WorldWideScience

Sample records for avoiding cardiopulmonary by-pass

  1. A numerical performance assessment of a commercial cardiopulmonary by-pass blood heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Filippo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Pelosi, Alessandra; Reggiani, Stefano; Redaelli, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    We developed a numerical model, based on multi-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, to assist the design process of a plastic hollow-fiber bundle blood heat exchanger (BHE) integrated within the INSPIRE(TM), a blood oxygenator (OXY) for cardiopulmonary by-pass procedures, recently released by Sorin Group Italia. In a comparative study, we analyzed five different geometrical design solutions of the BHE module. Quantitative geometrical-dependent parameters providing a comprehensive evaluation of both the hemo- and thermo-dynamics performance of the device were extracted to identify the best-performing prototypical solution. A convenient design configuration was identified, characterized by (i) a uniform blood flow pattern within the fiber bundle, preventing blood flow shunting and the onset of stagnation/recirculation areas and/or high velocity pathways, (ii) an enhanced blood heating efficiency, and (iii) a reduced blood pressure drop. The selected design configuration was then prototyped and tested to experimentally characterize the device performance. Experimental results confirmed numerical predictions, proving the effectiveness of CFD modeling as a reliable tool for in silico identification of suitable working conditions of blood handling medical devices. Notably, the numerical approach limited the need for extensive prototyping, thus reducing the corresponding machinery costs and time-to-market. PMID:25890509

  2. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) What is CPR? Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important lifesaving technique that involves chest compressions and giving ...

  3. More efficient by-passes[in district heating networks]; Effektivare rundgaangar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naesholm, Karolina; Walletun, Haakan [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    In a majority of district heating distribution networks by-passes (between supply and return pipe) are installed in order to avoid system stops or risk for freezing in low flow sections in wintertime on one hand and for reason of supplying minimum design temperatures on the other hand. However, the choice of the by-pass valve type can influence the costs caused by the by-pass. Manually operated valves very often deliver higher flows than necessary for the intended service function. Too high by-pass flows result in unwanted high system temperatures, implying higher heat losses. Different local investigations have shown that it is possible to use instead thermostat-controlled valves resulting in important reductions of operating costs. The objective of this project was to elaborate a method for investigating by-passes in a systematic and methodical way, similarly how it is done for substations. Another objective was to raise the technical 'status' of the by-pass as a component. By-passes have a big impact on the distribution capacity of a network and hence should get more attention than normally is the case. In this report, different types of by-passes are described. Furthermore, also the way how different energy companies operate them is analysed. The project has among others resulted in a proposed operation and maintenance method for by-passes. This method can be summarised as follows: Make an inventory and documentation of all by-passes in a district heating network. Question the need for by-passes in every case, make flow calculations for the given point. To each motivated by-pass, a calculated design flow value should be assigned. Adjust the flow by means of a correct valve dimension. Install temperature sensors in fixed by-passes. Control each by-pass at least twice a year. Operate the system for periods with changed supply temperature and/or changed differential pressure and log the temperatures in different sections. Analyse sections in more detail

  4. Panic disorder and exercise avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo W. Muotri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 To identify whether patients with panic disorder in general and those with the respiratory subtype in particular actively avoid exercise; 2 to investigate physiological differences in cardiopulmonary function parameters in patients with panic disorder in general, patients with the respiratory subtype of panic disorder, and healthy controls upon exercise challenge. Methods: Patients with panic disorder were classified as having either the respiratory or the non-respiratory subtype. Both groups were compared to controls in terms of exercise avoidance patterns and performance on cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Results: Patients with panic disorder exhibited higher exercise avoidance scores and worse performance on cardiopulmonary exercise testing as compared with controls. No differences were found between patients with the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes. Conclusions: Exercise avoidance is present in panic disorder and is associated with poorer performance on cardiopulmonary exercise testing. These findings are not limited to patients with the respiratory subtype of the disorder.

  5. Alveolar proteinosis lung lavage using partial cardiopulmonary bypass.

    OpenAIRE

    Freedman, A P; Pelias, A; Johnston, R F; Goel, I P; Hakki, H I; Oslick, T; Shinnick, J P

    1981-01-01

    An adult case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis presented with an arterial oxygen tension of 27 mmHg (3.6 kPa) while breathing air. Dangerous hypoxaemia during lung lavage was avoided by using partial cardiopulmonary bypass.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipley, Nick

    2014-11-01

    THE ROYAL College of Nursing (RCN), Resuscitation Council (UK) and British Medical Association (BMA) have issued a new edition of their guidance on when to attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). PMID:25369953

  7. Turbulent spots detection during boundary layer by-pass transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, Pavel; Elsner, W.; Mazur, Oton; Uruba, Václav; Wysocki, M.

    -, č. 80 (2009), s. 16-19. ISSN N R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614; GA MŠk MEB050810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulent spot * boundary layer * by-pass transition * turbulent spot detection Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomini, F; Mercogliano, D; Cavalletti, C; Caruso, A; Pomini, P

    1996-01-01

    The cardiopathic patient can sustain acute heart failure during pregnancy. In such cases, if open heart operation is necessary to save the patient's life, the fetus could be seriously compromised after exposure to cardiopulmonary bypass. From 1958 to 1992, 69 reports of cardiac operations during pregnancy with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass have been published. Maternal mortality was 2.9%. Embryofetal mortality was 20.2%. Examining only the last 40 patients, maternal and embryofetal mortality were 0.0% and 12.5%, respectively. Embryofetal mortality was 24.0% when hypothermia was used, compared with 0.0% while operating in normothermia. Maternal mortality did not change. The use of hypothermia during cardiopulmonary bypass provoked uterine contractions in several patients. Hypothermia decreases O2 exchange through the placenta. Pump flow and mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass seem to be the most important parameters that influence fetal oxygenation. We speculate that cardiac operation is not a contraindication to pregnancy prolongation. PMID:8561577

  9. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  10. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  11. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J.; Elliott, A. R.; West, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The lung is profoundly affected by gravity. The absence of gravity (microgravity) removes the mechanical stresses acting on the lung paranchyma itself, resulting in a reduction in the deformation of the lung due to its own weight, and consequently altering the distribution of fresh gas ventilation within the lung. There are also changes in the mechanical forces acting on the rib cage and abdomen, which alters the manner in which the lung expands. The other way in which microgravity affects the lung is through the removal of the gravitationally induced hydrostatic gradients in vascular pressures, both within the lung itself, and within the entire body. The abolition of a pressure gradient within the pulmonary circulation would be expected to result in a greater degree of uniformity of blood flow within the lung, while the removal of the hydrostatic gradient within the body should result in an increase in venous return and intra-thoracic blood volume, with attendant changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, and pulmonary diffusing capacity. During the 9 day flight of Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) we collected pulmonary function test data on the crew of the mission. We compared the results obtained in microgravity with those obtained on the ground in both the standing and supine positions, preflight and in the week immediately following the mission. A number of the tests in the package were aimed at studying the anticipated changes in cardiopulmonary function, and we report those in this communication.

  12. Statistics of Epidemics in Networks by Passing Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Munik Kumar

    Epidemic processes are common out-of-equilibrium phenomena of broad interdisciplinary interest. In this thesis, we show how message-passing approach can be a helpful tool for simulating epidemic models in disordered medium like networks, and in particular for estimating the probability that a given node will become infectious at a particular time. The sort of dynamics we consider are stochastic, where randomness can arise from the stochastic events or from the randomness of network structures. As in belief propagation, variables or messages in message-passing approach are defined on the directed edges of a network. However, unlike belief propagation, where the posterior distributions are updated according to Bayes' rule, in message-passing approach we write differential equations for the messages over time. It takes correlations between neighboring nodes into account while preventing causal signals from backtracking to their immediate source, and thus avoids "echo chamber effects" where a pair of adjacent nodes each amplify the probability that the other is infectious. In our first results, we develop a message-passing approach to threshold models of behavior popular in sociology. These are models, first proposed by Granovetter, where individuals have to hear about a trend or behavior from some number of neighbors before adopting it themselves. In thermodynamic limit of large random networks, we provide an exact analytic scheme while calculating the time dependence of the probabilities and thus learning about the whole dynamics of bootstrap percolation, which is a simple model known in statistical physics for exhibiting discontinuous phase transition. As an application, we apply a similar model to financial networks, studying when bankruptcies spread due to the sudden devaluation of shared assets in overlapping portfolios. We predict that although diversification may be good for individual institutions, it can create dangerous systemic effects, and as a result

  13. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  14. Mini cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthetic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Alsatli, Raed A.

    2012-01-01

    This review article is going to elaborate on the description, components, and advantages of mini-cardiopulmonary bypass (mini-CPB), with special reference to the anesthetic management and fast track anesthesia with mini-CPB. There are several clinical advantages of mini-CPB like, reduced inflammatory reaction to the pump, reduced need for allogenic blood transfusion and lower incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There are certainly important points that have to be considered...

  15. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  16. By-Pass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    By-Pass diodes are a key design feature of solar arrays and system design must be robust against local heating, especially with implementation of larger solar cells. By-Pass diode testing was performed to aid thermal model development for use in future array designs that utilize larger cell sizes that result in higher string currents. Testing was performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon provided by SSL. Test conditions were vacuum with cold array backside using discrete by-pass diode current steps of 0.25 A ranging from 0 A to 2.0 A.

  17. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

  18. LUCAS - Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Qiuming

    2011-01-01

    Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) is a mechanical device providing automatic 5 cm deep chest compressions and active decompressions back to normal anatomical position with a frequency of 100 per minute, and a duty cycle of 50%, i.e., LUCAS is constructed to give chest compressions according to the latest international guidelines in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of the thesis was to study cardiac arrest using different porcine models of ventricular fi...

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre C. Zago; Cristine E. Nunes; Viviane R. da Cunha; Euler Manenti; Luís Carlos Bodanese

    1999-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of...

  20. Vasopressin decreases neuronal apoptosis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chi; Zhu, Zhe; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council recently recommended that vasopressin can be used for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, instead of epinephrine. However, the guidelines do not discuss the effects of vasopressin during cerebral resuscitation. In this study, we intraperitoneally injected epinephrine and/or vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rat model of asphyxial cardiac arrest. The results demonstrated that, compared with epinephrine alone, ...

  1. Avoid Logs to Avoid Ticks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫文佳

    2004-01-01

    扁虱是莱姆关节炎的罪魁祸首。研究人员为了弄明白何处扁虱最猖獗, 不惜以身作饵,他们发现:The ticks were all over the log surface。因此告诫人 们:Avoid sitting on logs。

  2. By-pass Devices as Effective Means of Protection from the Hydraulic Hammer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S. Al-Rababa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Switching-off the parallel working pump units causes sudden discharge changes in parallel pipe lines, as a result of that hydraulic shocks takes place. The damping of these shocks can be achieved by the installation of the by-pass devices between the parallel lines of the piping system. The analytical calculations demonstrate that the reduction in hydraulic shocks reaches 40% and considerable part of the electric power (from 5 up to 21% is economized by using the by-pass devices, the duration of pressure decline decreases by more than 1,5 times. Comparison of the calculations based on the developed algorithm with the results of practical studies at the pumping station (Syrdarya has shown good convergence of analytical and experimental outcomes.

  3. Experimental study of the wall-friction development during boundary layer by-pass transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, Pavel; Mazur, Oton; Uruba, Václav

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, 2006 - (Jonáš, P.; Uruba, V.), s. 67-70 ISBN 80-87012-01-1. [Colloquium Fluid Dynamics 2006. Praha (CZ), 25.10.2006-27.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : by-pass transition * wall-friction intermittency * conditioned averaging Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  4. Postoperative cognitive deficit after cardiopulmonary bypass with preserved cerebral oxygenation: a prospective observational pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meybohm Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurologic deficits after cardiac surgery are common complications. Aim of this prospective observational pilot study was to investigate the incidence of postoperative cognitive deficit (POCD after cardiac surgery, provided that relevant decrease of cerebral oxygen saturation (cSO2 is avoided during cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods cSO2 was measured by near infrared spectroscopy in 35 patients during cardiopulmonary bypass. cSO2 was kept above 80% of baseline and above 55% during anesthesia including cardiopulmonary bypass. POCD was tested by trail making test, digit symbol substitution test, Ray's auditorial verbal learning test, digit span test and verbal fluency test the day before and 5 days after surgery. POCD was defined as a decline in test performance that exceeded - 20% from baseline in two tests or more. Correlation of POCD with lowest cSO2 and cSO2 - threshold were determined explorative. Results POCD was observed in 43% of patients. Lowest cSO2 during cardiopulmonary bypass was significantly correlated with POCD (p = 0.015, r2 = 0.44, without Bonferroni correction. A threshold of 65% for cSO2 was able to predict POCD with a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 65.0% (p = 0.03, without Bonferroni correction. Conclusions Despite a relevant decrease of cerebral oxygen saturation was avoided in our pilot study during cardiopulmonary bypass, incidence of POCD was comparable to that reported in patients without monitoring. A higher threshold for cSO2 may be needed to reduce the incidence of POCD.

  5. Successful application of acute cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derya ztrk; Erturul Altinbilek; Murat Koyuncu; Bedriye Mge Snmez; ilem altili; Ibrahim Ikzcel; Cemil Kavalci; Glsm Kavalci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the quality and correct the deficiencies of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedures performed in patients who developed cardiopulmonary cardiopulmonary arrest before or after Emergency Department admission. Methods: This study was conducted on patients who were applied CPR atŞŞişli Etfal Training and Research and Research Hospital, Emergency Department between 01 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare the patients' data. The study data were analyzed in SPSS 18.0 software package. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 155 patients who were applied CPR were included in the analysis. Among the study patients, seventy eight (50.3%) were brought to Emergency Department after developing cardiopulmonary arrest while 77 (49.7%) developed cardiopulmonary arrest at Emergency Department. The mean age of the study population was (66 ± 16) years and 64%of the patients were male. The initial rhythms of the CPR-applied patients were different (P 0.05). The CPR response time was longer in ED (P Conclusions: The scientific data obtained in this study suggest that an early response and therapy improves outcomes in CPR procedure.

  6. "Orpheus" cardiopulmonary bypass simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard W; Pybus, David A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we describe a high-fidelity perfusion simulation system intended for use in the training and continuing education of perfusionists. The system comprises a hydraulic simulator, an electronic interface unit and a controlling computer with associated real-time computer models. It is designed for use within an actual operating theatre, or within a specialized simulation facility. The hydraulic simulator can be positioned on an operating table and physically connected to the circuit of the institutional heart-lung machine. The institutional monitoring system is used to display the arterial and central venous pressures, the ECG and the nasopharyngeal temperature using appropriate connections. The simulator is able to reproduce the full spectrum of normal and abnormal events that may present during the course of cardiopulmonary bypass. The system incorporates a sophisticated blood gas model that accurately predicts the behavior of a modern, hollow-fiber oxygenator. Output from this model is displayed in the manner of an in-line blood gas electrode and is updated every 500 msecs. The perfusionist is able to administer a wide variety of drugs during a simulation session including: vasoconstrictors (metaraminol, epinephrine and phenylephrine), a vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside), chronotropes (epinephrine and atropine), an inotrope (epinephrine) and modifiers of coagulation (heparin and protamine). Each drug has a pharmacokinetic profile based on a three-compartment model plus an effect compartment. The simulation system has potential roles in the skill training of perfusionists, the development of crisis management protocols, the certification and accreditation of perfusionists and the evaluation of new perfusion equipment and/or techniques. PMID:18293807

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: a clinical and ethical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The daily practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in elderly patients has brought up the attention of outcome research and resource allocation. Determinants to predict survival have been well identified. There has been empirical evidence that CPR is of doubtful utility in the geriatric population, more studies have showed controversial data. Sometimes situations in which CPR needs to be given in the elderly, causes stress to healthcare providers, due to lack of communication of the patient's wishes and the belief that it will not be successful. It is of importance to state that we have the duty to identify on time the patients that will most likely benefit from CPR, and find out the preferences of the same. Whenever it is possible to institute these guidelines, we will avoid patient suffering.

  8. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  9. Impact of Obesity on Cardiopulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Marjorie L

    2016-09-01

    Although there are known detrimental effects of obesity on the heart and lungs, few data exist showing obesity as risk factor for cardiopulmonary disorders in dogs and cats. It is probable that increased abdominal fat is detrimental as it is in humans, and there is evidence of negative effects of increased intrathoracic fat. As well as physical effects of fat, increased inflammatory mediators and neurohormonal effects of obesity likely contribute to cardiopulmonary disorders. Weight loss in overweight individuals improves cardiac parameters and exercise tolerance. Obesity in patients with obstructive airway disorders is recognized to increase disease severity. PMID:27264052

  10. Rehabilitation after coronary artery by-pass grafting and improved quality of life.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoad, N A; Crawford, I C

    1990-01-01

    Long waiting lists for coronary artery by-pass grafting often mean that patients have to endure a prolonged period of pre-operative disability, a known poor prognostic factor for their future quality of life and employment prospects. A survey of 60 patients who attended a post-operative rehabilitation course designed to restore their fitness and self-esteem, and hence their quality of life, has shown encouraging results. When questioned a mean 16 months later, 85 per cent are working and sign...

  11. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the By-Pass Flow in a Catalytic Plate Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Haftor Örn; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental study is performed to evaluate the reactant by-pass flow in a catalytic plate reactor with a coated wire mesh catalyst for steam reforming of methane for hydrogen generation. By-pass of unconverted methane is evaluated under different wire mesh catalyst width to reactor...

  12. Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct (PPCI) trial - the importance of mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass to prevent cerebral complications after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Anne G; Holmgaard, Frederik; Rasmussen, Lars Simon;

    2016-01-01

    coronary vessel and/or valve disease and who are undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients are stratified by age and surgical procedure and are randomised 1:1 to either an increased mean arterial pressure (70-80 mmHg) or 'usual practice' (40-50 mmHg) during cardiopulmonary...... caused by emboli, but inadequate blood flow caused by other mechanisms may increase ischaemia in the penumbra or cause watershed infarcts. During cardiopulmonary bypass, blood pressure can be below the lower limit of cerebral autoregulation. Although much debated, the constant blood flow provided by the...... cardiopulmonary bypass system is still considered by many as appropriate to avoid cerebral ischaemia despite the low blood pressure. METHODS/DESIGN: The Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct trial is a single-centre superiority trial with a blinded outcome assessment. The trial is randomising 210 patients with...

  13. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL THROUGH KILN RECYCLING BY-PASS DUST IN A CEMENT FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mohsenzadeh, J. Nouri, A. Ranjbar, M. Mohammadian Fazli, A. A. Babaie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a major problem in the industrial areas. Cement dust is one of the important environmental pollutants. In this study the possibility of dust recycling especially kiln dust which has significant importance regarding air pollution in the cement plant, was examined. Tehran cement factory is one of the most important Iranian factories which is located in Tehran. This factory produces high volume of pollutants that are released to in environment. The possibility of reusing of kiln by pass returned dust has been examined in this factory. Different percentages of kiln by-pass dust of this factory were added to products and outcomes of its presence in parameters such as chemical compound, granulation, primary and final catch time, volume expansion, consumed water and resistance of mortar were surveyed. The result indicated that by adding the amounts of 3-8 dust the mortar resistance increase, but adding more than 15%, the mortar resistance has been decreased. Survey in consumed water proved that adding dust to cement, the trend for consuming water is decreased. After dust addition dust, primary and final catch time were compared in different samples and data which showed decrease in dust added samples. Cements with dust added showed increase in auto clave expansion. Overally, results proved that, the best percentage rate of dust addition to the cement was 15%.

  14. Is a fully heparin-bonded cardiopulmonary bypass circuit superior to a standard cardiopulmonary bypass circuit?

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Sarah; Bilal, Haris; Zaman, Mahvash; Tang, Augustine

    2012-01-01

    A best-evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘Is a fully heparin bonded cardiopulmonary bypass circuit superior to a standard cardiopulmonary bypass circuit?’ Altogether more than 792 papers were found using the reported search, of which 13 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of...

  15. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  16. Physiological consequences : Cardiopulmonary, vestibular, and sensory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsch, H.; Albery, W.; Banks, R.D.; Bles, W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussing the physiological consequences of enhanced fighter manoeuvrability (EFM), aspects of cardiopulmonary reactions will be seen during high G manoeuvres, especially the combination of negative G-load followed by high G-onset manoeuvres ("push-pull"). The aircraft's capability to reach high al

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Alexandre C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of life chain, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation courses for professionals who work in emergency medical services, the automated external defibrillator, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and mobile intensive care units, among others. New concepts, strategies and structures motivated by new advances have also modified the treatment and improved the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital setting. Among them, we can cite the concept of cerebral resuscitation, the application of the life chain, the creation of the universal life support algorithm, the adjustment of drug doses, new techniques - measure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and of the coronary perfusion pressure - and new drugs under research.

  18. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. By-passing the Kohn-Sham equations with machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Brockherde, Felix; Burke, Kieron; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Last year, at least 30,000 scientific papers used the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory to solve electronic structure problems in a wide variety of scientific fields, ranging from materials science to biochemistry to astrophysics. Machine learning holds the promise of learning the kinetic energy functional via examples, by-passing the need to solve these equations. This should yield substantial savings in computer time, allowing either larger systems or longer time-scales to be tackled. Attempts to machine-learn this functional have been limited by the need to find its derivative. The present work overcomes this difficulty, by learning the density-potential map directly. Both the improved accuracy and lower computational cost is demonstrated on DFT calculations of small molecules.

  20. Containment by-pass and isolation failure detection with the expert system ALIBABA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of an accident arising in an EDF (Electricite de France) pressurized water reactor, the IPSN Emergency Technical Centre (CTC) would be entrusted to provide the safety authorities with technical assistance. As pad of this responsibility it would analyse and forecast the barriers status (fuel clad, reactor coolant system, containment building), and the related safety functions (subcriticality, water inventory, primary pressure and temperature control, confinement). Its assignments would also require it to evaluate the kinetics and magnitude of a possible fission products release, in progress or to come, so as to advise necessary counter measures in order to ensure the surrounding population's protection, should the occasion arise. A realistic assessment of the release requires a good knowledge of the containment quality. It is therefore important to detect potential isolation faults (isolation failure or by-pass of the third barrier) as soon as possible. Once these leaks are identified, the plant operator will set required corrective arrangements rapidly. The CTC would follow up his actions closely. If none of them happen to be effective, containment leakage would be taken into account when estimating releases. Work of the emergency team lies indeed in two main points: early localization of isolation failure or containment by-pass; following up of the plant operator actions meant to remedy the problem. In order to meet these two requirements IPSN has developed an expert system named ALIBABA. Part one presents its advantages, whereas part two describes the expert system. Part three deals with the software environment and part four offers an example of the help provided by ALIBABA

  1. The management of impending myocardial infarction using coronary artery by-pass grafting and an intra-aortic balloon pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P L; Woollard, K; Bartoli, A; Makey, A R

    1980-01-01

    Of 33 patients with impending myocardial infarction 25 were treated using a combination of coronary artery by-pass grafting and intra-aortic balloon pumping. Eight patients were treated with coronary artery by-pass grafting alone. Twenty-two of the 25 patients who were treated with the combined technique made a full recovery. Three patients sustained definite myocardial infarctions and one of these died. Five of the 8 patients treated by grafting alone suffered infarction and of these 3 died. The value of intra-aortic balloon pumping in combination with coronary artery by-pass grafting in the management of impending myocardial infarction is discussed. PMID:6968314

  2. History of the evolution of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karlis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, history, evolution and combinations of them. Complementary bibliography was found through the library of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Results: The first historical references on CPR go back to the era of Ancient Egypt (3100 B.C.. Although the technique for mouth to mouth ventilation was known in ancient times, its efficacy was demonstrated just in 1958. The ease and efficacy of chest compressions were demonstrated in 1960. Electrical defibrillation may have begun in 1775, but it was applied to a victim of cardiac arrest in the 1950s. Conclusion: CPR is currently a rapidly evolving field of medical science. According to latest data, there is evidence that high quality chest compressions, prompt defibrillation if applicable and treatment of reversible causes improve Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, history, evolution and combinations of them. Complementary bibliography was found through the library of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Results: The first historical references

  3. Comparative study of the protective effect using hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Pei-li; FU Qing-lin; ZHANG Xin-zhong; ZHANG-Jie; QIN Yuan-xu; CUI Yu

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the detrimental influence of normothermic and hypothermic cardiopulmonary by-pass during open - heart surgery on immunity function,cytokines and complements. Methods Forty patients with con-genital or rheumatic heart disease were randomized to receive the two strategies: normothermie CPB (study group) andhypothermic CPB (control group) ,20 cases in each group. Venous blood samples were collected at each time points ofpreoperation, end of CPB, day 1,4,7,14 postoperatively to examine the plasma level of IL - 2, TNF - α, C3, C4, IgG,IgM, IgA, CD3, CD4, CD8. Results IL -2 in both groups decreased significantly at day 1,4, and returned to normal atday 7 postoperatively. IL - 2 in control group was significantly lower than that in study group postoperatively. TNF - α intwo groups was all higher at time points of end of CPB,day 1,4 postoperatively;in study group,it returned to normallevel at day 7 postoperatively, whereas in control group, it was still higher at day 7 postoperatively than that before oper-ation ,and returned to normal at day 14 postoperatively. C3 in study group was significantly lower at time points of endof CPB,day 1,7 postoperatively than that in control group;C3 in both groups was all higher at time points of end ofCPB, day 1,4 postoperatively;in study group, it returned to normal level at day 7 postoperatively, whereas in controlgroup,it was still higher at day 7 postoperatively than that before operation and returned to normal at day 14 postopera-tively. CA in study group at time points of end of CPB, day 1 postoperatively was significantly lower than that in controlgroup;C4 in both groups was all lower at time points of end of CPB, day 1,4 postoperatively than that before operation.The results showed that IgA after operation in both groups was significantly lower than that before operation, and re-turned to normal at day 7 postoperatively;IgA in study group at day 1 postoperatively was higher than that in controlgroup. IgG in

  4. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  5. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    M Adib Hajbaghery; H. Akbari; GA. Mousavi

    2005-01-01

    Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and unt...

  6. Alongshore momentum transfer to the nearshore zone from energetic ocean waves generated by passing hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Ryan P.; Hanson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Wave and current measurements from a cross-shore array of nearshore sensors in Duck, NC, are used to elucidate the balance of alongshore momentum under energetic wave conditions with wide surf zones, generated by passing hurricanes that are close to and far from to the coast. The observations indicate that a distant storm (Hurricane Bill, 2009) with large waves has low variability in directional wave characteristics resulting in alongshore currents that are driven mainly by the changes in wave energy. A storm close to the coast (Hurricane Earl, 2010), with strong local wind stress and combined sea and swell components in wave energy spectra, has high variability in wave direction and wave period that influence wave breaking and nearshore circulation as the storm passes. During both large wave events, the horizontal current shear is strong and radiation stress gradients, bottom stress, wind stress, horizontal mixing, and cross-shore advection contribute to alongshore momentum at different spatial locations across the nearshore region. Horizontal mixing during Hurricane Earl, estimated from rotational velocities, was particularly strong suggesting that intense eddies were generated by the high horizontal shear from opposing wind-driven and wave-driven currents. The results provide insight into the cross-shore distribution of the alongshore current and the connection between flows inside and outside the surf zone during major storms, indicating that the current shear and mixing at the interface between the surf zone and shallow inner shelf is strongly dependent on the distance from the storm center to the coast.

  7. Field experiment of subgrade vibration induced by passing train in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xianzhang; Zhang Feng; Zhu Zhanyuan; Ding Lin; Hu Qinli

    2009-01-01

    The vibration characteristics and attenuation of the subgrade caused by passing trains in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing, China are investigated. Three field experiments were conducted during different times through the year, in normal, freezing and thawing periods, respectively, and the influence of the season, train speed and train type, is described in this paper. The results show that: (l) the vertical component is the greatest among the three components of the measured vibration near the rail track, and as the distance to the railway track increases, the dominant vibration depends on the season. (2) Compared with the vibration in the normal period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations increase while the lateral vibration decreases in the freezing period. However, in the thawing period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations decrease, and the lateral vibration increases. (3) As train speeds increase, the subgrade vibration increases. (4) The vibration induced by a freight train is greater than by a passenger train. These observations provide a better understanding of the vibration and dynamic stability of the subgrade and may be useful in developing criteria for railway and building construction in cold regions.

  8. Redesign of emergency water supply system by-pass line from Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 and 2 using self regulating valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper one considered improving the EWS (emergency water supply system) by-pass line in order to replace current manual operated valve with an self operated valve. This change is necessary in order to reduce the human error events in operation of the system in case of a DBE (design basis earthquake). The paper describes a theoretical and practical operation of a system using self regulating flow rate valves. Basically, the elimination of a possible human error in operating a system is important for nuclear safety in case of a DBE because it makes it avoidable in normal reactor cooling systems. The paper describes checking of the functioning of this equipment in operating conditions, investigating how it responds to various operating regimes. (authors)

  9. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  10. Magnesium sulphate and amiodarone prophylaxis for prevention of postoperative arrhythmia in coronary by-pass operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huysal Kagan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the use of prophylactic magnesium sulphate and amiodarone in treating arrhythmias that may occur following coronary bypass grafting operations. Methods The study population consisted of 192 consecutive patients who were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Sixty-four patients were given 3 g of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4 [20 ml = 24.32 mEq/L Mg+2] in 100 cc of isotonic 0.9% solution over 2 hours intravenously at the following times: 12 hours prior to the operation, immediately following the operation, and on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 (Group 1. Another group of 64 patients was given a preoperative infusion of amiodarone (1200 mg on first post-operative day (Group 2. After the operation amiodarone was administered orally at a dose of 600 mg/day. Sixty-four patients in group 3 (control group had 100 cc. isotonic 0.9% as placebo, during the same time periods. Results In the postoperative period, the magnesium values were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 for all measurements. The use of amiodarone for total arrhythmia was significantly more effective than prophylactic treatment with magnesium sulphate (p = 0.015. There was no difference between the two drugs in preventing supraventricular arrhythmia, although amiodarone significantly delayed the revealing time of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.026. Ventricular arrhythmia, in the form of ventricular extra systole, was more common in the magnesium prophylaxis group. The two groups showed no significant differences in other operative or postoperative measurements. No side effects of the drugs were observed. Conclusion Prophylactic use of magnesium sulphate and amiodarone are both effective at preventing arrhythmia that may occur following coronary by-pass operations. Magnesium sulphate should be used in prophylactic treatment since it may decrease arrhythmia at low doses. If arrhythmia should occur despite this

  11. Bispectral index monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation repeated twice within 8 days in the same patient: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlik, Michael T.; Seyfried, Timo F.; Riegger, Christian; Klingler, Werner; Selig, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Research on cardiac resuscitation has led to various changes in the techniques and drug administration involved in modern advanced life support. Besides improving primary cardiac survival, interest is increasingly focused on a favourable neurological outcome. However, until now there has been no on-site equipment to support the clinical observations of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) team. Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring has been used for avoiding awareness during anaesthesia for ma...

  12. MEASUREMENT OF CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION BY REBREATHING METHODOLOGY IN PIGLETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of a multiple gas rebreathing method for the measurement of cardiopulmonary function in mechanically ventilated neonates was evaluated. The following indices of cardiopulmonary function were assessed in 20 piglets (mean weight, 2.3 kg): (1) pulmonary capillary blood flow ...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4420 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  17. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology’s standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Methods: In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Results: Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Conclusion: Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities’ attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand. PMID:27489600

  18. By-pass transition of flat plate boundary layers on the surfaces near the limit of admissible roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, Pavel; Hladík, Ondřej; Mazur, Oton; Uruba, Václav

    Warsaw, Poland: University of Warsaw, 2011 - (Bajer, K.; Kopeč, J.; Podziemski, P.), s. 82-82 ISSN N. [European turbulence conference /13./. Warsaw (PL), 12.09.2011-15.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA ČR GAP101/10/1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer by-pass transition * effect of free stream turbulence * effect of surface roughness * joint effect on by-pass transition Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics www.etc13.fuw.edu.pl

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, John J; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2007-01-01

    In the 43 years since it was first described, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has grown from an obscure medical theory to a basic first aid skill taught to adults and is now the near-universal technique used in CPR instruction. This article provides insight into the history of CPR. We explore the phenomenon of sudden cardiac arrest, the historical roots of CPR, current practice data and recommendations, and the society's role in the development of this life-saving technique. We conclude with a review of CPR's economic impact on the healthcare system and the ethical and policy issues surrounding CPR. PMID:17179837

  20. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation after Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Behrend; Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni;

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemodynamic disturbances in the peri- or postoperative period may contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We therefore examined dynamic cerebral autoregulation (d......CA) post-CPB and changes in neurocognitive function in patients that had undergone CABG. Materials and Methods We assessed dCA by transfer function analysis of spontaneous oscillations between arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound...

  1. Educational aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, S J

    1990-03-01

    The knowledge and skills surrounding the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have become essential to intensive care nurses and to nurses in general. With formalized training and refresher courses becoming more common in this country, it is evident that after relatively short periods of time the knowledge and skills acquired at such courses may be lost. While much consideration has been given to the content of both Basic and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (BCLS and ACLS) courses, relatively little attention has been paid to the educational issues surrounding CPR training. This paper explores some of these issues from the perspective of adult learning (andragogy). Research is cited from a wide range of sources to illustrate that CPR skill and knowledge deterioration is not unique to nursing, and that educational techniques exist which may improve current educational practices. PMID:2329270

  2. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices. PMID:24494769

  3. Evaluation of coma patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Ying-ying; YANG Qing-lin; PANG Ying; LV Xiang-ping

    2005-01-01

    Background Coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly seen in daily clinical practice. How to objectively evaluate brain function after CPR is essential to the following treatment. Coma patients after CPR had been studied prospectively at the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit of Xuanwu Hospital since 2002. In this study, we focused on the topic of how to evaluate the severity of coma after CPR .Methods From April 2002 to November 2004, patients in coma 24 hours after CPR were monitored, the evaluation methods included Glasgow coma score (GCS),brain stem reflection, and spinal reflection. Laboratory evaluation included electroencephalography (EEG),brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP), short latency somatosensory evoked potential (SLSEP), and transcranial Doppler (TCD) .Results Twenty-four of 35 patients(68.57%)were in deep coma. The GCS was 3 except for 2 patients;EEG was evaluated not less than grade Ⅳ except for 4 patients, BAEP was evaluated as grade Ⅲ except for 3 patients, and SLSEP was evaluated as grade Ⅲ except for 1 patient.Twenty-four patients died within 1 month and 11 of them(45.83%)were determined as brain death. Glasgow outcome score (GOS) was evaluated as grade Ⅰ. Eleven of the 35 patients survived and their consciousness changed from deep coma to coma vigil. EEG was evaluated as gradeⅠin 5 patients, BAEP and SLSEP were evaluated as grade Ⅰ in 3 patients, and GOS was all evaluated as grade Ⅱ among the 11 patients.Two patients(18.18%)regained consciousness in 35 and 90 days after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and GOS was evaluated as grade Ⅳ and Ⅲ, respectively.Conclusion Combined or continuous evaluation of clinical examinations and laboratory tests can accurately and objectively determine brain function after CPR.

  4. Preliminary studies of coolant by-pass flows in a prismatic very high temperature reactor using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations for a 1/12 sector of a prismatic block through the core of a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) were conducted to investigate the influence of gap geometry on flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core using commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing the gap width in a whole core length model of fuel and reflector columns were performed. The simulations show the effects of core by-pass flows in the heated core region by comparing results for several gap widths including zero gap width. The calculation results underline the importance of considering inter-column gap width for the evaluation of maximum fuel temperatures and temperature gradients in fuel blocks. It is shown that temperatures of core outlet flow from gaps and channels are strongly affected by the gap width of by-pass flow in the reactor core. (author)

  5. Preliminary studies of coolant by-pass flows in a prismatic very high temperature reactor using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) were conducted to investigate the influence of gap geometry on flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core using commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing the gap width in a whole core length model of fuel and reflector columns were performed. The simulations show the effects of core by-pass flows in the heated core region by comparing results for several gap widths including zero gap width. The calculation results underline the importance of considering inter-column gap width for the evaluation of maximum fuel temperatures and temperature gradients in fuel blocks. In addition, it is shown that temperatures of core outlet flow from gaps and channels are strongly affected by the gap width of by-pass flow in the reactor core.

  6. On the intermittent nature of the flow structure at by-pass transition of a flat plate boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, Pavel; Mazur, Oton; Uruba, Václav

    Praha: Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, 2001 - (Poživilová, A.; Masák, J.), s. 317-318 ISBN 80-85918-64-1. [National Conference with International Participation Engineering Mechanics 2001. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2001-17.05.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/00/1057 Keywords : by-pass transition Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. Conditional analysis of the instantaneous wall friction during by-pass transition of rough wall boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladík, Ondřej; Jonáš, Pavel; Mazur, Oton; Uruba, Václav

    Budapest : Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 2012 - (Vad, J.), s. 963-970 ISBN 978-963-08-4587-8. [International Conference on Fluid Flow Technologies /15./. Budapest (HU), 04.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : by-pass transition * conditional analysis of the wall friction * CTA * rough wall boundary layer * transitional intermittency factor Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange gases between blood and a gaseous environment to satisfy the gas exchange needs of a patient during...

  9. Cardiopulmonary disease in the geriatric dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cardiopulmonary disease increases with age. Degenerative valvular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and arrhythmias are common in the geriatric dog. Chronic bronchial disease, pulmonary neoplasia, and arrhythmias occur in the geriatric cat. Systemic diseases in both species often show cardiopulmonary manifestations. Medical management to treat the underlying disease and to control clinical signs is complicated by altered absorption, metabolism, and elimination of drugs

  10. Normoxic and Hyperoxic Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cyanotic congenital heart disease comprises a diverse spectrum of anatomical pathologies. Common to all, however, is chronic hypoxia before these lesions are operated upon when cardiopulmonary bypass is initiated. A range of functional and structural adaptations take place in the chronically hypoxic heart, which, whilst protective in the hypoxic state, are deleterious when the availability of oxygen to the myocardium is suddenly improved. Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass delivers hyperoxic...

  11. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: a critical moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durukan, Ahmet Baris; Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Yorgancioglu, Cem

    2016-06-01

    Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass is a crisis situation for the cardiac surgical team. Fortunately, it has a low incidence with low morbidity and mortality rates. Notwithstanding, institutional preventative and management measures should be taken. Here, we report a case of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass, which was successfully managed during the surgery, allowing the patient to recover uneventfully. These unwanted complications can only be managed by promoting awareness and putting in place strategies against them. PMID:27516788

  12. Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy with schizophrenia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Takako; Kaga, Akimune; Akagi, Kozo; Iwahashi, Hideki; Makino, Hiromitsu; WATANABE, YOKO; Kawamura, Takae; Sato, Taiju; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Miwa, Shinya; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kure, Shigeo; Nakae, Shingi

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy has a very high maternal and fetal mortality rate. We report a case of successful maternal and neonatal survival in association with emergency cesarean section of a schizophrenic pregnant patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cardiopulmonary arrest in a pregnant woman with schizophrenia. Case presentation The parents were Japanese. The mother was 39 years old and had no history of prior pregnancy. Her admission to our hosp...

  13. Strategies to prevent intraoperative lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siminelakis Stavros N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During open heart surgery the influence of a series of factors such as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, hypothermia, operation and anaesthesia, as well as medication and transfusion can cause a diffuse trauma in the lungs. This injury leads mostly to a postoperative interstitial pulmonary oedema and abnormal gas exchange. Substantial improvements in all of the above mentioned factors may lead to a better lung function postoperatively. By avoiding CPB, reducing its time, or by minimizing the extracorporeal surface area with the use of miniaturized circuits of CPB, beneficial effects on lung function are reported. In addition, replacement of circuit surface with biocompatible surfaces like heparin-coated, and material-independent sources of blood activation, a better postoperative lung function is observed. Meticulous myocardial protection by using hypothermia and cardioplegia methods during ischemia and reperfusion remain one of the cornerstones of postoperative lung function. The partial restoration of pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB possibly contributes to prevent pulmonary ischemia and lung dysfunction. Using medication such as corticosteroids and aprotinin, which protect the lungs during CPB, and leukocyte depletion filters for operations expected to exceed 90 minutes in CPB-time appear to be protective against the toxic impact of CPB in the lungs. The newer methods of ultrafiltration used to scavenge pro-inflammatory factors seem to be protective for the lung function. In a similar way, reducing the use of cardiotomy suction device, as well as the contact-time between free blood and pericardium, it is expected that the postoperative lung function will be improved.

  14. Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - predictors of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Data were collected retrospectively of all adult patients who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Of the 159 patients included, 55 (35%) were alive at the end of CPR and 17 (11%) were discharged alive from the hospital. At the end of CPR, univariate logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital as compared to outside the hospital (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.27-6.20, p-value = 0.01), both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to either cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.19- 0.73, p-value = 0.004), asystole as cardiac rhythm at presentation (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.24-0.93, p-value = 0.03), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97, p-value = 0.02). In multivariate logistic regression, cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.06-5.99, p-value = 0.04) and both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91, p-value = 0.03) were associated with survival at the end of CPR. At the time of discharge from hospital, univariate logistic regression analysis found following factors that were associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% CI = 1.09-65.64, p-value = 0.04), duration of CPR (odds ratio = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85-0.96, p-value = 0.001), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.99, p-value = 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio 8.69, 95% CI = 1.01-74.6, p-value = 0.05) and duration of CPR (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98, p-value = 0.01) were associated with survival at

  15. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rajeev; Bakken, Kristian; D'Elia, Emilia; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-08-01

    Exercise intolerance, indicated by dyspnea and fatigue during exertion, is a cardinal manifestation of heart failure (HF). Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) precisely defines maximum exercise capacity through measurement of peak oxygen uptake (VO2). Peak VO2 values have a critical role in informing patient selection for advanced HF interventions such as heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices. Oxygen uptake and ventilatory patterns obtained during the submaximal portion of CPET are also valuable to recognize because of their ease of ascertainment during low-level exercise, relevance to ability to perform activities of daily living, independence from volitional effort, and strong relationship to prognosis in HF. The ability of peak VO2 and other CPET variables to be measured reproducibly and to accurately reflect HF severity is increasingly recognized and endorsed by scientific statements. Integration of CPET with invasive hemodynamic monitoring and cardiac imaging during exercise provides comprehensive characterization of multisystem reserve capacity that can inform prognosis and the need for cardiac interventions. Here, we review both practical aspects of conducting CPETs in patients with HF for clinical and research purposes as well as interpretation of gas exchange patterns across the spectrum of preclinical HF to advanced HF. PMID:27289406

  16. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  17. Cardiopulmonary effects of intermittent mandatory ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M E; Downs, J B

    1980-01-01

    IMV is a combination of spontaneous and mechanical ventilation. For numerous reasons, IMV is potentially more advantageous than conventional techniques. By maintaining spontaneous breathing, mechanical augmentation can be titrated to adjust alveolar minute ventilation levels to normal, thereby decreasing the incidence of respiratory alkalemia. There are major differences between the cardiopulmonary effects of IMV and conventional mechanical ventilation. Spontaneous inspiration decreases Ppl and results in better distribution of inspired gas, a better V/Q, and less physiological dead space. In addition, transmural filling pressures, venous return, and cardiac output are more normal than during conventional mechanical ventilation. Maintenance of spontaneous ventilation lowers mean Paw and pulmonary vascular resistance. If venous admixture occurs, it can be minimized by titrating PEEP. Thus, more effective therapy for hypoxemia is possible. If spontaneous breathing is to persist and be efective, work-of-breathing must be minimized. This can be accomplished best when a continuous flow of gas provides optimal CPAP to maintain FRC and to minimize the effects of decreased compliance without depressing cardiac function. PMID:7007253

  18. Avoidant personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Personality disorder - avoidant References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  19. Avoidable mortality in Lithuania.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaizauskiene, A.; Gurevicius, R

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to analyse avoidable mortality in Lithuania as an index of the quality of health care and to assess trends in avoidable mortality from 1970-90. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--All deaths of Lithuanian residents aged between 0 and 64 years between 1970 and 1990 were analysed. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Twenty seven per cent of all deaths in this age group were avoidable. Avoidable deaths were grouped into preventable and treatable ones. Treatable causes of death ...

  20. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass—Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A.; Likosky, Donald S.; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation. PMID:26543248

  1. The Use of Tygon Tubing Sterilized by Gamma Radiation in Heart-Lung By-Pass Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tygon tubing is a co-polymer polyvinyl chloride. This tubing is used throughout the circuit of our heart-lung by-pass machines and had been sterilized by autoclaving or exposure to ethylene oxide gas. Tubing sterilized by autoclaving was noted to have a decrease in tensile strength and the transparency of the tubing was affected. Sterilization by ethylene oxide had the disadvantage that gas was often present in the lumen of the tube when connected to the machine. Lengths of Tygon tubing were sterilized by gamma radiation at varying radiation levels and temperatures. Bacteriological studies were done on the tubing and estimation of tensile strength carried out. We have found that a level of radiation of 2. 5 to 3. 0 Mrad at 20°C produces little or no change in tensile strength and the tubing remains bacteriologically sterile. Tygon tubing sterilized in this way has now been used in over sixty heart-lung by-pass machine operations. (author)

  2. Managing the Inflammatory Response after Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Review of the Studies in Animal Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liguori, Gabriel Romero; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review studies performed in animal models that evaluated therapeutic interventions to inflammatory response and microcirculatory changes after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: It was used the search strategy ("Cardiopulmonary Bypass" (MeSH)) and ("Microcirculation" (MeSH) or "Inflammat

  3. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  4. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Predictors of Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has shown improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR. The aim of this study was to determine factors predictive of survival in extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR). Methods Consecutive 85 adult patients (median age, 59 years; range, 18 to 85 years; 56 males) who underwent E-CPR from May 2005 to December 2012 were evaluated. Results Causes of arrest were cardiogenic in 62 patients (72.9%), septic in 18 patients (21.2%), and hypovolemic in 3 patients (3.5%), while the etiology was not specified in 2 patients (2.4%). The survival rate in patients with septic etiology was significantly poorer compared with those with another etiology (0% vs. 24.6%, p=0.008). Septic etiology (hazard ratio [HR], 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49 to 5.44; p=0.002) and the interval between arrest and ECLS initiation (HR, 1.05 by 10 minutes increment; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09; p=0.005) were independent risk factors for mortality. When the predictive value of the E-CPR timing for in-hospital mortality was assessed using the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the greatest accuracy was obtained at a cutoff of 60.5 minutes (area under the curve, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.80; p=0.032) with 47.8% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity. The survival rate was significantly different according to the cutoff of 60.5 minutes (p=0.001). Conclusion These results indicate that efforts should be made to minimize the time between arrest and ECLS application, optimally within 60 minutes. In addition, E-CPR in patients with septic etiology showed grave outcomes, suggesting it to be of questionable benefit in these patients. PMID:27525236

  5. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwes Aline

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of the study was to investigate whether acute PHM originates from cortical or subcortical structures, using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods Patients with acute PHM (focal myoclonus or status myoclonus within 72 hours after CPR were retrospectively selected from a multicenter cohort study. All patients were treated with hypothermia. Criteria for cortical origin of the myoclonus were: giant SEP potentials; or epileptic activity, status epilepticus, or generalized periodic discharges on the EEG (no back-averaging was used. Good outcome was defined as good recovery or moderate disability after 6 months. Results Acute PHM was reported in 79/391 patients (20%. SEPs were available in 51/79 patients and in 27 of them (53% N20 potentials were present. Giant potentials were seen in 3 patients. EEGs were available in 36/79 patients with 23/36 (64% patients fulfilling criteria for a cortical origin. Nine patients (12% had a good outcome. A broad variety of drugs was used for treatment. Conclusions The results of this study show that acute PHM originates from subcortical, as well as cortical structures. Outcome of patients admitted after CPR who develop acute PHM in this cohort was better than previously reported in literature. The broad variety of drugs used for treatment shows the existing uncertainty about optimal treatment.

  6. Management of a case of left tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy under cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lung tumors with carinal involvement are frequently managed with tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy and tracheobronchial anastomosis without use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Various modes of ventilation have been described during tracheal resection and anastomosis. Use of CPB during this period allows the procedure to be conducted in a more controlled way. We performed tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of left lung involving carina. The surgery was performed in two stages. In the first stage, left pneumonectomy was performed and in the second stage after 48 h, tracheobronchial resection and anastomosis was performed under CPB. Second stage was delayed to avoid excessive bleeding (due to heparinization from the extensive vascular raw area left after pneumonectomy. Meticulous peri-operative planning and optimal post-operative care helped in successful management of a complex case, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  7. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  8. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  12. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Della Corte, A; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Turtu, S; Basile, G L; Catitti, A; Chiarelli, S; Di Ferdinando, E; Taddia, G; Talli, M; Verdini, L; Viola, R

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported. (3 refs).

  13. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  14. QUALITY-OF-LIFE AFTER CARDIOPULMONARY-RESUSCITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIRANDA, DR

    1994-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluates the influence of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) on the components of quality of life (QOL) of patients after discharge from the hospital. Design: Extracted from a prospective national survey on Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). Setting: Thirty-six ICUs of both

  15. Predicting postoperative cardiopulmonary complications by a test of stair climbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess whether a test of stair climbing ability could be used to predict the risk of developing postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Design: Cohort study Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. The duration of the study was from December 2003 to December 2004. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out on consecutive, adult patients presenting for elective thoracic or abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. Pre-operatively, patients were asked to climb a standard staircase. Number of steps climbed was recorded. Those unable to climb stairs due to debilitation cardiac, pulmonary or rheumatologic disease were categorized as 0 stairs climbed. Outcome variables were postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for mortality. Period of follow-up was until hospital discharge. Results: Seventy-eight patients were enrolled; 59 (75.6%) climbed > 1 flight of stairs, 19 (24.3%) climbed 1 flight and 40% in those patients who climbed < 1 flight. The group that climbed < 1 flight tended to have complications associated with poor reserves of the cardiopulmonary systems; i.e. pulmonary edema, exacerbation of underlying lung disease. The relative risk of developing complications, if unable to climb at least 1 flight of stairs, was calculated to be 1.8 (95% CI 0.7 - 4.6). Conclusion: Stair climbing can be a useful pre-operative tool to predict the risk of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. (author)

  16. Clinical benefit of steroid use in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitlock, Richard P; Chan, Simon; Devereaux, P J;

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish the efficacy and safety of prophylactic steroids in adult patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials reporting the effects of prophylactic steroids on clinical outcomes after CPB. Outcomes examined were mortality, myo...

  17. Release of endogenous vasopressors during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, K. H.; Haak, T; Keller, A; Bothner, U.; Lurie, K. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether plasma endothelin, adrenaline, noradrenaline, arginine vasopressin, adrenocorticotropin, and cortisol concentrations were higher during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients in whom resuscitation was successful than in those in whom it failed, and to measure the concentrations of these hormones in the immediate post-resuscitation phase. DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive study. SETTING: Emergency medical service at a university hospital. PATIENTS: 60 patients wi...

  18. Comparison of end-tidal carbon dioxide levels with cardiopulmonary resuscitation success presented to emergency department with cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Emine; Ramadan, Hayri; Yuzbasioglu, Yucel; Coskun, Figen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PetCO2) in preset interval in order to evaluate the efficiency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed on patients in cardiopulmonary arrest, evaluate the validity of PetCO2 in predicting the mortality and finally assess the PetCO2 levels of the patients in cardiopulmonary arrest based on the initial presenting rhythm. Methods: This prospective study was conducted at the Ankara Training and Research Hospital on patients who presented with cardiopulmonary arrest. Standard ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols were performed. Patients were categorized in two groups based on their rhythms as Ventricular Fibrillation and Asystole. Patients’ PetCO2 values were recorded. Results: PetCO2 levels of the Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) group in the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th minutes were significantly higher compared to the exitus group (p<0.001). In distinguishing ROSC and exitus, PetCO2 measurements within 5-20 minute intervals showed highest performance on the 20th and lowest on the 5th minutes. Conclusion: PetCO2 values are higher in the ROSC group. During the CPR, the most reliable time for ROSC estimation according to PetCO2 values is 20th minute. None of the patients who had PetCO2 levels less than 14 mmHg survived. PMID:24639823

  19. Psychological Treatments to Avoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Certain psychological treatments should be avoided, and a list of such treatments would provide valuable guidance for counselors, as well as potential clients. It is well established that some therapies are potentially dangerous, and some fringe therapies are highly unlikely to help clients beyond a placebo effect. This article provides an…

  20. Avoiding the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Avoiding the Flu Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Children ... should still get the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. H1N1 Flu: Who Should Be Vaccinated First The Centers for ...

  1. Myelin Avoids the JAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follis, Rose M; Carter, Bruce D

    2016-08-17

    In this issue of Neuron, Redmond et al. (2016) identify junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitor of somatodendritic myelination in spinal cord neurons, thereby elucidating how myelin forms on axons but avoids dendrites and cell bodies. PMID:27537479

  2. Plants to Avoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of poisonous plants is extremely important for home owners, gardeners, farmers, hunters, hikers, and the rest of the general public. Among the most important plants to avoid in the Delta Region are poison ivy, bull nettle, eastern black nightshade, Queen Ann’s lace, jimsonweed, and trumpe...

  3. AVOIDING MANUSCRIPT MISTAKES

    OpenAIRE

    Grindstaff, Terry L.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Writing a scientific manuscript can be a consuming, but rewarding task with a number of intrinsic and extrinsic benefits. The ability to write a scientific manuscript is typically not an emphasized component of most entry‐level professional programs. The purpose of this overview is to provide authors with suggestions to improve manuscript quality and to provide mechanisms to avoid common manuscript mistakes that are often identified by journal reviewers and editors.

  4. Indonesia : Avoiding the Trap

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Within the next two decades Indonesia aspires to generate prosperity, avoid a middle-income trap and leave no one behind as it tries to catch up with high-income economies. These are ambitious goals. Realizing them requires sustained high growth and job creation, as well as reduced inequality. Can Indonesia achieve them? This report argues that the country has the potential to rise and bec...

  5. Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest due to penetrating cardiac injury treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in the emergency room: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Kano, Hitoshi; Yama, Naoya; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Asai, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injury tends to generally be repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass in the operating room. We herein report the case of penetrating cardiac injury repaired using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in an emergency room. A 57-year-old man attempted suicide by stabbing himself in the left anterior chest with a knife. Although the patient suffered cardiopulmonary arrest for 7 min in the ambulance, spontaneous circulation was restored following pericardiotomy through emergency left thoracotomy in the emergency room. To prevent coronary artery injury and control the massive bleeding, percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was instituted without systemic heparinization and the cardiac injury was repaired in the emergency room. The patient was then transferred to another hospital on day 46 for further rehabilitation. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support might be helpful for treating critical patients in an emergency room, even in the case of trauma patients. PMID:17342366

  6. Lethal systemic Degos disease with prominent cardio-pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degos disease (DD) is a rare obstructive vasculopathy characterized by distinctive skin lesions. Involvement of the soles, palms and genitalia is rare. In most cases disease has an unfavorable course and involves gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system and occasionally other organs. Pleural and pericardial involvements are usually minor manifestations with prolonged course. Death occurs in approximately 50% of the patients usually due to intestinal perforation or central nervous system bleeding. We describe a 48-year-old man of lethal systemic DD. Widespread skin lesions with involvement of palm plantar surfaces, genitalia and scalp were ignored for 3 years, whereas the disease revealed its own malignant nature. The disorder progressed to nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiopulmonary system that led to death after 5 months from onset of systemic involvement as severe restrictive cardio-pulmonary insufficiency. Autopsy showed diffuse fibrotic changes in serial membranes and internal organs. (author)

  7. Glycemic control and outcome related to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Steven; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia, aggravated by cardiopulmonary bypass, is associated with adverse outcome in adult and pediatric patients. Whereas hyperglycemia was originally perceived as an adaptive response to surgical stress, it is now clear that glycemic control is a strategy to reduce adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. The optimal blood glucose target, whether or not glycemic control should be initiated already intraoperatively, and whether or not perioperative glucose administration affects the impact of glycemic control on ischemia-reperfusion damage remain open questions. Hypoglycemia, the risk of which is increased with glycemic control, is also associated with adverse outcomes. However, it remains controversial whether brief episodes of hypoglycemia, rapidly corrected during glycemic control, have adverse effects on outcome. This review gives an overview of the currently available literature on glycemic control during and after cardiac surgery and focuses on the indicated open questions about this intervention for this specific patient population. PMID:26060029

  8. Ocular, bulbar, limb, and cardiopulmonary involvement in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, N; Mensah, A; Køber, L;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess skeletal muscle weakness and progression as well as the cardiopulmonary involvement in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study including symptomatic patients with genetically confirmed OPMD. Patients were assessed by medical...... history, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, facial and limb strength, and swallowing capability. Cardiopulmonary function was evaluated using forced expiratory capacity in 1 s (FEV1), electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitoring, and echocardiography. RESULTS: We included 13 symptomatic patients (six males, mean age......; 64 years (41-80) from 8 families. Ptosis was the first symptom in 8/13 patients followed by limb weakness in the remaining 5 patients Dysphagia was never the presenting symptom. At the time of examination, all affected patients had ptosis or had previously been operated for ptosis, while...

  9. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An experimental study in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlfart Björn; Paskevicius Audrius; Sjöberg Trygve; Liao Qiuming; Steen Stig

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Optimal manual closed chest compressions are difficult to give. A mechanical compression/decompression device, named LUCAS, is programmed to give compression according to the latest international guidelines (2005) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of the present study was to compare manual CPR with LUCAS-CPR. Methods 30 kg pigs were anesthetized and intubated. After a base-line period and five minutes of ventricular fibrillation, manual CPR (n = 8) or LUCAS-...

  10. Cardiopulmonary effects of intramuscular xylazine-ketamine in calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Rings, D M; Muir, W W

    1982-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary effects of an intramuscular xylazine (0.088 mg/kg)-ketamine (4.4 mg/kg) drug combination were evaluated in calves. Heart rate, central venous and mean pulmonary artery blood pressures, and cardiac output did not change after drug administration. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) 15 minutes after drug administration. Respiratory frequency increased significantly (P less than 0.05) whereas arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) decre...

  11. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran; Valerie J Ehlers

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations.Objective: The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills.Method: A pre-test, intervention and re-test ...

  13. Successful cardiopulmonary bypass in diabetics with anaphylactoid reactions to protamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, W. S.; Reid, K G; Hider, C F; Davidson, I. A.; Boulton, F. E.; Yap, P L

    1984-01-01

    Two insulin dependent diabetics with previous anaphylactic like (anaphylactoid) reactions to protamine underwent successful cardiopulmonary bypass for coronary artery surgery. Platelet concentrates instead of protamine were used to neutralise their systemic heparinisation. In both cases the anaphylactoid reactions first became apparent after administration of protamine sulphate at the end of cardiac catheterisation. These cases show that adverse reactions to protamine need not be a contraindi...

  14. Potential wrist ligament injury in rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Curran; Sasha Sorr; Eva Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Wrist pain in rescuers performing chest compressions as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been reported anecdotally and recently in the literature. Studies have indicated that rescuers apply as much as 644 N of force to the victim′s chest with each compression, while standards require one hundred compressions per minute. Recent research suggests that forces transmitted through the rescuers′ wrists of less than 10% of those seen during the performance of chest compressions significantl...

  15. Implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation workshop in first MBBS

    OpenAIRE

    Saiyad, Shaista M; Saiyad, Mubassir; Pandya, Charu J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Students should be exposed to early clinical scenario so that they start developing competency-based learning right from their MBBS 1st year. Medical Council of India has recognized this need and has suggested early clinical exposure of MBBS 1st year students in their document Vision 2015. Medical education in India needs change for achieving desired competencies. It has been concluded that Indian medical undergraduates have inadequate knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)...

  16. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali; Urman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlat...

  17. Current Care Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation : Implementation, skills and attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    MÀkinen, Marja

    2010-01-01

    Background: The national resuscitation guidelines were published in Finland in 2002 and are based on international guidelines published in 2000. The main goal of the national guidelines, available on the Internet free of charge, is early defibrillation by nurses in an institutional setting. Aim: To study possible changes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practices, especially concerning early defibrillation, nurses and students attitudes of guideline implementation and nurses and ...

  18. Hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏肇伉; 周成斌; 张海波; 祝忠群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods Six pregnant ewes underwent fetal cardiopulmonary bypasses with artificial oxygenators and roller pumps for 30 minutes, which maintained the blood gas value at the fetal physiological level. The fetal blood pressure, heart rate, pH value and blood lactate levels were monitored. The levels of catecholamine, cortisol and insulin were measured pre-bypass and then again 30 minutes later. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels were monitored continuously during the bypass. Fetal hepatic PAS staining was also carried out.Results There were no changes before and during the bypass in fetal blood pressure, heart rate and blood gas. However, pH values decreased and blood lactate levels increased (P<0.05). The fetal catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly (P<0.01), while the levels of insulin did not change. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels increased at the beginning of the bypass (P<0.01), and then gradually slowed down during the bypass. The fetal hepatic PAS staining showed that hepatic glycogen was consumed in large amounts. After 30 minutes of bypass, the fetal lamb would not survive more than 1 hour.Conclusion The fetal lamb has a strong negative reaction to cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  1. Effect of Dextrose-Crystalloid Priming Solution on Fluid Requirements and Urine Output During Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, Samuel; Hacker, Jerriann

    1986-01-01

    We examined the influence of the addition of dextrose to crystalloid cardiopulmonary bypass priming solution. Ten patients received only lactated Ringer's solution during the perioperative period and as their cardiopulmonary bypass priming solution, while ten others, managed identically in all other respects, received only 5% dextrose in lactated Ringer's solution (D 5LR). During cardiopulmonary bypass, patients who did not receive glucose required more supplementary fluid (20.0 vs 2.2 ml Kg−...

  2. On partitions avoiding right crossings

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Sherry H. F.; Xu, Yuexiao

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Chen et al. derived the generating function for partitions avoiding right nestings and posed the problem of finding the generating function for partitions avoiding right crossings. In this paper, we derive the generating function for partitions avoiding right crossings via an intermediate structure of partial matchings avoiding 2-right crossings and right nestings. We show that there is a bijection between partial matchings avoiding 2-right crossing and right nestings and partitions...

  3. Avoidable waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP

  4. Post-mortem CT and MRI: appropriate post-mortem imaging appearances and changes related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, Curtis E; Dean, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Post-mortem cross-sectional imaging in the form of CT and, less frequently, MRI is an emerging facility in the evaluation of cause-of-death and human identification for the coronial service as well as in assisting the forensic investigation of suspicious deaths and homicide. There are marked differences between the radiological evaluation and interpretation of the CT and MRI features of the live patient (i.e. antemortem imaging) and the evaluation and interpretation of post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. In addition to the absence of frequently utilized tissue enhancement following intravenous contrast administration in antemortem imaging, there are a number of variable changes which occur in the tissues and organs of the body as a normal process following death, some of which are, in addition, affected significantly by environmental factors. Many patients and victims will also have undergone aggressive attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the perimortem period which will also significantly alter post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. It is paramount that the radiologist and pathologist engaged in the interpretation of such post-mortem imaging are familiar with the appropriate non-pathological imaging changes germane to death, the post-mortem interval and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in order to avoid erroneously attributing such changes to trauma or pathology. Some of the more frequently encountered radiological imaging considerations of this nature will be reviewed. PMID:26562099

  5. Redundant Robot Can Avoid Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayoun, Seraji; Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin

    1991-01-01

    Simple and direct control scheme enables redundant robot to avoid obstacles in workspace. In proposed scheme, called "configuration control", degrees of freedom used to configure robot to satisfy set of inequality constraints representing avoidance of obstacles, while simultaneously making end effector follow desired trajectory. Provides capability to avoid obstacles in dynamically varying environment where apriori planning of tasks not feasible.

  6. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Children and Adolescents With Dystrophinopathies : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Bart; Takken, Tim; Blank, A. Christian; van Moorsel, Huib; van der Pol, W. Ludo; de Groot, Janke F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine exercise response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children and adolescents with dystrophinopathies. Methods: Exercise response on the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) was compared with a standard care test protocol. Results: Nine boys (aged 10.8 +/- 4.7 years) wi

  7. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  8. Perioperative considerations in a sickle cell patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish S Raut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old child, a known case of sickle cell anaemia with a history suggestive of sickling crisis in the past was scheduled for surgical pulmonary valvotomy. Pre-operative blood transfusion and hydroxyurea were administered. Pre-operative blood transfusion is indicated in sickle cell disease patients to raise the haematocrit level and lower sickle haemoglobin (HbS levels. Before the start of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, exchange transfusion was performed to reduce HbS level and raise adult haemoglobin level. Hypothermia was prevented by employing normothermic CPB.

  9. Digital subtraction cardiopulmonary angiography using FCR (Fuji computed radiography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital subtraction cardiopulmonary angiography using FCR was performed on 46 patients including lung cancer, mediastinal tumor, giant bullous formation and others. The images of digital subtraction for pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and thoracic aorta were studied by comparing to the conventional pulmonary angiogram. Good images of pulmonary artery due to digital subtraction were obtained in 80 % of the 45 cases. This method needed only half volume of contrast media compared to the conventional for obtaining good images and thus reduced side effect. Therefore this method seems to be an usefull pre-operative examination in various chest diseases, especially in case of lung cancer. (author)

  10. A method of automatic control procedures cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Kutsov, M. S.; Trifonov, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study is to present the results of works on creation of methods of automatic control procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A method of automatic control procedure of CPR by evaluating the acoustic data of the dynamics of blood flow in the bifurcation of carotid arteries and the dynamics of air flow in a trachea according to the current guidelines for CPR is presented. Evaluation of the patient is carried out by analyzing the respiratory noise and blood flow in the interspaces between the chest compressions and artificial pulmonary ventilation. The device operation algorithm of automatic control procedures of CPR and its block diagram has been developed.

  11. Potential wrist ligament injury in rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Curran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wrist pain in rescuers performing chest compressions as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been reported anecdotally and recently in the literature. Studies have indicated that rescuers apply as much as 644 N of force to the victim′s chest with each compression, while standards require one hundred compressions per minute. Recent research suggests that forces transmitted through the rescuers′ wrists of less than 10% of those seen during the performance of chest compressions significantly strain the scapholunate ligament. Biomechanical research should be performed to further evaluate this possible correlation. Compensation for worker injury maybe involved.

  12. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Cardiopulmonary System in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Dilek Sevimli; Fuat Kocyigit

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study is to investigate the changes in cardiopulmonary system stimulated by aerobic exercise in different age group of children and to find out in which age group aerobic exercise is more effective. METHOD: Totally, 76 children participated in this study. Ages of the participants ranged between 11–17, and mean age was 14.08±0.65. Participants were divided into three groups according to their age range. There were 23 in the first and second and 30 participant...

  13. Lepirudin as an alternative to "heparin allergy" during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissis Haralabos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A treatment strategy of a difficult and unusual problem is presented. We are reporting a case of a patient who had a documented allergy to heparin and required Cardiac surgery for an ASD closure. The anticoagulation regime used during cardiopulmonary bypass was lepirudin based. This report indicates that r-hirudin provides effective anticoagulation, however unless ECT is monitoring, post operative hemorrhage is encountered. Therefore this case is unique not only because of its rarity but also by the fact that it presents the caveats encountered when ECT is not available.

  14. MEST- avoid next extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Asteroid 2011 AG5 will impact on Earth in 2040. (See Donald K. Yoemans, ``Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check,'' NASA-JPL, 2012) In 2011, The author say: the dark hole will take the dark comet to impact our solar system in 20 years, and give a systemic model between the sun and its companion-dark hole to explain why were there periodicity mass extinction on earth. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.CAL.C1.7, BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.24, BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78 and BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17) The dark Asteroid 2011 AG5 (as a dark comet) is made of the dark matter which has a space-time (as frequence-amplitude square) center- a different systemic model from solar systemic model. It can asborb the space-time and wave. So it is ``dark.'' When many dark matters hit on our earth, they can break our atom structure and our genetic code to trigger the Mass Extinction. In our experiments, consciousness can change the systematic model and code by a life-informational technology. So it can change the output signals of the solar cell. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.MAR.C1.286 and BAPS.2012.MAR.P33.14) So we will develop the genetic code of lives to evolution and sublimation, will use the dark matter to change the systemic model between dark hole and sun and will avoid next extinction.

  15. The application of the internal friction damping nondestructive evaluation technique for detecting incipient cracking in critical components, by-pass lines and piping systems in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical feasibility program of utilizing an internal friction damping (IFD) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique under laboratory and field conditions for piping systems has been initiated. The applicability of the IFD-NDE technique for four inch (10.1 cm) stainless steel by-pass lines and ten inch (25.4 cm) feedwater lines has been established. The overall objectives of the program include: 1. application of the IFD-NDE technique for four inch (10.1 cm) stainless steel lines that simulate by-pass lines, 2. application of the IFD-NDE technique to full size feedwater lines in an on-line boiling water reactor, 3. evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the IFD-NDE technique as an incipient crack detection method for laboratory stress corrosion cracking tests. (orig.)

  16. New Replacement of a Thrombosed Mitral Valve via Right Anterolateral Thoracotomy in a Patient with Coronary Artery By-Pass Graft and Functioning Internal Mammary Artery Graft

    OpenAIRE

    CEVİZ, Münacettin

    2007-01-01

    A 49-year-old male, who had undergone mitral valve replacement with mechanical cardiac valve and coronary arterial by-pass grafting six years previously, was admitted to our hospital with acute dyspnea. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed that one of the leaflets of the prosthetic valve was entirely immobilized in the closed position, and an immobile soft tissue mass was detected on the ventricular side of the obstructed leaflet. We performed re-replacement using a 29-mm mechanical pros...

  17. CLINICAL ADVANTAGES OF TOTAL CAVOPULMONARY ANASTOMOSIS WITHOUT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-min Chu; Qing-yu Wu; Jian-ping Xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate surgical methods and results of extracardiac conduit total cavopulmonary anastomosis (ECTCPA) without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).Methods From May 2000 to April 2003, 11 patients with functional univentricle underwent off-pump EC-TCPA (noCPB group). Their postoperative outcome was retrospectively compared with a 17-patient group who underwent EC-TCPA with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB group) over a concurrent time period.Results There was 1 operative death in no-CPB group and 2 in CPB group; early postoperative hemodynamics appeared to significantly improve in no-CPB group. Blood and platelet transfusions decreased and blood plasma transfusion significantly lowered in no-CPB group compared with CPB group (P = 0.036). Postoperative courses of patients in no-CPB group were smooth and event free, and extubation time was substantially short. Intensive cares unit stay (P=0.04) and hospital stay (P= 0.02) postoperation were significantly shorter, hospital costs were significantly reduced (P= 0.004) in no-CPB group compared with CPB group.Conclusions EC-TCPA without use of CPB is not a difficult procedure; the procedure results in improvement in postoperative hemodynamics, and decreased use of blood and blood products. It is a more efficient operation with more short recovery time and reduced hospital stay.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Circuit Models for Predicting Injury to the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard; Wing, Sarah; Bassingthwaighte, James; Neal, Maxwell

    2004-11-01

    Circuit models have been used extensively in physiology to describe cardiopulmonary function. Such models are being used in the DARPA Virtual Soldier (VS) Project* to predict the response to injury or physiological stress. The most complex model consists of systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a four-chamber heart sub-model. This model also includes baroreceptor feedback, airway mechanics, gas exchange, and pleural pressure influence on the circulation. As part of the VS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been evaluating various cardiopulmonary circuit models for predicting the effects of injury to the heart. We describe, from a physicist's perspective, the concept of building circuit models, discuss both unstressed and stressed models, and show how the stressed models are used to predict effects of specific wounds. *This work was supported by a grant from the DARPA, executed by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command/TATRC Cooperative Agreement, Contract # W81XWH-04-2-0012. The submitted manuscript has been authored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed for the U.S. DOE by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purpose.

  19. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 ± 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations

  20. Myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Aron-Frederik

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodynamic function may be depressed in the early postoperative stages after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the analysis of the myocardial contractility in neonates after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and mild hypothermia. Methods Three indices of left ventricular myocardial contractile function (dP/dt, (dP/dt/P, and wall thickening were studied up to 6 hours after CPB in neonatal piglets (CPB group; n = 4. The contractility data were analysed and then compared to the data of newborn piglets who also underwent median thoracotomy and instrumentation for the same time intervals but without CPB (non-CPB group; n = 3. Results Left ventricular dP/dtmax and (dP/dtmax/P remained stable in CPB group, while dP/dtmax decreased in non-CPB group 5 hours postoperatively (1761 ± 205 mmHg/s at baseline vs. 1170 ± 205 mmHg/s after 5 h; p max and (dP/dtmax/P there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Comparably, although myocardial thickening decreased in the non-CPB group the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions The myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets remained stable 6 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass and mild hypothermia probably due to regional hypercontractility.

  1. Hypothermia and normothermia effects on mortality rate of cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rahdari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with higher risk of mortality and morbidity, thus it should be investigated regarding the major risk factors. Temperature management have a significant role in postoperative cerebral and neurological complications; however the optimum temperature during cardiopulmonary surgery is not certainly detected. This systematic review has investigated the differences between hypothermia and normothermia regarding postoperative mortality. Method: PubMed was searched for the relevant articles. Only English language articles were included with no time limitation. Data regarding in-hospital patient deaths provided in each article mostly within 30 days after the surgery, were extracted and compared based on relative risk reduction (RRR, absolute risk reduction (ARR, and number needed to treat (NNT.Result: Totally, 28 articles were retrieved and extracted. The mortality rate was zero in hypothermic and normotehrmic groups of 8/28 included studies, thus the RRR, ARR, and NNT could not be calculated. There were no significant differences between investigated groups of each included studies regarding the patients’ age, gender, and preoperative conditions.Conclusions: No significant difference was obtained between two studied groups. Similar prevalence of death observed between hypothermic and normothermic groups might be due to the sample size of studies, or the subsequent cares performed in intensive care units that assist to reduce the postoperative mortality rate. According to the obtained results, both of these procedures might be similarly safe regarding mortality rate.

  2. Age-related changes in chest geometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Schleien, C L; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Rogers, M C; Traystman, R J

    1987-06-01

    We studied alterations of chest geometry during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in anesthetized immature swine. Pulsatile force was applied to the sternum in increments to determine the effects of increasing compression on chest geometry and intrathoracic vascular pressures. In 2-wk- and 1-mo-old piglets, permanent changes in chest shape developed due to incomplete recoil of the chest along the anteroposterior axis, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were generated. In 3-mo-old animals, permanent chest deformity did not develop, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were not produced. We propose a theoretical model of the chest as an elliptic cylinder. Pulsatile displacement along the minor axis of an ellipse produces a greater decrease in cross-sectional area than displacement of a circular cross section. As thoracic cross section became less circular due to deformity, greater changes in thoracic volume, and hence pressure, were produced. With extreme deformity at high force, pulsatile displacement became limited, diminishing pressure generation. We conclude that changes in chest geometry are important in producing intrathoracic intravascular pressure during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in piglets. PMID:3610916

  3. Comparative analysis of operation in the regimes with by-pass of high pressure heat exchangers for two of the same power but different configuration steam turbine units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savic, B.M.; Zivanovic, T. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Perkovic, B. [Electric Power Industry of Serbia, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Power Generation and Transmission Dept.

    1999-11-01

    Additional power demands and some component failures at the high pressure heat exchangers system are two usual reasons for the operation in the regimes with by-pass of high pressure heat exchangers. This way the power output increase with the unchanged fresh steam rate could be very useful in practice because of its short-time response on electricity system demands, especially important in the circumstances of the steam boiler unavailability to produce the greater fresh steam rate and to retain such production for a longer period of time. Shortage of data about the operating conditions and operation costs for these regimes for two referent steam turbine units is certainly one of the important reasons for making this analysis. But, one comparative analysis of the operation in these regimes is yet more interesting having in mind that the reference units are practically of the same power, but different configurations. This analysis has been done on the basis of the regimes calculations for different variants of high pressure heat exchangers shut-off. The influences of the changes of cooling conditions in the condensers on the operating regimes with by-pass of high pressure heat exchangers have also been included. The potentially limiting factors during operation in the regimes with by-pass of high pressure heat exchangers have been discussed.

  4. Endless self-avoiding walks

    OpenAIRE

    Clisby, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent $\

  5. Communication Avoiding ILU0 Preconditioner

    OpenAIRE

    Grigori, Laura; Moufawad, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a communication avoiding ILU0 preconditioner for solving large linear systems of equations by using iterative Krylov subspace methods. Recent research has focused on communication avoiding Krylov subspace methods based on so called s-step methods. However there is no communication avoiding preconditioner yet, and this represents a serious limitation of these methods. Our preconditioner allows to perform s iterations of the iterative method with no communication, throu...

  6. Extendable self-avoiding walks

    OpenAIRE

    Grimmett, Geoffrey R.; Holroyd, Alexander E; Peres, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    The connective constant mu of a graph is the exponential growth rate of the number of n-step self-avoiding walks starting at a given vertex. A self-avoiding walk is said to be forward (respectively, backward) extendable if it may be extended forwards (respectively, backwards) to a singly infinite self-avoiding walk. It is called doubly extendable if it may be extended in both directions simultaneously to a doubly infinite self-avoiding walk. We prove that the connective constants for forward,...

  7. Myocardial edema and compromised left ventricular function attributable to dirofilariasis and cardiopulmonary bypass in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohn, D A; Davis, K L; Mehlhorn, U; Allen, S J; Laine, G A

    1995-02-01

    We investigated the relation between left ventricular dysfunction and myocardial edema in dogs with heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection that were undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Dogs with and without D immitis were anesthetized by continuous thiopental infusion and were mechanically ventilated. Sonomicrometry crystals were placed on the long and short axes of the left ventricle, and a Millar pressure transducer was placed in the left ventricular chamber. Pressure-volume loops were digitized and continuously recorded. Dogs with and without D immitis were placed on standard hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, with 1 hour of aortic cross-clamp. Wet-to-dry weight ratio corrected for residual blood volume was used to quantitate the volume of myocardial edema. Preload recruitable stroke work was used as a preload-independent index of systolic function. Tau, the isovolumic relaxation time constant, was determined to assess diastolic relaxation. Dogs with D immitis had increased baseline myocardial wet-to-dry weight ratio. After cardiopulmonary bypass, myocardial edema increased in all dogs. Acute edema attributable to cardiopulmonary bypass decreased preload recruitable stroke work in all dogs of both groups, and dogs with D immitis could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Myocardial edema increased diastolic relaxation times (tau) in dogs with and without D immitis. We conclude that cardiopulmonary bypass and heartworm infection induce myocardial edema. This edema compromises left ventricular systolic and diastolic function making D immitis an important confounding factor in weaning dogs from cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:7717590

  8. Prudent Self-Avoiding Walks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Guttmann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We have produced extended series for prudent self-avoiding walks on the square lattice. These are subsets of self-avoiding walks. We conjecture the exact growth constant and critical exponent for the walks, and show that the (anisotropic generating function is almost certainly not differentiably-finite.

  9. Prudent Self-Avoiding Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Guttmann, Anthony J.; Dethridge, John C.

    2008-01-01

    We have produced extended series for prudent self-avoiding walks on the square lattice. These are subsets of self-avoiding walks. We conjecture the exact growth constant and critical exponent for the walks, and show that the (anisotropic) generating function is almost certainly not differentiably-finite.

  10. Acquaintance Rape: Effective Avoidance Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine-MacCombie, Joyce; Koss, Mary P.

    1986-01-01

    Determined that acknowledged and unacknowledged acquaintance rape victims and rape avoiders could be discriminated by situational variables and response strategies. Avoiders were less likely to have experienced passive or internalizing emotions at the time of the assault, perceived the assault as less violent, and were more likely to have utilized…

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.;

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the first...... presentation of coronary artery disease is sudden death, typically in (western) men. [Anonymous, 2000, ID-469] However, achieving a clear understanding of why CPR saves some lives remains shrouded in mist; mist made even thicker by contradictory reports, different school of thought and persistently low...... survival rates. Despite the suggestion that much remains unclear, CPR is not new. An early report, in an 18 year old woman, of CPR as performed today, initially known as closed-chest cardiac resuscitation (CCCR), dates from 1858 [Husveti, ID-649]. Following airway obstruction and hypoxia, cardiac arrest...

  12. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines for...... Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  13. Cardiopulmonary arrest induced by anaphylactoid reaction with contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Iwao; Hori, Shingo; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Aoki, Katsunori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2002-05-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated contrast media can cause life-threatening events and even death. A 44-year-old woman presented with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) immediately following the administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media for an intravenous pyelography. Her cardiac rhythm during CPA was asystole. She was successfully resuscitated by the radiologists supported by paged emergency physicians using the prompt intravenous administration of 1 mg of epinephrine. Neither laryngeal edema nor bronchial spasm was observed during the course of treatment, and she was discharged on the 4th day without any complications. The patient did not have a history of allergy, but had experienced a myocardial infarction and aortitis. She had undergone 11 angiographies and had been taking a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Planned emergency medical backup is advisable to ensure resuscitation in the event of an anaphylactoid reaction to the use of contrast media in-hospital settings. PMID:12009227

  14. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An experimental study in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlfart Björn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal manual closed chest compressions are difficult to give. A mechanical compression/decompression device, named LUCAS, is programmed to give compression according to the latest international guidelines (2005 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. The aim of the present study was to compare manual CPR with LUCAS-CPR. Methods 30 kg pigs were anesthetized and intubated. After a base-line period and five minutes of ventricular fibrillation, manual CPR (n = 8 or LUCAS-CPR (n = 8 was started and run for 20 minutes. Professional paramedics gave manual chest compression's alternating in 2-minute periods. Ventilation, one breath for each 10 compressions, was given to all animals. Defibrillation and, if needed, adrenaline were given to obtain a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Results The mean coronary perfusion pressure was significantly (p Conclusions LUCAS-CPR gave significantly higher coronary perfusion pressure and significantly fewer rib fractures than manual CPR in this porcine model.

  15. Quantification of cardiopulmonary blood volume turnover using dynamic PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Kero, Tanja;

    index, the central circulatory turnover (CCT) which represents the fractional exchange of blood per stroke within the cardiopulmonary blood pool and can be measured from any dynamic PET scan. Methods: Data from 111 clinical patients were analysed retrospectively. Patients underwent a 6-min 15O...... and RV time-activity curves were extracted after which their first-pass peaks were isolated and the centroid of each peak was obtained. Mean pulmonary transit time (MPTT, min) was defined as the difference between the LV centroid and the RV centroid and CCT was defined as 1/(MPTT*heart rate). Results.......001). Decrease of CCT was especially pronounced in severely ischemic patients already at rest Conclusion: Pulmonary transit times and central circulatory turnover can be measured automatically using dynamic PET. Since both are correlated with severity of myocardial ischemia already at rest, they appear to...

  16. Myhre syndrome: Clinical features and restrictive cardiopulmonary complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lois J; Grange, Dorothy K; Delaney, Jeffrey W; Yetman, Anji T; Hammel, James M; Sanmann, Jennifer N; Perry, Deborah A; Schaefer, G Bradley; Olney, Ann Haskins

    2015-12-01

    Myhre syndrome, a connective tissue disorder characterized by deafness, restricted joint movement, compact body habitus, and distinctive craniofacial and skeletal features, is caused by heterozygous mutations in SMAD4. Cardiac manifestations reported to date have included patent ductus arteriosus, septal defects, aortic coarctation and pericarditis. We present five previously unreported patients with Myhre syndrome. Despite varied clinical phenotypes all had significant cardiac and/or pulmonary pathology and abnormal wound healing. Included herein is the first report of cardiac transplantation in patients with Myhre syndrome. A progressive and markedly abnormal fibroproliferative response to surgical intervention is a newly delineated complication that occurred in all patients and contributes to our understanding of the natural history of this disorder. We recommend routine cardiopulmonary surveillance for patients with Myhre syndrome. Surgical intervention should be approached with extreme caution and with as little invasion as possible as the propensity to develop fibrosis/scar tissue is dramatic and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:26420300

  17. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic [EMF] and radiomicrosphere [RMS]) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal

  18. Assessing Late Cardiopulmonary Function in Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Using Exercise Cardiopulmonary Function Test and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Ming-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Lu, Chun-Wei; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) usually experience progressive right ventricle (RV) dysfunction due to pulmonary regurgitation (PR). This could further worsen the cardiopulmonary function. This study aimed to compare the changes in patient exercise cardiopulmonary test and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and consider the implication of these changes. Methods Our study examined repaired TOF patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) to obtain maximal (peak oxygen consumption, peak VO2) and submaximal parameters (oxygen uptake efficiency plateau, oxygen uptake efficiency plateau (OUEP), and ratio of minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production, VE/VCO2 slope). Additionally, the hemodynamic status was assessed by using cardiac magnetic resonance. Criteria for exclusion included TOF patients with pulmonary atresia, atrioventricular septal defect, or absence of pulmonary valve syndrome. Results We enrolled 158 patients whose mean age at repair was 7.8 ± 9.1 years (range 0.1-49.2 years) and the mean patient age at CPET was 29.5 ± 12.2 years (range 7.0-57.0 years). Severe PR (PR fraction ≥ 40%) in 53 patients, moderate in 55, and mild (PR fraction 163 ml/m2. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 63 ± 8%, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVi) was 65 ± 12 ml/m2, and LVESVi was 25 ± 14 ml/m2. CPET revealed significantly decreased peak VO2 (68.5 ± 14.4% of predicted), and fair OUEP (90.3 ± 14.1% of predicted) and VE/VCO2 slope (27.1 ± 5.3). PR fraction and age at repair were negatively correlated with maximal and submaximal exercise indicators (peak VO2 and OUEP). Left ventricular (LV) function and size were positively correlated with peak VO2 and OUEP. Conclusions The results of CPET showed that patients with repaired TOF had a low maximal exercise capacity (peak VO2), but a fair submaximal exercise capacity (OUEP and VE/VCO2 slope), suggesting limited exercise capability in high

  19. Experimental study of the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A6 reactor are experimentally studied.The experiments are performed using a 1:1 scale mock-up of an external fuel element cell.Different gaps between fuel elements are considered in order to take into account the design allowances. Different flows are considered to take into account the normal operation flow range.Measurement uncertainties are included.The results will be used to calculate the core flow distribution

  20. Geologic interpretations of seismic data: Braintree-Weymouth by-pass stations 29-56, Liberty Street grade separation in Braintree, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    At the request of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, seismic and geologic studies were made for the projected Braintree-Weymouth By-Pass grade separation at Liberty Street in Braintree, Massachusetts. The work was performed in order to furnish data that would aid the engineers in preparing estimates of the quantity of bedrock to be excavated for this project. The study represents part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey. The work was performed in May 1949.

  1. Description and theory of operation of the computer by-pass system for the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A triplex digital flight control system was installed in a NASA F-8C airplane to provide fail operate, full authority control. The triplex digital computers and interface circuitry process the pilot commands and aircraft motion feedback parameters according to the selected control laws, and they output the surface commands as an analog signal to the servoelectronics for position control of the aircraft's power actuators. The system and theory of operation of the computer by pass and servoelectronics are described and an automated ground test for each axis is included.

  2. Changing attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation in older people: a 15-year follow-up study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P E

    2009-03-01

    while it is well established that individual patient preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may change with time, the stability of population preferences, especially during periods of social and economic change, has received little attention.

  3. Utilising cardiopulmonary bypass for cancer surgery. Malignancy-induced protein C deficiency and thrombophilia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, C

    2012-02-03

    Cardiopulmonary bypass has evolved over the last 30 years. It is an important tool for the cardiac surgeon today and also has applications in non-cardiac operations such as surgery to extract tumours. Such patients undergoing surgery for cancer may be at an increased risk of a thromboembolic event post surgery, due to disturbances in the normal clotting pathway leading to hypercoagulability. One such disturbance is malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency. A deficiency of Protein C can cause hypercoagulabitity. Recent studies have examined cardiopulmonary bypass and inherited Protein C deficiency. However, surgery for cancer patients with a malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency involving cardiopulmonary bypass has not been reported. Surgery using CPB in these patients may result in increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this article is to review the literature in order to discuss the occurrence, the aetiology and possible management of cancer patients with malignancy-induced Protein C deficiencies that require cardiopulmonary bypass for their surgery.

  4. Wireless System for Continuous Cardiopulmonary Monitoring in a Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the NJM Sense-It system based on small sensor tags, which include a cardiopulmonary MEMS sensor for measuring heartbeat and breath rates...

  5. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – Its application in cardiology and occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kurpesa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a method used to assess the exercise capacity. It is used in cardiology to define the diagnostic and prognostic information, the treatment and its effectiveness. This method is also useful in sport medicine and in occupational medicine. The cardiopulmonary exercise test involves measuring of gas exchange during exercise testing. The article presents the main parameters assessed during the test and the indications and contraindications for conducting the test. It also reveals the results of recently published clinical trials on the use of cardiopulmonary exercise test in patients with cardiovascular disease and in the working population. The study included variability of respiratory parameters during the cardiopulmonary exercise test and after its completion, as well as their impact on the prognostic value. In addition, the results of a study involving an optimal choice of interval training on the basis of oxygen consumption at peak exercise are summarized. Med Pr 2014;65(5:665–674

  6. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – Its application in cardiology and occupational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Kurpesa; Katarzyna Jerka; Alicja Bortkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a method used to assess the exercise capacity. It is used in cardiology to define the diagnostic and prognostic information, the treatment and its effectiveness. This method is also useful in sport medicine and in occupational medicine. The cardiopulmonary exercise test involves measuring of gas exchange during exercise testing. The article presents the main parameters assessed during the test and the indications and contraindications for conducting the tes...

  7. Self-priming Hemodynamic Reservoir and Inline Flow Meter for a Cardiopulmonary Bypass Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Raasch, David; Austin, Jon; Tallman, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Simulator exercises are used at Midwestern University to augment academic and laboratory training toward consolidating particular skills, increasing situation awareness, and preparing the student for practice within the team environment of an operating room. This paper describes an enhanced cardiopulmonary bypass simulator consisting of a self-priming hemodynamic reservoir that includes an inline flow meter. A typical cardiopulmonary bypass adult perfusion circuit was assembled using a roller...

  8. Ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass did not attenuate inflammatory response or affect postoperative outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Durukan, Ahmet Baris; Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ucar, Halil Ibrahim; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Salman, Nevriye; Utku Unal, Ertekin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cardiopulmonary bypass causes a series of inflammatory events that have adverse effects on the outcome. The release of cytokines, including interleukins, plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the process. Simultaneously, cessation of ventilation and pulmonary blood flow contribute to ischaemia–reperfusion injury in the lungs when reperfusion is maintained. Collapse of the lungs during cardiopulmonary bypass leads to postoperative atelectasis, which correlates with the amount...

  9. Neuromorphic UAS Collision Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Using biologically-inspired neuromorphic optic flow algorithms is a novel approach in collision avoidance for UAS. Traditional computer vision algorithms rely on...

  10. Endless self-avoiding walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisby, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent ν. However, there is no power law correction to the exponential number growth for this new model, i.e. the critical exponent γ = 1 exactly in any dimension. In addition, the number growth has no analytic corrections to scaling, and we have convincing numerical evidence to support the conjecture that the amplitude for the number growth is a universal quantity. The technique by which end-effects are eliminated may be generalized to other models of polymers such as interacting self-avoiding walks.

  11. Endless self-avoiding walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a self-avoiding walk model for which end-effects are completely eliminated. We enumerate the number of these walks for various lattices in dimensions two and three, and use these enumerations to study the properties of this model. We find that endless self-avoiding walks have the same connective constant as self-avoiding walks, and the same Flory exponent ν. However, there is no power law correction to the exponential number growth for this new model, i.e. the critical exponent γ = 1 exactly in any dimension. In addition, the number growth has no analytic corrections to scaling, and we have convincing numerical evidence to support the conjecture that the amplitude for the number growth is a universal quantity. The technique by which end-effects are eliminated may be generalized to other models of polymers such as interacting self-avoiding walks. (paper)

  12. Avoidable nightmare; Der vermeidbare Albtraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieg, Mirco

    2010-07-01

    Failure of photovoltaic systems because of serious damage is an increasing phenomenon. Especially in older systems, faulty projecting and installation may have costly late effects. Insurance companies reckon that most cases of damage and failure could easily be avoided. (orig.)

  13. Vision-based obstacle avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, John

    2006-07-18

    A method for allowing a robot to avoid objects along a programmed path: first, a field of view for an electronic imager of the robot is established along a path where the electronic imager obtains the object location information within the field of view; second, a population coded control signal is then derived from the object location information and is transmitted to the robot; finally, the robot then responds to the control signal and avoids the detected object.

  14. Self-avoiding quantum walks

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Elizabeth; Rohde, Peter P.; Twamley, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Quantum walks exhibit many unique characteristics compared to classical random walks. In the classical setting, self-avoiding random walks have been studied as a variation on the usual classical random walk. Classical self-avoiding random walks have found numerous applications, most notably in the modeling of protein folding. We consider the analogous problem in the quantum setting. We complement a quantum walk with a memory register that records where the walker has previously resided. The w...

  15. Who participates in tax avoidance?

    OpenAIRE

    Alstadsæter, Annette; Jacob, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sources of heterogeneity in legal tax avoidance strategies across individuals. Three conditions are required for a taxpayer to participate in tax avoidance: incentive, access, and awareness. Using rich Swedish administrative panel data with a unique link between corporate and individual tax returns, we analyze individual participation in legal tax planning around the 2006 Swedish tax reform. Our results suggest that closely held corporations are utilized to facilitate ...

  16. Predator Avoidance in Extremophile Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Plath

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme habitats are often characterized by reduced predation pressures, thus representing refuges for the inhabiting species. The present study was designed to investigate predator avoidance of extremophile populations of Poecilia mexicana and P. sulphuraria that either live in hydrogen sulfide-rich (sulfidic springs or cave habitats, both of which are known to have impoverished piscine predator regimes. Focal fishes that inhabited sulfidic springs showed slightly weaker avoidance reactions when presented with several naturally occurring predatory cichlids, but strongest differences to populations from non-sulfidic habitats were found in a decreased shoaling tendency with non-predatory swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii females. When comparing avoidance reactions between P. mexicana from a sulfidic cave (Cueva del Azufre and the adjacent sulfidic surface creek (El Azufre, we found only slight differences in predator avoidance, but surface fish reacted much more strongly to the non-predatory cichlid Vieja bifasciata. Our third experiment was designed to disentangle learned from innate effects of predator recognition. We compared laboratory-reared (i.e., predator-naïve and wild-caught (i.e., predator-experienced individuals of P. mexicana from a non-sulfidic river and found no differences in their reaction towards the presented predators. Overall, our results indicate (1 that predator avoidance is still functional in extremophile Poecilia spp. and (2 that predator recognition and avoidance reactions have a strong genetic basis.

  17. Effect of by-pass and effluent recirculation on nitrogen removal in hybrid constructed wetlands for domestic and industrial wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos, V; Gonzalo, O G; Trueba-Santiso, A; Ruiz, I; Soto, M

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid constructed wetlands (CWs) including subsurface horizontal flow (HF) and vertical flow (VF) steps look for effective nitrification and denitrification through the combination of anaerobic/anoxic and aerobic conditions. Several CW configurations including several configurations of single pass systems (HF + HF, VF + VF, VF + HF), the Bp(VF + HF) arrangement (with feeding by-pass) and the R(HF + VF) system (with effluent recirculation) were tested treating synthetic domestic wastewater. Two HF/VF area ratios (AR) were tested for the VF + HF and Bp(VF + HF) systems. In addition, a R(VF + VF) system was tested for the treatment of a high strength industrial wastewater. The percentage removal of TSS, COD and BOD5 was usually higher than 95% in all systems. The single pass systems showed TN removal below the threshold of 50% and low removal rates (0.6-1.2 g TN/m(2) d), except the VF + VF system which reached 63% and 3.5 g TN/m(2) d removal but only at high loading rates. Bp(VF + HF) systems required by-pass ratios of 40-50% and increased TN removal rates to approximately 50-60% in a sustainable manner. Removal rates depended on the AR value, increasing from 1.6 (AR 2.0) to 5.2 g TN/m(2) d (AR 0.5), both working with synthetic domestic wastewater. On real domestic wastewater the Bp (VF + HF) (AR 0.5 and 30% by-pass) reached 2.5 g TN/m(2) d removal rate. Effluent recirculation significantly improved the TN removal efficiency and rate. The R(HF + VF) system showed stable TN removals of approximately 80% at loading rates ranging from 2 to 8 g TN/m(2) d. High TN removal rates (up to 73% TN and 8.4 g TN/m(2) d) were also obtained for the R(VF + VF) system treating industrial wastewater. PMID:27441816

  18. A pulsatile pump for cardiopulmonary bypass and its clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Y; Kawai, T; Nishiyama, K; Murayama, Y; Toda, S; Wada, T; Kitaura, K; Sato, S; Kadowaki, M; Kanki, Y

    1988-09-01

    A pulsatile pump driven by a coil spring, which was designed and constructed by us, is described in this report. It consists of two main parts, a disposable blood chamber and a driving section. The blood chamber has two leaflet valves and a piston, which is covered with two bellofram rolling diaphragms and moves into the housing to draw in and eject the blood. The driving section consists of three cams, an electric motor and a coil spring. The ejection force is wholly produced by the compressed coil spring and is transmitted to the piston in the blood chamber by a rod. This pump allows the ejection pressure, the beat rates, and the stroke volume all to be changed independently. The performance of the pump was tested by using a circulation model where the beat rate was adjusted from 30 to 250 bpm. The output subsequently increased from 0.8 l/min to 5.7 l/min and the stroke volume, from 20.4 ml to 36.7 ml. This new pump has been used for clinical cardiopulmonary bypasses in 24 patients of open heart surgery and the pressure traces during perfusion resembled those of the patients' own hearts. PMID:3230723

  19. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: who should decide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Zohar; Garasic, Mirko; Piperberg, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Whether to allow the presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been a highly contentious topic in recent years. Even though a great deal of evidence and professional guidelines support the option of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), many healthcare professionals still oppose it. One of the main arguments espoused by the latter is that family members should not be allowed for the sake of the patient's best interests, whether it is to increase his chances of survival, respect his privacy or leave his family with a last positive impression of him. In this paper, we examine the issue of FPDR from the patient's point of view. Since the patient requires CPR, he is invariably unconscious and therefore incompetent. We discuss the Autonomy Principle and the Three-Tiered process for surrogate decision making, as well as the Beneficence Principle and show that these are limited in providing us with an adequate tool for decision making in this particular case. Rather, we rely on a novel principle (or, rather, a novel specification of an existing principle) and a novel integrated model for surrogate decision making. We show that this model is more satisfactory in taking the patient's true wishes under consideration and encourages a joint decision making process by all parties involved. PMID:23557910

  20. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  1. The Role of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in IPF Prognosis

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    Christina Triantafillidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In IPF, defects in lung mechanics and gas exchange manifest with exercise limitation due to dyspnea, the most prominent and disabling symptom. Aim. To evaluate the role of exercise testing through the 6MWT (6-minute walk test and CPET (cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the survival of patients with IPF. Methods. This is a prospective, observational study evaluating in 25 patients the relationship between exercise variables through both the 6MWT and CPET and survival. Results. By the end of the observational period 17 patients were alive (33% mortality. Observation ranged from 9 to 64 months. VE/VCO2 slope (slope of relation between minute ventilation and CO2 production, VO2 peak/kg (peak oxygen consumption/kg, VE/VCO2 ratio at anaerobic threshold, 6MWT distance, desaturation, and DLCO% were significant predictors of survival while VE/VCO2 slope and VO2 peak/kg had the strongest correlation with outcome. The optimal model for mortality risk estimation was VO2 peak/kg + DLCO% combined. Furthermore, VE/VCO2 slope and VO2 peak/kg were correlated with distance and desaturation during the 6MWT. Conclusion. The integration of oxygen consumption and diffusing capacity proved to be a reliable predictor of survival because both variables reflect major underlying physiologic determinants of exercise limitation.

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana

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    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations.Objective: The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills.Method: A pre-test, intervention and re-test time-series research design was adopted, and data were collected from 102 nurses from the 2 referral hospitals in Botswana. A multiple choice questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data.Results: All nurses failed the pre-test. Their knowledge and skills improved after training, but deteriorated over the three months until the post-test was conducted.Conclusion: The significantly low levels of registered nurses’ CPR skills in Botswana should be addressed by instituting country-wide CPR training and regular refresher courses.

  3. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, M.; Castrén, M.; Nurmi, J.; Niemi-Murola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p Nurse's Role (p CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills. PMID:27144027

  4. DOES MEAN PERFUSION PRESSURE DURING CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS AFFECT RENAL FUNCTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery acute kidney injury (AKI is a common and serious condition carrying significant costs and is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB surgery, modifiable factors may contri bute to post - operative AKI. Their prevention might be a potential target for nephroprotection and any other morbidity after cardiac surgery. METHODS AND MATERIAL : The objective of the present study was to identify and determine whether intraoperative hypot ension or any other cofactor are independent risk factors for postoperative AKI defined by the RIFLE (renal Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of renal function and End - stage renal disease. On basis of this patients were divided into two groups according to rise in serum creatinine >0.3 mg/dl till 72 hrs postoperatively. Group B patients have developed AKI (n=34 and the remaining patients were in Group A. RESULT : In our study we have found that mean arterial pressure during CPB were less in group B patients compare to group A patients which was statistically significant (p<0.001. And in this group ICU stay and mortality rate were also high compare to group A pati ent who had not developed AKI. CONCLUSION: Lower MAP during CPB is associated with development of postoperative renal derangement, leads to increase ICU stay and mortality. Larger studies are required to further support the evidence

  5. Trainers’ Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mäkinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers’ attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D, Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N=185 focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree. Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse’s Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student’s t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p<0.01. Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p<0.01 were less confident about their Nurse’s Role (p<0.01 and Nontechnical Skills (p<0.01. Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  6. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  7. Avoidance: grammatical or semantic causes?

    OpenAIRE

    Hulstijn, J.H.; de Marchena, E.

    1989-01-01

    This article follows up on a study by Dagut and Laufer (1985), who found that Hebrew learners of English avoid phrasal verbs, such as ‘let down’, while preferring one-word verbs, such as ‘;disappoint’, since phrasal verbs do not exist in Hebrew. A corollary derived from Dagut and Laufer's study is that Dutch learners of English would tend not to avoid English phrasal verbs, since phrasal verbs also exist in Dutch. It was hypothesized, however, that Dutch learners of English as a second langua...

  8. Cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery: the role of transcranial Doppler – a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Stephen P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD is a sensitive, real time tool for monitoring cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV. This technique is fast, accurate, reproducible and noninvasive. In the setting of congenital heart surgery, TCD finds application in the evaluation of cerebral blood flow variations during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Methodology We performed a search on human studies published on the MEDLINE using the keyword "trans cranial Doppler" crossed with "pediatric cardiac surgery" AND "cardio pulmonary by pass", OR deep hypothermic cardiac arrest", OR "neurological monitoring". Discussion Current scientific evidence suggests a good correlation between changes in cbral blood flow and mean cerebral artery (MCA blood flow velocity. The introduction of Doppler technology has allowed an accurate monitorization of cerebral blood flow (CBF during circulatory arrest and low-flow CPB. TCD has also been utilized in detecting cerebral emboli, improper cannulation or cross clamping of aortic arch vessels. Limitations of TCD routine utilization are represented by the need of a learning curve and some experience by the operators, as well as the need of implementing CBF informations with, for example, data on brain tissue oxygen delivery and consumption. Conclusion In this light, TCD plays an essential role in multimodal neurological monitorization during CPB (Near Infrared Spectroscopy, TCD, processed electro encephalography that, according to recent studies, can help to significantly improve neurological outcome after cardiac surgery in neonates and pediatric patients.

  9. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Khanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960′s when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author′s experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved.

  10. Avoiding plagiarism in academic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Irene

    Plagiarism means taking the work of another and presenting it as one's own, resulting in potential upset for the original author and disrepute for the professions involved. This article aims to explore the issue of plagiarism and some mechanisms for detection and avoidance. PMID:19186631

  11. Plagiarism Avoidance in Academic Submissions

    OpenAIRE

    Cully, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide undergraduate students with an introductory resource focusing on plagiarism avoidance. It sets out to identify often confusing associated nuances. From the perspective of paraphrasing, the requirements attaching to the necessary provision of proper citations are explored. The paper concludes by pondering the topic of reliability of sources.

  12. Avoidance: grammatical or semantic causes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Hulstijn; E. Marchena

    1989-01-01

    This article follows up on a study by Dagut and Laufer (1985), who found that Hebrew learners of English avoid phrasal verbs, such as ‘let down’, while preferring one-word verbs, such as ‘;disappoint’, since phrasal verbs do not exist in Hebrew. A corollary derived from Dagut and Laufer's study is t

  13. Neurodevelopmental outcome after cardiac surgery utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen N Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modulating the stress response and perioperative factors can have a paramount impact on the neurodevelopmental outcome of infants who undergo cardiac surgery utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass. Materials and Methods: In this single center prospective follow-up study, we evaluated the impact of three different anesthetic techniques on the neurodevelopmental outcomes of 19 children who previously underwent congenital cardiac surgery within their 1 st year of life. Cases were done from May 2011 to December 2013. Children were assessed using the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5 th edition. Multiple regression analysis was used to test different parental and perioperative factors that could significantly predict the different neurodevelopmental outcomes in the entire cohort of patients. Results: When comparing the three groups regarding the major cognitive scores, a high-dose fentanyl (HDF patients scored significantly higher than the low-dose fentanyl (LDF + dexmedetomidine (DEX (LDF + DEX group in the quantitative reasoning scores (106 ± 22 vs. 82 ± 15 P = 0.046. The bispectral index (BIS value at the end of surgery for the -LDF group was significantly higher than that in LDF + DEX group (P = 0.011. For the entire cohort, a strong correlation was seen between the standard verbal intelligence quotient (IQ score and the baseline adrenocorticotropic hormone level, the interleukin-6 level at the end of surgery and the BIS value at the end of the procedure with an R 2 value of 0.67 and P < 0.04. There was an inverse correlation between the cardiac Intensive Care Unit length of stay and the full-scale IQ score (R = 0.4675 and P 0.027. Conclusions: Patients in the HDF group demonstrated overall higher neurodevelopmental scores, although it did not reach statistical significance except in fluid reasoning scores. Our results may point to a possible correlation between blunting the stress response and improvement of the neurodevelopmental

  14. Cardiopulmonary Responses to Supine Cycling during Short-Arm Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, J. M.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J.; Evettes, S.; Bailey, K.; Biagini, H.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cardiopulmonary responses to supine cycling with concomitant +G(sub z) acceleration using the NASA/Ames Human Powered Short-Arm Centrifuge (HPC). Subjects were eight consenting males (32+/-5 yrs, 178+/-5 cm, 86.1+/- 6.2 kg). All subjects completed two maximal exercise tests on the HPC (with and without acceleration) within a three-day period. A two tailed t-test with statistical significance set at p less than or equal to 0.05 was used to compare treatments. Peak acceleration was 3.4+/-0.1 G(sub z), (head to foot acceleration). Peak oxygen uptake (VO2(sub peak) was not different between treatment groups (3.1+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) vs. 3.2+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) for stationary and acceleration trials, respectively). Peak HR and pulmonary minute ventilation (V(sub E(sub BTPS))) were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0.05) for the acceleration trial (182+/-3 BPM (Beats per Minute); 132.0+/-9.0 Lmin(exp -1)) when compared to the stationary trial (175+/-3 BPM; 115.5+/-8.5 Lmin(exp -1)). Ventilatory threshold expressed as a percent of VO2(sub peak) was not different for acceleration and stationary trials (72+/-2% vs. 68+/-2% respectively). Results suggest that 3.4 G(sub z) acceleration does not alter VO2(sub peak) response to supine cycling. However, peak HR and V(sub E(sub BTPS)) response may be increased while ventilatory threshold response expressed as a function of percent VO2(sub peak) is relatively unaffected. Thus, traditional exercise prescription based on VO2 response would be appropriate for this mode of exercise. Prescriptions based on HR response may require modification.

  15. Association Between Leisure Time Physical Activity, Cardiopulmonary Fitness, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Cardiovascular Workload at Work in Firefighters

    OpenAIRE

    Clare C. W. Yu; Au, Chun T.; Lee, Frank Y.F.; So, Raymond C.H.; Wong, John P.S.; Mak, Gary Y.K.; Chien, Eric P.; Alison M. McManus

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease risk factors are prevalent among firefighters in some developed countries. It is unclear whether physical activity and cardiopulmonary fitness reduce cardiovascular disease risk and the cardiovascular workload at work in firefighters. The present study investigated the relationship between leisure-time physical activity, cardiopulmonary fitness, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and cardiovascular workload at work in firefighters i...

  16. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients. PMID:2682024

  17. THE BASIC LAWS AND FEATURES OF CYTOKINE DYNAMICS IN PROCESS AND EARLY TERMS AFTER CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Suskov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic variants of cytokines reactions defining type of organ dysfunctions are revealed in the course of car- diopulmonary bypass and in the early postoperative period. Their character and expression, depends on gravity preoperative an immunodeficiency and initial degree of heart insufficiency. Diphasic dynamics of development of system inflammatory reaction is confirmed after cardiopulmonary bypass: increase of levels proinflammatory cytokines is in the first phase and anti-inflammatory cytokines with development immunodepression and cellular anergy in is the second phase. Also, key role IL-1Ra is revealed in restraint of hyperactivation of system inflam- matory reaction. Blood whey levels IL-6, IL-8, G-CSF, TNF-α and IL-1Ra should be defined to cardiopulmonary bypass, in 10–12 hours, 24 hours and 3 days after cardiopulmonary bypass and may be used as prognostic criteria of development of postoperative complications. 

  18. Retrospective Study of the Survival of Patients who Underwent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Daniel Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical and evolutive characteristics of patients admitted in an intensive care unit after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, identifying prognostic survival factors.METHODS: A retrospective study of 136 patients admitted between 1995 and 1999 to an intensive care unit, evaluating clinical conditions, mechanisms and causes of cardiopulmonary arrest, and their relation to hospital mortality.RESULTS: A 76% mortality rate independent of age and sex was observed. Asystole was the most frequent mechanism of death, and seen in isolation pulmonary arrest was the least frequent. Cardiac failure, need for mechanical ventilation, cirrhosis and previous stroke were clinically significant (p<0.01 death factors.CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors supplement the doctor's decision as to whether or not a patient will benefit from cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  19. Obstacle Avoidance Through Visual Teleoperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usman Keerio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel controlling approach forHumanoid Robot to work safely in critical situations like badlight environment using Visual Teleoperation. In this regardmodeling environments for Humanoid Teleoperation Systemis developed. Here virtual reality modeling environmentincludes development of virtual Humanoid BHR-2, andvirtual objects like table etc. The main goal of this work is toenhance our visual teleoperation system for BHR-2 in orderto avoid any collision during real time operation. SoftwareMaya is used for modeling and simulations. Maya plug-insin VC++ provides efficient modeling rule, real timeinteraction, and time saving rendering approach in a virtualenvironment. In this paper the validity of proposed scheme isshown by conducting experiments using offline step overtrajectory to avoid obstacle in bad light environment.

  20. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tordeux, Antoine; Lassarre, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed...

  1. Consumer Privacy and Marketing Avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Il-Horn Hann; Kai-Lung Hui; Sang-Yong Tom Lee; Ivan Png

    2005-01-01

    We introduce consumer avoidance into analytical marketing research. We show that consumer efforts to conceal themselves and to deflect marketing have a crucial impact on sellers¡¯ marketing strategy. Under reasonable conditions, seller marketing is a strategic complement with consumer concealment. Hence, consumer measures to conceal themselves from marketing will increase its cost-effectiveness and lead sellers to market more. Policies that encourage consumers to conceal their identities woul...

  2. Avoiding congestion in recommender systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recommender systems use the historical activities and personal profiles of users to uncover their preferences and recommend objects. Most of the previous methods are based on objects’ (and/or users’) similarity rather than on their difference. Such approaches are subject to a high risk of increasingly exposing users to a narrowing band of popular objects. As a result, a few objects may be recommended to an enormous number of users, resulting in the problem of recommendation congestion, which is to be avoided, especially when the recommended objects are limited resources. In order to quantitatively measure a recommendation algorithm's ability to avoid congestion, we proposed a new metric inspired by the Gini index, which is used to measure the inequality of the individual wealth distribution in an economy. Besides this, a new recommendation method called directed weighted conduction (DWC) was developed by considering the heat conduction process on a user–object bipartite network with different thermal conductivities. Experimental results obtained for three benchmark data sets showed that the DWC algorithm can effectively avoid system congestion, and greatly improve the novelty and diversity, while retaining relatively high accuracy, in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods. (paper)

  3. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation of brain-dead organ donors: a literature review and suggestions for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Gardiner, Dale; Shaw, David M

    2016-01-01

    "Organ preserving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (OP-CPR)" is defined as the use of CPR in cases of cardiac arrest to preserve organs for transplantation, rather than to revive the patient. Is it ethical to provide OP-CPR in a brain-dead organ donor to save organs that would otherwise be lost? To answer this question, we review the literature on brain-dead organ donors, conduct an ethical analysis, and make recommendations. We conclude that OP-CPR can benefit patients and families by fulfilling the wish to donate. However, it is an aggressive procedure that can cause physical damage to patients, and risks psychological harm to families and healthcare professionals. In a brain-dead organ donor, OP-CPR is acceptable without specific informed consent to OP-CPR, although advance discussion with next of kin regarding this possibility is strongly advised. In a patient where brain death is yet to be determined, but there is known wish for organ donation, OP-CPR would only be acceptable with a specific informed consent from the next of kin. When futility of treatment has not been established or it is as yet unknown if the patient wished to be an organ donor then OP-CPR should be prohibited, in order to avoid any conflict of interest. PMID:26073934

  4. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    OpenAIRE

    Hikasa, Y.; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K.; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV,...

  5. A simple technique can reduce cardiopulmonary bypass use during lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos N. Samano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass causes an inflammatory response and consumption of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding and neurological and renal complications. Its use during lung transplantation may be due to pulmonary hypertension or associated cardiac defects or just for better exposure of the pulmonary hilum. We describe a simple technique, or open pericardium retraction, to improve hilar exposure by lifting the heart by upward retraction of the pericardial sac. This technique permits lung transplantation without cardiopulmonary bypass when bypass use is recommended only for better exposure.

  6. Does transfusion of residual cardiopulmonary bypass circuit blood increase postoperative bleeding? A prospective randomized study in patients undergoing on pump cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Duara Rajnish; Misra Manoranjan; Bhuyan Ritwick; Sarma P; Jayakumar Karunakaran

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Homologous blood transfusion after open heart surgery puts a tremendous load on the blood banks. This prospective randomized study evaluates the efficacy of infusing back residual cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit i.e., pump blood as a means to reduce homologous transfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) and whether its use increases postoperative drainage. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven consecutive patients who underwent elective CABGs under CPB were randomi...

  7. Nurses’ attitude in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Kapadohos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in Europe. Bystanders’ early Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR may double or triple survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Aim: To investigate nurses’ attitude, in starting or not CPR and also the most frequent reasons that deter them from engaging in. Materials and Methods: The study had a sample of 177 nurses and assistant nurses that were working in nine hospitals of Athens. Nurses filled out the same, predetermined questionnaire, voluntarily and anonymously. The collected answers were analyzed with the help of the statistical program SPSS v.16, using x2 and Kendall’s Tau-B methods. Results: From 177 participants, 78% (137 were women and 22% (40 men with mean age 31 years (±7. According to their education, 16% (28 were Assistant Nurses, 79% (140 Registered Nurses (ATEI, AEI and 5% (9 Nurses had an MSc diploma. Nurses that had been recently trained in certified BLS courses felt more confident and were more willing to start CPR in a known victim (p=0.004 and in an unknown victim (p=0.02 comparing to nurses that had been trained a long time ago or never. Most frequent reasons nurses reported that deter them from starting CPR are the fear of a possible lawsuit (43%, the fear of harming instead of helping (30% and the fear of infectious transmission from victim to rescuer (15%. The fear of harming correlates considerably with lower ages (the younger the nurse the more is afraid, p=0.04 and also correlates substantially with the training in a certified CPR course (the more a nurse is trained, the less is afraid, p<0.001. Accordingly, the fear of infection diminishes as long as the CPR training is repeated (p=0.03. Conclusions: According to the results, there is a necessity of continuous education and re-education of nurses, in certified Basic Life Support programs. With frequent and specialized training, nurses will show more willingness to engage in an out

  8. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Cardiopulmonary System in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Sevimli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The purpose of this study is to investigate the changes in cardiopulmonary system stimulated by aerobic exercise in different age group of children and to find out in which age group aerobic exercise is more effective. METHOD: Totally, 76 children participated in this study. Ages of the participants ranged between 11–17, and mean age was 14.08±0.65. Participants were divided into three groups according to their age range. There were 23 in the first and second and 30 participants in the third group, (15–17, (13–14 and 30 (11–12 respectively. Each of the groups then was divided into two parts one of which was experimental and the other was control group. During 8 weeks, a training programme based on doing aerobic exercise lasting one hour 3 days a week was performed in the experimental groups. Before and after training, EKG, spirometer, blood pressure, heart rate, PWC 170 test of the participants, which was the data collection method, were recorded. The results obtained were compared through t test method of SPSS. RESULTS: The results revealed a decrease in the systolic blood pressure and in the heart rate of those who did exercise as opposed to those who did not do exercise in Group I. In addition, R wave height in V6 of exercise group showed a statistically significant increase. As for second group, it was determined that the R/S, at V1 derivation obtained from the participants who did exercise showed a statistically decrease as compared to those of the participants who did not do exercise. In the third group, no changes were observed in the systolic blood pressure the heart rate, R wave height in V6 and R/S although the measures of PWC 170 test, VC and FVC obtained from all training groups made a significant increase when compared to those of control groups. CONCLUSION: The results of this study revealed that of the three groups the 15–17 age group was affected mostly by the aerobic exercise on kardiyopulmoner sytem. The results

  9. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Khanna; George Filobbos

    2013-01-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960′s when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suc...

  10. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tordeux, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed difference term is taking into account. Within the linear OV models tested, the autonomous models including speed difference are sufficient to maximise the stability.

  11. Obstacle-avoiding navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Johann; Koren, Yoram; Levine, Simon P.

    1991-01-01

    A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

  12. Adaptive avoidance of reef noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Simpson

    Full Text Available Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise.

  13. Analysis of circulatory mitochondrial DNA level after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and potential prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chaoyi; Gu, Jun; Qian, Hong; Meng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Our research letter found that circulatory mtDNA level increased after the end of CPB and positive correlations between mtDNA and peak CRP level, peak BNP level, and peak PCT level, which revealed the prognostic role of perioperative circulatory mtDNA level in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27316503

  14. Microbubbles detection during cardiopulmonary bypass with transoesophageal echocardiography: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zanatta, Paolo; Bosco, Enrico; Salandin, Valeria; Salvador, Loris; Valfrè, Carlo; Sorbara, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Microembolic signals are usually detected with transcranial doppler during cardiac surgery. This report focuses on suggesting the transesophageal echocardiography as a different diagnostic approach to detect microemboli during cardiopulmonary bypass. Case presentation A 58 year old male patient, caucasian race, was operated on video assisted minimally invasive mitral valve repair using right minithoracotomy approach. His past medical history included an uncontrolled hypertension,...

  15. Accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension measurements during cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stege, G.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Heijdra, Y.F.; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Vos, P.J.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurements of transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (PtcCO(2)) with current devices are proven to provide clinically acceptable agreement with measurements of partial arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)) in several settings but not during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). O

  16. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  17. Four ways to ventilate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Benedict; Bavarskis, Egidijus; Magnusdottir, Sigriður Olga;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal method for out-of-hospital ventilation during cardiopulmonary rescue (CPR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to test different modes of ventilation during CPR for a prolonged period of 60 min. METHODS: Pigs were randomized to four groups after the induction of...

  18. Is the use of albumin in colloid prime solution of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit justified?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, RH; van Herwerden, LA; Takkenberg, JJM; van Oeveren, W; Gu, YJ; Wijers, MJ; Bogers, AJJC

    2001-01-01

    Background. Albumin in the priming solution precoats the surface of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, supposedly causing delayed adsorption of fibrinogen and reduced activation and adhesion of platelets. This action may result in lower transoxygenator resistance. Because our institution uses a col

  19. Imaging the human microcirculation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a hypothermic victim of submersion trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.G. Elbers; A.J. Craenen; A. Driessen; M.C. Stehouwer; L. Munsterman; M. Prins; M. van Iterson; P. Bruins; C. Ince

    2010-01-01

    The microcirculation is essential for delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue. However, the human microvascular response to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report on the first use of sidestream dark field imaging to assess the human microcirculation during CPR with a mechanical

  20. Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013, 23 September). Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support. Presentation given during the 6th World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps and Internet/Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health, and Biomedical Research, London, UK.

  1. Fat embolism with the use of intraosseous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallos, M; Kissoon, N; Abdelmoneim, T; Johnson, L; Murphy, S; Lu, L; Masood, S; Idris, A

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to assess the incidence and magnitude of fat emboli after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and intraosseous infusions. An animal laboratory at a university center was used to study 33 mixed-breed piglets. The piglets underwent hypoxic cardiac arrest followed by chest compressions and mechanical ventilation for a minimum of 30 minutes. The animals were divided in groups: group 1 (n = 5), which had no intraosseous cannulas, group 2 (n = 6), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion, groups 3 (n = 6), 4 (n = 6), and 5 (n = 8), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion of epinephrine, normal saline, and sodium bicarbonate respectively, and group 6 (n = 2), which was a sham group with no intraosseous cannulas and no cardiopulmonary resuscitation. At cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, representative lung samples were collected from upper and lower lobes of each lung and observed for fat globules and bone marrow elements. Fat globules were seen in the peribronchial blood vessels and intravascular areas throughout all lung fields of groups 1 through 5. There was no difference in appearance or distribution of fat globules among the 5 treatment groups. Analysis of variance showed no statistical significance (P fat embolization over cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone in this animal model. The benefits of using this procedure in critically ill children as a means of rapid vascular access for resuscitation is well established. However, the risk of fat embolism in this population needs further study. PMID:9258208

  2. Arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass is not associated with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, K; Jensen, M E; Nilsson, J C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is common and is associated with increased mortality. We wanted to investigate if the arterial pressure or the use of norepinephrine during cardiopulmonary bypass were associated with AKI. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patients who...

  3. A coprological investigation of gastrointestinal and cardiopulmonary parasites in hunting dogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Johansson, Anna; Espersen, Mia C.; Koch, Jørgen; Willesen, Jakob L.

    in Denmark, and fecal samples were obtainedin October and November, 2007. For detecting gastrointestinal parasites, samples (N = 178)were examined by a commercial flotation kit (Fecalyzer®EVSCO, USA). For detection of car-diopulmonary parasites, samples (N = 181) were collected on three consecutive...

  4. Measurement and analysis of cardiopulmonary vascular in Lanzhou healthy adults with multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To constitute a normal standard of cardiopulmonary vascular diameter and size of normal adult in Lanzhou, and to compared with the other's data reported in the previous bibliography by measuring diameter and area of cardiopulmonary artery lumen of the healthy adults in Lanzhou with multislice spiral CT (MSCT). Methods: Three hundred Lanzhou adults with no cardiopulmonary disease were equally assigned to 3 groups according to their age (A group: 18-39 years, B group: 40-60 years, C group: 61-80 years; 50 females and 50 males in each group). CT data were acquired at the end of deep inspiration phase and measurements were done on 3D reconstruction image with precise landmarks. All the results were statistically analyzed. Results: The diameters and areas of the main pulmonary artery left pulmonary artery right pulmonary artery ascending aorta and descending aorta differed significantly among the 3 groups (P<0.05). In groups B and C, there were significant differences in diameters and areas of pulmonary artery left pulmonary artery and right pulmonary between different genders (P<0.05). Conclusion: Imaging standard is provided for Lanzhou adult in early diagnosis of cardiopulmonary disease. The diameters and areas of main pulmonary artery left pulmonary artery and right pulmonary artery of Lanzhou healthy adults are different from that of other regions. It may be related to the geographical environment and the state of air pollution in Lanzhou. (authors)

  5. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on leukocyte activation : changes in membrane-bound elastase on neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, M; Gu, YJ; Wang, WJ; Xu, YP; Chen, CZ

    2004-01-01

    Background: Neutrophil elastase is known to be released from the activated leukocytes as a result of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, its biological effect on organ injury is questionable because it is quickly bound by natural proteinase inhibitors (PIs). Recently, membrane-bound elastase ( MB

  6. Endotoxin release in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass : pathophysiology and possible therapeutic strategies. An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, Suzanne; Schonberger, Jacques P. A. M.; Brands, Ruud; Seinen, Willem; van Oeveren, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass provokes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by the surgical trauma itself, blood contact with the non-physiological surfaces of the extracorporeal circuit, endotoxemia, and ischemia. The role of endotoxin in the inflammatory response syndrome

  7. Physiological basis of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung or heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafeiris Louvaris

    2015-06-01

    Shortness of breath associated with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and peripheral muscle discomfort are the major factors that limit exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and those with congestive heart failure (CHF. Both of these symptoms negatively impact on patients’ daily physical activity levels. In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes partially reverse muscle weakness and dysfunction and increase functional capacity in both COPD and CHF. However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes. Moreover, several barriers limit access and uptake of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes by eligible patients. A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies. Thus, tele-rehabilitation may be useful to encourage and educate patients with COPD or CHF on how best to maintain and/or further enhance daily physical activity levels.

  8. APROTININ PRESERVES HEMOSTASIS IN ASPIRIN-TREATED PATIENTS UNDERGOING CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TABUCHI, N; HUET, RCG; STURK, A; EIJSMAN, L; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1994-01-01

    Various clinical trials have shown that hemostasis is improved by the administration of aprotinin during cardiopulmonary bypass. However, this effect has not been proved for those patients treated preoperatively with aspirin. Therefore, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to test

  9. The effect of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass on lung function in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, Gerwin E.; Dodonov, Mikhail; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem; Milano, Aldo D.; Gu, Y. John; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiopulmonary bypass is still a major cause of lung injury and delay in pulmonary recovery after cardiac surgery. Although it has been shown that pulsatile flow induced by intra-aortic balloon pumping is beneficial for preserving lung function, it is not clear if the same beneficial effec

  10. Unexpected Fatal Hypernatremia after Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation with Therapeutic Hypothermia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sang-Sik; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Won; Lim, Kyung-Su

    2012-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI), characterized by unexpected fatal hypernatremia, is a rare complication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation with therapeutic hypothermia, but may be potentially fatal if recognition is delayed. We describe here a patient who experienced cardiac arrest due to a pulmonary embolism, followed by successful resuscitation after induction of therapeutic hypothermia. The patient, however, suddenly developed unexpected hypernatremia with increased urine outp...

  11. Comparative cardiopulmonary toxicity of soy biofuel and diesel exhaust in healthy and hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of renewable energy sources raise concerns about health effects of emissions from such sources. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of relative cardiopulmonary health effects of exhausts from 1) 100% soy biofuel (B100), 2) 20% soy biofuel + 80% low sulfur petroleu...

  12. Conventional hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass increases the serum lactate level in adult cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabie Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass on lactate level in adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Design: An observational study. Setting: Prince Sultan cardiac center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Participants: The study included 283 patients classified into two groups: Hemofiltration group (n=138, hemofiltration was done during CPB. Control group (n = 145, patients without hemofiltration. Interventions: Hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass. Measurements and Main Results: Monitors included hematocrit, lactate levels, mixed venous oxygen saturation, amount of fluid removal during hemofiltration and urine output. The lactate elevated in group H than group C (P < 0.05, and the PH showed metabolic acidosis in group H (P < 0.05. The mixed venous oxygen saturation decreased in group H than group C (P < 0.05. The number of transfused packed red blood cells was lower in group H than group C (P < 0.05. The hematocrit was higher in group H than group C (P < 0.05. The urine output was lower in group H than group C (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Hemofiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass leads to hemoconcentration, elevated lactate level and increased inotropic support. There are some recommendations for hemofiltration: First; Hemofiltration should be limited for patients with impaired renal function, positive fluid balance, reduced response to diuretics or prolonged bypass time more than 2 hours. Second; Minimal amount of fluids should be administered to maintain adequate cardiac output and reduction of priming volumes is preferable to maintain controlled hemodilution. Third; it should be done before weaning of or after cardiopulmonary bypass and not during the whole time of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  13. CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS WITH AUTOLOGOUS LUNG AS SUBSTITUTE FOR ARTIFICIAL OXYGENATOR ATTENUATES INFLAMMATORY RESPONSIVE INSPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hui-min; KONG Xiang; WANG Wei; ZHU De-ming; ZHANG Hai-bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study if using autologous lung as a substitute of oxygenator in cardiopulmonary bypass is better than the conventional cardiopulmonary bypass with artificial oxygenator in pulmonary preservation.Methods Twelve piglets were randomly divided into two groups ( n = 6). The isolated lung perfusion model was established. The experimental animals underwent continuous lung perfusion for about 120 min. While the control animals underwent 90 min lung ischemia followed by 30 min reperfusion. Another 12 piglets were randomly divided into two groups ( n =6). The experimental animals underwent bi-ventricular bypass with autologous lung perfusion.While control animals underwent conventional cardiopulmonary bypass with artificial oxygenator. The bypass time and aortic cross clamping time were 135 min and 60 min respectively for each animal. The lung static compliance ( Cstat), alveolus-artery oxygen difference ( PA-aO2 ), TNF-α, IL-6 and wet to dry lung weight ratio (W/D) were measured. Histological and ultra-structural changes of the lung were also observed after bypass. Results After either isolated lung perfusion or cardiopulmonary bypass, the Cstat decreased, the PA-aO2 increased and the content of TNF-α increased for both groups, but the changes of experimental group were much less than those of control group. The lower W/D ratio and mild pathological changes in experimental group than those in control group were also demonstrated. Conclusion Autologous lung is able to tolerate the nonpalsatile perfusion. It can be used as a substitute to artificial ogygenator in cardiopulmonary bypass to minimize the inflammatory pulmonary injury caused mainly by ischemic reperfusion and interaction of the blood to the non-physiological surface of artificial oxygenator.

  14. Neuroprotective role of Batroxobin in cardiopulmonary resuscitation rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhoujun Kang; Hui Cao; Bing Mei

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Batroxobin has been found to have protective effect on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion,and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the common cause of global brain ischemia-reperfusion.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of Batroxobin on the morphological results of cerebral cortex and hippocampus in rabbit models of CPR, and the changes of serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α) after CPR.DESIGN: A randomized controlled observation.SETTING: Laboratory of the Department of Burns, Changhai Hospital affiliated to the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Thirty healthy New Zealand rabbits of 2.5 - 3.0 kg, either male or female, were used. Kits for TNF- α determination were provided by LIFEKEY BioMeditech Company (USA).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the laboratory of Department of Burns, Changhai Hospital from February 2001 to January 2002. The 32 rabbits were randomly divided into sham-operated group (n=8),conventional resuscitation group (n=12) and Batroxobin-treated group (n=12). The animals in the conventional resuscitation group and Batroxobin-treated group were anesthetized, then induced into modified Pittsburg's model of mechanical ventricular fibrillation. Sham-operated group was discharged on the chest wall, which did not cause ventricular fibrillation. Conventional resuscitation group and Batroxobin-treated group were exposed to 6 minutes of cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, then the resuscitation began. A dosage of 0.3 Bu/kg of Batroxobin was administered to the rabbits in the Batroxobin-treated group at the beginning of resuscitation. Blood sample was collected at 4 and 12 hours after CPR to determine the concentration of TNF- α in serum. After the second blood collection, brain tissue was taken out immediately,and the forms of nerve cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region were observed under light microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① TNF-α concentration in

  15. A non-fatal case of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome imported into the UK (ex Panama), July 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Barry; Jameson, Lisa J.; Bovill, Begoña A.; Aarons, Emma J.; Clewlow, Jodie; Lumley, Sarah; Latham, Jennie; Jenkins, Megan H.; MacGowan, Alasdair P; Simpson, Andrew J.; Ahmed, Javeed; Brooks, Timothy J.; Hewson, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Highlights • Detection of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome imported into Europe. • Additional evidence that Choclo hantavirus is currently circulating and causing human disease in Panama. • Novel diagnostic and sequencing assays for identifying cases of Choclo hantavirus infection.

  16. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lili Long; Lin Xu; Zhenghui Xiao; Shixiong Hu; Ruping Luo; Hua Wang; Xiulan Lu; Zhiyue Xu; Xu Yao; Luo Zhou; Hongyu Long; Jiaoe Gong; Yanmin Song; Li Zhao; Kaiwei Luo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients ...

  17. Compromised Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity in Patients Early After Endoscopic Atraumatic Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: Implications for Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Dominique; Roijackers, Ruben; Jackmaert, Lore; Robic, Boris; Hendrikx, Marc; Yilmaz, Alaaddin; Frederix, Ines; Rosseel, Michael; DENDALE, PAUL

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this work was to test the hypothesis that cardiopulmonary exercise tolerance is better preserved early after endoscopic atraumatic coronary artery bypass graft (endo-ACAB) surgery versus coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Design: Twenty endo-ACAB surgery patients, 20 CABG surgery patients, and 15 healthy subjects executed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test, with assessment and comparison of cycling power output, O2 uptake, CO2 output, respiratory ...

  18. Successful Management of Membrane Oxygenator Failure during Cardiopulmonary Bypass—The Importance of Safety Algorithm and Simulation Drills

    OpenAIRE

    Soo, Alan; Booth, Karen; Parissis, Haralabos

    2012-01-01

    With a high risk to time ratio, the advent of cardiopulmonary bypass has facilitated greater advances in technical procedures in cardiac surgery. This, however, has not come without its own complication risk and previous near misses have been reported with regard to various technical aspects of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. We present a case of a failed membrane oxygenator and discuss the real-life aspects to managing this complication without added risk to the patient.

  19. Discussion of the Misunderstanding of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation%心肺复苏的误区探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立祥; 黄子通

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an effective way to rescue patients with cardiac arrest (CA) whose incidence rate has been increasing with the increase of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in recent years. After 50 years of exploration and practice of CPR, the survival rate on discharge of CA is far from satisfactory. While more efforts are being made to perfect CPR approach, the experience should be summarized and the misunderstanding should be avoided. We suggest that the main misunderstanding of CPR lies in stereotyped CPR procedure, CPR ventilation, CPR compression, open chest cardiac massage, CPR access, CPR back veneer and time limit are not adaptable to practice. We should work out a better method to guide CPR application in clinical practice.%心脏骤停威胁人们的生命健康,且近年随着心脑血管疾病增加其发病率逐渐攀升,心肺复苏(cardiopulmonaryresuscitation,CPR)作为抢救心脏骤停的有效方法,经过50余年的探索实践,患者的生存出院率仍不理想,故在发掘完善新方法的同时,亦应不断总结经验教训,找出CPR进程中的误区,笔者认为当前临床主要存在CPR程序“刻板化”、CPR通气“死腔化”、CPR按压“形式化”、CPR开胸“概念化”、CPR通路“单一化”、CPR背板“无声化”及CPR时限“教条化”,并结合经验积极尝试修正,以指导临床正确把握并实施CPR.

  20. Methodological approach to the first and second lactate threshold in incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Wonisch, Manfred; Corra, Ugo; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Vanhees, Luc; Saner, Hugo; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2008-12-01

    Determination of an 'anaerobic threshold' plays an important role in the appreciation of an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test and describes prominent changes of blood lactate accumulation with increasing workload. Two lactate thresholds are discerned during cardiopulmonary exercise testing and used for physical fitness estimation or training prescription. A multitude of different terms are, however, found in the literature describing the two thresholds. Furthermore, the term 'anaerobic threshold' is synonymously used for both, the 'first' and the 'second' lactate threshold, bearing a great potential of confusion. The aim of this review is therefore to order terms, present threshold concepts, and describe methods for lactate threshold determination using a three-phase model with reference to the historical and physiological background to facilitate the practical application of the term 'anaerobic threshold'. PMID:19050438

  1. Relationship Between Reverse Remodeling and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity in Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Sant, Jetske Van't; Versteeg, Henneke;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the relationship between left ventricular reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce and inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with a 1st-time CRT......-defibrillator (mean age 65 ± 11; 73% male) underwent echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) before implantation (baseline) and 6 months after implantation. At baseline, patients also completed a set of questionnaires measuring mental and physical health. The association between echocardiographic...... echocardiographic responders showed improvements in ventilatory efficiency during follow-up. Multivariable repeated measures analyses revealed that, besides reverse remodeling, New York Heart Association functional class II and good patient-reported health status before implantation were the most important...

  2. [Tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax following tracheal perforation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, C T; Tsokos, M; Kurz, S D; Kleber, C

    2015-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax can occur at any time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with external cardiac massage and invasive ventilation either from primary or iatrogenic rib fractures with concomitant pleural or parenchymal injury. Airway injury can also cause tension pneumothorax during CPR. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old woman who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest after undergoing elective mandibular surgery. During CPR the upper airway could not be secured by orotracheal intubation due to massive craniofacial soft tissue swelling. A surgical airway was established with obviously unrecognized iatrogenic tracheal perforation and subsequent development of tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax during ventilation. Neither the tension pneumomediastinum nor the tension pneumothorax were decompressed and accordingly resuscitation efforts remained unsuccessful. This case illustrates the need for a structured approach to resuscitate patients with ventilation problems regarding decompression of tension pneumomediastinum and/or tension pneumothorax during CPR. PMID:26036317

  3. Red Kidney: Kidney Transplant From a Deceased Donor Who Received Massive Blood Transfusion During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard; Hanif, Faisal; Prasad, Padmini; Ahmad, Niaz

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present a case of a deceased-donor kidney transplant. The brain-dead donor had received a massive blood transfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, which lead to hemolysis, hemoglobinuria, acute kidney injury, and renal replacement therapy. The kidney appeared red after in situ flush. Postoperatively, the recipient developed delayed graft function. Protocol biopsy during the postoperative period revealed the widespread deposition of heme pigment in the renal tubules. Massive blood transfusion and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery are associated with hemolysis and heme pigment deposition in the renal tubules, which subsequently lead to acute kidney injury. Kidneys from such donors appear red and, while this does not preclude transplant, are likely to develop delayed graft function. PMID:26030717

  4. Cardiopulmonary function of dogs with plutonium-induced chronic lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty dogs exposed by inhalation in the study, Toxicity of Inhaled 239PuO2 in Beagle Dogs, were evaluated for cardiopulmonary function. Another group of 10 dogs matched by age and sex, but not exposed to 239Pu, was also given the same cardiopulmonary function tests. The plutonium-exposed dogs were 7 or more years after exposure and ten of the dogs had clinical signs and pulmonary function values indicating radiation pneumonitis-pulmonary fibrosis. The occurrence of radiation pneumonitis-pulmonary fibrosis, a nonstochastic effect, over the same time period and range of lung doses as lung cancer, a stochastic effect, complicates the estimation of lung cancer risk for inhaled plutonium. 4 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  5. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Hee; Oh, Kyung Joon; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to ...

  6. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kalz, Marco; Lenssen, Niklas; Felzen, Marco; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background: No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. Objective: The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from exper...

  7. Examining Interrater Reliability and Validity of a Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy Discharge Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Lati, Jamil; Pellow, Vanessa; Sproule, Jeannine; Brooks, Dina; Ellerton, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the interrater reliability (IRR) of the individual items in the Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy (CPT) Discharge Tool. This tool identifies six critical items that physiotherapists should consider when determining a paediatric patient's readiness for discharge from CPT after upper-abdominal, cardiac, or thoracic surgery: oxygen saturation, mobility, secretion retention, discharge planning, auscultation, and signs of respiratory distress. Methods: A total of 33 pa...

  8. Diffusion of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training to Chinese Immigrants with Limited English Proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Po Yip; Brandon Ong; Shin Ping Tu; Devora Chavez; Brooke Ike; Ian Painter; Ida Lam; Bradley, Steven M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Meischke, Hendrika W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an effective intervention for prehospital cardiac arrest. Despite all available training opportunities for CPR, disparities exist in participation in CPR training, CPR knowledge, and receipt of bystander CPR for certain ethnic groups. We conducted five focus groups with Chinese immigrants who self-reported limited English proficiency (LEP). A bilingual facilitator conducted all the sessions. All discussions were taped, recorded, translated, and trans...

  9. Knowledge and psychomotor skills of nursing students in North Cyprus in the area of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dal, Umran; Sarpkaya, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Objective : The aim of the study was to determine the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skill levels of nursing students in North Cyprus. Methods : The study design was quasi-experimental and longitudinal. A questionnaire was applied to the students before the CPR lecture. Then the students were informed about adult CPR by the researchers and all of the students practiced CPR on a Resusci-Anne manikin. One and six months after this training the same questionnaire and skills ch...

  10. Usefulness of the bispectral index during cardiopulmonary resuscitation -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jin Yong; Kim, Yeonbaek; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of using the bispectral index (BIS) for monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not clearly understood. However, BIS has been a popular anesthetic monitoring device used during operations. The case presented is of a pregnant woman going into cardiac arrest due to an amniotic fluid embolism during a Cesarean section. CPR was performed, but neither the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) nor the return of consciousness was achieved, despite 50 min of effecti...

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and beyond: the need to improve real-time feedback and physiologic monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Steve; Scales, Damon C.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been shown to improve survival outcomes after cardiac arrest. The current standard in studies evaluating CPR quality is to measure CPR process measures—for example, chest compression rate, depth, and fraction. Published studies evaluating CPR feedback devices have yielded mixed results. Newer approaches that seek to optimize CPR by measuring physiological endpoints during the resuscitation may lead to individualized patient care and improve...

  12. A Prospective Study of Survival After In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and its Related Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hosseinpour, Nadimeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite several studies, there is no agreement on factors that affect survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of in-hospital CPR and its related factors at Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. Patients and Methods A descriptive study was conducted on all cases of CPR performed in Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital during a 6-month period in 2014. Through a consecutive sampling method, 250 c...

  13. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran; Valerie J. Ehlers

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to ...

  14. Marginally effective medical care: ethical analysis of issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

    OpenAIRE

    Hilberman, M.; Kutner, J; Parsons, D; Murphy, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performi...

  15. A review of cardiopulmonary research in Brazilian medical journals: clinical, surgical and epidemiological data

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Serrano; Mauricio Rocha e Silva

    2010-01-01

    Research in the field of cardiopulmonary disease in Brazil has been very active in recent decades. The combination of PUBMED, SCieLO, open access and online searching has provided a significant increase in the visibility of Brazilian journals. This newly acquired international visibility has in turn resulted in the appearance of more original research reports in the Brazilian scientific press. This review is intended to highlight part of this work for the benefit of the readers of "Clinics." ...

  16. Bioavailable transition metals in particulate matter mediate cardiopulmonary injury in healthy and compromised animal models.

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, D L; Dreher, K. L.

    1997-01-01

    Many epidemiologic reports associate ambient levels of particulate matter (PM) with human mortality and morbidity, particularly in people with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infection, asthma). Because much ambient PM is derived from combustion sources, we tested the hypothesis that the health effects of PM arise from anthropogenic PM that contains bioavailable transition metals. The PM samples studied derived from three emission sources (two...

  17. Effects of training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation on competence and patient outcome.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, L.; Gass, D

    1987-01-01

    Between 1981 and 1985 we carried out a study in two medium-sized nonteaching community hospitals to determine the rate of deterioration of knowledge and skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among physicians and nurses, the accuracy of their perceptions of their knowledge and skills, the effects of practice on retention and the effect of CPR training on mortality. The participants' knowledge and skills were measured before training and immediately after, 6 months after and 12 months a...

  18. Vasopressin reduces cardiac function and augments cardiopulmonary baroreflex resistance increases in man.

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, T J; Cowley, A W; Skelton, M

    1986-01-01

    We examined the effects of physiologic infusions of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and on reflex responses initiated by decreasing cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulation (with lower body negative pressure) in 10 healthy, captopril-pretreated young men (19-27 yr). Their responses were compared with those of four volunteers given isosmotic infusion. Heart rate, stroke volume, blood pressure, and forearm blood flow were measured by electrocardiography, impedance card...

  19. The role of cardiopulmonary exercise test for individualized exercise training recommendation in young obese subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian Hoble; Loredana Meşină; Alexandra Rusu; Claudiu Avram; Mihaela Oraviţan

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is affecting a growing segment of the population and should be considered a serious health problem which will lead to medical complications and decreased life span. Lifestyle changes by adopting healthy food and increase energy consumption through physical activity is the most important treatment for obesity. Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is considered the gold standard for exercise capacity assessment. Purpose: This study is aiming to demonstrate that individualized exercise t...

  20. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment

    OpenAIRE

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2012-01-01

    Background In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether ‘flashlight’ guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. Materials and methods We recruited 30 senior medical students with...

  1. GABA in nucleus tractus solitarius participates in electroacupuncture modulation of cardiopulmonary bradycardia reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phenylbiguanide (PBG) stimulates cardiopulmonary receptors and cardiovascular reflex responses, including decreases in blood pressure and heart rate mediated by the brain stem parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Electroacupuncture (EA) at P5–6 stimulates sensory fibers in the median nerve and modulates these reflex responses. Stimulation of median nerves reverses bradycardia through action of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nucleus a...

  2. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S.; Scislo, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as th...

  3. Effect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Regional Antibiotic Penetration into Lung Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Hutschala, D.; Skhirtladze, K.; Kinstner, C.; Zeitlinger, M.; Wisser, W.; Jaeger, W.; Hoeferl, M.; Müller, M; Tschernko, E.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during cardiac surgery causes regional ventilation-perfusion mismatch, contributing to regional disturbances in antibiotic penetration into lung tissue. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is associated with postoperative pneumonia, a frequent and devastating complication after cardiac surgery. In this prospective clinical animal study, we performed in vivo microdialysis to determine the effect of CPB on regional penetration of levofloxacin (LVX) into lung t...

  4. Developing Pulmonary Vasculopathy in Systemic Sclerosis, Detected with Non-Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel DUMITRESCU; Oudiz, Ronald J.; Karpouzas, George; Hovanesyan, Arsen; Jayasinghe, Amali; Hansen, James E.; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Wasserman, Karlman

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) may develop exercise intolerance due to musculoskeletal involvement, restrictive lung disease, left ventricular dysfunction, or pulmonary vasculopathy (PV). The latter is particularly important since it may lead to lethal pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that abnormalities during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in patients with SSc can identify PV leading to overt PAH. Methods Thirty SSc patients from the Harbor-U...

  5. Heart and Lungs Protection Technique for Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Pichugin; Nikolay Melnikov; Farkhad Olzhayev; Alexander Medvedev; Sergey Jourko; Alishir Gamzaev; Vladimir Chiginev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cardioplegic cardiac arrest with subsequent ischemic-reperfusion injuries can lead to the development of inflammation of the myocardium, leucocyte activation, and release of cardiac enzymes. Flow reduction to the bronchial arteries, causing low-flow lung ischemia, leads to the development of a pulmonary regional inflammatory response. Hypoventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is responsible for development of microatelectasis, hydrostatic pulmonary edema, poor complian...

  6. Unexplained exertional dyspnea caused by low ventricular filling pressures: results from clinical invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, William M.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Systrom, David M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether low ventricular filling pressures are a clinically relevant etiology of unexplained dyspnea on exertion, a database of 619 consecutive, clinically indicated invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPETs) was reviewed to identify patients with low maximum aerobic capacity (V̇o2max) due to inadequate peak cardiac output (Qtmax) with normal biventricular ejection fractions and without pulmonary hypertension (impaired: n = 49, V̇o2max = 53% predicted [interquartile range (I...

  7. Use of instructional video to prepare parents for learning infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Brannon, Timothy S.; White, Lisa A.; Kilcrease, Julie N.; Richard, LaShawn D.; Spillers, Jana G.; Cynthia L. Phelps

    2009-01-01

    Parents of premature infants often receive infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training prior to discharge from the hospital, but one study showed that 27.5% of parents could not demonstrate adequate CPR skills after completing an instructor-led class. We hypothesized that parents who viewed an instructional video on infant CPR before attending the class would perform better on a standardized skills test than parents who attended the class with no preparation. Parents randomized to the...

  8. Conflicting Physiological and Genomic Cardiopulmonary Effects of Recruitment Maneuvers in Murine Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Voiriot, Guillaume; Zhou, Tong; Marcos, Elisabeth; Dudek, Steven M.; Jacobson, Jeff R.; Machado, Roberto,; Adnot, Serge; Brochard, Laurent; Maitre, Bernard; Joe G N Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Low tidal volume ventilation, although promoting atelectasis, is a protective strategy against ventilator-induced lung injury. Deep inflation (DI) recruitment maneuvers restore lung volumes, but potentially compromise lung parenchymal and vascular function via repetitive overdistention. Our objective was to examine cardiopulmonary physiological and transcriptional consequences of recruitment maneuvers. C57/BL6 mice challenged with either PBS or LPS via aspiration were placed on mechanical ven...

  9. The Effect of Low Tidal Volume Ventilation during Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Postoperative Pulmonary Function

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Safarpour; Mohammad Hosein Bakhshaei; Ahmad Moradi; Afshin Farhanchi; Maryam Davoudi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction is one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery and it is believed to result from the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In this study, we investigated the effect of low tidal volume ventilation during CPB on postoperative gas exchange and lung mechanics. Methods: This prospective randomized study included 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting. In 50 patients, low tidal volume ventilation [tidal volum...

  10. Assessment of the teaching-learning process in students of the health area: cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Moita Garcia Kawakame; Ana Maria Kazue Miyadahira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the skills and knowledge of undergraduate students in the health area on cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers with the use of an automatic external defibrillator.METHODThe evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. A theoretical and practical course was taught and the theoretical classes included demonstration. The evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. Two instruments were applied ...

  11. Cardiopulmonary effects of a ketamine hydrochloride/acepromazine combination in healthy cats.

    OpenAIRE

    Ingwersen, W; Allen, D G; Dyson, D H; Pascoe, P J; O'Grady, M R

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a ketamine hydrochloride/acepromazine combination on the cardiopulmonary function of 11 healthy cats was studied. Test parameters included cardiac output, measured by thermodilution, heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean) and arterial blood gas analysis. Values for systemic vascular resistance, cardiac index and stroke volume were calculated. The cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, arterial blood pressure and arterial blood...

  12. Cardiopulmonary effects of a ketamine/acepromazine combination in hypovolemic cats.

    OpenAIRE

    Ingwersen, W; Allen, D G; Dyson, D H; Black, W D; Goldberg, M T; Valliant, A E

    1988-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary effects of a ketamine/ acepromazine combination was studied in ten cats subjected to a 25% whole blood volume loss. Test parameters included cardiac output, measured via thermodilution, heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean) and blood gas analysis. Values for cardiac index, stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance were calculated from these data. Posthemorrhage, cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, heart rate and...

  13. Cardiopulmonary effects of using carbon dioxide for laparoscopic surgery in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Beazley, Shannon G.; Cosford, Kevin; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary effects of capnoperitoneum were investigated in 8 spontaneously breathing, young adult female cats undergoing laparoscopic pancreatic biopsy (intra-abdominal pressure 12 mmHg). Cats were premedicated with acepromazine and hydromorphone, induced with ketamine and diazepam, and maintained using an end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.13% in 100% oxygen. Direct systemic arterial blood pressure, heart and respiratory rates, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2), and isoflurane wer...

  14. Median sternotomy for double lung transplantation with cardiopulmonary bypass in seven consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, Mitsutomo; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    We describe our technique of using median sternotomy to perform double lung transplantations with cardiopulmonary bypass. By sparing the respiratory muscles, median sternotomy is probably less invasive and preserves lung function. Furthermore, it causes less long-term discomfort than intercostal...... thoracotomy. Although exposure of the pleural space is less optimal, abundant pleural adhesions can be dissected, particularly in the left posterior pleural cavity, using pericardial traction stitches, exposing the retrocardiac pleura with minimal manipulation of the heart....

  15. Circadian affective, cardiopulmonary, and cortisol variability in depressed and nondepressed individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Ansgar; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Roth, Walton T.; Spiegel, David; Taylor, C. Barr

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) perhaps mediated by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis or vagal dysregulation. We investigated circadian mood variation and HPA-axis and autonomic function in older (≥55 years) depressed and nondepressed volunteers at risk for CVD by assessing diurnal positive and negative affect (PA, NA), cortisol, and cardiopulmonary variables in 46 moderately depressed and 19 nondepressed volunteers with elevated CVD risk. Participants sat...

  16. The ethics of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. II. Medical logistics and the potential for good response.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, J M; Reynolds, B M

    1992-01-01

    Mismatches between provision of paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and potential to benefit are examined. Deficiencies are most likely to occur in peripheral maternity units but futile CPR is more common in emergency departments where the child is unknown. Decision making in individual cases is best retained by the medical profession for the sake of the child and family. American style intervention by the legislature is likely to dissipate scarce resources and perhaps harm infants...

  17. Esmolol added in repeated, cold, oxygenated blood cardioplegia improves myocardial function after cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Geir Olav; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Moen, Christian Arvei; Eliassen, Finn; Jonassen, Anne K.; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated if the β-receptor blocking agent esmolol, added to standard oxygenated blood cardioplegia, improved myocardial function after weaning from bypass. Design: A block-randomized, blinded study. Setting: A university laboratory. Participants: Twenty anesthetized pigs, Norwegian Landrace. Interventions: After cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiac arrest was induced with cold (12°C), oxygenated blood cardioplegia, enriched with either esmolol or vehi...

  18. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. Objective The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from expert ...

  19. Renal hemodynamics, function, and oxygenation during cardiac surgery performed on cardiopulmonary bypass: a modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Evans, Roger G.; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, Julian A.; Fry, Brendan C.; Layton, Anita T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury, a prevalent complication of cardiac surgery performed on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is thought to be driven partly by hypoxic damage in the renal medulla. To determine the causes of medullary hypoxia during CPB, we modeled its impact on renal hemodynamics and function, and thus oxygen delivery and consumption in the renal medulla. The model incorporates autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and the utilization of oxygen for tubular ...

  20. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  1. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  2. Developing pulmonary vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis, detected with non-invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dumitrescu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc may develop exercise intolerance due to musculoskeletal involvement, restrictive lung disease, left ventricular dysfunction, or pulmonary vasculopathy (PV. The latter is particularly important since it may lead to lethal pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. We hypothesized that abnormalities during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET in patients with SSc can identify PV leading to overt PAH. METHODS: Thirty SSc patients from the Harbor-UCLA Rheumatology clinic, not clinically suspected of having significant pulmonary vascular disease, were referred for this prospective study. Resting pulmonary function and exercise gas exchange were assessed, including peakVO2, anaerobic threshold (AT, heart rate-VO2 relationship (O2-pulse, exercise breathing reserve and parameters of ventilation-perfusion mismatching, as evidenced by elevated ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE/VCO2 and reduced end-tidal pCO2 (PETCO2 at the AT. RESULTS: Gas exchange patterns were abnormal in 16 pts with specific cardiopulmonary disease physiology: Eleven patients had findings consistent with PV, while five had findings consistent with left-ventricular dysfunction (LVD. Although both groups had low peak VO2 and AT, a higher VE/VCO2 at AT and decreasing PETCO2 during early exercise distinguished PV from LVD. CONCLUSIONS: Previously undiagnosed exercise impairments due to LVD or PV were common in our SSc patients. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing may help to differentiate and detect these disorders early in patients with SSc.

  3. Obesity and Healthcare Avoidance: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Robert D McGuigan; Jenny M Wilkinson

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of health care avoidance and obesity. English language journal articles published between 1990 and 2012 that addressed the review question|“is being overweight or obese an unrecognized factor in healthcare avoidance?” were located using major databases. A modified JADAD scoring system was then used to assess papers. Ten papers were identified which directly addressed the review question. A positive relationship exists between obesity and healthcare avoidance. T...

  4. Can the Cardiopulmonary 6-Minute Walk Test Reproduce the Usual Activities of Patients with Heart Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 6-minute walk test is an way of assessing exercise capacity and predicting survival in heart failure. The 6-minute walk test was suggested to be similar to that of daily activities. We investigated the effect of motivation during the 6-minute walk test in heart failure. METHODS: We studied 12 males, age 45±12 years, ejection fraction 23±7%, and functional class III. Patients underwent the following tests: maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on the treadmill (max, cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test with the walking rhythm maintained between relatively easy and slightly tiring (levels 11 and 13 on the Borg scale (6EB, and cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test using the usual recommendations (6RU. The 6EB and 6RU tests were performed on a treadmill with zero inclination and control of the velocity by the patient. RESULTS: The values obtained in the max, 6EB, and 6RU tests were, respectively, as follows: O2 consumption (ml.kg-1.min-1 15.4±1.8, 9.8±1.9 (60±10%, and 13.3±2.2 (90±10%; heart rate (bpm 142±12, 110±13 (77±9%, and 126±11 (89±7%; distance walked (m 733±147, 332±66, and 470±48; and respiratory exchange ratio (R 1.13±0.06, 0.9±0.06, and 1.06±0.12. Significant differences were observed in the values of the variables cited between the max and 6EB tests, the max and 6RU tests, and the 6EB and 6RU tests (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Patients, who undergo the cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test and are motivated to walk as much as they possibly can, usually walk almost to their maximum capacity, which may not correspond to that of their daily activities. The use of the Borg scale during the cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test seems to better correspond to the metabolic demand of the usual activities in this group of patients.

  5. Effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on propofol pharmacokinetics and bispectral index during coronary surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio G. Barbosa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Cardiopulmonary bypass is known to alter propofol pharmacokinetics in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of these alterations on postoperative pharmacodynamics. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that changes in propofol pharmacokinetics increase hypnotic effects after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: Twenty patients scheduled for on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (group, n=10 or off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (group, n=10 coronary artery bypass grafts were anesthetized with sufentanil and a propofol target controlled infusion (2.0 µg/mL. Depth of hypnosis was monitored using the bispectral index. Blood samples were collected from the induction of anesthesia up to 12 hours after the end of propofol infusion, at predetermined intervals. Plasma propofol concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography, followed by a non-compartmental propofol pharmacokinetic analysis. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, considering p<0.05 as significant. RESULTS: After cardiopulmonary bypass, despite similar plasma propofol concentrations in both groups, bispectral index values were lower in the on-pump coronary artery bypass graft group. Time to extubation after the end of propofol infusion was greater in the on-pump coronary artery bypass graft group (334 ± 117 vs. 216 ± 85 min, p = 0.04. Patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass had shorter biological (1.82 ± 0.5 vs. 3.67 ± 1.15h, p < 0.01 and terminal elimination (6.27 ± 1.29 vs. 10.5h ± 2.18, p < 0.01 half-life values, as well as higher total plasma clearance (28.36 ± 11.40 vs.18.29 ± 7.67 mL/kg/min, p = 0.03, compared to patients in the off-pump coronary artery bypass graft group. CONCLUSION: Aside from the increased sensitivity of the brain to anesthetics after cardiopulmonary bypass, changes in propofol pharmacokinetics may contribute to its central nervous system effects.

  6. The experience of psychological nursing of cardiopulmonary bypass heart operation during perioperative period%体外循环心脏手术围手术期的心理护理体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉梅; 范春兰; 韩萌萌

    2015-01-01

    目的:对体外循环心脏手术围术期的心理观察,有前瞻性和针对性的心理护理,从而及时治疗、预防心理行为异常的发生,使患者早日康复。方法通过术前强化系统脱敏、认知行为以及术后相应心理护理。结果45例手术患者无不良事件发生。结论心理护理能有效避免体外循环心脏手术围手术期的病人心理行为异常的发生。%Objective On the psychological observation of cardiopulmonary bypass heart operation during perioperative period,forward-looking and corresponding psychological nursing,and timely treatment,prevent abnormal psychological behavior, so that patients with early rehabilitation.Methods To strengthen the systematic desensitization, cognitive behavior and corresponding psychological nursing after surgery by preoperative.Results 45 cases of operation patients without adverse events.Conclusion Psychological nursing can occur in patients with psychological behavior effectively avoid cardiopulmonary bypass heart operation in perioperative period of abnormal.

  7. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  8. Exact enumeration of self-avoiding walks

    OpenAIRE

    Schram, Raoul D.; Barkema, Gerard T.; Bisseling, Rob H.

    2011-01-01

    A prototypical problem on which techniques for exact enumeration are tested and compared is the enumeration of self-avoiding walks. Here, we show an advance in the methodology of enumeration, making the process thousands or millions of times faster. This allowed us to enumerate self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice up to a length of 36 steps.

  9. Strategic Family Therapy of Avoidant Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Thomas A.; Hinkle, J. Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Millon's biopsychosocial model asserts that socioenvironmental factors of parental or peer rejection may shape development of avoidant behavior but does not elaborate on how family system may perpetuate its existence once disorder has evolved. Presents brief overview of avoidant behavior and strategic family therapy case study.…

  10. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  11. Lectures on Self-Avoiding Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Duminil-Copin, Hugo; Goodman, Jesse; Slade, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a rapid introduction to a number of rigorous results on self-avoiding walks, with emphasis on the critical behaviour. Following an introductory overview of the central problems, an account is given of the Hammersley--Welsh bound on the number of self-avoiding walks and its consequences for the growth rates of bridges and self-avoiding polygons. A detailed proof that the connective constant on the hexagonal lattice equals $\\sqrt{2+\\sqrt{2}}$ is then provided. The la...

  12. End patterns of self-avoiding walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consider a fixed end pattern (a short self-avoiding walk) that can occur as the first few steps of an arbitrarily long self-avoiding walk on Z/sup d/. It is a difficult open problem to show that as N → ∞, the fraction of N-step self-avoiding walks beginning with this pattern converges. It is shown that as N → ∞, this fraction is bounded away from zero, and that the ratio of the fractions for N and N + 2 converges to one. Similar results are obtained when patterns are specified at both ends, and also when the endpoints are fixed

  13. Passive avoidence learning in the young rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blozovski, D; Cudennec, A

    1980-09-01

    A step-through locomotor passive avoidance task is described requiring the suppression of a spontaneous escape reaction from a cool toward a warm compartment in order to avoid an electric shock delivered in the warm side. We observed no lerning of this task at 9 days of age, a very low but significant level of acquisition at 11 days, a slow but progressive improvement of avoidance from the 13th until the 17th day when the adult capacity was achieved, and a marked increase in the rate between 17-20 days. PMID:7409331

  14. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, R Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Hammon, John W

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture "self-identified" anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the "Outcomes 2010" consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a "multiple hit" hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response requires hitting multiple

  15. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 μm2). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0±5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCODSA=COFick. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  16. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Mingde; Marshall, Craig T.; Qi, Yi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Badea, Cristian T.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Johnson, G. Allan [Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0{+-}5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCO{sub DSA}=CO{sub Fick}. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  17. Interleukin-27 as a Novel Biomarker for Early Cardiopulmonary Failure in Enterovirus 71-Infected Children with Central Nervous System Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingyuan; Du, Wenjing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang; Cao, Longbin; Yang, Weiqing; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhiyong; Wei, Pei; Wu, Weiquan; Huang, Zhulin; Fang, Ying; Lin, Qiling; Qin, Xingwen; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major pathogen for severe hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which leads to severe neurological complications and has high morbidity and mortality. Reliable biomarker for the prediction of deterioration in EV71-infected children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement may reduce the cardiopulmonary failure and mortality. Here, we found that serum IL-27 levels were significantly higher in stage III EV71-infected HFMD patients with early cardiopulmonary failure and strong correlation with CRP levels. IL27p28 polymorphisms (rs153109, rs17855750, and rs181206) did not influence IL-27 production, and these three SNPs were not associated with EV71 infection risk and clinical stage. IL-27 can be used as an prediction indicator for early cardiopulmonary failure in EV71-infected children with CNS involvement. PMID:27403033

  18. Coronary artery bypass surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass: short- and mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Y; Mehta, Y; Kohli, V M; Kohli, V; Mairal, M; Mishra, A; Bapna, R K; Trehan, N

    1997-01-01

    From March 1994 to April 1997, 433 patients had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass in our institute. Sixty-eight patients had various organ dysfunctions and/or aortic atheroma or calcification and were regarded as high risk for cardiopulmonary bypass. In 277 patients surgery was performed through midline sternotomy, while in 156 minithoracotomy approach was used. In 361 patients single coronary artery bypass grafting was done, and in 72 two-coronary arteries were bypassed. In 63 patients who had graftable vessels in anterior wall and diffusely diseased ungraftable vessels in posterolateral and/or inferior wall, transmyocardial laser revascularisation was also done along with coronary artery bypass grafting to achieve complete myocardial revascularisation. Nine patients in this series were also subjected to simultaneous carotid endarterectomy along with myocardial revascularisation. In two patients complementary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty of left circumflex coronary artery was done five days after minithoracotomy and left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending coronary artery bypass grafting. Forty-two cases were extubated in operating room. Average blood loss was 260 ml. Six patients were reexplored for postoperative bleeding. Seven patients had perioperative myocardial infarction. One developed neurological complication. Hospital mortality was 2.3 percent (10/433 cases) and four deaths were due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Nine patients developed chest wound complications. Average hospital stay after operation was six days, 423 patients were discharged from hospital and all of them were asymptomatic. During three years follow-up (range 3 to 38 months) there were three known cardiac deaths. Ninety percent (391) patients reported to the follow-up clinic and 91 percent of them were angina-free. In patients who were subjected to transmyocardial laser revascularisation along with coronary

  19. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: an evaluation of incidence, causes, management and guidelines for preventative measures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hargrove, M

    2012-02-03

    The incidence of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has been reported to occur in approximately 1 per 1000 cases. While the resultant morbidity and mortality is low, electrical failure is a life-threatening scenario. We report three major electrical failures during CPB in a patient population of 3500 over a 15-year period. These cases involved mains failure and generator shut down, mains failure and generator power surge, and failure of the uninterruptable power supply (UPS), which caused protected sockets to shut down. Protocols for preventative maintenance, necessary equipment, battery backup and guidelines for the successful management of such accidents during CPB are discussed.

  20. Cardiovascular Devices; Reclassification of External Cardiac Compressor; Reclassification of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Aids. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify external cardiac compressors (ECC) (under FDA product code DRM), a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls). FDA is also creating a separate classification regulation for a subgroup of devices previously included within this classification regulation, to be called cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) aids, and reclassifying these devices from class III to class II for CPR aids with feedback and to class I for CPR aids without feedback. PMID:27224965

  1. Femoro-femoral cardiopulmonary bypass for the resection of an anterior mediastinal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali SenDasgupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The perioperative management of patients with mediastinal mass is challenging. Complete airway obstruction and cardiovascular collapse may occur during the induction of general anaesthesia, tracheal intubation, and positive pressure ventilation. The intubation of trachea may be difficult or even impossible due to the compressed, tortuous trachea. Positive pressure ventilation may increase pre-existing superior vena cava (SVC obstruction, reducing venous return from the SVC causing cardiovascular collapse and acute cerebral oedema. We are describing here the successful management of a patient with a large anterior mediastinal mass by anaesthetizing the patient through a femoro-femoral cardiopulmonary bypass (fem-fem CPB.

  2. Effect of short-acting beta blocker on the cardiac recovery after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yanning

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of beta blocker on cardiac recovery and rhythm during cardiac surgeries. Sixty surgical rheumatic heart disease patients were received esmolol 1 mg/kg or the same volume of saline prior to removal of the aortic clamp. The incidence of cardiac automatic re-beat, ventricular fibrillation after reperfusion, the heart rate after steady re-beat, vasoactive drug use during weaning from bypass, the posterior parallel time and total bypass time were decreased by esmolol treatment. In conclusion: Esmolol has a positive effect on the cardiac recovery in cardiopulmonary bypass surgeries.

  3. Oxygenator Exhaust Capnography for Prediction of Arterial Carbon Dioxide Tension During Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Baraka, Anis; El-Khatib, Mohamad; Muallem, Eva; Jamal, Salim; Haroun-Bizri, Sania; Aouad, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Continuous monitoring and control of arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is essential. A reliable, accurate, and inexpensive system is not currently available. This study was undertaken to assess whether the continuous monitoring of oxygenator exhaust carbon dioxide tension (PexCO2) can be used to reflect PaCO2 during CPB. A total of 33 patients undergoing CPB for cardiac surgery were included in the study. During normothermia (37°C) and stable hypother...

  4. Emergency management of heat exchanger leak on cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukop, P; Tiezzi, A; Mattam, K; Sarsam, M

    2015-11-01

    Heat exchanger leak on cardiopulmonary bypass is very rare, but serious. The exact incidence is not known. It is an emergency associated with the potential risk of blood contamination, air embolism and haemolysis, difficulty with re-warming, acidosis, subsequent septic shock, multi-organ failure and death. We present a prompt, highly co-ordinated algorithm for the successful management of this important rare complication. There is need for further research to look for safety devices that detect leaks and techniques to reduce bacterial load. It is essential that teams practice oxygenator change-out routines and have a well-established change-out protocol. PMID:25870370

  5. Cardiopulmonary Function, Exercise Capacity, and Echocardiography Finding of Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Sheng-Hui; LI, Min-hui; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Chen, Yin-Han; Liao, Tin-Yun; Lin, Ko-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery (CA) abnormalities influence exercise capacity (EC) of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD), and Z-score of CA is a well established method for detecting CA aneurysm. We studied the influence of KD on cardiopulmonary function and EC; meanwhile we analyzed echocardiographic findings of KD patients. We also assessed the correlation between CA Z-score and EC of KD patients to see if CA Z-score of KD patients could reflect EC during exercise. Sixty-three KD patients were r...

  6. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Extracorporeal Life Support for Emergent Intraoperative Thoracic Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative thoracic surgical catastrophes may require extracorporeal circulation modes to support the patient while the appropriate repair is made. Teamwork is key and, given the evidence supporting better performance with the use of simulation and surgical-crisis checklists, their use should be encouraged. Anticipation is another important factor because the results of intrathoracic malignancy resection are clearly superior in the setting of planned cardiopulmonary support. In addition, familiarity with the different modes of support that are currently available can direct the decision-making process toward the best option to facilitate resolution of the intraoperative catastrophe with the least related morbidity. PMID:26210928

  7. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intake Disorder Binge Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Pica Rumination Disorder Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder is characterized ... Intake Disorder Binge Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Pica Rumination Disorder NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. CONSUMERS: ...

  8. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Stroke More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Jun 19,2014 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  9. Dual Eligibles and Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — About 25 percent of the hospitalizations for dual eligible beneficiaries in 2005 were potentially avoidable. Medicare and Medicaid spending for those potentially...

  10. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  11. Growing partially directed self-avoiding walks

    OpenAIRE

    Privman, V.

    1985-01-01

    A partially directed self-avoiding walk model with the 'kinetic growth' weighting is solved exactly, on the square lattice and for two restricted, strip geometries. Some finite-size effects are examined.

  12. Family Key to Helping Teens Avoid Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159681.html Family Key to Helping Teens Avoid Obesity Good relationship with parents, especially between fathers and ... develop healthy habits that may protect them against obesity, a new study suggests. The researchers also found ...

  13. How to avoid overheating during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000865.htm How to avoid overheating during exercise To use the sharing features on this page, ... condition can get heat illness. Stay Cool During Exercise Try these tips to help prevent heat-related ...

  14. The challenges for scientists in avoiding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E R; Partin, K M

    2014-01-01

    Although it might seem to be a simple task for scientists to avoid plagiarism and thereby an allegation of research misconduct, assessment of trainees in the Responsible Conduct of Research and recent findings from the National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General regarding plagiarism suggests otherwise. Our experiences at a land-grant academic institution in assisting researchers in avoiding plagiarism are described. We provide evidence from a university-wide multi-disciplinary course that understanding how to avoid plagiarism in scientific writing is more difficult than it might appear, and that a failure to learn the rules of appropriate citation may cause dire consequences. We suggest that new strategies to provide training in avoiding plagiarism are required. PMID:24785995

  15. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in radar technology have resulted in commercial, automotive collision avoidance radars. These radar systems typically use 37GHz or 77GHz interferometry...

  16. Conjecture on Avoidance of Big Crunch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng-Yi; ZHANG De-Hai

    2006-01-01

    By conjecturing the physics at the Planck scale, we modify the definition of the Hawking temperature and modify the Friedmann equation. It is found that we can avoid the singularity of the big crunch and obtain a bouncing cosmological model.

  17. Polymers as Self-Avoiding Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Karl F.

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the relation of the properties of real polymers to the problem of self-avoiding random walks. The self-consistent field method is discussed wherein the non-Markovian continuous self-avoiding polymer is replaced by a self-consistent Markovian approximation. An outline is presented of the method of solution of the resultant nonlinear integrodifferential equations. A description is also presented of the scaling theories which provide a means for deducing some exp...

  18. Weakly prudent self-avoiding bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Bacher, Axel; Beaton, Nicholas,

    2014-01-01

    We define and enumerate a new class of self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, which we call \\emphweakly prudent bridges. Their definition is inspired by two previously-considered classes of self-avoiding walks, and can be viewed as a combination of those two models. We consider several methods for recursively generating these objects, each with its own advantages and disadvantages, and use these methods to solve the generating function, obtain very long series, and randomly generate walks...

  19. Factors affecting the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in inpatient units: perception of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clairton Marcos Citolino Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify, in the perception of nurses, the factors that affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in adult inpatient units, and investigate the influence of both work shifts and professional experience length of time in the perception of these factors. METHOD A descriptive, exploratory study conducted at a hospital specialized in cardiology and pneumology with the application of a questionnaire to 49 nurses working in inpatient units. RESULTS The majority of nurses reported that the high number of professionals in the scenario (75.5%, the lack of harmony (77.6% or stress of any member of staff (67.3%, lack of material and/or equipment failure (57.1%, lack of familiarity with the emergency trolleys (98.0% and presence of family members at the beginning of the cardiopulmonary arrest assistance (57.1% are factors that adversely affect the quality of care provided during CPR. Professional experience length of time and the shift of nurses did not influence the perception of these factors. CONCLUSION The identification of factors that affect the quality of CPR in the perception of nurses serves as parameter to implement improvements and training of the staff working in inpatient units.

  20. Use of the cardiopulmonary flow index to evaluate cardiac function in thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of the cardiopulmonary blood volume to stroke volume is called the cardiopulmonary flow index (CPFI). The CPFI can be determined indirectly from the simultaneous recording of a radiocardiogram and an electrocardiogram. The CPFI and cardiac output were measured simultaneously in horses that were diagnosed as having cardiac disease. The results obtained from these subjects were compared with those from control animals and significant differences were found between the mean CPFI of the control horses and those with macroscopically visible myocardial fibrosis on post mortem examination. No significant differences were found between the means of the cardiac output measured in either of the groups of horses. The effect of pharmacological acceleration of the heart rate on the CPFI was also studied. Significant differences were found between the mean CPFI and the slopes of the regression lines of CPFI on heart rate of the control and principal groups of horses. These differences were greatest at heart rates near to the resting heart rates of the individuals. The CPFI was found to be a more sensitive measure of cardiac function than cardiac output, in the horses. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Occupational affiliation does not influence practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoren Ann-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-CPR (Defibrillator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is a technique for optimal basic life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals can perform CPR with competence. How CPR training and provision is organized varies between hospitals, and it is our impression that in Sweden this has generally improved during the last 15-20 years. However, some hospitals still do not have any AED (Automated External Defibrillators. The aim was to investigate potential differences in practical skills between different healthcare professions before and after training in D-CPR. Methods Seventy-four healthcare professionals were video recorded and evaluated for adherence to a modified Cardiff Score. A Laerdal Resusci Anne manikin in connection to PC Skill reporting System was used to evaluate CPR quality. A simulated CPR situation was accomplished during a 5-10 min scenario of ventricular fibrillation. Paired and unpaired statistical methods were used to examine differences within and between occupations with respect to the intervention. Results There were no differences in skills among the different healthcare professions, except for compressions per minute. In total, the number of compression per minute and depth improved for all groups (P P Conclusion Nearly all healthcare professionals learned to use the AED. There were no differences in CPR skill performances among the different healthcare professionals.

  2. Nontraumatic postmortem computed tomographic demonstration of cerebral gas embolism following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate cerebral gas embolism (GE) on nontraumatic postmortem CT (PMCT), regarding its frequency, location (arterial or venous), and causes. Our subjects were 404 nontraumatically deceased patients who had been in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival at our emergency room. PMCT was performed within 2 h of the confirmation of death. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed on 387 of the 404 subjects; and of these, cerebral GE was detected in 29 (7.5%) subjects (3 arterial, 25 venous, 1 undeterminable). Cerebral GE was not noted in the other 17 of the 404 subjects who did not undergo CPR. However, there was no significant difference in the incidence of cerebral GE between the subjects who underwent CPR and those who did not. The mechanism of cerebral arterial GE was presumed due to pulmonary barotrauma and/or paradoxical embolism, while the thoracic pump theory was suggested to explain the cerebral venous GE. Cerebral arterial/venous GE is found in CPR cases on nontraumatic PMCT. (author)

  3. An integrative review: instructional strategies to improve nurses' retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing and responding to a cardiac arrest in the hospital setting is a high stress, high anxiety event for all healthcare providers. It requires the performance of several basic, but extremely important cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills and response priorities. If not executed correctly and in a timely manner, a bad outcome may result. Poor retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills and priorities is well documented in the literature. An integrative review of the evidence was conducted to answer the question, "Is there a more effective training method to improve nurses' retention of CPR priorities during an in hospital cardiac arrest as compared to traditional American Heart Association training? "This review evaluated high fidelity and low fidelity simulation training, online or computer-based training and video instruction as potential teaching strategies focusing on CPR priorities. The role of deliberate practice is discussed. The strongest evidence suggests that a teaching plan employing brief, frequent, repetitive or deliberate practice used in collaboration with low fidelity or high fidelity simulation may be a potential strategy to improve nurses' retention of CPR priorities over time. PMID:25830906

  4. Problems of Cold Agglutinins in Cardiac Surgery: How to Manage Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Myocardial Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Alizadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold agglutinins are of unique relevance in cardiac surgerybecause of the use of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Cold autoimmune diseases are defined by the presence of abnormal circulating proteins (usually IgM or IgA antibodies that agglutinate in response to a decrease in body temperature. These disorders include cryoglobulinemia and cold hemagglutinin disease.Immunoglobulin M autoantibodies to red blood cells, which activateat varying levels of hypothermia, can cause catastrophic hemagglutination,microvascular thrombosis, or hemolysis. Management of anesthesia in these patients includes strict maintenance of normothermia. Patients scheduled for the surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass present significant challenges. Use of systemic hypothermia may be contraindicated, and cold cardioplegia solutions may precipitate intracoronary hemagglutination with consequent thrombosis, ischemia, or infarction. Management of CPB andmyocardial protection requires individualized planning. We describea case of MV repair and CABG in a patient with high titercold agglutinins and high thermal amplitude for antibody activation.Normothermic CPB and continuous warm blood cardioplegia weresuccessfully used.

  5. Scorpion (Buthus tamulus venom toxicity on cardiopulmonary reflexes involves kinins via 5-HT3 receptor subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. BAGCHI

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the action of Indian red scorpion Buthus tamulus (BT venom-induced augmentation of cardiopulmonary reflexes elicited by intravenous injection of 5-HT were examined in urethane anaesthetized rats. The 5-HT produced a concentration-dependent increase in time-response area of bradycardiac response, with the responses at submaximal concentrations shifted to the left after exposure to BT venom (20 µg/kg, IV. Aprotinin (6000 kallikrein inactivating unit, IV as such had no effect on 5-HT reflex responses (bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, but blocked the venom-induced reflex augmentation. While ondansetron (10 µg/kg, IV completely blocked the 5-HT reflex responses, these reappeared partially after venom exposure (20 µg/kg. Exposure to bradykinin (50 µg/kg, IV for 30 min also augmented the 5-HT-induced reflex responses similar to venom. The bradykinin-induced augmentation was also blocked by ondansetron. Results indicate that the venom-induced augmentation of cardiopulmonary reflexes is mediated through kinins sensitizing 5-HT3 receptor subtypes.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of cardiopulmonary functional reserve in treated patients with pulmonary embolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wen-wen; WANG Le-min; CHE Lin; SONG Hao-ming; JIANG Jin-fa; XU Jia-hong; SHEN Yu-qin; ZHANG Qi-ping

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no research,either at home or abroad,focusing on assessing the cardiopulmonary functional reserve and exercise tolerance in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE),but the benefits of early exercise are well recognized.The goals of this study were to assess cardiopulmonary functional reserve in treated PE patients using the inert gas rebreathing method of the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET),and to compare it with traditional methods.Methods CPET on the bicycle ergometer were performed in 40 patients with age,gender,body mass index,systolic blood pressure,and pulmonary function matched.The first group was the PE group composed of 16 PE patients (5 male,11 female) who were given the standard antithrombotic therapy for two weeks.The second group was composed of 24 normal individuals (10 male,14 female).Both groups were evaluated by cardiac ultrasound examination,6-minute walking test (6MVVT),and CPET.Results (1) Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) in the PE group increased significantly compared to the control group,(34.81±8.15) mmHg to (19.75±3.47) mmHg (P <0.01).But neither right atrial end-systolic diameter (RASD) nor right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (RVDD) in the PE patients had changed when compared with the controls.The 6-minute walk distance was significantly reduced in the PE patients compared with normal subjects,(447.81±79.20) m vs.(513.75±31.45) m (P <0.01).Both anaerobic threshold oxygen consumption (VO2AT) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) were significantly lower in patients with PE,while CO2 equivalent ventilation (VE/VCO2 slope) was higher;VO2AT (9.44±3.82) ml·kg1.min-1 vs.(14.62±2.93) ml.kg-1.min-1 (P <0.01) and VO2peak (12.26±4.06) ml.kg-1.min-1 vs.(23.46±6.15) ml.kg-1.min-1 (P <0.01) and VE/VCO2 slope 35.47±6.66 vs.26.94±3.16 (P <0.01).There was no significant difference in resting cardiac output (CO) between the PE and normal groups,whereas peak cardiac output (peak CO)and the

  7. Scaling of Self-Avoiding Walks and Self-Avoiding Trails in Three Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Prellberg, T.

    2001-01-01

    Motivated by recent claims of a proof that the length scale exponent for the end-to-end distance scaling of self-avoiding walks is precisely $7/12=0.5833...$, we present results of large-scale simulations of self-avoiding walks and self-avoiding trails with repulsive contact interactions on the hypercubic lattice. We find no evidence to support this claim; our estimate $\

  8. Improvement in recuperative gas cycles by means of a heat generator partly by-passing the recuperator. Application to open and closed cycles and to various kinds of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particular arrangement applicable to open or closed recuperative gas cycles and consisting of a heat generator partly by-passing the low pressure side of the recuperator is proven to enhance advantages of gas cycles for energy production. The cogeneration of both power with a high efficiency owing to the recuperator and high temperature process heat becomes possible and economically attractive. Furthermore, additional possibilities appear for power generation by combined gas and steam or ammonia cycles. In any case the overall utilization coefficient of the primary energy is increased and the combined production of low or medium temperature heat can also be improved. The great operation flexibility of the system for combined energy generation is worth being emphasized: the by-pass arrangement involves no significant change in the operation conditions of the main turbocompressor as the heat output varies. Applications of this arrangement are made to: - open and closed gas cycle, power plants; - fossil, nuclear and solar energies. The overall heat conversion efficiency is tentatively estimated in order to appreciate the energy conversion capability of the investigated power plants

  9. Avoiding barriers in control of mowing robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Bai-jing; QIAN Guo-hong; XIANG Zhong-ping; LI Zuo-peng

    2006-01-01

    Due to complicated barriers,it is difficult to track the path of the mowing robot and to avoid barriers.In order to solve the problem,a method based on distance-measuring sensors and fuzzy control inputs was proposed.Its track was composed of beelines and was easy to tail.The fuzzy control inputs were based on the front barrier distance and the difference between the left and right barrier distance measured by ultrasonic sensors;the output was the direction angle.The infrared sensors around the robot improved its safety in avoiding barriers.The result of the method was feasible,agile,and stable.The distance between the robot and the barriers could be changed by altering the inputs and outputs of fuzzy control and the length of the beelines.The disposed sensors can fulfill the need of the robot in avoiding barriers.

  10. Avoidable deaths in Greenland 1968-1985

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Juel, K

    1990-01-01

    suicides and alcohol related diseases were high in the capital and East Greenland and low in West Greenlandic settlements. It is concluded that further studies on preventable diseases and causes of death, in particular certain infectious diseases, accidents and suicides, are needed.......The concept of avoidable deaths suggests that certain deaths ought not occur in a given society because it is possible to prevent or treat the disease or condition. A list of avoidable deaths is time and community specific as it reflects the socioeconomic conditions, professional medical capacity...... and political will of the society. A list of avoidable deaths is proposed for Greenland which includes, inter alia, meningitis, lung cancer, acute respiratory infections, suicides, boat accidents and alcohol related diseases and accidents. All were considerably more common in Greenland than in Denmark...

  11. Functional neuroimaging of avoidance habits in OCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Claire M; Apergis-Schoute, Annemieke M; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Sule, Akeem; Fineberg, Naomi A; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine the neural correlates of excessive habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We aimed to (i) test for neurobiological convergence with the known pathophysiology of OCD and (ii) infer, based on abnormalities in brain activation, whether these habits arise from dysfunction in the goal-directed or habit system. Method Thirty-seven OCD patients and 33 controls learned to avoid shocks while undergoing a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan. Following 4 blocks of training, we tested if the avoidance response had become a habit by removing the threat of shock and measuring continued avoidance. We tested for task-related differences in brain activity in 3 ROIs, the caudate, putamen and medial orbitofrontal cortex at a statistical threshold of pdifferences in the build up of stimulus-response habits themselves. PMID:25526600

  12. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kroc, Lukas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krakala, Florent [ESPCI; Vergassola, M [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  13. Autonomous Collision avoidance for Unmanned aerial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Melega, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) applications are growing day by day and this will lead Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the close future to share the same airspace of manned aircraft.This implies the need for UAS to define precise safety standards compatible with operations standards for manned aviation. Among these standards the need for a Sense And Avoid (S&A) system to support and, when necessary, sub¬stitute the pilot in the detection and avoidance of hazardous situations (e.g. midair collis...

  14. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  15. Self Organization and Self Avoiding Limit Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2014-01-01

    A simple periodically driven system displaying rich behavior is introduced and studied. The system self-organizes into a mosaic of static ordered regions with three possible patterns, which are threaded by one-dimensional paths on which a small number of mobile particles travel. These trajectories are self-avoiding and non-intersecting, and their relationship to self-avoiding random walks is explored. Near $\\rho=0.5$ the distribution of path lengths becomes power-law like up to some cutoff le...

  16. Self-Avoiding Walks with Writhe

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, J. David; Kamien, Randall D.

    1997-01-01

    We map self-avoiding random walks with a chemical potential for writhe to the three-dimensional complex O(N) Chern-Simons theory as N -> 0. We argue that at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point which characterizes normal self-avoiding walks (with radius of gyration exponent nu = 0.588) a small chemical potential for writhe is irrelevant and the Chern-Simons field does not modify the monomer- monomer correlation function. For a large chemical potential the polymer collapses.

  17. Self-avoiding walks with writhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We map self-avoiding random walks with a chemical potential for writhe to the three-dimensional complex O(N) Chern-Simons theory as N→0. We argue that at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point which characterizes normal self-avoiding walks (with radius of gyration exponent ν∼0.588) a small chemical potential for writhe is irrelevant and the Chern-Simons field does not modify the monomer-monomer correlation function. For a large chemical potential the polymer collapses. (orig.)

  18. Benchmarking Collision Avoidance Schemes for Dynamic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Gomez, Luis; Fraichard, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates and compare three state-of-the-art collision avoidance schemes designed to operate in dynamic environments. The first one is an extension of the popular Dynamic Window approach; it is henceforth called TVDW which stands for Time-Varying Dynamic Window. The second one called NLVO builds upon the concept of Non Linear Velocity Obstacle which is a generalization of the Velocity Obstacle concept. The last one is called ICS-Avoid, it draws upon the concept of Inevitable Collis...

  19. Beliefs, Anxiety, and Avoiding Failure in Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Steve Chinn

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety has been the subject of several books and numerous research papers, suggesting that it is a significant issue for many people. Children and adults develop strategies to cope with this anxiety, one of which is avoidance. This paper presents data taken from over 2500 mathematics test papers in order to compare the levels of accuracy and the frequency of the use of the “no attempt” strategy, that is, avoidance, for arithmetic problems given to children aged from 10 years to a...

  20. Augmentation of abdominal organ perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass with a novel intra-aortic pulsatile catheter pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; De Kroon, T; Elstrodt, JM; van Oeveren, W; Boonstra, PW; Rakhorst, G

    2005-01-01

    Background: Current pulsatile pumps for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are far from satisfactory because of the poor pulsatility. This study was undertaken to examine the efficiency of a novel pulsatile catheter pump on pulsatility and its effect on abdominal organ perfusion during CPB. Methods: Twelv

  1. Acute and Subacute Effects of Urban Air Pollution on Cardiopulmonary Emergencies and Mortality: Time Series Studies in Austrian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rabczenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Daily pollution data (collected in Graz over 16 years and in the Linz over 18 years were used for time series studies (GAM and case-crossover on the relationship with daily mortality (overall and specific causes of death. Diagnoses of patients who had been transported to hospitals in Linz were also available on a daily basis from eight years for time series analyses of cardiopulmonary emergencies. Increases in air pollutant levels over several days were followed by increases in mortality and the observed effects increased with the length of the exposure window considered, up to a maximum of 15 days. These mortality changes in Graz and Linz showed similar patterns like the ones found before in Vienna. A significant association of mortality could be demonstrated with NO2, PM2.5 and PM10 even in summer, when concentrations are lower and mainly related to motor traffic. Cardiorespiratory ambulance transports increased with NO2/PM2.5/PM10 by 2.0/6.1/1.7% per 10 µg/m³ on the same day. Monitoring of NO2 (related to motor traffic and fine particulates at urban background stations predicts acute effects on cardiopulmonary emergencies and extended effects on cardiopulmonary mortality. Both components of urban air pollution are indicators of acute cardiopulmonary health risks, which need to be monitored and reduced, even below current standards.

  2. [Informative value of cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspnea diagnosis among asbestos-cement goods production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with diagnosis of respiratory system changes through cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspneic individuals over 10 years exposed to dust at work. The results help to assess changes in the cardio-respiratory system, further prognosis and expedience of continued work in the hazardous conditions. PMID:19882774

  3. Efficacy analysis of intravenous thrombolysis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of intravenous thrombolysis in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI)and cardiac arrest after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Methods 120 patients with AMI and cardiac arrest admitted in our hospital from Mar2009 to Mar 2013 were divided into thrombolytic group(n=50)and control group(n=70)according to the

  4. Health effects and time course of particulate matter on the cardiopulmonary system in rats with lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, M.M.W.; Alink, G.M.; Kumarathasan, P.; Vincent, R.; Boere, A.J.F.; Cassee, F.R.

    2002-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies associate health effects and particulate matter in ambient air. Exacerbation of the particle-induced inflammation can be a mechanism responsible for increased hospitalization and death due to cardiopulmonary events in high-risk groups of the population. Systems regulat

  5. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  6. Clinical Effectiveness of Centrifugal Pump to Produce Pulsatile Flow During Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Y. John; van Oeveren, Willem; Mungroop, Hubert E.; Epema, Anne H.; den Hamer, Inez J.; Keizer, Jorrit J.; Leuvenink, Ron P.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Although the centrifugal pump has been widely used as a nonpulsatile pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), little is known about its performance as a pulsatile pump for CPB, especially on its efficacy in producing hemodynamic energy and its clinical effectiveness. We performed a study to evaluate w

  7. Comparative Cardiopulmonary Toxicity of exhausts from Soy-Based Biofuels and Diesel in Healthy and Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of renewable energy sources raise concerns about health effects of new emissions. We analyzed relative cardiopulmonary health effects of exhausts from (1) 100% soy biofuel (B100), (2) 20% soy biofuel + 80% low sulfur petroleum diesel (B20), and (3) 100% petroleum di...

  8. Message measurement and feedback cardiopulmonary resuscitation board: a monitor for standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation%感控式心肺复苏背板:按标准进行心肺复苏的裁判员

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立祥; 郑静晨

    2010-01-01

    目的 发明一种感控式心肺复苏(CPR)背板,引导施救者进行标准CPR.方法 施救者将一个既具有支撑功能、又能提供标准按压参数和频率提示的多功能智能化感控式CPR背板置于患者胸背部下方,将患者的头部置于背板上方中央的凹槽中,按2005国际CPR指南进行徒手胸外心脏按压,参照背板显示窗口的标准压力及频率提示实时调整,以完成标准的胸外按压.结果 感控式CPR背板较以往用于CPR时的支撑背板具有对按压时压力和频率的显示功能,现场实施时能即时反馈客观数据,使施救者达到标准CPR的要求,从而提高了CPR的成功率;且使用感控式CPR背板进行CPR时操作的规范性明显优于传统的CPR,能有效规避不规范胸外按压引发的胸肋骨骨折等并发症.结论 感控式CPR背板在具备以往垫板支撑功能的同时,规避了传统胸外按压时的不规范操作,减少了并发症,提高了CPR的成功率,担当了提示、监督和协助施救者按标准进行CPR裁判员的重要角色.%Objective To invest a message measurement and feedback cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)board which could guide the first aider to perform standard CPR.Methods The muhifunctional and intelligent CPR board which could not only support but also provide standard parameters and frequency of compression for first aiders was placed underneath the patient's back.with his head in the concave headrest at the top of the board.The operator exerted chest compression with his hands according to the 2005 American heart association(AHA)guidelines for CPR,and adjusted the pressure and rate according to that showed on the board to achieve the force and frequency of chest compression according to the standard.Results The operation of the chest compression which was cariied out on the message measurement andfeedback CPR board was significantly better than that carried out on the ordinary board because that the former could show

  9. Does transfusion of residual cardiopulmonary bypass circuit blood increase postoperative bleeding? A prospective randomized study in patients undergoing on pump cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duara Rajnish

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Homologous blood transfusion after open heart surgery puts a tremendous load on the blood banks. This prospective randomized study evaluates the efficacy of infusing back residual cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB circuit i.e., pump blood as a means to reduce homologous transfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG and whether its use increases postoperative drainage. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven consecutive patients who underwent elective CABGs under CPB were randomized into 2 groups: (1 cases where residual pump blood was used and (2 controls where residual pump blood was not used. Patients were monitored for hourly drainage on the day of surgery and the 1 st postoperative day and the requirements of homologous blood and its products. Data were matched regarding change in Hemoglobin, Packed Cell Volume and coagulation parameters till 1st postoperative day. All cases were followed up for three years. Results: There was a marginal reduction in bleeding pattern in the early postoperative period in the cases compared to controls. The requirement of homologous blood and its products were also reduced in the cases. Conclusions: The use of CPB circuit blood is safe in the immediate postoperative period. The requirement of homologous blood transfusion can come down if strict transfusion criteria are maintained.

  10. Complications to Avoid with Pre-Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Stroke More Complications to Avoid with Pre-diabetes Updated:Nov 19,2015 If I ignore the ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  11. Avoidance Motivation and Conservation of Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskes, Marieke; Elliot, Andrew J.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to approach motivation, avoidance motivation evokes vigilance, attention to detail, systematic information processing, and the recruitment of cognitive resources. From a conservation of energy perspective it follows that people would be reluctant to engage in the kind of effortful cognitive

  12. Teaching Preschool Children to Avoid Poison Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancho, Kelly A.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rhoades, Melissa M.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of group safety training and in situ feedback and response interruption to teach preschool children to avoid consuming potentially hazardous substances. Three children ingested ambiguous substances during a baited baseline assessment condition and continued to ingest these substances following group safety training.…

  13. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication. PMID:16736662

  14. Reasonable Avoidability, Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Marchman

    2012-01-01

    In “Health, Luck and Justice” Shlomi Segall argues for a luck egalitarian approach to justice in health care. As the basis for a just distribution he suggests a principle of Reasonable Avoidability, which he takes to imply that we do not have justice-based reasons to treat diseases brought about ...

  15. Your Adolescent: Anxiety and Avoidant Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the problem manifests in school avoidance, the initial goal will be to get the youngster back to school as soon as possible. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy In many cases, cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy techniques are effective in addressing adolescent anxiety disorders. ...

  16. Pathogen evolution under host avoidance plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, David V; Day, Troy

    2015-09-01

    Host resistance consists of defences that limit pathogen burden, and can be classified as either adaptations targeting recovery from infection or those focused upon infection avoidance. Conventional theory treats avoidance as a fixed strategy which does not vary from one interaction to the next. However, there is increasing empirical evidence that many avoidance strategies are triggered by external stimuli, and thus should be treated as phenotypically plastic responses. Here, we consider the implications of avoidance plasticity for host-pathogen coevolution. We uncover a number of predictions challenging current theory. First, in the absence of pathogen trade-offs, plasticity can restrain pathogen evolution; moreover, the pathogen exploits conditions in which the host would otherwise invest less in resistance, causing resistance escalation. Second, when transmission trades off with pathogen-induced mortality, plasticity encourages avirulence, resulting in a superior fitness outcome for both host and pathogen. Third, plasticity ensures the sterilizing effect of pathogens has consequences for pathogen evolution. When pathogens castrate hosts, selection forces them to minimize mortality virulence; moreover, when transmission trades off with sterility alone, resistance plasticity is sufficient to prevent pathogens from evolving to fully castrate. PMID:26336170

  17. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  18. The Advocacy or Avoidance of Only Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Toni

    A brief review of the psychological literature on the characteristics of only children is presented in order to determine if the one-child family should be avoided or advocated. The relevant literature is found to be limited in quantity and conceptualization of the only child. Previous literature is divided into three types of study: those with…

  19. Bilocal Dynamics for Self-Avoiding Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Caracciolo, Sergio; Ferraro, G; Papinutto, Mauro; Pelissetto, A; Caracciolo, Sergio; Causo, Maria Serena; Ferraro, Giovanni; Papinutto, Mauro; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    We introduce several bilocal algorithms for lattice self-avoiding walks that provide reasonable models for the physical kinetics of polymers in the absence of hydrodynamic effects. We discuss their ergodicity in different confined geometries, for instance in strips and in slabs. A short discussion of the dynamical properties in the absence of interactions is given.

  20. Self-avoiding random walk in superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model is presented, where all the critical exponents are calculated exactly. It corresponds to a self-avoiding random walk in superspace of dimension D≤4. For the correlation length the validity of Flory's conjecture (ν=3/(D+2)) is confirmed. (orig.)

  1. Bilocal Dynamics for Self-Avoiding Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Caracciolo, Sergio; Causo, Maria Serena; Ferraro, Giovanni; Papinutto, Mauro; Pelissetto, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    We introduce several bilocal algorithms for lattice self-avoiding walks that provide reasonable models for the physical kinetics of polymers in the absence of hydrodynamic effects. We discuss their ergodicity in different confined geometries, for instance in strips and in slabs. A short discussion of the dynamical properties in the absence of interactions is given.

  2. Specific Language Impairment at Adolescence: Avoiding Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, Laurice; Henry, Celia; Sizaret, Eva; Barthez, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study explores complex language in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) with the aim of finding out how aspects of language characteristic of typical syntactic development after childhood fare and, in particular, whether there is evidence that individuals with SLI avoid using structures whose syntactic derivation involves…

  3. Working with Avoidant Children: A Clinical Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Nancy; Meisburger, Diana

    1998-01-01

    Presents strategies for interviewing and assisting highly avoidant children who may be victims of maltreatment. Discusses factors inhibiting their self-disclosure, the importance of managing child safety, and establishing and maintaining rapport. Describes strategies including pacing the interview, empowering the child, and using distancing…

  4. Obesity and Healthcare Avoidance: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D McGuigan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the issue of health care avoidance and obesity. English language journal articles published between 1990 and 2012 that addressed the review question|“is being overweight or obese an unrecognized factor in healthcare avoidance?” were located using major databases. A modified JADAD scoring system was then used to assess papers. Ten papers were identified which directly addressed the review question. A positive relationship exists between obesity and healthcare avoidance. The major contributory factors were being female, have a diagnosed mental health problem and perceived or actual bias and discrimination by health professionals. The review also highlights the importance of the relationship between healthcare professionals and their patients, and the physical environment in which interactions occur as these may contribute to avoidance behaviors. Concern about obesity is rising and while there has been much discussion about strategies to reduce obesity this review highlights the need for thinking more broadly about the way in which overweight and obese individuals interact with preventative health strategies.

  5. Obsessive compulsive disorder with pervasive avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Parul; Sharma Ravi; Kumar Ramesh; Sharma Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common disorder, but some of its atypical presentations are uncommon and difficult to diagnose. We report one such case which on initial presentation appeared to be psychotic protocol but after detailed workup was diagnosed as OCD with marked avoidance symptoms.

  6. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  7. Measuring Patients’ Attachment Avoidance in Psychotherapy: Development of the Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale (AATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Láng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new scale measuring patient-therapist attachment avoidance was developed. Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale is a new measure based on the Bartholomew model of adult attachment (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991 and the Experience in Close Relationships Scale (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 to measure patients’ attachment avoidance towards therapists. With 112 patient-therapist dyads participating in the study, validation of a preliminary scale – measuring both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance in therapy – took place using therapists’ evaluations of patients’ relational behavior and patients’ self-reports about their attitude toward psychotherapy. Analysis of the data revealed six underlying scales. Results showed all six scales to be reliable. Validation of scales measuring attachment anxiety failed. The importance of Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale and its subscales is discussed.

  8. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  9. [Treatment of a female patient with sickle-cell anemia during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pache, M V Acedo; Sarrión Bravo, M V; Silva Guisasola, J; Ariño Irujo, J; López Timoneda, F

    2011-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with drepanocytic (sickle-cell) anemia who was being treated with hydroxyurea and periodic blood transfusions through a Hickman-type catheter was admitted for periodic episodes of fever. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Massive right atrial thrombosis with pulmonary embolism and bacterial endocarditis were detected by computed tomography. Surgery with a beating heart and cardiopulmonary bypass was undertaken. Drepanocytic anemia in individuals homozygous for hemoglobin S is a rare condition in Spain but we are beginning to see a few cases, in which management during anesthesia will be more complicated. High-risk surgery can be carried out in these patients without adverse events if the anesthesiologist is guided by a complete blood workup and takes precautions during and after surgery to control hydration, oxygenation, temperature, and the acid-base balance. PMID:22046869

  10. Differences in displayed pump flow compared to measured flow under varying conditions during simulated cardiopulmonary bypass.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hargrove, M

    2008-07-01

    Errors in blood flow delivery due to shunting have been reported to reduce flow by, potentially, up to 40-83% during cardiopulmonary bypass. The standard roller-pump measures revolutions per minute and a calibration factor for different tubing sizes calculates and displays flow accordingly. We compared displayed roller-pump flow with ultrasonically measured flow to ascertain if measured flow correlated with the heart-lung pump flow reading. Comparison of flows was measured under varying conditions of pump run duration, temperature, viscosity, varying arterial\\/venous loops, occlusiveness, outlet pressure, use of silicone or polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in the roller race, different tubing diameters, and use of a venous vacuum-drainage device.

  11. Low-fidelity simulator for technical connection to the cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossien, Abdullrazak

    2016-01-01

    The technical simulator proposed in this study is an additional low-cost, reusable, reproducible and portable tool to guide trainees at all levels to effectively construct it in order to improve their surgical skills in connection with the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit. The simulator is a self-made portable box that can be used for an unrestricted number of procedures. It is supplied with self-made anatomical replicas that have been tested to simulate the flexible property of the real anatomy. The building process is detailed in this study. The connection to the CPB is performed by the usage of this simulator, in which surgical handling was tested. The total cost was calculated in Euros (about 3.5 Euros). PMID:26811507

  12. Disseminating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training by distributing 35,000 personal manikins among school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Rasmussen, Lars S; Ringsted, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    train 17,140 from the second tier (mean, 2.5 persons per pupil; 95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 2.5). The teachers had used a mean of 64 minutes (95% confidence interval, 60 to 68) for preparation and a mean of 13 minutes (95% confidence interval, 11 to 15) to tidy up. Incidence of bystander CPR in the......BACKGROUND: Because most cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by lay persons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mass distribution of CPR instructional materials among schoolchildren. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We distributed 35,002 resuscitation manikins to pupils (12 to 14 years of age) at 806 primary schools. Using the enclosed 24-minute instructional DVD, they trained in CPR and subsequently used the kit to train family and friends (second tier). They completed a questionnaire on who had...

  13. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish; Apicella, Michael A.; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Saunders, Geoffrey K.; Inzana, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms form in a variety of host sites following infection with many bacterial species. However, the study of biofilms in a host is hindered due to the lack of protocols for the proper experimental investigation of biofilms in vivo. Histophilus somni is an agent of respiratory and systemic...... diseases in bovines, and readily forms biofilms in vitro. In the present study the capability of H. somni to form biofilms in cardiopulmonary tissue following experimental respiratory infection in the bovine host was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy...... filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for...

  14. The potential of the novel leukocyte removal filter in cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is indispensable for cardiac surgery but leads to systemic inflammatory responses and leukocyte activation, possibly due to blood contact with the surface of the CPB unit, surgical, ischemic reperfusion injury, etc. Systemic inflammatory responses during CPB result in increased morbidity and mortality. Activation of leukocytes is an important part of this process and directly contributes to coagulopathy and hemorrhage. This inflammatory response may contribute to the development of postoperative complications, including myocardial dysfunction, respiratory failure, renal and neurologic dysfunction, altered liver function and ultimately, multiple organ failure. Various pharmacologic and mechanical strategies have been developed to minimize the systemic inflammatory response during CPB. For example, leukocyte removal filters were developed in the 1990s for incorporation into the CPB circuit. However, studies of this approach have yielded conflicting findings. The purpose of this was to review the studies of a novel leukocyte removal filter in patients undergoing CPB. PMID:26613267

  15. Are the current guideline recommendations for neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation safe and effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    A recently published review of approaches to optimize chest compressions in the resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns discussed the current recommendations and explored potential determinants of effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, not all potential determinants of effective neonatal CPR were explored. Chest compression shallower than the current guideline recommendation of approximately 33% of the anterior-posterior (AP) chest diameter may be safer and more effective. From a physiological standpoint, high-velocity brief duration shallower compression may be more effective than current recommendations. The application of a 1- or 2-finger method of high-impulse CPR, which would depend on the size of the subject, may be more effective than using a 2-thumb (TT) encircling hands method of CPR. Adrenaline should not be used in the treatment of asphyxiated neonates and when necessary titrated vasopressin should be used. PMID:27220864

  16. A Review of the Performance of Artifact Filtering Algorithms for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushun Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various filtering strategies have been adopted and investigated to suppress the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR artifact. In this article, two types of artifact removal methods are reviewed: one is the method that removes CPR artifact using only ECG signals, and the other is the method with additional reference signals, such as acceleration, compression depth and transthoracic impedance. After filtering, the signal-to-noise ratio is improved from 0 dB to greater than 2.8 dB, the sensitivity is increased to > 90% as recommended by the American Heart Association, whereas the specificity was far from the recommended 95%, which is considered to be the major drawback of the available artifact removal methods. The overall performance of the adaptive filtering methods with additional reference signal outperforms the methods using only ECG signals. Further research should focus on the refinement of artifact filtering methods and the improvement of shock advice algorithms with the presence of CPR.

  17. Canine and feline cardiopulmonary parasitic nematodes in Europe: emerging and underestimated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conboy Gary

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiopulmonary nematodes of dogs and cats cause parasitic diseases of central relevance in current veterinary practice. In the recent past the distribution of canine and feline heartworms and lungworms has increased in various geographical areas, including Europe. This is true especially for the metastrongyloids Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Angiostrongylus vasorum and Crenosoma vulpis, the filarioid Dirofilaria immitis and the trichuroid Eucoleus aerophilus (syn. Capillaria aerophila. The reasons of this emergence are little known but many drivers such as global warming, changes in vector epidemiology and movements in animal populations, may be taken into account. The purpose of this article is to review the knowledge of the most important heartworm and lungworm infections of dogs and cats in Europe. In particular recent advances in epidemiology, clinical and control are described and discussed.

  18. NPC 15669 blocks neutrophil CD18 increase and lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bator

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, neutrophils become activated due to contact with extracorporeal surfaces and binding of complement fragments C3a and C5a, leading to extravasation and subsequent tissue damage. In this study, the effects of the leumedin NPC 15669 (N [9H - (2,7 dimethylfluorenyl - 9 - methoxy car bonyl]-L-leucine, a leukocyte recruitment inhibitor, were evaluated in a pig model of CPB. NPC 15669 caused significant inhibition of CPB associated increase in CD18 upregulation, lung tissue myeloperoxidase content, and percentage wet weight compared to controls. Lung histology revealed clear airways and minimal neutrophil infiltration in treated animals vs. significant oedema and cellular infiltration in controls. It is concluded that CPB causes a dramatic increase in neutrophil CD18, and that leumedins are effective in inhibiting neutrophil activation and subsequent tissue injury when administered during CPB.

  19. Impact of Intraoperative Events on Cerebral Tissue Oximetry in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševerdija, Ervin E; Vranken, Nousjka P A; Teerenstra, Steven; Ganushchak, Yuri M; Weerwind, Patrick W

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that decreased cerebral saturation during cardiac surgery is related to adverse postoperative outcome. Therefore, we investigated the influence of intraoperative events on cerebral tissue saturation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A total of 52 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery using pulsatile CPB were included in this prospective explorative study. Cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) was measured in both the left and right cerebral hemisphere. Intraoperative events, involving interventions performed by anesthesiologist, surgeon, and clinical perfusionist, were documented. Simultaneously, in-line hemodynamic parameters (partial oxygen pressure, partial carbon dioxide pressure, hematocrit, arterial blood pressure, and CPB flow rates) were recorded. Cerebral tissue saturation was affected by anesthetic induction (p partial oxygen pressures changed. Cerebral tissue oximetry effectively identifies changes related to surgical events or vulnerable periods during cardiac surgery. Future studies are needed to identify methods of mitigating periods of reduced cerebral saturation. PMID:26390677

  20. An integrated mathematical model of the human cardiopulmonary system: model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Antonio; Cheng, Limei; Ursino, Mauro; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2016-04-01

    Several cardiovascular and pulmonary models have been proposed in the last few decades. However, very few have addressed the interactions between these two systems. Our group has developed an integrated cardiopulmonary model (CP Model) that mathematically describes the interactions between the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, along with their main short-term control mechanisms. The model has been compared with human and animal data taken from published literature. Due to the volume of the work, the paper is divided in two parts. The present paper is on model development and normophysiology, whereas the second is on the model's validation on hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions. The CP Model incorporates cardiovascular circulation, respiratory mechanics, tissue and alveolar gas exchange, as well as short-term neural control mechanisms acting on both the cardiovascular and the respiratory functions. The model is able to simulate physiological variables typically observed in adult humans under normal and pathological conditions and to explain the underlying mechanisms and dynamics. PMID:26683899

  1. Cardiopulmonary effects of using carbon dioxide for laparoscopic surgery in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, Shannon G; Cosford, Kevin; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya

    2011-09-01

    The cardiopulmonary effects of capnoperitoneum were investigated in 8 spontaneously breathing, young adult female cats undergoing laparoscopic pancreatic biopsy (intra-abdominal pressure 12 mmHg). Cats were premedicated with acepromazine and hydromorphone, induced with ketamine and diazepam, and maintained using an end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.13% in 100% oxygen. Direct systemic arterial blood pressure, heart and respiratory rates, end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and isoflurane were recorded every 5 min before insufflation (baseline), during insufflation of the abdomen with CO(2), and following desufflation. Arterial blood samples were drawn at baseline, at 10 and 30 min of insufflation, and 5 min after desufflation for blood gases. The significant findings (P cats despite no artificial maintenance of minute ventilation. PMID:22379196

  2. A Multi Parameters Wearable Telemetric System for Cardio-Pulmonary Fitness of e-Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tsung-Che; Chiu, Nan-Fu; Liao, Fang-Ren; Lu, Shey-Shi; Ping, Feng; Yang, Chang-Rung; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2005-01-01

    We report a multi parameters cardio-pulmonary (CP) monitoring system with features of low power consumptions (30mA,3.3V), miniaturization (size 25 cm2), and wireless data communications (Frequency 96 MHz) for wearable applications in e-Health. Its target application is forthe evaluation of fitness of CP during exercises. We use aminiature bi-directional hot-wire sensor for respiratory function,an optical sensor for saturated blood oxygen level or plethsymograph, and two surface electrodes for single lead electrocardiograph. The fitness indexes include blood oxygen level, ECG, and respiratory functions, which will be used for the quantitative evaluation of the level of physical activity. PMID:17280978

  3. What are the barriers to implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinckernagel, Line; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in schools is recommended to increase bystander CPR and thereby survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but despite mandating legislation, low rates of implementation have been observed in several countries, including Denmark. The purpose...... of the study was to explore barriers to implementation of CPR training in Danish secondary schools. DESIGN: A qualitative study based on individual interviews and focus groups with school leadership and teachers. Thematic analysis was used to identify regular patterns of meaning both within and...... study population comprised 25 participants, 9 school leadership members and 16 teachers. RESULTS: School leadership and teachers considered it important for implementation and sustainability of CPR training that teachers conduct CPR training of students. However, they preferred external instructors to...

  4. Association of cardiopulmonary resuscitation psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry

    2014-12-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills are essential for better patient survival, but whether these skills are associated with knowledge of and self-efficacy in CPR is not well known. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of CPR skills and identify the association of the psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy at the time of CPR skills training. A convenience sample of 124 nursing students participated in a one-group posttest-only study. The quality of CPR psychomotor skills, as assessed by structured observation using a manikin, was suboptimal. Nursing students who performed correct chest compression skills reported higher self-efficacy, but there was no association between CPR psychomotor skills and total knowledge. Rigorous skills training sessions with more objective feedback on performance and individual coaching are warranted to enable mastery learning and self-efficacy. PMID:24219782

  5. Brief Bedside Refresher Training to Practice Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in the Ambulatory Surgery Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemery, Stephanie; Kelly, Kelley; Wilson, Connie; Wheeler, Corrine A

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur in any health care setting at any time, requiring nursing staff to be prepared to quickly and adequately perform basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Currently, the American Heart Association certifies health care providers in Basic Life Support (BLS) for a 2-year period, but evidence indicates that psychomotor skills decline well before the end of the certification time frame. Nurses in the ambulatory surgery setting expressed concern regarding their ability to implement CPR successfully, given the infrequent occurrence of cardiac and respiratory arrests. Using a study by Niles et al. as a model, the authors piloted the implementation of brief CPR refresher training at the bedside of an ambulatory surgery center to assess and increase nurse confidence in BLS skills. PMID:26247660

  6. Intact Survival After Obstetric Hemorrhage and 55 Minutes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anast, Nicholas; Kwok, Joseph; Carvalho, Brendan; Lipman, Steven; Flood, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac arrest occurs in approximately 1:12,000 parturients. Among nonpregnant patients who have in-hospital cardiac arrest, those whose spontaneous circulation does not return within 15 to 20 minutes have a high risk of death and disability, so life support efforts are generally stopped after this period. However, among parturients, witnessed in-hospital arrest is often reversible and has a better prognosis. We describe a successful clinical outcome after maternal cardiac arrest and 55 minutes of advanced cardiac life support. This case underscores the importance of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and raises questions about the appropriate duration of resuscitation efforts in otherwise healthy young mothers with a potentially reversible cause of arrest. PMID:26125692

  7. Subarachnoid clonidine and trauma response in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gissi da Rocha Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The intense trauma response triggered by cardiopulmonary bypass can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The present study evaluated whether clonidine, a drug of the class of α-2 agonists, administered by spinal route, without association with local anesthetics or opioids, reduces this response in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Method: A total of 27 patients between 18 and 75 years old, divided by non-blinded fashion into a control group (15 and a clonidine group (12, were studied. All patients underwent identical technique of general anesthesia. Then, only the clonidine group received 1 μg kg−1 clonidine by spinal route. Levels of blood glucose, lactate and cortisol were measured at three consecutive times: T1, at the time of installation of invasive arterial pressure; T2, 10 min after the first dose for cardioplegia; and T3, at the time of skin suture; and troponin I values at T1 and T3. The variation of results between T2-T1, T3-T2, and T3-T1 was also evaluated. Results: There was a statistically significant difference only with respect to the variation in blood glucose in the clonidine group: T3-T2, p = 0.027 and T3-T1, p = 0.047. Conclusions: Spinal clonidine at a dose of 1 μg kg−1 did not decrease blood measurements of troponin, cortisol, or lactate. Blood glucose suffered a more moderate variation during the procedure in the clonidine group. This fact, already reported in the literature, requires further investigation to be clarified.

  8. Self-priming hemodynamic reservoir and inline flow meter for a cardiopulmonary bypass simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, David; Austin, Jon; Tallman, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Simulator exercises are used at Midwestern University to augment academic and laboratory training toward consolidating particular skills, increasing situation awareness, and preparing the student for practice within the team environment of an operating room. This paper describes an enhanced cardiopulmonary bypass simulator consisting of a self-priming hemodynamic reservoir that includes an inline flow meter. A typical cardiopulmonary bypass adult perfusion circuit was assembled using a roller pump console and integrated oxygenator/heat exchanger/reservoir and primed with 2 liters of water. For patient simulation, a soft-sided reservoir bag was mounted onto an inclined platform. A 1-liter soft-sided bag was placed just above the reservoir, providing an overflow reservoir. The priming line extended to the head of the mannequin. The arterial, venous, and suction lines extended through the open chest. The primed perfusion circuit was connected to ports on the filled reservoir bag. To test the patient simulation, the arterial pump output was adjusted to flow rates ranging from 1-7 liters per minute, with a complete interruption (to zero flow) between each test run. An inline flow meter was added to the bypass circuit and an analog to digital converter board was used to pass flow data into the computer-based simulation program. The use of an inclined hemodynamic reservoir bag proved to be self-priming and functional without problems over a wide range of flows tested. By including a reservoir with the mannequin, plus processing and displaying real-time flow data using the CPB-Sim simulation program, a higher fidelity and more realistic simulation experience was created. PMID:20648900

  9. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – the gold standard in physical performance assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX is a modern procedure that allows us to evaluate the global performanceof a subject. Because CPX devices are expensive and less popular due to a less amount of specialists in this field, many oflaboratories uses the more common ECG stress tests for physical performance assessment. Aim: to demonstrate theimportance and accuracy of cardiopulmonary exercise testing comparing with traditional maximal electrocardiographic (ECGstress test without gas exchange analysis. Methods: 18th elite soccer players (age 22.7±6 years, body mass 74.6±9.5 kg,height 175.4±9.8 cm participated in the study. The subjects accomplished two treadmill effort tests with and without gasanalyses, in 2 consecutive days interval. Results: At the end of the study we noticed a highly significant statistical difference(p<0.0001 between the investigated testing methods. In gas exchange testing method we found a decreased level of all theparameters evaluated comparing to stress ECG: VO2 peak (ml*kg-1*min-1 = 55.4±5.2 vs. 67.8±5.7; AT (ml*kg-1*min-1 =41.2±7.6 vs. 47.4±6.9; VO2/HR (ml = 23.8±2.5 vs. 23.8±2.5. Conclusions: Asessment of exercise performance based solelyon a maximal stress ECG without gas analyzing is inaccurate. Furthermore, estimation of peak exercise responses based uponcalculation of VO2 peak from peak work rate are inappropriate in sportsman. The study demonstrate once again that CPXremain the most accurate and reliable test for detection of AT and for a comprehensive physical performance assessment andcannot be replace by other surrogate laboratory exercise tests like stress ECG.

  10. Significance of the carboxyhemoglobin level for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yanagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At low concentrations, carbon monoxide (CO can confer cyto and tissue-protective effects, such as endogenous Heme oxygenase 1 expression, which has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects. The level of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood is an indicator of the endogenous production of CO and inhaled CO. Aim of study: To investigate the significance of the value of carboxyhemoglobin for out-of-hospital (OH cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA. Materials and Methods: This study involved a medical chart review of cases treated from January to December 2005. The inclusion criteria included a patient who was transported to this department due to an OH CPA. The exclusion criteria included a patient who did not undergo blood gas analysis on arrival and who experienced CPA due to acute carbon monoxide intoxication. The subjects were divided into two groups based on their final outcome of either survival or non-survival. Results: There was no significant difference associated with the sex, age, frequency of witness collapse, bystander cardiopulmonary arrest, electrocardiogram at scene, cause of CPA, value of PCO 2 , HCO3 - , and methemoglobin. The frequency of OH return of spontaneous circulation and the value of pH, PO 2 , base excess, and carboxyhemoglobin in the survival group were greater than those values in the non-survival group. There were no subjects whose carboxyhemoglobin level was 0% on arrival in the survival groups. Conclusion: There appeared to be an association between higher carboxyhemoglobin levels and survival in comparison with non-survival patients.

  11. Effect of exercise training on cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, G. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Nadel, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) in four groups of male volunteer subjects: i) unfit, ii) physically fit, iii) before and after 10 wk of endurance training (chronic blood volume expansion), and iv) before and after acute blood volume expansion. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus, i.e., changes in central venous pressure and response, i.e., FVR, during unloading of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). The slope of the linear relationship between FVR and CVP, the index of the responsiveness of this baroreflex, was significantly diminished (> 50%) in the fit subjects compared with the unfit. The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely correlated with the subject's total blood volume, suggesting that blood volume expansion was related to the attenuated CP baroreflex. In the exercise training study, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume increased following 10 wk of endurance training (N = 14) but were unchanged in the time control group (N = 7). The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was significantly reduced (32%) following 10 wk of training but was unchanged in the time control group. The reduction in slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely related to the increase in blood volume associated with exercise training. Acute blood volume expansion 8 ml.kg-1 body weight with 5% human serum albumin solution) significantly reduced the slope of the FVR-CVP relationship. These data support the hypothesis that the attenuated forearm vascular reflex in physically fit individuals is related to a training-induced hypervolemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  12. Survival after In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Major Referral Center during 2001-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rafati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to save more people suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest, rates of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR are no better today than they were more than a decade ago. This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing CPR by the code blue team at our center during 2001 to 2008. Data were collected retrospectively from adult patients (n=2262 who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using binomial and Chi Square tests. Of the patients included (n=2262, 741 patients (32.8% had successful CPR. The number of male patients requiring CPR was more than females in need of the procedure. The majority of patients requiring CPR were older than 60 years (56.4±17.9. The number of successful CPR cases in long-day shift (7:00 to 19:00 was more than that in the night shift (19:00 to 7:00. Furthermore, 413 (18.4% cases were resuscitated on holidays and 1849 (81.7% on the working days. The duration of CPR was 10 min or less in 710 (31.4% cases. Cardiopulmonary resuscitations which lasted less than 10 minutes were associated with better outcomes. The findings of the present study indicate that some manageable factors including the duration of CPR, working shift, working day (holiday or non-holiday could affect the CPR outcomes. The findings might also be taken as evidence to suggest that the allocation of more personnel in each shift especially in night shifts and holidays, planning to increase the personnel's CPR skills, and decreasing the waste time would result in the improvement of CPR outcome.

  13. The Feasibility of Avoiding Future Climate Impacts: Results from the AVOID Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, J. A.; Warren, R.; Arnell, N.; Buckle, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AVOID programme and its successor, AVOID2, have focused on answering three core questions: how do we characterise potentially dangerous climate change and impacts, which emissions pathways can avoid at least some of these impacts, and how feasible are the future reductions needed to significantly deviate from a business-as-usual future emissions pathway. The first AVOID project succeeded in providing the UK Government with evidence to inform its position on climate change. A key part of the work involved developing a range of global emissions pathways and estimating and understanding the corresponding global impacts. This made use of a combination of complex general circulation models, simple climate models, pattern-scaling and state-of-the art impacts models. The results characterise the range of avoidable impacts across the globe in several key sectors including river and coastal flooding, cooling and heating energy demand, crop productivity and aspects of biodiversity. The avoided impacts between a scenario compatible with a 4ºC global warming and one with a 2ºC global warming were found to be highly sector dependent and avoided fractions typically ranged between 20% and 70%. A further key aspect was characterising the magnitude of the uncertainty involved, which is found to be very large in some impact sectors although the avoided fraction appears a more robust metric. The AVOID2 programme began in 2014 and will provide results in the run up to the Paris CoP in 2015. This includes new post-IPCC 5th assessment evidence to inform the long-term climate goal, a more comprehensive assessment of the uncertainty ranges of feasible emission pathways compatible with the long-term goal and enhanced estimates of global impacts using the latest generation of impact models and scenarios.

  14. UV Impacts Avoided by the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul; McKenzie, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal and geographical variabilities in the future "World Expected" UV environment are compared with the "World Avoided", which would have occurred without the Montreal Protocol on protection of the ozone layer and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Based on calculations of clear-sky UV irradiances, the effects of the Montreal Protocol have been hugely beneficial to avoid the health risks, such as skin cancer, which are associated with high UV, while there is only a small increase in health risks, such as vitamin D deficiency, that are associated with low UV. However, interactions with climate change may lead to changes in cloud and albedo, and possibly behavioural changes which could also be important.

  15. How to avoid deferred-compensation troubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Todd I

    2005-06-01

    Executive compensation packages have long included stock options and deferred compensation plans in order to compete for talent. Last year, Congress passed a law in response to the Enron debacle, in which executives were perceived to be protecting their deferred compensation at the expense of employees, creditors, and investors. The new law is designed to protect companies and their shareholders from being raided by the very executives that guided the company to financial ruin. Physicians who are part owners of medical practices need to know about the changes in the law regarding deferred compensation and how to avoid costly tax penalties. This article discusses how the changes affect medical practices as well as steps physician-owned clinics can take to avoid the risk of penalty, such as freezing deferred compensation and creating a new deferred compensation plan. PMID:16050311

  16. Construction dispute research conceptualisation, avoidance and resolution

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    There are three specific purposes of Construction Dispute Research. First, this volume aims to summarise studies on construction dispute. Second, apart from the theoretical constructs, where appropriate empirical tests are also included. This approach serves to go beyond the commonly used anecdotal approach for the subject matters. Third, it is the sincere hope of the authors that this book will help shaping research agenda of construction dispute.  The studies are mostly framed from a management perspective drawing on methods and concepts in contract law, economics, psychology and management science.   The book has twenty chapters that are arranged in four parts covering conceptualisation, avoidance, negotiation and mediation. Part 1 is devoted for dispute conceptualisation. A building is only as strong as its foundation. Thus it is no better start to study construction dispute by conceptualisation. The theme of Part 2 is dispute avoidance. The conventional wisdom of ‘prevention is better than cure’ se...

  17. Obstacle Detection and Avoidance Autonomous Car

    OpenAIRE

    K.Vasavi; M.V.S.Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Driving models are needed by many researchers to improve traffic safety and to advance autonomous vehicle design. To be most useful, a driving model must state specifically what information is needed and how it is processed. So we developed an “Obstacle Avoidance and Detection Autonomous Car” based on sensor application. The essential part of this autonomous car is that it drives taking the energy from solar panel. This paper explains the method of interfacing the solar panel, relay circuit b...

  18. Anorexia nervosa and food avoidance emotional disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, J F; Goodyer, I M; Birch, J.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective and longitudinal study was carried out on all children and adolescents who presented to a child psychiatry service over a period of 26 years to identify the nature, course, and outcome of cases meeting criteria for anorexia nervosa (n = 27). Two groups of the same age were identified for comparison, firstly those with food avoidance and emotional disorders (n = 23), and secondly those with emotional disorders but no symptoms associated with eating (n = 22). The results confirm...

  19. Robot maps, robot moves, robot avoids

    OpenAIRE

    Farrugia, Claire; Duca, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Robotics is a cornerstone for this century’s innovations. From robot nurses to your own personal assistant, most robots need to know: ‘where is it?’ ‘Where should it go?’ And ‘how to get there?’ Without answers to these questions a robot cannot do much. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/robot-maps-robot-moves-robot-avoids/

  20. Can subjectivity be avoided in translation evaluation?

    OpenAIRE

    Segers, Winibert; Kockaert, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The didactics of translation and interpreting Testing and assessment criteria and methods Can subjectivity be avoided in translation evaluation? Winibert Segers & Hendrik J Kockaert, KU Leuven Camiel Paulusstraat 8, 2630 Aartselaar, België Is translation evaluation a subjective, personal matter? Is evaluating translations the same as beer tasting or listening to a piece of music? Is the judgment determined by personal taste? We will try to answe...

  1. Inhibited Sexual Desire and Sexual Avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, William I.

    1985-01-01

    Inhibited sexual desire (ISD) is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions, especially in women. Family physicians have an opportunity to recognize ISD before the associated problems become entrenched, and to guide couples toward satisfactory resolution. A summary is presented of current thinking on ISD and its causes. Case reports and observations about frequency of and treatment for ISD are included. Much less has been written about sexual avoidance in the presence of desire. A definition ...

  2. Normal coronary arteriogram. An avoidable test?

    OpenAIRE

    Ilsley, C; Stockley, A; Clitsakis, D; Layton, C

    1982-01-01

    Between 10 and 20% of coronary arteriograms in patients with chest pain show normal vessels, often in association with a history of "atypical" angina. Conventional non-invasive tests are inaccurate in this group of patients compared with those with classical angina. This study prospectively evaluates combined 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and thallium-201 scintigraphy as a screening test in patients with atypical angina in order to determine whether normal arteriograms are avoidable in...

  3. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  4. Urban water restrictions: Attitudes and avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bethany; Burton, Michael; Crase, Lin

    2011-12-01

    In most urban cities across Australia, water restrictions remain the dominant policy mechanism to restrict urban water consumption. The extensive adoption of water restrictions as a means to limit demand, over several years, means that Australian urban water prices have consistently not reflected the opportunity cost of water. Given the generally strong political support for water restrictions and the likelihood that they will persist for some time, there is value in understanding households' attitudes in this context. More specifically, identifying the welfare gains associated with avoiding urban water restrictions entirely would be a nontrivial contribution to our knowledge and offer insights into the benefits of alternative policy responses. This paper describes the results from a contingent valuation study that investigates consumers' willingness to pay to avoid urban water restrictions. Importantly, the research also investigates the influence of cognitive and exogenous dimensions on the utility gain associated with avoiding water restrictions. The results provide insights into the impact of the current policy mechanism on economic welfare.

  5. Granting silence to avoid wireless collisions

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jung Il

    2010-10-01

    We describe grant-to-send, a novel collision avoidance algorithm for wireless mesh networks. Rather than announce packets it intends to send, a node using grant-to-send announces packets it expects to hear others send. We present evidence that inverting collision avoidance in this way greatly improves wireless mesh performance. Evaluating four protocols from 802.11 meshes and 802.15.4 sensor networks, we find that grant-to-send matches or outperforms CSMA and RTS/CTS in all cases. For example, in a 4-hop UDP flow, grantto- send can achieve 96% of the theoretical maximum throughput while maintaining a 99.9% packet delivery ratio. Grant-tosend is also general enough to replace protocol-specific collision avoidance mechanisms common to sensor network protocols. Grant-to-send is simple. For example, incorporating it into 802.11 requires only 11 lines of driver code and no hardware changes. Furthermore, as it reuses existing 802.11 mechanisms, grant-to-send inter-operates with current networks and can be incrementally deployed. © 2010 IEEE.

  6. Traffic jam driving with NMV avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanés, Vicente; Alonso, Luciano; Villagrá, Jorge; Godoy, Jorge; de Pedro, Teresa; Oria, Juan P.

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, the development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) - mainly based on lidar and cameras - has considerably improved the safety of driving in urban environments. These systems provide warning signals for the driver in the case that any unexpected traffic circumstance is detected. The next step is to develop systems capable not only of warning the driver but also of taking over control of the car to avoid a potential collision. In the present communication, a system capable of autonomously avoiding collisions in traffic jam situations is presented. First, a perception system was developed for urban situations—in which not only vehicles have to be considered, but also pedestrians and other non-motor-vehicles (NMV). It comprises a differential global positioning system (DGPS) and wireless communication for vehicle detection, and an ultrasound sensor for NMV detection. Then, the vehicle's actuators - brake and throttle pedals - were modified to permit autonomous control. Finally, a fuzzy logic controller was implemented capable of analyzing the information provided by the perception system and of sending control commands to the vehicle's actuators so as to avoid accidents. The feasibility of the integrated system was tested by mounting it in a commercial vehicle, with the results being encouraging.

  7. See-and-Avoid Collision Avoidance Using ADS-B Signal and Radar Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI proposes an innovative collision avoidance radar and communication technology to detect and track both cooperative and non-cooperative targets. The system...

  8. Correlation between Success Rates of Cardiopulmonary Cerebral Resuscitation and the Educational Level of the Team Leader; A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Bolandparvaz; Hamid Mohajer; Mansoor Masjedi; Ehsan Mohammadhoseini; Leila Shayan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the correlation between the success rates of the cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR) and the team’s leader education and skill level in Shiraz, southern Iran. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted during a 6-month period from October 2007 to March 2008 in Nemazee hospital of Shiraz. We included all the patients who underwent CPCR due to cardiopulmonary arrest in emergency room of Nemazee hospital during the study period. We recorded the rates o...

  9. Avoiding Negative Outcomes: Tracking the Mechanisms of Avoidance Learning in Humans During Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, Mauricio R.; Jou, Rita L.; Liz Phelps

    2009-01-01

    Previous research across species has shown that the amygdala is critical for learning about aversive outcomes, while the striatum is involved in reward-related processing. Less is known, however, about the role of the amygdala and the striatum in learning how to exert control over emotions and avoid negative outcomes. One potential mechanism for active avoidance of stressful situations is postulated to involve amygdala–striatal interactions. The goal of this study was to investigate the physi...

  10. Avoiding negative outcomes: tracking the mechanisms of avoidance learning in humans during fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio R Delgado

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous research across species has shown that the amygdala is critical for learning about aversive outcomes, while the striatum is involved in reward-related processing. Less is known, however, about the role of the amygdala and the striatum in learning how to exert control over emotions and avoid negative outcomes. One potential mechanism for active avoidance of stressful situations is postulated to involve amygdala-striatal interactions. The goal of this study was to investigate the physiological and neural correlates underlying avoidance learning in humans. Specifically, we used a classical conditioning paradigm where three different conditioned stimuli (CS were presented. One stimulus predicted the delivery of a shock upon stimulus offset (CS+, while another predicted no negative consequences (CS-. A third conditioned cue also predicted delivery of a shock, but participants were instructed that upon seeing this stimulus, they could avoid the shock if they chose the correct action (AV +. After successful learning, participants could then easily terminate the shock during subsequent stimulus presentations (AV-. Physiological responses (as measured by SCRs confirmed a main effect of conditioning, particularly showing higher arousal responses during pre (AV+ compared to post (AV- learning of an avoidance response. Consistent with animal models, amygdala-striatal interactions were observed to underlie the acquisition of an avoidance response. These results support a mechanism of active coping with conditioned fear that allows for the control over emotional responses such as fears that can become maladaptive and influence our decision-making.

  11. Awake cardiopulmonary bypass to prevent hemodynamic collapse and loss of airway in a severely symptomatic patient with a mediastinal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Sameh M; Telesz, Brian J; Makdisi, George; Quevedo, Fernando J; Suri, Rakesh M; Allen, Mark S; Mauermann, William J

    2014-10-01

    Management of a large mediastinal mass causing respiratory and hemodynamic compromise represents a major challenge during induction of anesthesia and surgical resection. The hemodynamic changes associated with anesthetic induction and initiation of positive-pressure ventilation can lead to acute hemodynamic collapse or inability to ventilate, or both. Initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass before anesthetic induction represents a safe alternative. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent successful resection of a large anterior mediastinal mass through sternotomy. Cardiopulmonary bypass was instituted using the right femoral vessels under local analgesia to allow safe anesthetic induction. Her postoperative course was uneventful. This represents an example of a team approach to the management of a complex patient to achieve a successful outcome. PMID:25282247

  12. Nursing diagnosis activity intolerance and inefficient cardiopulmonary tissue perfusion: evaluation in patients undergoing gene therapy  preview note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Garcia Rodrigues, Maria Antonieta Moraes, Emiliane Nogueira de Souza, Jaquelini Messer Sauer, Andréia Orjana Ribeiro Coutinho, Renato Abdala Karam Kalil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate and compare the frequency of nursing diagnosis activity intolerance and ineffective cardiopulmonary tissue perfusion in advanced ischemic heart disease patients before and after gene therapy for myocardial revascularization. Methods: cohort study, in which 20 patients developed ischemic heart disease treated with gene therapy are undergoing clinical evaluation of two nurses with experience of minimum three years in cardiology, to identify the presence or absence of the nursing diagnosis activity intolerance and ineffective cardiopulmonary tissue perfusion. These evaluations will be done before gene therapy and three and six months afterwards. The data will be tabulated for later analysis of absolute and relative frequency as well as comparison between the three moments. Will be used for the coefficient of Kappa analysis of agreement between the assessments of nursing. To compare the dichotomous variables will be used for the Cochran Q-test and for ordinal variables will be used the Friedman test.

  13. Banda gástrica com desvio jejunoileal: nova opção técnica em cirurgia bariátrica Gastric band with jejunoileal by-pass: new option in bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zilberstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Os procedimentos cirúrgicos para tratamento da obesidade morbida têm sido eficientes na resolução desta afecção a curto e longo prazo. Com exceção da banda gástrica ajustável todos estes procedimentos de alguma forma são capazes de induzir a liberação de hormônios intestinais em função do desvio intestinal e desta forma exercerem um efeito metabólico. OBJETIVO: Com a intenção de obter efeitos semelhantes às operações que promovem um desvio intestinal, com as vantagens de baixa morbidade e mortalidade da BGA, foi proposto novo procedimento técnico associando à banda gástrica ajustável a um desvio jejunoileal. MÉTODO: O procedimento cirúrgico totalmente conduzido por videolaparoscopia, consiste na aplicação inicial da banda gástrica e a seguir a realização de anastomose látero-lateral a 80 cm do ângulo duodenojejunal e 120 cm da válvula ileocecal. RESULTADOS: Foram operados 10 pacientes com esta técnica, seis mulheres e quatro homens com IMC médio de 40 kg/m². A perda média de excesso de peso nos seis primeiros meses foi de 51,56%. Em quatro pacientes diabéticos houve normalização dos níveis glicêmicos e suspensão do uso da medicação antidiabética. CONCLUSÃO: Adição de desvio jejunoileal látero-lateral à banda gástrica pode melhorar a perda de peso em pacientes portadores de obesidade mórbida e contribuir para o controle da diabete tipo II.BACKGROUND: Current procedures for surgical treatment of morbid obesity have proved to be efficient in controlling the process in the short and long follow-up. The bariatric surgical procedures, with the exception of the adjustable gastric banding are capable, in one way or another, of inducing hormonal release due to the intestinal by-pass that they may promote and therefore offering a metabolic effect. AIM: With the intention to maintain the same results promoted by gastrojejunal diversion, while maintaining the lower mortality rates of the

  14. The global cost of eliminating avoidable blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten L Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To complete an initial estimate of the global cost of eliminating avoidable blindness, including the investment required to build ongoing primary and secondary health care systems, as well as to eliminate the ′backlog′ of avoidable blindness. This analysis also seeks to understand and articulate where key data limitations lie. Materials and Methods : Data were collected in line with a global estimation approach, including separate costing frameworks for the primary and secondary care sectors, and the treatment of backlog. Results : The global direct health cost to eliminate avoidable blindness over a 10-year period from 2011 to 2020 is estimated at $632 billion per year (2009 US$. As countries already spend $592 billion per annum on eye health, this represents additional investment of $397.8 billion over 10 years, which is $40 billion per year or $5.80 per person for each year between 2010 and 2020. This is concentrated in high-income nations, which require 68% of the investment but comprise 16% of the world′s inhabitants. For all other regions, the additional investment required is $127 billion. Conclusions : This costing estimate has identified that low- and middle-income countries require less than half the additional investment compared with high-income nations. Low- and middle-income countries comprise the greater investment proportion in secondary care whereas high-income countries require the majority of investment into the primary sector. However, there is a need to improve sector data. Investment in better data will have positive flow-on effects for the eye health sector.

  15. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VERSUS TAX AVOIDANCE PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoian Ciprian-Dumitru

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide crisis has made multinational companies that are engaged in corporate social responsibility actions to manage their businesses through the lens of various tax avoidance practices. The content of this paper is important due to the fact that tries to identify the impact in case of companies active in corporate social responsibility actions versus their tax structures orientation. Corporate social responsibility literature did not paid enough attention on the impact of the tax avoidance practices of companies. Tax, as a concept, brings in itself an important corporate financial impact with subsequent effects for the life of multiple citizens in countries where private entities are operating. Even though companies are usually expressing their ethical and responsible conduct in respect of the social environment, there are many cases when the business practices were not aligned with the declared corporate behavior. This paper seeks firstly to examine whether companies engaged in tax avoidance practices (ex. offshore tax havens consider that continue to act socially responsible. Secondly, the paper examines the influence on attending the stakeholders’ goals for those companies practicing tax avoidance and its implications on corporate social responsibility actions. Moreover, the paper focuses also on the aspects described before from the perspective of the corporate entities operating in Romania. This paper’s intention is to use and to develop the results of previous research carried out by Lutz Preus (University of London and, subsequently, by Senators Levin, Coleman and Obama in their “Stop Tax Haven Abuse Bill”. The implications and the objectives of this material are to highlight, to identify and to spot clearly the relations and the influences of the tax haven practices of corporations versus their undertaken social responsibility actions. Moreover, this paper brings a fresh perspective of this topic from the

  16. Wireless vehicular networks for car collision avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Vehicular Networks for Car Collision Avoidance focuses on the development of the ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) in order to minimize vehicular accidents. The book presents and analyses a range of concrete accident scenarios while examining the causes of vehicular collision and proposing countermeasures based on wireless vehicular networks. The book also describes the vehicular network standards and quality of service mechanisms focusing on improving critical dissemination of safety information. With recommendations on techniques and protocols to consider when improving road safety policies in order to minimize crashes and collision risks.

  17. The International Double Taxation – Avoiding Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Barbuta-Misu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main causes that determine double taxation, its forms, i.e. the economicdouble taxation and the international legal double taxation, the need for eliminating the double taxation andavoiding methods. In the presentation of the avoidance methods have been used practical examples forcomparison of the tax advantages for income beneficiary between: the total exemption method andprogressive exemption method, on the one hand, and total crediting method and ordinary crediting method,on the other hand, but the comparing of tax reduction between methods of exemption and crediting.

  18. Understanding, Avoiding, and Managing Severe Filler Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzany, Berthold; DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Any injectable filler may elicit moderate-to-severe adverse events, ranging from nodules to abscesses to vascular occlusion. Fortunately, severe adverse events are uncommon for the majority of fillers currently on the market. Because these are rare events, it is difficult to identify the relevant risk factors and to design the most efficacious treatment strategies. Poor aesthetic outcomes are far more common than severe adverse events. These in contrast should be easily avoidable by ensuring that colleagues receive proper training and follow best practices. PMID:26441099

  19. Families of prudent self-avoiding walks

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet-Mélou, Mireille

    2010-01-01

    A self-avoiding walk (SAW) on the square lattice is prudent if it never takes a step towards a vertex it has already visited. Prudent walks differ from most classes of SAW that have been counted so far in that they can wind around their starting point. Their enumeration was first addressed by Préa in 1997. He defined 4 classes of prudent walks, of increasing generality, and wrote a system of recurrence relations for each of them . However, these relations involve more and more parameters as t...

  20. How to avoid unnatural hierarchical thermal leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Jackson D

    2015-01-01

    A one-flavour naturalness argument suggests that the Type I seesaw model cannot naturally explain neutrino masses and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via hierarchical thermal leptogenesis. We prove that there is no way to avoid this conclusion in a minimal three-flavour setup. We then comment on the simplest ways out. In particular, we focus on a resolution utilising a second Higgs doublet. Such models predict an automatically SM-like Higgs boson, (maximally) TeV-scale scalar states, and low- to intermediate-scale hierarchical leptogenesis with $10^3\\text{ GeV}\\lesssim M_{N_1}\\lesssim 10^7\\text{ GeV}$.

  1. Avoiding plagiarism: guidance for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    The pressures of study, diversity of source materials, past assumptions relating to good writing practice, ambiguous writing guidance on best practice and students' insecurity about their reasoning ability, can lead to plagiarism. With the use of source checking software, there is an increased chance that plagiarised work will be identified and investigated, and penalties given. In extreme cases, plagiarised work may be reported to the Nursing and Midwifery Council and professional as well as academic penalties may apply. This article provides information on how students can avoid plagiarism when preparing their coursework for submission. PMID:24568425

  2. Avoidance learning : a review of theoretical models and recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance is a key characteristic of adaptive and maladaptive fear. Here, we review past and contemporary theories of avoidance learning. Based on the theories, experimental findings and clinical observations reviewed, we distill key principles of how adaptive and maladaptive avoidance behavior is acquired and maintained. We highlight clinical implications of avoidance learning theories and describe intervention strategies that could reduce maladaptive avoidance and prevent its return. We end...

  3. Avoidance Learning: A Review of Theoretical Models and Recent Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos; Tom Beckers

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance is a key characteristic of adaptive and maladaptive fear. Here, we review past and contemporary theories of avoidance learning. Based on the theories, experimental findings and clinical observations reviewed, we distil key principles of how adaptive and maladaptive avoidance behavior is acquired and maintained. We highlight clinical implications of avoidance learning theories and describe intervention strategies that could reduce maladaptive avoidance and prevent its return. We e...

  4. Confirmation of Choclo Virus as the Cause of Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome and high serum antibody prevalence in Panama

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Randin; Cañate, Raul; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Dragoo, Jerry W.; Armien, Blas; Armien, Anibal G.; Koster, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Choclo virus (CHOV) was described in sigmodontine rodents, Oligoryzomys fulvescens, and humans during an outbreak of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in 1999 to 2000 in western Panama. Although HCPS is rare, hantavirus-specific serum antibody prevalence among the general population is high suggesting that CHOV may cause many mild or asymptomatic infections. The goals of this study were to confirm the role of CHOV in HCPS and in the frequently detected serum antibody and to establish...

  5. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction in the Osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model Aga2 and human patients are caused by bone-independent mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Frank; Cohrs, Christian M.; Flor, Armando; Lisse, Thomas S.; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Horsch, Marion; Schrewe, Anja; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Ivandic, Boris; Katus, Hugo A.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Reisenberg, Catherine; Chaney, Hollis; Fuchs, Helmut; Hans, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder with skeletal dysplasia of varying severity, predominantly caused by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1/COL1A2). Extraskeletal findings such as cardiac and pulmonary complications are generally considered to be significant secondary features. Aga2, a murine model for human OI, was systemically analyzed in the German Mouse Clinic by means of in vivo and in vitro examinations of the cardiopulmonary system, to identif...

  6. Cardiopulmonary function of Young bronchitics (mostly mineworkers) before and after respiratory physiotherapy and physical training. Comparison with a control group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcq, M.; Minette, A.

    1981-01-01

    This article covers the effects of 4 weeks' treatment consisting of respiratory physiotherapy associated with physical training on cardiopulmonary function. It involved 12 patients (updated group) suffering from chronic bronchitis, still at an early stage in clinical terms. All patients showed signs of early broncho-destructive problems. This research was carried out with financial aid from the EEC (Agreement No. 7246-30-2-001). (32 refs.)

  7. Comparative Effects of Angiotensin Receptor BlockadeandACE Inhibition on the Fibrinolytic and Inflammatory Responses to Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Frederic T.; Balaguer, Jorge M.; Yu, Chang; Wright, Patricia; Petracek, Michael R.; Byrne, John G; Brown, Nancy J.; Pretorius, Mias

    2012-01-01

    The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade (ARB) on fibrinolysis and inflammation following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are uncertain. This study tested the hypothesis that ACE inhibition enhances fibrinolysis and inflammation to greater extent than ARB in patients undergoing CPB.One week to five days prior to surgery, patients were randomized to ramipril 5mg/day,candesartan 16mg/day or placebo.ACE inhibition increased intraopera...

  8. Changes in cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Do-Youn; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test. [Subjects and Methods] University students (13 males and 27 females) participated in this study. Before and after the Rockport 1 mile walking test, pulmonary function, respiratory pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake were measured. [Results] Significant improvements in forced vital capacity and maximal inspiratory pressure were observed after t...

  9. Activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinose, Tomoko K.; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S.; Scislo, Tadeusz J.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A1 receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it i...

  10. Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise in COPD and Overweight Patients: Relationship between Unloaded Cycling and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary response to unloaded cycling may be related to higher workloads. This was assessed in male subjects: 18 healthy sedentary subjects (controls), 14 hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 31 overweight individuals (twelve were hypoxemic). They underwent an incremental exercise up to the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), preceded by a 2 min unloaded cycling period. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and respiratory frequ...

  11. Induced apnea enhances image quality and visualization of cardiopulmonary anatomic during contrastenhanced cardiac computerized tomographic angiography in children

    OpenAIRE

    Murali Chakravarthy; Gubbihalli Sunilkumar; Sumant Pargaonkar; Rajathadri Hosur; Chidananda Harivelam; Deepak Kavaraganahalli; Pradeep Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of induced apnea on quality of cardiopulmonary structures during computerized tomographic (CT) angiography images in children with congenital heart diseases. Methods: Pediatric patients with congenital heart defects undergoing cardiac CT angiography at our facility in the past 3 years participated in this study. The earlier patients underwent cardiac CT angiography without induced apnea and while, later, apnea was induced in pati...

  12. Characteristics and Mechanisms of Cardiopulmonary Injury Caused by Mine Blasts in Shoals: A Randomized Controlled Study in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gengfen; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weixiao; Chen, Jing; Kang, Jianyi; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Aimin; Lai, Xinan

    2013-01-01

    Background Because the characteristics of blast waves in water are different from those in air and because kinetic energy is liberated by a pressure wave at the water-air interface, thoracic injuries from mine blasts in shoals may be serious. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury caused by mine blasts in shoals. Methods To study the characteristics of cardiopulmonary injury, 56 animals were divided randomly into three experimental groups (12 animals in the sham group, 22 animals in the land group and 22 animals in the shoal group). To examine the biomechanics of injury, 20 animals were divided randomly into the land group and the shoal group. In the experimental model, the water surface was at the level of the rabbit's xiphoid process, and paper electric detonators (600 mg RDX) were used to simulate mines. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were conducted, and arterial blood gases, serum levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB and other physiologic parameters were measured over a 12-hour period after detonation. Pressures in the thorax and abdomen and the acceleration of the thorax were measured. Conclusion The results indicate that severe cardiopulmonary injury and dysfunction occur following exposure to mine blasts in shoals. Therefore, the mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury may result from shear waves that produce strain at the water-air interface. Another mechanism of injury includes the propagation of the shock wave from the planta to the thorax, which causes a much higher peak overpressure in the abdomen than in the thorax; as a result, the abdominal organs and diaphragm are thrust into the thorax, damaging the lungs and heart. PMID:24358110

  13. Survey of knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiu-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the nurses ( n= 302) of community-based health services in Hainan province of China, a survey was made by randomized stratified cluster sampling using self-designed questionnaires. The passing rate for qualification of the knowledge of CPR was found to be very low in Hainan province (23.18 %). A significant difference of regions and different educational level among the nurses were also noticed (P

  14. Partial exchange transfusion in a patient with homozygous sickle cell disease undergoing heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Deyvis Cruz

    2012-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell anemia, the extracorporeal circulation circuit promotes the polymerization of hemoglobin and sickle cell formation. Exchange transfusion reduces circulating levels of hemoglobin S. We report the management of a child with homozygous sickle cell anemia who required surgical closure of atrial septal defect. Partial intraoperative exchange transfusion was performed that decreased hemoglobin S levels from 89% to 23%. Cardiopulmonary bypass was conducted at normothermi...

  15. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – effective method for evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Avram; Mihaela Oraviţan; Lucian D. Hoble; Bogdan Almăjan-Guţă

    2011-01-01

    The present study aims to emphasize the role of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET) in evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with a metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 9 months. The study group consisted of 28 young patients (21.3±3.1 years old) without contraindications to exercise, previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATPIII criteria. All patients were evaluating at baseline and ...

  16. Detection of Brazilian hantavirus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification of N gene in patients with hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Lázaro Moreli; Ricardo Luiz Moro de Sousa; Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    We report a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for hantavirus using primers selected to match high homology regions of hantavirus genomes detected from the whole blood of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) patients from Brazil, also including the N gene nucleotide sequence of Araraquara virus. Hantavirus genomes were detected in eight out of nine blood samples from the HCPS patients by RT-PCR (88.9% positivity) and in all 9 blood samples (100% positi...

  17. Bloodless Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass for a 3.2-kg Patient Whose Parents are of Jehovah’s Witness Faith

    OpenAIRE

    Ratliff, Todd M.; Hodge, Ashley B.; Preston, Thomas J.; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Gomez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Patients and parents of Jehovah’s Witness (JW) faith present multiple challenges to a medical team, especially in the neonatal and pediatric population. The medical team must balance honoring the parents’ request of not receiving blood products and fulfilling our commitment as advocates for the child’s wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach to cardiac surgery must be embraced for bloodless cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to be successful. At our institution, we have developed strategies and tec...

  18. Platelet Function in Stored Heparinised Autologous Blood Is Not Superior to in Patient Platelet Function during Routine Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Gallandat Huet, Rolf C. G.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Cernak, Vladimir; Lisman, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Background In cardiac surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and unfractionated heparin have negative effects on blood platelet function. In acute normovolemic haemodilution autologous unfractionated heparinised blood is stored ex-vivo and retransfused at the end of the procedure to reduce (allogeneic) transfusion requirements. In this observational study we assessed whether platelet function is better preserved in ex vivo stored autologous blood compared to platelet function in the patient du...

  19. Acute serum sodium concentration changes in pediatric patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and the association with postoperative outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong Jin; Kim, Young-Soon; Jung, Hae Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the degree of serum sodium changes and its association with patient outcomes in pediatrics undergoing heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We reviewed the medical records of 275 pediatric patients who underwent heart surgery with CPB. Prior to CPB, hyponatremia (≤135 mmol/L) was observed in 21 of 275 patients. After initiation of CPB, serum sodium decreased significantly and severe hyponatermia (≤130 mmol/L) subsequently developed in 3...

  20. The role of MR imaging and cardio-pulmonary exercise test (CPET) in oncology patient - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Thromboembolic complications are the second cause of mortality in patients with malignant neoplasms. Their course can be apparently asymptomatic, masked by other dominant symptoms of a malignant process. Therefore, there is a need for an unbiased diagnostic method to establish the causes of the patients' clinical condition. Case Report: The authors present a case of a 42-year-old neoplastic male patient admitted for bone marrow transplant. Examinations performed routinely before marrow transplantation showed pulmonary embolism in CT, while Trans Thoracic Echocardiography (TTE) revealed abnormal findings in the heart. Trans Esophageal Echocardiography (TEE) was indecisive and did not discriminate between a thrombus or neoplastic character of the observed pathological structures. MR helped to identify the findings as a thrombus. For unbiased initial assessment, the patient was referred for cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Cardiopulmonary exercise test allowed to rule out any signs of restrictive or occlusive lung disease, and along with other diagnostic tests confirmed chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Conclusions: Pulmonary embolism is found significantly more often in patients with neoplastic disease. Its course can be apparently asymptomatic, masked by other dominant symptoms of a malignant process. Magnetic resonance is a valuable tool in assessment of heart morphology, allowing proper diagnosis especially in thrombus identification, or detection of metastases. Cardiopulmonary exercise test can be useful in diagnosis and assessment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in apparently asymptomatic patients. CPET used in conjunction with MR seem to be a valuable combination capable of providing correct diagnosis where other methods fail. (author)

  1. Basic life support skills of high school students before and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a longitudinal investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissner Theresa M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR significantly improves survival after a sudden cardiopulmonary collapse. This study assessed the basic life support (BLS knowledge and performance of high school students before and after CPR training. Methods This study included 132 teenagers (mean age 14.6 ± 1.4 years. Students completed a two-hour training course that provided theoretical background on sudden cardiac death (SCD and a hands-on CPR tutorial. They were asked to perform BLS on a manikin to simulate an SCD scenario before the training. Afterwards, participants encountered the same scenario and completed a questionnaire for self-assessment of their pre- and post-training confidence. Four months later, we assessed the knowledge retention rate of the participants with a BLS performance score. Results Before the training, 29.5% of students performed chest compressions as compared to 99.2% post-training (P P Conclusions BLS training in high school seems highly effective considering the minimal amount of previous knowledge the students possess. We observed significant improvement and a good retention rate four months after training. Increasing the number of trained students may minimize the reluctance to conduct bystander CPR and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiopulmonary collapse.

  2. A randomized cross-over study of the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among females performing 30:2 and hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrickson W Clive

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hands-Only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recommended for use on adult victims of witnessed out-of-hospital (OOH sudden cardiac arrest or in instances where rescuers cannot perform ventilations while maintaining minimally interrupted quality compressions. Promotion of Hands-Only CPR should improve the incidence of bystander CPR and, subsequently, survival from OOH cardiac arrest; but, little is known about a rescuer's ability to deliver continuous chest compressions of adequate rate and depth for periods typical of emergency services response time. This study evaluated chest compression rate and depth as subjects performed Hands-Only CPR for 10 minutes. For comparison purposes, each also performed chest compressions with ventilations (30:2 CPR. It also evaluated fatigue and changes in body biomechanics associated with each type of CPR. Methods Twenty healthy female volunteers certified in basic life support performed Hands-Only CPR and 30:2 CPR on a manikin. A mixed model repeated measures cross-over design evaluated chest compression rate and depth, changes in fatigue (chest compression force, perceived exertion, and blood lactate level, and changes in electromyography and joint kinetics and kinematics. Results All subjects completed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR; but, only 17 completed 10 minutes of Hands-Only CPR. Rate, average depth, percentage at least 38 millimeters deep, and force of compressions were significantly lower in Hands-Only CPR than in 30:2 CPR. Rates were maintained; but, compression depth and force declined significantly from beginning to end CPR with most decrement occurring in the first two minutes. Perceived effort and joint torque changes were significantly greater in Hands-Only CPR. Performance was not influenced by age. Conclusion Hands-Only CPR required greater effort and was harder to sustain than 30:2 CPR. It is not known whether the observed greater decrement in chest compression depth associated

  3. Avoidance of strobe lights by zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Martin J.; Richards, Nathan S.; Brown, Michael L.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Underwater strobe lights can influence the behavior and distribution of fishes and are increasingly used as a technique to divert fish away from water intake structures on dams. However, few studies examine how strobe lights may affect organisms other than targeted species. To gain insight on strobe lighting effects on nontarget invertebrates, we investigated whether underwater strobe lights influence zooplankton distributions and abundance in Lake Oahe, South Dakota. Zooplankton were collected using vertical tows at 3 discrete distances from an underwater strobe light to quantify the influence of light intensity on zooplankton density. Samples were collected from 3 different depth ranges (0–10 m, 10–20 m and 20–30 m) at zooplankton sampled from 17 August to 15 September 2004. Night time zooplankton densities significantly decreased in surface waters when strobe lights were activated. Copepods exhibited the greatest avoidance patterns, while Daphnia avoidance varied throughout sampling depths. These results indicate that zooplankton display negative phototaxic behavior to strobe lights and that researchers must be cognizant of potential effects to the ecosystem such as altering predator–prey interactions or affecting zooplankton distribution and growth.

  4. Shape optimization of self-avoiding curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shawn W.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a softened notion of proximity (or self-avoidance) for curves. We then derive a sensitivity result, based on shape differential calculus, for the proximity. This is combined with a gradient-based optimization approach to compute three-dimensional, parameterized curves that minimize the sum of an elastic (bending) energy and a proximity energy that maintains self-avoidance by a penalization technique. Minimizers are computed by a sequential-quadratic-programming (SQP) method where the bending energy and proximity energy are approximated by a finite element method. We then apply this method to two problems. First, we simulate adsorbed polymer strands that are constrained to be bound to a surface and be (locally) inextensible. This is a basic model of semi-flexible polymers adsorbed onto a surface (a current topic in material science). Several examples of minimizing curve shapes on a variety of surfaces are shown. An advantage of the method is that it can be much faster than using molecular dynamics for simulating polymer strands on surfaces. Second, we apply our proximity penalization to the computation of ideal knots. We present a heuristic scheme, utilizing the SQP method above, for minimizing rope-length and apply it in the case of the trefoil knot. Applications of this method could be for generating good initial guesses to a more accurate (but expensive) knot-tightening algorithm.

  5. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  6. Ship Collision Avoidance by Distributed Tabu Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gyun Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 90% of world trade is transported by sea. The size and speed of ships is rapidly increasing in order to boost economic efficiency. If ships collide, the damage and cost can be astronomical. It is very difficult for officers to ascertain routes that will avoid collisions, especially when multiple ships travel the same waters. There are several ways to prevent ship collisions, such as lookouts, radar, and VHF radio. More advanced methodologies, such as ship domain, fuzzy theory, and genetic algorithm, have been proposed. These methods work well in one-on-one situations, but are more difficult to apply in multiple-ship situations. Therefore, we proposed the Distributed Local Search Algorithm (DLSA to avoid ship collisions as a precedent study. DLSA is a distributed algorithm in which multiple ships communicate with each other within a certain area. DLSA computes collision risk based on the information received from neighboring ships. However, DLSA suffers from Quasi-Local Minimum (QLM, which prevents a ship from changing course even when a collision risk arises. In our study, we developed the Distributed Tabu Search Algorithm (DTSA. DTSA uses a tabu list to escape from QLM that also exploits a modified cost function and enlarged domain of next-intended courses to increase its efficiency. We conducted experiments to compare the performance of DLSA and DTSA. The results showed that DTSA outperformed DLSA.

  7. Orbital Fitness: An Overview of Space Shuttle Cardiopulmonary Exercise Physiology Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Limited observations regarding the cardiopulmonary responses to aerobic exercise had been conducted during short-duration spaceflight before the Space Shuttle program. This presentation focuses on the findings regarding changes observed in the cardiopulmonary exercise responses during and following Shuttle flights. During flight, maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) remained unchanged as did the maximum work rate achievable during cycle exercise testing conducted during the last full flight day. Immediately following flight, the ubiquitous finding, confirmed by investigations conducted during the Spacelab Life Sciences missions 1 and 2 and by NASA Detailed Supplemental Objective studies, indicated that VO2max was reduced; however, the reduction in VO2max was transient and returned to preflight levels within 7 days following return. Studies regarding the influence of aerobic exercise countermeasures performed during flight on postflight performance were mostly limited to the examination of the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing on landing day. These studies revealed that exercise HR was elevated in individuals who performed little to no exercise during their missions as compared to individuals who performed regular exercise. In addition, astronauts who performed little to no aerobic exercise during flight demonstrated an increased HR and lowered pulse pressure response to the standard stand test on landing day, indicating a decrease in orthostatic function in these individuals. With regard to exercise modality, four devices were examined during the Shuttle era: two treadmills, a cycle ergometer, and a rowing device. Although there were limited investigations regarding the use of these devices for exercise training aboard the Shuttle, there was no clear consensus reached regarding which proved to be a "superior" device. Each device had a unique operational or physiologic limitation associated with its use. In conclusion, exercise research conducted

  8. The influence of the media on COPD patients’ knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Nava

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Nava1, Carmen Santoro1, Mario Grassi2, Nicholas Hill31Respiratory Unit, Fondazione S Maugeri, I R C C S Istituto Scientifico di Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 2Department of Health Sciences, Section of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 3Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Tufts University, New England Medical Center, Boston, MA, USABackground: The decision whether or not to undertake cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a major ethical challenge. Patient preferences may be influenced by multiple factors, including information given by the media.Objectives: We wanted to assess whether patients’ knowledge about CPR survival and outcomes was related to presentation by the media.Methods: 100 consecutive patients with COPD and chronic respiratory failure (CRF and 100 patients at their first hospital admission for respiratory problems were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the patients seeking to ascertain their exposure to health information from the media, and to obtain their opinions on 1 the probability of survival after CPR, 2 the maximal length of time from collapse to CPR that allows a reasonable chance of survival, and 3 long-term outcomes of CPR survivors.Results: The patients overestimated the success rate of CPR (63% of them estimated a hospital survival >40%, while the estimate of long-term outcome and timing of the procedure were more realistic. Bivariate correlations analysis showed significant correlation between the rate of correct responses and the viewing of educational television programs (p = 0.039, but not medical stories, reading of health-oriented newspapers, use of the internet, age, educational level, and the presence of CRF.Conclusions: In conclusion, we have shown that both COPD and “newly admitted” patients’ estimate of survival after CPR is much higher than reported by the current literature. A correct knowledge of CPR procedures and outcomes is significantly

  9. Awareness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in medical-students and doctors in Rawalpindi-Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the level of awareness regarding basic and practical knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and its importance in the eyes of medical/dental students and doctors. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in medical and dental colleges as well as hospitals of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan, from June to September 2011. Non-probability convenience sampling was used and structured questionnaires on basic and practical knowledge of the procedure were distributed. The questionnaire had 26 items related to basic and advanced knowledge of the required skills. Doctors were divided into two groups based on their years of service and practice. Those with less than 5 years' experience were grouped as junior doctors, while rest as senior doctors. Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data using SPPS version 17 and Microsoft Excel. Percentages were worked out and the results were interpreted. Result: Of the 1000 questionnaires distributed, 646 (64.6%) were received duly filled and represented the study sample. Of the 646 participants, 34 (5.26%) were dentists, 424 (65.63%) were medical students, 92 (14.24%) were doctors and 96 (14.86%) were dental students. Basic knowledge of doctors was found to be better than that of dentists (n=96; 50% vs. n=8; 23%). Similarly, the advance knowledge of doctors was better than the dentists (n=53; 58% vs. n=11; 31%). The basic knowledge of junior doctors was found to be almost equal to the senior doctors (n=26; 44.75% vs. n=15; 45.5%). The advance knowledge of junior doctors was found to be better than the senior doctors (n=27; 45.37% vs. n=10; 29.48%). Among the students, 157 (37%) of the medical students had basic knowledge of CPR, while 36 (38%) dental students had basic knowledge of the topic. Medical students had more advanced knowledge (n=157; 37%) than dental students (n=34; 35%). Conclusion: The awareness of basic and advance knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills in medical

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  11. Cardiopulmonary parameters in propofol- or thiopental-anesthetized dogs induced to pulmonary hypertension by serotonin

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    P. C. Ferro Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe cardiopulmonary changes in propofol- or thiopental-anesthetized dogs induced to pulmonary hypertension (PH were evaluated. Twenty adult animals were randomly assigned to two groups: propofol group (PG and thiopental group (TG. In PG, propofol was used for induction (8(0.03mg.kg-1 and anesthesia maintenance (0.8mg.kg-1.minute-1, while, in TG, thiopental was used (22±2.92mg.kg-1; 0.5mg.kg-1.minute-1, respectively. Mechanical ventilation using time cycle was started. PH was induced by administration of serotonin (5HT (10µg.kg-1 and 1mg.kg-1.hour-1 through a thermodilution catheter positioned in the pulmonary artery. The measurements were performed before administration of 5HT (T0, after 30 minutes (T30, then at 15-minute intervals (T45, T60, T75 and T90. No differences between groups were registered for systolic (sPAP and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, total peripheral resistance index (TPRI and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI. In PG, sPAP and mPAP increased from T30. While in TG, sPAP and mPAP increased from T75. In PG, heart rate (HR increased from T30, in which PG was higher than TG. The TPRI values decreased from T30 in PG, and in TG, at T45, T60 and T90. In PG, at T0, PVRI was lower than at other times. In PG, arterial partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2 decreased from T60 and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (PA-aO2 increased at T60. In TG, at T0 PaO2 was higher than at T30, T45, T60 and T90, while PA-aO2 at T0 was lower than at T90. From T30 to T90, TG showed higher PaO2 means and lower arterial partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PaCO2 values when compared to PG. In PG, from T30, PaCO2 increased, while in TG this parameter was stable. In conclusion, thiopental anesthesia attenuated the cardiopulmonary changes resulting from serotonin-induced PH, probably by attenuation of vasoconstriction and bronchoconstriction.

  12. Survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a major referral center

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    Saghafinia Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, by the code blue team at our center to compare with other centers. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from all adult patients who underwent CPR at our hospital from 2007 to 2008. CPR was performed on 290 patients and it was given 313 times. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated via binomial and chi square-tests. Results: Of the 290 patients included, 95 patients (30.4% had successful CPR. However, only 35 patients (12% were alive at discharge. The majority requiring CPR were above 60 years of age (61.7%. Males required CPR more than females. There were 125 women (43.1% and 165 males (56.9% aged 3 to 78 (average 59.6 years. Majority (179 of the cases (61.7% were above 60 years of age. Regarding the various wards, 54 cases (17.3% were in the internal medicine ward, 63 cases (20.1% in the surgery ward, 1 case (0.3% in the clinic, 11 cases (3.5% in the paraclinic, 116 cases (37.1% in the emergency (ER, 55 cases (17.5% in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU, and 13 cases (4.2% were in other wards. Cardiac massage was done in 133 cases (42.5%, defibrillation only via electroshock 3 cases (1%, and both were used in177 cases (56.5%. The ER had the most cases of CPR. Both cardiac massage and electroshock defibrillation were needed in most cases. Conclusion: In-hospital CPR for cardiopulmonary arrest was associated with 30.4% success at our center at the end of CPR but only 12% were alive at discharge. Duration of CPR> 10 minutes was predictive of significantly decreased survival to discharge.

  13. New pattern theorems for square lattice self-avoiding walks and self-avoiding polygons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general pattern theorem for weighted self-avoiding polygons (SAPs) and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) in Z2 is obtained. The pattern theorem for SAPs fits into the general framework of the pattern theorem for lattice clusters introduced by Madras (1999 Ann. Comb. 3 357-84). Note that, unlike other pattern theorems proved for SAPs, this pattern theorem does not rely on first establishing a relationship between SAPs and SAWs. These results are applied to obtain pattern theorems for self-interacting SAPs and self-interacting SAWs

  14. Hypothermia During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Increases Need for Inotropic Support but Does Not Impact Inflammation in Children Undergoing Surgical Ventricular Septal Defect Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katharina Rose Luise; Fedarava, Katsiaryna; Justus, Georgia; Redlin, Mathias; Böttcher, Wolfgang; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Hetzer, Roland; Berger, Felix; Miera, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Minimizing the systemic inflammatory response caused by cardiopulmonary bypass is a major concern. It has been suggested that the perfusion temperature affects the inflammatory response. The aim of this prospective study was to compare the effects of moderate hypothermia (32°C) and normothermia (36°C) during cardiopulmonary bypass on markers of the inflammatory response and clinical outcomes (time on ventilator) after surgical closure of ventricular septal defects. During surgical closure of ventricular septal defects under cardiopulmonary bypass, 20 children (median age 4.9 months, range 2.3-38 months; median weight 7.2 kg, range 5.2-11.7 kg) were randomized to a perfusion temperature of either 32°C (Group 1, n = 10) or 36°C (Group 2, n = 10). The clinical data and blood samples were collected before cardiopulmonary bypass, directly after aortic cross-clamp release, and 4 and 24 h after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Time on ventilation as primary outcome did not differ between the two groups. Other clinical outcome parameters like fluid balance or length of stay in the intensive care were also similar in the two groups. Compared with Group 2, Group 1 needed significantly higher and longer inotropic support (P Perfusion temperature did not influence cytokine release, organ injury, or coagulation. Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature does not influence time on ventilation or inflammatory marker release. However, in the present study, with a small patient cohort, patients operated under hypothermic bypass needed higher and longer inotropic support. The use of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in infants and children should be approached with care. PMID:26581834

  15. Avoiding Deontic Explosion by Contextually Restricting Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meheus, Joke; Beirlaen, Mathieu; van de Putte, Frederik

    In this paper, we present an adaptive logic for deontic conflicts, called P2.1 r , that is based on Goble's logic SDL a P e - a bimodal extension of Goble's logic P that invalidates aggregation for all prima facie obligations. The logic P2.1 r has several advantages with respect to SDL a P e. For consistent sets of obligations it yields the same results as Standard Deontic Logic and for inconsistent sets of obligations, it validates aggregation "as much as possible". It thus leads to a richer consequence set than SDL a P e. The logic P2.1 r avoids Goble's criticisms against other non-adjunctive systems of deontic logic. Moreover, it can handle all the 'toy examples' from the literature as well as more complex ones.

  16. Mars Rover Local Navigation And Hazard Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. H.; Gennery, D. B.; Mishkin, A. H.

    1989-03-01

    A Mars rover sample return mission has been proposed for the late 1990's. Due to the long speed-of-light delays between Earth and Mars, some autonomy on the rover is highly desirable. JPL has been conducting research in two possible modes of rover operation, Computer-Aided Remote Driving and Semiautonomous Navigation. A recently-completed research program used a half-scale testbed vehicle to explore several of the concepts in semiautonomous navigation. A new, full-scale vehicle with all computational and power resources on-board will be used in the coming year to demonstrate relatively fast semiautonomous navigation. The computational and power requirements for Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance are discussed.

  17. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Ulbak, Kaare; Dreyer, L;

    1997-01-01

    countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and......Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our...... estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all...

  18. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Ulbak, Kaare; Dreyer, L; Pukkala, E; Osterlind, A

    1997-01-01

    estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120 cancers at various sites. For all types of ionizing radiation, the annual total will be 4420 cancer cases, or 3.9% of all......Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our...... estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all...

  19. Weakly directed self-avoiding walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bacher, Axel

    2010-01-01

    We define a new family of self-avoiding walks (SAW) on the square lattice, called weakly directed walks. These walks have a simple characterization in terms of the irreducible bridges that compose them. We determine their generating function. This series has a complex singularity structure and in particular, is not D-finite. The growth constant is approximately 2.54 and is thus larger than that of all natural families of SAW enumerated so far (but smaller than that of general SAW, which is about 2.64). We also prove that the end-to-end distance of weakly directed walks grows linearly. Finally, we study a diagonal variant of this model.

  20. Collision Avoidance of Trains Using Arm7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. R. R. Mohan Rao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Railways are the popular mode of Transport in almost all major cities of the World. Railways are the most widely used and comfortable modes of transportation system. The major cause for railway accidents is collision of trains on the same track. The main aim of this anti collision system is to identify collision points and to report these error cases to main control room nearer to the station as well as grid control station. Majority of accidents occurred due to improper communication among the network between drivers and control room, due to wrong signaling, worst atmospheric condition, immediate change of route. The train driver doesn’t get proper information in time leading to hazardous situations. So this system by using zigbee protocol provides communication in between trains, which provide information or track id of one train to another train to avoid collision.

  1. Artifacts in CT: recognition and avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Julia F; Keat, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Artifacts can seriously degrade the quality of computed tomographic (CT) images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand why artifacts occur and how they can be prevented or suppressed. CT artifacts originate from a range of sources. Physics-based artifacts result from the physical processes involved in the acquisition of CT data. Patient-based artifacts are caused by such factors as patient movement or the presence of metallic materials in or on the patient. Scanner-based artifacts result from imperfections in scanner function. Helical and multisection technique artifacts are produced by the image reconstruction process. Design features incorporated into modern CT scanners minimize some types of artifacts, and some can be partially corrected by the scanner software. However, in many instances, careful patient positioning and optimum selection of scanning parameters are the most important factors in avoiding CT artifacts. PMID:15537976

  2. Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. H.; Gennery, D. B.; Mishkin, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    A Mars rover sample return mission has been proposed for the late 1990's. Due to the long speed-of-light delays between earth and Mars, some autonomy on the rover is highly desirable. JPL has been conducting research in two possible modes of rover operation, Computer-Aided Remote Driving and Semiautonomous Navigation. A recently-completed research program used a half-scale testbed vehicle to explore several of the concepts in semiautonomous navigation. A new, full-scale vehicle with all computational and power resources on-board will be used in the coming year to demonstrate relatively fast semiautonomous navigation. The computational and power requirements for Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance are discussed.

  3. Obstacle Avoiding Robot – A Promising One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAKESH CHANDRA KUMAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world ROBOTICS is a fast growing and interesting field. ROBOT has sufficient intelligence to cover the maximum area of provided space. It has an infrared sensor which are used to sense the obstacles coming in between the path of ROBOT. It will move in a particular direction and avoid the obstacle which is coming in its path.Autonomous Intelligent Robots are robots that can perform desired tasks in unstructured environments without continuous human guidance. The minimum number of gearmotor allows the walking robot to minimize the power consumption while construct a program that can produce coordination of multi-degree of freedom for the movement of the robot. It is found that two gearmotors are sufficient to produce the basic walking robot and one voltage regulators are needed to control the load where it is capable of supplying enough current to drive two gearmotors for each wheel.

  4. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts.

  5. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Maintenance Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Fahad; Adil, Malik M; Malik, Ahmed A; Schold, Jesse D; Holley, Jean L

    2015-12-01

    Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospitalized patients with ESRD requiring maintenance dialysis are unknown. Outcomes of in-hospital CPR in these patients were compared with outcomes in the general population using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 2005-2011). The study population included all adults (≥ 18 years old) from the general population and those with a history of ESRD. Baseline characteristics, in-hospital complications, and discharge outcomes were compared between the two groups. The effects of in-hospital CPR on mortality, length of stay, hospitalization charges, and discharge destination were analyzed. Yearly national trends in survival, discharge to home, and length of stay were also examined using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. During the study period, 56,069 patients with ESRD underwent in-hospital CPR compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with ESRD (73.9% versus 71.8%, Phomes. PMID:25908784

  6. Assessment of the teaching-learning process in students of the health area: cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Moita Garcia Kawakame

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo evaluate the skills and knowledge of undergraduate students in the health area on cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers with the use of an automatic external defibrillator.METHODThe evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. A theoretical and practical course was taught and the theoretical classes included demonstration. The evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. Two instruments were applied to evaluate the skills (30-items checklist and knowledge (40-questions written test. The sample comprised 84 students.RESULTSAfter the theoretical and practical course, an increase was observed in the number of correct answers in the 30-items checklist and 40-questions written test.CONCLUSIONAfter the theoretical class (including demonstration, only one of the 30-items checklist for skills achieved an index ≥ 90% of correct answers. On the other hand, an index of correct answers greater than 90% was achieved in 26 (86.7% of the 30 items after a practical training simulation, evidencing the importance of this training in the defibrillation procedure.

  7. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  8. A Review of Compression, Ventilation, Defibrillation, Drug Treatment, and Targeted Temperature Management in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Important studies of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR techniques influence the development of new guidelines. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of some important studies of CPR. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE, published from 1964 to 2014. Study Selection: Original articles and critical reviews about CPR techniques were selected for review. Results: The survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is improving. This improvement is associated with the performance of uninterrupted chest compressions and simple airway management procedures during bystander CPR. Real-time feedback devices can be used to improve the quality of CPR. The recommended dose, timing, and indications for adrenaline (epinephrine use may change. The appropriate target temperature for targeted temperature management is still unclear. Conclusions: New studies over the past 5 years have evaluated various aspects of CPR in OHCA. Some of these studies were high-quality randomized controlled trials, which may help to improve the scientific understanding of resuscitation techniques and result in changes to CPR guidelines.

  9. A new method without reference channels used for ventricular fibrillation detection during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Zhang, Guang; Wu, Taihu; Li, Chao; Wan, Zongming; Li, Liangzhe; Wang, Chunfei; Wang, Yalin; Lu, Hengzhi; Chen, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is observed as the initial rhythm in the majority of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrest. It is vitally important to accurately recognize the initial VF rhythm and then implement electrical defibrillation. However, artifacts produced by chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) make the VF detection algorithms utilized by current automated external defibrillators (AEDs) unreliable. CPR must be traditionally interrupted for a reliable diagnosis. However, interruptions in chest compression have a deleterious effect on the success of defibrillation. The elimination of the CPR artifacts would enable compressions to continue during AED VF detection and thereby increase the likelihood of resuscitation success. We have estimated a model of this artifact by adaptively incorporating noise-assisted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (NA-MEMD) and least mean squares (LMS) and then removing the artifact from the corrupted ECGs. The simulation experiment indicated that the CPR artifact could be accurately modeled without any reference channels. We constructed a BP neural network to evaluate the results. A total of 372 VF and 645 normal sinus rhythm (SR) ECG samples were included in the analysis, and 24 CPR artifact signals were used to construct corrupted ECGs. The results indicated that at different SNR levels ranging from 0 to -12 dB, the sensitivity and specificity were always above 95 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26831488

  10. 2016 Focused Update: Clinical Recommendations for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Data Assessment in Specific Patient Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzi, Marco; Arena, Ross; Halle, Martin; Piepoli, Massimo F; Myers, Jonathan; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-06-14

    In the past several decades, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) has seen an exponential increase in its evidence base. The growing volume of evidence in support of CPX has precipitated the release of numerous scientific statements by societies and associations. In 2012, the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation and the American Heart Association developed a joint document with the primary intent of redefining CPX analysis and reporting in a way that would streamline test interpretation and increase clinical application. Specifically, the 2012 joint scientific statement on CPX conceptualized an easy-to-use, clinically meaningful analysis based on evidence-vetted variables in color-coded algorithms; single-page algorithms were successfully developed for each proposed test indication. Because of an abundance of new CPX research in recent years and a reassessment of the current algorithms in light of the body of evidence, a focused update to the 2012 scientific statement is now warranted. The purposes of this update are to confirm algorithms included in the initial scientific statement not requiring revision, to propose revisions to algorithms included in the initial scientific statement, to propose new algorithms based on emerging scientific evidence, to further clarify the application of oxygen consumption at ventilatory threshold, to describe CPX variables with an emerging scientific evidence base, to describe the synergistic value of combining CPX with other assessments, to discuss personnel considerations for CPX laboratories, and to provide recommendations for future CPX research. PMID:27143685

  11. Combined cardiopulmonary assessments with implantable telemetry device in conscious freely moving cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, S; Haefner, Paul; Fournier, S; Troncy, E; Moon, L B

    2010-01-01

    Female cynomolgus monkeys were surgically implanted with telemetry transmitters recording ECG (DII), arterial pressure, physical activity, body temperature, and tidal volume. Respiratory rate (RR) and tidal volume (TV) were monitored simultaneously with the telemetry transmitter using impedance. Impedance-based monitoring of RR and TV by telemetry correlated with controlled TV and with pneumotachometer (>98%) in restrained animals. Control drugs with cardiovascular and respiratory effects, including saline, medetomidine (0.01, 0.02 and 0.04mg/kg) and cocaine (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5mg/kg) were administered intravenously. An averaging epoch of 5min was used for analysis of respiratory data. Medetomidine induced significant respiratory depression with decrease in RR and TV in freely moving animals while cocaine increased TV, RR and minute ventilation (MV) with concomitant increase in heart rate when compared with time matched values from saline-treated animals. The onset, duration and magnitude of cardiovascular and respiratory changes were correlated. This highlights the dependency of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The use of cardiopulmonary monitoring can allow continuous monitoring including during night time when variability of respiratory parameters is lower. Monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters in the same animals could also help to decrease the number of animals used in research. PMID:20570745

  12. Changes in cardiopulmonary values after heartworm removal from pulmonary artery using flexible alligator forceps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiograph, arteriograph, echocardiogram, electrocardiogram and cardiopulmonary values were obtained in dogs with dirofilariasis before and after heartworm removal with a flexible alligator forceps. After heartworm removal, the following results were obtained: 1) Dilations of the pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the right atrium reduced on radiograph and ultrasonic echocardiogram; 2) tortuousness of the pulmonary artery was reduced, and pruning of the peripheral arteries improved on arteriogram: 3) electrocardiographic findings indicated the correction of right axis deviation in mean electric axis in frontal plane and decreases of voltages; 4) pulmonary arterial and right ventricular pressures fell (improvement of pulmonary hypertension); 5) right cardiac output decreased; 6) heart rate tended to decrease; and 7) total pulmonary arterial resistance decreased. These results indicated that pulmonary arterial resistance and blood flow volume might be reduced, thus decreasing the burden on the heart. It was considered that not only lesions of the pulmonary arteries but also heartworms themselves in the pulmonary artery play an important role in affecting right heart hemodynamics

  13. Establishment of an animal model of non-transthoracic cardiopulmonary bypass in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Hong-wei; XIAO Ying-bin; LIU Mei; CHEN Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model of non-transthoracic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in rats. Methods: Ten adult male Sprague-Dawlay rats, weighing 350-500 g, were used in this study. CPB was established in these animals through cannulating the left carotid and right jugular vein for arterial perfusion and venous return. The components of perfusion circuit, especially the miniature oxygenator and cannula, were specially designed and improved. The mean arterial pressure was measured with a blood pressure meter through cannulating the left femoral artery. The hemodynamic and blood gas parameters were also monitored. Results: The rat model of non-transthoracic CPB was established successfully. The hemodynamical parameters were changed within an acceptable region during CPB. The miniature oxygenator was sufficient to meet the standard of satisfactory CPB.Conclusions: The rat model of non-transthoracic CPB established through the carotid and jugular cannulation is feasible, easily operated, safe, reliable, and economic. It is an ideal model for the pathophysiological research of CPB.

  14. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Pattern Evaluation Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Filter via Nonlinear Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Good quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the mainstay of treatment for managing patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Assessment of the quality of the CPR delivered is now possible through the electrocardiography (ECG) signal that can be collected by an automated external defibrillator (AED). This study evaluates a nonlinear approximation of the CPR given to the asystole patients. The raw ECG signal is filtered using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), and the CPR-related intrinsic mode functions (IMF) are chosen to be evaluated. In addition, sample entropy (SE), complexity index (CI), and detrended fluctuation algorithm (DFA) are collated and statistical analysis is performed using ANOVA. The primary outcome measure assessed is the patient survival rate after two hours. CPR pattern of 951 asystole patients was analyzed for quality of CPR delivered. There was no significant difference observed in the CPR-related IMFs peak-to-peak interval analysis for patients who are younger or older than 60 years of age, similarly to the amplitude difference evaluation for SE and DFA. However, there is a difference noted for the CI (p CPR-IMFs amplitude differences. PMID:27529068

  15. Impaired Cerebral Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Function in a Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA. Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF. We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  16. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). METHODS: We included 1316 adult OHCA individuals with pre-hospital ROSC (2005-2011) handled by the largest nationwide ambulance provider in Denmark. Patients were stratified into 0-5, 6-10, 11-15, 16-20, 21-25 and >25min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by...... emergency medical services until ROSC was achieved. Nursing home admission and diagnosis of anoxic brain damage were measured as proxies of poor neurological/functional outcomes. FINDINGS: Median time from CPR initiation to ROSC was 12min (IQR: 7-18) while 20.4% achieved ROSC after >25min. Overall, 37.......5% (494) of the study population achieved 30-day survival. Thirty-day survival was inversely related to minutes of CPR to ROSC: ranging from 59.6% (127/213) for ≤5min to 13.8% (19/138) for >25min. If bystander initiated CPR before ambulance arrival, corresponding values ranged from 70.4% (107/152) to 21...

  17. A simple accurate chest-compression depth gauge using magnetic coils during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Sano, Yuko; Zhang, Yuhua; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new method for calculating chest compression depth and a simple chest-compression gauge for validating the accuracy of the method. The chest-compression gauge has two plates incorporating two magnetic coils, a spring, and an accelerometer. The coils are located at both ends of the spring, and the accelerometer is set on the bottom plate. Waveforms obtained using the magnetic coils (hereafter, "magnetic waveforms"), which are proportional to compression-force waveforms and the acceleration waveforms were measured at the same time. The weight factor expressing the relationship between the second derivatives of the magnetic waveforms and the measured acceleration waveforms was calculated. An estimated-compression-displacement (depth) waveform was obtained by multiplying the weight factor and the magnetic waveforms. Displacements of two large springs (with similar spring constants) within a thorax and displacements of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training manikin were measured using the gauge to validate the accuracy of the calculated waveform. A laser-displacement detection system was used to compare the real displacement waveform and the estimated waveform. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the real displacement using the laser system and the estimated displacement waveforms were calculated. The estimated displacement error of the compression depth was within 2 mm (ICCs (two springs and a manikin) were above 0.85 (0.99 in the case of one of the springs). The developed simple chest-compression gauge, based on a new calculation method, provides an accurate compression depth (estimation error < 2 mm).

  18. Using an inertial navigation algorithm and accelerometer to monitor chest compression depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussen, Salah; Ibouanga-Kipoutou, Harold; Fournier, Nathalie; Raboutet, Yves Godio; Llari, Maxime; Bruder, Nicolas; Arnoux, Pierre Jean; Behr, Michel

    2016-09-01

    We present an original method using a low cost accelerometer and a Kalman-filter based algorithm to monitor cardiopulmonary resuscitation chest compressions (CC) depth. A three-axis accelerometer connected to a computer was used during CC. A Kalman filter was used to retrieve speed and position from acceleration data. We first tested the algorithm for its accuracy and stability on surrogate data. The device was implemented for CC performed on a manikin. Different accelerometer locations were tested. We used a classical inertial navigation algorithm to reconstruct CPR depth and frequency. The device was found accurate enough to monitor CPR depth and its stability was checked for half an hour without any drift. Average error on displacement was ±0.5mm. We showed that depth measurement was dependent on the device location on the patient or the rescuer. The accuracy and stability of this small low-cost accelerometer coupled to a Kalman-filter based algorithm to reconstruct CC depth and frequency, was found well adapted and could be easily implemented. PMID:27246666

  19. Effect of Low-Dose Dopamine on Renal Function and Electrolyte Extraction During Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türker EMRE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Kidney damage after cardiac surgery can cause acute renal failure, increase the morbidity and mortality, and prolong the hospital stay. Various methods have therefore been used to prevent renal failure. One of the most frequently used drugs for this purpose is low-dose dopamine (2-4 mcg/kg/min but it has various disadvantages in addition to advantages. One disadvantage is the increased urinary excretion of electrolytes. We studied the use low-dose dopamine on renal function in patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. MATERIAL and METHODS: We included 40 patients who were planned to undergo open heart surgery, had developed kidney damage for any reason before the surgery, and had normal ejection fraction (EF in the study. The data were recorded before and 1, 24, and 48 hours after the operation. RESULTS: When we compared the postoperative 24th hour data, urinary K and Cl were higher in the control group than the dopamine group (p<0.05. Postoperative 24th hour creatinine clearance was higher in the dopamine group than the control group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the use of low-dose dopamine in cardiopulmonary bypass patients in the postoperative period does not have a positive effect on the renal function and does not affect urinary electrolyte excretion.

  20. Exertional dyspnoea in COPD: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

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    O'Donnell, Denis E; Elbehairy, Amany F; Faisal, Azmy; Webb, Katherine A; Neder, J Alberto; Mahler, Donald A

    2016-09-01

    Activity-related dyspnoea is often the most distressing symptom experienced by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can persist despite comprehensive medical management. It is now clear that dyspnoea during physical activity occurs across the spectrum of disease severity, even in those with mild airway obstruction. Our understanding of the nature and source of dyspnoea is incomplete, but current aetiological concepts emphasise the importance of increased central neural drive to breathe in the setting of a reduced ability of the respiratory system to appropriately respond. Since dyspnoea is provoked or aggravated by physical activity, its concurrent measurement during standardised laboratory exercise testing is clearly important. Combining measurement of perceptual and physiological responses during exercise can provide valuable insights into symptom severity and its pathophysiological underpinnings. This review summarises the abnormal physiological responses to exercise in COPD, as these form the basis for modern constructs of the neurobiology of exertional dyspnoea. The main objectives are: 1) to examine the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in uncovering the physiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD; 2) to examine the escalating negative sensory consequences of progressive respiratory impairment with disease advancement; and 3) to build a physiological rationale for individualised treatment optimisation based on CPET. PMID:27581832

  1. Theophylline Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing in Children Following Congenital Heart Surgery With Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frymoyer, Adam; Su, Felice; Grimm, Paul C; Sutherland, Scott M; Axelrod, David M

    2016-09-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently develop acute kidney injury due to renal ischemia. Theophylline, which improves renal perfusion via adenosine receptor inhibition, is a potential targeted therapy. However, children undergoing cardiac surgery and CPB commonly have alterations in drug pharmacokinetics. To help understand optimal aminophylline (salt formulation of theophylline) dosing strategies in this population, a population-based pharmacokinetic model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) from 71 children (median age 5 months; 90% range 1 week to 10 years) who underwent cardiac surgery requiring CPB and received aminophylline as part of a previous randomized controlled trial. A 1-compartment model with linear elimination adequately described the pharmacokinetics of theophylline. Weight scaled via allometry was a significant predictor of clearance and volume. In addition, allometric scaled clearance increased with age implemented as a power maturation function. Compared to prior reports in noncardiac children, theophylline clearance was markedly reduced across age. In the final population pharmacokinetic model, optimized empiric dosing regimens were developed via Monte Carlo simulations. Doses 50% to 75% lower than those recommended in noncardiac children were needed to achieve target serum concentrations of 5 to 10 mg/L. PMID:26712558

  2. Cardiorespiratory adaptation to breath-holding in air: Analysis via a cardiopulmonary simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Antonio; Limei Cheng; Ursino, Mauro; Chbat, Nicolas W

    2015-08-01

    Apnea via breath-holding (BH) in air induces cardiorespiratory adaptation that involves the activation of several reflex mechanisms and their complex interactions. Hence, the effects of BH in air on cardiorespiratory function can become hardly predictable and difficult to be interpreted. Particularly, the effect on heart rate is not yet completely understood because of the contradicting results of different physiological studies. In this paper we apply our previously developed cardiopulmonary model (CP Model) to a scenario of BH with a twofold intent: (1) further validating the CP Model via comparison against experimental data; (2) gaining insights into the physiological reasoning for such contradicting experimental results. Model predictions agreed with published experimental animal and human data and indicated that heart rate increases during BH in air. Changes in the balance between sympathetic and vagal effects on heart rate within the model proved to be effective in inverting directions of the heart rate changes during BH. Hence, the model suggests that intra-subject differences in such sympatho-vagal balance may be one of the reasons for the contradicting experimental results. PMID:26738098

  3. Cardiopulmonary function of dogs with plutonium-induced chronic lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs had signs of restrictive lung disease 1 to 5 years after exposure by inhalation to 239PuO2 aerosols. The 239PuO2 aerosols were monodisperse with activity median aerodynamic diameters of 0.75, 1.5, or 3.0 microns. The plutonium particles produced protracted alpha irradiation of the lungs. Ten dogs had specific initial pulmonary burdens (IPB) of 330 to 4100 kBq of 239PuO2/kg of body mass. The average onset time of clinical signs of lung injury was 3 years after exposure; the average time from the onset of signs until cardiorespiratory function evaluation was 5.5 years. A second group of 10 dogs had IPB of 110 to 2000 kBq of 239Pu/kg of body mass but no signs of lung injury. A third group of 10 dogs, not exposed to 239Pu, were matched for age and sex. Cardiopulmonary function tests were performed. Only the dogs in group I with signs of lung injury had a mild respiratory function disorder consisting of smaller lung volumes, reduced compliance, increased respiratory frequency and minute volume, and reduced carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. Cardiac function of all three groups was similar. These findings indicate that alpha irradiation of the lungs of man could produce restrictive lung disease at long times after initial exposure

  4. Cardiopulmonary stress testing in children and adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliaresis, Christa; Beker, Susan; Gewitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise stress testing (CPET) is a vital tool used to assess patients with a history of congenital heart disease. There are several tests in the cardiologist's armamentarium that allow for assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. The majority of these tests are only performed with the body at rest and some even require sedation. Exercise stress testing is unique in allowing assessment of the hemodynamic status of a patient in motion. In addition to providing all the information obtained during an exercise stress test, such as heart rate, rhythm, ST-segment analysis, and blood pressure, the CPET provides critical metabolic information. Parameters such as VO2, oxygen pulse, and VE/VCO2 slope help to detail the patient's physiology in a dynamic state. Decisions can then be better made regarding follow-up plans, acceptable exercise recommendations, and future interventions, if necessary. It allows insight into the patient's exercise capacity and quality of life. Norms for both children and adults with many forms of congenital heart disease are now available allowing appropriate comparisons to be made. This review will discuss in detail the CPET and its application in congenital heart disease. PMID:25162333

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production following Cardiopulmonary Bypass Was Not Associated with Pulmonary Dysfunction after Cardiac Surgery

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    Tso-Chou Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB causes release of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9, contributing to pulmonary infiltration and dysfunction. The aims were to investigate MMP-9 production and associated perioperative variables and oxygenation following CPB. Methods. Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were included. Arterial blood was sampled at 6 sequential points (before anesthesia induction, before CPB and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 h after beginning CPB for plasma MMP-9 concentrations by ELISA. The perioperative laboratory data and variables, including bypass time, PaO2/FiO2, and extubation time, were also recorded. Results. The plasma MMP-9 concentrations significantly elevated at 2–6 h after beginning CPB (P<0.001 and returned to the preanesthesia level at 24 h (P=0.23, with predominant neutrophil counts after surgery (P<0.001. The plasma MMP-9 levels at 4 and 6 h were not correlated with prolonged CPB time and displayed no association with postoperative PaO2/FiO2, regardless of reduced ratio from preoperative 342.9±81.2 to postoperative 207.3±121.3 mmHg (P<0.001. Conclusion. Elective cardiac surgery with CPB induced short-term elevation of plasma MMP-9 concentrations within 24 hours, however, without significant correlation with CPB time and postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, despite predominantly increased neutrophils and reduced oxygenation.

  6. Significance of adrenomedullin under cardiopulmonary bypass in children during surgery for congenital heart disease.

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    Takeuchi M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the effect of adrenomedullin (AM on fluid homeostasis under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, we investigated the serial changes in plasma AM and other parameters related to fluid homeostasis in 13 children (average age, 28.2 months with congenital heart disease during cardiac surgery under CPB. Arterial blood and urine samples were collected just after initiation of anesthesia, just before commencement of CPB, 10 min before the end of CPB, 60 min after CPB, and 24 h after operation. Plasma AM levels increased significantly 10 min before the end of CPB and decreased 24 h after operation. Urine volume increased transiently during CPB, which paralleled changes in AM. Simple regression analysis showed that plasma AM level correlated significantly with urinary vasopressin, urine volume, urinary sodium excretion, and plasma osmolarity. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that urine volume was the most significant determinant of plasma AM levels. Percent rise in AM during CPB relative to control period correlated with that of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (r = 0.57, P < 0.01. Our results suggest that AM plays an important role in fluid homeostasis under CPB in cooperation with other hormones involved in fluid homeostasis.

  7. The Effect of Low Tidal Volume Ventilation during Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Postoperative Pulmonary Function

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    Gholamreza Safarpour

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction is one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery and it is believed to result from the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. In this study, we investigated the effect of low tidal volume ventilation during CPB on postoperative gas exchange and lung mechanics.Methods: This prospective randomized study included 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting. In 50 patients, low tidal volume ventilation [tidal volume (TV = 3 ml/kg, respiratory rate (RR = 12/min, fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FIO2= 1.0, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP = 5 cmH2O] was applied during CPB (group I; and in the other 50 patients (group II, the lungs were open to the atmosphere without ventilation. Measurements were taken preoperatively,after CPB, and before discharge.Results: Post-bypass PaO2 (just after CPB 85 versus75 was higher significantly in group I (P value < 0.05. Decrease in postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (25% versus 30% and forced vital capacity (32% versus 35% was less significant in group I. Also, time to extubation (5 hrs versus 5.5 hrs was shorter in group I.Conclusion: Continued low tidal volume ventilation during CPB improved post-bypass oxygenation and lung mechanics.

  8. Knowledge and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation among university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the students of King Saud University. This study was a cross sectional survey among King Saud University students, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which took place on December 17-20, 2006. The data was collected from self-administered questionnaires prepared in Arabic. The questionnaires were distributed to all 15 colleges of the university. Out of a study sample of 2250 students, 31% did not have prior CPR information. Of those with previous knowledge, 85% feel that it is inadequate. The most common sources of information were television and movies. The 12.7% of individuals encountered a situation that required the use of CPR. However, 14% of them performed it. This was mostly due to lack of knowledge (42.8%). Eighty-eight percent of students would like to learn how to perform CPR. Out of all King Saud University students, 45% believe that CPR training should be a graduation requirement. It was found that overall attitude towards CPR was positive. However, the knowledge on the topic was insufficient. Thus, more focus should be placed on the improvement of CPR skills. In addition, more studies are needed to assess knowledge and attitudes towards CPR in the community. (author)

  9. Computed tomography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using automated chest compression devices - an initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate both CT image quality in a phantom study and feasibility in an initial case series using automated chest compression (A-CC) devices for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Multidetector CT (MDCT) of a chest/heart phantom (Thorax-CCI, QRM, Germany) was performed with identical protocols of the phantom alone (S), the phantom together with two different A-CC devices (A: AutoPulse, Zoll, Germany; L: LUCAS, Jolife, Sweden), and the phantom with a LUCAS baseplate, but without the compression unit (L-bp). Nine radiologists evaluated image noise quantitatively (n=244 regions, Student's t-test) and also rated image quality subjectively (1-excellent to 6-inadequate, Mann-Whitney U-test). Additionally, three patients during prolonged CPR underwent CT with A-CC devices. Mean image noise of S was increased by 1.21 using L-bp, by 3.62 using A, and by 5.94 using L (p<0.01 each). Image quality was identical using S and L-bp (1.64 each), slightly worse with A (1.83), and significantly worse with L (2.97, p<0.001). In all patient cases the main lesions were identified, which led to clinical key decisions. Image quality was excellent with L-bp and good with A. Under CPR conditions initial cases indicate that MDCT diagnostics supports either focused treatment or the decision to terminate efforts. (orig.)

  10. Anaesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of intramuscular morphine, medetomidine and ketamine administered to telemetered cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Ashley J; Muir, William W

    2007-04-01

    The quality and duration of anaesthesia, cardiorespiratory effects and recovery characteristics of a morphine, medetomidine, ketamine (MMK) drug combination were determined in cats. Six healthy, adult female cats were administered 0.2 mg/kg morphine sulphate, 60 microg/kg medetomidine hydrochloride, and 5 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride intramuscularly. Atipamezole was administered intramuscularly at 120 min after MMK administration. Time to lateral recumbency, intubation, extubation and sternal recumbency were recorded. Cardiorespiratory variables and response to a noxious stimulus were recorded before and at 3 min and 10 min increments after drug administration until sternal recumbency. The time to lateral recumbency and intubation were 1.9+/-1.2 and 4.3+/-1.2 min, respectively. Body temperature and haemoglobin saturation with oxygen remained unchanged compared to baseline values throughout anaesthesia. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute volume, heart rate, and blood pressure were significantly decreased during anaesthesia compared to baseline values. One cat met criteria for hypotension (systolic blood pressure cat remained non-responsive to noxious stimuli from 3 to 120 min. Time to extubation and sternal recumbency following atipamezole were 2.9+/-1.1 and 4.7+/-1.0 min, respectively. MMK drug combination produced excellent short-term anaesthesia and analgesia with minimal cardiopulmonary depression. Anaesthesia lasted for at least 120 min in all but one cat and was effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:17198759

  11. Effect of 6 degrees head-down tilt on cardiopulmonary function: comparison with microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Fine, Janelle M.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head-down tilt (HDT) of 6 degrees is a commonly used model of weightlessness, but there are few comparisons with actual microgravity. HYPOTHESIS: Our study was designed to prove that the changes in cardiopulmonary function seen in HDT would be similar to those seen in microgravity. METHODS: We compared measurements of cardiovascular and pulmonary function from three separate spaceflights of 14 to 17 d duration, with data collected during a 17-d period of HDT. RESULTS: HDT proved a good model of the cardiovascular response to microgravity, resulting in increases in cardiac output and stroke volume of a similar magnitude to those seen in microgravity, with a concomitant reduction in heart rate. By contrast, HDT was a poor model of the effects of microgravity on pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function in HDT approximated the changes seen in the 1-G supine posture, while in microgravity this was much closer to that seen in the 1-G upright position. The differences probably reflect the fact that changes in cardiovascular function result primarily from fluid shifts within the entire body, whereas changes in pulmonary ventilation are primarily a result of mechanical influences on the lung and chest and abdominal wall.

  12. Diffusion of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training to Chinese Immigrants with Limited English Proficiency

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    Mei Po Yip

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an effective intervention for prehospital cardiac arrest. Despite all available training opportunities for CPR, disparities exist in participation in CPR training, CPR knowledge, and receipt of bystander CPR for certain ethnic groups. We conducted five focus groups with Chinese immigrants who self-reported limited English proficiency (LEP. A bilingual facilitator conducted all the sessions. All discussions were taped, recorded, translated, and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed by content analysis guided by the theory of diffusion. The majority of participants did not know of CPR and did not know where to get trained. Complexity of CPR procedure, advantages of calling 9-1-1, lack of confidence, and possible liability discourage LEP individuals to learn CPR. LEP individuals welcome simplified Hands-Only CPR and are willing to perform CPR with instruction from 9-1-1 operators. Expanding the current training to include Hands-Only CPR and dispatcher-assisted CPR may motivate Chinese LEP individuals to get trained for CPR.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of propofol during cardiopulmonary bypass: A pilot study

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    A Samir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Propofol has been suggested as a useful adjunct to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB because of its potential protective effect on the heart mediated by a decrease in ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation at clinically relevant concentrations. In view of these potentially protective properties, which modulate many of the deleterious mechanism of inflammation attributable to reperfusion injury and CPB, we sought to determine whether starting a low dose of propofol infusion at the beginning of CPB would decrease inflammation as measured by pro-inflammatory markers. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 24 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. The study group received propofol at rate of 120 mcg/kg/min immediately after starting CPB and was maintained throughout the surgery and for the following 6 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU. The control group received propofol dose of 30-50 mcg/kg/min which was started at the time of chest closure with wires and continued for the next 6 hours in the ICU. Interleukins (IL -6, -8 and -10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha were assayed. Result: The most significant difference was in the level of IL-6 which had a P value of less than 0.06. Starting a low dose propofol early during the CPB was not associated with significant hemodynamic instability in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: Our study shows that propofol may be suitable as an anti-inflammatory adjunct for patients undergoing CABG.

  14. Hydrodynamic evaluation of aortic cardiopulmonary bypass cannulae using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C I; Bolle, E; Lang, H F; Ribolzi, C; Thomson, B; Tansley, G D; Fraser, J F; Gregory, S D

    2016-01-01

    The high velocity jet from aortic arterial cannulae used during cardiopulmonary bypass potentially causes a "sandblasting" injury to the aorta, increasing the possibility of embolisation of atheromatous plaque. We investigated a range of commonly available dispersion and non-dispersion cannulae, using particle image velocimetry. The maximum velocity of the exit jet was assessed 20 and 40 mm from the cannula tip at flow rates of 3 and 5 L/min. The dispersion cannulae had lower maximum velocities compared to the non-dispersion cannulae. Dispersion cannulae had fan-shaped exit profiles and maximum velocities ranged from 0.63 to 1.52 m/s when measured at 20 mm and 5 L/min. Non-dispersion cannulae had maximum velocities ranging from 1.52 to 3.06 m/s at 20 mm and 5 L/min, with corresponding narrow velocity profiles. This study highlights the importance of understanding the hydrodynamic performance of these cannulae as it may help in selecting the most appropriate cannula to minimize the risk of thromboembolic events or aortic injury. PMID:25987551

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in the emergency department: An ethnography of tacit knowledge in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Stephen P; Seymour, Jane; Higginbottom, Gina

    2016-05-01

    Despite media images to the contrary, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore how health care professionals working in two emergency departments in the UK, make decisions to commence, continue or stop resuscitation. Data collection involved participant observation of resuscitation attempts and in-depth interviews with nurses, medical staff and paramedics who had taken part in the attempts. Detailed case examples were constructed for comparative analysis. Findings show that emergency department staff use experience and acquired tacit knowledge to construct a typology of cardiac arrest categories that help them navigate decision making. Categorisation is based on 'less is more' heuristics which combine explicit and tacit knowledge to facilitate rapid decisions. Staff then work as a team to rapidly assimilate and interpret information drawn from observations of the patient's body and from technical, biomedical monitoring data. The meaning of technical data is negotiated during staff interaction. This analysis was informed by a theory of 'bodily' and 'technical' trajectory alignment that was first developed from an ethnography of death and dying in intensive care units. The categorisation of cardiac arrest situations and trajectory alignment are the means by which staff achieve consensus decisions and determine the point at which an attempt should be withdrawn. This enables them to construct an acceptable death in highly challenging circumstances. PMID:27017090

  16. Clinical Review: Management of weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass after cardiac surgery

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    Marc Licker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A sizable number of cardiac surgical patients are difficult to wean off cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB as a result of structural or functional cardiac abnormalities, vasoplegic syndrome, or ventricular dysfunction. In these cases, therapeutic decisions have to be taken quickly for successful separation from CPB. Various crisis management scenarios can be anticipated which emphasizes the importance of basic knowledge in applied cardiovascular physiology, knowledge of pathophysiology of the surgical lesions as well as leadership, and communication between multiple team members in a high-stakes environment. Since the mid-90s, transoesophageal echocardiography has provided an opportunity to assess the completeness of surgery, to identify abnormal circulatory conditions, and to guide specific medical and surgical interventions. However, because of the lack of evidence-based guidelines, there is a large variability regarding the use of cardiovascular drugs and mechanical circulatory support at the time of weaning from the CPB. This review presents key features for risk stratification and risk modulation as well as a standardized physiological approach to achieve successful weaning from CPB.

  17. Correlation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters with quality of life in stable COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirdamadi, Mahsa; Safavi, Enayat; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Peiman, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Background The precise head to head relationships between Cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPET) parameters and patients’ daily symptoms/activities and the disease social/emotional impact are less well defined. In this study, the correlation of COPD daily symptoms and quality of life [assessed by St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ)] and COPD severity index (BODE-index) with CPET parameters were investigated. Methods Symptom-limited CPET was performed in 37 consecutive COPD (GOLD I-III) subjects during non-exacerbation phase. The SGRQ was also completed by each patient. Results SGRQ-score correlated negatively with FEV1 (r=−0.49, Prate (%WR-max) (r=−0.44, Pbreathing reserve (r=−0.50, PBreathing reserve were higher (P=0.04, breathing-reserve (r=−0.38, P=0.018). Conclusions The observed relationships between CPET parameter and daily subjective complaints in COPD were not strong. Those who discontinued the CPET because of leg fatigue were in the earlier stages of COPD. Significant negative correlation between ∆VO2/∆WR and BODE-index suggests that along with COPD progression, regardless of negative past history, other comorbidities such as cardiac/musculoskeletal problems should be sought.

  18. Cardiovascular gas on non-traumatic postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). The influence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the causes of cardiovascular gas (CVG) detected on non-traumatic postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). PMCT was performed on 247 subjects within two hours of non-traumatic death, including 228 patients who had undergone cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and 19 patients who had not. We evaluated the incidence and distribution of CVG in four areas of the heart, namely, the upper course of the right atrium (UC-RA), the right atrium, the right ventricle, and the left heart (left atrium, left ventricle, and aorta). CVG was observed in 163 (71%) of the 228 patients who underwent CPR. In those 163 patients, we detected CVG in the UC-RA (103 patients), right atrium (81 patients), right ventricle (94 patients), and left heart (5 patients). Nineteen patients who received no CPR showed no CVG. CVG on non-traumatic PMCT is mainly caused by CPR, which is characterized by venous catheterization that permits possible air inflow and by pneumatization of dissolved gas in the blood as a result of cardiac massage. (author)

  19. Idiopathic Infantile Arterial Calcification: A Possible Cause of Refractory Cardiopulmonary Failure in Infancy

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    A. Nael

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Infantile Arterial Calcification is a rare autosome recessive disease characterized by extensive calcification of medium and large arteries. Loss-of-function mutations in ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 gene have been described in more than 80% of the cases. Although the diagnosis is usually made at autopsy, it is possible to identify cases based on clinical presentation, radiology findings, and molecular studies. Appropriate treatment can be initiated and has been shown to successfully induce permanent remission. We report a 4-week-old neonate who initially presented with respiratory distress, heart failure, and Coxsackie B viremia suggestive of viral induced cardiomyopathy. His symptoms progressed to multiple organ failure and he eventually expired at four weeks of age. On autopsy, diffuse calcium deposition within the internal elastic lamina of medium and large arteries was identified, as well as narrowing of lumen due to myointimal proliferation. This case report will emphasize the importance of taking this rare curable disease into consideration in all cases of infants with cardiopulmonary failure.

  20. Experiential Avoidance and Technological Addictions in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Oliva, Carlos; Piqueras, José A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims This study focuses on the use of popular information and communication technologies (ICTs) by adolescents: the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. The relationship of ICT use and experiential avoidance (EA), a construct that has emerged as underlying and transdiagnostic to a wide variety of psychological problems, including behavioral addictions, is examined. EA refers to a self-regulatory strategy involving efforts to control or escape from negative stimuli such as thoughts, feelings, or sensations that generate strong distress. This strategy, which may be adaptive in the short term, is problematic if it becomes an inflexible pattern. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether EA patterns were associated with addictive or problematic use of ICT in adolescents. Methods A total of 317 students of the Spanish southeast between 12 and 18 years old were recruited to complete a questionnaire that included questions about general use of each ICTs, an experiential avoidance questionnaire, a brief inventory of the Big Five personality traits, and specific questionnaires on problematic use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. Results Correlation analysis and linear regression showed that EA largely explained results regarding the addictive use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games, but not in the same way. As regards gender, boys showed a more problematic use of video games than girls. Concerning personality factors, conscientiousness was related to all addictive behaviors. Discussion and conclusions We conclude that EA is an important construct that should be considered in future models that attempt to explain addictive behaviors. PMID:27363463