere in which nucleation intensity is not strong were found to underestimate the comparatively high new particle formation rate in urban Beijing because of their underestimation or neglect of the coagulation scavenging effect. The coagulation sink term is the governing component of the estimated formation rate in the observed NPF events in Beijing, and coagulation among newly formed particles contributes a large fraction to the coagulation sink term. Previously reported formation rates in Beijing and in other locations with intense NPF events might be underestimated because the coagulation scavenging effect was not fully considered; e.g., estimated formation rates of 1.5 nm particles in this campaign using the new formula are 1.3–4.3 times those estimated using the formula neglecting coagulation among particles in the nucleation mode.

  2. Translocation and potential neurological effects of fine and ultrafine particles a critical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Annette; Veronesi, Bellina; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Gehr, Peter; Chen, Lung Chi; Geiser, Marianne; Reed, William; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schürch, Samuel; Schulz, Holger

    2006-09-08

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disease. Evidence for cardiovascular and neurodegenerative effects of ambient particles was reviewed as part of a workshop. The purpose of this critical update is to summarize the evidence presented for the mechanisms involved in the translocation of particles from the lung to other organs and to highlight the potential of particles to cause neurodegenerative effects. Fine and ultrafine particles, after deposition on the surfactant film at the air-liquid interface, are displaced by surface forces exerted on them by surfactant film and may then interact with primary target cells upon this displacement. Ultrafine and fine particles can then penetrate through the different tissue compartments of the lungs and eventually reach the capillaries and circulating cells or constituents, e.g. erythrocytes. These particles are then translocated by the circulation to other organs including the liver, the spleen, the kidneys, the heart and the brain, where they may be deposited. It remains to be shown by which mechanisms ultrafine particles penetrate through pulmonary tissue and enter capillaries. In addition to translocation of ultrafine particles through the tissue, fine and coarse particles may be phagocytized by macrophages and dendritic cells which may carry the particles to lymph nodes in the lung or to those closely associated with the lungs. There is the potential for neurodegenerative consequence of particle entry to the brain. Histological evidence of neurodegeneration has been reported in both canine and human brains exposed to high ambient PM levels, suggesting the potential for neurotoxic consequences of PM-CNS entry. PM mediated damage may be caused by the oxidative stress pathway. Thus, oxidative stress due to nutrition, age, genetics among others may increase the susceptibility for neurodegenerative diseases. The relationship between PM exposure and CNS degeneration can also be

  3. Re-examining the effect of particle phase functions on the remote-sensing reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yuanheng; Zhang, Xiaodong; He, Shuangyan; Gray, Deric J

    2017-08-20

    Even though it is well known that both the magnitude and detailed angular shape of scattering (phase function, PF), particularly in the backward angles, affect the color of the ocean, the current remote-sensing reflectance (R rs ) models typically account for the effect of its magnitude only through the backscattering coefficient (b b ). Using 116 volume scattering function (VSF) measurements previously collected in three coastal waters around the U.S. and in the water of the North Atlantic Ocean, we re-examined the effect of particle PF on R rs in four scenarios. In each scenario, the magnitude of particle backscattering (i.e., b bp ) is known, but the knowledge on the angular shape of particle backscattering is assumed to increase from knowing nothing about the shape of particle PFs to partially knowing the particle backscattering ratio (B p ), the exact backscattering shape as defined by β˜ p (γ≥90°) (particle VSF normalized by the particle total scattering coefficient), and the exact backscattering shape as defined by the χ p factor (particle VSF normalized by the particle backscattering coefficient). At sun zenith angle=30°, the nadir-viewed R rs would vary up to 65%, 35%, 20%, and 10%, respectively, as the constraints on the shape of particle backscattering become increasingly stringent from scenarios 1 to 4. In all four scenarios, the R rs variations increase with both viewing and sun angles and are most prominent in the direction opposite the sun. Our results show a greater impact of the measured particle PFs on R rs than previously found, mainly because our VSF data show a much greater variability in B p , β˜ p (γ≥90°), and χ p than previously known. Among the uncertainties in R rs due to the particle PFs, about 97% can be explained by χ p , 90% by β˜ p (γ≥90°), and 27% by B p . The results indicate that the uncertainty in ocean color remote sensing can be significantly constrained by accounting for χ p of the VSFs.

  4. Effect of particle stiffness on contact dynamics and rheology in a dense granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathraj, S.; Kumaran, V.

    2018-01-01

    Dense granular flows have been well described by the Bagnold rheology, even when the particles are in the multibody contact regime and the coordination number is greater than 1. This is surprising, because the Bagnold law should be applicable only in the instantaneous collision regime, where the time between collisions is much larger than the period of a collision. Here, the effect of particle stiffness on rheology is examined. It is found that there is a rheological threshold between a particle stiffness of 104-105 for the linear contact model and 105-106 for the Hertzian contact model above which Bagnold rheology (stress proportional to square of the strain rate) is valid and below which there is a power-law rheology, where all components of the stress and the granular temperature are proportional to a power of the strain rate that is less then 2. The system is in the multibody contact regime at the rheological threshold. However, the contact energy per particle is less than the kinetic energy per particle above the rheological threshold, and it becomes larger than the kinetic energy per particle below the rheological threshold. The distribution functions for the interparticle forces and contact energies are also analyzed. The distribution functions are invariant with height, but they do depend on the contact model. The contact energy distribution functions are well fitted by Gamma distributions. There is a transition in the shape of the distribution function as the particle stiffness is decreased from 107 to 106 for the linear model and 108 to 107 for the Hertzian model, when the contact number exceeds 1. Thus, the transition in the distribution function correlates to the contact regime threshold from the binary to multibody contact regime, and is clearly different from the rheological threshold. An order-disorder transition has recently been reported in dense granular flows. The Bagnold rheology applies for both the ordered and disordered states, even though

  5. Nonlocality and particle-clustering effects on the optical response of composite materials with metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. W.; Chung, H. Y.; Chiang, H.-P.; Lu, J. Y.; Chang, R.; Tsai, D. P.; Leung, P. T.

    2010-10-01

    The optical properties of composites with metallic nanoparticles are studied, taking into account the effects due to the nonlocal dielectric response of the metal and the coalescing of the particles to form clusters. An approach based on various effective medium theories is followed, and the modeling results are compared with those from the cases with local response and particles randomly distributed through the host medium. Possible observations of our modeling results are illustrated via a calculation of the transmission of light through a thin film made of these materials. It is found that the nonlocal effects are particularly significant when the particles coalesce, leading to blue-shifted resonances and slightly lower values in the dielectric functions. The dependence of these effects on the volume fraction and fractal dimension of the metal clusters is studied in detail.

  6. Granular Leidenfrost effect: Experiment and theory of floating particle clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshuis, Peter; Eshuis, P.G.; van der Meer, Roger M.; van der Weele, J.P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Granular material is vertically vibrated in a 2D container: above a critical shaking strength, and for a sufficient number of beads, a crystalline cluster is elevated and supported by a dilute gaseous layer of fast beads underneath. We call this phenomenon the granular Leidenfrost effect. The

  7. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  8. Study of Acid Hydrolysis on Organic Waste: Understanding The Effect of Delignification and Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Nadiem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic wastes from Swiettenia marcophylla L, Artocarpus heterophyllus L, Mangifera indica L, and Annona muricata L were prepared by grinding into 0.1875, 0.3750, 0.7500 mm of particle size and delignified by 2% NaOH at 80°C for 90 minutes. Acid dilution hydrolysis process with H2SO4 1% was performed at 150°C for 120 minutes in a closed reactor. The effect of particle size and delignification on and reducing sugar concentration were investigated. The result showed (1 leaves that can be used as raw material to produce hydrogen should have 38–49% cellulose and hemicellulose. (2 Reducing sugar concentration increased with particle size reduction and delignification. (3 the best result with the highest reducing sugar concentration was achieved by 0.1875 mm particle size with delignification on Annona muricata L.

  9. 1-3 Nuclear In-medium Effects of Strange Particles in Proton-nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Zhaoqing[1

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of the in-medium properties of strange particles from heavy-ion collisions is very complicated, since he nuclear density varies in the evolution of nucleus-nucleus collisions. To avoid the uncertainties of the baryon ensities during the stage of strange particle production, one can investigate proton-nucleus collisions where the uclear density is definite around the saturation density. Dynamics of strange particles produced in the protoninduced uclear the reactions near the threshold energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum olecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. The in-medium modifications on particle production in densenuclear matter are considered through the corrections to the elementary cross sections via the effective mass and he mean-field potentials[1].

  10. Effect of carbonyl iron particles composition on the physical characteristics of MR grease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad, Norzilawati, E-mail: mnorzilawati@gmail.com; Mazlan, Saiful Amri, E-mail: amri.kl@utm.my [Vehicle System Engineering, Malaysia – Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra (Jalan Semarak), Kuala Lumpur, 54000 (Malaysia); Ubaidillah, E-mail: ubaidillah@uns.ac.id [Vehicle System Engineering, Malaysia – Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra (Jalan Semarak), Kuala Lumpur, 54000 (Malaysia); Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Kentingan, Surakarta, 57126, Central Java, Surakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Magnetorheological (MR) grease is an extension of the study of magnetorheological materials. The MR grease can help to reduce the particles sedimentation problem occurred in the MR fluids. Within this study, an effort has been taken to investigate the effect of different weight compositions of carbonyl iron particles on the physical and chemical characteristics of the MR grease under off-state condition (no magnetic field). The MR grease is prepared by mixing carbonyl iron particles having a size range of 1 to 10 µm with commercial NPC Highrex HD-3 grease. Characterizations of MR grease are investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and rheometer. The dependency of carbonyl iron particles weight towards the magnetic properties of MR grease and other characterizations are investigated.

  11. Temperature effects on drift of suspended single-domain particles induced by the Magnus force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Lyutyy, T. V.; Reva, V. V.; Yermolenko, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the drift velocity of single-domain ferromagnetic particles induced by the Magnus force in a dilute suspension. A set of stochastic equations describing the translational and rotational dynamics of particles is derived, and the particle drift velocity that depends on components of the average particle magnetization is introduced. The Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density of magnetization orientations is solved analytically in the limit of strong thermal fluctuations for both the planar rotor and general models. Using these solutions, we calculate the drift velocity and show that the out-of-plane fluctuations of magnetization, which are not accounted for in the planar rotor model, play an important role. In the general case of arbitrary fluctuations, we investigate the temperature dependence of the drift velocity by numerically simulating a set of effective stochastic differential equations for the magnetization dynamics.

  12. Effect of particle size on colloidal zirconia rheology at the isoelectric point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Y.K.; Scales, P.J.; Healy, T.W.; Boger, D.V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of particle concentration and size on the yield stress of ZrO 2 suspensions at a well-defined surface chemistry condition of the isoelectric point (IEP). At the IEP, the relationship between yield stress τ y max and particulate volume fraction φ s , and mean particle size d was evaluated to be τ y max = K φ s 4.0 /d 2.0 . The difference in size distribution of the various ZrO 2 suspensions examined causes some degree of scatter in the data used to establish the τ y max , φ s , and d relation. The use of particle concentration n t based on the fine size fraction instead of volume fraction φ s provided a better correlation, because the fine particles govern the properties of the flocculated network structure

  13. Effect of heavy charged particles of galactic cosmic radiation on seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    The experiments were carried out on Lactuca sativa seeds exposed for 20, 66, 123 and 308 days in a biostack also containing physical detectors of heavy charged particles. The puppose of the experiments was to measure the yield of abberrant cells and its dependence on the exposure time and the site where particles hit the object. The cytogenetic examination demonstrated a significant difference between the seeds that were or were not hit by heavy charged particles. This is indicative of a significant contribution of galactic cosmic radiation to the radiobiological effect. The yield of aberrant cells as a function of the localization of heavy charged particles in the seed was established. The most sensitive target was the root meristem

  14. Effective equilibrium states in mixtures of active particles driven by colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Brader, J. M.; Sharma, A.; Marconi, U. Marini Bettolo

    2018-01-01

    We consider the steady-state behavior of pairs of active particles having different persistence times and diffusivities. To this purpose we employ the active Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model, where the particles are driven by colored noises with exponential correlation functions whose intensities and correlation times vary from species to species. By extending Fox's theory to many components, we derive by functional calculus an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the configurational distribution function of the system. After illustrating the predicted distribution in the solvable case of two particles interacting via a harmonic potential, we consider systems of particles repelling through inverse power-law potentials. We compare the analytic predictions to computer simulations for such soft-repulsive interactions in one dimension and show that at linear order in the persistence times the theory is satisfactory. This work provides the toolbox to qualitatively describe many-body phenomena, such as demixing and depletion, by means of effective pair potentials.

  15. Effects of translation-rotation coupling on the displacement probability distribution functions of boomerang colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Ayan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Kai; Wei, Qi-Huo

    Prior studies have shown that low symmetry particles such as micro-boomerangs exhibit behaviour of Brownian motion rather different from that of high symmetry particles because convenient tracking points (TPs) are usually inconsistent with the center of hydrodynamic stress (CoH) where the translational and rotational motions are decoupled. In this paper we study the effects of the translation-rotation coupling on the displacement probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the boomerang colloid particles with symmetric arms. By tracking the motions of different points on the particle symmetry axis, we show that as the distance between the TP and the CoH is increased, the effects of translation-rotation coupling becomes pronounced, making the short-time 2D PDF for fixed initial orientation to change from elliptical to crescent shape and the angle averaged PDFs from ellipsoidal-particle-like PDF to a shape with a Gaussian top and long displacement tails. We also observed that at long times the PDFs revert to Gaussian. This crescent shape of 2D PDF provides a clear physical picture of the non-zero mean displacements observed in boomerangs particles.

  16. Restraint of fatigue crack growth by wedge effects of fine particles

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, I; Kotani, N

    2000-01-01

    Presents some experimental results which demonstrate restraint of fatigue crack growth in an Al-Mg alloy by wedge effects of fine particles. Fatigue test specimens were machined from a JIS A5083P-O Al-Mg alloy plate of 5 mm thickness and an EDM starter notch was introduced to each specimen. Three kinds of fine particles were prepared as the materials to be wedged into the fatigue cracks, i.e. magnetic particles and two kinds of alumina particles having different mean particle sizes of 47.3 mu m and 15.2 mu m. Particles of each kind were suspended in an oil to form a paste, which was applied on the specimen surface covering the notch zone prior to the fatigue tests. In order to make some fracture mechanics approaches, in situ observations of fatigue cracks were performed for the two cases using a CCD microscope, with a magnification of *1000. The crack length and the crack opening displacement (COD) at the notch root, delta , were measured. The crack retardation effect continues almost through the entire lifet...

  17. Effect of ultrasonic stimulation on particle transport and fate over different lengths of porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxin; Wu, Zhonghan; Cai, Qipeng; Cao, Wei

    2018-04-01

    It is well established that seismic waves traveling through porous media stimulate fluid flow and accelerate particle transport. However, the mechanism remains poorly understood. To quantify the coupling effect of hydrodynamic force, transportation distance, and ultrasonic stimulation on particle transport and fate in porous media, laboratory experiments were conducted using custom-built ultrasonic-controlled soil column equipment. Three column lengths (23 cm, 33 cm, and 43 cm) were selected to examine the influence of transportation distance. Transport experiments were performed with 0 W, 600 W, 1000 W, 1400 W, and 1800 W of applied ultrasound, and flow rates of 0.065 cm/s, 0.130 cm/s, and 0.195 cm/s, to establish the roles of ultrasonic stimulation and hydrodynamic force. The laboratory results suggest that whilst ultrasonic stimulation does inhibit suspended-particle deposition and accelerate deposited-particle release, both hydrodynamic force and transportation distance are the principal controlling factors. The median particle diameter for the peak concentration was approximately 50% of that retained in the soil column. Simulated particle-breakthrough curves using extended traditional filtration theory effectively described the experimental curves, particularly the curves that exhibited a higher tailing concentration.

  18. Effect of particle inertia and gravity on the turbulence in a suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Poesio, P.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented for the effect of particle inertia and gravity on the turbulence in a homogeneous suspension. It is an extension of the one-fluid model developed by L’vov, Ooms, and Pomyalov [Phys. Rev. E 67, 046314 (2003)] , in which the effect of gravity was not considered. In the

  19. Effect of statin versus fibrate on postprandial endothelial dysfunction: role of remnant-like particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmink, H. W.; Twickler, M. B.; Banga, J. D.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; Eeltink, H.; Erkelens, D. W.; Rabelink, T. J.; Stroes, E. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postprandial lipemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Remnant-like particles (RLP) have been suggested to contribute to these adverse vascular effects. We investigated the effect of cerivastatin and gemfibrozil upon oral fat load induced changes in endothelial function and

  20. The effects of alfalfa particle size and acid treated protein on ruminal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... changes in canola meal protein (khorasani et al., 1993). ... studies have been done in relation to the effects of different particle size and acid .... taken out during the time of measurement of the saliva secretion rate, the effect of ...

  1. Particle-size dependent effects in the Balb/c murine model of inhalational melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eThomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Burkholderia pseudomallei within either the lungs or nasal passages of the Balb/c murine model resulted in different infection kinetics. The infection resulting from the inhalation of B. pseudomallei within a 12 um particle aerosol was prolonged compared to a 1 um particle aerosol with a mean time-to-death (MTD of 73.8 ± 11.3 h and 174.7 ± 14.9 h respectively. Inhalation of B. pseudomallei within 1 um or 12 um particle aerosols resulted in a median lethal dose (MLD of 4 and 12 cfu respectively. The 12 mm particle inhalational infection was characterised by involvement of the respiratory epithelium and inflammation of the neurological path leading from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb (100%, culminating in abscessation of the brain (33%. Initial involvement of the upper respiratory tract lymphoid tissues (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and cervical lymph nodes was observed in both the 1 and 12 um particle inhalational infections (80-85%. Necrotising alveolitis and bronchiolitis were evident in both inhalational infections however lung pathology was greater after inhalation of the 1 mm particle aerosol with pronounced involvement of the mediastinal lymph node (50%. Terminal disease was characterised by bacteraemia in both inhalational infections with dissemination to the spleen, liver, kidneys and thymus. Treatment with co-trimoxazole was more effective than treatment with doxycycline irrespective of the size of the particles inhaled. Doxycycline was more effective against the 12 um particle inhalational infection as evidenced by increased time to death. However, both treatment regimes exhibited significant relapse when therapy was discontinued with massive enlargement and abscessation of the lungs, spleen and cervical lymph nodes observed.

  2. Active Brownian particles at interfaces: An effective equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Brader, Joseph M.

    2016-06-01

    A simple theoretical approach is used to investigate active colloids at the free interface and near repulsive substrates. We employ dynamical density functional theory to determine the steady-state density profiles in an effective equilibrium system (Farage T. F. F. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 91 (2015) 042310). In addition to the known accumulation at surfaces, we predict wetting and drying transitions at a flat repulsive wall and capillary condensation and evaporation in a slit pore. These new phenomena are closely related to the motility-induced phase separation (MIPS) in the bulk.

  3. Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; LEcuyer, Tristan; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli J.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Ice clouds influence the climate system by changing the radiation budget and large-scale circulation. Therefore, climate models need to have an accurate representation of ice clouds and their radiative effects. In this paper, new broadband parameterizations for ice cloud bulk scattering properties are developed for severely roughened ice particles. The parameterizations are based on a general habit mixture that includes nine habits (droxtals, hollow/solid columns, plates, solid/hollow bullet rosettes, aggregate of solid columns, and small/large aggregates of plates). The scattering properties for these individual habits incorporate recent advances in light-scattering computations. The influence of ice particle surface roughness on the ice cloud radiative effect is determined through simulations with the Fu-Liou and the GCM version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) codes and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5.1). The differences in shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative effect at both the top of the atmosphere and the surface are determined for smooth and severely roughened ice particles. While the influence of particle roughening on the single-scattering properties is negligible in the LW, the results indicate that ice crystal roughness can change the SW forcing locally by more than 10 W m(exp -2) over a range of effective diameters. The global-averaged SW cloud radiative effect due to ice particle surface roughness is estimated to be roughly 1-2 W m(exp -2). The CAM results indicate that ice particle roughening can result in a large regional SW radiative effect and a small but nonnegligible increase in the global LW cloud radiative effect.

  4. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Particles for Chromosomal Exchanges and Other Surrogate Cancer Risk Endpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliedonna Cacao

    Full Text Available The biological effects of high charge and energy (HZE particle exposures are of interest in space radiation protection of astronauts and cosmonauts, and estimating secondary cancer risks for patients undergoing Hadron therapy for primary cancers. The large number of particles types and energies that makeup primary or secondary radiation in HZE particle exposures precludes tumor induction studies in animal models for all but a few particle types and energies, thus leading to the use of surrogate endpoints to investigate the details of the radiation quality dependence of relative biological effectiveness (RBE factors. In this report we make detailed RBE predictions of the charge number and energy dependence of RBE's using a parametric track structure model to represent experimental results for the low dose response for chromosomal exchanges in normal human lymphocyte and fibroblast cells with comparison to published data for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation. RBE's are evaluated against acute doses of γ-rays for doses near 1 Gy. Models that assume linear or non-targeted effects at low dose are considered. Modest values of RBE (10 are predicted at low doses <0.1 Gy. The radiation quality dependence of RBE's against the effects of acute doses γ-rays found for neoplastic transformation and gene mutation studies are similar to those found for simple exchanges if a linear response is assumed at low HZE particle doses. Comparisons of the resulting model parameters to those used in the NASA radiation quality factor function are discussed.

  5. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on object recognition memory in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Hinchman, Marie; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James A.; Foster, Brian C.

    2009-04-01

    On long-duration missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit. Previous research using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays has shown that exposure to heavy particles, such as 56Fe, disrupts spatial learning and memory measured using the Morris water maze. Maintaining rats on diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals for 2 weeks prior to irradiation ameliorated this deficit. The present experiments were designed to determine: (1) the generality of the particle-induced disruption of memory by examining the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on object recognition memory; and (2) whether maintaining rats on these antioxidant diets for 2 weeks prior to irradiation would also ameliorate any potential deficit. The results showed that exposure to low doses of 56Fe particles does disrupt recognition memory and that maintaining rats on antioxidant diets containing blueberry and strawberry extract for only 2 weeks was effective in ameliorating the disruptive effects of irradiation. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms by which exposure to these particles may produce effects on neurocognitive performance.

  6. Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Beydoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS density (ns often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown

  7. Effects of fuel components and combustion particle physicochemical properties on toxicological responses of lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Isabel C; Sturrock, Anne; Ghiassi, Hossein; Woller, Diana J; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Lighty, JoAnn S; Paine, Robert; Reilly, Christopher; Kelly, Kerry E

    2018-03-21

    The physicochemical properties of combustion particles that promote lung toxicity are not fully understood, hindered by the fact that combustion particles vary based on the fuel and combustion conditions. Real-world combustion-particle properties also continually change as new fuels are implemented, engines age, and engine technologies evolve. This work used laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled combustion conditions in an effort to understand the relationship between different particle properties and the activation of established toxicological outcomes in human lung cells (H441 and THP-1). Particles were generated from controlled combustion of two simple biofuel/diesel surrogates (methyl decanoate and dodecane/biofuel-blended diesel (BD), and butanol and dodecane/alcohol-blended diesel (AD)) and compared to a widely studied reference diesel (RD) particle (NIST SRM2975/RD). BD, AD, and RD particles exhibited differences in size, surface area, extractable chemical mass, and the content of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Some of these differences were directly associated with different effects on biological responses. BD particles had the greatest surface area, amount of extractable material, and oxidizing potential. These particles and extracts induced cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 enzyme mRNA in lung cells. AD particles and extracts had the greatest total PAH content and also caused CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA induction. The RD extract contained the highest relative concentration of 2-ring PAHs and stimulated the greatest level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) cytokine secretion. Finally, AD and RD were more potent activators of TRPA1 than BD, and while neither the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 nor the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) affected CYP1A1 or 1B1 mRNA induction, both inhibitors reduced IL-8 secretion and mRNA induction. These results highlight that differences in fuel and combustion conditions

  8. Effects of particle size and heating time on thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test of soybean powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Ju; Yoon, Won-Byong

    2013-06-01

    Effects of particle size and heating time during TBA test on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) of soybean (Glycine Max) powder were studied. Effects of processing variables involved in the pulverization of soybean, such as the temperature of soybean powder, the oxygen level in the vessel, and the pulverisation time, were investigated. The temperature of the soybean powder and the oxygen level had no significant influence on the TBARS (pTBA test significantly affected the TBARS. Change of TBARS during heating was well described by the fractional conversion first order kinetics model. A diffusion model was introduced to quantify the effect of particle size on TBARS. The major finding of this study was that the TBA test to estimate the level of the lipid oxidation directly from powders should consider the heating time and the mean particle sizes of the sample. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of electron degeneracy on fast-particles energy deposition in dense plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johzaki, T.; Nakao, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Kudo, K.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of electron degeneracy on fast-particles energy deposition in dense plasmas are investigated by making transport calculations for the fast particles. It is found that the degeneracy substantially affects the profiles of energy deposition of 3.52-MeV α-particles. On the other hand, the effect on the energy deposition of 14.1-MeV neutrons is negligibly small because the recoil ions, which transfer the neutron energy to the plasma constituents, are produced in a whole plasma volume due to the long mean-free-path of neutrons. The coupled transport-hydrodynamic calculations show that these effects of degeneracy are negligible in the ignition and burn characteristics of central ignition D-T targets. (author)

  10. Effects of various forces on the distribution of particles at the boundary of a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Ma, J.X.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution and suspension of dust particles under the action of electrostatic, gravitational, ion-drag and neutral collision forces are investigated near the boundary of a dusty plasma. It is shown that the competition among the forces results in spatial oscillations (multi-layer) of the particle distribution. For sub-micron grains the ion-drag has a significant effect on the grain dynamics while for micrometer sized grains the gravity quickly dominates over other forces. The effect of the neutral gas flux is to enhance or diminish that of the gravity while the effect of the neutral viscosity is to shift the profile toward the wall. Under the force balance, the particles are suspended in a narrow region with sharp boundaries within the sheath. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Preparation of SnO_2-Glass Composite Containing Cu Particles Reduced from Copper Ions in Glass Matrix : Effect of Glass Particle Size on Microstructure and Electrical Property

    OpenAIRE

    Haruhisa, SHIOMI; Kaori, UMEHARA; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the electrical properties of SnO_2-glass composites by dispersing Cu particles with low resistivity and positive temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR)in the glass matrix. Cu metal particles were precipitated by reducing Cu_2O previously dissolved into the matrix glass by adding LaB_6 as a reducing agent. The effect of the glass particle size, which influences the homogeneity of LaB_6 dispersion in the powder mixture before firing, on the Cu precipitation in...

  12. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  13. Effect of Pressurized Metered Dose Inhaler Spray Characteristics and Particle Size Distribution on Drug Delivery Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Morteza; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2017-10-01

    A key issue in pulmonary drug delivery is improvement of the delivery device for effective and targeted treatment. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are the most popular aerosol therapy device for treating lung diseases. This article studies the effect of spray characteristics: injection velocity, spray cone angle, particle size distribution (PSD), and its mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) on drug delivery. An idealized oral airway geometry, extending from mouth to the main bronchus, was connected to a pMDI device. Inhalation flow rates of 15, 30, and 60 L/min were used and drug particle tracking was a one-way coupled Lagrangian model. The results showed that most particles deposited in the pharynx, where the airway has a reduced cross-sectional area. Particle deposition generally decreased with initial spray velocity and with increased spray cone angle for 30 and 60 L/min flow rates. However, for 15 L/min flow rate, the deposition increased slightly with an increase in the spray velocity and cone angle. The effect of spray cone angle was more significant than the initial spray velocity on particle deposition. When the MMAD of a PSD was reduced, the deposition efficiency also reduces, suggesting greater rates of particle entry into the lung. The deposition rate showed negligible change when the MMAD was more than 8 μm. Spray injection angle and velocity change the drug delivery efficacy; however, the efficiency shows more sensitivity to the injection angle. The 30 L/min airflow rate delivers spray particles to the lung more efficiently than 15 and 60 L/min airflow rate, and reducing MMAD can help increase drug delivery to the lung.

  14. Effects of particle fracturing and moisture content on fire behaviour in masticated fuelbeds burned in a laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; J. Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical mastication is a fuels treatment that converts shrubs and small trees into dense fuelbeds composed of fractured woody particles. Although compaction is thought to reduce fireline intensity, the added particle surface area due to fracturing could also influence fire behavior. We evaluated effects of particle fracturing and moisture content (ranging from 2.5...

  15. Concentration of aqueous extracts of defatted soy flour by ultrafiltration; Effect of suspended particles on the filtration flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, T.R.; Kooiker, K.; Bel, W.; Dekker, M.; Wesselingh, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Suspended particles can have a positive effect on the flux and concentration curve of soy flour extracts during ultrafiltration. This is described by a simple empirical model. The suspended particles in this study were insoluble milled bean material (mean particle size 25 m). It is shown that it is

  16. PAMELA’S MEASUREMENTS OF MAGNETOSPHERIC EFFECTS ON HIGH-ENERGY SOLAR PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II,” I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A. [University of Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bravar, U. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M.; De Donato, C. [INFN, Sezione di Rome “Tor Vergata,” I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Christian, E. R.; Nolfo, G. A. de, E-mail: georgia.a.denolfo@nasa.gov [Heliophysics Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); and others

    2015-03-01

    The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument enables unique observations of SEPs including the composition and angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e., pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV)—bridging a critical gap between space-based and ground-based measurements. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two distinct pitch angle distributions: a low-energy population that extends to 90° and a population that is beamed at high energies (>1 GeV), consistent with neutron monitor measurements. To explain a low-energy SEP population that exhibits significant scattering or redistribution accompanied by a high-energy population that reaches the Earth relatively unaffected by dispersive transport effects, we postulate that the scattering or redistribution takes place locally. We believe that these are the first comprehensive measurements of the effects of solar energetic particle transport in the Earth’s magnetosheath.

  17. Bioleaching of metals from spent refinery petroleum catalyst using moderately thermophilic bacteria: effect of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Singh, Sradhanjali; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won; Heyes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the leaching potential of moderately thermophilic bacteria in the recovery of metals from spent petroleum catalyst of varying particle sizes. The batch bioleaching experiments were conducted by employing a mixed consortium of moderate thermophilic bacteria at 45°C and by using five different particle sizes (from 45 to >2000 μm) of acetone-washed spent catalyst. The elemental mapping by FESEM confirmed the presence of Al, Ni, V and Mo along with sulfur in the spent catalyst. During bioleaching, Ni (92-97%) and V (81-91%) were leached in higher concentrations, whereas leaching yields of Al (23-38%) were found to be lowest in all particle sizes investigated. Decreasing the particle size from >2000 μm to 45-106 μm caused an increase in leaching yields of metals during initial hours. However, the final metals leaching yields were almost independent of particle sizes of catalyst. Leaching kinetics was observed to follow the diffusion-controlled model showing the linearity more close than the chemical control. The results of the present study suggested that bioleaching using moderate thermophilic bacteria was highly effective in removing the metals from spent catalyst. Moreover, bioleaching can be conducted using spent catalyst of higher particle size (>2000 μm), thus saving the grinding cost and making process attractive for larger scale application.

  18. In vitro radiosensitizing effects of ultrasmall gadolinium based particles on tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, P; Mignot, A; Rima, W; Lux, F; Tillement, O; Roulin, C; Dutreix, M; Bechet, D; Huger, S; Humbert, L; Barberi-Heyob, M; Aloy, M T; Armandy, E; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Le Duc, G; Roux, S; Perriat, P

    2011-09-01

    Since radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment, it is essential to develop strategies which lower the irradiation burden while increasing efficacy and become efficient even in radio resistant tumors. Our new strategy is relying on the development of solid hybrid nanoparticles based on rare-earth such as gadolinium. In this paper, we then evidenced that gadolinium-based particles can be designed to enter efficiently into the human glioblastoma cell line U87 in quantities that can be tuned by modifying the incubation conditions. These sub-5 nm particles consist in a core of gadolinium oxide, a shell of polysiloxane and are functionalized by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Although photoelectric effect is maximal in the [10-100 keV] range, such particles were found to possess efficient in-vitro radiosensitizing properties at an energy of 660 keV by using the "single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay," an assay that measures the number of DNA damage that occurs during irradiation. Even more interesting, the particles have been evidenced by MTT assays to be also efficient radiosensitizers at an energy of 6 MeV for doses comprised between 2 and 8 Gy. The properties of the gadolinium-based particles give promising opening to a particle-assisted radio-therapy by using irradiation systems already installed in the majority of hospitals.

  19. Effects of particles thickness and veneer reiforced layer in the properties of oriented strand boards OSB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effects of particle thickness and veneer reinforced layer on the physical and mechanicalproperties of OSB made of Pinus taeda L. The boards were manufactured with particle thickness of 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0 mm and phenolformaldehyderesin in the proportion of 6% of solid content. To the veneer reinforced layer was used veneer from Pinus taeda with 2.0mm of thickness. The increase in the slenderness (length/thickness ratio of thins particles, results in the higher values of MOE andMOR in the cross direction. The increase in the particles thickness contributed to higher values of the board internal bond. Thedifferent particles thickness did not clearly affected on the physical properties of OSB. The veneer reinforced layer results in the higheraverage values of MOE and MOR in the cross direction. All of the results of MOE and MOR obtained for boards with differentthickness attend tominimum values required per CSA 0437 (CSA, 1993. For the internal bond, the results were satisfactory to boardsmanufactured with particles thickness of 0.7 and 1.0 mm. According to the results the main conclusions were: (i The increase in theparticles thickness contributed to lower values of MOE and MOR, and higher values of the board internal bond; (ii the veneerreinforced layer increased MOE and MOR values in the cross direction.

  20. Effect of bovine manure on fecal coliform attachment to soil and soil particles of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, Andrey K; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Shelton, Daniel R; Yu, Olivia

    2007-05-01

    Manure-borne bacteria can be transported in runoff as free cells, cells attached to soil particles, and cells attached to manure particles. The objectives of this work were to compare the attachment of fecal coliforms (FC) to different soils and soil fractions and to assess the effect of bovine manure on FC attachment to soil and soil fractions. Three sand fractions of different sizes, the silt fraction, and the clay fraction of loam and sandy clay loam soils were separated and used along with soil samples in batch attachment experiments with water-FC suspensions and water-manure-FC suspensions. In the absence of manure colloids, bacterial attachment to soil, silt, and clay particles was much higher than the attachment to sand particles having no organic coating. The attachment to the coated sand particles was similar to the attachment to silt and clay. Manure colloids in suspensions decreased bacterial attachment to soils, clay and silt fractions, and coated sand fractions, but did not decrease the attachment to sand fractions without the coating. The low attachment of bacteria to silt and clay particles in the presence of manure colloids may cause predominantly free-cell transport of manure-borne FC in runoff.

  1. Numerical determination of the effective moments of non-spherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Nicolas G; Jones, Thomas B

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric characterisation of polarisable particles, and prediction of the forces and torques exerted upon them, relies on the knowledge of the effective, induced dipole moment. In turn, through the mechanism of depolarisation, the induced dipole moment of a particle is strongly dependent upon its shape. Since realistic shapes create modelling difficulties, the 'spherical particle' approximation is often invoked. However, in many cases, including biological dielectric spectroscopy and dielectrophoresis, this assumption is a poor one. For example, human erythrocytes are essentially oblate spheroids with indented sides, while viruses and bacteria often have elongated cigar shapes. Since shape-dependent polarisation both strongly influences the accuracy of conventional dielectric characterisation methods using Maxwell's mixture formula and confounds accurate prediction of dielectrophoretic forces and torques, it is important to develop means to treat non-spherical particles. In this paper, we demonstrate a means to extract the dipole moment directly from numerical solutions of the induced electrostatic potential when a particle is placed in a uniform electric field. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for a range of particle shapes: spherical, ellipsoidal, truncated cylinders and an approximation of an erythrocyte, the red blood cell

  2. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  3. Particle size effect of redox reactions for Co species supported on silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chotiwan, Siwaruk; Tomiga, Hiroki; Katagiri, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yusaku; Yamashita, Shohei; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversions of chemical states during redox reactions of two silica-supported Co catalysts, which were prepared by the impregnation method, were evaluated by using an in situ XAFS technique. The addition of citric acid into the precursor solution led to the formation on silica of more homogeneous and smaller Co particles, with an average diameter of 4 nm. The supported Co 3 O 4 species were reduced to metallic Co via the divalent CoO species during a temperature-programmed reduction process. The reduced Co species were quantitatively oxidized with a temperature-programmed oxidation process. The higher observed reduction temperature of the smaller CoO particles and the lower observed oxidation temperature of the smaller metallic Co particles were induced by the higher dispersion of the Co oxide species, which apparently led to a stronger interaction with supporting silica. The redox temperature between CoO and Co 3 O 4 was found to be independent of the particle size. - Graphical abstract: Chemical state conversions of SiO 2 -supported Co species and the particle size effect have been analyzed by means of in situ XAFS technique. The small CoO particles have endurance against the reduction and exist in a wide temperature range. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The conversions of the chemical state of supported Co species during redox reaction are evaluated. • In operando XAFS technique were applied to measure redox properties of small Co particles. • A small particle size affects to the redox temperatures of cobalt catalysts.

  4. Damping of Mechanical Waves with Styrene/Butadiene Rubber Filled with Polystyrene Particle: Effects of Particles Size and Wave Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghgo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing polymeric materials for damping mechanical waves is of great importance in various fields of applications such as military camouflage, prevention of structural vibrational energy transfer, and noise attenuation. This ability originates from segmental dynamics of chain-like polymer molecules. Damping properties of styrene-butadiene rubbercontaining 10 wt% of monosize polystyrene particles with different diameters (from 80 nm to 500 μm was investigated in the frequency range of vibration, sound, and ultrasound via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, normalsound adsorption test, and ultrasound attenuation coefficient measurement. The obtained results indicated that for different systems, containing different sizes of polystyrene particles, the area under the damping curve does not show significant change comparing to the neat SBR in the frequency range studied. However, addition of polystyrene particles, specifically nanosized particles, resulted in emergence of a secondary glass transition temperature which could be attributed to the modified dynamics of a layer of matrix molecules near the surface of PS particles. In the range of sound frequency, 0.5 to 6.3 kHz, the maximum damping was observed for the system containing polystyrene nanoparticles. However the single damping curve of neat SBR was separated into two or even three distinct curves owing to the presence of the particles. The maximum damping in the ultrasound frequency range was found for the system containing 0.5 mm polystyrene particles. This is attributed to different contributions from matrix chains dynamics and the reflection of mechanical waves from particles-matrix interface at different frequency ranges. On other words, the increase in the glass transition temperature of the elastomeric matrix phase with increasing the mechanical wave frequency causes a reduction in the contribution from matrix chains dynamics while the contribution due to diffraction from dispersed

  5. Laboratory evaluation of the particle size effect on the performance of an elastomeric half-mask respirator against ultrafine combustion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjian; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Reponen, Tiina; Yermakov, Michael; McKay, Roy; Haruta, Hiroki; Kimura, Kazushi

    2013-08-01

    This study quantified the particle size effect on the performance of elastomeric half-mask respirators, which are widely used by firefighters and first responders exposed to combustion aerosols. One type of elastomeric half-mask respirator equipped with two P-100 filters was donned on a breathing manikin while challenged with three combustion aerosols (originated by burning wood, paper, and plastic). Testing was conducted with respirators that were fully sealed, partially sealed (nose area only), or unsealed to the face of a breathing manikin to simulate different faceseal leakages. Three cyclic flows with mean inspiratory flow (MIF) rates of 30, 85, and 135 L/min were tested for each combination of sealing condition and combustion material. Additional testing was performed with plastic combustion particles at other cyclic and constant flows. Particle penetration was determined by measuring particle number concentrations inside and outside the respirator with size ranges from 20 to 200 nm. Breathing flow rate, particle size, and combustion material all had significant effects on the performance of the respirator. For the partially sealed and unsealed respirators, the penetration through the faceseal leakage reached maximum at particle sizes >100 nm when challenged with plastic aerosol, whereas no clear peaks were observed for wood and paper aerosols. The particles aerosolized by burning plastic penetrated more readily into the unsealed half-mask than those aerosolized by the combustion of wood and paper. The difference may be attributed to the fact that plastic combustion particles differ from wood and paper particles by physical characteristics such as charge, shape, and density. For the partially sealed respirator, the highest penetration values were obtained at MIF = 85 L/min. The unsealed respirator had approximately 10-fold greater penetration than the one partially sealed around the bridge of the nose, which indicates that the nose area was the primary leak

  6. Cement analysis by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry: comparison of the effect of different charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gihwala, D.; Peisach, M.

    1985-01-01

    Standard cements were analysed by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry (PIPPS) using 4,75-MeV protons, 5-MeV 4 He+ ions, and 2-MeV deuterons. Precision and sensitivity attainable were compared. Protons and alpha-particles were comparable for the determination of F, Na, Mg and Si. Protons were preferred for P and Ca, and alpha-particles for the direct determination of O. Sources of interference are discussed with particular reference to delayed gamma-ray emission from deuteron bombardment

  7. Health effects of daily airborne particle dose in children: Direct association between personal dose and respiratory health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Marks, Guy B.; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution is a widespread health problem associated with respiratory symptoms. Continuous exposure monitoring was performed to estimate alveolar and tracheobronchial dose, measured as deposited surface area, for 103 children and to evaluate the long-term effects of exposure to airborne particles through spirometry, skin prick tests and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). The mean daily alveolar deposited surface area dose received by children was 1.35 × 10 3 mm 2 . The lowest and highest particle number concentrations were found during sleeping and eating time. A significant negative association was found between changes in pulmonary function tests and individual dose estimates. Significant differences were found for asthmatics, children with allergic rhinitis and sensitive to allergens compared to healthy subjects for eNO. Variation is a child's activity over time appeared to have a strong impact on respiratory outcomes, which indicates that personal monitoring is vital for assessing the expected health effects of exposure to particles. -- Highlights: •Particle dose was estimated through personal monitoring on more than 100 children. •We focused on real-time daily dose of particle alveolar deposited surface area. •Spirometry, skin prick and exhaled Nitric Oxide tests were performed. •Negative link was found between changes in pulmonary functions and individual doses. •A child's lifestyle appeared to have a strong impact on health respiratory outcomes. -- The respiratory health effects of daily airborne particle dose on children through personal monitoring

  8. Effect of tungsten metal particle sizes on the solubility of molten alloy melt: Experimental observation of Gibbs-Thomson effect in nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. H.; Das, J.; Sordelet, D. J.; Eckert, J.; Hurd, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the effect of tungsten particle sizes on the thermal stability and reactivity of uniformly dispersed W particles in molten Hf-based alloy melt at elevated temperature (1673 K). The solubility of particles less than 100 nm in radius is significantly enhanced. In case of fine W particles with 20 nm diameter, their solubility increases remarkably around 700% compared to that of coarse micrometer-scale particles. The mechanisms and kinetics of this dynamic growth of particle are discussed as well as techniques developed to obtain frozen microstructure of particle-reinforced composites by rapid solidification.

  9. Size scaling effects on the particle density fluctuations in confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Federico; Markus, Ferenc

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, memory and nonlocal effects on fluctuating mass diffusion are addressed in the context of fusion plasmas. Nonlocal effects are included by considering a diffusivity coefficient depending on the size of the container in the transverse direction to the applied magnetic field. It is obtained by resorting to the general formulation of the extended version of irreversible thermodynamics in terms of the higher order dissipative fluxes. The developed model describes two different types of the particle density time correlation function. Both have been observed in tokamak and nontokamak devices. These two kinds of time correlation function characterize the wave and the diffusive transport mechanisms of particle density perturbations. A transition between them is found, which is controlled by the size of the container. A phase diagram in the (L,2π/k) space describes the relation between the dynamics of particle density fluctuations and the size L of the system together with the oscillating mode k of the correlation function.

  10. The effects of fluvial transport on radionuclide concentrations on different particle size classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, F.J.; Olley, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of grain abrasion and disaggregation on the distribution of 137 Cs with respect to particle size and the effects this may have on the use of 137 Cs for determining the origin of recent sediment. Cs-137 is a product of above ground nuclear testing and has been deposited on the earth's surface by rainfall. On contact with soil, 137 Cs is strongly adsorbed by soil particles and there is a direct correlation between 137 Cs concentration and decreasing particle size. Rapid adsorption means that 137 Cs is preferentially concentrated in surface soils, and it's subsequent redistribution by physical processes rather than chemical has lead to 137 Cs being widely used to study soil erosion

  11. Quantum gravity effects on scalar particle tunneling from rotating BTZ black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitei, I. Ablu; Singh, T. Ibungochouba; Devi, S. Gayatri; Devi, N. Premeshwari; Singh, K. Yugindro

    2018-04-01

    Tunneling of scalar particles across the event horizon of rotating BTZ black hole is investigated using the Generalized Uncertainty Principle to study the corrected Hawking temperature and entropy in the presence of quantum gravity effects. We have determined explicitly the various correction terms in the entropy of rotating BTZ black hole including the logarithmic term of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (SBH), the inverse term of SBH and terms with inverse powers of SBH, in terms of properties of the black hole and the emitted particles — mass, energy and angular momentum. In the presence of quantum gravity effects, for the emission of scalar particles, the Hawking radiation and thermodynamics of rotating BTZ black hole are observed to be related to the metric element, hence to the curvature of space-time.

  12. Analysis of aluminum protective effect for female astronauts in solar particle events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure the health and safety of female astronauts in space, the risks of space radiation should be evaluated, and effective methods for protecting against space radiation should be investigated. In this paper, a dose calculation model is established for Chinese female astronauts. The absorbed doses of some organs in two historical solar particle events are calculated using Monte Carlo methods, and the shielding conditions are 0 gcm-2 and 5 gcm-2 aluminum, respectively. The calculated results are analysed, compared, and discussed. The results show that 5 gcm-2 aluminum cannot afford enough effective protection in solar particle events. Hence, once encountering solar particle events in manned spaceflight missions, in order to ensure the health and safety of female astronauts, they are not allowed to stay in the pressure vessel, and must enter into the thicker shielding location such as food and water storage cabin.

  13. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron–chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Valdez, James A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Saber, Mostafa [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Zhu, Yuntian, E-mail: ytzhu@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Radiation resistance of Fe–14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700–1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150–700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5–4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  14. Centroids of effective interactions from measured single-particle energies: An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Centroids of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for the mass region A=28--64 are extracted directly from experimental single-particle spectra, by comparing single-particle energies relative to different cores. Uncertainties in the centroids are estimated at approximately 100 keV, except in cases of exceptional fragmentation of the single-particle strength. The use of a large number of inert cores allows the dependence of the interaction on mass or model space to be investigated. The method permits accurate empirical modifications to be made to realistic interactions calculated from bare nucleon-nucleon potentials, which are known to possess defective centroids in many cases. In addition, the centroids can be used as input to the more sophisticated fitting procedures that are employed to produce matrix elements of the effective interaction

  15. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthi, A.; Parihar, P.R.; Saravanan, S.; Vairamani, M.; Selvamurugan, N.

    2014-01-01

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO 2 :CaO:P 2 O 5 ; mol% ∼ 70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO 2 :CaO:P 2 O 5 ; mol% ∼ 64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. - Highlights: • nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium and silica were synthesized. • They were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells. • nBGC-2 particles had more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation. • nBGC-2 particles promoted entering of osteoblasts into G2/M cell cycle phase. • Expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment

  16. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorthi, A.; Parihar, P.R.; Saravanan, S.; Vairamani, M.; Selvamurugan, N., E-mail: selvamurugan.n@ktr.srmuniv.ac.in

    2014-10-01

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO{sub 2}:CaO:P{sub 2}O{sub 5}; mol% ∼ 70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO{sub 2}:CaO:P{sub 2}O{sub 5}; mol% ∼ 64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. - Highlights: • nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium and silica were synthesized. • They were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells. • nBGC-2 particles had more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation. • nBGC-2 particles promoted entering of osteoblasts into G2/M cell cycle phase. • Expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment.

  17. Vibration-induced particle formation during yogurt fermentation-Effect of frequency and amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körzendörfer, Adrian; Temme, Philipp; Schlücker, Eberhard; Hinrichs, Jörg; Nöbel, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Machinery such as pumps used for the commercial production of fermented milk products cause vibrations that can spread to the fermentation tanks. During fermentation, such vibrations can disturb the gelation of milk proteins by causing texture defects including lumpiness and syneresis. To study the effect of vibrations on yogurt structure systematically, an experimental setup was developed consisting of a vibration exciter to generate defined vibrational states and accelerometers for monitoring. During the fermentation of skim milk, vibrations (frequency sweep: 25 to 1,005 Hz) were introduced at different pH (5.7 to 5.1, step width 0.1 units) for 200 s. Physical properties of set gels (syneresis, firmness) and resultant stirred yogurts (visible particles, rheology, laser diffraction) were analyzed. Vibrational treatments at pH 5.5 to 5.2 increased syneresis, gel firmness, and the number of large particles (d > 0.9 mm); hence, this period was considered critical. The particle number increased from 34 ± 5 to 242 ± 16 particles per 100 g of yogurt due to vibrations at pH 5.4. In further experiments, yogurts were excited with fixed frequencies (30, 300, and 1,000 Hz). All treatments increased syneresis, firmness, and particle formation. As the strongest effect was observed by applying 30 Hz, the amplitude was set to vibration accelerations of a = 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 m/s 2 in the final experiments. The number of large particles was increased due to each treatment and a positive correlation with the amplitude was found. We concluded that vibrations during gelation increase the collision probability of aggregating milk proteins, resulting in a compressed set gel with syneresis. Resultant stirred yogurts exhibit large particles with a compact structure leading to a reduced water-holding capacity and product viscosity. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Particle Shape on Frictional Pressure drop in Particulate Debris Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed which is governed by pressure drop in porous media. For this reason, it is necessary to understand pressure drop mechanisms in porous bed to verify the feasibility of water penetration into particulate debris bed. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) experiments, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of irregular shape particles. Therefore, empirical or semiempirical models based on the Ergun equation (Ergun, 1952) for single-phase flow in porous media composed of single sized spherical particle were developed to consider the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop by means of adding a shape factor or modifying the Ergun constants etc. (Leva, 1959, Handley and Heggs, 1968, Macdonald, 1979, Foumeny et al., 1996). An experimental investigate on single-phase frictional pressure drop of water in packed bed was conducted in the transparent cylindrical test section with the inner diameter of 100 mm and the height of 700 mm to study the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop in porous media. This paper reports the experimental data for spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm and cylindrical particles with ED of 2 mm and 5 mm. And also, the experimental data compared with the models to predict frictional pressure drop in particulate bed. The conclusions are summarized as follows. As a result of the experiment to measure frictional pressure drop in particulate bed composed of cylindrical particles the models predict the experimental data well within 22.11 % except the Handley and Heggs model when ED is applied to the models.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Particle Shape on Frictional Pressure drop in Particulate Debris Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed which is governed by pressure drop in porous media. For this reason, it is necessary to understand pressure drop mechanisms in porous bed to verify the feasibility of water penetration into particulate debris bed. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) experiments, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of irregular shape particles. Therefore, empirical or semiempirical models based on the Ergun equation (Ergun, 1952) for single-phase flow in porous media composed of single sized spherical particle were developed to consider the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop by means of adding a shape factor or modifying the Ergun constants etc. (Leva, 1959, Handley and Heggs, 1968, Macdonald, 1979, Foumeny et al., 1996). An experimental investigate on single-phase frictional pressure drop of water in packed bed was conducted in the transparent cylindrical test section with the inner diameter of 100 mm and the height of 700 mm to study the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop in porous media. This paper reports the experimental data for spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm and cylindrical particles with ED of 2 mm and 5 mm. And also, the experimental data compared with the models to predict frictional pressure drop in particulate bed. The conclusions are summarized as follows. As a result of the experiment to measure frictional pressure drop in particulate bed composed of cylindrical particles the models predict the experimental data well within 22.11 % except the Handley and Heggs model when ED is applied to the models

  20. Enhancement of transport properties of a Brownian particle due to quantum effects: Smoluchowski limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into quantum Smoluchowski equation, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient and current of a quantum Brownian particle. Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects. Highlights:: ► Transport of a quantum Brownian particle in a periodic potential has been addressed. ► Governing quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE) includes state dependent diffusion. ► A coordinate transformation is used to recast QSE with constant diffusion. ► Transport properties increases in comparison to the corresponding classical result. ► This enhancement is purely a quantum effect. - Abstract: The transport property of a quantum Brownian particle that interacts strongly with a bath (in which a typical damping constant by far exceeds a characteristic frequency of the isolated system) under the influence of a tilted periodic potential has been studied by solving quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE). By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into QSE, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient of a quantum Brownian particle and the current (the average stationary velocity). Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects only if the bath temperature hovers around an appropriate range of intermediate values. Our findings also confirm the results obtained in the classical cases.

  1. Nonlinear Delta-f Particle Simulations of Collective Effects in High-Intensity Bunched Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Hong; Hudson, Stuart R; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The collective effects in high-intensity 3D bunched beams are described self-consistently by the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations.* The nonlinear delta-f method,** a particle simulation method for solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations, is being used to study the collective effects in high-intensity 3D bunched beams. The delta-f method, as a nonlinear perturbative scheme, splits the distribution function into equilibrium and perturbed parts. The perturbed distribution function is represented as a weighted summation over discrete particles, where the particle orbits are advanced by equations of motion in the focusing field and self-consistent fields, and the particle weights are advanced by the coupling between the perturbed fields and the zero-order distribution function. The nonlinear delta-f method exhibits minimal noise and accuracy problems in comparison with standard particle-in-cell simulations. A self-consistent 3D kinetic equilibrium is first established for high intensity bunched beams. The...

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles on microbiological characteristics of saffron, using hurdle technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid Sales, E; Motamedi Sedeh, F; Rajabifar, S

    2012-03-01

    Saffron, a plant from the Iridaceae family, is the world's most expensive spice. Gamma irradiation and silver nano particles whose uses are gradually increasing worldwide, have positive effects on preventing decay by sterilizing the microorganisms and by improving the safety without compromising the nutritional properties and sensory quality of the foods. In the present study combination effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles packaging on the microbial contamination of saffron were considered during storage. A combination of hurdles can ensure stability and microbial safety of foods. For this purpose, saffron samples were packaged by Poly Ethylene films that posses up to 300 ppm nano silver particles as antimicrobial agents and then irradiated in cobalt-60 irradiator (gamma cell PX30, dose rate 0.55 Gry/Sec) to 0, 1, 2,3 and 4 kGy at room temperature. The antimicrobial activities against Total Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria, Entrobacteriace, Escherichia Coli and Clostridium Perfringines were higher in the irradiated samples, demonstrating the inhibition zone for their growth. Irradiation of the saffron samples packaged by Poly Ethylene films with nano silver particles showed the best results for decreasing microbial contamination at 2 kGy and for Poly Ethylene films without silver nano particles; it was 4 kGy.

  3. Problem on eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for effective Hamiltonians in pair channels of four-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurbanovich, N.S.; Zelenskaya, I.N.

    1976-01-01

    The solution for eigenfunction and eigenvalue for effective Hamiltonians anti Hsub(p) in two-particle channels corresponding to division of four particles into groups (3.1) and (2.2) is very essential in the four-body problem as applied to nuclear reactions. The interaction of anti√sub(p) in each channel may be written in the form of an integral operator which takes account of the structure of a target nucleus or of an incident particle and satisfying the integral equation. While assuming the two-particle potentials to be central, it is possible to expand the effective interactions anti√sub(p) in partial waves and write the radial equation for anti Hsub(p). In the approximation on a mass shell the radial equations for the eigenfunctions of Hsub(p) are reduced to an algebraic equations system. The coefficients of the latter are expressed through the Fourier images for products of wave functions of bound clusters and the two-particle central potential which are localized in a momentum space

  4. Elimination of particle effects in SF/sub 6/ insulated transmission systems. First quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop methods and equipment to eliminate the adverse effect of particle contamination in SF/sub 6/-insulated transmission (CGIT) systems, so that the excellent dielectric properties of SF/sub 6/ can be fully exploited. Presently, CGIT systems are operated at about 10% of the dielectric strength capability of the SF/sub 6/ gas. The program includes theoretical and experimental evaluation of concepts, optimization and verification studies in CGIT systems, and reliability analysis, documentation of designs and economic analysis. Progress is now being made on evaluating alternative conductor and sheath designs to minimize the effect of particles. Materials for solid insulation is being investigated for the same purpose; the effort is presently concentrated on obtaining reliable quantitative measurement techniques of electrostatic properties. Computer calculation of particle trap configurations are being made to determine the optimum trap configurations. A novel particle trapping technique is being using adhesive materials. Manufacture and field control technique studies has commenced with a study of mechanical vibration techniques. An experimental test chamber consisting of a 9 m (30 foot) long 145 kV bus has been designed. This system will be used in testing of particle control concepts and in migration and optimization studies.

  5. Effect of charged particle flux on Bacillus mesentericus and Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapenkov, A.M.; Kaptereva, Yu.V.; Merinov, N.S.; Lavrova, V.L.

    1979-01-01

    Studied was the effect of a strong electric field and charged particle (aerions) flow on Bac. mesentericus and Ps. fluorescens cultures causing the spoiling of foodstuffs and food raw materials. It has been found, that under the effects of the electric field and positive or negative ions reduced is the Bac. mesentericus and Ps. fluorescens viability, cultivated on a solid nutrient medium; the effect of the electric field only does not affect the Bac. mesentericus viability

  6. Effects of anthropogenic aerosol particles on the radiation balance of the atmosphere. Einfluss anthropogener Aerosolteilchen auf den Strahlungshaushalt der Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newiger, M

    1985-01-01

    The influence of aerosol particles is assessed on the basis of the changes in the climate parameters ''albedo'' and ''neutron flux''. Apart from the directly emitted particles, particles formed in the atmosphere as a result of SO/sub 2/ emissions are investigated. The model of aerosol effects on the radiation field takes account of the feedback with the microphysical parameters of the clouds. In the investigation, given particle concentrations were recalculated for three size classes using a two-dimensional transport model. The particle size distribution is described by a modified power function. Extreme-value estimates are made because the absorption capacity of anthropogenic particles is little known. A comparison of the climatic effects of anthropogenic activities shows that aerosol particles and SO/sub 2/ emissions have opposite effects on the radiation balance. (orig./PW).

  7. Effect of particle size of drug on conversion of crystals to an amorphous state in a solid dispersion with crospovidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamura, Yuka; Fujii, Makiko; Nakanishi, Sayaka; Suzuki, Ayako; Shibata, Yusuke; Koizumi, Naoya; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2011-01-01

    The effect of particle size on amorphization of drugs in a solid dispersion (SD) was investigated for two drugs, indomethacin (IM) and nifedipine (NP). The SD of drugs were prepared in a mixture with crospovidone by a variety of mechanical methods, and their properties investigated by particle sizing, thermal analysis, and powder X-ray diffraction. IM, which had an initial particle size of 1 µm and tends to aggregate, was forced through a sieve to break up the particles. NP, which had a large initial particle size, was jet-milled. In both cases, reduction of the particle size of the drugs enabled transition to an amorphous state below the melting point of the drug. The reduction in particle size is considered to enable increased contact between the crospovidone and drug particles, increasing interactions between the two compounds. © 2011 Pharmaceutical Society of Japan

  8. Zn incorporation in CuInSe2: Particle size and strain effects on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Zn incorporation in CuInSe2: Particle size and strain effects on microstructural ... size as well as tensile strain. The calculated ... X-ray diffraction analysis of CuInSe2 samples reported in figure 2 ... To estimate qualitative information regarding ...

  9. Ionospheric storm effects in the nighttime E region caused by neutralized ring current particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bauske

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms an anomalous increase in the ionization density of the nighttime E region is observed at low and middle latitudes. It has been suggested that this effect is caused by the precipitation of neutralized ring current particles. Here a coupled ring current decay-ionosphere model is used to confirm the validity of this explanation.

  10. The effects of alfalfa particle size and acid treated protein on ruminal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of alfalfa particle size (long vs. fine) and canola meal treated with hydrochloric acid solution (untreated vs treated) on ruminal chemical composition, liquid, particulate, escapable and non escapable phases in Zel sheep. Four ruminally cannulated sheep received a mixed ...

  11. Combustion of PTFE: The effects of gravity on ultrafine particle generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Thomas; Todd, Paul; Oberdorster, Gunter

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project is to obtain an understanding of the effect of gravity on the toxicity of ultrafine particle and gas phase materials produced when fluorocarbon polymers are thermally degraded or burned. The motivation for the project is to provide a basic technical foundation on which policies for spacecraft health and safety with regard to fire and polymers can be formulated.

  12. Effect of vegetative canopy architecture on vertical transport of massless particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of large-eddy simulations were performed to examine the effect of canopy architecture on particle dispersion. A heterogeneous canopy geometry was simulated that consists of a set of infinitely repeating vegetation rows. Simulations in which row structure was approximately resolved were comp...

  13. The effect of perception anisotropy on particle systems describing pedestrian flows in corridors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, L.; Evers, J.H.M.; Muntean, A.; Lyulin, A.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a microscopic model (a system of self-propelled particles) to study the behaviour of a large group of pedestrians walking in a corridor. Our point of interest is the effect of anisotropic interactions on the global behaviour of the crowd. The anisotropy we have in mind reflects the fact

  14. The effect of perception anisotropy on particle systems describing pedestrian flows in corridors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, L.; Evers, J.H.M.; Muntean, A.; Lyulin, A.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a microscopic model (a system of self-propelled particles) to study the behaviour of a large group of pedestrians walking in a corridor. Our point of interest is the effect of anisotropic interactions on the global behaviour of the crowd. The anisotropy we have in mind reflects the fact

  15. Alpha particle effects as a test domain for PAP, a Plasma Apprentice Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of computational tool under development, employing techniques of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence to automate as far as possible the research activities of a human plasma theorist, is described. Its present and potential uses are illustrated using the area of the theory of alpha particle effects in fusion plasmas as a sample domain. (orig.)

  16. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...

  17. Perspective on "The effect of shape on the interaction of colloidal particles"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    2000-01-01

    Onsager's paper on the effect of shape on the interaction of colloidal particles is seminal in many ways. I shall focus on two aspects: it is (to my knowledge) the earliest classical density functional theory, and it demonstrates the possibility of ordering transitions driven by entropy

  18. Side effects of kaolin particle films on apple orchard bug, beetle and spider communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marko, V.; Bogya, S.; Kondorosy, E.; Blommers, L.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of multiple applications of hydrophobic kaolin particle film on apple orchard bug (Heteroptera), beetle (Coleoptera) and spider (Araneae) assemblages were studied in the Netherlands. Insecticide-free orchard plots served as a control. The kaolin applications significantly reduced the

  19. Quantum production of particles (the Hawking effect) in nonstationary black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovich, I.V.; Zagrebnov, V.A.; Frolov, V.P.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    1976-01-01

    Particle production in a gravitational field of a black hole with changing mass is considered. It is shown that in the case when parameters are changed adiabatically taking into account the nonstationarity is reduced effectively to the taking into account the dependence of the Hawking radiation temperature on the retarded time

  20. Particle size distribution effect on burn rate of ammonium nitrate based propellant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, J.R.; Klein, A.J.J.; Zee, F.W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Burn rate control of a Phase Stabilised Ammonium Nitrate (PSAN) propellant by specific surface area (SSA) tuning of the PSAN oxidiser resulted in unexpected effects of applying a new batch of PSAN having a different particle size distribution. Analysis of the deviations and consultation of

  1. Configurational entropy and effective temperature in systems of active Brownian particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preisler, Zdeněk; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to determine the effective density of states and configurational entropy in systems of active Brownian particles by measuring the probability distribution function of potential energy at varying temperatures. Assuming that the entropy is a continuous and monotonically increasing

  2. Effect of external pulsation on kinematics of fluid particles in the field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of external pulsation on a pair of stationary Lamb–Oseen vortices of equal strength has been analyzed to investigate kinematic behavior of a fluid particle. The assumption of vortices being treated stationary or fixed vortex filaments is valid in a reference frame attached to the vortex system with axes along and ...

  3. Effect of micro-organism and particle size on fermentation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aziwo Niba

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Effect of micro-organism and particle size on ... fermentation for pH, sugar and organic acids analysis. Significant reductions in the pH of maize and sorghum .... Raw sorghum was milled in a hammer mill to pass through a 3 mm screen while equal quantities of raw maize were ...

  4. Quantum production of particles (the Hawking effect) in nonstationary black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volovich, I V; Zagrebnov, V A; Frolov, V P [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR); AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    1976-11-01

    Particle production in a gravitational field of a black hole with changing mass is considered. It is shown that in the case when parameters are changed adiabatically taking into account the nonstationarity is reduced effectively to the taking into account the dependence of the Hawking radiation temperature on the retarded time.

  5. On the sizes and observable effects of dust particles in polar mesospheric winter echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnes, O.; Kassa, M.

    2009-05-01

    In the present paper, recent radar and heating experiments on the polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are analyzed with the radar overshoot model. The PMWE dust particles that influence the radar backscatter most likely have sizes around 3 nm. For dust to influence the electrons in the PMWE layers, it must be charged; therefore, we have discussed the charging of nanometer-sized particles and found that the photodetachment effect, where photons of energy less than the work function of the dust material can remove excess electrons, probably is dominant at sunlit conditions. For moderate and low electron densities, very few of the dust smaller than ˜3 nm will be charged. We suggest that the normal requirement that disturbed magnetospheric conditions with ionizing precipitation must be present to create observable PMWE is needed mainly to create sufficiently high electron densities to overcome the photodetachment effect and charge the PMWE dust particles. We have also suggested other possible effects of the photodetachment on the occurrence rate of the PMWE. We attribute the lack of PMWE-like radar scattering layers in the lower mesosphere during the summer not only to a lower level of turbulence than in winter but also to that dust particles are removed from these layers due to the upward wind draught in the summer mesospheric circulation system. It is likely that this last effect will completely shut off the PMWE-like radar layers in the lower parts of the mesosphere.

  6. Particle Size Effects on Fenton Regeneration of MTBE-spent Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that may reduce water treatment costs. In this study, the effect of GAC particle size on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was evaluated. The GAC was...

  7. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F.; Yu, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  8. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  9. Effect of single-particle magnetostriction on the shear modulus of compliant magnetoactive elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Viktor M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Shamonin, Mikhail; Zorinets, Denis

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the static shear strain and the effective shear modulus of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) is studied theoretically in the framework of a recently introduced approach to the single-particle magnetostriction mechanism [V. M. Kalita et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062503 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062503]. The planar problem of magnetostriction in an MAE with magnetically soft inclusions in the form of a thin disk (platelet) having the magnetic anisotropy in the plane of this disk is solved analytically. An external magnetic field acts with torques on magnetic filler particles, creates mechanical stresses in the vicinity of inclusions, induces shear strain, and increases the effective shear modulus of these composite materials. It is shown that the largest effect of the magnetic field on the effective shear modulus should be expected in MAEs with soft elastomer matrices, where the shear modulus of the matrix is less than the magnetic anisotropy constant of inclusions. It is derived that the effective shear modulus is nonlinearly dependent on the external magnetic field and approaches the saturation value in magnetic fields exceeding the field of particle anisotropy. It is shown that model calculations of the effective shear modulus correspond to a phenomenological definition of effective elastic moduli and magnetoelastic coupling constants. The obtained theoretical results compare well with known experimental data. Determination of effective elastic coefficients in MAEs and their dependence on magnetic field is discussed. The concentration dependence of the effective shear modulus at higher filler concentrations has been estimated using the method of Padé approximants, which predicts that both the absolute and relative changes of the magnetic-field-dependent effective shear modulus will significantly increase with the growing concentration of filler particles.

  10. EFFECTS OF ULTRASOUND ON THE MORPHOLOGY, PARTICLE SIZE, CRYSTALLINITY, AND CRYSTALLITE SIZE OF CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUMARI SUMARI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to optimize ultrasound treatment to produce fragment of cellulose that is low in particles size, crystallite size, and crystallinity. Slurry of 1 % (w/v the cellulose was sonicated at different time periods and temperatures. An ultrasonic reactor was operated at 300 Watts and 28 kHz to cut down the polymer into smaller particles. We proved that ultrasound damages and fragments the cellulose particles into shorter fibers. The fiber lengths were reduced from in the range of 80-120 µm to 30-50 µm due to an hour ultrasonication and became 20-30 µm after 5 hours. It was also found some signs of erosion on the surface and stringy. The acoustic cavitation also generated a decrease in particle size, crystallinity, and crystallite size of the cellulose along with increasing sonication time but it did not change d-spacing. However, the highest reduction of particle size, crystallite size, and crystallinity of the cellulose occurred within the first hour of ultrasonication, after which the efficiency was decreased. The particle diameter, crystallite size, and crystallinity were decreased from 19.88 µm to 15.96 µm, 5.81 Å to 2.98 Å, and 77.7% to 73.9% respectively due to an hour ultrasound treatment at 40 °C. The treatment that was conducted at 40 °C or 60 °C did not give a different effect significantly. Cellulose with a smaller particle and crystallite size as well as a more amorphous shape is preferred for further study.

  11. The effect of hexapole and vertical fields on α-particle confinement in heliotron configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, M.Yu.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    2003-03-01

    Collisionless mono-energetic α-particle confinement in three-dimensional magnetic fields obtained from the magnetic coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) is calculated. It is found that the inward shift of magnetic axis due to the vertical field improves the α-particle confinement. In contrast to the vertical field, both large positive and negative hexapole fields do not improve the confinement. The study of the β effect and Mercier criterion calculations for different hexapole fields are also presented. (author)

  12. Effects of the particle-number projection on the isovector pairing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.; Oudih, M.R.; Benhamouda, N.

    2006-01-01

    The usual neutron-proton BCS wave function is simultaneously projected on both the good neutron and proton numbers using a discrete projection operator. The projected energy of the system is deduced as a limit of rapidly convergent sequence. It is numerically studied for the N=Z nuclei of which ''experimental'' pairing gaps may be deduced from the experimental odd-even mass differences. It then appears that the particle-number fluctuation effect is even more important than in the case of pairing between like-particles. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of doping and particle size effect on structural, magnetic and magnetoresistance properties of manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakimi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper after introduction of manganites, we have studied the effect of particle size and doping on structural, magnetic and magnetoresistance of LSMO manganite samples. The magnetoresistance measurements show that, by decreasing the particle size LFMR increases. Also the results show that the LFMR increases at low doping levels and decreases at high doping levels. The spin dependent tunneling and scattering at the grain boundaries is the origin of increasing the LFMR at low doping levels. Also the substitution of impurity ions at Mn sites and subsequently weaking of double exchange is responsible for decreasing of LFMR at high doping level.

  14. Particle-size effect on the rate of TiO2 carbonizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekanova, T.L.; Ryabkov, Yu.I.; Sevbo, O.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dependence of recovery rate constant of titanium dioxide in TiO 2 -C system on the value of specific surface initial components at 1300 deg C was studied. It is shown that decrease in equivalent particle size of titanium dioxide and carbon particles in the range of 500-100 μm has a similar effect on increase in titanium dioxide recovery rate. Analysis of kinetic equations suggests diffusion character of titanium dioxide carbonizing at the values of initial components specific surface in excess of 100 m 2 /g [ru

  15. Electromagnetic spin–orbit interaction and giant spin-Hall effect in dielectric particle clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yineng [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Xiangdong, E-mail: zhangxd@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics and Beijing Key Laboratory of Nanophotonics and Ultrafine Optoelectronic Systems, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-09

    We report a phenomenon that electromagnetic spin–orbit interactions can be tailored by dielectric nanoparticles, and self-similar giant spin-Hall effect has been observed in the dielectric particle cluster. The near-field phase singularities and phase vorticity in the longitudinal component of scattered field can also be controlled by such a dielectric structure. The origin of phenomena is believed to be due to the collective resonance excitation in the dielectric particle cluster. It is expected to find applications in optics information processing and designing new nanophotonic devices.

  16. Effect of Particle Size and Operating Conditions on Pt3Co PEMFC Cathode Catalyst Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Gummalla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The initial performance and decay trends of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC cathodes with Pt3Co catalysts of three mean particle sizes (4.9 nm, 8.1 nm, and 14.8 nm with identical Pt loadings are compared. Even though the cathode based on 4.9 nm catalyst exhibited the highest initial electrochemical surface area (ECA and mass activity, the cathode based on 8.1 nm catalyst showed better initial performance at high currents. Owing to the low mass activity of the large particles, the initial performance of the 14.8 nm Pt3Co-based electrode was the lowest. The performance decay rate of the electrodes with the smallest Pt3Co particle size was the highest and that of the largest Pt3Co particle size was lowest. Interestingly, with increasing number of decay cycles (0.6 to 1.0 V, 50 mV/s, the relative improvement in performance of the cathode based on 8.1 nm Pt3Co over the 4.9 nm Pt3Co increased, owing to better stability of the 8.1 nm catalyst. The electron microprobe analysis (EMPA of the decayed membrane-electrode assembly (MEA showed that the amount of Co in the membrane was lower for the larger particles, and the platinum loss into the membrane also decreased with increasing particle size. This suggests that the higher initial performance at high currents with 8.1 nm Pt3Co could be due to lower contamination of the ionomer in the electrode. Furthermore, lower loss of Co from the catalyst with increased particle size could be one of the factors contributing to the stability of ECA and mass activity of electrodes with larger cathode catalyst particles. To delineate the impact of particle size and alloy effects, these results are compared with prior work from our research group on size effects of pure platinum catalysts. The impact of PEMFC operating conditions, including upper potential, relative humidity, and temperature on the alloy catalyst decay trends, along with the EMPA analysis of the decayed MEAs, are reported.

  17. The effects of heavy particle irradiation on exploration and response to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadesus, G.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.

    Free radicals produced by exposure to heavy particles have been found to produce motor and behavioral toxicity effects in rats similar to those found during aging. The present research was designed to investigate the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on the ability to detect novel arrangements in a given environment of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using a test of spatial memory previously demonstrated to be sensitive to aging, open-field activity and reaction to spatial and non-spatial changes were measured in a group that received a dose of 1.5 Gy (n=10) of 56Fe heavy particle radiation or in non- radiated controls. Animals irradiated with 1.5 Gy of56Fe particles exhibited some age-like effects in animals tested, even though they were for the most part, subtle. Animals took longer to enter, visited less and spent significantly less time in the middle and the center portions of the open-field independently of total frequency and duration of activity of both groups. Likewise, irradiated subjects reacted significantly more to novel objects placed in the open-field than did controls. However, irradiated subjects did not vary from controls in their exploration patterns when objects in the open-field were spatially rearranged. Thus, irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of 56Fe high-energy particle radiation elicited age-like effects in general open-field exploratory behavior, but did not elicit age- like effects during the spatial and non-spatial rearrangement tasks. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  18. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  19. Effect of the relationship between particle size, inter-particle distance, and metal loading of carbon supported fuel cell catalysts on their catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Patricia Gon; Pires, Felipe I.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Perez, Joelma; Antolini, Ermete

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the relationship between particle size ( d), inter-particle distance ( x i ), and metal loading ( y) of carbon supported fuel cell Pt or PtRu catalysts on their catalytic activity, based on the optimum d (2.5-3 nm) and x i / d (>5) values, was evaluated. It was found that for y fuel cell electrode than that using catalysts with y ethanol oxidation on PtRu/C catalysts with same particle size and same degree of alloying but different metal loading. Tests in direct ethanol fuel cells showed that, compared to 20 wt% PtRu/C, the negative effect of the lower x i / d on the catalytic activity of 30 and 40 wt% PtRu/C catalysts was superior to the positive effect of the thinner catalyst layer.

  20. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s-1, amplitude (0 mm-1 mm, bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups. The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within ±15%, was proposed.

  1. Surface Potential and Particle Size Effect on the Rate of Perikinetic Coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Bolivar, J. A.; Galisteo-Gonzalez, F.; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M.; Hidalgo-alvarez, R.

    1998-01-01

    The diffusion-controlled rapid coagulation rate of monodisperse polystyrene particles in aqueous solutions has been measured with a low angle scattering apparatus (nephelometer). We have refined this technique by using a narrow scattering flow cell and a pneumatic addicting-mixing device to introduce the salt solution and the latex sample in the cell. Coagulation rate constants were determined from analysis of the scattered light intensity dependence with time at an angle of 4.5 degree centigrade ± 1 degree centigrade. Experiments were designed to check the effects of particle size, surface potential and counterion valency on rapid coagulation constant. The particle ranged in diameter from 151 nm to 530 nm. The results are compared with the predictions of Smoluchowski's theory. Experiments to obtain the stability diagrams and the critical coagulation concentration of latexes have been performed. (Author) 31 refs

  2. Elimination of effect of α-particles in tritium gas monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yuzuru; Asaoka, Koichi; Manako, Hiroaki; Kumabe, Isao

    1982-01-01

    In order to obtain the high sensitivity in a tritium monitor, a cancellation circuit for α-particles emitted by Rn in air was designed and constructed. The cancellation circuit consists of a differentiating circuit, discriminator, peak-hold circuit and difference amplifier. Pulsed signals induced by α-particles are separated from tritium #betta#-signals by the differentiating circuit and the discriminator. After being shaped by the peak-hold circuit with the same decay time constant as that of the initial α-signals, the α-signals are subtracted from the initial signals by the difference amplifier. The experimental test of this system was carried out, and it was confirmed that the elimination of the effect of α-particles was achieved successfully by the use of this cancellation circuit. (author)

  3. Anomalous Brownian motion of colloidal particle in a nematic environment: effect of the director fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Turiv

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As recently reported [Turiv T. et al., Science, 2013, Vol. 342, 1351], fluctuations in the orientation of the liquid crystal (LC director can transfer momentum from the LC to a colloid, such that the diffusion of the colloid becomes anomalous on a short time scale. Using video microscopy and single particle tracking, we investigate random thermal motion of colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal for the time scales shorter than the expected time of director fluctuations. At long times, compared to the characteristic time of the nematic director relaxation we observe typical anisotropic Brownian motion with the mean square displacement (MSD linear in time τ and inversly proportional to the effective viscosity of the nematic medium. At shorter times, however, the dynamics is markedly nonlinear with MSD growing more slowly (subdiffusion or faster (superdiffusion than τ. These results are discussed in the context of coupling of colloidal particle's dynamics to the director fluctuation dynamics.

  4. Characterization of 3-D particle distribution and effects on recrystallization studied by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridy, J.M.; Marthinsen, K.; Rouns, T.N.; Lippert, K.B.; Nes, E.; Richmond, O.

    1992-12-01

    Artificial particle distribution in three dimensions with different degree of clustering have been generated and used as nucleation sites for the simulation of particle stimulated recrystallization with site saturation nucleation kinetics. The clustering has a strong effect on both the Avrami exponent and the resulting sectioned grain size distributions. The Avrami exponent decreases rapidly from the expected value of 3 with the degree of clustering. A value of less than 1.5 is obtained for the Avrami exponent with a strongly clustered distribution of nucleation sites. The size distributions of sectioned grain areas are considerably broadened with clustering, but are still far from the log-normal distributions observed experimentally. A computer program has been developed to generate particle distributions whose pair correlation functions match experimentally measured functions. 15 refs., 6 figs

  5. Visualized effect of oxidation on magnetic recording fidelity in pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    fidelity of Fe3O4 particles is greatly diminished over time by progressive oxidation to less magnetic iron oxides, such as maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), with consequent alteration of remanent magnetization potentially having important geological significance. Here we use the complementary techniques...... of environmental transmission electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography to induce and visualize the effects of oxidation on the magnetization of individual nanoscale Fe3O4 particles as they transform towards γ-Fe2O3. Magnetic induction maps demonstrate a change in both strength and direction of remanent...... magnetization within Fe3O4 particles in the size range dominant in rocks, confirming that oxidation can modify the original stored magnetic information....

  6. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  7. Effects of high-LET particles (40A) on the brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, J.; Herman, M.M.; Benton, E.V.; Welch, G.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the effects of galactic heavy particles on nervous tissue, Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to 40 A from the Super-HILAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The energy of the particles reaching the Drosophila neurons was 4.8 MeV/nucleon, and the fluence ranged from 6 x 10 4 to 8 x 10 7 particles/cm 2 . Thirty-five days after irradiation at the higher fluences, extensive tissue fragmentation and cysts were found. At fluences as low as one hit/two cell bodies (about 5 x 10 6 ) and one hit/90 cell bodies (about 9 x 10 4 particles/cm 2 or 21 rad average dose) swelling of neuronal cytoplasm and focally fragmented membranes were noted; at fluences ranging from one hit/six to one hit/135 cell bodies, there was frequently a marked increase in glial lamellae around nerve-cell processes, which often had degenerative features. These findings support the view that single hits by heavy particles may injure nervous tissue. (author)

  8. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.W.; Azure, M.T.; Narra, V.R.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit α particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224 Ra daughters 212 Pb and 212 Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of α and β particles in their decay to stable 208 Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212 Pb and its daughters. When 212 Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212 Bi, 212 Po and 208 Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D 37 ) was 0.143 ± 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D 37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210 Po, was used to obtain an RBE-LET relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBE α = 4.8 - 6.1 x 10 -2 LET + 1.0 x 10 -3 LET 2 . Similarly, the dependence of RBE on α-particle energy E α was given by RBE α = 22 E α -0.73 . These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of α-particle emitters. 46 refs., 6 figs

  9. Effects of Process Parameters on Copper Powder Compaction Process Using Multi-Particle Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, F.; Sofuoğlu, H.

    2018-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) has been widely used in several industries; especially automotive and aerospace industries and powder metallurgy products grow up every year. The mechanical properties of the final product that is obtained by cold compaction and sintering in powder metallurgy are closely related to the final relative density of the process. The distribution of the relative density in the die is affected by parameters such as compaction velocity, friction coefficient and temperature. Moreover, most of the numerical studies utilizing finite element approaches treat the examined environment as a continuous media with uniformly homogeneous porosity whereas Multi-Particle Finite Element Method (MPFEM) treats every particles as an individual body. In MPFEM, each of the particles can be defined as an elastic- plastic deformable body, so the interactions of the particles with each other and the die wall can be investigated. In this study, each particle was modelled and analyzed as individual deformable body with 3D tetrahedral elements by using MPFEM approach. This study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effects of different temperatures and compaction velocities on stress distribution and deformations of copper powders of 200 µm-diameter in compaction process. Furthermore, 3-D MPFEM model utilized von Mises material model and constant coefficient of friction of μ=0.05. In addition to MPFEM approach, continuum modelling approach was also performed for comparison purposes.

  10. Effect of the primary particle morphology on the micromechanical properties of nanostructured alumina agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilde, Carsten; Westphal, Bastian; Kwade, Arno

    2012-01-01

    Depending on the application of nanoparticles, certain characteristics of the product quality such as size, morphology, abrasion resistance, specific surface, dispersibility and tendency to agglomeration are important. These characteristics are a function of the physicochemical properties, i.e. the micromechanical properties of the nanostructured material. The micromechanical properties of these nanostructured agglomerates such as the maximum indentation force, the plastic and elastic deformation energy and the strength give information on the product properties, e.g. the efficiency of a dispersion process of the agglomerates, and can be measured by nanoindentation. In this study a Berkovich indenter tip was used for the characterisation of model aggregates out of sol–gel produced silica and precipitated alumina agglomerates with different primary particle morphologies (dimension of 15–40 nm). In general, the effect of the primary particle morphology and the presence or absence of solid bonds can be characterised by the measurement of the micromechanical properties via nanoindentation. The micromechanical behaviour of aggregates containing solid bonds is strongly affected by the elastic–plastic deformation behaviour of the solid bonds and the breakage of solid bonds. Moreover, varying the primary particle morphology for similar particle material and approximately isotropic agglomerate behaviour the particle–particle interactions within the agglomerates can be described by the elementar breaking stress according to the formula of Rumpf.

  11. Kevlar based nanofibrous particles as robust, effective and recyclable absorbents for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chuanxiong; Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Cheng, Chong; Ma, Lang; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-11-15

    Developing robust and recyclable absorbents for water purification is of great demand to control water pollution and to provide sustainable water resources. Herein, for the first time, we reported the fabrication of Kevlar nanofiber (KNF) based composite particles for water purification. Both the KNF and KNF-carbon nanotube composite particles can be produced in large-scale by automatic injection of casting solution into ethanol. The resulted nanofibrous particles showed high adsorption capacities towards various pollutants, including metal ions, phenylic compounds and various dyes. Meanwhile, the adsorption process towards dyes was found to fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, while the adsorption speed was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Furthermore, the adsorption capacities of the nanofibrous particles could be easily recovered by washing with ethanol. In general, the KNF based particles integrate the advantages of easy production, robust and effective adsorption performances, as well as good recyclability, which can be used as robust absorbents to remove toxic molecules and forward the application of absorbents in water purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of high-LET particles /A-40/ on the brain of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Herman, M. M.; Benton, E. V.; Welch, G.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the effects of galactic heavy particles on nervous tissue, Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to A-40 from the Super-HILAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The energy of the particles reaching the Drosophila neurons was 4.8 MeV/nucleon, and the fluence ranged from 60,000 to 80 million particles/sq cm. Thirty-five days after irradiation at the higher fluences, extensive tissue fragmentation and cysts were found. At fluences as low as one hit/two cell bodies (about 5 million) and one hit/90 cell bodies (about 90,000 particles/sq cm or 21 rad average dose) swelling of neuronal cytoplasm and focally fragmented membranes were noted; at fluences ranging from one hit/six to one hit/135 cell bodies, there was frequently a marked increase in glial lamellae around nerve-cell processes, which often had degenerative features. These findings support the view that single hits by heavy particles may injure nervous tissue.

  13. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  14. Effects of nuclear structure in the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, M. A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.

    1993-06-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear from factors for spin-dependent elastic scattering of dark matter WIMPs from123Te and131Xe isotopes, proposed to be used for dark matter detection. A method based on the theory of finite Fermi systems was used to describe the reduction of the single-particle spin-dependent matrix elements in the nuclear medium. Nucleon single-particle states were calculated in a realistic shell model potential; pairing effects were treated within the BCS model. The coupling of the lowest single-particle levels in123Te to collective 2+ excitations of the core was taken into account phenomenologically. The calculated nuclear form factors are considerably less then the single-particle ones for low momentum transfer. At high momentum transfer some dynamical amplification takes place due to the pion exchange term in the effective nuclear interaction. But as the momentum transfer increases, the difference disappears, the momentum transfer increases and the quenching effect disappears. The shape of the nuclear form factor for the131Xe isotope differs from the one obtained using an oscillator basis.

  15. Effects of nuclear structure in the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, M.A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.

    1993-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear from factors for spin-dependent elastic scattering of dark matter WIMPs from 123 Te and 131 Xe isotopes, proposed to be used for dark matter detection. A method based on the theory of finite Fermi systems was used to describe the reduction of the single-particle spin-dependent matrix elements in the nuclear medium. Nucelon single-particle states were calculated in a realistic shell model potential; pairing effects were treated within the BCS model. The coupling of the lowest single-particle levels in 123 Te to collective 2 + excitations of the core was taken into account phenomenologically. The calculated nuclear form factors are considerably less then the single-particle ones for low momentum transfer. At high momentum transfer some dynamical amplification takes place due to the pion exchange term in the effective nuclear interaction. But as the momentum transfer increases, the difference disappears, the momentum transfer increases and quenching effect disappears. The shape of the nuclear form factor for the 131 Xe isotope differs from the one obtained using an oscillator basis. (orig.)

  16. Development of students' interest in particle physics as effect of participating in a Masterclass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedigk, Kerstin; Pospiech, Gesche

    2015-01-01

    The International Hands On Particle Physics Masterclasses are enjoying increasing popularity worldwide every year. In Germany a national program was brought to live in 2010, which offers these appreciated events to whole classes or courses of high school students all over the year. These events were evaluated concerning the issues of students’ interest in particle physics and their perception of the events. How several interest variables interact with each other and the perception of the events is answered by structural equation modelling (sect. 5 . 2). The results give information about the events’ effects on the students’ interest development in particle physics, show which event features are important (e.g. the authenticity) and give information about practical approaches to improve the effects of the Masterclasses. Section 5 . 3 deals with a group of participants which have a high interest in particle physics 6–8 weeks after the participation. The number of these students is remarkable large, with 26% of all participants. The investigation of this group shows that the Masterclass participation has the same positive effect on both sexes and all levels of physics education.

  17. The effect of particle size distributions on the microstructural evolution during sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and sintering behavior of powder compacts composed of spherical particles with different particle size distributions (PSDs) were simulated using a kinetic Monte Carlo model of solid state sintering. Compacts of monosized particles, normal PSDs with fixed mean particle...

  18. EFFECT OF BODY SIZE ON BREATHING PATTERN AND FINE PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-child variability in breathing patterns may contribute to variability in fine particle, lung deposition and morbidity in children associated with those particles. Fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (2um monodisperse, carnauba wax particles) was measured in healthy...

  19. Effect of settling particles on the stability of a particle-laden flow in a vertical plane channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronin, S. A.; Osiptsov, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    The stability of a viscous particle-laden flow in a vertical plane channel in the presence of the gravity force is studied. The flow is described using a two-fluid "dusty-gas" model with negligibly small volume fraction of fines and two-way coupling of the phases. Two different profiles of the particle number density in the main flow are considered: homogeneous and non-homogeneous in the form of two layers symmetric about the channel axis. The novel element of the linear-stability problem formulation is a particle velocity slip in the main flow caused by the gravity-induced settling of the dispersed phase. The eigenvalue problem for a linearized system of governing equations is solved using the orthonormalization and QZ algorithms. For a uniform particle number density distribution, it is found that there exists a domain in the plane of Froude and Stokes numbers, in which the two-phase flow in a vertical channel is stable for an arbitrary Reynolds number. This stability domain corresponds to relatively small-inertia particles and large velocity-slip in the main flow. In contrast to the flow with a uniform particle number density distribution, the stratified dusty-gas flow in a vertical channel is unstable over a wide range of governing parameters. The instability at small Reynolds numbers is determined by the gravitational mode characterized by small wavenumbers (long-wave instability), while at larger Reynolds numbers the instability is dominated by the shear mode with the time-amplification factor larger than that of the gravitational mode. The results of the study can be used for optimization of a large number of technological processes, including those in riser reactors, pneumatic conveying in pipeline systems, hydraulic fracturing, and well cementing.

  20. Drift of the center of motion for a charged particle due to radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares De Parga, G.; Mares, R. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Zacatenco (Mexico). Dept. de Fisica, Escuela de Fisica y Matematica

    1999-10-01

    Through parametrization of the relativistic Larmor formula, one can find the trajectory of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. Simultaneously, there exists a drift of the center of curvature for the same. This effect is quantitatively compared with the predictions by other equations of motion, such as Dirac, Mo-Papas, Herrera, Bonnor and Cardirola and the one recently obtained by Hartemann and others. The paper proposes an experiment to verify the predicted effect, both qualitative and quantitative.