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Sample records for avoidance memory role

  1. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

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    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  2. The role of hippocampal nitric oxide (NO) on learning and immediate, short- and long-term memory retrieval in inhibitory avoidance task in male adult rats.

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    Harooni, Hooman Eshagh; Naghdi, Nasser; Sepehri, Hoori; Rohani, Ali Haeri

    2009-07-19

    There is impressive amount of evidence suggesting the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and consequently learning and memory. Hippocampus is a brain region which is widely implicated in several types of learning and memory formation, including inhibitory avoidance learning. Since the CA1 region of hippocampus has shown nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, inhibition of the NOS enzymes can modulate hippocampal function, hence affecting memory processes. Therefore, we conducted series of experiments to further investigate the role of NO on inhibitory avoidance short- and long-term memory in rats. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were divided into 15 groups (n=10), and bilaterally implanted with guide cannulae aimed at the CA1 region of hippocampus. Animals received pre-training, post-training and pre-retrieval injections of vehicle (saline) or different doses of L-NAME (5, 10 and 15 microg/0.5 microl/side) or l-arginine (alone or in combination with L-NAME), tested for immediate, short- and long-term memory retention in an inhibitory avoidance task. Our results indicated that step-through latency (STL) of short- and long-term memory retention test was significantly reduced in L-NAME treated rats (15 microg/0.5 microl for immediate and short-term memory; 10 microg/0.5 microl for long-term memory), as compared to that of control group. Results also revealed that, L-arginine produced no any significant effect on STL, however could reverse the effect of L-NAME on memory. Our results also showed that, blocking of NO signaling immediately after training had no effect on either short- or long-term memory, indicating that NO release only during training, and not during consolidation, plays a role in memory formation. Together, our findings suggest that NO synthase inhibition by L-NAME can induce impairments in immediate, short- and long-term memories of inhibitory avoidance task, and these impairments are dependent on the learning and

  3. Hippocampal-dependent memory in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task: The role of spatial cues and CA1 activity.

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    Leão, Anderson H F F; Medeiros, André M; Apolinário, Gênedy K S; Cabral, Alícia; Ribeiro, Alessandra M; Barbosa, Flávio F; Silva, Regina H

    2016-05-01

    The plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT) has been used to investigate interactions between aversive memory and an anxiety-like response in rodents. Suitable performance in this task depends on the activity of the basolateral amygdala, similar to other aversive-based memory tasks. However, the role of spatial cues and hippocampal-dependent learning in the performance of PMDAT remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of proximal and distal cues in the retrieval of this task. Animals tested under misplaced proximal cues had diminished performance, and animals tested under both misplaced proximal cues and absent distal cues could not discriminate the aversive arm. We also assessed the role of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) in this aversive memory task. Temporary bilateral inactivation of dorsal CA1 was conducted with muscimol (0.05 μg, 0.1 μg, and 0.2 μg) prior to the training session. While the acquisition of the task was not altered, muscimol impaired the performance in the test session and reduced the anxiety-like response in the training session. We also performed a spreading analysis of a fluorophore-conjugated muscimol to confirm selective inhibition of CA1. In conclusion, both distal and proximal cues are required to retrieve the task, with the latter being more relevant to spatial orientation. Dorsal CA1 activity is also required for aversive memory formation in this task, and interfered with the anxiety-like response as well. Importantly, both effects were detected by different parameters in the same paradigm, endorsing the previous findings of independent assessment of aversive memory and anxiety-like behavior in the PMDAT. Taken together, these findings suggest that the PMDAT probably requires an integration of multiple systems for memory formation, resembling an episodic-like memory rather than a pure conditioning behavior. Furthermore, the concomitant and independent assessment of emotionality and memory in rodents is relevant to

  4. Reduction in Memory Specificity Following an Approach/Avoidance Scrambled Sentences Task Relates to Cognitive Avoidant Coping

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    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J. Mark G.; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    "Overgeneral autobiographical memory" (OGM) refers to the tendency to retrieve less specific personal memories. According to the functional avoidance hypothesis, OGM might act as a cognitive strategy to avoid emotionally distressing details of negative memories. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an experimentally…

  5. Is all motivation good for learning? Dissociable influences of approach and avoidance motivation in declarative memory.

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    Murty, Vishnu P; LaBar, Kevin S; Hamilton, Derek A; Adcock, R Alison

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of approach versus avoidance motivation on declarative learning. Human participants navigated a virtual reality version of the Morris water task, a classic spatial memory paradigm, adapted to permit the experimental manipulation of motivation during learning. During this task, participants were instructed to navigate to correct platforms while avoiding incorrect platforms. To manipulate motivational states participants were either rewarded for navigating to correct locations (approach) or punished for navigating to incorrect platforms (avoidance). Participants' skin conductance levels (SCLs) were recorded during navigation to investigate the role of physiological arousal in motivated learning. Behavioral results revealed that, overall, approach motivation enhanced and avoidance motivation impaired memory performance compared to nonmotivated spatial learning. This advantage was evident across several performance indices, including accuracy, learning rate, path length, and proximity to platform locations during probe trials. SCL analysis revealed three key findings. First, within subjects, arousal interacted with approach motivation, such that high arousal on a given trial was associated with performance deficits. In addition, across subjects, high arousal negated or reversed the benefits of approach motivation. Finally, low-performing, highly aroused participants showed SCL responses similar to those of avoidance-motivation participants, suggesting that for these individuals, opportunities for reward may evoke states of learning similar to those typically evoked by threats of punishment. These results provide a novel characterization of how approach and avoidance motivation influence declarative memory and indicate a critical and selective role for arousal in determining how reinforcement influences goal-oriented learning.

  6. Place avoidance learning and memory in a jumping spider.

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    Peckmezian, Tina; Taylor, Phillip W

    2017-03-01

    Using a conditioned passive place avoidance paradigm, we investigated the relative importance of three experimental parameters on learning and memory in a salticid, Servaea incana. Spiders encountered an aversive electric shock stimulus paired with one side of a two-sided arena. Our three parameters were the ecological relevance of the visual stimulus, the time interval between trials and the time interval before test. We paired electric shock with either a black or white visual stimulus, as prior studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that S. incana prefer dark 'safe' regions to light ones. We additionally evaluated the influence of two temporal features (time interval between trials and time interval before test) on learning and memory. Spiders exposed to the shock stimulus learned to associate shock with the visual background cue, but the extent to which they did so was dependent on which visual stimulus was present and the time interval between trials. Spiders trained with a long interval between trials (24 h) maintained performance throughout training, whereas spiders trained with a short interval (10 min) maintained performance only when the safe side was black. When the safe side was white, performance worsened steadily over time. There was no difference between spiders tested after a short (10 min) or long (24 h) interval before test. These results suggest that the ecological relevance of the stimuli used and the duration of the interval between trials can influence learning and memory in jumping spiders.

  7. About sleep's role in memory.

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    Rasch, Björn; Born, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Over more than a century of research has established the fact that sleep benefits the retention of memory. In this review we aim to comprehensively cover the field of "sleep and memory" research by providing a historical perspective on concepts and a discussion of more recent key findings. Whereas initial theories posed a passive role for sleep enhancing memories by protecting them from interfering stimuli, current theories highlight an active role for sleep in which memories undergo a process of system consolidation during sleep. Whereas older research concentrated on the role of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, recent work has revealed the importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation and also enlightened some of the underlying electrophysiological, neurochemical, and genetic mechanisms, as well as developmental aspects in these processes. Specifically, newer findings characterize sleep as a brain state optimizing memory consolidation, in opposition to the waking brain being optimized for encoding of memories. Consolidation originates from reactivation of recently encoded neuronal memory representations, which occur during SWS and transform respective representations for integration into long-term memory. Ensuing REM sleep may stabilize transformed memories. While elaborated with respect to hippocampus-dependent memories, the concept of an active redistribution of memory representations from networks serving as temporary store into long-term stores might hold also for non-hippocampus-dependent memory, and even for nonneuronal, i.e., immunological memories, giving rise to the idea that the offline consolidation of memory during sleep represents a principle of long-term memory formation established in quite different physiological systems.

  8. About Sleep's Role in Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Over more than a century of research has established the fact that sleep benefits the retention of memory. In this review we aim to comprehensively cover the field of “sleep and memory” research by providing a historical perspective on concepts and a discussion of more recent key findings. Whereas initial theories posed a passive role for sleep enhancing memories by protecting them from interfering stimuli, current theories highlight an active role for sleep in which memories undergo a process of system consolidation during sleep. Whereas older research concentrated on the role of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, recent work has revealed the importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation and also enlightened some of the underlying electrophysiological, neurochemical, and genetic mechanisms, as well as developmental aspects in these processes. Specifically, newer findings characterize sleep as a brain state optimizing memory consolidation, in opposition to the waking brain being optimized for encoding of memories. Consolidation originates from reactivation of recently encoded neuronal memory representations, which occur during SWS and transform respective representations for integration into long-term memory. Ensuing REM sleep may stabilize transformed memories. While elaborated with respect to hippocampus-dependent memories, the concept of an active redistribution of memory representations from networks serving as temporary store into long-term stores might hold also for non-hippocampus-dependent memory, and even for nonneuronal, i.e., immunological memories, giving rise to the idea that the offline consolidation of memory during sleep represents a principle of long-term memory formation established in quite different physiological systems. PMID:23589831

  9. Nitric oxide in the nucleus accumbens is involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

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    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Piri, Morteza; Nasehi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, the possible effect of nitric oxide agents injected into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the presence or absence of nicotine on morphine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats was investigated. As a model of memory, a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task was used. Post-training injection of morphine (4 and 6mg/kg) dose dependently induced the impairment of memory retention. Administration of morphine (4 and 6mg/kg) before retention induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine (6mg/kg) influence. Injection of nicotine before retention (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg) alone and nicotine (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5mg/kg) plus an ineffective dose of morphine (2mg/kg) reversed the post-training morphine-induced memory impairment. The amnesia elicited by morphine (6mg/kg) was also prevented by pre-retention intra-NAc administration of a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, l-NAME (0.24μg/rat, intra-NAc). Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1mg/kg) in combination with low doses of l-NAME (0.06 and 0.12μg/rat, intra-NAc) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by morphine given after training. It is important to note that intra-NAc administration of l-NAME before retention impaired memory retrieval by itself. In contrast, pre-retention administration of l-arginine, a nitric oxide (NO) precursor (0.25 and 0.5μg/rat, intra-NAc), which had no effect alone, prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. The results suggest a possible role for nitric oxide of nucleus accumbens in the improving effect of nicotine on the morphine-induced amnesia and morphine state-dependent memory.

  10. Relationship between cognitive avoidant coping and changes in overgeneral autobiographical memory retrieval following an acute stressor.

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    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Claes, Stephan; Vrieze, Elske; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2012-12-01

    According to the functional avoidance hypothesis, overgeneral autobiographical memory, the tendency to retrieve personal memories in a less specific format, might serve an affect-regulating function. Reducing the specificity of memories of negative events may prevent individuals from re-experiencing the associated painful emotions. This cognitive avoidance strategy might not only be employed by depressed and traumatized patients, but also by healthy individuals. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the increase in memory overgenerality induced by an acute stressor is positively correlated with habitual (cognitive) avoidant coping. Participants (N = 32) were exposed to a Trier Social Stress Test. Cognitive avoidant coping was measured at the start of the experiment by means of the Mainz Coping Inventory. Before, immediately after, and 40 min after the Trier Social Stress Test, autobiographical memory specificity was assessed by means of the Autobiographical Memory Test. Cognitive avoidant coping was significantly correlated with an increase in categoric memories from pre to immediately post stressor, but not with change in overgeneral memories from pre to 40 min post stressor. The results of the present experiment provide further support for functional avoidance as one of the mechanisms underlying overgeneral memory.

  11. Zinc Chloride and Lead Acetate-Induced Passive Avoidance Memory Retention Deficits Reversed by Nicotine and Bucladesine in Mice.

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    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yazdani, Abdolmajid; Baheri, Behnam; Payandemehr, Borna; Sanati, Mehdi; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Miri, Abdolhossein; Zandkarimi, Majid; Belaran, Maryam; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very important to investigate the neurotoxic effects of metals on learning and memory processes. In this study, we tried to investigate the effects and time course properties of oral administration of zinc chloride (25, 50, and 75 mg/kg, for 2 weeks), lead acetate (250, 750, 1,500, and 2,500 ppm for 4, 6 and 8 weeks), and their possible mechanisms on a model of memory function. For this matter, we examined the intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mg/kg) and bucladesine (50, 100, 300, and 600 nM/mouse) for 4 days alone and in combination with mentioned metals in the step-through passive avoidance task. Control animals received saline, drinking water, saline, and DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide)/deionized water (1:9), respectively. At the end of each part of studies, animals were trained for 1 day in step-through task. The avoidance memory retention alterations were evaluated 24 and 48 h later in singular and combinational studies. Zinc chloride (75 mg/kg) oral gavage for 2 weeks decreased latency times compared to control animals. Also, lead acetate (750 ppm oral administrations for 8 weeks) caused significant lead blood levels and induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Four-days intra-peritoneal injection of nicotine (1 mg/kg) increased latency time compared to control animals. Finally, findings of this research showed that treatment with intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (1 mg/kg) and/or bucladesine (600 nM/mouse) reversed zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Taken together, these results showed the probable role of cholinergic system and protein kinase A pathways in zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory alterations.

  12. Teacher Distress and the Role of Experiential Avoidance

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    Hinds, Erika; Jones, Laura Backen; Gau, Jeffrey M.; Forrester, Kathleen K.; Biglan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' psychological well-being is important for teachers and students, but teaching is highly stressful, particularly in special education. We examined the role of experiential avoidance (EA) in the well-being of 529 middle and elementary school teachers. EA involves the tendency to avoid thoughts, feelings, and other internal experiences,…

  13. Context-dependent activation of reduced autobiographical memory specificity as an avoidant coping style.

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    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    According to the affect-regulation hypothesis (Williams et al., 2007), reduced autobiographical memory specificity (rAMS) or overgeneral memory (OGM) might be considered a cognitive avoidance strategy; that is, people learn to avoid the emotionally painful consequences associated with the retrieval of specific negative memories. Based on this hypothesis, one would predict significant negative associations between AMS and avoidant coping. However, studies investigating this prediction have led to equivocal results. In the present study we tested a possible explanation for these contradictory findings. It was hypothesized that rAMS (in part) reflects an avoidant coping strategy, which might only become apparent under certain conditions, that is, conditions that signal the possibility of 'danger.' To test this hypothesis, we assessed AMS and behavioral avoidance but experimentally manipulated the instructions. In the neutral condition, two parallel versions of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were presented under neutral instructions. In the threat condition, the first AMT was presented under neutral instructions, while the second AMT was presented under 'threat instructions.' Results showed no significant correlations between avoidance and OGM under neutral conditions but significant and markedly stronger correlations under threat conditions, with more avoidance being associated with fewer specific and more categoric memories. In addition, high avoiders showed a stronger reduction in AMS in the threat condition as compared with the neutral condition, while low avoiders showed no such difference between conditions. The data confirm that OGM can be considered as part of a broader avoidant coping style. However, more importantly, they show that, at least in nonclinical individuals, the activation of this coping style may depend on the context.

  14. Hear no evil: The effect of auditory warning signals on avian innate avoidance, learned avoidance and memory

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    Emma C. SIDDALL, Nicola M. MARPLES

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aposematic insect species advertise their toxicity to potential predators using olfactory and auditory signals, in addition to visual signals, to produce a multimodal warning display. The olfactory signals in these displays may have interesting effects, such as eliciting innate avoidance against novel colored prey, or improving learning and memory of defended prey. However, little is known about the effects of such ancillary signals when they are auditory rather than olfactory. The few studies that have investigated this question have provided conflicting results. The current study sought to clarify and extend understanding of the effects of prey auditory signals on avian predator responses. The domestic chick Gallus gallus domesticus was used as a model avian predator to examine how the defensive buzzing sound of a bumblebee Bombus terrestris affected the chick’s innate avoidance behavior, and the learning and memory of prey avoidance. The results demonstrate that the buzzing sound had no effect on the predator’s responses to unpalatable aposematically colored crumbs, suggesting that the agitated buzzing of B. terrestris may provide no additional protection from avian predators [Current Zoology 57 (2: 197–207, 2011].

  15. Obstacle avoidance locomotor tasks: adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

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    Kloter, Evelyne; Dietz, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neural basis of adaptation, memory and skill transfer during human stepping over obstacles. Whilst walking on a treadmill, subjects had to perform uni- and bilateral obstacle steps. Acoustic feedback information about foot clearance was provided. Non-noxious electrical stimuli were applied to the right tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase of the right leg, i.e. 'prior' to the right or 'during' the left leg swing over the obstacle. The electromyogram (EMG) responses evoked by these stimuli in arm and leg muscles are known to reflect the neural coordination during normal and obstacle steps. The leading and trailing legs rapidly adapted foot clearance during obstacle steps with small further changes when the same obstacle condition was repeated. This adaptation was associated with a corresponding decrease in arm and leg muscle reflex EMG responses. Arm (but not leg) muscle EMG responses were greater when the stimulus was applied 'during' obstacle crossing by the left leg leading compared with stimulation 'prior' to right leg swing over the obstacle. A corresponding difference existed in arm muscle background EMG. The results indicate that, firstly, the somatosensory information gained by the performance and adaptation of uni- and bilateral obstacle stepping becomes transferred to the trailing leg in a context-specific manner. Secondly, EMG activity in arm and leg muscles parallels biomechanical adaptation of foot clearance. Thirdly, a consistently high EMG activity in the arm muscles during swing over the obstacle is required for equilibrium control. Thus, such a precision locomotor task is achieved by a context-specific, coordinated activation of arm and leg muscles for performance and equilibrium control that includes adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

  16. Involvement of the insular cortex in regulating glucocorticoid effects on memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance training

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    Raquel eFornari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are known to enhance the consolidation of memory of emotionally arousing experiences by acting upon a network of interconnected brain regions. Although animal studies typically do not consider the insular cortex (IC to be part of this network, the present findings indicate that the IC is importantly involved in regulating glucocorticoid effects on memory consolidation of emotionally arousing inhibitory avoidance training. The specific glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU 28362 (3 or 10 ng in 0.5 l infused bilaterally into the IC of male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after one-trial inhibitory avoidance training dose-dependently enhanced 48-h retention performance. Moreover, training on the inhibitory avoidance task increased neuronal activity of the IC, as assessed by an increased number of cells expressing immunoreactivity for phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2. However, systemic administration of a memory-enhancing dose of corticosterone (1 mg/kg after inhibitory avoidance training rapidly reduced the number of pERK1/2-positive cells in the IC, suggesting that glucocorticoid administration reduces overall neuronal activity of the IC. To investigate which components of the inhibitory avoidance training experience were influenced by the intra-IC glucocorticoid administration, in the last experiment rats were trained on a modified inhibitory avoidance task in which context exposure and footshock training occur on two sequential days. RU 28362 administration into the IC enhanced later retention when infused immediately after either the context or footshock training. Thus, these findings indicate that the IC mediates glucocorticoid effects on the consolidation of memory of different components of inhibitory avoidance training and suggest that the IC might be an important element of the rodent brain network involved in emotional regulation of learning and memory.

  17. Effects of Exercise on Memory Consolidation and Retrieval of Passive Avoidance Learning In Young Male Rats

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    Saadati

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Previous studies have shown that physical activity improves learning and memory. Present study was performed to determine the effects of short term and long term treadmill exercise on learning, memory consolidation and retrieval of passive avoidance learning in an animal model. Methods In this study fifty male Wistar rats with 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into five groups (n=10 in each group. Control group was trained in passive avoidance box and was tested 10 min, 24 hr, 10 days and 3 months later. Two groups exercised on treadmill one hour at 17 m. min for 10 days and 3 months respectively and then were trained in passive avoidance box and were tested 10 min and 24 hr later. The other two groups were trained and were tested 10 days and 24 hr later and then exercised on treadmill as same as other exercised groups. Results Obtained results showed that short-term (10 days and long-term (3 months treadmill running before training by passive avoidance test had significant (P=0.006 and P=0.001 respectively effects on memory consolidation. However, no significant difference was observed between latency time of rats before and after exercise in exercised groups retrieval (P>0.05. Conclusion Our results showed that physical activity promoted learning and memory consolidation but it did not affect retrieval memory performance.

  18. Externalizing psychopathology and behavioral disinhibition: working memory mediates signal discriminability and reinforcement moderates response bias in approach-avoidance learning.

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    Endres, Michael J; Rickert, Martin E; Bogg, Tim; Lucas, Jesolyn; Finn, Peter R

    2011-05-01

    Research has suggested that reduced working memory capacity plays a key role in disinhibited patterns of behavior associated with externalizing psychopathology. In this study, participants (N = 365) completed 2 versions of a go/no-go mixed-incentive learning task that differed in the relative frequency of monetary rewards and punishments for correct and incorrect active-approach responses, respectively. Using separate structural equation models for conventional (hit and false alarm rates) and signal detection theory (signal discriminability and response bias) performance indices, distinct roles for working memory capacity and changes in payoff structure were found. Specifically, results showed that (a) working memory capacity mediated the effects of externalizing psychopathology on false alarms and discriminability of go versus no-go signals; (b) these effects were not moderated by the relative frequency of monetary rewards and punishments; (c) the relative frequency of monetary rewards and punishments moderated the effects of externalizing psychopathology on hits and response bias for go versus no-go responses; and (d) these effects were not mediated by working memory capacity. The findings implicate distinct roles for reduced working memory capacity and poorly modulated active approach and passive avoidance in the link between externalizing psychopathology and behavioral disinhibition.

  19. On the role of subsecond dopamine release in conditioned avoidance

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    Erik B Oleson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using shock avoidance procedures to study conditioned behavioral responses has a rich history within the field of experimental psychology. Such experiments led to the formulation of the general concept of negative reinforcement and specific theories attempting to explain escape and avoidance behavior, or why animals choose to either terminate or prevent the presentation of an aversive event. For example, the two-factor theory of avoidance holds that cues preceding an aversive event begin to evoke conditioned fear responses, and these conditioned fear responses reinforce the instrumental avoidance response. Current neuroscientific advances are providing new perspectives into this historical literature. Due to its well-established role in reinforcement processes and behavioral control, the mesolimbic dopamine system presented itself as a logical starting point in the search for neural correlates of avoidance and escape behavior. We recently demonstrated that phasic dopamine release events are inhibited by stimuli associated with aversive events but increased by stimuli preceding the successful avoidance of the aversive event. The latter observation is inconsistent with the second component of the two-factor theory of avoidance and; therefore, led us propose a new theoretical explanation of conditioned avoidance: 1 fear is initially conditioned to the warning signal and dopamine computes this fear association as a decrease in release, 2 the warning signal, now capable of producing a negative emotional state, suppresses dopamine release and behavior, 3 over repeated trials the warning signal becomes associated with safety rather than fear; dopaminergic neurons already compute safety as an increase in release and begin to encode the warning signal as the earliest predictor of safety 4 the warning signal now promotes conditioned avoidance via dopaminergic modulation of the brain’s incentive-motivational circuitry.

  20. Intrusions, avoidance and overgeneral memory in a non-clinical sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, I.; Merckelbach, H.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between intrusions, effortful avoidance and overgeneral memory in people suffering from (mild) depression or PTSD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate these relationships in a non-clinical sample. As part of a mass testing session,

  1. Intrusions, avoidance and overgeneral memory in a non-clinical sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, I.; Merckelbach, H.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between intrusions, effortful avoidance and overgeneral memory in people suffering from (mild) depression or PTSD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate these relationships in a non-clinical sample. As part of a mass testing session,

  2. Repeated administration of histamine improves memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by lithium in mice.

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    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Parsaei, Leila; Ahmadi, Shamseddin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of repeated administration of histamine on lithium-induced state dependency has been investigated. A single-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task was used to assess memory in adult male NMRI mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lithium (10 mg/kg), immediately after training (post-training), impaired inhibitory avoidance memory on the test day. Pre-test administration of lithium reversed amnesia induced by the drug given after training, with the maximum response at a dose of 10 mg/kg. Repeated intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine (20 microg/mouse) for 3 consecutive days followed by 5 days of no drug treatment improved memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by a pre-test lower dose (5 mg/kg i.p.) of lithium. In contrast, 3 days of i.c.v. injections of both the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine (40 microg/mouse) and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (6.25 and 12.5 microg/mouse) prevented the improving effect of pre-test lithium (10 mg/kg i.p.) on memory retrieval. The results suggest that the repeated administration of histaminergic agents may induce a sensitization which affects the memory impairment induced by lithium.

  3. The prototypical histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist thioperamide improves multiple aspects of memory processing in an inhibitory avoidance task.

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    Charlier, Yana; Brabant, Christian; Serrano, Maria Elisa; Lamberty, Yves; Tirelli, Ezio

    2013-09-15

    Numerous studies have found that histamine plays a major role in memory and that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) inverse agonist thioperamide improves cognitive performance in various animal models. However, little is known about the stages of memory that are specifically affected by thioperamide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of thioperamide on acquisition, consolidation and retrieval processes in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in female C57BL/6J mice. In addition, potential state-dependency effects were studied by injecting thioperamide before the training and the test sessions in order to induce similar physiological states during acquisition and retrieval. Our results indicate that post-training systemic administration of thioperamide facilitated consolidation. Moreover, the administration of thioperamide before the training session had no effect on latency to enter the black compartment during training but enhanced memory during the retention test. The administration of thioperamide before the retention test also increased performance, which indicates that this compound ameliorates memory retrieval. Finally, when animals received thioperamide before the training session and before the retention test, the cognitive enhancing effects of thioperamide were not significantly changed. Together, our results show that thioperamide improves cognitive performance in an inhibitory avoidance task through actions on different memory stages. Furthermore, inducing a similar physiological state with thioperamide during acquisition and retrieval do not significantly affect cognitive enhancement. Our results suggest that the blockade of H3R can be helpful for the treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions characterized by deficits affecting several stages of memory processing.

  4. Critical period of memory enhancement during taste avoidance conditioning in Lymnaea stagnalis.

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    Tomoyo Takahashi

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the optimal training procedure leading to long-lasting taste avoidance behavior in Lymnaea. A training procedure comprising 5 repeated pairings of a conditional stimulus (CS, sucrose, with an unconditional stimulus (US, a tactile stimulation to the animal's head, over a 4-day period resulted in an enhanced memory formation than 10 CS-US repeated pairings over a 2-day period or 20 CS-US repeated pairings on a single day. Backward conditioning (US-CS pairings did not result in conditioning. Thus, this taste avoidance conditioning was CS-US pairing specific. Food avoidance behavior was not observed following training, however, if snails were immediately subjected to a cold-block (4°C for 10 min. It was critical that the cold-block be applied within 10 min to block long-term memory (LTM formation. Further, exposure to the cold-block 180 min after training also blocked both STM and LTM formation. The effects of the cold-block on subsequent learning and memory formation were also examined. We found no long lasting effects of the cold-block on subsequent memory formation. If protein kinase C was activated before the conditioning paradigm, snails could still acquire STM despite exposure to the cold-block.

  5. Induction and requirement of gene expression in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex for the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory

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    Zhang Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory consolidation is a process to stabilize short-term memory, generating long-term memory. A critical biochemical feature of memory consolidation is a requirement for gene expression. Previous studies have shown that fear memories are consolidated through the activation of gene expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, indicating essential roles of these brain regions in memory formation. However, it is still poorly understood whether gene expression in brain regions other than the amygdala/hippocampus is required for the consolidation of fear memory; however, several brain regions are known to play modulatory roles in fear memory formation. Results To further understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of fear memory, we first identified brain regions where gene expression is activated after learning inhibitory avoidance (IA by analyzing the expression of the immediately early genes c-fos and Arc as markers. Similarly with previous findings, the induction of c-fos and Arc expression was observed in the amygdala and hippocampus. Interestingly, we also observed the induction of c-fos and Arc expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC: prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL regions and Arc expression in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. We next examined the roles of these brain regions in the consolidation of IA memory. Consistent with previous findings, inhibiting protein synthesis in the hippocampus blocked the consolidation of IA memory. More importantly, inhibition in the mPFC or ACC also blocked the formation of IA memory. Conclusion Our observations indicated that the formation of IA memory requires gene expression in the ACC and mPFC as well as in the amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting essential roles of the ACC and mPFC in IA memory formation.

  6. Inflammatory markers are associated with inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

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    Esumi, L A; Palma, B D; Gomes, V L; Tufik, S; Hipólide, D C

    2011-08-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) causes detrimental effects to the body, such as memory impairment and weight loss. SD also changes the concentration of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, which, in turn, can affect cognitive functioning. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of these inflammatory mediators in inhibitory avoidance memory deficit in sleep-deprived rats. Male Wistar rats were deprived of sleep by the modified multiple platform method for 96 h, while their respective controls remained in their housing cages. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training, followed by the inhibitory avoidance task test 24h later. Also, the weight of each animal was recorded daily. In the first experiment, animals received an acute administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 or 75 μg/kg i.p.) 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training. In the experiment 2, the animals received acute or chronic administration of anti-IL-6 antibody (Ab, 2 μg/kg i.p.). The acute administration was performed 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training, while the chronic treatment administrations were performed daily during the SD period. The 75 μg/kg dose of LPS, but not the 50 μg/kg dose, caused a significant attenuation of memory impairment in the sleep-deprived animals. Although the treatments with the anti-IL-6 Ab did not produce any significant changes in cognitive performance, the Ab attenuated weight loss in sleep-deprived animals. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the modulation of memory deficit and weight loss that are observed in sleep-deprived rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Dopamine Receptors Subtypes, D1-Like and D2-Like, within the Nucleus Accumbens Subregions, Core and Shell, on Memory Consolidation in the One-Trial Inhibitory Avoidance Task

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    Manago, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dopamine within the nucleus accumbens mediates consolidation of both associative and nonassociative memories. However, the specific contribution of the nucleus accumbens subregions, core and shell, and of D1 and D2 receptors subtypes has not been yet clarified. The aim of this study was, therefore, to directly…

  8. Role of Dopamine Receptors Subtypes, D1-Like and D2-Like, within the Nucleus Accumbens Subregions, Core and Shell, on Memory Consolidation in the One-Trial Inhibitory Avoidance Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dopamine within the nucleus accumbens mediates consolidation of both associative and nonassociative memories. However, the specific contribution of the nucleus accumbens subregions, core and shell, and of D1 and D2 receptors subtypes has not been yet clarified. The aim of this study was, therefore, to directly…

  9. Effect of Methylphenidate on Retention and Retrieval of Passive Avoidance Memory in Young and Aged Mice

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    Arzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Several studies showed that dopamine and norepinephrine improve retention and retrieval of memory. Methylphenidate is an enhancer of dopamine and norepinephrine in brain. Objectives In the present study, the effect of methylphenidate was evaluated on retention and retrieval of memory in young and aged mice using passive avoidance apparatus. Materials and Methods Animals were divided into groups (n = 8 as follows: test groups received electric shock plus methylphenidate (2.5, 5 and 10mg kg-1, i. P., control group received electric shock plus normal saline and blank group received only electric shock. In all groups, step-down latency for both retention and retrieval test of memory was measured. Methylphenidate was administered immediately after receiving electric shock in the retention test, but methylphenidate was administered 23.5 hours after receiving electric shock in the retrieval test. Results The mean of step-down latency on day 4 was significantly higher compared to day 2 (P < 0.05 in all young and aged groups of mice. The best response was attained with 5 mg/kg of methylphenidate. In memory retention test, the mean of step-down latency in young groups that received 2.5 and 5 mg/kg methylphenidate was significantly longer(P < 0.05 than aged groups. However, this difference was not significant in memory retrieval test. Conclusions Methylphenidate may improve memory retention and retrieval.

  10. Chronic Rumex Patientia Seed Feeding Improves Passive Avoidance Learning and Memory in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats

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    Tourandokht Baluchnejadmojarad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C T Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is accompanied with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Due to anti-diabetic and antioxidant activity of Rumex patientia (RP, this research study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of chronic Rumex patientia feeding on alleviation of learning and memory disturbance in streptozotocindiabetic rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into control, diabetic, RP-treatedcontrol and -diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was administered at a dose of 60 mg/Kg. Meanwhile, RP-treated groups received RP seed powder mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 6% for 4 weeks. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined at the end of study using passive avoidance test. Results: It was found out that regarding initial latency, there was no significant difference among the groups. In addition, diabetic rats developed a significant impairment in retention and recall in passive avoidance test (p<0.01, as it is evident by a lower STL. Furthermore, RP treatment of diabetic rats did produce a significant improvement in retention and recall (p<0.05. Discussion: Taken together, chronic RP feeding could improve retention and recall capability in passive avoidance test in STZ-diabetic rats

  11. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus.

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    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-05-10

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos-positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies.

  12. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

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    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-09-02

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  13. Aerobic exercise attenuates inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

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    Fernandes, Jansen; Baliego, Luiz Guilherme Zaccaro; Peixinho-Pena, Luiz Fernando; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-09-05

    The deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (SD) on memory processes are well documented. Physical exercise improves many aspects of brain functions and induces neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the influence of 4 weeks of treadmill aerobic exercise on both long-term memory and the expression of synaptic proteins (GAP-43, synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95) in normal and sleep-deprived rats. Adult Wistar rats were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill exercise training for 35 min, five times per week. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise session, the rats were sleep-deprived for 96 h using the modified multiple platform method. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training for the inhibitory avoidance task and were tested 24h later. The aerobic exercise attenuated the long-term memory deficit induced by 96 h of paradoxical SD. Western blot analysis of the hippocampus revealed increased levels of GAP-43 in exercised rats. However, the expression of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 was not modified by either exercise or SD. Our results suggest that an aerobic exercise program can attenuate the deleterious effects of SD on long-term memory and that this effect is not directly related to changes in the expression of the pre- and post-synaptic proteins analyzed in the study.

  14. Role of D2 dopamine receptors of the ventral pallidum in inhibitory avoidance learning.

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    Lénárd, László; Ollmann, Tamás; László, Kristóf; Kovács, Anita; Gálosi, Rita; Kállai, Veronika; Attila, Tóth; Kertes, Erika; Zagoracz, Olga; Karádi, Zoltán; Péczely, László

    2017-03-15

    In our present experiments, the role of D2 dopamine (DA) receptors of the ventral pallidum (VP) was investigated in one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance paradigm. Animals were shocked 3 times in the conditioning trial, with 0.5mA current for 1s. Subsequently bilateral microinjection of the D2 DA receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the VP in three doses (0.1μg, 1.0μg or 5.0μg in 0.4μl saline). We also applied the D2 DA receptor antagonist sulpiride (0.4μg in 0.4μl saline) alone or 15min prior to the agonist treatment to elucidate whether the agonist effect was specific for the D2 DA receptors. Control animals received saline. In a supplementary experiment, it was also investigated whether application of the same conditioning method leads to the formation of short-term memory in the experimental animals. In the experiment with the D2 DA receptor agonist, only the 0.1μg quinpirole increased significantly the step-through latency during the test trials: retention was significant compared to the controls even 2 weeks after conditioning. The D2 DA receptor antagonist sulpiride pretreatment proved that the effect was due to the agonist induced activation of the D2 DA receptors of the VP. The supplementary experiment demonstrated that short-term memory is formed after conditioning in the experimental animals, supporting that the agonist enhanced memory consolidation in the first two experiments. Our results show that the activation of the D2 DA receptors in the VP facilitates memory consolidation as well as memory-retention in inhibitory avoidance paradigm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prelimbic cortex extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation is required for memory retrieval of long-term inhibitory avoidance.

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    Luo, Fei; Zheng, Jian; Sun, Xuan; Deng, Wei-Ke; Li, Bao Ming; Liu, Fang

    2017-04-15

    Neural mechanism underlying memory retrieval has been extensively studied in the hippocampus and amygdala. However, little is known about the role of medial prefrontal cortex in long-term memory retrieval. We evaluate this issue in one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance (IA) paradigm. Our results showed that, 1) inactivation of mPFC by local infusion of GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol caused severe deficits in retrieval of 1-day and 7-day but had no effects on 2-h inhibitory avoidance memory; 2) the protein level of phosphorylated-ERK1/2 in mPFC were significantly increased following retrieval of 1-day and 7-day IA memory, so did the numbers of phosphorylated-ERK (pERK) and phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) labeled neurons; 3) intra-mPFC infusion of ERK kinase inhibitor PD98095 significantly reduced phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 and phosphorylated-CREB labeled cells, and severely impaired retrieval of 7-day IA memory when the drugs were administrated 30min prior to test. The present study provides evidence that retrieval of long-lasting memory for inhibitory avoidance requires mPFC and involves the ERK-CREB signaling cascade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of histamine and opioid systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

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    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbano

    2002-10-04

    The present study investigated the effect of interactions between histamine receptor agents and the opioid peptidergic system on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections were carried out in all the experiments. Administration of histamine (20 micro g/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (20 and 50 micro g/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (10 and 50 micro g/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists decreased the response induced by histamine. Morphine (1-10 micro g/rat) reduced, while pentazocine (5 and 10 micro g/rat) or the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (5 and 15 micro g/rat), increased memory retention. The combination of histamine with morphine showed potentiation. Effects of pyrilamine and cimetidine were attenuated by morphine. The responses to pentazocine and naloxone also were decreased by histamine. It is concluded that the histaminergic system has an interaction with opioidergic system that is involved in the memory retention process.

  17. Personality characteristics in MS patients: The role of avoidant personality.

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    Mohamadi, Amin; Davoodi-Makinejad, Mahsa; Azimi, Amirreza; Nafissi, Shahriar

    2016-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is markedly affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). Particular personality characteristics (PC) of MS patients can affect their QOL. We designed the present study to determine the role of various PCs on QOL in MS patients accounting for other clinical factors. QOL, PC, physical disability, and mental status were recorded in 83 MS patients referred to two academic hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2012. The mean age of enrolled patients was 31.54±7.38 (range: 14-50) years and 74 (89.2%) were female. Mean disease duration was 4.55±4.70 years. Seventy-seven patients (92.8%) had relapsing-remitting disease, five (6%) had primary progressive, and one showed a secondary progressive course. Correlation between total QOL scores in MS patients and disease duration, cognitive impairment, and physical disability was significant (all ppersonality was the most frequent PC (43.4%) in our patients. Only avoidant personality had a significant negative correlation with all components of QOL (Beta: 0.33, ppersonality, physical disability, and mental status were found to be three predictors of QOL with all its components. Avoidant personality appears to be an important predictor of poor QOL in MS patients. In addition, avoidant coping strategies appear to be associated with adverse response to stressful events in these patients. These findings suggest the need for psychological intervention for improving the coping strategies and QOL in MS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of prenatal exposure to combined stress on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats

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    Z. Homauni Afshari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have shown that prenatal stress affects development of fetal brain. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prenatal exposure to combined stress on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Methods: This experimental study was performed on 16 male and 16 female Wistar rats in 2014. The rats were divided into four groups: male and female control groups, with natural pregnancy and two male and female treatment groups with exposure to combined stress (electromagnetic field, immobility and social stress in the second and third weeks of embryonic development. The learning was evaluated using shuttle box setup. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test. Findings: The prenatal combined stress caused decrease in the latency time to enter the dark chamber in male and female new born rats in post-training periods especially the second week compared to the control groups. Conclusion: With regards to the results, prenatal exposure to combined stress can reduce the memory retention of passive avoidance learning.

  19. Pharmacological differences between memory consolidation of habituation to an open field and inhibitory avoidance learning

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    Vianna M.R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Rats implanted bilaterally with cannulae in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex were submitted to either a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task, or to 5 min of habituation to an open field. Immediately after training, they received intrahippocampal or intraentorhinal 0.5-µl infusions of saline, of a vehicle (2% dimethylsulfoxide in saline, of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphono pentanoic acid (AP5, of the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-cAMPs (0.5 µg/side, of the calcium-calmodulin protein kinase II inhibitor KN-62, of the dopaminergic D1 antagonist SCH23390, or of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059. Animals were tested in each task 24 h after training. Intrahippocampal KN-62 was amnestic for habituation; none of the other treatments had any effect on the retention of this task. In contrast, all of them strongly affected memory of the avoidance task. Intrahippocampal Rp-cAMPs, KN-62 and AP5, and intraentorhinal Rp-cAMPs, KN-62, PD098059 and SCH23390 caused retrograde amnesia. In view of the known actions of the treatments used, the present findings point to important biochemical differences in memory consolidation processes of the two tasks.

  20. Effect of Royal Jelly on Improving Passive Avoidance Learning and Spatial Learning and Memory in Rats

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    H Alaei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies have proposed that royal jelly(RJ has various biological activities in different cells and tissues. Since it has been demonstrated that RJ contains compounds having desirable effects on central neurons system and neural functions, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of royal jelly on learning and memory in rats. Methods: Male wistar rats were divided into two groups, the royal jelly and the control. In the RJ group, the rats received a food that contained 3% RJ instead of regular food for 10 days. Then learning and memory were investigated in these animals through both passive avoidance learning test(1 day and 1 week after receiving electrical shock and Morris water maze test(1 day and 1 week after a 4-day learning period. Results: The study results indicated that the food containing RJ in the RJ group significantly increased the time of the first entrance to the dark room one week after the electrical shock in passive avoidance learning test. In other words, the findings suggest an improvement of learning and memory in RJ group. In the acquisition phase of Morris water maze test, rats receiving RJ found the underwater escape plate during less time and distance comparing with the control group. Furthermore, one week after the acquisition phase, in the retention phase, rats spent more time in the quadrant in which the escape plate was previously located. Conclusion: The present study findings propose that Royal Jelly can improve cognitive processes through positive effects on neural functions and probably has a significant influence on prevention and therapy of some neuronal disorders.

  1. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

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    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women.

  2. The effect of Resveratrol flavonoid on learning and memory in passive avoidance and Y maze in diabetic rat

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    Sima Nasri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes type I is accompanied with disturbances in cognitive skills, memory and learning. In this research, we evaluated the effect of resveratrol chronic treatment on learning and memory in diabetic male rats. Material and Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups: control, resveratrol-treated control, diabetic and resveratrol-treated diabetic groups. We used streptozotosin for inducing diabetes. Resveratrol (10mg/kg I.p. was administered for 8 weeks. For evaluation of learning and memory, passive avoidance test and Y-maze task were used. For Statistical analysis, SPSS software and paired T-test and one-way ANOVA were used. Results: Resveratrol decreased serum glucose in diabetic rats (P<0.01. In passive avoidance learning, there wasn’t any significant difference in initial latency between diabetic and treated- diabetic group. Also, a significant decrease of step latency was observed in diabetic and treated diabetic rats (P<0.01. In Y maze, Resveratrol improved alternation percentage in diabetic rats. Conclusion: Probably due to different mechanism of long term and short term memory, long term resveratrol treatment didn’t improve memory and learning in passive avoidance learning. In Y maze, method for determining the spatial memory, resveratrol improved spatial memory in diabetic rats. Resveratrol not only regulates glucose in diabetic rats but also it improves short term memory.

  3. Nitric oxide in the ventral tegmental area is involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

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    Piri, M; Zarrindast, M R

    2011-02-23

    In the present study, the possible involvement of nitric oxide systems in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in nicotine's effect on morphine-induced amnesia and morphine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats was investigated. Step-through type inhibitory avoidance task was used to test memory retrieval. Post-training administration of morphine (5 and 7.5 mg/kg) induced amnesia. The response induced by post-training morphine was significantly reversed by pre-test administration of the drug. Pre-test injection of nicotine (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) alone and nicotine (0.1, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) plus an ineffective dose of morphine also significantly reversed the amnesia induced by morphine. Morphine amnesia was also prevented by pre-test administration of l-arginine (1 and 3 μg/rat, intra-VTA), a nitric oxide (NO) precursor. Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg s.c.) in combination with low dose of l-arginine (0.3 μg/rat, intra-VTA) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by morphine given after training. In contrast, pre-test administration of NG nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (2 μg/rat, intra-VTA) prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. The results suggest a possible role for nitric oxide of ventral tegmental area in the improving effect of nicotine on the morphine-induced amnesia.

  4. The Role of Social Capital in Avoiding Over-education

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    BLANKA BALINT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In post-socialist countries, overqualification is a current and relevant issue, butdespite its importance, this topic is not sufficiently addressed in the literature,especially in the post-communist region. Starting from the theory of professionalreorientation strategies, one can assume that the lack of social capital may be one ofthe causes of overqualification. In this study, I will investigate this hypothesis. Theanalysis of the issue was performed on the database of the “MOZAIK2001”sociological survey. The long period of time that has lapsed since the collection of thedata requires the verification of the assumptions on a much more recent database,namely the Cultural Consumption Barometer 2010. In order to identify the necessaryworkplace educational training, I used the occupation classification method.Overqualification was determined by comparing the educational training acquiredwith the occupation performed. Although the importance of relational resources on thelabour market is discussed in several studies in the field, the research was only partlyable to prove the positive role of social capital in avoiding overqualification.

  5. Effects of clozapine and sulpiride on morphine state-dependent memory in the step-down passive avoidance test.

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    Malekmohamadi, Nazanin; Heidari, Parviz; Sahebgharani, Mousa; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2007-01-01

    The effects of antipsychotic drugs sulpiride and clozapine on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance task were examined in mice. Post-training administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) led to state-dependent learning with impaired memory retrieval on the test day which was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of the opioid (5 mg/kg). In animals where memory was impaired by post-training morphine, the administration of either sulpiride or clozapine before pre-test morphine reduced the improvement of memory produced by the opioid. Co-administration of sulpiride with clozapine did not potentiate their antagonistic response. In conclusion, the inhibition of improvement of memory retrieval by morphine treatment on the test day by the two dopamine receptor antagonists seems to be induced through two different receptor mechanisms.

  6. Memory suppression trades prolonged fear and sleep-dependent fear plasticity for the avoidance of current fear

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    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Honma, Motoyasu; Yoshiike, Takuya; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2013-07-01

    Sleep deprivation immediately following an aversive event reduces fear by preventing memory consolidation during homeostatic sleep. This suggests that acute insomnia might act prophylactically against the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) even though it is also a possible risk factor for PTSD. We examined total sleep deprivation and memory suppression to evaluate the effects of these interventions on subsequent aversive memory formation and fear conditioning. Active suppression of aversive memory impaired retention of event memory. However, although the remembered fear was more reduced in sleep-deprived than sleep-control subjects, suppressed fear increased, and seemed to abandon the sleep-dependent plasticity of fear. Active memory suppression, which provides a psychological model for Freud's ego defense mechanism, enhances fear and casts doubt on the potential of acute insomnia as a prophylactic measure against PTSD. Our findings bring into question the role of sleep in aversive-memory consolidation in clinical PTSD pathophysiology.

  7. Binge Eating and Weight Control: The Role of Experiential Avoidance

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    Lillis, Jason; Hayes, Steven C.; Levin, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Two thirds of the adults in the United States are overweight or obese. Binge eating is a barrier to treatment adherence and sustained weight loss, and can be seen as a form of experiential avoidance. The current study analyzed the impact of binge eating on weight reduction in a previously published study of a 1-day acceptance and commitment…

  8. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

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    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. NMDA receptors in the dorsal hippocampal area are involved in tramadol state-dependent memory of passive avoidance learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Mofidi, Hamed; Attarian-Khosroshahi, Mohammad-Sadegh

    2017-08-03

    The neurobiological mechanisms of tramadol abuse underlying the cognitive function are still imprecise. Considering these, the aim of the present study was to examine the possible effects of intra-CA1 injections of NMDA, an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) agonist and DL-AP5, a competitive NMDAR antagonist, on tramadol state-dependent memory. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retrieval in adult male NMRI mice. Post-training i.p. administration of an atypical MOR agonist, tramadol (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) dose dependently induced impairment of memory retention. Pre-test injection of tramadol (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg) influence. Pre-test intra-CA1 injection of NMDA (10-5 and 10-4 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pre-test intra-CA1 injection of DL-AP5 (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (5 mg/kg). Pre-test administration of DL-AP5 (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (1.25 mg/kg) restored the retrieval and induced tramadol state-dependent memory. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal NMDARs mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  10. CB1 receptors in the formation of the different phases of memory-related processes in the inhibitory avoidance test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Biala, Grażyna

    2016-03-15

    The endocannabinoid system, through the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) receptors modulates many physiological functions, including different aspects of memory-related processes. The aim of the present experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through CB1 receptors in the different stages of short-term (acquisition, retention and retrieval) and long-term (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval) memory-related responses, using the inhibitory avoidance (IA) test in mice. Our results revealed that an acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, impairs the short-term or/and long-term acquisition, retention/consolidation, retrieval memory and learning processes in the IA test in mice. In turn, in this test an acute injection of AM 251 (1 and 3mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, improves the short-term or/and long-term memory stages, described above. Moreover, this memory impairment induced by effective dose of oleamide (20mg/kg) is reversed by non-effective dose of AM 251 (0.25mg/kg) in the IA task, which proves the selectivity of oleamide to CB1 receptors and confirms that the CB1 receptor-related mechanism is one of the possible mechanisms, responsible for memory and learning responses. Obtained results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system, through CB1 receptors, participates in the different stages of short- and long-term memory-related behavior. This knowledge may open in the future new possibilities for the development of CB-based therapies, especially for memory impairment human disorders.

  11. Low-dose memantine induced working memory improvement in the allothetic place avoidance alternation task (APAAT in young adult male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Julita Wesierska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR are involved in neuronal plasticity. To assess their role simultaneously in spatial working memory and non-cognitive learning, we used NMDAR antagonists and the Allothetic Place Avoidance Alternation Task (APAAT. In this test rats should avoid entering a place where shocks were presented on a rotating arena which requires cognitive coordination for the segregation of stimuli. The experiment took place 30 min after intraperitoneal injection of memantine (5; 10; 20 mg/kg b.w.: MemL, MemM, MemH respectively and (+MK-801 (0.1; 0.2; 0.3 mg/kg b.w.: MK-801L, MK-801M, MK-801H respectively. Rats from the control group were intact or injected with saline (0.2 ml/kg. Over three consecutive days the rats underwent habituation, two avoidance training intervals with shocks, and a retrieval test. The shock sector was alternated daily. The after-effects of the agents were tested on Day21. Rats treated with low dose memantine presented a longer maximum time avoided and fewer entrances than the MemH, MK-801M, MK-801H and Control rats. The shocks per entrances ratio, used as an index of cognitive skill learning, showed skill improvement after D1, except for rats treated by high doses of the agents. The activity levels, indicated by the distance walked, were higher for the groups treated with high doses of the agents. On D21 the MK801H rats performed the memory task better than the MemH rats, whereas the rats’ activity depended on condition, not on the group factor. These results suggest that in naïve rats mild NMDAR blockade by low-dose memantine improves working memory related to a highly challenging task.

  12. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones modulate learning and memory processes by interacting with specific glucocorticoid receptors at different brain areas. In this article, certain components of the physiological response to stress elicited by learning situations are proposed to form an integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning) and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning), a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i) glutamatergic transmission and (ii) cell adhesion molecules. PMID:9920681

  13. The role of NPY in learning and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, C. R.; Woldbye, D. P. D.

    2016-01-01

    with Y1 receptor-mediated neurogenesis could constitute necessary steps in consolidation and long-term retention of spatial memory. Altogether, NPY-induced effects on learning and memory seem to be biphasic, anatomically and temporally differential, and in support of a modulatory role of NPY at keeping......High levels of NPY expression in brain regions important for learning and memory together with its neuromodulatory and neurotrophic effects suggest a regulatory role for NPY in memory processes. Therefore it is not surprising that an increasing number of studies have provided evidence for NPY...... acting as a modulator of neuroplasticity, neurotransmission, and memory. Here these results are presented in relation to the types of memory affected by NPY and its receptors. NPY can exert both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on memory, depending on memory type and phase, dose applied, brain region...

  14. Declarative vs. Procedural Memory: Roles in Second Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Fakhraee Faruji

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Memory is not a single faculty but is a combination of multiple distinct abilities (Schacter, 1987. The declarative-procedural distinction is used both with regard to knowledge and memory that stores this knowledge. Ellis (2008 used the terms explicit/implicit, and declarative/procedural interchangeably. In this article the researcher aims at identifying the different aspects of declarative/procedural memory, interaction between these two types of memory, and the role they may play in second language acquisition.

  15. The Role of Approach and Avoidance Motives for Unemployed Job Search Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Karen; Menting, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the role of approach and avoidance motives for unemployed job search behavior. Two approach motives (employment and PJ-fit) and two avoidance motives (low-expectation and low-interest) were distinguished. Antecedents and consequences of these motives were examined using a sample of 303 unemployed clients of…

  16. Cooperative interaction between the basolateral amygdala and ventral tegmental area modulates the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari-Serenjeh, Farzaneh; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2013-01-10

    The aim of the current study was to examine the existence of a cooperative interaction between the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in inhibitory avoidance task. The BLA and the VTA regions of adult male Wistar rats were simultaneously cannulated and memory consolidation was measured in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance apparatus. Post-training microinjection of muscimol, a potent GABA-A receptor agonist (0.01-0.02 μg/rat), into the VTA impaired memory in a dose-dependent manner. Post-training intra-BLA microinjection of NMDA (0.02-0.04 μg/rat), 5 min before the intra-VTA injection of muscimol (0.02 μg/rat), attenuated muscimol-induced memory impairment. Microinjection of a NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (0.02-0.06 μg/rat) into the BLA inhibited NMDA effect on the memory impairment induced by intra-VTA microinjection of muscimol. On the other hand, post-training intra-BLA microinjection of muscimol (0.02-0.04 μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an impairing effect on memory. This impairing effect was however significantly attenuated by intra-VTA microinjection of NMDA (0.01-0.03 μg/rat). Intra-VTA microinjection of D-AP5 (0.02-0.08 μg/rat), 5 min prior to NMDA injection, inhibited NMDA response on the impairing effect induced by intra-BLA microinjection of muscimol. It should be considered that post-training microinjection of the same doses of NMDA or D-AP5 into the BLA or the VTA alone had no effect on memory consolidation. The data suggest that the relationship between the BLA and the VTA in mediating memory consolidation in inhibitory avoidance learning may be dependent on a cooperative interaction between the glutamatergic and GABAergic systems via NMDA and GABA-A receptors.

  17. Chronic caffeine prevents changes in inhibitory avoidance memory and hippocampal BDNF immunocontent in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallaberry, Cássia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Ardais, Ana Paula; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Klaudat, Bruno; Forte, Thomás; Souza, Diogo O; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects of caffeine on memory processes have been observed in animal models relevant to neurodegenerative diseases and aging, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with memory formation and BDNF's actions are modulated by adenosine receptors, the molecular targets for the psychostimulant actions of caffeine, we here compare the effects of chronic caffeine (1 mg/mL drinking solution for 30 days) on short- and long term memory and on levels of hippocampal proBDNF, mature BDNF, TrkB and CREB in young (3 month old) and middle-aged (12 month old) rats. Caffeine treatment substantially reduced i) age-related impairments in the two types of memory in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm, and ii) parallel increases in hippocampal BDNF levels. In addition, chronic caffeine increased proBDNF and CREB concentrations, and decreased TrkB levels, in hippocampus regardless of age. These data provide new evidence in favor of the hypothesis that modifications in BDNF and related proteins in the hippocampus contribute to the pro-cognitive effects of caffeine on age-associated losses in memory encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  18. Hemispheric lateralization of memory stages for discriminated avoidance learning in the chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Marie E; Andrew, Richard J; Ng, Kim T

    2003-02-17

    Memory formation following the one trial discriminated bead task in the chick falls into three stages (short-term, intermediate and long-term memory) that are defined by susceptibility to different classes of drugs. The stages show sharply timed offsets of sensitivity and loss at specific times after inhibition. Recall of the memory in the chick shows cyclical changes that differ in period between left and right hemispheres, and is marked by a series of brief windows of enhanced recall that recur with periods of about 16 and 25 min in the left and right hemispheres respectively. The timing of these 'retrieval events' corresponds, to a large extent, with the timing of the memory stages seen in the visual discrimination task. Here we examine the effects of left or right hemisphere injection of the main agents (glutamate, ouabain and anisomycin) that have been used to characterize the three stages of memory. We show that memory in the left hemisphere is largely responsible for performance at test and that processes involved in its consolidation generate the phases of memory.

  19. The Role of Informative and Ambiguous Feedback in Avoidance Behavior: Empirical and Computational Findings.

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    Ahmed A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Avoidance behavior is a critical component of many psychiatric disorders, and as such, it is important to understand how avoidance behavior arises, and whether it can be modified. In this study, we used empirical and computational methods to assess the role of informational feedback and ambiguous outcome in avoidance behavior. We adapted a computer-based probabilistic classification learning task, which includes positive, negative and no-feedback outcomes; the latter outcome is ambiguous as it might signal either a successful outcome (missed punishment or a failure (missed reward. Prior work with this task suggested that most healthy subjects viewed the no-feedback outcome as strongly positive. Interestingly, in a later version of the classification task, when healthy subjects were allowed to opt out of (i.e. avoid responding, some subjects ("avoiders" reliably avoided trials where there was a risk of punishment, but other subjects ("non-avoiders" never made any avoidance responses at all. One possible interpretation is that the "non-avoiders" valued the no-feedback outcome so positively on punishment-based trials that they had little incentive to avoid. Another possible interpretation is that the outcome of an avoided trial is unspecified and that lack of information is aversive, decreasing subjects' tendency to avoid. To examine these ideas, we here tested healthy young adults on versions of the task where avoidance responses either did or did not generate informational feedback about the optimal response. Results showed that provision of informational feedback decreased avoidance responses and also decreased categorization performance, without significantly affecting the percentage of subjects classified as "avoiders." To better understand these results, we used a modified Q-learning model to fit individual subject data. Simulation results suggest that subjects in the feedback condition adjusted their behavior faster following better

  20. The Role of Informative and Ambiguous Feedback in Avoidance Behavior: Empirical and Computational Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Sheynin, Jony; Myers, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance behavior is a critical component of many psychiatric disorders, and as such, it is important to understand how avoidance behavior arises, and whether it can be modified. In this study, we used empirical and computational methods to assess the role of informational feedback and ambiguous outcome in avoidance behavior. We adapted a computer-based probabilistic classification learning task, which includes positive, negative and no-feedback outcomes; the latter outcome is ambiguous as it might signal either a successful outcome (missed punishment) or a failure (missed reward). Prior work with this task suggested that most healthy subjects viewed the no-feedback outcome as strongly positive. Interestingly, in a later version of the classification task, when healthy subjects were allowed to opt out of (i.e. avoid) responding, some subjects ("avoiders") reliably avoided trials where there was a risk of punishment, but other subjects ("non-avoiders") never made any avoidance responses at all. One possible interpretation is that the "non-avoiders" valued the no-feedback outcome so positively on punishment-based trials that they had little incentive to avoid. Another possible interpretation is that the outcome of an avoided trial is unspecified and that lack of information is aversive, decreasing subjects' tendency to avoid. To examine these ideas, we here tested healthy young adults on versions of the task where avoidance responses either did or did not generate informational feedback about the optimal response. Results showed that provision of informational feedback decreased avoidance responses and also decreased categorization performance, without significantly affecting the percentage of subjects classified as "avoiders." To better understand these results, we used a modified Q-learning model to fit individual subject data. Simulation results suggest that subjects in the feedback condition adjusted their behavior faster following better-than-expected outcomes

  1. The role of basolateral amygdala adrenergic receptors in hippocampus dependent spatial memory in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaei A.L.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: There are extensive evidences indicating that the noradrenergic system of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA is involved in memory processes. The present study investigated the role of the BLA adrenergic receptors (ARs in hippocampus dependent spatial memory in place avoidance task in male rat. Material and Methods: Long Evans rats (n=150 were trained to avoid footshock in a 60° segment while foraging for scattered food on a circular (80-cm diameter arena. The rats were injected bilaterally in the BLA specific ARS (Adrenergic receptors agonist norepinephrine (NE, 0.5 and 1 µg/µl and specific β-ARs antagonist propranolol (PRO, 0.5 and 1 µg/µl before acquisition, after training or before retrieval of the place avoidance task. Control rats received vehicle at the same volume. The learning in a single 30-min session was assessed 24h later by a 30-min extinction trial in which the time to first entrance and the number of entrances to the shocked area measured the avoidance memory. Results: Acquisition and consolidation were enhanced and impaired significantly by NE and PRO when the drugs were injected 10 min before or immediately after training, respectively. In contrast, neither NE nor PRO influenced animal performances when injected before retention testing. Conclusion: Findings of this study indicates that adrenergic system of the BLA plays an important role in regulation of memory storage and show further evidences for the opinion that the BLA plays an important role in integrating hormonal and neurotransmitter influences on memory storage.

  2. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  3. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sandi

    1998-01-01

    integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning, a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i glutamatergic transmission and (ii cell adhesion molecules.

  4. Effect of Three Different Types of Honey on Passive Avoidance Memory Process in the Male Diabetic Rats

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    Farzaneh Sadeghmanesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Honey is a natural product which has been known to have various nutritional benefits. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of oral administration of honey (sort of Yazd, Strabillus and Acacia on memory impairment in diabetes using passive avoidance learning test. Materials and Methods: 64 male Wistar rats (180-220 g were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 8 each, including normal (control, diabetic control, honey-treated normal groups and honey-treated diabetic groups. The honey-treated groups were administrated by 1 g/kg/BW dose of organic honey (sort of Acacia, Strabillus and Yazd for the 8 weeks. Diabetes was induced by intrapritoneally injection of Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg. Passive avoidance learning test was used to evaluate learning and memory. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20 and OneWay ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis post-hoc tests. Results: Diabetic control group showed a significant increase in STLa compared with control group (P < 0.001. Diabetic groups received Yazd, Strabillus and Acacia honey compared to diabetic control group showed a significant decrease in STLa (P < 0.001. 24 and 48 hours after learning, diabetic groups received Yazd and Strabillus honey showed a significant increase (P < 0.001 and diabetic group received Acacia honey showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in STLr compared to diabetic control group. In the retrieval test, diabetic group received Yazd and Strabillus honey (P < 0.001 and diabetic group received Acacia honey (P < 0.01 showed a significant decrease in TDC compared to diabetic control group. Conclusions: Treatment with honey can improve memory possibly via reducing oxidative stress in the diabetic rats. It also possibly can affect some nerve pathways in certain areas of the brain effective on learning and memory.

  5. The role of nitric oxide in the object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos

    2015-05-15

    The novel object recognition task (NORT) assesses recognition memory in animals. It is a non-rewarded paradigm that it is based on spontaneous exploratory behavior in rodents. This procedure is widely used for testing the effects of compounds on recognition memory. Recognition memory is a type of memory severely compromised in schizophrenic and Alzheimer's disease patients. Nitric oxide (NO) is sought to be an intra- and inter-cellular messenger in the central nervous system and its implication in learning and memory is well documented. Here I intended to critically review the role of NO-related compounds on different aspects of recognition memory. Current analysis shows that both NO donors and NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors are involved in object recognition memory and suggests that NO might be a promising target for cognition impairments. However, the potential neurotoxicity of NO would add a note of caution in this context.

  6. Modeling the Role of Working Memory and Episodic Memory in Behavioral Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Zilli, Eric A.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of goal-directed behavior have been studied using reinforcement learning theory, but these theoretical techniques have not often been used to address the role of memory systems in performing behavioral tasks. The present work addresses this shortcoming by providing a way in which working memory and episodic memory may be included in the reinforcement learning framework, then simulating the successful acquisition and performance of six behavioral tasks, drawn from or inspired by...

  7. Memory formation, amnesia, improved memory and reversed amnesia: 5-HT role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, G; Meneses, A

    2008-12-16

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been focused on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and neuroimaging. A complementary alternative has become the use of autoradiography with radioligands, aiming to identify neurobiological markers associated with memory formation, amnesia states and (more recently) recovery from memory deficits. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage of detecting functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools during memory formation, amnesia states and memory recovery. Moreover, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have become a pharmacological and genetic target in the treatment of memory disorders. Herein evidence from studies involving expression of 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(4), and 5-HT(6) receptors in memory formation, amnesia conditions (e.g., pharmacological models or aging) and recovery of memory is reviewed. Thus, specific 5-HT receptors were expressed in trained animals relative to untrained in brain areas such as cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. However, relative to the control group, rats showing amnesia or recovered memory, showed in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, a complex pattern of 5-HT receptor expression. An intermediate expression occurred in amygdala, septum and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. Even in brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such as basal ganglia, animals showing recovered memory displayed an intermediate expression, while amnesic groups, depending on the pharmacological amnesia model, showed up- or down-regulation. In conclusion, evidence indicates that autoradiography, by using specific radioligands, offers excellent opportunities to map dynamic changes in brain areas engaged in these cognitive processes. The 5-HT modulatory role strengthens or suppresses memory is critically depend on the timing of the memory formation.

  8. The role of fear-avoidance cognitions and behaviors in patients with chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstäuber, Maria; Jasper, Kristine; Schweda, Isabell; Hiller, Wolfgang; Andersson, Gerhard; Weise, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the role of fear-avoidance-a concept from chronic pain research-in chronic tinnitus. A self-report measure the "Tinnitus Fear-Avoidance Cognitions and Behaviors Scale (T-FAS)" was developed and validated. Furthermore, the role of fear-avoidance behavior as mediator of the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and tinnitus handicap was investigated. From a clinical setting, N = 373 patients with chronic tinnitus completed questionnaires assessing tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory), anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3), personality factors (Big Five Inventory-10), and fear-avoidance. To analyze the psychometric properties, principal component analysis with parallel component extraction and correlational analyses were used. To examine a possible mediating effect, hierarchical regression analysis was applied. The principal component analysis resulted in a three-factor solution: Fear-avoidance Cognitions, Tinnitus-related Fear-Avoidance Behavior, and Ear-related Fear-Avoidance Behavior. Internal consistency was satisfactory for the total scale and all subscales. High correlations between tinnitus-related handicap scales, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and the T-FAS were found, whereas associations with personality factors were low. Moreover, results indicate a significant partial mediation of fear-avoidance behaviors in the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and the cognitive dimension of tinnitus handicap. Results show that fear-avoidance behavior plays an important role in tinnitus handicap. More attention should be paid to this concept in research and clinical practice of psychotherapy for chronic tinnitus.

  9. The Impairing Role of Stress on Autobiographical Memory Reconsolidation

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    Zeinab Azimi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite some studies indicating improving role of stress on memory consolidation, very few animal and human studies show that stress impairs reconsolidation of memories. This study aimed to determine the effect of stress on autobiographical memory reconsolidation.Materials and Methods: The present study was done with an experimental method (Solomon Four-Group design. The statistical society of this study was all undergraduate female students in 2009-2010 academic year at Tabriz University. Forty students were selected using random cluster sampling, and we ensure about their physical and mental health by GHQ-28 and interview. Tools for this study were cueing autobiographical memory test, SECPT (for raising blood pressure and stress induction, autobiographical memory test, PANAS and general health questionnaire (GHQ-28. MANOVA was used for data analysis by SPSS-17.Results: The results show that stress after activation of memory impairs memory for neutral events (p0.05. None of stress and memory activation alone had effect on memory performance (p>0.05.Conclusion: These findings indicate that stress impairs autobiographical memory reconsolidation, which is opposite to its effects on memory consolidation, so it supports the view that consolidation and reconsolidation are separate process.

  10. Modafinil Prevents Inhibitory Avoidance Memory Deficit Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Karin Monteiro; Ferreira, Tatiana Lima; Hipolide, Debora Cristina; Fomari, Raquel Vecchio; Tufik, Sergio; Menezes Oliveira, Maria Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evaluation of modafinil effects on the inhibitory avoidance task (IA). Design: Rats were trained on a multiple trial IA task after receiving modafinil or vehicle injections. In experiment 1 they were trained with a weak protocol under baseline condition and in experiment 2, with a

  11. The role of NPY in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøtzsche, C R; Woldbye, D P D

    2016-02-01

    High levels of NPY expression in brain regions important for learning and memory together with its neuromodulatory and neurotrophic effects suggest a regulatory role for NPY in memory processes. Therefore it is not surprising that an increasing number of studies have provided evidence for NPY acting as a modulator of neuroplasticity, neurotransmission, and memory. Here these results are presented in relation to the types of memory affected by NPY and its receptors. NPY can exert both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on memory, depending on memory type and phase, dose applied, brain region, and NPY receptor subtypes. Thus NPY act as a resilience factor by impairing associative implicit memory after stressful and aversive events, as evident in models of fear conditioning, presumably via Y1 receptors in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In addition, NPY impairs acquisition but enhances consolidation and retention in models depending on spatial and discriminative types of associative explicit memory, presumably involving Y2 receptor-mediated regulations of hippocampal excitatory transmission. Moreover, spatial memory training leads to increased hippocampal NPY gene expression that together with Y1 receptor-mediated neurogenesis could constitute necessary steps in consolidation and long-term retention of spatial memory. Altogether, NPY-induced effects on learning and memory seem to be biphasic, anatomically and temporally differential, and in support of a modulatory role of NPY at keeping the system in balance. Obtaining further insight into memory-related effects of NPY could inspire the engineering of new therapeutics targeting diseases where impaired learning and memory are central elements.

  12. Distribution of glutamine synthetase in the chick forebrain: implications for passive avoidance memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowd, B S; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    1997-01-01

    The glial enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts glutamate to glutamine; the latter is used by neurons for the resynthesis of glutamate and GABA. We have used a monoclonal antibody to GS to examine the regional distribution of this enzyme in the forebrains of day-old chicks. GS was detected in glia throughout the rostral and caudal regions of the forebrain and was particularly intense in the hippocampus, area parahippocampus and parts of the hyperstriatal and paleostriatal complex, regions widely considered to be involved in memory formation. Thus, our data provide an anatomical framework for the conclusion that neurons require the support of glia in order to restock their glutamate and/or GABA transmitter supplies during memory processing.

  13. Long-term avoidance memory formation is associated with a transient increase in mushroom body synaptic complexes in leaf-cutting ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina eFalibene

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-term behavioral changes related to learning and experience have been shown to be associated with structural remodeling in the brain. Leaf-cutting ants learn to avoid previously preferred plants after they have proved harmful for their symbiotic fungus, a process that involves long-term olfactory memory. We studied the dynamics of brain microarchitectural changes after long-term olfactory memory formation following avoidance learning in Acromyrmex ambiguus. After performing experiments to control for possible neuronal changes related to age and body size, we quantified synaptic complexes (microglomeruli, MG in olfactory regions of the mushroom bodies (MB at different times after learning. Long-term avoidance memory formation was associated with a transient change in MG densities. Two days after learning, MG density was higher than before learning. At days 4 and 15 after learning — when ants still showed plant avoidance — MG densities had decreased to the initial state. The structural reorganization of MG triggered by long-term avoidance memory formation clearly differed from changes promoted by pure exposure to and collection of novel plants with distinct odors. Sensory exposure by the simultaneous collection of several, instead of one, non-harmful plant species resulted in a decrease in MG densities in the olfactory lip. We hypothesize that while sensory exposure leads to MG pruning in the MB olfactory lip, the formation of long-term avoidance memory involves an initial growth of new MG followed by subsequent pruning.

  14. ROLE OF CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF MEMORY AND ITS INTERACTION WITH DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEM

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    F. Z. Zangeneh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The central cholinergic system has been associated with cognitive function and memory and acetylcholine plays an important role during the early stages of memory consolidation. In this study, after training mice were tested with one way active avoidance procedure and retention were tested at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 hours of training and compared with non-shocked mice, in which it took 24 hours, a suitable time for retention test. Low dose administration of arecoline and physostigmine pre-training, immediate post-training and before retrieval showed that muscarinic agonist arecoline can potentiated memory in post trained and retrieval phases and reversible cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine potentiated memory only in retrieval phase. Scopolamine disrupted acetylcholine potentiation only in retrieval phase. In the second part of this study, the effect of dopaminergic system was investigated. Low dose of apomorphine and D2 agonist bromocriptine potentiated memory when administered immediately post-training, and D2 antagonist sulpiride impaired memory. When the cholinergic system was blocked by scopolamine immediately post-training, apomorphine and bromocriptine potentiated memory and sulpiride impaired it. In conclusion, these results suggest that, cholinergic system in retrieval phase is very critical and there was no interaction between the two systems in the post-training phase.

  15. Role of 5-HT6 receptors in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A

    2001-09-01

    Mice lacking the 5-HT(6) receptor presented neither gross anatomical or behavioral abnormalities nor obvious changes in microscopic brain morphology, and their performance in rotarod, open field and novel object testing paradigms revealed no differences compared with wild-type animals. Nevertheless, an association between the 5-HT(6) receptor polymorphism C267T and Alzheimer's disease has been reported. Interestingly, the 5-HT(6) antisense oligonucleotide decreased 5-HT(6) gene expression and enhanced spatial learning acquisition in the water maze. Similarly, injection of the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro-04-6790 improved learning consolidation in an autoshaping task, while mCPP, scopolamine and dizocilpine decreased performance. The effect induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine, but not that induced by mCPP, was completely or partially reversed by Ro-04-6790. Ro-04-6790 did not modify the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effects on learning consolidation. Since Ro-04-6790 facilitatory effect was unaffected by 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A/2B/2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4) or 5-HT(7) receptor blockade, the facilitatory effect induced by Ro-04-6790 involved specifically 5-HT6 receptors. Similarly, the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-271046 improved retention in the water maze and produced a significant performance improvement in aged rats in an operant-delayed alternation task. A series of Ro-04-6790 analogues that penetrate the brain and specifically bind to 5-HT(6) receptors reversed scopolamine-induced retention deficit in a passive avoidance learning test. Collectively, these data provide further support to the notion that 5-HT systems, via 5-HT(6) receptors, also play a significant role in memory formation under normal and dysfunctional memory conditions.

  16. ROLE OF THE SEROTONIN IN MEMORY PROCESSES IN THE RAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Ioana Hefco

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic 5, 7-dihydroxytryptamine (5, 7-DHT, 150 μg,i.c.v. disruption of the central serotonergic function, is able to interfere with learning and memory processes in the rat. Serotonin depletion significantly diminished spontaneous alternation % in Y-maze task, which suggest the impairment of short-term memory. Long-term memory does not undergo significant changes. Parachlorophenylalanine (200μg i.c.v. x 3 days a semichronic serotonin neurotoxin, do not impaired long-term memory. This effect of serotonin depletion was not produced at the level of organism motricity that, in turn, would allow an enhancing efficiency of another neurotransmitters contribution to memory processes, as number of arm entries was not affected by serotonin depletion. It is concluded that learning and memory processes is a multitransmitter system function, in which serotonin play an important role

  17. Place avoidance learning and stress-induced analgesia in the attacked mouse: role of endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, B; Frischknecht, H R

    1989-07-01

    In this study, mechanisms of pain inhibition (tail-flick test) and memory (place avoidance paradigm) were investigated in attacked, DBA/2 and C57BL/6, mice. During training, exposure of test animals to 10 or 30 bites by an aggressive, isolated ICR mouse situated in the dark half of a bright/dark conditioning box induced a significantly higher social conflict analgesia in DBA than in C57 mice. Naltrexone (0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg) reduced this response in DBA mice that received 30, but not 10, bites and was ineffective in C57 mice. This points to different, opioid versus naltrexone-insensitive nonopioid, analgesic mechanisms. During place choice testing in the same box 24 h later, DBA mice that had received 30, but not 10, bites showed a significant, naltrexone-reversible, avoidance of the attack place. No place avoidance learning was observed in C57 mice. The data provided unequivocal evidence that place avoidance learning was a result of associative conditioning, in that neither pairing nor social conflict per se significantly changed the preference for the dark side seen in experimentally naive DBA mice. Antagonism of place avoidance conditioning was observed regardless of whether testing was carried out in the drugged or undrugged state, excluding possible state-dependent effects as an explanation for the naltrexone-induced impairment. Individual correlational analysis in saline-injected, attacked DBA mice revealed a negative relationship between the analgesic state immediately after training and the avoidance of attack place during testing. In summary, the results suggest strain-dependent analgesic and learning mechanisms and indicate that endogenous opioids released in attacked DBA mice support pain inhibition and modulate the memorization of attack place by their analgesic effects, as well as by mechanisms independent of pain inhibitory systems.

  18. Forced exercise improves passive avoidance memory in morphine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadipour, K; Sarkaki, A; Alaei, H; Badavi, M; Rahim, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term forced exercise protocol on passive avoidance retention in morphine-exposed rats. Effects of morphine on acquisition and retrieval of retention have been proven in the avoidance paradigms. Twenty four male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into four groups including: (1) non-morphine-exposed without exercise (nA.nE) (2) non-morphine-exposed with exercise (nA.E) (3) morphine-exposed without exercise (A.nE) and (4) morphine-exposed with exercise (A.E). Rats ran as forced exercise on the motorized treadmill 1 h daily for ten days. Morphine-exposed animals received intraperitoneal morphine during first 5 days of the exercise period and their dependence to morphine was confirmed by naloxane admistration (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and withdrawal test. After 10 days of forced exercise, step down latency was tested and Inflexion Ratio (IR) was evaluated in each rat. Baseline step down latencies before any morphine exposing or exercise have shown no significant alteration in all groups. Inflexion Ratio (IR) ofnA.E group has increased significantly (pexercise on treadmill improved retention in both morphine-exposed and non morphine-exposed rats at least up to 7 days and more than 14 days, respectively. Alteration in retention between exercised groups may attribute the release of adrenal stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone because of the emotional arousal.

  19. The Role of Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Pecher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Motor affordances are important for object knowledge. Semantic tasks on visual objects often show interactions with motor actions. Prior neuro-imaging studies suggested that motor affordances also play a role in visual working memory for objects. When participants remembered manipulable objects (e.g., hammer greater premotor cortex activation was observed than when they remembered non-manipulable objects (e.g., polar bear. In the present study participants held object pictures in working memory while performing concurrent tasks such as articulation of nonsense syllables and performing hand movements. Although concurrent tasks did interfere with working memory performance, in none of the experiments did we find any evidence that concurrent motor tasks affected memory differently for manipulable and non-manipulable objects. I conclude that motor affordances are not used for visual working memory.

  20. A compensatory role for declarative memory in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Michael T; Pullman, Mariel Y

    2015-04-01

    Most research on neurodevelopmental disorders has focused on their abnormalities. However, what remains intact may also be important. Increasing evidence suggests that declarative memory, a critical learning and memory system in the brain, remains largely functional in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Because declarative memory remains functional in these disorders, and because it can learn and retain numerous types of information, functions, and tasks, this system should be able to play compensatory roles for multiple types of impairments across the disorders. Here, we examine this hypothesis for specific language impairment, dyslexia, autism spectrum disorder, Tourette syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We lay out specific predictions for the hypothesis and review existing behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging evidence. Overall, the evidence suggests that declarative memory indeed plays compensatory roles for a range of impairments across all five disorders. Finally, we discuss diagnostic, therapeutic and other implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A compensatory role for declarative memory in neurodevelopmental disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Michael T.; Pullman, Mariel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Most research on neurodevelopmental disorders has focused on their abnormalities. However, what remains intact may also be important. Increasing evidence suggests that declarative memory, a critical learning and memory system in the brain, remains largely functional in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Because declarative memory remains functional, and because this system can learn and retain numerous types of information, functions, and tasks, it should be able to play compensatory roles for multiple types of impairments across the disorders. Here, we examine this hypothesis for specific language impairment, dyslexia, autism spectrum disorder, Tourette syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We lay out specific predictions for the hypothesis and review existing behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging evidence. Overall, the evidence suggests that declarative memory indeed plays compensatory roles for a range of impairments across all five disorders. Finally, we discuss diagnostic, therapeutic and other implications. PMID:25597655

  2. Avoidance of activity and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee - The mediating role of muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, MPM; Dekker, J; Bijlsma, JWJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Avoidance of activity is hypothesized to lead to muscle weakness and consequently, to physical disability. This study was undertaken to validate the avoidance model by providing evidence for the mediating role of muscle weakness in the relationship between avoidance of activity and physic

  3. Avoidance of activity and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: the mediating role of muscle strength.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Avoidance of activity is hypothesized to lead to muscle weakness and consequently, to physical disability. This study was undertaken to validate the avoidance model by providing evidence for the mediating role of muscle weakness in the relationship between avoidance of activity and physic

  4. The role of working memory in tactile selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli; Spence, Charles

    2009-04-01

    Load theory suggests that working memory controls the extent to which irrelevant distractors are processed (e.g., Lavie, Hirst, De Fockert, & Viding, 2004). However, so far this proposal has only been tested in vision. Here, we examine the extent to which tactile selective attention also depends on working memory. In Experiment 1, participants focused their attention on continuous target vibrations while attempting to ignore pulsed distractor vibrations. In Experiment 2, targets were always presented to a particular hand, with distractors being presented to the other hand. In both experiments, a high (vs. low) load in a concurrent working memory task led to greater interference by the tactile distractors. These results establish the role of working memory in the control of tactile selective attention, demonstrating for the first time that the principles of load theory also apply to the tactile modality.

  5. The Role of Muscarinic and Nicotinic Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Aversive Conditioning: Comparing Pavlovian Fear Conditioning and Inhibitory Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Matthew R.; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Aversive conditioning is an ideal model for studying cholinergic effects on the processes of learning and memory for several reasons. First, deficits produced by selective lesions of the anatomical structures shown to be critical for Pavlovian fear conditioning and inhibitory avoidance (such as the amygdala and hippocampus) resemble those deficits…

  6. THE ROLE OF STEROID HORMONES IN LEARNING AND MEMORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Gurzu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient evidence has accumulated since the 1970s to support the hypothesis that gonadal steroids can influence processes that allow an organism to learn and remember new information. Although this conclusion quickly leads to exciting implications for our understanding of cognitive function and for the treatment of cognitive disability, it also raises questions regarding the nature, mechanism, and significance of the steroid modulation of learning and memory. In order to support the case that a steroid plays a meaningful role in cognition, several central issues must be addressed : adaptative value (the proposed effect of the steroid on learning and memory should have adaptive value to the organism; strenght of effect (empirical data supporting the role of the steroid in learning and memory should be sufficiently robust in magnitude and replicability; neural substrate (anatomical and physilogical substrates should exist to support the actions of the steroid on learning and memory ; and nonmnemonic processes (processes other than those directly mediating steroid effects on learning and memory systems should be identified (23. Sufficient evidence has accumulated since the 1970s to support the hypothesis that gonadal steroids can influence processes that allow an organism to learn and remember new information. Although this conclusion quickly leads to exciting implications for our understanding of cognitive function and for the treatment of cognitive disability, it also raises questions regarding the nature, mechanism, and significance of the steroid modulation of learning and memory. In order to support the case that a steroid plays a meaningful role in cognition, several central issues must be addressed : adaptative value (the proposed effect of the steroid on learning and memory should have adaptive value to the organism; strenght of effect (empirical data supporting the role of the steroid in learning and memory should be sufficiently robust

  7. The role of REM theta activity in emotional memory

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    Isabel Camilla Hutchison

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While NREM sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of REM sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity – which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex – is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale PGO waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and the gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces observed in both wake and REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep acetylcholine levels – which are thought to reduce hippocampal afferent inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate recurrent activation within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  8. The role of REM sleep theta activity in emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Isabel C; Rathore, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    While non-REM (NREM) sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity-which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex-is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale pontine-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces during REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep levels of achetylcholine - which is thought to reduce hippocampal inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate feedback within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  9. Calcium homeostasis and protein kinase/phosphatase balance participate in nicotine-induced memory improvement in passive avoidance task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2017-01-15

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) depend on specific postsynaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin concentration. LTP results from Ca(2+) influx through the activated NMDA receptors or voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and is linked with activation of protein kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Weaker synaptic stimulation, as a result of low Ca(2+) influx, leads to activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase (calcineurin - CaN) and triggers LTD. Interestingly, both memory formation and drug addiction share similar neuroplastic changes. Nicotine, which is one of the most common addictive drugs, manifests its memory effects through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Because nAChRs may also gate Ca(2+), it is suggested that calcium signaling pathways are involved in nicotine-induced memory effects. Within the scope of the study was to evaluate the importance of calcium homeostasis and protein kinase/phosphatase balance in nicotine-induced short- and long-term memory effects. To assess memory function in mice passive avoidance test was used. The presented results confirm that acute nicotine (0.1mg/kg) improves short- and long-term memory. Pretreatment with L-type VGCC blockers (amlodipine, nicardipine verapamil) increased nicotine-induced memory improvement in the context of short- and long-term memory. Pretreatment with FK-506 (a potent CaN inhibitor) enhanced short- but not long-term memory effects of nicotine, while SL-327 (a selective MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor) attenuated both nicotine-induced short- and long-term memory improvement. Acute nicotine enhances both types of memory via L-type VGCC blockade and via ERK1/2 activation. Only short- but not long-term memory enhancement induced by nicotine is dependent on CaN inhibition.

  10. Non-local quantum effects in cosmology 1: Quantum memory, non-local FLRW equations and singularity avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Donoghue, John F

    2014-01-01

    We discuss cosmological effects of the quantum loops of massless particles, which lead to temporal non-localities in the equations of motion governing the scale factor a(t). For the effects discussed here, loops cause the evolution of a(t) to depend on the memory of the curvature in the past with a weight that scales initially as 1/(t-t'). As one of our primary examples we discuss the situation with a large number of light particles, such that these effects occur in a region where gravity may still be treated classically. However, we also describe the effect of quantum graviton loops and the full set of Standard Model particles. We show that these effects decrease with time in an expanding phase, leading to classical behavior at late time. In a contracting phase, within our approximations the quantum results can lead to a bounce-like behavior at scales below the Planck mass, avoiding the singularities required classically by the Hawking-Penrose theorems. For conformally invariant fields, such as the Standard ...

  11. Auditory Discrimination Learning: Role of Working Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Perceptual training is generally assumed to improve perception by modifying the encoding or decoding of sensory information. However, this assumption is incompatible with recent demonstrations that transfer of learning can be enhanced by across-trial variation of training stimuli or task. Here we present three lines of evidence from healthy adults in support of the idea that the enhanced transfer of auditory discrimination learning is mediated by working memory (WM. First, the ability to discriminate small differences in tone frequency or duration was correlated with WM measured with a tone n-back task. Second, training frequency discrimination around a variable frequency transferred to and from WM learning, but training around a fixed frequency did not. The transfer of learning in both directions was correlated with a reduction of the influence of stimulus variation in the discrimination task, linking WM and its improvement to across-trial stimulus interaction in auditory discrimination. Third, while WM training transferred broadly to other WM and auditory discrimination tasks, variable-frequency training on duration discrimination did not improve WM, indicating that stimulus variation challenges and trains WM only if the task demands stimulus updating in the varied dimension. The results provide empirical evidence as well as a theoretic framework for interactions between cognitive and sensory plasticity during perceptual experience.

  12. No Role for Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Motor affordances have been shown to play a role in visual object identification and categorization. The present study explored whether working memory is likewise supported by motor affordances. Use of motor affordances should be disrupted by motor interference, and this effect should be larger for objects that have motor affordances than for…

  13. Involvement of PLC-beta3 in the effect of morphine on memory retrieval in passive avoidance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E; Lehmann, D; Vivoli, E; Norcini, M; Ghelardini, C

    2010-06-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is one signalling effector enzyme whose activity is directly modulated by opioids. Several physiological studies have implicated PLC-linked pathways in in-vivo pain regulation and opioid tolerance. Co-administration of PLC-beta(2/3) activity blocker M119 with morphine resulted in a dramatic increase in morphine-induced amnesic effect in mice, proving a role for beta subunit of PLC enzyme in these processes. Administration of morphine to mice at amnesic dose increased PLC-beta(3) activity, with respect to basal value, in the membrane-soluble material from anterior cortex and hippocampal formation in brain areas. PLC-beta(3) appears to be simultaneously implicated in both analgesic and amnesic effects induced by administration of morphine to mice suggesting a commonality in the molecular mechanisms of morphine-induced analgesia and memory impairment.

  14. Long-term memory was impaired in one-trial passive avoidance task of day-old chicks hatching from hypo-magnetic field space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuebin; XU Muling; LI Bing; LI Dongfeng; JIANG Jinchang

    2003-01-01

    The retained curve in one-trial passive avoidance task (OTPAT) of day-old chicks hatching from natural geomagnetic field (control groups) is consistent with the acknowledged three-phase model. The two dips are at the 20th min and the 60 min, and the avoidance rates (AR) to the red bead in short- and intermediate-term memory are 68.4% on average, while that in the long-term momory was 74.8%. The OTPAT retained curve of day-old chicks hatching from hypomagnetic field space (experimental groups) presents the marked timing effect. The two dips were at the 25th min and the 50th min, the avoidance rates to the red bead (ARR) in the short- and intermediate-term memory was 74.1% on an average, which was resembled to that in control group; however, the long-term memory appeared an obvious fluctuation. Compared with that in control groups, ARR and the deviation coefficient in experimental groups were decreased by 25.3% and increased by 1.3 times, respectively. That is to say, both the memory ability and stability in the experimental chicks declined. The result shows that the hypomagnetic field space has a negative effect on the development of chick brain function, and that cannot be negligible.

  15. Influence of intracerebroventricular administration of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory in the step-down passive avoidance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad R; Khalilzadeh, Azita; Rezayat, S Mehdi; Sahebgharani, Mousa; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2005-05-01

    The effects of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of a passive avoidance task were examined in mice. Pre-training administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) led to state-dependent learning with impaired memory recall on the test day which was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of the opioid. The pre-test intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the H(1) blocker (pyrilamine) prevented the restoration of memory by morphine. The H(2) blocker (ranitidine) was ineffective in this regard and the H(3) blocker (clobenpropit) potentiated the effect of morphine on memory recall. The pre-test i.c.v. administration of histamine alone (5, 10, and 20 microg/mouse) not only mimicked the effect of pre-test morphine treatment, but also increased this action of the opioid. The effect of histamine on memory recall was not changed by the pre-test administration of mu-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. In conclusion, the improvement of memory recall by morphine treatment, on the test day, seems to be, at least in part, through the release of histamine followed by the stimulation of H(1) receptors. Histamine by itself, when administered on the test day, mimicked morphine-induced memory improvement by a mechanism independent of the mu-opioid receptors.

  16. A simple role for BDNF in learning and memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Carla; Brambilla, Riccardo; Thomas, Kerrie L

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery almost three decades ago, the secreted neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been firmly implicated in the differentiation and survival of neurons of the CNS. More recently, BDNF has also emerged as an important regulator of synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the adult CNS. In this review we will discuss our knowledge about the multiple intracellular signalling pathways activated by BDNF, and the role of this neurotrophin in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory formation as well as in synaptogenesis. We will show that maturation of BDNF, its cellular localization and its ability to regulate both excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the CNS may result in conflicting alterations in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Lack of a precise knowledge about the mechanisms by which BDNF influences higher cognitive functions and complex behaviours may constitute a severe limitation in the possibility to devise BDNF-based therapeutics for human disorders of the CNS.

  17. The role of the hippocampus in long-term memory: is it memory store or comparator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, V I

    2008-03-01

    Several attempts have been made to reconcile a number of rival theories on the role of the hippocampus in long-term memory. Those attempts fail to explain the basic effects of the theories from the same point of view. We are reviewing the four major theories, and shall demonstrate, with the use of mathematical models of attention and memory, that only one theory is capable of reconciling all of them by explaining the basic effects of each theory in a unified fashion, without altogether sacrificing their individual contributions. The key issue here is whether or not a memory trace is ever stored in the hippocampus itself, and there is no reconciliation unless the answer to that question is that there is not. As a result of the reconciliation that we are proposing, there is a simple solution to several outstanding problems concerning the neurobiology of memory such as: consolidation and reconsolidation, persistency of long term memory, novelty detection, habituation, long-term potentiation, and the multifrequency oscillatory self-organization of the brain.

  18. The development of time-based prospective memory in childhood: the role of working memory updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Babett; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Ellis, Judi; Schnitzspahn, Katharina; Krause, Ivonne; Altgassen, Mareike; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    This large-scale study examined the development of time-based prospective memory (PM) across childhood and the roles that working memory updating and time monitoring play in driving age effects in PM performance. One hundred and ninety-seven children aged 5 to 14 years completed a time-based PM task where working memory updating load was manipulated within individuals using a dual task design. Results revealed age-related increases in PM performance across childhood. Working memory updating load had a negative impact on PM performance and monitoring behavior in older children, but this effect was smaller in younger children. Moreover, the frequency as well as the pattern of time monitoring predicted children's PM performance. Our interpretation of these results is that processes involved in children's PM may show a qualitative shift over development from simple, nonstrategic monitoring behavior to more strategic monitoring based on internal temporal models that rely specifically on working memory updating resources. We discuss this interpretation with regard to possible trade-off effects in younger children as well as alternative accounts.

  19. The role of working memory and declarative memory in trace conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David A; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    Translational assays of cognition that are similarly implemented in both lower and higher-order species, such as rodents and primates, provide a means to reconcile preclinical modeling of psychiatric neuropathology and clinical research. To this end, Pavlovian conditioning has provided a useful tool for investigating cognitive processes in both lab animal models and humans. This review focuses on trace conditioning, a form of Pavlovian conditioning typified by the insertion of a temporal gap (i.e., trace interval) between presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US). This review aims to discuss pre-clinical and clinical work investigating the mnemonic processes recruited for trace conditioning. Much work suggests that trace conditioning involves unique neurocognitive mechanisms to facilitate formation of trace memories in contrast to standard Pavlovian conditioning. For example, the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) appear to play critical roles in trace conditioning. Moreover, cognitive mechanistic accounts in human studies suggest that working memory and declarative memory processes are engaged to facilitate formation of trace memories. The aim of this review is to integrate cognitive and neurobiological accounts of trace conditioning from preclinical and clinical studies to examine involvement of working and declarative memory.

  20. Situated navigational working memory: the role of positive mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Nori, Raffaella; Rogolino, Carmelo; D'Amico, Simonetta; Piccardi, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The perspective of situated cognition assumes that cognition is not separated from the context. In the present study, the issue if visuospatial memory and navigational working memory are situated was explored by manipulating participants' mood (positive, negative and neutral) while performing two different tasks. College students were randomly assigned to the group of positive, negative or neutral music. Participants filled out the positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) before and after carrying out the Corsi Test and the Walking Corsi Test. Both tasks were performed forward and backward. Music was played throughout the memory tasks. Firstly, comparing pre-mood induction PANAS scores to post-mood induction PANAS scores, results showed that only positive affects were manipulated: After mood induction, the Positive Music Group produced higher scores, whereas the Negative Music Group produced lower scores than before mood induction; the Neutral Music Group produced no effect. Secondly, the Positive Music Group produced higher scores than Negative and Neutral Music Groups both at the Corsi Test and at the Walking Corsi Test. These results show that situational contexts that induce a specific mood can affect visuospatial memory and navigational working memory, and open to the idea that positive emotions may play a crucial role in enhancing navigational strategies.

  1. The role of NMDA receptors of the medial septum and dorsal hippocampus on memory acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakpai, Fatemeh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    The glutamatergic neurons in the medial septal/diagonal band of broca (MS/DB) affect the hippocampal functions by modulating the septo-hippocampal neurons. Our study investigated the possible role of NMDA receptors of the medial septum nucleus (MS) and dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on memory acquisition in male Wistar rats. Animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the MS and CA1. Rats were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training to measure step-through latency as memory retrieval. Our results indicated that pre-training intra-MS or intra-CA1 infusions of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) and D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) increased and decreased memory acquisition, respectively when compared to saline control group. Also, pre-training intra-CA1 and intra-MS injection of an effect dose of D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) along with an effect dose of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) impaired memory acquisition. Interestingly, pre-training intra-CA1/MS infusion of D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) diminished memory response produced by pre-training injection of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) in the MS/CA1, respectively (cross injection or bilateral injection). Also, all above doses of drugs did not alter locomotor activity. These results suggest that the glutamatergic pathway between the MS and CA1 regions is involved in memory acquisition process.

  2. Organizational memory and its role for the knowledge management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Sá Freire

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8077.2012v14n33p41This study presents the conceptualization of organizational memory, its role in knowledge management and the importance of knowledge media for its construction. For this purpose, an exploratory research has been held on a theoretical basis. The results indicate that knowledge management is a supporting tool for knowledge creation and its maintenance within the organization, since it enables knowledge existing in people’s minds, and in the actions of their work practices, to be shared, recorded, preserved as an organizational memorial, and subsequently disseminated. The conclusion is that knowledge media, rather than simply disseminating organizational knowledge, have multiple roles in the permanent whole construction of knowledge. The media enable the creation of new contents, arouseinterest, attract attention, nurture socialization and record and disseminate knowledge, thus favoring its explicitness.

  3. Peptides and aging: Their role in anorexia and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E

    2015-10-01

    The rapid aging of the world's population has led to a need to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of the factors leading to frailty and cognitive decline. Peptides have been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of frailty and cognitive decline. Weight loss is a major component of frailty. In this review, we demonstrate a central role for both peripheral peptides (e.g., cholecystokinin and ghrelin) and neuropeptides (e.g., dynorphin and alpha-MSH) in the pathophysiology of the anorexia of aging. Similarly, peripheral peptides (e.g., ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and cholecystokinin) are modulators of memory. A number of centrally acting neuropeptides have also been shown to modulate cognitive processes. Amyloid-beta peptide in physiological levels is a memory enhancer, while in high (pathological) levels, it plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Improvement of Two-Way Active Avoidance Memory Requires Protein Kinase A Activation and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Subimal; Siwek, Donald F.; Huang, Max P.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that two-way active avoidance (TWAA) memory processing involves a functional interaction between the pontine wave (P wave) generator and the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus (DH-CA3). The present experiments examined whether the interaction between P wave generator activity and the DH-CA3 involves the intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) signaling system. In the first series of experiments, rats were subjected to a session of TWAA training followed immediately ...

  5. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  6. Interactions of the dorsal hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in formation of fear memory: difference in inhibitory avoidance learning and contextual fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Chi; Liang, K C

    2014-07-01

    Learning active or reactive responses to fear involves different brain circuitry. This study examined how the nuclus accumbens (NAc), dorsal hippocampus (DH) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) may interact in memory processing for these two kinds of responses. Male Wistar rats with cannulae implanted in these areas were trained on a contextual fear conditioning or inhibitory avoidance task that respectively engaged a reactive or active response to fear in the test. Immediately after training, a memory modulating factor released by stress, norepinephrine (NE), was infused into one region and 4% lidocaine into another to examine if an upstream activation effect could be blocked by the downstream suppression. Retention tested 1 day later showed that in both tasks posttraining infusion of NE at different doses into either the DH or mPFC enhanced retention but the enhancement was blocked by concurrent infusion of lidocaine into the other region, suggesting reliance of the effect on functional integrity of both regions. Further, posttraining intra-NAc lidocaine infusion attenuated memory enhancement of NE infused to the DH or mPFC in the inhibitory avoidance task but did not do so in contextual fear conditioning. These results suggest that NE regulation of memory formation for the reactive and active responses to fear may rely on distinct interactions among the DH, mPFC and NAc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Memory loss versus memory distortion: the role of encoding and retrieval deficits in Korsakoff patients' false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Gery

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies with the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm have revealed that Korsakoff patients show reduced levels of false recognition and different patterns of false recall compared to controls. The present experiment examined whether this could be attributed to an encoding deficit, or rather to problems with explicitly retrieving thematic information at test. In a variation on the DRM paradigm, both patients and controls were presented with associative as well as categorised word lists, with the order of recall and recognition tests manipulated between-subjects. The results point to an important role for the automatic/controlled retrieval distinction: Korsakoff patients' false memory was only diminished compared to controls' when automatic or short-term memory processes could not be used to fulfil the task at hand. Hence, the patients' explicit retrieval deficit appears to be crucial in explaining past and present data. Results are discussed in terms of fuzzy-trace and activation-monitoring theories.

  8. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahiruddin Othman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang honey on learning and memory in human as well as animal models is gleaned to hypothesize its underlying mechanisms. These studies show that Tualang honey improves morphology of memory-related brain areas, reduces brain oxidative stress, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and acetylcholine (ACh concentrations, and reduces acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the brain homogenates. Its anti-inflammatory roles in reducing inflammatory trigger and microglial activation have yet to be investigated. It is hypothesized that the improvement in learning and memory following Tualang honey supplementation is due to the significant improvement in brain morphology and enhancement of brain cholinergic system secondary to reduction in brain oxidative damage and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration. Further studies are imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanism of actions.

  9. PTSD as a mediator of sexual revictimization: the role of reexperiencing, avoidance, and arousal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Heather J; Hetzel-Riggin, Melanie D; Thomsen, Cynthia J; McCanne, Thomas R

    2006-10-01

    Theory and research suggest that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may mediate the relationship between child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault. However, little empirical research has examined the mediational role of PTSD. In the present study, the authors use structural equation modeling to examine the degree to which the three symptom clusters that define PTSD (reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal) contribute to sexual revictimization. To assess PTSD symptomatology, undergraduate women completed questionnaires (N = 1,449), which detailed the history and severity of childhood and adult sexual assault experiences. Results indicated that PTSD mediated sexual revictimization. When PTSD symptom clusters were examined individually, only the hyperarousal cluster was a significant mediator. Results are discussed in terms of information-processing mechanisms that may underlie sexual revictimization.

  10. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on histamine-induced impairment of memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Ahmadi, Ramesh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem; Haeri-Rohani, Ali

    2002-11-15

    The effect of alpha-adrenoceptor agents on the impairment induced by histamine was measured for memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection was carried out in all the experiments. Histamine (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat) reduced, while a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (0.1, 1 and 10 microg/rat), increased memory retention. The histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, ranitidine (0.1, 1, 10 and 20 microg/rat), did not elicit any response in this respect. Different doses of chlorpheniramine but not ranitidine reversed the histamine-induced impairment of memory. Clonidine and prazosin decreased, but yohimbine and phenylephrine increased, memory retention. Yohimbine decreased the inhibitory response to histamine. Phenylephrine, clonidine and prazosin did not alter the histamine effect. It is concluded that a histamine-induced impairment of memory retention through histamine H(1) receptors and an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanism may be involved in the histamine response.

  11. Role of insulin and insulin receptor in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W Q; Alkon, D L

    2001-05-25

    As one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, insulin and its receptor have been known to play key roles in a variety of important biological functions. Until recent years, the functions of insulin and insulin receptor (IR) in the central nervous system (CNS) have largely remained unclear. IR is abundantly expressed in several specific brain regions that govern fundamental behaviors such as food intake, reproduction and high cognition. The IR from the periphery and CNS exhibit differences in both structure and function. In addition to that from the peripheral system, locally synthesized insulin in the brain has also been identified. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that insulin/IR plays important roles in associative learning, as suggested by results from both interventive and correlative studies. Interruption of insulin production and IR activity causes deficits in learning and memory formation. Abnormal insulin/IR levels and activities are seen in Alzheimer's dementia, whereas administration of insulin significantly improves the cognitive performance of these patients. The synaptic bases for the action of insulin/IR include modifying neurotransmitter release processes at various types of presynaptic terminals and modulating the activities of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic receptors such as NMDA and GABA receptors, respectively. At the molecular level, insulin/IR participates in regulation of learning and memory via activation of specific signaling pathways, one of which is shown to be associated with the formation of long-term memory and is composed of intracellular molecules including the shc, Grb-r/SOS, Ras/Raf, and MEK/MAP kinases. Cross-talk with another IR pathway involving IRS1, PI3 kinase, and protein kinase C, as well as with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase pp60c-src, may also be associated with memory processing.

  12. Analysis of the role of General Practice in preventing Avoidable Hospitalisation through a multilevel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the relationship between Avoidable Hospitalisation (AH and the activities of General Practitioners (GPs. The study was carried out in the Lazio Region (Italy within different organizational models of primary care (PC delivery. Methods: Secondary data of a set of GP activities delivered to the Lazio population as listed in the Lazio GPs in 2008, were used. For each GP a set of health services delivered to the patients on their practice lists were measured. The relation between the rates of AH, acute and chronic conditions separately, and the rates of such health services were analyzed through the use of a multilevel Poisson regression model, adjusted according to patients’ health status. Results: The study included data from all the active GPs (4,837 in the Lazio Region and their 4,666,037 registered patients. The overall AH rate of the registered patients was 7.7 per 1,000, 2.2 for acute and 5.5 for chronic conditions. The diagnostics prescription by GPs is associated with a 7% (IRR=0.93;95% C.I.:0.89-0.97 reduction of the chronic AH rate. Patients registered at GPs working within a team practice resulted in a hospitalisation rate decrease of 5% (IRR= 0.95; 95% C.I.:0.91-0.99  for avoidable acute conditions. Conclusion: The study showed that the role of GPs in preventing AH is substantial, particularly when team practice is performed and specifically when additional diagnostics are prescribed. The study is further evidence in favor of the validity of AH as an outcome measure of quality and accessibility of primary care.

  13. At the Intersection of Attention and Memory: The Mechanistic Role of the Posterior Parietal Lobe in Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Chein, Jason; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2011-01-01

    Portions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) play a role in working memory (WM) yet the precise mechanistic function of this region remains poorly understood. The "pure storage" hypothesis proposes that this region functions as a short-lived modality-specific memory store. Alternatively, the "internal attention" hypothesis proposes that the PPC…

  14. At the Intersection of Attention and Memory: The Mechanistic Role of the Posterior Parietal Lobe in Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Chein, Jason; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2011-01-01

    Portions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) play a role in working memory (WM) yet the precise mechanistic function of this region remains poorly understood. The "pure storage" hypothesis proposes that this region functions as a short-lived modality-specific memory store. Alternatively, the "internal attention" hypothesis proposes that the PPC…

  15. Effect of Calendula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract on passive avoidance learning and memory in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Moradkhani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, CO extract can improve PAL and memory impairments in STZ-diabetic rats. This improvement may be due to its antioxidant, anticholinergic activities or its power to reduce hyperglycemia.

  16. Beneficial effect of commercial Rhodiola extract in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment on active avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Liliya V; Getova, Damianka P; Doncheva, Nina D; Marchev, Andrey S; Georgiev, Milen I

    2016-12-04

    Rhodiola rosea L., family Crassulaceae also known as Golden Root or Arctic root is one of the most widely used medicinal plants with effect on cognitive dysfunction, psychological stress and depression. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a standardized commercial Rhodiola extract on learning and memory processes in naive rats as well as its effects in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

  17. The n-butanolic extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten enhances long-term memory in the passive avoidance task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Se Jin; Park, Dong Hyun; Jung, Seo Yun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Yong Sup; Jin, Changbae; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2010-08-16

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Makino (Cactaceae) is used to treat burns, edema, dyspepsia, and asthma in traditional medicine. The present study investigated the beneficial effects of the n-butanolic extract of O. ficus-indica var. saboten (BOF) on memory performance in mice and attempts to uncover the mechanisms underlying its action. Memory performance was assessed with the passive avoidance task, and western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to measure changes in protein expression and cell survival. After the oral administration of BOF for 7 days, the latency time in the passive avoidance task was significantly increased relative to vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05). Western blotting revealed that the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding-protein (pCREB), and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) 1/2 were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue after 7 days of BOF administration (P<0.05). Doublecortin and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining also revealed that BOF significantly enhanced the survival of immature neurons, but did not affect neuronal cell proliferation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the subchronic administration of BOF enhances long-term memory, and that this effect is partially mediated by ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling and the survival of immature neurons.

  18. A simple role for BDNF in learning and memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cunha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery almost three decades ago, the secreted neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been firmly implicated in the differentiation and survival of neurons of the CNS. More recently, BDNF has also emerged as an important regulator of synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the adult CNS. In this review we will discuss our knowledge about the multiple intracellular signalling pathways activated by BDNF, and the role of this neurotrophin in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory formation as well as in synaptogenesis. We will show that maturation of BDNF, its cellular localisation and its ability to regulate both excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the CNS may result in conflicting alterations in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Lack of a precise knowledge about the mechanisms by which BDNF influences higher cognitive functions and complex behaviours may constitute a severe limitation in the possibility to devise BDNF-based therapeutics for human disorders of the CNS.

  19. Testing the role of reward and punishment sensitivity in avoidance behavior: a computational modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sheynin, Jony; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Beck, Kevin D.; Servatius, Richard J.; Myers, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated avoidance behavior is a predominant symptom in all anxiety disorders and its degree often parallels the development and persistence of these conditions. Both human and non-human animal studies suggest that individual differences as well as various contextual cues may impact avoidance behavior. Specifically, we have recently shown that female sex and inhibited temperament, two anxiety vulnerability factors, are associated with greater duration and rate of the avoidance behavior, as...

  20. The role of the harm avoidance personality in depression and anxiety during the medical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Li, Peng; Huang, Wei-Lieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether physicians with harm avoidance (HA) personality traits were more prone to developing increased anxiety and depression during the medical internship. A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns was carried out using repeated measures of symptoms of anxiety and depression with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories (BAI and BDI) before, at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th months during the internship, and 2 weeks after the internship was completed. Baseline personality was assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire with 3 dimensions: novelty-seeking, HA, and reward dependence (RD). Levels of both depression and anxiety increased (6.4 and 3.4 on scores for BDI and BAI, respectively) during the internship and returned to baseline 2 weeks after it ended. HA scores were significantly correlated with depression and anxiety (0.3 scores on both the BDI and the BAI) and the scores for RD were significantly correlated with anxiety but not with depression. The interaction of HA and point in internship showed no significant differences. Internship plays a major role in the increase in depression and anxiety. A HA personality was also associated with the development of both depression and anxiety.

  1. Contamination Appraisals, Pollution Beliefs, and the Role of Cultural Inheritance in Shaping Disease Avoidance Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Yitzhaq

    2016-08-01

    Despite the upsurge of research on disgust, the implications of this research for the investigation of cultural pollution beliefs has yet to be adequately explored. In particular, the sensitivity of both disgust and pollution to a common set of elicitors (e.g., bodily emissions, disease, and death) suggests a common psychological basis, though several obstacles have prevented an integrative account, including methodological differences between the relevant disciplines. Employing a conciliatory framework that embraces both naturalistic (evolutionary) and humanistic levels of explanation, this article examines the dynamic reciprocal process by which contamination/contagion appraisals in individuals serve to shape-and are in turn shaped by-culture-specific pollution beliefs. This complex interrelationship is illustrated by examining ancient Near Eastern and modern ethnographic documentation of pollution beliefs, highlighting the underappreciated function of these pollution beliefs as folk theories for the spread of infectious disease. By evaluating how pollution beliefs (as also modern germ theory) shape contamination appraisals in individuals, it will be argued that cultural inheritance has played a much larger role in guiding disease avoidance behavior than has been previously recognized.

  2. The Evolving Roles of Memory Immune Cells in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C

    2015-10-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance.

  3. Children's selective attention to pain and avoidance behaviour: the role of child and parental catastrophizing about pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated selective attention to pain in children, its implications for child avoidance behaviour, and the moderating role of dimensions comprising child and parental catastrophizing about pain (ie, rumination, magnification, and helplessness). Participants were 59 children (31 boys) aged 10-16 years and one of their parents (41 mothers). Children performed a dot-probe task in which child facial pain displays of varying pain expressiveness were presented. Child avoidance behaviour was indexed by child pain tolerance during a cold-pressor task. Children and parents completed measures of child and parent pain catastrophizing, respectively. Findings indicated that both the nature of child selective attention to pain and the impact of selective attention upon child avoidance behaviour were differentially sensitive to specific dimensions of child and parental catastrophizing. Specifically, findings showed greater tendency to shift attention away from pain faces (i.e.,, attentional avoidance) among children reporting greater pain magnification. A similar pattern was observed in terms of parental characteristics, such that children increasingly shifted attention away from pain with increasing levels of parental rumination and helplessness. Furthermore, child attentional avoidance was associated with greater avoidance behaviour (i.e., lower pain tolerance) among children reporting high levels of pain magnification and those whose parents reported greater rumination about pain. The current findings corroborate catastrophizing as a multidimensional construct that may differentially impact outcomes and attest to the importance of assessing both child and parental characteristics in relation to child pain-related attention and avoidance behaviour. Further research directions are discussed.

  4. Moral fixations: The role of moral integrity and social anxiety in the selective avoidance of social threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dillen, Lotte F; Enter, Dorien; Peters, Leonie P M; van Dijk, Wilco W; Rotteveel, Mark

    2017-01-01

    People derive their sense of belonging from perceptions of being a moral person. Research moreover suggests that social cues of rejection rapidly influence visual scanning, and result in avoidant gaze behavior, especially in socially anxious individuals. With the current eye-tracking experiment, we therefore examined whether moral integrity threats and affirmations influence selective avoidance of social threat, and how this varies with individual differences in social anxiety. Fifty-nine participants retrieved a memory of a past immoral, moral, or neutral act. Next, participants passively viewed angry, happy, and neutral faces, while we recorded how often they first fixated on the eyes. In addition, we administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (1987). Participants first fixated less on angry eyes compared to happy or neutral eyes when their moral integrity was threatened, and this selective avoidance was enhanced with increasing social anxiety. Following a moral affirmation, however, participants no longer selectively avoided the eyes of angry faces, regardless of individual differences in social anxiety. The results thus suggest that both low and high socially anxious people adjust their social gaze behavior in response to threats and affirmations of their moral integrity, pointing to the importance of the social context when considering affective processing biases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconsidering the Role of Memory in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancatelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the importance of memory in the Hebrew bible and how memory lay at the center of Ancient Israel's religious faith and cultural identity. It argues for a similar, albeit nuanced, memory-based approach to contemporary Christian religious education. It analyzes memory through the lens of Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic of…

  6. Reconsidering the Role of Memory in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancatelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the importance of memory in the Hebrew bible and how memory lay at the center of Ancient Israel's religious faith and cultural identity. It argues for a similar, albeit nuanced, memory-based approach to contemporary Christian religious education. It analyzes memory through the lens of Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic of narration…

  7. Distinct roles of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in GABAA receptor blockade-induced enhancement of object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Younghwan; Park, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2014-03-13

    It is well known that the hippocampus plays a role in spatial and contextual memory, and that spatial information is tightly regulated by the hippocampus. However, it is still highly controversial whether the hippocampus plays a role in object recognition memory. In a pilot study, the administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, enhanced memory in the passive avoidance task, but not in the novel object recognition task. In the present study, we hypothesized that these different results are related to the characteristics of each task and the different roles of hippocampus and perirhinal cortex. A region-specific drug-treatment model was employed to clarify the role of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in object recognition memory. After a single habituation in the novel object recognition task, intra-perirhinal cortical injection of bicuculline increased and intra-hippocampal injection decreased the exploration time ratio to novel object. In addition, when animals were repeatedly habituated to the context, intra-perirhinal cortical administration of bicuculline still increased exploration time ratio to novel object, but the effect of intra-hippocampal administration disappeared. Concurrent increases of c-Fos expression and ERK phosphorylation were observed in the perirhinal cortex of the object with context-exposed group either after single or repeated habituation to the context, but no changes were noted in the hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that object recognition memory formation requires the perirhinal cortex but not the hippocampus, and that hippocampal activation interferes with object recognition memory by the information encoding of unfamiliar environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Testing the role of reward and punishment sensitivity in avoidance behavior: a computational modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheynin, Jony; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Beck, Kevin D; Servatius, Richard J; Myers, Catherine E

    2015-04-15

    Exaggerated avoidance behavior is a predominant symptom in all anxiety disorders and its degree often parallels the development and persistence of these conditions. Both human and non-human animal studies suggest that individual differences as well as various contextual cues may impact avoidance behavior. Specifically, we have recently shown that female sex and inhibited temperament, two anxiety vulnerability factors, are associated with greater duration and rate of the avoidance behavior, as demonstrated on a computer-based task closely related to common rodent avoidance paradigms. We have also demonstrated that avoidance is attenuated by the administration of explicit visual signals during "non-threat" periods (i.e., safety signals). Here, we use a reinforcement-learning network model to investigate the underlying mechanisms of these empirical findings, with a special focus on distinct reward and punishment sensitivities. Model simulations suggest that sex and inhibited temperament are associated with specific aspects of these sensitivities. Specifically, differences in relative sensitivity to reward and punishment might underlie the longer avoidance duration demonstrated by females, whereas higher sensitivity to punishment might underlie the higher avoidance rate demonstrated by inhibited individuals. Simulations also suggest that safety signals attenuate avoidance behavior by strengthening the competing approach response. Lastly, several predictions generated by the model suggest that extinction-based cognitive-behavioral therapies might benefit from the use of safety signals, especially if given to individuals with high reward sensitivity and during longer safe periods. Overall, this study is the first to suggest cognitive mechanisms underlying the greater avoidance behavior observed in healthy individuals with different anxiety vulnerabilities.

  9. The central role of heat shock factor 1 in synaptic fidelity and memory consolidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hooper, Philip L; Durham, Heather D; Török, Zsolt; Hooper, Paul L; Crul, Tim; Vígh, László

    2016-01-01

    ...), the major transcription factor regulating expression of heat shock genes, plays a central role in proteostasis, in establishing and sustaining synaptic fidelity and function, and in memory consolidation...

  10. Possible role of root border cells in detection and avoidance of aluminum toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, S C; Hawes, M C

    2001-04-01

    Root border cells are living cells that surround root apices of most plant species and are involved in production of root exudates. We tested predictions of the hypothesis that they participate in detection and avoidance of aluminum (Al) toxicity by comparing responses of two snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivars (cv Dade and cv Romano) known to differ in Al resistance at the whole-root level. Root border cells of these cultivars were killed by excess Al in agarose gels or in simple salt solutions. Percent viability of Al-sensitive cv Romano border cells exposed in situ for 96 h to 200 microM total Al in an agarose gel was significantly less than that of cv Dade border cells; similarly, relative viability of harvested cv Romano border cells was significantly less than that of cv Dade cells after 24 h in 25 microM total Al in a simple salt solution. These results indicate that Al-resistance mechanisms that operate at the level of whole roots also operate at the cellular level in border cells. Al induced a thicker mucilage layer around detached border cells of both cultivars. Cultivar Dade border cells produced a thicker mucilage layer in response to 25 microM Al compared with that of cv Romano cells after 8 h of treatment and this phenomenon preceded that of observed cultivar differences in relative cell viability. Release of an Al-binding mucilage by border cells could play a role in protecting root tips from Al-induced cellular damage.

  11. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  12. Effects of traumatic experiences on obsessive-compulsive and internalizing symptoms: The role of avoidance and mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Emily B; Miller, Michelle L; Roche, Anne I; Kroska, Sydney K; O'Hara, Michael W

    2017-08-24

    Trauma exposure is associated with adverse psychological outcomes including anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms. Adolescence is increasingly recognized as a period of vulnerability for the onset of these types of psychological symptoms. The current study explored the mediating roles of experiential avoidance and mindfulness processes in the association between retrospective reports of childhood trauma and current internalizing and OC symptoms in adolescents. A group of at-risk adolescents (N = 51) and a group of college students (N = 400) reported on childhood trauma, experiential avoidance, mindfulness, anxiety, depressive, and OC symptoms. Mediation analyses were performed to examine the mechanistic roles of avoidance and mindfulness in the association between trauma and internalizing and OC-specific symptoms. In the group of at-risk adolescents, experiential avoidance and mindfulness both significantly mediated the association between childhood trauma and OC symptoms. In the college student sample, experiential avoidance mediated the association between trauma and OC symptoms. Experiential avoidance, as well as the observe, act with awareness, and nonjudgmental facets of mindfulness all significantly mediated the association between trauma and internalizing symptoms. The group of at-risk adolescents was small, and the college student group was demographically homogeneous. All data was self-report and cross-sectional. The current study demonstrated that experiential avoidance and mindfulness processes may be the mechanisms through which the association between trauma and obsessive-compulsive and trauma and internalizing symptoms exist in adolescents. These findings provide potential targets for clinical intervention to improve outcomes for adolescents who have experienced trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement of two-way active avoidance memory requires protein kinase a activation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the dorsal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Siwek, Donald F; Huang, Max P

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that two-way active avoidance (TWAA) memory processing involves a functional interaction between the pontine wave (P wave) generator and the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus (DH-CA3). The present experiments examined whether the interaction between P wave generator activity and the DH-CA3 involves the intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) signaling system. In the first series of experiments, rats were subjected to a session of TWAA training followed immediately by bilateral microinjection of either the PKA activation inhibitor (KT-5720) or vehicle control into the DH-CA3 and tested for TWAA memory 24 h later. The results indicated that immediate KT-5720 infusion impaired improvement of TWAA performance. Additional experiments showed that KT-5720 infusion also blocked TWAA training-induced BDNF expression in the DH-CA3. Together, these findings suggest that the PKA activation and BDNF expression in the DH-CA3 is essential for the improvement of TWAA memory.

  14. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the ventral tegmental area are involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Maryam; Haeri-Rohani, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2007-10-01

    The interaction of opiate, cholinergic, glutamatergic and (possibly) dopaminergic inputs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) influencing a learned behavior is certainly a topic of great interest. In the present study, the effect of intra-VTA administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agents on nicotine's effect in morphine state-dependent learning was investigated. An inhibitory avoidance (IA) task was used for memory assessment in male Wistar rats. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of morphine (5 and 7.5mg/kg) immediately after training decreased IA response on the test day, which was reinstated by pre-test administration of the same doses of the opioid; this is known as state-dependency. Moreover, pre-test administration of nicotine (0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) also reversed the decrease in IA response because of post-training morphine (5mg/kg). Here, we also show that when infused into the VTA before testing, NMDA (0.01 and 0.1 microg/rat) reverse the post-training morphine effect on memory. In addition, the sub-effective doses of NMDA (0.0001 and 0.001 microg/rat) in combination with a low dose of nicotine (0.1mg/kg) which had no effects by themselves, synergistically improved retrieval of IA memory on the test day. In contrast, pre-test administration of a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (0.5, 1 and 2 microg/rat) which had no effect alone prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. Our data indicate that NMDA receptors in the VTA are involved in the reversing effect of nicotine on morphine induced state-dependency.

  15. The role of sleep in false memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jessica D; Schacter, Daniel L; Propper, Ruth E; Huang, Li-Wen; Wamsley, Erin J; Tucker, Matthew A; Walker, Matthew P; Stickgold, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Memories are not stored as exact copies of our experiences. As a result, remembering is subject not only to memory failure, but to inaccuracies and distortions as well. Although such distortions are often retained or even enhanced over time, sleep's contribution to the development of false memories is unknown. Here, we report that a night of sleep increases both veridical and false recall in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, compared to an equivalent period of daytime wakefulness. But while veridical memory deteriorates across both wake and sleep, false memories are preferentially preserved by sleep, actually showing a non-significant improvement. The same selectivity of false over veridical memories was observed in a follow-up nap study. Unlike previous studies implicating deep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) in declarative memory consolidation, here veridical recall correlated with decreased SWS, a finding that was observed in both the overnight and nap studies. These findings lead to two counterintuitive conclusions - that under certain circumstances sleep can promote false memories over veridical ones, and SWS can be associated with impairment rather than facilitation of declarative memory consolidation. While these effects produce memories that are less accurate after sleep, these memories may, in the end, be more useful.

  16. The critical role of the endocannabinoid system in emotional homeostasis: avoiding excess and deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, E M; Viveros, M P

    2009-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is critical in the regulation of emotion and stress responsiveness. Despite the promising therapeutic value of its pharmacological modulation, deficient and excessive endocannabinoid signalling should be avoided. This mini-review will provide an up-to-date revision on this topic, emphasizing the relevance of a normative endocannabinoid system for emotional homeostasis.

  17. Insight in paranoia: The role of experiential avoidance and internalized stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carmen; Provencio, Maria; Espinosa, Regina; Duque, Almudena; Everts, Franziska

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that insight in psychosis has been related to treatment adherence, recovery and good prognosis, but also to depression, low self-esteem, and diminished quality of life. Thus, insight might not be advantageous under all circumstances. Internalized-stigma (i.e. self-acceptance of stigmatizing images of illness) and experiential avoidance (i.e. unwillingness to experience negative private events) have been proposed as moderating variables between insight, and psychological health variables and/or distress. We investigated the patterns of association of insight with satisfaction with life, self-esteem, depression, anxiety and psychotic psychopathology as moderated by self-stigmatizing beliefs and experiential avoidance, in a sample of 47 participants with persecutory beliefs and diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder. Moderation analyses confirm the importance of internalized-stigma and experiential avoidance. The presence of insight was associated with more depression when there were high levels of self-stigma. Whereas, the absence of insight was associated with a greater life satisfaction when there were high levels of experiential avoidance. To summarize, our results help understand the complex relationship between insight, psychological health variables and emotional distress, pointing to a differential pattern of moderation for negative and positive outcomes. We discuss the implications of these results for research and treatment of paranoia.

  18. The Role of Sexual Compulsivity, Impulsivity, and Experiential Avoidance in Internet Pornography Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterneck, Chad T.; Burgess, Angela J.; Short, Mary B.; Smith, Angela H.; Cervantes, Maritza E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has found that a significant proportion of individuals who use Internet pornography (IP) report that their use is problematic in some area of functioning. Problematic IP use has been conceptualized as an aspect of sexual addiction and as having components of impulsivity and compulsivity. Experiential avoidance also has been…

  19. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  20. The Effect of Chronic Oral Administration of Withania Somnifera Root on Learning and Memory in Diabetic Rats Using Passive Avoidance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Roghani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus (especially type I is accompanied with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Considering the potential anti-diabetic effect of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera (ashwagandha and the augmenting effect of its consumption on the memory and mental health, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic oral administration of ashwagandha root on learning and memory in diabetic rats using passive avoidance test. Materials & Methods: For this purpose, male Wistar diabetic rats were randomly divided into control, ashwagandha-treated control, diabetic, and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups. Ashwagandha treatment continued for 1 to 2 months. For induction of diabetes, streptozotocin was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. Serum glucose level was determined before the study and at 4th and 8th weeks after the experiment. In addition, for evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined after 1 and 2 months using passive avoidance test. Results: It was found that one- and two-month administration of ashwagandha root at a weight ratio of 1/15 has not any significant hypoglycemic effect in treated control and diabetic groups. Furthermore, there was a significant increase (p<0.05 in IL in diabetic and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups after two months compared to control group. In this respect, there was no significant difference between diabetic and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups. In addition, STL significantly increased in ashwagandha-treated control group after 1 (p<0.01 and 2 (p<0.05 month in comparison to control group. On the other hand, STL significantly decreased (p<0.05 in diabetic group and significantly increased (p<0.05 in ashwagandha-treated diabetic group as compared to control group after two months. Conclusion: In summary, chronic oral administration of

  1. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Memory Formation in Amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael eLamprecht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The central, lateral and basolateral amygdala nuclei are essential for the formation of long-term memories including emotional and drug-related memories. The study of cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning memory in amygdala may shed light on the formation of memory and on fear and addiction-related disorders. A challenge is to identify molecules activated by learning that subserve cellular changes needed for memory formation and maintenance in amygdala. Recent studies show that activation of synaptic receptors during fear and drug-related learning leads to alteration in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and structure in amygdala. Such changes in actin cytoskeleton in amygdala are essential for fear and drug-related memories formation. Moreover, the actin cytoskeleton subserves, after learning, changes in neuronal morphogenesis and glutamate receptors trafficking in amygdala. These cellular events are involved in fear and drug-related memories formation. Actin polymerization is also needed for the maintenance of drug-associated memories in amygdala. Thus, the actin cytoskeleton is a key mediator between receptor activation during learning and cellular changes subserving long-term memory in amygdala. The actin cytoskeleton may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear memory associated with fear and anxiety disorders and drug addiction to prevent the debilitating consequences of these diseases.

  2. Goal-directed memory: the role of cognitive control in older adults' emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Knight, Marisa

    2005-12-01

    The present study revealed that older adults recruit cognitive control processes to strengthen positive and diminish negative information in memory. In Experiment 1, older adults engaged in more elaborative processing when retrieving positive memories than they did when retrieving negative memories. In Experiment 2, older adults who did well on tasks involving cognitive control were more likely than those doing poorly to favor positive pictures in memory. In Experiment 3, older adults who were distracted during memory encoding no longer favored positive over negative pictures in their later recall, revealing that older adults use cognitive resources to implement emotional goals during encoding. In contrast, younger adults showed no signs of using cognitive control to make their memories more positive, indicating that, for them, emotion regulation goals are not chronically activated.

  3. How to avoid reputation damage in financial restatement? The role of investor relations management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of avoiding reputation damage by investor relations management under certain corporate governance structures and mechanisms, samples of 1120 listed companies are used to research the influence on financial restatements by corporate governance. Then the moderating effects of investor relations management on financial restatements are analyzed. The result is that the more dispersed the equity, the higher the probability of financial restatements will be (This includes the gover...

  4. A critical role of the human hippocampus in an electrophysiological measure of implicit memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addante, Richard James

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus has traditionally been thought to be critical for conscious explicit memory but not necessary for unconscious implicit memory processing. In a recent study of a group of mild amnesia patients with evidence of MTL damage limited to the hippocampus, subjects were tested on a direct test of item recognition confidence while electroencephalogram (EEG) was acquired, and revealed intact measures of explicit memory from 400–600ms (mid-frontal old-new effect, FN400). The current investigation re-analyzed this data to study event-related potentials (ERPs) of implicit memory, using a recently developed procedure that eliminated declarative memory differences. Prior ERP findings from this technique were first replicated in two independent matched control groups, which exhibited reliable implicit memory effects in posterior scalp regions from 400–600 msec, which were topographically dissociated from the explicit memory effects of familiarity. However, patients were found to be dramatically impaired in implicit memory effects relative to control subjects, as quantified by a reliable condition × group interaction. Several control analysis were conducted to consider alternative factors that could account for the results, including outliers, sample size, age, or contamination by explicit memory, and each of these factors were systematically ruled out. Results suggest that the hippocampus plays a fundamental role in aspects of memory processing that is beyond conscious awareness. The current findings therefore indicate that both memory systems of implicit and explicit memory may rely upon the same neural structures – but function in different physiological ways. PMID:25562828

  5. The role of mosquito olfaction in oviposition site location and in the avoidance of unsuitable hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J A; Woodcock, C M

    1996-01-01

    Developments in the exploitation of mosquito olfaction are traced, in collaborative studies with various groups, from the first identification of a mosquito pheromone through to a discussion of non-host avoidance. The characterization of the oviposition pheromone for mosquitoes in the genus Culex, e.g. Culex quinquefasciatus, as a novel chiral lactone ester provided the impetus for a number of sophisticated asymmetric syntheses and economical large-scale routes to racemic products. The latter have provided material for successful field trials in three continents. During the course of this field work, we obtained evidence that semiochemicals originating directly from the oviposition site are essential for activity of the oviposition pheromone. Recent studies are elucidating the nature of these agents and their geographical variability. Initially, we used synthetic oviposition pheromone to attract mosquitoes to sites treated with a biorational larvicide. However, recyclable biological control agents offer better prospects for resource-poor regions. A biotechnological approach to pheromone production has been devised involving the generation of inexpensive starting materials by the cultivation of a higher plant. New studies on dipterous pests feeding on farm animals indicate a semiochemically based mechanism by which unsuitable individuals within the host species are avoided. There appears to be an analogous process in which mosquitoes avoid certain potential human hosts, thereby raising prospects for the development of novel, rationally identified repellents once the semiochemical/olfactory interactions have been fully elucidated.

  6. Role of autobiographical memory in social problem solving and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, L; Dritschel, B; Burton, A

    1996-11-01

    Depressed patients frequently exhibit deficiencies in social problem solving (SPS). A possible cause of this deficit is an impairment in patients' ability to retrieve specific autobiographical memories. A clinically depressed group and a hospital control group performed the Means-End Problem-Solving (MEPS; J. J. Platt & G. Spivack, 1975a) task, during which they were required to attend to the memories retrieved during solution generation. Memories were categorized according to whether they were specific, categoric, or extended and whether the valence of the memories was positive or negative. Results support the general hypothesis that SPS skill is a function of autobiographical memory retrieval as measured by a cuing task and by the types of memories retrieved during the MEPS. However, the dysfunctional nature of categoric memories in SPS, rather than the importance of specific memories, was highlighted in the depressed group. Valence proved to be an unimportant variable in SPS ability. The cyclical links among autobiographical memory retrieval, SPS skills, and depression are discussed.

  7. The role of overt attention in emotion-modulated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Lily; McQuiggan, Douglas A; Farb, Norman; Anderson, Adam K; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2011-08-01

    The presence of emotional stimuli results in a central/peripheral tradeoff effect in memory: memory for central details is enhanced at the cost of peripheral items. It has been assumed that emotion-modulated differences in memory are the result of differences in attention, but this has not been tested directly. The present experiment used eye movement monitoring as an index of overt attention allocation and mediation analysis to determine whether differences in attention were related to subsequent memory. Participants viewed negative and neutral scenes surrounded by three neutral objects and were then given a recognition memory test. The results revealed evidence in support of a central/peripheral tradeoff in both attention and memory. However, contrary with previous assumptions, whereas attention partially mediated emotion-enhanced memory for central pictures, it did not explain the entire relationship. Further, although centrally presented emotional stimuli led to decreased number of eye fixations toward the periphery, these differences in viewing did not contribute to emotion-impaired memory for specific details pertaining to the periphery. These findings suggest that the differential influence of negative emotion on central versus peripheral memory may result from other cognitive influences in addition to overt visual attention or on postencoding processes. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  8. The Role of Nitric Oxide in Memory is Modulated by Diurnal Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Gage

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important neuromodulatory role in the olfactory system. This modulation has been suggested to be particularly important for olfactory learning and memory in the antennal lobe (the primary olfactory network in invertebrates. We are using the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, to further investigate the role of NO in olfactory memory. Recent findings suggest that NO affects short-term memory traces and that NO concentration fluctuates with the light cycle. This gives rise to the hypothesis that NO may be involved in the connection between memory and circadian rhythms. In this study, we explore the role of diurnal time and NO in memory by altering the time of day when associative-olfactory conditioning is performed. We find a strong effect of NO on short-term memory, and two surprising effects of diurnal time. We find that (1 at certain time points, NO affects longer traces of memory in addition to short-term memory, and (2 when conditioning is performed close to the light cycle switches—both from light to dark and dark to light—NO does not significantly affect memory at all. These findings suggest an intriguing functional role for NO in olfactory conditioning that is modulated as a function of diurnal time.

  9. The role of working memory in inferential sentence comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ana Isabel; Paolieri, Daniela; Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa

    2014-08-01

    Existing literature on inference making is large and varied. Trabasso and Magliano (Discourse Process 21(3):255-287, 1996) proposed the existence of three types of inferences: explicative, associative and predictive. In addition, the authors suggested that these inferences were related to working memory (WM). In the present experiment, we investigated whether WM capacity plays a role in our ability to answer comprehension sentences that require text information based on these types of inferences. Participants with high and low WM span read two narratives with four paragraphs each. After each paragraph was read, they were presented with four true/false comprehension sentences. One required verbatim information and the other three implied explicative, associative and predictive inferential information. Results demonstrated that only the explicative and predictive comprehension sentences required WM: participants with high verbal WM were more accurate in giving explanations and also faster at making predictions relative to participants with low verbal WM span; in contrast, no WM differences were found in the associative comprehension sentences. These results are interpreted in terms of the causal nature underlying these types of inferences.

  10. Listening Comprehension in Preschoolers: The Role of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florit, Elena; Roch, Maja; Altoe, Gianmarco; Levorato, Maria Chiara

    2009-01-01

    The current study analyzed the relationship between text comprehension and memory skills in preschoolers. We were interested in verifying the hypothesis that memory is a specific contributor to listening comprehension in preschool children after controlling for verbal abilities. We were also interested in analyzing the developmental path of the…

  11. The role of associative strength in children's false memory illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L; Wimmer, Marina C; Blease, Katrina

    2009-01-01

    The effects of associative strength on rates of 7- and 11-year-old children's true and false memories were examined when category and Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists were used to cue the same critical lure. Backward associative strength (BAS) was varied such that the category and DRM lists had the same strength (DRM=category), DRM lists had more BAS (DRM>category), or category lists had more BAS (DRMfalse memories then BAS, not the type of relation across items in a list, should determine false memory production. The results confirmed this prediction using both recall and recognition measures: (1) both true and false memories increased with age, (2) true memory was better for category than DRM lists but there were no differences for false memory, and (3) at all ages, false memories varied predictably with changes in BAS but were unaffected by list-type manipulations. These findings are discussed in the context of models of false memory development.

  12. Involvement of AMPA receptors in maintenance of memory for a passive avoidance task in day-old domestic chicks (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, R J; Stewart, M G

    1995-06-01

    Day-old chicks (Gallus domesticus) were trained on a one-trial passive avoidance task where the aversive stimulus was an unpleasant tasting substance, methyl anthranilate. Chicks were killed 6.5 h after training. The kinetic parameters of [3H] alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ([3H]AMPA) binding were determined using quantitative receptor autoradiography and Scatchard analyses in 15 discrete forebrain regions of trained and control (water-trained) chicks, revealing two components of binding in each. KD values showed some regional variation, but were 22.2 +/- 1.1 nmol l-1 for the high-affinity component and 685 +/- 25 nmol l-1 for the low-affinity component of binding to whole forebrain sections from control chicks. Analyses also revealed that Hill coefficients were significantly less than 1 in all regions measured. A significant decrease in KD for the low-affinity component occurred bilaterally in the intermediate and medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV; left, 34.8%; right, 33.3%), a region that has previously been shown to be implicated in the processes of memory formation, following passive avoidance training. A significant decrease in KD for the high-affinity component occurred in the right palaeostriatum augmentatum (19.5%). Significant decreases in Bmax accompanied the KD alterations in both cases. Additionally, bilateral intracerebral injections (administered 4.5-5.5 h after training) into the IMHV of 500 nmol l-1 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a selective antagonist of non-NMDA glutamate receptors (particularly AMPA receptors), resulted in amnesia for one-trial passive avoidance training in day-old chicks tested 6.5 h after training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.; Becker, E.S.; Craske, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This

  14. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.; Becker, E.S.; Craske, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This st

  15. The role of cannabinoids in modulating emotional and non-emotional memory processes in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit eAkirav

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid agonists generally have a disruptive effect on memory, learning, and operant behavior that is considered to be hippocampus-dependent. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, cannabinoid receptor activation may facilitate neuronal learning processes. For example, CB1 receptors are essential for the extinction of conditioned fear associations, indicating an important role for this receptor in neuronal emotional learning and memory. This review examines the diverse effects of cannabinoids on hippocampal memory and plasticity. It shows how the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation may vary depending on the route of administration, the nature of the task (aversive or not, and whether it involves emotional memory formation (e.g. conditioned fear and extinction learning or non-emotional memory formation (e.g. spatial learning. It also examines the memory stage under investigation (acquisition, consolidation, retrieval, extinction, and the brain areas involved. Differences between the effects of exogenous and endogenous agonists are also discussed. The apparently biphasic effects of cannabinoids on anxiety is noted as this implies that the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on hippocampal learning and memory may be attributable to a general modulation of anxiety or stress levels and not to memory per se. The review concludes that cannabinoids have diverse effects on hippocampal memory and plasticity that cannot be categorized simply into an impairing or an enhancing effect. A better understanding of the involvement of cannabinoids in memory processes will help determine whether the benefits of the clinical use of cannabinoids outweigh the risks of possible memory impairments.

  16. The role of experiential avoidance, rumination and mindfulness in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Felicity A; Park, Rebecca J

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa has been associated with high levels of ruminative thoughts about eating, shape and weight as well as avoidance of emotion and experience. This study examined the associations between disorder-specific rumination, mindfulness, experiential avoidance and eating disorder symptoms. A sample of healthy females (n=228) completed a battery of on-line self-report measures. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that ruminative brooding on eating, weight and shape concerns was uniquely associated with eating disorder symptoms, above and beyond anxiety and depression symptoms. In a small group (n=42) of individuals with a history of anorexia nervosa, only reflection on eating weight and shape was able to predict eating disorder symptoms when controlling for depression and anxiety. The results suggest that rumination (both brooding and reflection) on eating, weight and shape concerns may be a process which exacerbates eating disorder symptoms. Examining rumination may improve understanding of the cognitive processes which underpin anorexia nervosa and this may in turn aid the development of novel strategies to augment existing interventions. Replication in a larger clinical sample is warranted.

  17. Connecting Eating Pathology with Risk for Engaging in Suicidal Behavior: The Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Kayla D; Rojas, Sasha M; Veilleux, Jennifer C

    2017-02-01

    Individuals with eating pathology, particularly those with diagnosed eating disorders, are at high risk for suicide. It is less clear whether undiagnosed eating pathology and subsyndromal eating disorders carry the same risk and, if so, what mechanisms may explain why higher levels of eating pathology yield greater risk for engaging in suicidal behaviors. The indirect relationship between disordered eating and risk for suicidal behaviors via facets of experiential avoidance was tested using a multiple-mediator model. The model was tested using bootstrapping estimates of indirect effects in a sample of 218 noncollege student adults (Mage = 32.33, 66.1% women) with a history of suicidal attempt and/or history of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Results revealed that disordered eating indirectly predicted risk for suicidal behaviors, distress aversion (i.e., negative attitudes or dislike of distress), and procrastination (i.e., delaying engagement with distressing activities). Results suggest that targeting experiential avoidance and helping those who have a history of engaging in suicidal behaviors and/or NSSI develop regulation strategies to use during times of distress may be of utmost importance for treatment and prevention of eating pathology.

  18. A Physiological Role for Amyloid Beta Protein: Enhancement of Learning and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    John Morley; Susan Farr; William Banks; Johnson, Steven N.; Yamada, Kelvin A.; Lin Xu

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein (A[beta]) is well recognized as having a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The reason for the presence of A[beta] and its physiological role in non-disease states is not clear. In these studies, low doses of A[beta] enhanced memory retention in two memory tasks and enhanced acetylcholine production in the hippocampus _in vivo_. We then tested whether endogenous A[beta] has a role in learning and memory in young, cognitively intact mice...

  19. Is there a role of depressive symptoms in the fear-avoidance model? A structural equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekatz, Bettina; Meng, Karin; Bengel, Juergen; Faller, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    The fear-avoidance (FA) model has gained widespread acceptance as a conceptual framework for investigating psychological factors such as FA beliefs and avoidance behavior, which contribute to chronic back pain and reduced functioning. Depressive symptoms are supposed to be related to FA beliefs and to foster avoidance behavior. This study aims to investigate the multivariate assumptions of the FA model with a focus on the role of depressive symptoms. A total of N = 360 patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain at admission of inpatient orthopedic rehabilitation participated in the survey. Measures included a numeric pain rating scale, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire and Patient Health Questionnaire. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), we construed a basic FA model and subsequently extended it by adding symptoms of depression as a covariate. The results of SEM indicated a good model fit for a basic FA model (χ²(263) = 431.069, p < .001, RMSEA = .042, CFI = .964, WRMR = .986). They confirmed the hypothesized relations and supported single mediations of the relationship between pain and functioning by FA beliefs and avoidance behavior. A second model including symptoms of depression as additional covariate (χ²(511) = 722.761, p < .001, RMSEA = .034, CFI = .956, WRMR = .949) showed a high impact of depressive symptoms on all FA model variables leading to a decrease of the FA mediations. The findings provide empirical support for the multivariate FA model and underline the importance of considering depressive symptoms in a multiple-target approach to understand the mechanisms of chronic pain.

  20. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Rebecca; Allan, Kevin; Tsivilis, Dimitris; Martin, Douglas; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe) systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  1. Correlated bursts and the role of memory range

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertesz, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous temporal processes in natural and social phenomena have been described by bursts that are rapidly occurring events within short time periods alternating with long periods of low activity. In addition to the analysis of heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions, higher-order correlations between inter-event times, called \\emph{correlated bursts}, have been studied only recently. As the possible mechanisms underlying such correlated bursts are far from being fully understood, we devise a simple model for correlated bursts by using a self-exciting point process with variable memory range. Here the probability that a new event occurs is determined by a memory function that is the sum of decaying memories of the past events. In order to incorporate the noise and/or limited memory capacity of systems, we apply two memory loss mechanisms, namely either fixed number or variable number of memories. By using theoretical analysis and numerical simulations we find that excessive amount of memory effect ma...

  2. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wheeler

    Full Text Available Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  3. On the Role of Hippocampal Protein Synthesis in the Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Object Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.; Myskiw, Jociane C.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Upon retrieval, consolidated memories are again rendered vulnerable to the action of metabolic blockers, notably protein synthesis inhibitors. This has led to the hypothesis that memories are reconsolidated at the time of retrieval, and that this depends on protein synthesis. Ample evidence indicates that the hippocampus plays a key role both in…

  4. Insights from Neuropsychology: Pinpointing the role of the Posterior Parietal Cortex in Episodic and Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian E. Berryhill

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of posterior parietal cortex (PPC in various forms of memory is a current topic of interest in the broader field of cognitive neuroscience. This large cortical region has been linked with a wide range of mnemonic functions affecting each stage of memory processing: encoding, maintenance and retrieval. Yet, the precise role of the PPC in memory remains mysterious and controversial. Progress in understanding PPC function will require researchers to incorporate findings in a convergent manner from multiple experimental techniques rather than emphasizing a particular type of data. To facilitate this process, here, we review findings from the human neuropsychological research and examine the consequences to memory following PPC damage. Recent patient-based research findings have investigated two typically disconnected fields: working memory and episodic memory. The findings from patient participants with unilateral and bilateral PPC lesions performing diverse experimental paradigms are summarized. These findings are then related to findings from other techniques including neurostimulation (TMS and tDCS and the influential and more abundant functional neuroimaging literature. We then review the strengths and weaknesses of hypotheses proposed to account for PPC function in these forms of memory. Finally, we address what missing evidence is needed to clarify the role(s of the PPC in memory.

  5. The role of trust in nurturing compliance: a study of accused tax avoiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kristina

    2004-04-01

    Why an institution's rules and regulations are obeyed or disobeyed is an important question for regulatory agencies. This paper discusses the findings of an empirical study that shows that the use of threat and legal coercion as a regulatory tool--in addition to being more expensive to implement--can sometimes be ineffective in gaining compliance. Using survey data collected from 2,292 taxpayers accused of tax avoidance, it will be demonstrated that variables such as trust need to be considered when managing noncompliance. If regulators are seen to be acting fairly, people will trust the motives of that authority, and will defer to their decisions voluntarily. This paper therefore argues that to shape desired behavior, regulators will need to move beyond motivation linked purely to deterrence. Strategies directed at reducing levels of distrust between the two sides may prove particularly effective in gaining voluntary compliance with an organization's rules and regulations.

  6. Confabulation behavior and false memories in Korsakoff's syndrome: role of source memory and executive functioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Kortrijk, H.E.; Wester, A.J.; Nys, G.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Confabulation behavior is common in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome. A distinction can be made between spontaneous and provoked confabulations, which may have different underlying cognitive mechanisms. Provoked confabulations may be related to intrusions on memory tests, whereas spontaneous

  7. Sex and estrous cycle influence diazepam effects on anxiety and memory: Possible role of progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Sousa, Diego Silveira; Medeiros, André Macêdo; Macêdo, Priscila Tavares; Leão, Anderson Henrique; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Izídio, Geison Souza; Silva, Regina Helena

    2016-10-03

    Studies with rodents and humans show the relationship between female sex hormones and cognitive/emotional tasks. However, despite the greater incidence of anxiety disorders in women, the data are still inconclusive regarding the mechanisms related to this phenomenon. We evaluated the effects of a classical anxiolytic/amnestic drug (diazepam; DZP) on female (at different estrous cycle phases) and male rats tested in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT), that allows the concomitant evaluation of memory and anxiety-like behavior. Further, in order to investigate the role of progesterone and its metabolites in the effects of DZP in the PMDAT, female rats were pre-treated with the progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone or the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. The main findings were: (1) DZP caused memory impairment and anxiolysis in both sexes, but only the highest dose induced the anxiolytic effect in females; (2) females in proestrus did not present the amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP (at 2.0 and 4.0mg/kg, respectively) and (3) the co-administration of mifepristone reestablished both amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP, while finasteride reinstated the amnestic effect in proestrus female rats. These results suggest that changes in the endogenous levels of progesterone and its metabolites are important in the modulation of emotional/cognitive behavior in female rats. Based on the influence on different aspects of DZP action, the mechanisms related to this modulation are probably linked to GABAergic transmission, but this point remains to be investigated. Further, the variation in therapeutic and adverse effects of DZP depending on sex and hormonal state is of great relevance considering the higher prevalence of anxiety disorders in women.

  8. Timing, memory for intervals, and memory for untimed stimuli: The role of instructional ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Thomas R

    2006-02-28

    Theories of animal timing have had to account for findings that the memory for the duration of a timed interval appears to be dramatically shorted within a short time of its termination. This finding has led to the subjective shortening hypothesis and it has been proposed to account for the poor memory that animals appear to have for the initial portion of a timed interval when a gap is inserted in the to-be-timed signal. It has also been proposed to account for the poor memory for a relatively long interval that has been discriminated from a shorter interval. I suggest here a simpler account in which ambiguity between the gap or retention interval and the intertrial interval results in resetting the clock, rather than forgetting the interval. The ambiguity hypothesis, together with a signal salience mechanism that determines how quickly the clock is reset at the start of the intertrial interval can account for the results of the reported timing experiments that have used the peak procedure. Furthermore, instructional ambiguity rather than memory loss may account for the results of many animal memory experiments that do not involve memory for time.

  9. Attention on our mind: the role of spatial attention in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeuwes, Jan; Kramer, Arthur F; Irwin, David E

    2011-06-01

    The current study shows that spatial visual attention is used to retrieve information from visual working memory. Participants had to keep four colored circles in visual working memory. While keeping this information in memory we asked whether one of the colors was present in the array. While retrieving this information, on some trials a probe dot was presented. When this probe dot was presented at the location of the color that had to be retrieved, participants responded faster than when it was presented at another location. Our findings further elaborate the role of visual attention in working memory: not only is attention the mechanism by which information is stored into working memory, it is also the mechanism by which information is retrieved from visual working memory.

  10. Child Maltreatment and Adult Substance Abuse: The Role of Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Elwyn, Laura; Smith, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a risk factor for substance abuse in adulthood. This study examines whether memory of maltreatment is a necessary link in the path leading from prospectively measured childhood maltreatment to adult substance use problems. Official Child Protective Services reports and adult retrospective recall of childhood maltreatment were used to predict illegal drug use and alcohol problems in adulthood controlling for covariates. Memory was a necessary link in the path between pros...

  11. Role of beta-adrenoceptors in memory consolidation: beta3-adrenoceptors act on glucose uptake and beta2-adrenoceptors on glycogenolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Marie E; Hutchinson, Dana S; Summers, Roger J

    2008-09-01

    Noradrenaline, acting via beta(2)- and beta(3)-adrenoceptors (AR), enhances memory formation in single trial-discriminated avoidance learning in day-old chicks by mechanisms involving changes in metabolism of glucose and/or glycogen. Earlier studies of memory consolidation in chicks implicated beta(3)- rather than beta(2)-ARs in enhancement of memory consolidation by glucose, but did not elucidate whether stimulation of glucose uptake or of glycolysis was responsible. This study examines the role of glucose transport in memory formation using central injection of the nonselective facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitor cytochalasin B, the endothelial/astrocytic GLUT-1 inhibitor phloretin and the Na(+)/energy-dependent endothelial glucose transporter (SGLT) inhibitor phlorizin. Cytochalasin B inhibited memory when injected into the mesopallium (avian cortex) either close to or between 25 and 45 min after training, whereas phloretin and phlorizin only inhibited memory at 30 min. This suggested that astrocytic/endothelial (GLUT-1) transport is critical at the time of consolidation, whereas a different transporter, probably the neuronal glucose transporter (GLUT-3), is important at the time of training. Inhibition of glucose transport by cytochalasin B, phloretin, or phlorizin also interfered with beta(3)-AR-mediated memory enhancement 20 min posttraining, whereas inhibition of glycogenolysis interfered with beta(2)-AR agonist enhancement of memory. We conclude that in astrocytes (1) activities of both GLUT-1 and SGLT are essential for memory consolidation 30 min posttraining; (2) neuronal GLUT-3 is essential at the time of training; and (3) beta(2)- and beta(3)-ARs consolidate memory by different mechanisms; beta(3)-ARs stimulate central glucose transport, whereas beta(2)-ARs stimulate central glycogenolysis.

  12. Biases in the Explore-Exploit Tradeoff in Addictions: The Role of Avoidance of Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Laurel S; Baek, Kwangyeol; Kundu, Prantik; Harrison, Neil A; Frank, Michael J; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    We focus on exploratory decisions across disorders of compulsivity, a potential dimensional construct for the classification of mental disorders. Behaviors associated with the pathological use of alcohol or food, in alcohol use disorders (AUD) or binge-eating disorder (BED), suggest a disturbance in explore-exploit decision-making, whereby strategic exploratory decisions in an attempt to improve long-term outcomes may diminish in favor of more repetitive or exploitatory choices. We compare exploration vs exploitation across disorders of natural (obesity with and without BED) and drug rewards (AUD). We separately acquired resting state functional MRI data using a novel multi-echo planar imaging sequence and independent components analysis from healthy individuals to assess the neural correlates underlying exploration. Participants with AUD showed reduced exploratory behavior across gain and loss environments, leading to lower-yielding exploitatory choices. Obese subjects with and without BED did not differ from healthy volunteers but when compared with each other or to AUD subjects, BED had enhanced exploratory behaviors particularly in the loss domain. All subject groups had decreased exploration or greater uncertainty avoidance to losses compared with rewards. More exploratory decisions in the context of reward were associated with frontal polar and ventral striatal connectivity. For losses, exploration was associated with frontal polar and precuneus connectivity. We further implicate the relevance and dimensionality of constructs of compulsivity across disorders of both natural and drug rewards.

  13. Evaluation of passive avoidance learning and spatial memory in rats exposed to low levels of lead during specific periods of early brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Barkur, Rajashekar; Bairy, Laxminarayana K

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of heavy metal lead (Pb) for various commercial purposes has resulted in the environmental contamination caused by this metal. The studies have shown a definite relationship between low level lead exposure during early brain development and deficit in children's cognitive functions. This study investigated the passive avoidance learning and spatial learning in male rat pups exposed to lead through their mothers during specific periods of early brain development. Experimental male rats were divided into 5 groups: i) the normal control group (NC) (N = 12) consisted of rat offspring born to mothers who were given normal drinking water throughout gestation and lactation, ii) the pre-gestation lead exposed group (PG) (N = 12) consisted of rat offspring, mothers of these rats had been exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water for 1 month before conception, iii) the gestation lead exposed group (G) (N = 12) contained rat offspring born to mothers who had been exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water throughout gestation, iv) the lactation lead exposed group (L) (N = 12) had rat offspring, mothers of these rats exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water throughout lactation and v) the gestation and lactation lead exposed group (GL) (N = 12) contained rat offspring, mothers of these rats were exposed to 0.2% lead acetate throughout gestation and lactation. The study found deficit in passive avoidance learning in the G, L and GL groups of rats. Impairment in spatial learning was found in the PG, G, L and GL groups of rats. Interestingly, the study found that gestation period only and lactation period only lead exposure was sufficient to cause deficit in learning and memory in rats. The extent of memory impairment in the L group of rats was comparable with the GL group of rats. So it can be said that postnatal period of brain development is more sensitive to neurotoxicity compared to prenatal exposure. This work is available in Open

  14. Childhood pet ownership, attachment to pets, and subsequent meat avoidance. The mediating role of empathy toward animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgerber, Hank; Mican, Frances

    2014-08-01

    Researchers studying childhood pet ownership outcomes do not typically focus on measures of adult diet, and those studying the psychology of meat consumption do not normally consider early experiences with companion animals. The present research sought to integrate these two areas by examining relationships between childhood pet ownership, pet attachment, empathy toward animals, belief in human-animal similarity, meat avoidance, and justifications for eating meat. Results from 273 individuals responding to a survey on an internet platform revealed that participants with greater childhood attachment to a pet reported greater meat avoidance as adults, an effect that disappeared when controlling for animal empathy. Greater childhood pet attachment was also related to the use of indirect, apologetic justifications for meat consumption, and this effect too, was mediated by empathy toward animals. Child pet ownership itself predicted views toward animals but not dietary behavior or meat-eating justifications. The authors propose a sequence of events by which greater childhood pet attachment leads to increased meat avoidance, focusing on the central role played by empathy toward animals.

  15. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL.

  16. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Mendes Schöwe; Eduardo Moreira de Oliveira; Hudson Sousa Buck; Tania Araujo Viel

    2016-01-01

    Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer’s disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind). However...

  17. On the role of memory errors in quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, L; Dür, W; Kraus, B

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the influence of memory errors in the quantum repeater scheme for long-range quantum communication. We show that the communication distance is limited in standard operation mode due to memory errors resulting from unavoidable waiting times for classical signals. We show how to overcome these limitations by (i) improving local memory, and (ii) introducing two new operational modes of the quantum repeater. In both operational modes, the repeater is run blindly, i.e. without waiting for classical signals to arrive. In the first scheme, entanglement purification protocols based on one-way classical communication are used allowing to communicate over arbitrary distances. However, the error thresholds for noise in local control operations are very stringent. The second scheme makes use of entanglement purification protocols with two-way classical communication and inherits the favorable error thresholds of the repeater run in standard mode. One can increase the possible communication distance by an o...

  18. The Role of Memory in Document Re-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, X; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fulton, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    . For participants the act of organizing documents is itself a memory aid. Participants’ recommendations for PIM tools include support for information organization and simplistic visualizations that can be customized, e.g., using colour to highlight folders or documents. Research limitations......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore graduate students’ behaviour and perspectives regarding personal digital document management, as well as insights into the connections between memory and document re-finding. Design/methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews were conducted...

  19. Child Maltreatment and Adult Substance Abuse: The Role of Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Laura; Smith, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a risk factor for substance abuse in adulthood. This study examines whether memory of maltreatment is a necessary link in the path leading from prospectively measured childhood maltreatment to adult substance use problems. Official Child Protective Services reports and adult retrospective recall of childhood maltreatment were used to predict illegal drug use and alcohol problems in adulthood controlling for covariates. Memory was a necessary link in the path between prospective reports of maltreatment and alcohol problems, and an important link in the path between prospective reports and illegal drug use. Implications for prevention and treatment are discussed.

  20. The pivotal role of semantic memory in remembering the past and imagining the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muireann eIrish

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory refers to a complex and multifaceted process which enables the retrieval of richly detailed evocative memories from the past. In contrast, semantic memory is conceptualised as the retrieval of general conceptual knowledge divested of a specific spatiotemporal context. The neural substrates of the episodic and semantic memory systems have been dissociated in healthy individuals during functional imaging studies, and in clinical cohorts, leading to the prevailing view that episodic and semantic memory represent functionally distinct systems subtended by discrete neurobiological substrates. Importantly, however, converging evidence focusing on widespread neural networks now points to significant overlap between those regions essential for retrieval of autobiographical memories, episodic learning, and semantic processing. Here we review recent advances in episodic memory research focusing on neurodegenerative populations which has proved revelatory for our understanding of the complex interplay between episodic and semantic memory. Whereas episodic memory research has traditionally focused on retrieval of autobiographical events from the past, we also include evidence from the recent paradigm shift in which episodic memory is viewed as an adaptive and constructive process which facilitates the imagining of possible events in the future. We examine the available evidence which converges to highlight the pivotal role of semantic memory in providing schemas and meaning whether one is engaged in autobiographical retrieval for the past, or indeed, is endeavouring to construct a plausible scenario of an event in the future. It therefore seems plausible to contend that semantic processing may underlie most, if not all, forms of episodic memory, irrespective of temporal condition.

  1. The Role of Memory Activation in Creating False Memories of Encoding Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Using 3 experiments, I examined false memory for encoding context by presenting Deese-Roediger-McDermott themes (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) in usual-looking fonts and by testing related, but unstudied, lure items in a font that was shown during encoding. In 2 of the experiments, testing lure items in the font used to study their…

  2. Microtubules in the Cerebral Cortex: Role in Memory and Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Nancy J.

    This chapter raises the question whether synaptic connections in the cerebral cortex are adequate in accounting for higher cognition, especially cognition involving multimodal processing. A recent and novel approach to brain mechanics is outlined, one that involves microtubules and microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2). In addition to effects on the neuronal membrane, neurotransmitters exert actions on microtubules. These neurotransmitter effects alter the MAP2 phosphorylation state and rates of microtubule polymerization and transport. It is argued that these processes are important to the physical basis of memory and consciousness. In support of this argument, MAP2 is degraded with learning in discrete cortical modules. How this relates to synaptic change related to learning is unknown. The specific proposal is advanced that learning alters microtubules in the subsynaptic zone lying beneath the synapse, and that this forms the physical basis of long-term memory storage because microtubule networks determine the synapse strength by directing contacts with actin filaments and transport of synaptic proteins. It is argued that this is more probable than memory-related physical storage in the synapse itself. Comparisons to consciousness are made and it is concluded that there is a link between microtubules, memory and consciousness.

  3. The Role of Semantic Clustering in Optimal Memory Foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Priscilla; Thompson, Graham; Kello, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of semantic memory have investigated two theories of optimal search adopted from the animal foraging literature: Lévy flights and marginal value theorem. Each theory makes different simplifying assumptions and addresses different findings in search behaviors. In this study, an experiment is conducted to test whether clustering in…

  4. The Role of Vocal Practice in Constructing Phonological Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Portnoy, Tamar; Vihman, Marilyn M.; DePaolis, Rory A.; Whitaker, Chris J.; Williams, Nicola M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors looked for effects of vocal practice on phonological working memory. Method: A longitudinal design was used, combining both naturalistic observations and a nonword repetition test. Fifteen 26-month-olds (12 of whom were followed from age 11 months) were administered a nonword test including real words,…

  5. Categorical Biases in Spatial Memory: The Role of Certainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Mark P.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Memories for spatial locations often show systematic errors toward the central value of the surrounding region. The Category Adjustment (CA) model suggests that this bias is due to a Bayesian combination of categorical and metric information, which offers an optimal solution under conditions of uncertainty (Huttenlocher, Hedges, & Duncan,…

  6. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tadi

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  7. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Tadi, Monika

    2015-10-29

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  8. Aging and memory for numerical information: the role of specificity and expertise in associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Alan D

    2007-05-01

    In order to examine the nature of associative memory deficits in old age, the present study examined how younger and older adults link numerical and object information to other items. The hypothesis was that there would be large age differences for numerical information caused by the arbitrariness and specificity of this type of information, but that this could be reduced by expertise. Participants studied sentences that contained numeric quantity, object, and location information (e.g., 26 cherries in the bowl); they were later cued with the location and had to recall the object and quantity. In general, there were significant age differences for quantity recall but negligible age differences for recall of related objects but not unrelated objects. However, a group of older retired accountants and bookkeepers showed exceptional memory for quantity information. The findings suggest that the associative deficit in old age is based on the linking of specific arbitrary information.

  9. The role of the PFC in memory: An investigation of the Von Restorff effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat eElhalal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from neuropsychology and neuroimaging indicate that the pre-frontal cortex (PFC plays an important role in human memory. Although frontal patients are able to form new memories, these memories appear qualitatively different from those of controls, lacking distinctiveness. Neuroimaging studies of memory indicate activation in the PFC under deep encoding conditions, and under conditions of semantic elaboration. Based on these results, we hypothesise that the PFC enhances memory by extracting differences and commonalities in the studied material. To test this hypothesis, we carried out an experimental investigation to test the relationship between the PFC-dependent factors and semantic factors associated with common and specific features of words. These experiments were performed using Free-Recall of word lists with healthy adults, exploiting the correlation between PFC function and fluid intelligence. As predicted, a correlation was found between fluid intelligence and the Von-Restorff effect (better memory for semantic isolates; e.g., isolate cat within category members of fruit. Moreover, memory for the semantic isolate was found to depend on the isolate’s serial position. The isolate item tends to be recalled first, in comparison to non isolates, suggesting that the process interacts with short term memory. These results are captured within a computational model of free recall, which includes a PFC mechanism that is sensitive to both commonality and distinctiveness, sustaining a trade-off between the two.

  10. The role of the frontal cortex in memory: an investigation of the Von Restorff effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhalal, Anat; Davelaar, Eddy J.; Usher, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from neuropsychology and neuroimaging indicate that the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in human memory. Although frontal patients are able to form new memories, these memories appear qualitatively different from those of controls by lacking distinctiveness. Neuroimaging studies of memory indicate activation in the PFC under deep encoding conditions, and under conditions of semantic elaboration. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the PFC enhances memory by extracting differences and commonalities in the studied material. To test this hypothesis, we carried out an experimental investigation to test the relationship between the PFC-dependent factors and semantic factors associated with common and specific features of words. These experiments were performed using Free-Recall of word lists with healthy adults, exploiting the correlation between PFC function and fluid intelligence. As predicted, a correlation was found between fluid intelligence and the Von-Restorff effect (better memory for semantic isolates, e.g., isolate “cat” within category members of “fruit”). Moreover, memory for the semantic isolate was found to depend on the isolate's serial position. The isolate item tends to be recalled first, in comparison to non-isolates, suggesting that the process interacts with short term memory. These results are captured within a computational model of free recall, which includes a PFC mechanism that is sensitive to both commonality and distinctiveness, sustaining a trade-off between the two. PMID:25018721

  11. Role of Atypical Protein Kinases in Maintenance of Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinova, A A; Zuzina, A B; Balaban, P M

    2017-03-01

    Investigation of biochemical mechanisms underlying the long-term storage of information in nervous system is one of main problems of modern neurobiology. As a molecular basis of long-term memory, long-term changes in kinase activities, increase in the level and changes in the subunit composition of receptors in synaptic membranes, local activity of prion-like proteins, and epigenetic modifications of chromatin have been proposed. Perhaps a combination of all or of some of these factors underlies the storage of long-term memory in the brain. Many recent studies have shown an exclusively important role of atypical protein kinases (PKCζ, PKMζ, and PKCι/λ) in processes of learning, consolidation and maintenance of memory. The present review is devoted to consideration of mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control of atypical protein kinases and their roles in induction and maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory in vertebrates and invertebrates.

  12. Role of the hippocampus on learning and memory functioning and pain modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haimei Wang

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus, an important part of the limbic system, is considered to be an important region of the brain for learning and memory functioning. Recent studies have demonstrated that synaptic plasticity is thought to be the basis of learning and memory functioning. A series of studies report that similar synaptic plasticity also exists in the spinal cord in the conduction pathway of pain sensation, which may contribute to hyperalgesia, abnormal pain, and analgesia. The synaptic plasticity of learning and memory functioning and that of the pain conduction pathway have similar mechanisms, which are related to the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor. The hippocampus also has a role in pain modulation. As pain signals can reach the hippocampus, the precise correlation between synaptic plasticity of the pain pathway and that of learning and memory functioning deserves further investigation. The role of the hippocampus in processing pain information requires to be identified.

  13. Tracking the Time-Dependent Role of the Hippocampus in Memory Recall Using DREADDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Carmen; Weiss, Sarah; Meyer, Retsina; Halassa, Michael; Biedenkapp, Joseph; Wilson, Matthew A; Goosens, Ki Ann; Bendor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the storage of new autobiographical experiences as memories. Following an initial encoding stage in the hippocampus, memories undergo a process of systems-level consolidation, which leads to greater stability through time and an increased reliance on neocortical areas for retrieval. The extent to which the retrieval of these consolidated memories still requires the hippocampus is unclear, as both spared and severely degraded remote memory recall have been reported following post-training hippocampal lesions. One difficulty in definitively addressing the role of the hippocampus in remote memory retrieval is the precision with which the entire volume of the hippocampal region can be inactivated. To address this issue, we used Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs), a chemical-genetic tool capable of highly specific neuronal manipulation over large volumes of brain tissue. We find that remote (>7 weeks after acquisition), but not recent (1-2 days after acquisition) contextual fear memories can be recalled after injection of the DREADD agonist (CNO) in animals expressing the inhibitory DREADD in the entire hippocampus. Our data demonstrate a time-dependent role of the hippocampus in memory retrieval, supporting the standard model of systems consolidation.

  14. Tracking the Time-Dependent Role of the Hippocampus in Memory Recall Using DREADDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Varela

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is critical for the storage of new autobiographical experiences as memories. Following an initial encoding stage in the hippocampus, memories undergo a process of systems-level consolidation, which leads to greater stability through time and an increased reliance on neocortical areas for retrieval. The extent to which the retrieval of these consolidated memories still requires the hippocampus is unclear, as both spared and severely degraded remote memory recall have been reported following post-training hippocampal lesions. One difficulty in definitively addressing the role of the hippocampus in remote memory retrieval is the precision with which the entire volume of the hippocampal region can be inactivated. To address this issue, we used Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs, a chemical-genetic tool capable of highly specific neuronal manipulation over large volumes of brain tissue. We find that remote (>7 weeks after acquisition, but not recent (1-2 days after acquisition contextual fear memories can be recalled after injection of the DREADD agonist (CNO in animals expressing the inhibitory DREADD in the entire hippocampus. Our data demonstrate a time-dependent role of the hippocampus in memory retrieval, supporting the standard model of systems consolidation.

  15. The role of working memory in the metaphor interference effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Russell S; Maclaren, Rick; Chiappe, Dan L

    2010-06-01

    Participants took longer to judge that metaphors (e.g., an insult is a razor, memory is a warehouse) were literally false than to judge that scrambled sentences (e.g., an insult is a warehouse) were false. This result is the metaphor interference effect (MIE). It demonstrates that metaphor processing is automatic. In this experiment, we found that the magnitude of the MIE is predicted by working memory (WM) capacity, with higher WM yielding a smaller MIE. This suggests that although metaphor comprehension is automatic, the early processing of metaphors is controllable by executive mechanisms. We relate our results to Kintsch's (2000, 2001) predication model. Specifically, we suggest that mechanisms of WM influence metaphor processing by affecting the effectiveness of the construction-integration process that identifies common properties between topics and vehicles. WM also influences the speed with which meanings are identified as literal or figurative.

  16. The role of short-term memory in semantic priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A L; Diehl, V A

    2001-07-01

    Two theories of priming were compared: spreading activation theories, in particular ACT, and compound-cue theories. Whereas ACT assumes that priming is a result of diffusing activation in long-term memory, compound-cue models suggest that priming results from a formation process of prime and target in short-term memory. Thirty-eight participants took part in a study that combined a digit span task with a double lexical decision task consisting of a prime and a target item. Digit span length (low, medium, and high) and prime type (related or unrelated word or nonword) were both within-subject variables. As expected, results showed significant priming effects. In favor of ACT, no interaction between digit span length and prime type was found. Additionally, a nonword inhibition effect (unrelated versus nonword prime) was found, which was predicted by compound-cue theories. This finding is discussed in terms of the process interference and response competition hypotheses.

  17. The Role of Short-Term Memory in Operator Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    phonetically similar words but alleviates the effect of word length in general (Baddeley, Lewis, and Vallor, cited by Hitch, 1984), Salame and Baddeley (1982...suggested the existence of a passive phonological store. A second subsystem serving the central executive is the visuo-spatial scratch-pad (Baddeley...strategy for extending the efficiency of working memory. This of course may be limited to the encoding of stimuli which are semantically or phonetically

  18. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  19. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  20. Role of immediate-early genes in synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensembles underlying the memory trace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro eMinatohara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, neuronal gene expression is dynamically changed in response to neuronal activity. In particular, the expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs such as egr-1, c-fos, and Arc is rapidly and selectively upregulated in subsets of neurons in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory formation. IEG expression has therefore been widely used as a molecular marker for neuronal populations that undergo plastic changes underlying formation of long-term memory. In recent years, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic studies of neurons expressing c-fos or Arc have revealed that, during learning, IEG-positive neurons encode and store information that is required for memory recall, suggesting that they may be involved in formation of the memory trace. However, despite accumulating evidence for the role of IEGs in synaptic plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with this process remain unclear. In this review, we first summarize recent literature concerning the role of IEG-expressing neuronal ensembles in organizing the memory trace. We then focus on the physiological significance of IEGs, especially Arc, in synaptic plasticity, and describe our hypotheses about the importance of Arc expression in various types of input-specific circuit reorganization. Finally, we offer perspectives on Arc function that would unveil the role of IEG-expressing neurons in the formation of memory traces in the hippocampus and other brain areas.

  1. NF-κB Transcription Factor Role in Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Persistent Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica ede la Fuente

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is an important molecular process required for long-term neural plasticity and long-term memory formation. Thus, one main interest in molecular neuroscience in the last decades has been the identification of transcription factors that are involved in memory processes. Among them, the NF-κB family of transcription factors has gained interest due to a significant body of evidence that supports a key role of these proteins in synaptic plasticity and memory. In recent years, the interest was particularly reinforced because NF-κB was characterized as an important regulator of synaptogenesis. This function may be explained by its participation in synapse to nucleus communication, as well as a possible local role at the synapse. This review provides an overview of experimental work obtained in the last years, showing the essential role of this transcription factor in memory processes in different learning tasks in mammals. We focus the review on the consolidation and reconsolidation memory phases as well as on the regulation of immediate-early and late genes by epigenetic mechanisms that determine enduring forms of memories.

  2. Role of Immediate-Early Genes in Synaptic Plasticity and Neuronal Ensembles Underlying the Memory Trace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatohara, Keiichiro; Akiyoshi, Mika; Okuno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, neuronal gene expression is dynamically changed in response to neuronal activity. In particular, the expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs) such as egr-1, c-fos, and Arc is rapidly and selectively upregulated in subsets of neurons in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory formation. IEG expression has therefore been widely used as a molecular marker for neuronal populations that undergo plastic changes underlying formation of long-term memory. In recent years, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic studies of neurons expressing c-fos or Arc have revealed that, during learning, IEG-positive neurons encode and store information that is required for memory recall, suggesting that they may be involved in formation of the memory trace. However, despite accumulating evidence for the role of IEGs in synaptic plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with this process remain unclear. In this review, we first summarize recent literature concerning the role of IEG-expressing neuronal ensembles in organizing the memory trace. We then focus on the physiological significance of IEGs, especially Arc, in synaptic plasticity, and describe our hypotheses about the importance of Arc expression in various types of input-specific circuit reorganization. Finally, we offer perspectives on Arc function that would unveil the role of IEG-expressing neurons in the formation of memory traces in the hippocampus and other brain areas.

  3. NF-κB transcription factor role in consolidation and reconsolidation of persistent memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Zalcman, Gisela; Salles, Angeles; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is an important molecular process required for long-term neural plasticity and long-term memory (LTM) formation. Thus, one main interest in molecular neuroscience in the last decades has been the identification of transcription factors that are involved in memory processes. Among them, the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors has gained interest due to a significant body of evidence that supports a key role of these proteins in synaptic plasticity and memory. In recent years, the interest was particularly reinforced because NF-κB was characterized as an important regulator of synaptogenesis. This function may be explained by its participation in synapse to nucleus communication, as well as a possible local role at the synapse. This review provides an overview of experimental work obtained in the last years, showing the essential role of this transcription factor in memory processes in different learning tasks in mammals. We focus the review on the consolidation and reconsolidation memory phases as well as on the regulation of immediate-early and late genes by epigenetic mechanisms that determine enduring forms of memories. PMID:26441513

  4. Evidence for a developmental role for TLR4 in learning and memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Okun

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play essential roles in innate immunity and increasing evidence indicates that these receptors are expressed in neurons, astrocytes and microglia in the brain where they mediate responses to infection, stress and injury. Very little is known about the roles of TLRs in cognition. To test the hypothesis that TLR4 has a role in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, we used mice deficient for TLR4 and mice receiving chronic TLR4 antagonist infusion to the lateral ventricles in the brain. We found that developmental TLR4 deficiency enhances spatial reference memory acquisition and memory retention, impairs contextual fear-learning and enhances motor functions, traits that were correlated with CREB up-regulation in the hippocampus. TLR4 antagonist infusion into the cerebral ventricles of adult mice did not affect cognitive behavior, but instead affected anxiety responses. Our findings indicate a developmental role for TLR4 in shaping spatial reference memory, and fear learning and memory. Moreover, we show that central TLR4 inhibition using a TLR4 antagonist has no discernible physiological role in regulating spatial and contextual hippocampus-dependent cognitive behavior.

  5. Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic AMP 2 (Epac2) Plays a Specific and Time-Limited Role in Memory Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostroveanu, Anghelus; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Schmidt, Martina; Nijholt, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in memory retrieval is limited due to the lack of tools to study this stage of the memory process. Here we report that exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epac) play a surprisingly specific role in memory retrieval. Intrahippocampal injection of the

  6. Toward a better understanding on the role of prediction error on memory processes: From bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, María C; Fernández, Rodrigo S; Pedreira, María E; Boccia, Mariano M

    2017-07-01

    Experimental psychology defines Prediction Error (PE) as a mismatch between expected and current events. It represents a unifier concept within the memory field, as it is the driving force of memory acquisition and updating. Prediction error induces updating of consolidated memories in strength or content by memory reconsolidation. This process has two different neurobiological phases, which involves the destabilization (labilization) of a consolidated memory followed by its restabilization. The aim of this work is to emphasize the functional role of PE on the neurobiology of learning and memory, integrating and discussing different research areas: behavioral, neurobiological, computational and clinical psychiatry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A key role for nectin-1 in the ventral hippocampus in contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantin, Martina; van der Kooij, Michael A; Grosse, Jocelyn; Krummenacher, Claude; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in the brain. Nectin expression shows a dynamic spatiotemporal regulation, playing a role in neural migratory processes during development. Nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their heterophilic trans-interactions are important for the proper formation of synapses. In the hippocampus, nectin-1 and nectin-3 localize at puncta adherentia junctions and may play a role in synaptic plasticity, a mechanism essential for memory and learning. We evaluated the potential involvement of nectin-1 and nectin-3 in memory consolidation using an emotional learning paradigm. Rats trained for contextual fear conditioning showed transient nectin-1-but not nectin-3-protein upregulation in synapse-enriched hippocampal fractions at about 2 h posttraining. The upregulation of nectin-1 was found exclusively in the ventral hippocampus and was apparent in the synaptoneurosomal fraction. This upregulation was induced by contextual fear conditioning but not by exposure to context or shock alone. When an antibody against nectin-1, R165, was infused in the ventral-hippocampus immediately after training, contextual fear memory was impaired. However, treatment with the antibody in the dorsal hippocampus had no effect in contextual fear memory formation. Similarly, treatment with the antibody in the ventral hippocampus did not interfere with acoustic memory formation. Further control experiments indicated that the effects of ventral hippocampal infusion of the nectin-1 antibody in contextual fear memory cannot be ascribed to memory non-specific effects such as changes in anxiety-like behavior or locomotor behavior. Therefore, we conclude that nectin-1 recruitment to the perisynaptic environment in the ventral hippocampus plays an important role in the formation of contextual fear memories. Our results suggest that these mechanisms could be involved in the connection of emotional and contextual information processed in the amygdala and dorsal

  8. A key role for nectin-1 in the ventral hippocampus in contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Fantin

    Full Text Available Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in the brain. Nectin expression shows a dynamic spatiotemporal regulation, playing a role in neural migratory processes during development. Nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their heterophilic trans-interactions are important for the proper formation of synapses. In the hippocampus, nectin-1 and nectin-3 localize at puncta adherentia junctions and may play a role in synaptic plasticity, a mechanism essential for memory and learning. We evaluated the potential involvement of nectin-1 and nectin-3 in memory consolidation using an emotional learning paradigm. Rats trained for contextual fear conditioning showed transient nectin-1-but not nectin-3-protein upregulation in synapse-enriched hippocampal fractions at about 2 h posttraining. The upregulation of nectin-1 was found exclusively in the ventral hippocampus and was apparent in the synaptoneurosomal fraction. This upregulation was induced by contextual fear conditioning but not by exposure to context or shock alone. When an antibody against nectin-1, R165, was infused in the ventral-hippocampus immediately after training, contextual fear memory was impaired. However, treatment with the antibody in the dorsal hippocampus had no effect in contextual fear memory formation. Similarly, treatment with the antibody in the ventral hippocampus did not interfere with acoustic memory formation. Further control experiments indicated that the effects of ventral hippocampal infusion of the nectin-1 antibody in contextual fear memory cannot be ascribed to memory non-specific effects such as changes in anxiety-like behavior or locomotor behavior. Therefore, we conclude that nectin-1 recruitment to the perisynaptic environment in the ventral hippocampus plays an important role in the formation of contextual fear memories. Our results suggest that these mechanisms could be involved in the connection of emotional and contextual information processed in the

  9. Role of Glia in Stress-Induced Enhancement and Impairment of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; Osborne, Danielle Maria; McNay, Ewan C.

    2016-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affect hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized. PMID:26793072

  10. Beyond perceptual load and dilution: a review of the role of working memory in selective attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W. De Fockert

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The perceptual load and dilution models differ fundamentally in terms of the proposed mechanism underlying variation in distractibility during different perceptual conditions. However, both models predict that distracting information can be processed beyond perceptual processing under certain conditions, a prediction that is well-supported by the literature. Load theory proposes that in such cases, where perceptual task aspects do not allow for sufficient attentional selectivity, the maintenance of task-relevant processing depends on cognitive control mechanisms, including working memory. The key prediction is that working memory plays a role in keeping clear processing priorities in the face of potential distraction, and the evidence reviewed and evaluated in a meta-analysis here supports this claim, by showing that the processing of distracting information tends to be enhanced when load on a concurrent task of working memory is high. Low working memory capacity is similarly associated with greater distractor processing in selective attention, again suggesting that the unavailability of working memory during selective attention leads to an increase in distractibility. Together, these findings suggest that selective attention against distractors that are processed beyond perception depends on the availability of working memory. Possible mechanisms for the effects of working memory on selective attention are discussed.

  11. The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednick, Sara C; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Walsh, James K; Wamsley, Erin; Paulus, Martin; Kanady, Jennifer C; Drummond, Sean P A

    2013-03-06

    An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention. Using zolpidem (Ambien), a short-acting GABAA agonist hypnotic, we show increased sleep spindle density and decreased REM sleep compared with placebo and sodium oxybate (Xyrem). Naps with increased spindles produced significantly better verbal memory and significantly worse perceptual learning but did not affect motor learning. The experimental spindles were similar to control spindles in amplitude and frequency, suggesting that the experimental intervention enhanced normal sleep processes. Furthermore, using statistical methods, we demonstrate for the first time a critical role of spindles in human hippocampal memory performance. The gains in memory consolidation exceed sleep-alone or control conditions and demonstrate the potential for targeted, exceptional memory enhancement in healthy adults with pharmacologically modified sleep.

  12. Role of Glia in Stress-Induced Enhancement and Impairment of Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; Osborne, Danielle Maria; McNay, Ewan C

    2015-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affect hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized.

  13. Role of glia in stress-induced enhancement and impairment of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiah ePearson-Leary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affects hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized.

  14. False memory for positive and negative life events. The role of mental imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairean, C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A false memory appears when a person recalls memories of events that did not actually happen to him or her. The present study focused on situational and personal determinants of spontaneous false memories. Specifically, we aimed to investigate the role of emotional valence of an event, as well as the individual differences in mental imagery in evocation false memory. Three videos in which related details were not shown but were presented during a recognition task were used to induce spontaneous false memories. The three videos are different in terms of valence, reflecting positive, negative and neutral events. A scale for measuring mental imagery was also used. A sample of 132 participants completed the study. The results showed that the positive event lead to a higher level of false memory than the negative event. Moreover, the participants differ in their susceptibility to false memories based on the level of imagery, but the interaction between the emotional valence of the event and mental imagery is not significant. The results are discussed from the perspective of their legal and clinical implications.

  15. The role of the hippocampus in memory and mental construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Signy; Levine, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Much has been learned about the processes that support the remembrance of past autobiographical episodes and their importance for a number of cognitive tasks. This work has focused on hippocampal contributions to constructing coherent mental representations of scenarios for these tasks, which has opened up new questions about the underlying hippocampal mechanisms. We propose a new framework to answer these questions, which incorporates task demands that prompt hippocampal contributions to mental construction, the online formation of such mental representations, and how these demands relate to the functional organization of the hippocampus. Synthesizing findings from autobiographical memory research, our framework suggests that the interaction of two task characteristics influences the recruitment of the hippocampus: (1) the degree of task open-endedness (quantified by the presence/absence of a retrieval framework) and (2) the degree to which the integration of perceptual details is required. These characteristics inform the relative weighting of anterior and posterior hippocampal involvement, following an organizational model in which the anterior and posterior hippocampus support constructions on the basis of conceptual and perceptual representations, respectively. The anticipated outcome of our framework is a refined understanding of hippocampal contributions to memory and to the host of related cognitive functions. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Neuroepigenetics of memory formation and impairment: the role of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Bechara J; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNAs that primarily regulate protein synthesis through reversible translational repression or mRNA degradation. MiRNAs can act by translational control of transcription factors or via direct action on the chromatin, and thereby contribute to the non-genetic control of gene-environment interactions. MiRNAs that regulate components of pathways required for learning and memory further modulate the influence of epigenetics on cognition in the normal and diseased brain. This review summarizes recent data exemplifying the known roles of miRNAs in memory formation in different model organisms, and describes how neuronal plasticity regulates miRNA biogenesis, activity and degradation. It also examines the relevance of miRNAs for memory impairment in human, using recent clinical observations related to neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses the potential mechanisms by which these miRNAs may contribute to memory disorders.

  17. Making new memories: the role of the hippocampus in new associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wendy A

    2007-02-01

    Both aging and Alzheimer's disease target the hippocampal formation and can result in mild to devastating memory impairment depending on the severity of the condition. Understanding the normal mnemonic functions of the hippocampus and related structures of the medial temporal lobe is the first step toward the development of diagnostics and treatments designed to ameliorate these potentially devastating age-related memory deficits. Here I describe findings from behavioral neurophysiological studies in which we have investigated the patterns of dynamic neural activity seen in the macaque monkey hippocampus during the acquisition of new associative memories. We report that hippocampal neurons signal the formation of new associations with dramatic changes in their firing rate. Because these learning-related signals can occur just before behavioral learning is expressed, this suggests that these signals play a role in driving the learning process. Implications of these findings for understanding the memory deficits associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease are discussed.

  18. The role of reinstating generation operations in recognition memory and reality monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieznański Marek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of encoding/retrieval conditions compatibility was investigated in a reality-monitoring task. An experiment was conducted which showed a positive effect of reinstating distinctive encoding operations at test. That is, generation of a low-frequency (LF word from the same word fragment at study and test significantly enhanced item recognition memory. However, reinstating of relatively more automatic operations of reading or generating a highfrequency (HF word did not influence recognition performance. Moreover, LF words were better recognized than HF words, but memory for source did not depend on the encoding/retrieval match or on the word-frequency. In comparison with reading, generating an item at study significantly enhanced source memory but generating it at test had no effect. The data were analysed using a multinomial modelling approach which allowed ruling out the influence of a response bias on the measurement of memory ability.

  19. The hormonal Zeitgeber melatonin: Role as a circadian modulator in memory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRawashdeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine substance melatonin is a hormone synthesized rhythmically by the pineal gland under the influence of the circadian system and alternating light/dark cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have broad applications, and consequently becoming a molecule of great controversy. Undoubtedly, however, melatonin plays an important role as a time cue for the endogenous circadian system. This review focuses on melatonin as a regulator in the circadian modulation of memory processing. Memory processes (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval are modulated by the circadian system. However, the mechanism by which the biological clock is rhythmically influencing cognitive processes remains unknown. We also discuss, how the circadian system by generating cycling melatonin levels can implant information about daytime into memory processing, depicted as day and nighttime differences in acquisition, memory consolidation and/or retrieval.

  20. The role of the serotonin receptor subtypes 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 and its interaction in emotional learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eStiedl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is a multifunctional neurotransmitter innervating cortical and limbic areas involved in cognition and emotional regulation. Dysregulation of serotonergic transmission is associated with emotional and cognitive deficits in psychiatric patients and animal models. Drugs targeting the 5-HT system are widely used to treat mood disorders and anxiety-like behaviors. Among the fourteen 5-HT receptor (5-HTR subtypes, the 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R are associated with the development of anxiety, depression and cognitive function linked to mechanisms of emotional learning and memory. In rodents fear conditioning and passive avoidance (PA are associative learning paradigms to study emotional memory. This review assesses the role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R as well as their interplay at the molecular, neurochemical and behavioral level. Activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1ARs impairs emotional memory through attenuation of neuronal activity, whereas presynaptic 5-HT1AR activation reduces 5-HT release and exerts pro-cognitive effects on PA retention. Antagonism of the 5-HT1AR facilitates memory retention possibly via 5-HT7R activation and evidence is provided that 5HT7R can facilitate emotional memory upon reduced 5-HT1AR transmission. These findings highlight the differential role of these 5-HTRs in cognitive/emotional domains of behavior. Moreover, the results indicate that tonic and phasic 5-HT release can exert different and potentially opposing effects on emotional memory, depending on the states of 5-HT1ARs and 5-HT7Rs and their interaction. Consequently, individual differences due to genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role for the responsiveness to drug treatment, e.g., by SSRIs which increase intrasynaptic 5-HT levels thereby activating multiple pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTR subtypes.

  1. The role of the serotonin receptor subtypes 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 and its interaction in emotional learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiedl, Oliver; Pappa, Elpiniki; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Ögren, Sven Ove

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is a multifunctional neurotransmitter innervating cortical and limbic areas involved in cognition and emotional regulation. Dysregulation of serotonergic transmission is associated with emotional and cognitive deficits in psychiatric patients and animal models. Drugs targeting the 5-HT system are widely used to treat mood disorders and anxiety-like behaviors. Among the fourteen 5-HT receptor (5-HTR) subtypes, the 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R are associated with the development of anxiety, depression and cognitive function linked to mechanisms of emotional learning and memory. In rodents fear conditioning and passive avoidance (PA) are associative learning paradigms to study emotional memory. This review assesses the role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R as well as their interplay at the molecular, neurochemical and behavioral level. Activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1ARs impairs emotional memory through attenuation of neuronal activity, whereas presynaptic 5-HT1AR activation reduces 5-HT release and exerts pro-cognitive effects on PA retention. Antagonism of the 5-HT1AR facilitates memory retention possibly via 5-HT7R activation and evidence is provided that 5HT7R can facilitate emotional memory upon reduced 5-HT1AR transmission. These findings highlight the differential role of these 5-HTRs in cognitive/emotional domains of behavior. Moreover, the results indicate that tonic and phasic 5-HT release can exert different and potentially opposing effects on emotional memory, depending on the states of 5-HT1ARs and 5-HT7Rs and their interaction. Consequently, individual differences due to genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role for the responsiveness to drug treatment, e.g., by SSRIs which increase intrasynaptic 5-HT levels thereby activating multiple pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTR subtypes.

  2. The Memory System You Can't Avoid it, You Can't Ignore it, You Can't Fake it

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Today, computer-system optimization, at both the hardware and software levels, must consider the details of the memory system in its analysis; failing to do so yields systems that are increasingly inefficient as those systems become more complex. This lecture seeks to introduce the reader to the most important details of the memory system; it targets both computer scientists and computer engineers in industry and in academia. Roughly speaking, computer scientists are the users of the memory system and computer engineers are the designers of the memory system. Both can benefit tremendously from

  3. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudaz, Myriam; Ledermann, Thomas; Margraf, Jürgen; Becker, Eni S.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This study examined the extent to which avoidance behavior moderates the relationship between general anxiety at baseline and 18 months later in women with a diagnosed social anxiety disorder (n = 91) and women with a diagnosed specific phobia (n = 130) at baseline. Circumscribed avoidance of social and specific situations were clinician-rated using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime (ADIS-IV-L), and general anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Moderated regression analyses revealed that (a) general anxiety at baseline predicted general anxiety at follow-up in both women with a specific phobia and women with a social anxiety disorder and (b) avoidance behavior moderated this relationship in women with a specific phobia but not in women with a social anxiety disorder. Specifically, high avoidance behavior was found to amplify the effect between general anxiety at baseline and follow-up in specific phobia. Reasons for the absence of a similar moderating effect of avoidance behavior within social anxiety disorder are discussed. PMID:28671977

  4. Social Role and Memory of the Alighieri before Dante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Faini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the nobility Dante’s family can now be approached using new tools. Recent investigations on the communal society, on its social networks, and on the structure of family memory enable us to trace the historical framework of Cacciaguida’s account. At the very beginning the Alighieri family was related to those who would become its enemies at the end of the 13th century. After, to crown what can be seen as a ruthless social climb, the Alighieris, like many other city families, appear to have constructed a “myth of the origins”. Dante did not passively accept this myth, but called it into question and possibly used it as an inspiration for his tormented reflections on nobility.

  5. ‎ Anxiety Sensitivity Dimensions and Generalized Anxiety‏ ‏Severity: The ‎Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance and Repetitive‏ ‏Negative Thinking‎ ‎

    OpenAIRE

    Parvaneh‏ ‏ Mohammadkhani; Abbas Pourshahbaz; Maryam Kami; Mahdi Mazidi; Imaneh Abasi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general ‎population. Several studies suggest that anxiety sensitivity is a vulnerability factor in generalized ‎anxiety severity. However, some other studies suggest that negative repetitive thinking and ‎experiential avoidance as response factors can explain this relationship. Therefore, this study ‎aimed to investigate the mediating role of experiential avoidance and negative repetitive thinking ‎in t...

  6. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi eOliveras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogues. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I, displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM in these three rat types (Experiment 1, as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low PPI scores (Experiment 2. The results from Exp. 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Exp. 2, Low-PPI NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to Medium-PPI and High-PPI NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps at risk phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  7. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  8. Novel Roles for the Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transporter-4 in Hippocampally Dependent Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C

    2016-11-23

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) is critical for insulin- and contractile-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. GluT4 is also expressed in some hippocampal neurons, but its functional role in the brain is unclear. Several established molecular modulators of memory processing regulate hippocampal GluT4 trafficking and hippocampal memory formation is limited by both glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that hippocampal GluT4 might be involved in memory processes. Here, we show that, in male rats, hippocampal GluT4 translocates to the plasma membrane after memory training and that acute, selective intrahippocampal inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport impaired memory acquisition, but not memory retrieval. Other studies have shown that prolonged systemic GluT4 blockade causes insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, we found that prolonged hippocampal blockade of glucose transport through GluT4-upregulated markers of hippocampal insulin signaling prevented task-associated depletion of hippocampal glucose and enhanced both working and short-term memory while also impairing long-term memory. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of hippocampal AMPA GluR1 subunits and the neuronal GluT3, but decreased expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, consistent with impaired ability to form long-term memories. Our findings are the first to show the cognitive impact of brain GluT4 modulation. They identify GluT4 as a key regulator of hippocampal memory processing and also suggest differential regulation of GluT4 in the hippocampus from that in peripheral tissues. The role of insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) in the brain is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrate that GluT4 is a critical component of hippocampal memory processes. Memory training increased hippocampal GluT4 translocation and memory acquisition was impaired by GluT4 blockade. Unexpectedly, whereas long

  9. The beneficial role of memory reactivation for language learning during sleep: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Thomas; Rasch, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Sleep is essential for diverse aspects of language learning. According to a prominent concept these beneficial effects of sleep rely on spontaneous reactivation processes. A series of recent studies demonstrated that inducing such reactivation processes by re-exposure to memory cues during sleep enhances foreign vocabulary learning. Building upon these findings, the present article reviews recent models and empirical findings concerning the beneficial effects of sleep on language learning. Consequently, the memory function of sleep, its neural underpinnings and the role of the sleeping brain in language learning will be summarized. Finally, we will propose a working model concerning the oscillatory requirements for successful reactivation processes and future research questions to advance our understanding of the role of sleep on language learning and memory processes in general.

  10. Integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in leaves of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arkajo; Kar, Rup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Directional chloroplast photorelocation is a major physio-biochemical mechanism that allows these organelles to realign themselves intracellularly in response to the intensity of the incident light as an adaptive response. Signaling processes involved in blue light (BL)-dependent chloroplast movements were investigated in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle leaves. Treatments with antagonists of actin filaments [2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA)] and microtubules (oryzalin) revealed that actin filaments, but not microtubules, play a pivotal role in chloroplast movement. Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in controlling chloroplast avoidance movement has been demonstrated, as exogenous H2O2 not only accelerated chloroplast avoidance but also could induce chloroplast avoidance even in weak blue light (WBL). Further support came from experiments with different ROS scavengers, i.e., dimethylthiourea (DMTU), KI, and CuCl2, which inhibited chloroplast avoidance, and from ROS localization using specific stains. Such avoidance was also partially inhibited by ZnCl2, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX) as well as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a photosynthetic electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitor at PS II. However, methyl viologen (MV), a PS I ETC inhibitor, rather accelerated avoidance response. Exogenous calcium (Ca(+2)) induced avoidance even in WBL while inhibited chloroplast accumulation partially. On the other hand, chloroplast movements (both accumulation and avoidance) were blocked by Ca(+2) antagonists, La(3+) (inhibitor of plasma membrane Ca(+2) channel) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca(+2) chelator) while LiCl that affects Ca(+2) release from endosomal compartments did not show any effect. A model on integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) (influx from apolastic space) in actin-mediated chloroplast avoidance has been proposed.

  11. The role of experiential avoidance, psychopathology, and borderline personality features in experiencing positive emotions: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Gitta A; Ower, Nicole; Buchholz, Angela

    2013-03-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) is an important factor in maintaining different forms of psychopathology including borderline personality pathology (BPD). So far little is known about the functions of EA, BPD features and general psychopathology for positive emotions. In this study we investigated three different anticipated pathways of their influence on positive emotions. A total of 334 subjects varying in general psychopathology &/or BPD features completed an online survey including self-ratings of BPD features, psychopathology, negative and positive emotions, and EA. Measures of positive emotions included both a general self-rating (PANAS) and emotional changes induced by two positive movie clips. Data were analyzed by means of path analysis. In comparing the three path models, one model was found clearly superior: In this model, EA acts as a mediator of the influence of psychopathology, BPD features, and negative emotions in the prediction of both measures of positive emotions. EA plays a central role in maintaining lack of positive emotions. Therapeutic implications and study limitations are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Learning, memory, and the role of neural network architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermundstad, Ann M; Brown, Kevin S; Bassett, Danielle S; Carlson, Jean M

    2011-06-01

    The performance of information processing systems, from artificial neural networks to natural neuronal ensembles, depends heavily on the underlying system architecture. In this study, we compare the performance of parallel and layered network architectures during sequential tasks that require both acquisition and retention of information, thereby identifying tradeoffs between learning and memory processes. During the task of supervised, sequential function approximation, networks produce and adapt representations of external information. Performance is evaluated by statistically analyzing the error in these representations while varying the initial network state, the structure of the external information, and the time given to learn the information. We link performance to complexity in network architecture by characterizing local error landscape curvature. We find that variations in error landscape structure give rise to tradeoffs in performance; these include the ability of the network to maximize accuracy versus minimize inaccuracy and produce specific versus generalizable representations of information. Parallel networks generate smooth error landscapes with deep, narrow minima, enabling them to find highly specific representations given sufficient time. While accurate, however, these representations are difficult to generalize. In contrast, layered networks generate rough error landscapes with a variety of local minima, allowing them to quickly find coarse representations. Although less accurate, these representations are easily adaptable. The presence of measurable performance tradeoffs in both layered and parallel networks has implications for understanding the behavior of a wide variety of natural and artificial learning systems.

  13. Learning, memory, and the role of neural network architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Hermundstad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of information processing systems, from artificial neural networks to natural neuronal ensembles, depends heavily on the underlying system architecture. In this study, we compare the performance of parallel and layered network architectures during sequential tasks that require both acquisition and retention of information, thereby identifying tradeoffs between learning and memory processes. During the task of supervised, sequential function approximation, networks produce and adapt representations of external information. Performance is evaluated by statistically analyzing the error in these representations while varying the initial network state, the structure of the external information, and the time given to learn the information. We link performance to complexity in network architecture by characterizing local error landscape curvature. We find that variations in error landscape structure give rise to tradeoffs in performance; these include the ability of the network to maximize accuracy versus minimize inaccuracy and produce specific versus generalizable representations of information. Parallel networks generate smooth error landscapes with deep, narrow minima, enabling them to find highly specific representations given sufficient time. While accurate, however, these representations are difficult to generalize. In contrast, layered networks generate rough error landscapes with a variety of local minima, allowing them to quickly find coarse representations. Although less accurate, these representations are easily adaptable. The presence of measurable performance tradeoffs in both layered and parallel networks has implications for understanding the behavior of a wide variety of natural and artificial learning systems.

  14. A combinatorial role for MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in mutation avoidance in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassim, Farzanah; Papadopoulos, Andrea O.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Gordhan, Bhavna G., E-mail: bhavna.gordhan@nhls.ac.za

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We studied the combined role of MutY and Fpg DNA glycosylases in M. smegmatis. • Loss of MutY showed increased sensitivity to oxidative damage. • Loss of MutY together with the Fpg glycosylases showed increased mutation rates. • Our data indicate interplay between these enzymes to control mutagenesis. - Abstract: Hydroxyl radical (·OH) among reactive oxygen species cause damage to nucleobases with thymine being the most susceptible, whilst in contrast, the singlet oxygen ({sup 1}0{sub 2}) targets only guanine bases. The high GC content of mycobacterial genomes predisposes these organisms to oxidative damage of guanine. The exposure of cellular DNA to ·OH and one-electron oxidants results in the formation of two main degradation products, the pro-mutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) and the cytotoxic 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua). These lesions are repaired through the base excision repair (BER) pathway and we previously, demonstrated a combinatorial role for the mycobacterial Endonuclease III (Nth) and the Nei family of DNA glycosylases in mutagenesis. In addition, the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg/MutM) and MutY DNA glycosylases have also been implicated in mutation avoidance and BER in mycobacteria. In this study, we further investigate the combined role of MutY and the Fpg/Nei DNA glycosylases in Mycobacterium smegmatis and demonstrate that deletion of mutY resulted in enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, an effect which was not exacerbated in Δfpg1 Δfpg2 or Δnei1 Δnei2 double mutant backgrounds. However, combinatorial loss of the mutY, fpg1 and fpg2 genes resulted in a significant increase in mutation rates suggesting interplay between these enzymes. Consistent with this, there was a significant increase in C → A mutations with a corresponding change in cell morphology of rifampicin resistant mutants in the Δfpg1 Δfpg2 ΔmutY deletion mutant. In contrast, deletion of mutY together with the nei

  15. Inattentive Behavior in Boys with ADHD during Classroom Instruction: the Mediating Role of Working Memory Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Sarah A; Rapport, Mark D; Friedman, Lauren M; Eckrich, Samuel J; Kofler, Michael J

    2017-08-19

    Children with ADHD exhibit clinically impairing inattentive behavior during classroom instruction and in other cognitively demanding contexts. However, there have been surprisingly few attempts to validate anecdotal parent/teacher reports of intact sustained attention during 'preferred' activities such as watching movies. The current investigation addresses this omission, and provides an initial test of how ADHD-related working memory deficits contribute to inattentive behavior during classroom instruction. Boys ages 8-12 (M = 9.62, SD = 1.22) with ADHD (n = 32) and typically developing boys (TD; n = 30) completed a counterbalanced series of working memory tests and watched two videos on separate assessment days: an analogue math instructional video, and a non-instructional video selected to match the content and cognitive demands of parent/teacher-described 'preferred' activities. Objective, reliable observations of attentive behavior revealed no between-group differences during the non-instructional video (d = -0.02), and attentive behavior during the non-instructional video was unrelated to all working memory variables (r = -0.11 to 0.19, ns). In contrast, the ADHD group showed disproportionate attentive behavior decrements during analogue classroom instruction (d = -0.71). Bias-corrected, bootstrapped, serial mediation revealed that 59% of this between-group difference was attributable to ADHD-related impairments in central executive working memory, both directly (ER = 41%) and indirectly via its role in coordinating phonological short-term memory (ER = 15%). Between-group attentive behavior differences were no longer detectable after accounting for ADHD-related working memory impairments (d = -0.29, ns). Results confirm anecdotal reports of intact sustained attention during activities that place minimal demands on working memory, and indicate that ADHD children's inattention during analogue classroom instruction is related, in large part

  16. Explaining Semantic Short-Term Memory Deficits: Evidence for the Critical Role of Semantic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with apparently selective short-term memory (STM) deficits for semantic information have played an important role in developing multi-store theories of STM and challenge the idea that verbal STM is supported by maintaining activation in the language system. We propose that semantic STM deficits are not as selective as previously thought…

  17. The Mediating Role of Mind Wandering in the Relationship between Working Memory Capacity and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind wandering in the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and reading comprehension as predicted by the executive-attention theory of WMC (e.g., Kane & Engle, 2003). I used a latent-variable, structural-equation-model approach with three WMC span tasks, seven…

  18. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  19. The Role of Shifting, Updating, and Inhibition in Prospective Memory Performance in Young and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzspahn, Katharina M.; Stahl, Christoph; Zeintl, Melanie; Kaller, Christoph P.; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory performance shows a decline in late adulthood. The present article examines the role of 3 main executive function facets (i.e., shifting, updating, and inhibition) as possible developmental mechanisms associated with these age effects. One hundred seventy-five young and 110 older adults performed a battery of cognitive tests…

  20. On the Role of Individual Items in Recognition Memory and Metacognition: Challenges for Signal Detection Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, Thomas A.; Arici, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The authors tested the role of individual items in recognition memory using a forced-choice paradigm with face stimuli. They constructed distractor stimuli using morphing procedures that were similar to two parent faces and then compared a studied morph against an unstudied morph that was similar to two studied parents. The similarity of the…

  1. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  2. Learned Avoidance in the Male Syrian Hamster: Investigating the Outcome of a Glucocorticoid Antagonist on Reconsolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Haugsnes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, we used our Conflict Alleyway Apparatus and a glucocorticoid antagonist, mifepristone, to investigate the role of glucocorticoids in the reconsolidation of learned avoidance in defeated male Syrian hamsters. Subjects were tested for memory deficits 48 hours and 96 hours after the drug/vehicle was administered. It were hypothesized that mifepristone administration would produce memory deficits when the defeat memory had been reactivated, and that this deficit would be present 48 hours and 96 hours after the administration. Prolonged deficits that are dependent upon memory reactivation would suggest that glucocorticoids play a role in reconsolidation of learned avoidance. Our results indicated a strong evidence for learned avoidance after defeat; however, we did not find any significant drug effect.

  3. Neurotrophins play differential roles in short and long-term recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Charlotte K; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-09-01

    The neurotrophin family of proteins are believed to mediate various forms of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Here we have assessed the roles of these proteins in object recognition memory in the rat, using icv infusions of function-blocking antibodies or the tyrosine kinase antagonist, tyrphostin AG879, to block Trk receptors. We report that tyrphostin AG879 impairs both short-term and long-term recognition memory, indicating a requirement for Trk receptor activation in both processes. The effect of inhibition of each of the neurotrophins with activity-blocking neutralising antibodies was also tested. Treatment with anti-BDNF, anti-NGF or anti-NT4 had no effect on short-term memory, but blocked long-term recognition memory. Treatment with anti-NT3 had no effect on either process. We also assessed changes in expression of neurotrophins and their respective receptors in the hippocampus, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex over a 24 h period following training in the object recognition task. We observed time-dependent changes in expression of the Trk receptors and their ligands in the dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex. The data are consistent with a pivotal role for neurotrophic factors in the expression of recognition memory.

  4. The role of central attention in retrieval from visual short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Hagit

    2017-04-01

    The role of central attention in visual short-term memory (VSTM) encoding and maintenance is well established, yet its role in retrieval has been largely unexplored. This study examined the involvement of central attention in retrieval from VSTM using a dual-task paradigm. Participants performed a color change-detection task. Set size varied between 1 and 3 items, and the memory sample was maintained for either a short or a long delay period. A secondary tone discrimination task was introduced at the end of the delay period, shortly before the appearance of a central probe, and occupied central attention while participants were searching within VSTM representations. Similarly to numerous previous studies, reaction time increased as a function of set size reflecting the occurrence of a capacity-limited memory search. When the color targets were maintained over a short delay, memory was searched for the most part without the involvement of central attention. However, with a longer delay period, the search relied entirely on the operation of central attention. Taken together, this study demonstrates that central attention is involved in retrieval from VSTM, but the extent of its involvement depends on the duration of the delay period. Future studies will determine whether the type of memory search (parallel or serial) carried out during retrieval depends on the nature of the attentional mechanism involved the task.

  5. A role for nitric oxide-driven retrograde signaling in the consolidation of a fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie A Overeem

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In both invertebrate and vertebrate models of synaptic plasticity, signaling via the putative “retrograde messenger” nitric oxide (NO has been hypothesized to serve as a critical link between functional and structural alterations at pre- and postsynaptic sites. However, while in vitro models of synaptic plasticity have consistently implicated NO signaling in linking postsynaptic induction mechanisms with accompanying presynaptic changes, a convincing role of such “retrograde signaling” in mammalian memory formation has remained elusive. Using auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning, we show that synaptic plasticity and NO signaling in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA regulate the expression of the ERK-driven immediate early gene early growth response gene I (EGR-1 in regions of the auditory thalamus that are presynaptic to the LA. Further, antisense knockdown of EGR-1 in the auditory thalamus impairs both fear memory consolidation and the training-induced elevation of two presynaptically localized proteins in the LA. These findings indicate that synaptic plasticity and NO signaling in the LA during auditory fear conditioning promote alterations in ERK-driven gene expression in auditory thalamic neurons that are required for both fear memory consolidation as well as presynaptic correlates of fear memory formation in the LA, and provide general support for a role of NO as a “retrograde signal” in mammalian memory formation.

  6. Psychological Outcomes among Lesbian Sexual Assault Survivors: An Examination of the Roles of Internalized Homophobia and Experiential Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Sari D.; Dickstein, Benjamin D.; Marx, Brian P.; Lexington, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relations among internalized homophobia (IH), experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity in a community sample of 72 lesbian sexual assault survivors. Results indicated that IH is associated with both experiential avoidance and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. In addition, experiential…

  7. Psychological Outcomes among Lesbian Sexual Assault Survivors: An Examination of the Roles of Internalized Homophobia and Experiential Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Sari D.; Dickstein, Benjamin D.; Marx, Brian P.; Lexington, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relations among internalized homophobia (IH), experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity in a community sample of 72 lesbian sexual assault survivors. Results indicated that IH is associated with both experiential avoidance and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. In addition, experiential…

  8. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of ultra low doses of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Azita; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2006-01-06

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of ultra low doses (ULDs) of histamine, clobenpropit and pyrilamine are studied on morphine state-dependent (STD) memory in mice. Although pre-test administration of different doses of histamine and clobenpropit showed no effect on impairment of memory induced by pre-training morphine, when the above drugs were co-administered with morphine, they inhibited the restoration of memory by morphine. These effects were opposite to microgram doses of the same drugs.

  9. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mendes Schöwe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer’s disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind. However, at this age, no change in density of nicotinic receptors was observed.

  10. Dataset for the role of sustained attention in memory formation of transgenic mice for Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; de Oliveira, Eduardo Moreira; Buck, Hudson Sousa; Viel, Tania Araujo

    2016-03-01

    Weekly submission of rats to active avoidance apparatus can be considered a neurostimulation strategy, once it can improve memory and can increase the density of receptors from different neurotransmitter systems in brain areas related to memory. These benefits were observed in rats chronically infused with amyloid-β peptide. In the present work it is presented that the same benefit for memory was observed in five months old transgenic mice for Alzheimer's disease (TG-PDGFB-APPSw,Ind). However, at this age, no change in density of nicotinic receptors was observed.

  11. Differential role of entorhinal and hippocampal nerve growth factor in short- and long-term memory modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Reinke, A; Martins, M R; Quevedo, J; Izquierdo, I

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g, N = 11-13 per group) on inhibitory avoidance retention. In order to evaluate the modulation of entorhinal and hippocampal NGF in short- and long-term memory, animals were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (foot shock, 0.4 mA). Retention tests were carried out 1.5 h or 24 h after training to measure short- and long-term memory, respectively. Immediately after training, rats received 5 microl NGF (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng) or saline per side into the CA1 area and entorhinal cortex. The correct position of the cannulae was confirmed by histological analysis. The highest dose of NGF (5.0 ng) into the hippocampus blocked short-term memory (P long-term memory. NGF administration into the entorhinal cortex improved long-term memory at the dose of 5.0 ng (P short-term memory. Taken as a whole, our results suggest a differential modulation by entorhinal and hippocampal NGF of short- and long-term memory.

  12. Diazepam effects on aversive memory retrieval and extinction: Role of anxiety levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Anderson H F F; Cabral, Alícia; Izídio, Geison S; Ribeiro, Alessandra M; Silva, Regina H

    2016-02-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) are anxiolytic drugs that impair memory acquisition. Previous studies using the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT, which assesses memory and anxiety concomitantly) indicated that the effects of BDZs on anxiety and acquisition are related to each other. The possible influence of the anxiolytic action of BDZs on their effects on memory retrieval and extinction are poorly understood. This is relevant considering the relationship between aversive memories and anxiety disorders. We designed a modified protocol of PMDAT that evaluates anxiety during retrieval and extinction of the task. Male Wistar rats were trained in the PMDAT (plus-maze with two open and two enclosed arms) using a standard or a modified protocol. In the standard protocol, the aversive stimuli were presented in one of the enclosed arms during training, and the animal had free access to the whole apparatus. In the modified protocol, the open arms were blocked with glass walls. Twenty-four hours after training, the animals subjected to each of the protocols were treated with saline or 2.0mg/kg of diazepam (DZP) 30min before the test. There was a third session in the maze (retest) 24h after the test. During the test, DZP impaired and improved retrieval in rats that had been trained in the standard and the modified protocol when compared to the respective saline-treated groups. In addition, treatment with DZP prior to the test induced anxiolysis, but only in the animals that were not pre-exposed to the open arms of the apparatus (modified protocol). In these animals, DZP impaired extinction, which was evaluated during retest session. The impairing effect of DZP on extinction seems to be related to its anxiolytic action during the test (extinction learning). Further, we suggest that aversive memory retrieval depends on both the treatment and the arousal elicited by exposure to the apparatus.

  13. Divergent effects of isolation rearing on prepulse inhibition, activity, anxiety and hippocampal-dependent memory in Roman high- and low-avoidance rats: A putative model of schizophrenia-relevant features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Sánchez-González, Ana; Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Gerboles, Cristina; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Social isolation of rats induces a constellation of behavioral alterations known as "isolation syndrome" that are consistent with some of the positive and cognitive symptoms observed in schizophrenic patients. In the present study we have assessed whether isolation rearing of inbred Roman high-avoidance (RHA-I) and Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) strains can lead to the appearance of some of the key features of the "isolation syndrome", such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits, increased anxious behavior, hyperactivity and memory/learning impairments. Compared to RLA-I rats, the results show that isolation rearing (IR) in RHA-I rats has a more profound impact, as they exhibit isolation-induced PPI deficits, increased anxiety, hyperactivity and long-term reference memory deficits, while isolated RLA-I rats only exhibit deficits in a spatial working memory task. These results give further support to the validity of RHA-I rats as a genetically-based model of schizophrenia relevant-symptoms.

  14. The role of astrocytic aquaporin-4 in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny I. Szu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 is the predominant water channel expressed by astrocytes in the central nervous system. AQP4 is widely expressed throughout the brain, especially at the blood-brain barrier where AQP4 is highly polarized to astrocytic foot processes in contact with blood vessels. The bidirectional water transport function of AQP4 suggests its role in cerebral water balance in the CNS. The regulation of AQP4 has been extensively investigated in various neuropathological conditions such as cerebral edema, epilepsy, and ischemia, however, the functional role of AQP4 in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory is only beginning to be elucidated. In this review, we explore the current literature on AQP4 and its influence on LTP and LTD in the hippocampus as well as the potential relationship between AQP4 in learning and memory. We begin by discussing recent in vitro and in vivo studies using AQP4 knockout (KO and wild-type mice, in particular, the impairment of LTP and LTD observed in the hippocampus. Early evidence using AQP4 KO mice have suggested that impaired LTP and LTD is BDNF dependent. Others have indicated a possible link between defective LTP and the downregulation of glutamate transporter-1 which is rescued by chronic treatment of β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone. Furthermore, behavioral studies may shed some light into the functional role of AQP4 in learning and memory. AQP4 KO mice performances utilizing Morris water maze, object placement tests, and contextual fear conditioning proposed a specific role of AQP4 in memory consolidation. All together, these studies highlight the potential influence AQP4 may have on long term synaptic plasticity and memory.

  15. Delineating the effect of semantic congruency on episodic memory: the role of integration and relatedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Bein

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge in the study of learning and memory is to understand the role of existing knowledge in the encoding and retrieval of new episodic information. The importance of prior knowledge in memory is demonstrated in the congruency effect-the robust finding wherein participants display better memory for items that are compatible, rather than incompatible, with their pre-existing semantic knowledge. Despite its robustness, the mechanism underlying this effect is not well understood. In four studies, we provide evidence that demonstrates the privileged explanatory power of the elaboration-integration account over alternative hypotheses. Furthermore, we question the implicit assumption that the congruency effect pertains to the truthfulness/sensibility of a subject-predicate proposition, and show that congruency is a function of semantic relatedness between item and context words.

  16. The role of sleep and sleep deprivation in consolidating fear memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, M M; Rihm, J S; Salari, N; Born, J; Kalisch, R; Pape, H C; Marshall, L; Büchel, C

    2013-07-15

    Sleep, in particular REM sleep, has been shown to improve the consolidation of emotional memories. Here, we investigated the role of sleep and sleep deprivation on the consolidation of fear memories and underlying neuronal mechanisms. We employed a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm either followed by a night of polysomnographically monitored sleep, or wakefulness in forty healthy participants. Recall of learned fear was better after sleep, as indicated by stronger explicitly perceived anxiety and autonomous nervous responses. These effects were positively correlated with the preceding time spent in REM sleep and paralleled by activation of the basolateral amygdala. These findings suggest REM sleep-associated consolidation of fear memory in the human amygdala. In view of the critical participation of fear learning mechanisms in the etiology of anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, deprivation of REM sleep after exposure to distressing events is an interesting target for further investigation.

  17. The Role of Nigella sativa and Its Active Constituents in Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khairul Azali Sahak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of the ability for learning and memory is a prominent feature of dementia, which affects millions of individuals all over the world, due to either neurodegenerative diseases or brain injury. Although a lot of information is known about the pathology involved, treatment remains elusive at best. The Black Seed of Nigella sativa has been historically and religiously used for thousands of years for preventing and treating many different kinds of diseases. This review article looks at Nigella sativa and its potential role in facilitating learning and memory. The possible use of this seed’s extract or compounds isolated from it, such as thymoquinone, for treating damaged brain neural tissue is discussed. The evidence presented in this paper appears to be supporting the hypothesis that this plant and/or its bioactive constituents can enhance learning and memory in health and disease in animals and humans.

  18. On the Role of Memory in an Asset Pricing Model with Heterogeneous Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Verbič

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of memory in an asset pricing model with heterogeneous beliefs. In particular, we were interested in how memory in the fitness measure affects the stability of evolutionary adaptive systems and the survival of technical trading. In order to obtain an insight into this matter, two cases were analyzed: a two-type case of fundamentalists versus contrarians and a three-type case of fundamentalists versus opposite biases. It has been established that increasing memory strength has a stabilizing effect on dynamics, though it is not able to eliminate speculative traders’ short-run profit-seeking behaviour from the market. Furthermore, opposite biases do not seem to lead to chaotic dynamics, even when there are no costs for fundamentalists. Apparently some (strong trend extrapolator beliefs are needed in order to trigger chaotic asset price fluctuations.

  19. The differential role of cortical protein synthesis in taste memory formation and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, David; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Heise, Christopher; Rosenberg, Tali; Elkobi, Alina; Inberg, Sharon; Sala, Carlo; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-05-01

    The current dogma suggests that the formation of long-term memory (LTM) is dependent on protein synthesis but persistence of the memory trace is not. However, many of the studies examining the effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTM persistence were performed in the hippocampus, which is known to have a time-dependent role in memory storage, rather than the cortex, which is considered to be the main structure to store long-term memories. Here we studied the effect of PSIs on LTM formation and persistence in male Wistar Hola (n⩾5) rats by infusing the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (100 μg, 1 μl), into the gustatory cortex (GC) during LTM formation and persistence in conditioned taste aversion (CTA). We found that local anisomycin infusion to the GC before memory acquisition impaired LTM formation (P=8.9E-5), but had no effect on LTM persistence when infused 3 days post acquisition (P=0.94). However, when we extended the time interval between treatment with anisomycin and testing from 3 days to 14 days, LTM persistence was enhanced (P=0.01). The enhancement was on the background of stable and non-declining memory, and was not recapitulated by another amnesic agent, APV (10 μg, 1 μl), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (P=0.54). In conclusion, CTA LTM remains sensitive to the action of PSIs in the GC even 3 days following memory acquisition. This sensitivity is differentially expressed between the formation and persistence of LTM, suggesting that increased cortical protein synthesis promotes LTM formation, whereas decreased protein synthesis promotes LTM persistence.

  20. Role of glycogenolysis in memory and learning: regulation by noradrenaline, serotonin and ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Elizabeth Gibbs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role played by glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis and glycogen re-synthesis in memory processing in two different chick brain regions, (1 the hippocampus and (2 the avian equivalent of the mammalian cortex, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM. Memory processing is regulated by the neuromodulators noradrenaline and serotonin soon after training and glycogen breakdown and re-synthesis are involved. In day-old domestic chicks, memory formation is dependent on the breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis at three specific times during the first 60 min after learning (around 2.5, 30 and 55 min. The chicks learn to discriminate in a single trial between beads of two colours and tastes. Inhibition of glycogen breakdown by the inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB given at specific times prior to the formation of long-term memory prevents memory forming. Noradrenergic stimulation of cultured chicken astrocytes by a selective β2-adrenergic (AR agonist reduces glycogen levels and we believe that in vivo this triggers memory consolidation at the second stage of glycogenolysis. Serotonin acting at 5-HT2B receptors acts on the first stage, but not on the second. We have shown that noradrenaline, acting via post-synaptic α2-ARs, is also responsible for the synthesis of glycogen and our experiments suggest that there is a readily accessible labile pool of glycogen in astrocytes which is depleted within 10 min if glycogen synthesis is inhibited. Endogenous ATP promotion of memory consolidation at 2.5 and 30 min is also dependent on glycogen breakdown. ATP acts at P2Y1 receptors and the action of thrombin suggests that it causes the release of internal calcium ([Ca2+]i] in astrocytes. Glutamate and GABA, the primary neurotransmitters in the brain, cannot be synthesized in neurons de novo. Neurons rely on astrocytic glutamate synthesis, requiring glycogenolysis.

  1. The differential role of cortical protein synthesis in taste memory formation and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, David; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Heise, Christopher; Rosenberg, Tali; Elkobi, Alina; Inberg, Sharon; Sala, Carlo; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    The current dogma suggests that the formation of long-term memory (LTM) is dependent on protein synthesis but persistence of the memory trace is not. However, many of the studies examining the effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTM persistence were performed in the hippocampus, which is known to have a time-dependent role in memory storage, rather than the cortex, which is considered to be the main structure to store long-term memories. Here we studied the effect of PSIs on LTM formation and persistence in male Wistar Hola (n ≥ 5) rats by infusing the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (100 μg, 1 μl), into the gustatory cortex (GC) during LTM formation and persistence in conditioned taste aversion (CTA). We found that local anisomycin infusion to the GC before memory acquisition impaired LTM formation (P = 8.9E − 5), but had no effect on LTM persistence when infused 3 days post acquisition (P = 0.94). However, when we extended the time interval between treatment with anisomycin and testing from 3 days to 14 days, LTM persistence was enhanced (P = 0.01). The enhancement was on the background of stable and non-declining memory, and was not recapitulated by another amnesic agent, APV (10 μg, 1 μl), an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist (P = 0.54). In conclusion, CTA LTM remains sensitive to the action of PSIs in the GC even 3 days following memory acquisition. This sensitivity is differentially expressed between the formation and persistence of LTM, suggesting that increased cortical protein synthesis promotes LTM formation, whereas decreased protein synthesis promotes LTM persistence. PMID:27721985

  2. The roles of immune memory and aging in protective immunity and endogenous reactivation of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetta, Giorgio; Kirschner, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Finding more effective vaccines against tuberculosis (TB) and improved preventive treatments against endogenous reactivation of latent TB is strategic to block transmission and reach the WHO goal of eliminating TB by 2050. Key related open questions in TB research include: i) what are the determinants of a strong memory response upon primary infection? ii) what is the role of cytokines towards protective memory response against a secondary infection? iii) what are the mechanisms responsible for the increased risk of reactivation in elderly individuals? To address these questions, we explored a computational model of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including a mathematical description of immunosenescence and the generation and maintenance of immune memory. Sensitivity analysis techniques, together with extensive model characterization and in silico experiments, were applied to identify key mechanisms controlling TB reactivation and immunological memory. Key findings of this study are summarized by the following model predictions: i) increased strength and duration of memory protection is associated with higher levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-[Formula: see text] (TNF) during primary infection; ii) production of TNF, but not of interferon-[Formula: see text], by memory T cells during secondary infection is a major determinant of effective protection; iii) impaired recruitment of CD4+ T cells may promote reactivation of latent TB infections in aging hosts. This study is a first attempt to consider the immune dynamics of a persistent infection throughout the lifetime of the host, taking into account immunosenescence and memory. While the model is TB specific, the results are applicable to other persistent bacterial infections and can aid in the development, evaluation and refinement of TB treatment and/or vaccine protocols.

  3. Role of Glycogenolysis in Memory and Learning: Regulation by Noradrenaline, Serotonin and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the role played by glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis) and glycogen re-synthesis in memory processing in two different chick brain regions, (1) the hippocampus and (2) the avian equivalent of the mammalian cortex, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM). Memory processing is regulated by the neuromodulators noradrenaline and serotonin soon after training glycogen breakdown and re-synthesis. In day-old domestic chicks, memory formation is dependent on the breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) at three specific times during the first 60 min after learning (around 2.5, 30, and 55 min). The chicks learn to discriminate in a single trial between beads of two colors and tastes. Inhibition of glycogen breakdown by the inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) given at specific times prior to the formation of long-term memory prevents memory forming. Noradrenergic stimulation of cultured chicken astrocytes by a selective β2-adrenergic (AR) agonist reduces glycogen levels and we believe that in vivo this triggers memory consolidation at the second stage of glycogenolysis. Serotonin acting at 5-HT2B receptors acts on the first stage, but not on the second. We have shown that noradrenaline, acting via post-synaptic α2-ARs, is also responsible for the synthesis of glycogen and our experiments suggest that there is a readily accessible labile pool of glycogen in astrocytes which is depleted within 10 min if glycogen synthesis is inhibited. Endogenous ATP promotion of memory consolidation at 2.5 and 30 min is also dependent on glycogen breakdown. ATP acts at P2Y1 receptors and the action of thrombin suggests that it causes the release of internal calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in astrocytes. Glutamate and GABA, the primary neurotransmitters in the brain, cannot be synthesized in neurons de novo and neurons rely on astrocytic glutamate synthesis, requiring glycogenolysis.

  4. Psychological Mechanisms Mediating Effects Between Trauma and Psychotic Symptoms: The Role of Affect Regulation, Intrusive Trauma Memory, Beliefs, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Amy; Emsley, Richard; Freeman, Daniel; Bebbington, Paul; Garety, Philippa A; Kuipers, Elizabeth E; Dunn, Graham; Fowler, David

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests a causal role for trauma in psychosis, particularly for childhood victimization. However, the establishment of underlying trauma-related mechanisms would strengthen the causal argument. In a sample of people with relapsing psychosis (n = 228), we tested hypothesized mechanisms specifically related to impaired affect regulation, intrusive trauma memory, beliefs, and depression. The majority of participants (74.1%) reported victimization trauma, and a fifth (21.5%) met symptomatic criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. We found a specific link between childhood sexual abuse and auditory hallucinations (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.74, P = .018). This relationship was mediated by posttraumatic avoidance and numbing (OR = 1.48, SE = 0.19, P = .038) and hyperarousal (OR = 1.44, SE = 0.18, P = .045), but not intrusive trauma memory, negative beliefs or depression. In contrast, childhood emotional abuse was specifically associated with delusions, both persecutory (adjusted OR = 2.21, SE = 0.68, P = .009) and referential (adjusted OR = 2.43, SE = 0.74, P = .004). The link with persecutory delusions was mediated by negative-other beliefs (OR = 1.36, SE = 0.14, P = .024), but not posttraumatic stress symptoms, negative-self beliefs, or depression. There was no evidence of mediation for referential delusions. No relationships were identified between childhood physical abuse and psychosis. The findings underline the role of cognitive-affective processes in the relationship between trauma and symptoms, and the importance of assessing and treating victimization and its psychological consequences in people with psychosis.

  5. Sensitivity to Referential Ambiguity in Discourse: The Role of Attention, Working Memory, and Verbal Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudewyn, Megan A; Long, Debra L; Traxler, Matthew J; Lesh, Tyler A; Dave, Shruti; Mangun, George R; Carter, Cameron S; Swaab, Tamara Y

    2015-12-01

    The establishment of reference is essential to language comprehension. The goal of this study was to examine listeners' sensitivity to referential ambiguity as a function of individual variation in attention, working memory capacity, and verbal ability. Participants listened to stories in which two entities were introduced that were either very similar (e.g., two oaks) or less similar (e.g., one oak and one elm). The manipulation rendered an anaphor in a subsequent sentence (e.g., oak) ambiguous or unambiguous. EEG was recorded as listeners comprehended the story, after which participants completed tasks to assess working memory, verbal ability, and the ability to use context in task performance. Power in the alpha and theta frequency bands when listeners received critical information about the discourse entities (e.g., oaks) was used to index attention and the involvement of the working memory system in processing the entities. These measures were then used to predict an ERP component that is sensitive to referential ambiguity, the Nref, which was recorded when listeners received the anaphor. Nref amplitude at the anaphor was predicted by alpha power during the earlier critical sentence: Individuals with increased alpha power in ambiguous compared with unambiguous stories were less sensitive to the anaphor's ambiguity. Verbal ability was also predictive of greater sensitivity to referential ambiguity. Finally, increased theta power in the ambiguous compared with unambiguous condition was associated with higher working-memory span. These results highlight the role of attention and working memory in referential processing during listening comprehension.

  6. Sensitivity to Referential Ambiguity in Discourse: The Role of Attention, Working Memory, and Verbal Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudewyn, Megan A.; Long, Debra L.; Traxler, Matthew J.; Lesh, Tyler A.; Dave, Shruti; Mangun, George R.; Carter, Cameron S.; Swaab, Tamara Y.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of reference is essential to language comprehension. The goal of this study was to examine listeners’ sensitivity to referential ambiguity as a function of individual variation in attention, working memory capacity, and verbal ability. Participants listened to stories in which two entities were introduced that were either very similar (e.g., two oaks) or less similar (e.g., one oak and one elm). The manipulation rendered an anaphor in a subsequent sentence (e.g., oak) ambiguous or unambiguous. EEG was recorded as listeners comprehended the story, after which participants completed tasks to assess working memory, verbal ability, and the ability to use context in task performance. Power in the alpha and theta frequency bands when listeners received critical information about the discourse entities (e.g., oaks) was used to index attention and the involvement of the working memory system in processing the entities. These measures were then used to predict an ERP component that is sensitive to referential ambiguity, the Nref, which was recorded when listeners received the anaphor. Nref amplitude at the anaphor was predicted by alpha power during the earlier critical sentence: Individuals with increased alpha power in ambiguous compared with unambiguous stories were less sensitive to the anaphor's ambiguity. Verbal ability was also predictive of greater sensitivity to referential ambiguity. Finally, increased theta power in the ambiguous compared with unambiguous condition was associated with higher working-memory span. These results highlight the role of attention and working memory in referential processing during listening comprehension. PMID:26401815

  7. Following instructions in a virtual school: Does working memory play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroslawska, Agnieszka J; Gathercole, Susan E; Logie, Matthew R; Holmes, Joni

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence that working memory supports the ability to follow instructions has so far been restricted to experimental paradigms that have greatly simplified the practical demands of performing actions to instructions in everyday tasks. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether working memory is involved in maintaining information over the longer periods of time that are more typical of everyday situations that require performing instructions to command. Forty-two children 7-11 years of age completed assessments of working memory, a real-world following-instructions task employing 3-D objects, and two new computerized instruction-following tasks involving navigation around a virtual school to complete a sequence of practical spoken commands. One task involved performing actions in a single classroom, and the other, performing actions in multiple locations in a virtual school building. Verbal working memory was closely linked with all three following-instructions paradigms, but with greater association to the virtual than to the real-world tasks. These results indicate that verbal working memory plays a key role in following instructions over extended periods of activity.

  8. The central role of heat shock factor 1 in synaptic fidelity and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Philip L; Durham, Heather D; Török, Zsolt; Hooper, Paul L; Crul, Tim; Vígh, László

    2016-09-01

    Networks of neuronal synapses are the fundamental basis for making and retaining memory. Reduced synapse number and quality correlates with loss of memory in dementia. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the major transcription factor regulating expression of heat shock genes, plays a central role in proteostasis, in establishing and sustaining synaptic fidelity and function, and in memory consolidation. Support for this thesis is based on these observations: (1) heat shock induces improvements in synapse integrity and memory consolidation; (2) synaptic depolarization activates HSF1; (3) activation of HSF1 alone (independent of the canonical heat shock response) augments formation of essential synaptic elements-neuroligands, vesicle transport, synaptic scaffolding proteins, lipid rafts, synaptic spines, and axodendritic synapses; (4) HSF1 coalesces and activates memory receptors in the post-synaptic dendritic spine; (5) huntingtin or α-synuclein accumulation lowers HSF1 while HSF1 lowers huntingtin and α-synuclein aggregation-a potential vicious cycle; and (6) HSF1 agonists (including physical activity) can improve cognitive function in dementia models. Thus, via direct gene expression of synaptic elements, production of HSPs that assure high protein fidelity, and activation of other neuroprotective signaling pathways, HSF1 agonists could provide breakthrough therapy for dementia-associated disease.

  9. Sex Differences in the Development of the Motive to Avoid Success, Sex Role Identity, and Performance in Competitive and Non-Competitive Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Nancy

    Horner's study of the motive to avoid success (Ms) was replicated on fifth through eleventh grade males and females. Ss were given a TAT-like measure of Ms and a measure of sex role identity. They also performed a series of tasks in competitive and non-competitive conditions. No sex differences or clear age trends in Ms imagery were found;…

  10. Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

  11. The Role of Long-Term Memory in a Test of Visual Working Memory: Proactive Facilitation but No Proactive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klaus; Awh, Edward; Sutterer, David W.

    2017-01-01

    We report 4 experiments examining whether associations in visual working memory are subject to proactive interference from long-term memory (LTM). Following a long-term learning phase in which participants learned the colors of 120 unique objects, a working memory (WM) test was administered in which participants recalled the precise colors of 3…

  12. Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

  13. The Role of Long-Term Memory in a Test of Visual Working Memory: Proactive Facilitation but No Proactive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klaus; Awh, Edward; Sutterer, David W.

    2017-01-01

    We report 4 experiments examining whether associations in visual working memory are subject to proactive interference from long-term memory (LTM). Following a long-term learning phase in which participants learned the colors of 120 unique objects, a working memory (WM) test was administered in which participants recalled the precise colors of 3…

  14. Cognitive Processes Supporting Episodic Memory Formation in Childhood: The Role of Source Memory, Binding, and Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Vinaya; Bell, Martha Ann

    2010-01-01

    Episodic memories contain various forms of contextual detail (e.g., perceptual, emotional, cognitive details) that need to become integrated. Each of these contextual features can be used to attribute a memory episode to its source, or origin of information. Memory for source information is one critical component in the formation of episodic…

  15. The Roles of Phonological Short-Term Memory and Working Memory in L2 Grammar and Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katherine I.; Ellis, Nick C.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed phonological short-term memory (PSTM) and working memory (WM) and their relationship with vocabulary and grammar learning in an artificial foreign language. Nonword repetition, nonword recognition, and listening span were used as memory measures. Participants learned the singular forms of vocabulary for an artificial foreign…

  16. Cognitive Processes Supporting Episodic Memory Formation in Childhood: The Role of Source Memory, Binding, and Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Vinaya; Bell, Martha Ann

    2010-01-01

    Episodic memories contain various forms of contextual detail (e.g., perceptual, emotional, cognitive details) that need to become integrated. Each of these contextual features can be used to attribute a memory episode to its source, or origin of information. Memory for source information is one critical component in the formation of episodic…

  17. ROLE OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN SHORT- AND LONG-TERM MEMORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.L.; Rosenzweig, M.R.; Flood, J.F.

    1978-10-01

    Anisomycin is an effective inhibitor of cerebral protein synthesis in mice and is also an effective amnestic agent for both passive and active behavioral tasks. From use of anisomycin in combination with a variety of stimulant and depressant drugs, we conclude that the level of arousal following acquisition plays an important role in determining the duration and the rate of the biosynthetic phase of memory formation. While we have interpreted the experiments with anisomycin as evidence for an essential role of protein in memory storage, others have suggested that side effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis on catecholamine metabolism are the main cause of amnesia. Several experiments were therefore done to compare the effects of anisemycin and catecholamine inhibitors on memory. We conclude that anisomycin's principal amnestic mechanism does not involve inhibition of the catecholamine system. The results strengthen our conclusion that protein synthesis is an essential component for longterm memory trace formation. Also, it is suggested that proteins synthesized in the neuronal cell body are used, in conjunction with other molecules, to produce permanent and semi-permanent anatomical changes.

  18. Cues, context, and long-term memory: the role of the retrosplenial cortex in spatial cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M P Miller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial navigation requires representations of landmarks and other navigation cues. The retrosplenial cortex (RSC is anatomically positioned between limbic areas important for memory formation, such as the hippocampus and the anterior thalamus, and cortical regions along the dorsal stream known to contribute importantly to long-term spatial representation, such as the posterior parietal cortex. Damage to the RSC severely impairs allocentric representations of the environment, including the ability to derive navigational information from landmarks. The specific deficits seen in tests of human and rodent navigation suggest that the RSC supports allocentric representation by processing the stable features of the environment and the spatial relationships among them. In addition to spatial cognition, the RSC plays a key role in contextual and episodic memory. The RSC also contributes importantly to the acquisition and consolidation of long-term spatial and contextual memory through its interactions with the hippocampus. Within this framework, the RSC plays a dual role as part of the feedforward network providing sensory and mnemonic input to the hippocampus and as a target of the hippocampal-dependent systems consolidation of long-term memory.

  19. Acute exercise and motor memory consolidation: The role of exercise intensity and timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Richard; Korsgaard Johnsen, Line; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2015-01-01

    Background A single bout of high intensity cycling (~90% VO2peak) immediately after motor skill training enhances motor memory consolidation. It is unclear how different parameters of exercise may influence this process and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that the ...... tests were not related to measures of CSE at any time point indicating that further studies are necessary to understand the physiological mechanisms leading to improvements in motor memory relating to exercise.......Background A single bout of high intensity cycling (~90% VO2peak) immediately after motor skill training enhances motor memory consolidation. It is unclear how different parameters of exercise may influence this process and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize...... that the effects of exercise on consolidation are time-dependent with a decreasing positive effect of exercise post acquisition and investigate the role of exercise intensity and timing on motor memory consolidation. Furthermore, we explore the potential role of transient changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE...

  20. Just in time for late-LTP: A mechanism for the role of PKMzeta in long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola; Jedlicka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    It is a fundamental question in neuroscience how long-term memory formation is regulated at the molecular level. Although widely considered a highly complex process requiring numerous molecular players, it also has been speculated that a single protein could play a pivotal role. This "astonishing hypothesis" has made a significant impact on memory research and has led to a reevaluation of concepts regarding memory formation.1,2.

  1. Cannabis and Related Impairment: The Unique Roles of Cannabis Use to Cope with Social Anxiety and Social Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Julia D.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Social anxiety appears to be a risk factor for cannabis-related problems. Socially anxious individuals are vulnerable to using cannabis to cope in social situations and to avoiding social situations if marijuana is unavailable. Yet, the relative impact of cannabis use to cope with social anxiety relative to use to cope with negative affect more broadly has yet to be examined. Methods The present study used the Marijuana to Cope with Social Anxiety Scale (MCSAS) to examine the incremental validity of using cannabis use to cope in social situations (MCSAS-Cope) and avoidance of social situations if cannabis is unavailable (MCSAS-Avoid) in a community-recruited sample of 123 (34.1% female) current cannabis users. Results After controlling for age of first cannabis use, gender, alcohol and tobacco use, other cannabis use motives, and cannabis expectancies, MCSAS-Cope remained significantly positively related to cannabis use frequency and cannabis-related problems. After controlling for age of first cannabis use, gender, alcohol and tobacco use, and experiential avoidance, MCSAS-Avoid remained significantly related to cannabis problems but not frequency. Discussion and Conclusions The present findings suggest that cannabis use to manage social forms of anxiety may be important to understanding cannabis use behaviors. Scientific Significance The current findings identify cognitive/motivational factors implicated in more frequent cannabis use and in cannabis-related impairment, which may be essential to inform efforts to further refine prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:25196146

  2. Rethinking the role of worry in generalized anxiety disorder: evidence supporting a model of emotional contrast avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llera, Sandra J; Newman, Michelle G

    2014-05-01

    The Contrast Avoidance model (Newman & Llera, 2011) proposes that individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are hypersensitive to sharp upward shifts in negative emotion that typically accompany negative events, and use worry to maintain sustained intrapersonal negativity in an attempt to avoid these shifts. Although research shows that worry increases negative emotionality and mutes further emotional reactivity to a stressor when compared to the worry period (e.g., Llera & Newman, 2010), no study has tracked changes in negative emotionality from baseline to worry inductions followed by a range of emotional exposures. Further, no study has yet assessed participants' subjective appraisals of prior worry on helping to cope with such exposures. The present study tested the main tenets of the Contrast Avoidance model by randomly assigning participants with GAD (n=48) and nonanxious controls (n=47) to experience worry, relaxation, and neutral inductions prior to sequential exposure to fearful, sad, and humorous film clips. Both physiological (nonspecific skin conductance responses [NS-SCRs]) and self-reported emotional changes were observed. Results indicated that worry boosted negative emotionality from baseline, which was sustained across negative exposures, whereas low negative emotionality during relaxation and neutral inductions allowed for sharp increases in response to exposures. Furthermore, GAD participants found worry to be more helpful than other conditions in coping with exposures, whereas control participants reported the opposite pattern. Results provide preliminary support for the Contrast Avoidance model. This suggests that treatment should focus on underlying avoidance patterns before attempting to reduce worry behavior.

  3. Direct and indirect predictors of social anxiety: The role of anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, experiential avoidance and self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Georgia; Karekla, Maria; Panayiotou, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    Using mediated and moderated regression, this study examined the hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity, the tendency to be concerned about anxiety symptoms, and behavioral inhibition, the tendency to withdraw from novel and potentially dangerous stimuli, predict social anxiety indirectly through experiential avoidance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II and self-consciousness, as measured by the Self-Consciousness Scale. Behavioral inhibition and anxiety sensitivity are operationalized as temperamental traits, while experiential avoidance and self-consciousness are seen as learned emotion regulation strategies. Study 1 included college student groups from Cyprus scoring high and low on social anxiety (N=64 and N=63) as measured by the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory. Study 2 examined a random community sample aged 18-65 (N=324) treating variables as continuous and using the Psychiatric Disorders Screening Questionnaire to screen for social anxiety. Results suggest that experiential avoidance, but not self-consciousness mediates the effects of anxiety sensitivity on predicting social anxiety status, but that behavioral inhibition predicts social anxiety directly and not through the proposed mediators. Moderation effects were not supported. Overall, the study finds that social anxiety symptomatology is predicted not only by behavioral inhibition, but also anxiety sensitivity, when individuals take actions to avoid anxious experiences. Modifying such avoidant coping approaches may be more beneficial for psychological treatments than attempts to change long-standing, temperamental personality traits.

  4. A G-protein α subunit, GOA-1, plays a role in C. elegans avoidance behavior of strongly alkaline pH

    OpenAIRE

    Sassa, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    The ability of animals to avoid strongly alkaline pH is critical for survival. However, the means by which they sense high pH has not been determined. We have previously found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) avoids environmental pH above 10.5. Detection involves ASH nociceptive neurons as the major sensors. Upon stimulation, transient receptor potential vanilloid-type (TRPV) ion channels encoded by osm-9 and ocr-2 play an essential role in Ca2+ entry into ASH. Here we re...

  5. Socioeconomic status and paranoia: the role of life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Fraser; Freeman, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Paranoid ideation is more common in the general population than previously thought, and it is associated with low socioeconomic status. Daily life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority may partly account for this association, but these factors have not been examined in relation to paranoid thoughts. Two hundred fifteen individuals from the general population completed self-report assessments of paranoid thoughts during the last month, daily life hassles, self-mastery, striving to avoid inferiority, and socioeconomic classification. A greater number of daily hassles, low self-mastery, and insecure striving were all associated with greater levels of paranoid thinking. Each variable was associated with markers of socioeconomic status. This study demonstrates for the first time the association of paranoid thoughts with life hassles, self-mastery, and striving to avoid inferiority. Each of the factors examined may be a plausible candidate to account for why lower socioeconomic status is associated with greater perceptions of threat from other people.

  6. Remembering under stress: different roles of autonomic arousal and glucocorticoids in memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Pia; Ackermann, Karina; Schwabe, Lars

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that stress impairs memory retrieval. Glucocorticoids, released with a delay of several minutes in response to stressful experiences, are thought to play a key role in the stress-induced retrieval impairment. Accordingly, most studies on the impact of stress on retrieval tested memory a considerable time after stressor exposure, when glucocorticoid levels were elevated. Here, we asked how stress affects memory when retrieval takes place under stress, that is, when stress is part of the retrieval situation and glucocorticoids are not yet increased at the time of testing. To contrast stress effects on ongoing and delayed memory retrieval, 72 participants learned first neutral and emotional material. Twenty-four hours later, half of the learned material was tested either in a stressful, oral examination-like testing situation or in a standard, non-stressful free recall test. Memory for the other half of the learned material was assessed 25 min after the first, stressful or non-stressful retention test. Significant increases in blood pressure and salivary cortisol confirmed the stress induction by the first, examination-like testing situation. Retrieval performance under stress was positively correlated with the blood pressure response to the stressor but unaffected by cortisol. Conversely, retrieval performance 25 min post stress was negatively correlated with the cortisol response to the stressor, particularly for emotional items. These results suggest that the same stressor may have opposite effects on ongoing and delayed memory retrieval, depending on the presence of autonomic arousal and glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of an mGluR5 inhibitor on procedural memory and avoidance discrimination impairments in Fmr1 KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria); R.A.M. Buijsen (Ronald); R. Willemsen (Rob); A. Cupido (Alexander); L.W.J. Bosman (Laurens); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. Patients with FXS do not only suffer from cognitive problems, but also from abnormalities/deficits in procedural memory formation. It has been proposed that a lack of fragile X mental retardation prote

  8. The Advantage of Reading over Listening Text Comprehension in Down Syndrome: What Is the Role of Verbal Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Maja; Florit, Elena; Levorato, M. Chiara

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the role played by verbal memory in the advantage shown by individuals with Down syndrome in reading over listening text comprehension (Roch & Levorato, 2009). Two different aspects of verbal memory were analyzed: processing load and coding modality. Participants were 20 individuals with Down syndrome,…

  9. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Plays a Critical and Selective Role in "Feeling of Knowing" Meta-Memory Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modirrousta, Mandana; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2008-01-01

    The frontal lobes are thought to play a role in the monitoring of memory performance, or "meta-memory," but the specific circuits involved have yet to be definitively established. Medial prefrontal cortex in general and the anterior cingulate cortex in particular, have been implicated in other forms of monitoring, such as error and conflict…

  10. Role of pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their sulfate esters on learning and memory in cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, M; Mayo, W; Le Moal, M

    2001-11-01

    Aging is a general process of functional decline which involves in particular a decline of cognitive abilities. However, the severity of this decline differs from one subject to another and inter-individual differences have been reported in humans and animals. These differences are of great interest especially as concerns investigation of the neurobiological factors involved in cognitive aging. Intensive pharmacological studies suggest that neurosteroids, which are steroids synthesized in the brain in an independent manner from peripheral steroid sources, could be involved in learning and memory processes. This review summarizes data in animals and humans in favor of a role of neurosteroids in cognitive aging. Studies in animals demonstrated that the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), as sulfate derivatives (PREGS and DHEAS, respectively), display memory-enhancing properties in aged rodents. Moreover, it was recently shown that memory performance was correlated with PREGS levels in the hippocampus of 24-month-old rats. Human studies, however, have reported contradictory results. First, improvement of learning and memory dysfunction was found after DHEA administration to individuals with low DHEAS levels, but other studies failed to detect significant cognitive effects after DHEA administration. Second, cognitive dysfunctions have been associated with low DHEAS levels, high DHEAS levels, or high DHEA levels; while in other studies, no relationship was found. As future research perspectives, we propose the use of new methods of quantification of neurosteroids as a useful tool for understanding their respective role in improving learning and memory impairments associated with normal aging and/or with pathological aging, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  11. The Role of Cannabinoid Transmission in Emotional Memory Formation: Implications for Addiction and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibing eTan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both basic and clinical research demonstrates an important role for endocannabinoid (ECB signaling in the processing of emotionally salient information, learning and memory. Cannabinoid transmission within neural circuits involved in emotional processing has been shown to modulate the acquisition, recall and extinction of emotionally salient memories and importantly, can strongly modulate the emotional salience of incoming sensory information. Two neural regions in particular, the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA, play important roles in emotional regulation and contain high levels of cannabinoid receptors. Furthermore, both regions show profound abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction and schizophrenia. Considerable evidence has demonstrated that cannabinoid transmission functionally interacts with dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter system that is of exceptional importance for both addictive behaviours and the neuropsychopathology of disorders like schizophrenia. Research in our laboratory has focused on how cannabinoid transmission both within and extrinsic to the mesolimbic DA system, including the BLAmPFC circuitry, can modulate both rewarding and aversive emotional information. In this review, we will summarize clinical and basic neuroscience research demonstrating the importance of cannabinoid signaling within this neural circuitry. In particular, evidence will be reviewed emphasizing the importance of cannabinoid signaling within the BLAmPFC circuitry in the context of emotional salience processing, memory formation and memory-related plasticity. We propose that aberrant states of hyper or hypoactive ECB signaling within the amygdala-prefrontal cortical circuit may lead to dysregulation of mesocorticolimbic DA transmission controlling the processing of emotionally salient information. These disturbances may in turn lead to emotional processing

  12. A G-protein α subunit, GOA-1, plays a role in C. elegans avoidance behavior of strongly alkaline pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassa, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-11-01

    The ability of animals to avoid strongly alkaline pH is critical for survival. However, the means by which they sense high pH has not been determined. We have previously found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) avoids environmental pH above 10.5. Detection involves ASH nociceptive neurons as the major sensors. Upon stimulation, transient receptor potential vanilloid-type (TRPV) ion channels encoded by osm-9 and ocr-2 play an essential role in Ca(2+) entry into ASH. Here we report that C. elegans mutants deficient in a G-protein α subunit, GOA-1, failed to avoid strongly alkaline pH with normal Ca(2+) influx into ASH. These results suggest that GOA-1 regulates signal transmission downstream of Ca(2+) influx through OSM-9/OCR-2 TRPV channels in ASH.

  13. Mood impairs time-based prospective memory in young but not older adults: the mediating role of attentional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzspahn, Katharina M; Thorley, Craig; Phillips, Louise; Voigt, Babett; Threadgold, Emma; Hammond, Emily R; Mustafa, Besim; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The present study examined age-by-mood interactions in prospective memory and the potential role of attentional control. Positive, negative, or neutral mood was induced in young and older adults. Subsequent time-based prospective memory performance was tested, incorporating a measure of online attentional control shifts between the ongoing and the prospective memory task via time monitoring behavior. Mood impaired prospective memory in the young, but not older, adults. Moderated mediation analyses showed that mood effects in the young were mediated by changes in time monitoring. Results are discussed in relation to findings from the broader cognitive emotional aging literature.

  14. Maternal Dysphoric Mood, Stress, and Parenting Practices in Mothers of Head Start Preschoolers: The Role of Experiential Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Sarah E.; Coyne, Lisa W.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal dysphoria predicts behavioral difficulties in preschool-aged children, and may contribute to negative child outcomes by exacerbating parenting stress. Parenting stress increases the likelihood of maladaptive parenting practices, especially when mothers face multiple contextual stressors. We explored maternal experiential avoidance (EA) as…

  15. The Role of Model Fidelity in Model Predictive Control Based Hazard Avoidance in Unmanned Ground Vehicles Using Lidar Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    for Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance", Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics and Automation, Harbin, China, pp. 2784-2788. [10...military and commercial applications. Although earlier UGV platforms were typically exclusively small ground robots , recent efforts started...targeting passenger vehicle and larger size platforms. Due to their size and speed, these platforms have significantly different dynamics than small robots

  16. The role of memory in posttraumatic stress disorder: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Montagner Rigoli

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a highly prevalent disorder with important social consequences. Several models have been developed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying its symptoms. Intrusions are idiosyncratic symptoms that commonly take the form of involuntary recollection of images or flashbacks about the traumatic event. Objective: To review how memory is conceptualized in each of these models and the implications for clinical practice. Methods: A narrative review of the literature was conducted through analysis of the perspectives of memory in theoretical models of PTSD. Results: Two main perspectives were identified: 1 models in which specific mechanisms of memory for processing traumatic events are proposed, especially those based on clinical studies, and 2 models in which common mnemonic mechanisms are utilized to explain the phenomenon, primarily based on basic experimental research studies investigating memory. The different theories based on these approaches have led to distinct psychotherapy interventions. Conclusion: In order to clarify these discrepancies, future research should aim for the methodological rigor of experimental studies, while maintaining the ecological applicability of findings. Cognitive experimental psychopathology is therefore an area on which research funding should be focused. Such studies could elucidate the role of mnemonic aspects in PTSD and how they impact psychological treatments.

  17. Assessing the role of memory in preschoolers' performance on episodic foresight tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atance, Cristina M; Sommerville, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    A total of 48 preschoolers (ages 3, 4, and 5) received four tasks modelled after prior work designed to assess the development of "episodic foresight". For each task, children encountered a problem in one room and, after a brief delay, were given the opportunity in a second room to select an item to solve the problem. Importantly, after selecting an item, children were queried about their memory for the problem. Age-related changes were found both in children's ability to select the correct item and their ability to remember the problem. However, when we controlled for children's memory for the problem, there were no longer significant age-related changes on the item choice measure. These findings suggest that age-related changes in children's performance on these tasks are driven by improvements in children's memory versus improvements in children's future-oriented thinking or "foresight" per se. Our results have important implications for how best to structure tasks to measure children's episodic foresight, and also for the relative role of memory in this task and in episodic foresight more broadly.

  18. The role of histamine receptors in the consolidation of object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Clarice Krás Borges; Furini, Cristiane R G; Benetti, Fernando; Monteiro, Siomara da Cruz; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    Findings have shown that histamine receptors in the hippocampus modulate the acquisition and extinction of fear motivated learning. In order to determine the role of hippocampal histaminergic receptors on recognition memory, adult male Wistar rats with indwelling infusion cannulae stereotaxically placed in the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus were trained in an object recognition learning task involving exposure to two different stimulus objects in an enclosed environment. In the test session, one of the objects presented during training was replaced by a novel one. Recognition memory retention was assessed 24 h after training by comparing the time spent in exploration (sniffing and touching) of the known object with that of the novel one. When infused in the CA1 region immediately, 30, 120 or 360 min posttraining, the H1-receptor antagonist, pyrilamine, the H2-receptor antagonist, ranitidine, and the H3-receptor agonist, imetit, blocked long-term memory retention in a time dependent manner (30-120 min) without affecting general exploratory behavior, anxiety state or hippocampal function. Our data indicate that histaminergic system modulates consolidation of object recognition memory through H1, H2 and H3 receptors.

  19. The role of memory in distinguishing risky decisions from experience and description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Christopher R; Ludvig, Elliot A; Spetch, Marcia L

    2017-10-01

    People's risk preferences differ for choices based on described probabilities versus those based on information learned through experience. For decisions from description, people are typically more risk averse for gains than for losses. In contrast, for decisions from experience, people are sometimes more risk seeking for gains than losses, especially for choices with the possibility of extreme outcomes (big wins or big losses), which are systematically overweighed in memory. Using a within-subject design, this study evaluated whether this memory bias plays a role in the differences in risky choice between description and experience. As in previous studies, people were more risk seeking for losses than for gains in description but showed the opposite pattern in experience. People also more readily remembered the extreme outcomes and judged them as having occurred more frequently. These memory biases correlated with risk preferences in decisions from experience but not in decisions from description. These results suggest that systematic memory biases may be responsible for some of the differences in risk preference across description and experience.

  20. The Role of Spatial Memory and Frames of Reference in the Precision of Angular Path Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Joeanna C.; Philbeck, John W.; Kleene, Nicholas J.; Chichka, David

    2012-01-01

    Angular path integration refers to the ability to maintain an estimate of self-location after a rotational displacement by integrating internally-generated (idiothetic) self-motion signals over time. Previous work has found that non-sensory inputs, namely spatial memory, can play a powerful role in angular path integration (Arthur et al., 2007, 2009). Here we investigated the conditions under which spatial memory facilitates angular path integration. We hypothesized that the benefit of spatial memory is particularly likely in spatial updating tasks in which one’s self-location estimate is referenced to external space. To test this idea, we administered passive, nonvisual body rotations (ranging 40° – 140°) about the yaw axis and asked participants to use verbal reports or open-loop manual pointing to indicate the magnitude of the rotation. Prior to some trials, previews of the surrounding environment were given. We found that when participants adopted an egocentric frame of reference, the previously-observed benefit of previews on within-subject response precision was not manifested, regardless of whether remembered spatial frameworks were derived from vision or spatial language. We conclude that the powerful effect of spatial memory is dependent on one’s frame of reference during self-motion updating. PMID:22885073

  1. The Role of Histone Deacetylase 6 in Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Perry

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have been extensively studied as drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases, but less is known about their role in healthy neurons. We tested zinc-dependent HDACs using RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster and found memory deficits with RPD3 and HDAC6. We demonstrate that HDAC6 is required in both the larval and adult stages for normal olfactory memory retention. Neuronal expression of HDAC6 rescued memory deficits, and we demonstrate that the N-terminal deacetylase (DAC domain is required for this ability. This suggests that deacetylation of synaptic targets associated with the first DAC domain, such as the active-zone scaffold Bruchpilot, is required for memory retention. Finally, electrophysiological experiments at the neuromuscular junction reveal that HDAC6 mutants exhibit a partial block of homeostatic plasticity, suggesting that HDAC6 may be required for the stabilization of synaptic strength. The learning deficit we observe in HDAC6 mutants could be a behavioral consequence of these synaptic defects.

  2. The role of memory in posttraumatic stress disorder: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Marcelo Montagner; Silva, Gustavo Ramos; Oliveira, Fernando Rainho de; Pergher, Giovanni Kuckartz; Kristensen, Christian Haag

    2016-06-27

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent disorder with important social consequences. Several models have been developed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying its symptoms. Intrusions are idiosyncratic symptoms that commonly take the form of involuntary recollection of images or flashbacks about the traumatic event. To review how memory is conceptualized in each of these models and the implications for clinical practice. A narrative review of the literature was conducted through analysis of the perspectives of memory in theoretical models of PTSD. Two main perspectives were identified: 1) models in which specific mechanisms of memory for processing traumatic events are proposed, especially those based on clinical studies, and 2) models in which common mnemonic mechanisms are utilized to explain the phenomenon, primarily based on basic experimental research studies investigating memory. The different theories based on these approaches have led to distinct psychotherapy interventions. In order to clarify these discrepancies, future research should aim for the methodological rigor of experimental studies, while maintaining the ecological applicability of findings. Cognitive experimental psychopathology is therefore an area on which research funding should be focused. Such studies could elucidate the role of mnemonic aspects in PTSD and how they impact psychological treatments.

  3. The role of spatial memory and frames of reference in the precision of angular path integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Joeanna C; Philbeck, John W; Kleene, Nicholas J; Chichka, David

    2012-09-01

    Angular path integration refers to the ability to maintain an estimate of self-location after a rotational displacement by integrating internally-generated (idiothetic) self-motion signals over time. Previous work has found that non-sensory inputs, namely spatial memory, can play a powerful role in angular path integration (Arthur et al., 2007, 2009). Here we investigated the conditions under which spatial memory facilitates angular path integration. We hypothesized that the benefit of spatial memory is particularly likely in spatial updating tasks in which one's self-location estimate is referenced to external space. To test this idea, we administered passive, non-visual body rotations (ranging 40°-140°) about the yaw axis and asked participants to use verbal reports or open-loop manual pointing to indicate the magnitude of the rotation. Prior to some trials, previews of the surrounding environment were given. We found that when participants adopted an egocentric frame of reference, the previously-observed benefit of previews on within-subject response precision was not manifested, regardless of whether remembered spatial frameworks were derived from vision or spatial language. We conclude that the powerful effect of spatial memory is dependent on one's frame of reference during self-motion updating.

  4. The Role of Extrinsic Rewards and Cue-Intention Association in Prospective Memory in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Daniel Patrick; Kretschmer, Anett; Knispel, Elisa; Vollert, Bianka; Altgassen, Mareike

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined, for the first time, the effect of cue-intention association, as well as the effects of promised extrinsic rewards, on prospective memory in young children, aged 5-years-old (n = 39) and 7-years-old (n = 40). Children were asked to name pictures for a toy mole, whilst also having to remember to respond differently to certain target pictures (prospective memory task). The level to which the target picture was associated with the intention was manipulated across two conditions (low- or high-association) for all participants, whilst half of the participants were promised a reward for good prospective memory performance. Results showed a main effect of age, with the 7-year-olds outperforming the 5-year-olds. Furthermore, there was a main effect of reward, with those promised a reward performing better than those who were not. No effect was found for cue-association, with the participants of both age groups performing equally well in both association conditions. No significant interactions were found between any of the variables. The potentially important role of reward in young children's everyday prospective memory tasks, and possible reasons for the lack of a reflexive-associative effect, are discussed.

  5. The Role of Extrinsic Rewards and Cue-Intention Association in Prospective Memory in Young Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Patrick Sheppard

    Full Text Available The current study examined, for the first time, the effect of cue-intention association, as well as the effects of promised extrinsic rewards, on prospective memory in young children, aged 5-years-old (n = 39 and 7-years-old (n = 40. Children were asked to name pictures for a toy mole, whilst also having to remember to respond differently to certain target pictures (prospective memory task. The level to which the target picture was associated with the intention was manipulated across two conditions (low- or high-association for all participants, whilst half of the participants were promised a reward for good prospective memory performance. Results showed a main effect of age, with the 7-year-olds outperforming the 5-year-olds. Furthermore, there was a main effect of reward, with those promised a reward performing better than those who were not. No effect was found for cue-association, with the participants of both age groups performing equally well in both association conditions. No significant interactions were found between any of the variables. The potentially important role of reward in young children's everyday prospective memory tasks, and possible reasons for the lack of a reflexive-associative effect, are discussed.

  6. Avoid Logs to Avoid Ticks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫文佳

    2004-01-01

    扁虱是莱姆关节炎的罪魁祸首。研究人员为了弄明白何处扁虱最猖獗, 不惜以身作饵,他们发现:The ticks were all over the log surface。因此告诫人 们:Avoid sitting on logs。

  7. Sleep-Dependent Oscillatory Synchronization: A Role in Fear Memory Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Totty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation through the facilitation of neuronal plasticity; however, how sleep accomplishes this remains to be completely understood. It has previously been demonstrated that neural oscillations are an intrinsic mechanism by which the brain precisely controls neural ensembles. Inter-regional synchronization of these oscillations is also known to facilitate long-range communication and long-term potentiation (LTP. In the present study, we investigated how the characteristic rhythms found in local field potentials (LFPs during non-REM and REM sleep play a role in emotional memory consolidation. Chronically implanted bipolar electrodes in the lateral amygdala (LA, dorsal and ventral hippocampus (DH, VH, and the infra-limbic (IL, and pre-limbic (PL prefrontal cortex were used to record LFPs across sleep-wake activity following each day of a Pavlovian cued fear conditioning paradigm. This resulted in three principle findings: (1 theta rhythms during REM sleep are highly synchronized between regions; (2 the extent of inter-regional synchronization during REM and non-REM sleep is altered by FC and EX; (3 the mean phase difference of synchronization between the LA and VH during REM sleep predicts changes in freezing after cued fear extinction. These results both oppose a currently proposed model of sleep-dependent memory consolidation and provide a novel finding which suggests that the role of REM sleep theta rhythms in memory consolidation may rely more on the relative phase-shift between neural oscillations, rather than the extent of phase synchronization.

  8. Evidence of Drought Stress Memory in the Facultative CAM, Aptenia cordifolia: Possible Role of Phytohormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Fleta-Soriano

    Full Text Available Although plant responses to drought stress have been studied in detail in several plant species, including CAM plants, the occurrence of stress memory and possible mechanisms for its regulation are still very poorly understood. In an attempt to better understand the occurrence and possible mechanisms of regulation of stress memory in plants, we measured the concentrations of phytohormones in Aptenia cordifolia exposed to reiterated drought, together with various stress indicators, including leaf water contents, photosynthesis and mechanisms of photo- and antioxidant protection. Results showed that plants exposed to drought stress responded differently if previously challenged with a first drought. Gibberellin levels decreased upon exposure to the first drought and remained lower in double-stressed plants compared with those exposed to stress for the first time. In contrast, abscisic acid levels were higher in double- than single-stressed plants. This occurred in parallel with alterations in hydroperoxide levels, but not with malondialdehyde levels, thus suggesting an increased oxidation state that did not result in oxidative damage in double-stressed plants. It is concluded that (i drought stress memory occurs in double-stressed A. cordifolia plants, (ii both gibberellins and abscisic acid may play a role in plant response to repeated periods of drought, and (iii changes in abscisic acid levels in double-stressed plants may have a positive effect by modulating changes in the cellular redox state with a role in signalling, rather than cause oxidative damage to the cell.

  9. Evidence of Drought Stress Memory in the Facultative CAM, Aptenia cordifolia: Possible Role of Phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleta-Soriano, Eva; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Although plant responses to drought stress have been studied in detail in several plant species, including CAM plants, the occurrence of stress memory and possible mechanisms for its regulation are still very poorly understood. In an attempt to better understand the occurrence and possible mechanisms of regulation of stress memory in plants, we measured the concentrations of phytohormones in Aptenia cordifolia exposed to reiterated drought, together with various stress indicators, including leaf water contents, photosynthesis and mechanisms of photo- and antioxidant protection. Results showed that plants exposed to drought stress responded differently if previously challenged with a first drought. Gibberellin levels decreased upon exposure to the first drought and remained lower in double-stressed plants compared with those exposed to stress for the first time. In contrast, abscisic acid levels were higher in double- than single-stressed plants. This occurred in parallel with alterations in hydroperoxide levels, but not with malondialdehyde levels, thus suggesting an increased oxidation state that did not result in oxidative damage in double-stressed plants. It is concluded that (i) drought stress memory occurs in double-stressed A. cordifolia plants, (ii) both gibberellins and abscisic acid may play a role in plant response to repeated periods of drought, and (iii) changes in abscisic acid levels in double-stressed plants may have a positive effect by modulating changes in the cellular redox state with a role in signalling, rather than cause oxidative damage to the cell.

  10. The Role of Absolute Pitch Memory in the Oral Transmission of Folksongs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merwin Olthof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Absolute Pitch (AP is the ability to identify or produce isolated tones in the absence of contextual cues or reference pitches. While AP is thought to differ from other human abilities in its bimodal distribution (Takeuchi & Hulse, 1993 – either you have it or you do not – recent evidence suggests that memory for absolute pitch in a melody is actually widespread (Schellenberg & Trehub, 2003. In the current project the Dutch collection of historic audio recordings, Onder de Groene Linde (Grijp, 2008, is used as a source to explore the potential role of AP in the memory of songs transmitted in oral traditions. Since the melodies in this database are grouped by tune family and are available as sound files, they can serve as empirical support for the Absolute Pitch Memory (APM hypothesis, predicting that these tunes are memorized and transmitted over time and geographical location based on their absolute pitch height. To this end, between- and within-tune family analyses were performed. In the between-tune family analysis, two tune families showed significant inter-recording tonic pitch consistency. The within-tune family analysis further substantialized that effect, while controlling for possible factors of variance such as gender, geographical origin, and lyrics. Together, the results are taken as empirical support that APM plays a significant role in the oral transmission of folksongs.

  11. Roles of aminergic neurons in formation and recall of associative memory in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mizunami

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress in the study of roles of octopaminergic (OA-ergic and dopaminergic (DA-ergic signaling in insect classical conditioning, focusing on our studies on crickets. Studies on olfactory learning in honey bees and fruit-flies have suggested that OA-ergic and DA-ergic neurons convey reinforcing signals of appetitive unconditioned stimulus (US and aversive US, respectively. Our work suggested that this is applicable to olfactory, visual pattern and color learning in crickets, indicating that this feature is ubiquitous in learning of various sensory stimuli. We also showed that aversive memory decayed much faster than did appetitive memory, and we proposed that this feature is common in insects and humans. Our study also suggested that activation of OA- or DA-ergic neurons is needed for appetitive or aversive memory recall, respectively. To account for this finding, we proposed a model in which it is assumed that two types of synaptic connections are strengthened by conditioning and are activated during memory recall, one type being connections from neurons representing conditioned stimulus (CS to neurons inducing conditioned response and the other being connections from neurons representing CS to OA- or DA-ergic neurons representing appetitive or aversive US, respectively. The former is called stimulus-response (S-R connection and the latter is called stimulus-stimulus (S-S connection by theorists studying classical conditioning in vertebrates. Results of our studies using a second-order conditioning procedure supported our model. We propose that insect classical conditioning involves the formation of S-S connection and its activation for memory recall, which are often called cognitive processes.

  12. Role of early visual cortex in trans-saccadic memory of object features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Pankhuri; Dessing, Joost C; Crawford, J Douglas

    2015-08-01

    Early visual cortex (EVC) participates in visual feature memory and the updating of remembered locations across saccades, but its role in the trans-saccadic integration of object features is unknown. We hypothesized that if EVC is involved in updating object features relative to gaze, feature memory should be disrupted when saccades remap an object representation into a simultaneously perturbed EVC site. To test this, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over functional magnetic resonance imaging-localized EVC clusters corresponding to the bottom left/right visual quadrants (VQs). During experiments, these VQs were probed psychophysically by briefly presenting a central object (Gabor patch) while subjects fixated gaze to the right or left (and above). After a short memory interval, participants were required to detect the relative change in orientation of a re-presented test object at the same spatial location. Participants either sustained fixation during the memory interval (fixation task) or made a horizontal saccade that either maintained or reversed the VQ of the object (saccade task). Three TMS pulses (coinciding with the pre-, peri-, and postsaccade intervals) were applied to the left or right EVC. This had no effect when (a) fixation was maintained, (b) saccades kept the object in the same VQ, or (c) the EVC quadrant corresponding to the first object was stimulated. However, as predicted, TMS reduced performance when saccades (especially larger saccades) crossed the remembered object location and brought it into the VQ corresponding to the TMS site. This suppression effect was statistically significant for leftward saccades and followed a weaker trend for rightward saccades. These causal results are consistent with the idea that EVC is involved in the gaze-centered updating of object features for trans-saccadic memory and perception.

  13. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures.

  14. Autobiographical memory in adults with autism spectrum disorder: the role of depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults matched for age, gender and IQ. Results demonstrated that the adults with ASD reported higher levels of depressed mood and rumination than the typical adults, and also received lower scores on measures of theory of mind and working memory. Correlational analysis suggested that theory of mind and working memory were associated with autobiographical memory performance in the adults with ASD, but no significant relationships were observed between autobiographical memory, depressed mood and rumination in this group. To explore these patterns further, two cases of adults with a dual diagnosis of ASD and depression are discussed. These participants present a profile in line with the idea that depressed mood and rumination do not have the same influence on autobiographical memory in adults with ASD as they do in typical adults.

  15. Episodic Long-Term Memory of Spoken Discourse Masked by Speech: What Is the Role for Working Memory Capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorqvist, Patrik; Ronnberg, Jerker

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether working memory capacity (WMC) modulates the effects of to-be-ignored speech on the memory of materials conveyed by to-be-attended speech. Method: Two tasks (reading span, Daneman & Carpenter, 1980; Ronnberg et al., 2008; and size-comparison span, Sorqvist, Ljungberg, & Ljung, 2010) were used to measure individual…

  16. Working Memory and Arithmetic Calculation in Children: The Contributory Roles of Processing Speed, Short-Term Memory, and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Derek H.

    2008-01-01

    The cognitive underpinnings of arithmetic calculation in children are noted to involve working memory; however, cognitive processes related to arithmetic calculation and working memory suggest that this relationship is more complex than stated previously. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relative contributions of processing…

  17. Reading comprehension in aging: the role of working memory and metacomprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beni, Rossana; Borella, Erika; Carretti, Barbara

    2007-03-01

    This study examines age-related differences in reading comprehension analyzing the role of working memory and metacomprehension components in a sample of young (18-30 years), young-old (65-74 years), and old-old (75-85 years) participants. Text comprehension abilities were measured by a standardized test, including two texts: a narrative and an expository text. The elderly's reading comprehension performance, when compared to the norm, emerged to be adequate. More specifically, the young-old showed an equivalent level of comprehension as the young adults for the narrative text. However, a clear age-related decline was found in the case of the expository text. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that working memory capacity, as well as different metacomprehension components but not age, are the key aspects in explaining the different patterns of changes in the comprehension of narrative and expository texts.

  18. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 in Learning and Memory Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd; Christoffersen, Gert Rene Juul

    2005-01-01

    signaling mechanisms have also been revealed. MGluR5s are mainly localized postsynaptically on the periphery of synap-ses. MGluR5s have been implicated in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. The development of the highly potent and selective mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl...... of the effects of MPEP in various behavioral paradigms have concluded that mGluR5s play a critical role in aversive learning tasks and in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. However, MPEP has proved ineffective in certain other learning tasks. MGluR5 knockout mice have shown impairments in water maze...... and radial arm maze performance as well as in contextual fear conditioning, but not in cue conditioning. This review summarizes recent advances reported on mGluR5 function in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The current development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5...

  19. Differential role of entorhinal and hippocampal nerve growth factor in short- and long-term memory modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walz R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF into the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g, N = 11-13 per group on inhibitory avoidance retention. In order to evaluate the modulation of entorhinal and hippocampal NGF in short- and long-term memory, animals were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (foot shock, 0.4 mA. Retention tests were carried out 1.5 h or 24 h after training to measure short- and long-term memory, respectively. Immediately after training, rats received 5 µl NGF (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng or saline per side into the CA1 area and entorhinal cortex. The correct position of the cannulae was confirmed by histological analysis. The highest dose of NGF (5.0 ng into the hippocampus blocked short-term memory (P < 0.05, whereas the doses of 0.5 (P < 0.05 and 5.0 ng (P < 0.01 NGF enhanced long-term memory. NGF administration into the entorhinal cortex improved long-term memory at the dose of 5.0 ng (P < 0.05 and did not alter short-term memory. Taken as a whole, our results suggest a differential modulation by entorhinal and hippocampal NGF of short- and long-term memory.

  20. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells have a temporal dynamic role in recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Oever, Michel C; Rotaru, Diana C; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B

    2013-11-13

    In addicts, associative memories related to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse can evoke powerful craving and drug seeking urges, but effective treatment to suppress these memories is not available. Detailed insight into the neural circuitry that mediates expression of drug-associated memory is therefore of crucial importance. Substantial evidence from rodent models of addictive behavior points to the involvement of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in conditioned drug seeking, but specific knowledge of the temporal role of vmPFC pyramidal cells is lacking. To this end, we used an optogenetics approach to probe the involvement of vmPFC pyramidal cells in expression of a recent and remote conditioned cocaine memory. In mice, we expressed Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or Halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) in pyramidal cells of the vmPFC and studied the effect of activation or inhibition of these cells during expression of a cocaine-contextual memory on days 1-2 (recent) and ∼3 weeks (remote) after conditioning. Whereas optical activation of pyramidal cells facilitated extinction of remote memory, without affecting recent memory, inhibition of pyramidal cells acutely impaired recall of recent cocaine memory, without affecting recall of remote memory. In addition, we found that silencing pyramidal cells blocked extinction learning at the remote memory time-point. We provide causal evidence of a critical time-dependent switch in the contribution of vmPFC pyramidal cells to recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory, indicating that the circuitry that controls expression of cocaine memories reorganizes over time.

  1. Anxiety Sensitivity Dimensions and Generalized Anxiety‏ ‏Severity: The ‎Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance and Repetitive‏ ‏Negative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh‏ ‏ Mohammadkhani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general ‎population. Several studies suggest that anxiety sensitivity is a vulnerability factor in generalized ‎anxiety severity. However, some other studies suggest that negative repetitive thinking and ‎experiential avoidance as response factors can explain this relationship. Therefore, this study ‎aimed to investigate the mediating role of experiential avoidance and negative repetitive thinking ‎in the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity.‎Method: This was a cross-sectional and correlational study. A sample of 475 university students was ‎selected through stratified sampling method. The participants completed Anxiety Sensitivity ‎Inventory-3, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire, and ‎Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation, multiple ‎regression analysis and path analysis.‎Results: The results revealed a positive relationship between anxiety sensitivity, particularly cognitive ‎anxiety sensitivity, experiential avoidance, repetitive thinking and generalized anxiety severity. In ‎addition, findings showed that repetitive thinking, but not experiential avoidance, fully mediated ‎the relationship between cognitive anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity. α Level ‎was p<0.005.‎Conclusion: Consistent with the trans-diagnostic hypothesis, anxiety sensitivity predicts generalized anxiety‏ ‏severity, but its effect is due to the generating repetitive negative thought.‎

  2. Role of the hippocampus in memory formation: restorative encoding memory integration neural device as a cognitive neural prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Theodore; Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa; Shin, Dae; Marmarelis, Vasilis; Hampson, Robert; Sweatt, Andrew; Heck, Christi; Liu, Charles; Wills, Jack; Lacoss, Jeff; Granacki, John; Gerhardt, Greg; Deadwyler, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Remind, which stands for "restorative encoding memory integration neural device," is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-sponsored program to construct the first-ever cognitive prosthesis to replace lost memory function and enhance the existing memory capacity in animals and, ultimately, in humans. Reaching this goal involves understanding something fundamental about the brain that has not been understood previously: how the brain internally codes memories. In developing a hippocampal prosthesis for the rat, we have been able to demonstrate a multiple-input, multiple- output (MIMO) nonlinear model that predicts in real time the spatiotemporal codes for specific memories required for correct performance on a standard learning/memory task, i.e., delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) memory. The MIMO model has been tested successfully in a number of contexts; most notably, in animals with a pharmacologically disabled hippocampus, we were able to reinstate long-term memories necessary for correct DNMS behavior by substituting a MIMO model-predicted code, delivered by electrical stimulation to the hippocampus through an array of electrodes, resulting in spatiotemporal hippocampal activity that is normally generated endogenously. We also have shown that delivering the same model-predicted code to electrode-implanted control animals with a normally functioning hippocampus substantially enhances animals memory capacity above control levels. These results in rodents have formed the basis for extending the MIMO model to nonhuman primates; this is now underway as the last step of the REMIND program before developing a MIMO-based cognitive prosthesis for humans.

  3. The role of avoidance and inflexibility in characterizing response to contingency management for cocaine use disorders: A secondary profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotts, Angela L; Vujanovic, Anka; Heads, Angela; Suchting, Robert; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M

    2015-06-01

    Contingency management (CM) is a reinforcement-based approach that provides tangible rewards for objectively verified drug abstinence. CM is the most effective available behavioral intervention for cocaine use disorders; however, response to CM is variable, with significant rates of nonresponse. In the present investigation, we conducted a secondary profile analysis to identify potentially modifiable cognitive-affective characteristics associated with CM response (abstinence vs. continued use) preceding a pharmacotherapy trial for cocaine dependence. Ninety-nine cocaine-dependent, treatment-seeking adults participated in a 4-week baseline CM procedure using high-value vouchers for submission of cocaine-negative urines. Separate profiles for responders and the nonresponders were established using standardized mean scores on relevant pretreatment measures of negative affect, experiential avoidance, cocaine withdrawal/craving, and impulsivity. Results indicated no differences between responder subgroups on baseline levels of negative affect, withdrawal/craving, or impulsivity; however, CM nonresponders, relative to responders, reported significantly higher levels of avoidance and behavioral inflexibility (p < .01) in the context of distressing cocaine-related thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. These data suggest that emotion regulation skills may serve as a therapeutic strategy for enhancing response to CM for cocaine use disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. The shade avoidance syndrome in Arabidopsis: the antagonistic role of phytochrome a and B differentiates vegetation proximity and canopy shade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F Martínez-García

    Full Text Available Light limitation caused by dense vegetation is one of the greatest threats to plant survival in natural environments. Plants detect such neighboring vegetation as a reduction in the red to far-red ratio (R:FR of the incoming light. The low R:FR signal, perceived by phytochromes, initiates a set of responses collectively known as the shade avoidance syndrome, intended to reduce the degree of current or future shade from neighbors by overtopping such competitors or inducing flowering to ensure seed production. At the seedling stage these responses include increased hypocotyl elongation. We have systematically analyzed the Arabidopsis seedling response and the contribution of phyA and phyB to perception of decreased R:FR, at three different levels of photosynthetically active radiation. Our results show that the shade avoidance syndrome, induced by phyB deactivation, is gradually antagonized by phyA, operating through the so-called FR-High Irradiance Response, in response to high FR levels in a range that simulates plant canopy shade. The data indicate that the R:FR signal distinguishes between the presence of proximal, but non-shading, neighbors and direct foliar shade, via a intrafamily photosensory attenuation mechanism that acts to suppress excessive reversion toward skotomorphogenic development under prolonged direct vegetation shade.

  5. A New Role for Attentional Corticopetal Acetylcholine in Cortical Memory Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroshi; Kanamaru, Takashi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tsuda, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although the role of corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh) in higher cognitive functions is increasingly recognized, the questions as (1) how ACh works in attention(s), memory dynamics and cortical state transitions, and also (2) why and how loss of ACh is involved in dysfunctions such as visual hallucinations in dementia with Lewy bodies and deficit of attention(s), are not well understood. From the perspective of a dynamical systems viewpoint, we hypothesize that transient ACh released under top-down attention serves to temporarily invoke attractor-like memories, while a background level of ACh reverses this process returning the dynamical nature of the memory structure back to attractor ruins (quasi-attractors). In fact, transient ACh loosens inhibitions of py ramidal neurons (PYRs) by P V+ fas t spiking (FS) i nterneurons, while a baseline ACh recovers inhibitory actions of P V+ FS. Attentional A Ch thus dynamically modifies brain's connectivity. Th e core of this process is in the depression of GABAergic inhibitory currents in PYRs due to muscarinic (probably M2 subtype) presyn aptic effects on GABAergic synapses of PV+ FS neurons

  6. The Role of Epigenetic Regulation in Transcriptional Memory in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, A M; Holloway, A F

    The immune system is exquisitely poised to identify, respond to, and eradicate pathogens from the body, as well as to produce a more rapid and augmented response to a subsequent encounter with the pathogen. These cellular responses rely on the highly coordinated and rapid activation of gene expression programs as well as the ability of the cell to retain a memory of the initial gene response. It is clear that chromatin structure and epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in determining these gene responses, and in fact the immune system has proved an instructive model for investigating the multifaceted mechanisms through which the chromatin landscape contributes to gene expression programs. These mechanisms include modifications to the DNA and histone proteins, the positioning, composition, and remodeling of nucleosomes, as well as the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Moreover, it is now apparent that epigenetic mechanisms also provide an instrument by which cells can retain memory of the initial transcriptional response, "priming" the genome so that it can respond more quickly to subsequent exposure to the signal. Here, we use the immune system as a model to demonstrate the complex interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin landscape required to orchestrate precise gene responses to external stimuli and further to demonstrate how these interactions can establish memory of past transcriptional events. We focus on what we have learnt from the immune system and how this can inform our understanding of other cellular systems. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Time Delay on Recognition Memory for Pictures: The Modulatory Role of Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the modulatory role of emotion in the effect of time delay on recognition memory for pictures. Participants viewed neutral, positive and negative pictures, and took a recognition memory test 5 minutes, 24 hours, or 1 week after learning. The findings are: 1) For neutral, positive and negative pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h delay. For neutral and positive pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 1-week delay was lower than in the 24-h delay; for negative pictures, overall recognition in the 24-h and 1-week delay did not significantly differ. Therefore negative emotion modulates the effect of time delay on recognition memory, maintaining retention of overall recognition accuracy only within a certain frame of time. 2) For the three types of pictures, recollection and familiarity in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h and the 1-week delay. Thus emotion does not appear to modulate the effect of time delay on recollection and familiarity. However, recollection in the 24-h delay was higher than in the 1-week delay, whereas familiarity in the 24-h delay was lower than in the 1-week delay. PMID:24971457

  8. Pharmacological evidence is consistent with a prominent role of spatial memory in complex navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Timothy C; Krochmal, Aaron R

    2016-02-10

    The ability to learn about the spatial environment plays an important role in navigation, migration, dispersal, and foraging. However, our understanding of both the role of cognition in the development of navigation strategies and the mechanisms underlying these strategies is limited. We tested the hypothesis that complex navigation is facilitated by spatial memory in a population of Chrysemys picta that navigate with extreme precision (±3.5 m) using specific routes that must be learned prior to age three. We used scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, to manipulate the cognitive spatial abilities of free-living turtles during naturally occurring overland movements. Experienced adults treated with scopolamine diverted markedly from their precise navigation routes. Naive juveniles lacking experience (and memory) were not affected by scopolamine, and thereby served as controls for perceptual or non-spatial cognitive processes associated with navigation. Further, neither adult nor juvenile movement was affected by methylscopolamine, a form of scopolamine that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, a control for the peripheral effects of scopolamine. Together, these results are consistent with a role of spatial cognition in complex navigation and highlight a cellular mechanism that might underlie spatial cognition. Overall, our findings expand our understanding of the development of complex cognitive abilities of vertebrates and the neurological mechanisms of navigation.

  9. Role of the somatostatin system in contextual fear memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Christian; Stoppel, Christian; Szinyei, Csaba; Stork, Oliver; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2008-04-01

    Somatostatin has been implicated in various cognitive and emotional functions, but its precise role is still poorly understood. Here, we have made use of mice with somatostatin deficiency, based upon genetic invalidation or pharmacologically induced depletion, and Pavlovian fear conditioning in order to address the contribution of the somatostatin system to associative fear memory. The results demonstrate an impairment of foreground and background contextual but not tone fear conditioning in mice with targeted ablation of the somatostatin gene. These deficits were associated with a decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Both the behavioral and the electrophysiological phenotypes were mimicked in wild-type mice through application of the somatostatin-depleting substance cysteamine prior to fear training, whereas no further deficits were observed upon application in the somatostatin null mutants. These results suggest that the somatostatin system plays a critical role in the acquisition of contextual fear memory, but not tone fear learning, and further highlights the role of hippocampal synaptic plasticity for information processing concerning contextual information.

  10. Anxiety Sensitivity and Smoking Behavior Among Trauma-Exposed Daily Smokers: The Explanatory Role of Smoking-Related Avoidance and Inflexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshaie, Jafar; Zvolensky, Michael J; Salazar, Adriana; Vujanovic, Anka A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS), defined as the extent to which individuals believe that anxiety-related sensations have harmful consequences, is associated with smoking processes and poorer clinical outcomes among trauma-exposed smokers. Yet the specific mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility is a construct implicated in multiple manifestations of mood regulation that may underlie smoking behavior. The current study examined the explanatory role of smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility in terms of the relation between AS and indices of smoking behavior among trauma-exposed smokers. The sample consisted of 217 treatment-seeking adult smokers (44% female; M age = 37.8; SD = 13.2; age range: 18-65 years), who were exposed to at least one lifetime Criterion A trauma event (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR] Criterion A for trauma exposure). Bootstrap analysis (5,000 re-samples) revealed that AS was indirectly related to the (a) number of cigarettes smoked per day, (b) number of years being a daily smoker, (c) number of failed quit attempts, and (d) heaviness of smoking index among trauma-exposed smokers through its relation with smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility. These findings provide initial evidence suggesting that smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility may be an important construct in better understanding AS-smoking relations among trauma-exposed smokers. Future work is needed to explore the extent to which smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility account for relations between AS and other smoking processes (e.g., withdrawal, cessation outcome) in the context of trauma and smoking comorbidity.

  11. Pivotal role of anterior cingulate cortex in working memory after traumatic brain injury in youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne eCazalis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this fMRI study, the functions of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex were studied in a group of adolescents who had sustained a moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury. A spatial working memory task with varying working memory loads, representing experimental conditions of increasing difficulty, was administered.In a cross-sectional comparison between the patients and a matched control group, patients performed worse than Controls, showing longer reaction times and lower response accuracy on the spatial working memory task. Brain imaging findings suggest a possible double-dissociation: activity of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in the Traumatic Brain Injury group, but not in the Control group, was associated with task difficulty; conversely, activity of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in the Control group, but not in the TBI group, was correlated with task difficulty.In addition to the main cross-sectional study, a longitudinal study of a group of adolescent patients with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury was done using fMRI and the same spatial working memory task. The patient group was studied at two time points: one time point during the post-acute phase and one time point 12 months later, during the chronic phase. Results indicated that patients' behavioral performance improved over time, suggesting cognitive recovery. Brain imaging findings suggest that, over this 12 month period, patients recruited less of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and more of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in response to increasing task difficulty.The role of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in executive functions following a moderate to severe brain injury in adolescence is discussed within the context of conflicting models of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex functions in the existing literature.

  12. The role of movement representation in episodic memory for actions: A study of patients with apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Kouhei; Shirakawa, Masayuki; Higashiyama, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    In attempting to memorize a sentence about an action, such as "Pick up the glass," performing the action (motor encoding) results in better memory performance than simply memorizing the words (verbal encoding). Such enhancement of memory is known as the enactment effect. Several theories have been proposed to explain this phenomenon using concepts such as physical motor information associated with speed, form, amplitude of movement and/or movement representations involved in movement imaging, knowledge on manipulating tools, and spatial relationships in the enactment effect. However, there have been no cognitive neuropsychological studies investigating whether the enactment effect is crucially influenced by physical motor information or movement representations. To clarify this issue, we compared healthy adult control participants with two different types of apraxia patients. One patient with left hemisphere lesions caused by cerebral infarction had a disability involving multiple movement representations. The other patient showed symptoms of corticobasal syndrome and was not able to benefit from feedback on the accuracy of her motor movements during enactment. Participants memorized action sentences via either verbal or motor encoding and responded to recall and recognition tests. Results indicated that the patient with the movement representation deficits exhibited worse memory performance than the other patient or control participants following both verbal and motor encoding. Although the enactment effect was present during recall in both patients, the effect was not observed for recognition in the patient with severe movement representation deficits. These results suggest that movement representations are involved in encoding episodic memories of action. Moreover, the role of movement representations appears to depend on the form of retrieval that is being used.

  13. The Role of Emotional Avoidance, the Patient-Provider Relationship, and Other Social Support in ART Adherence for HIV+ Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Christopher R; Gratz, Kim L; Portz, Kaitlin J; Pinkston, Megan; Naifeh, James A; Evans, Shenell D; Konkle-Parker, Deborah J; Tull, Matthew T

    2017-03-06

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with positive health outcomes among HIV+ patients. However, non-adherence remains high. Though factors that account for non-adherence remain unclear, social support has been consistently associated with ART adherence. As such, identifying malleable factors that hinder patients' ability to form supportive relationships may have consequence for improving ART adherence. Emotional avoidance (EA) may be one such factor given that it has been linked to difficulties in social situations. The present study examined relations among EA, the patient-provider relationship, other sources of social support, and ART adherence within a sample of HIV+ ART-prescribed patients. High EA was related to poor adherence and patient-provider relationships. EA was indirectly related to poor adherence through poorer patient-provider interactions. The indirect relation of EA to ART adherence through other sources of social support was not significant. Implications for developing targeted behavioral interventions focused on improving ART adherence are discussed.

  14. Maternal bonding in mothers with postpartum anxiety disorder: the crucial role of subclinical depressive symptoms and maternal avoidance behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, A; Zietlow, A-L; Reck, C

    2014-10-01

    Hardly any research has examined the link between postpartum anxiety disorder and maternal bonding. This study examined if postpartum anxiety disorder and maternal bonding are related in the postpartum period. Thereby, subclinical depressive symptoms and specific aspects of an anxious symptomatology were also taken into consideration. The German sample of N = 78 mother-infant dyads is composed of n = 30 mothers with postpartum anxiety disorders but without major or minor depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) and n = 48 healthy mothers. Subjects were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders at an average infant age of M = 4.1 months. Moreover, mothers filled out the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire-16. The Anxiety Cognitions Questionnaire, the Body Sensations Questionnaire and the Mobility Inventory were chosen to assess different aspects of anxious symptomatology. To control for concurrent subclinical depressive symptoms, we used the German Edinburgh-Postnatal-Depression Scale. Mothers with postpartum anxiety disorder reported significantly lower bonding than healthy mothers. However, in a linear regression analysis, concurrent subclinical depressive symptoms and avoidance of anxiety-related situations in company explained 27 % of the overall variance in maternal bonding. The perceived lower bonding of mothers with anxiety disorder could be due to aspects of a concurrent subclinical depressive symptomatology. This notion emphasizes the need to target even mild depressive symptoms in the treatment of postpartum anxiety disorders. The outcomes also underline that the severity of anxious symptomatology, reflected by avoidance behaviour in company, puts the mother-infant bond at risk.

  15. The role of short-term memory impairment in nonword repetition, real word repetition, and nonword decoding: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate

    2017-09-21

    In a companion study, adults with dyslexia and adults with a probable history of childhood apraxia of speech showed evidence of difficulty with processing sequential information during nonword repetition, multisyllabic real word repetition and nonword decoding. Results suggested that some errors arose in visual encoding during nonword reading, all levels of processing but especially short-term memory storage/retrieval during nonword repetition, and motor planning and programming during complex real word repetition. To further investigate the role of short-term memory, a participant with short-term memory impairment (MI) was recruited. MI was confirmed with poor performance during a sentence repetition and three nonword repetition tasks, all of which have a high short-term memory load, whereas typical performance was observed during tests of reading, spelling, and static verbal knowledge, all with low short-term memory loads. Experimental results show error-free performance during multisyllabic real word repetition but high counts of sequence errors, especially migrations and assimilations, during nonword repetition, supporting short-term memory as a locus of sequential processing deficit during nonword repetition. Results are also consistent with the hypothesis that during complex real word repetition, short-term memory is bypassed as the word is recognized and retrieved from long-term memory prior to producing the word.

  16. Interference Conditions of the Reconsolidation Process in Humans: The Role of Valence and Different Memory Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo S.; Bavassi, Luz; Kaczer, Laura; Forcato, Cecilia; Pedreira, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Following the presentation of a reminder, consolidated memories become reactivated followed by a process of re-stabilization, which is referred to as reconsolidation. The most common behavioral tool used to reveal this process is interference produced by new learning shortly after memory reactivation. Memory interference is defined as a decrease in memory retrieval, the effect is generated when new information impairs an acquired memory. In general, the target memory and the interference task used are the same. Here we investigated how different memory systems and/or their valence could produce memory reconsolidation interference. We showed that a reactivated neutral declarative memory could be interfered by new learning of a different neutral declarative memory. Then, we revealed that an aversive implicit memory could be interfered by the presentation of a reminder followed by a threatening social event. Finally, we showed that the reconsolidation of a neutral declarative memory is unaffected by the acquisition of an aversive implicit memory and conversely, this memory remains intact when the neutral declarative memory is used as interference. These results suggest that the interference of memory reconsolidation is effective when two task rely on the same memory system or both evoke negative valence. PMID:28066212

  17. Interference conditions of the reconsolidation process in humans: the role of valence and different memory systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the presentation of a reminder, consolidated memories become reactivated followed by a process of re-stabilization, which is referred to as reconsolidation. The most common behavioral tool used to reveal this process is interference produced by new learning shortly after memory reactivation. Memory interference is defined as a decrease in memory retrieval, the effect is generated when new information impairs an acquired memory. In general, the target memory and the interference task used are the same. Here we investigated how different memory systems and/or their valence could produce memory reconsolidation interference. We showed that a reactivated neutral declarative memory could be interfered by new learning of a different neutral declarative memory. Then, we revealed that an aversive implicit memory could be interfered by the presentation of a reminder followed by a threatening social event. Finally, we showed that the reconsolidation of a neutral declarative memory is unaffected by the acquisition of an aversive implicit memory and conversely, this memory remains intact when the neutral declarative memory is used as interference. These results suggest that the interference of memory reconsolidation is effective when two task rely on the same memory system or both evoke negative valence.

  18. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  19. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  20. Distinct roles of Cdc42 in thymopoiesis and effector and memory T cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukun Guo

    Full Text Available Cdc42 of the Rho GTPase family has been implicated in cell actin organization, proliferation, survival, and migration but its physiological role is likely cell-type specific. By a T cell-specific deletion of Cdc42 in mouse, we have recently shown that Cdc42 maintains naïve T cell homeostasis through promoting cell survival and suppressing T cell activation. Here we have further investigated the involvement of Cdc42 in multiple stages of T cell differentiation. We found that in Cdc42(-/- thymus, positive selection of CD4(+CD8(+ double-positive thymocytes was defective, CD4(+ and CD8(+ single-positive thymocytes were impaired in migration and showed an increase in cell apoptosis triggered by anti-CD3/-CD28 antibodies, and thymocytes were hyporesponsive to anti-CD3/-CD28-induced cell proliferation and hyperresponsive to anti-CD3/-CD28-stimulated MAP kinase activation. At the periphery, Cdc42-deficient naive T cells displayed an impaired actin polymerization and TCR clustering during the formation of mature immunological synapse, and showed an enhanced differentiation to Th1 and CD8(+ effector and memory cells in vitro and in vivo. Finally, Cdc42(-/- mice exhibited exacerbated liver damage in an induced autoimmune disease model. Collectively, these data establish that Cdc42 is critically involved in thymopoiesis and plays a restrictive role in effector and memory T cell differentiation and autoimmunity.

  1. A specific role for hippocampal mossy fiber's zinc in rapid storage of emotional memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccom, Johnatan; Halley, Hélène; Daumas, Stéphanie; Lassalle, Jean Michel

    2014-04-16

    We investigated the specific role of zinc present in large amounts in the synaptic vesicles of mossy fibers and coreleased with glutamate in the CA3 region. In previous studies, we have shown that blockade of zinc after release has no effect on the consolidation of spatial learning, while zinc is required for the consolidation of contextual fear conditioning. Although both are hippocampo-dependent processes, fear conditioning to the context implies a strong emotional burden. To verify the hypothesis that zinc could play a specific role in enabling sustainable memorization of a single event with a strong emotional component, we used a neuropharmacological approach combining a glutamate receptor antagonist with different zinc chelators. Results show that zinc is mandatory to allow the consolidation of one-shot memory, thus being the key element allowing the hippocampus submitted to a strong emotional charge to switch from the cognitive mode to a flashbulb memory mode. Individual differences in learning abilities have been known for a long time to be totally or partially compensated by distributed learning practice. Here we show that contextual fear conditioning impairments due to zinc blockade can be efficiently reduced by distributed learning practice.

  2. Sleep-Wake Regulation and Its Impact on Working Memory Performance: The Role of Adenosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Franziska Reichert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a fine-tuned interplay between sleep-homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Compelling evidence suggests that adenosine plays an important role in mediating the increase of homeostatic sleep pressure during time spent awake and its decrease during sleep. Here, we summarize evidence that adenosinergic mechanisms regulate not only the dynamic of sleep pressure, but are also implicated in the interaction of homeostatic and circadian processes. We review how this interaction becomes evident at several levels, including electrophysiological data, neuroimaging studies and behavioral observations. Regarding complex human behavior, we particularly focus on sleep-wake regulatory influences on working memory performance and underlying brain activity, with a specific emphasis on the role of adenosine in this interplay. We conclude that a change in adenosinergic mechanisms, whether exogenous or endogenous, does not only impact on sleep-homeostatic processes, but also interferes with the circadian timing system.

  3. Gnosall Primary Care Memory Clinic: Eldercare facilitator role description and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ian; Greaves, Nicola; Walker, Elaine; Greening, Lesley; Benbow, Susan Mary; Jolley, David

    2015-07-01

    The Gnosall Primary Care Memory Clinic has been operating since 2006 and adds the skills of a specialist old age psychiatrist to the extensive skills and knowledge available in primary care. Key to the organisation and function of the clinic is the eldercare facilitator, a new role situated in primary care and linking with the specialist and a wide range of other agencies and people. In order to facilitate replication of the model elsewhere, the function, role and competencies of existing and previous eldercare facilitators in the clinic have been reviewed, clarified and related to a competency framework and to similar initiatives in the literature. The selection and training of people with the attributes and skills required to become an eldercare facilitator will determine whether extension of the model is successful elsewhere.

  4. Differences in Attainment and Performance in a Foreign Language: The Role of Working Memory Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the role of working memory capacity in L2 attainment and performance. The study uses an L1 reading span task to measure working memory of a group of 59 high- intermediate/advanced learners of English, and a film retelling task to measure their oral production. The analysis first showed a moderate to high correlation between proficiency measured by a general proficiency test and learners’ fluency, lexical complexity, and accuracy but not structural complexity on the retelling task. Secondly, no correlation was found between overall proficiency and working memory. Thirdly, a weak correlation was found between fluency and lexical complexity, and working memory. When the group was split into top and bottom levels of proficiency, moderate correlations were found between lexical complexity and working memory only for the high-proficiency group. The results are discussed in the light of previous research.El objetivo de este estudio es investigar el rol de la capacidad de memoria operativa en la proficiencia y la producción en una L2. El estudio utiliza una tarea de reading span en la L1 para medir la memoria operativa de un grupo de 59 estudiantes de inglés de nivel intermedio alto/avanzado, y una tarea narrativa para medir su producción oral. Los análisis muestran correlaciones significativas entre la proficiencia medida por un test de proficiencia general y la fluidez, complejidad léxica, y corrección, aunque no con la complejidad estructural. Las correlaciones también son positivas y significativas entre la memoria operativa y la fluidez y complejidad léxica, pero no se observa una correlación significativa entre la proficiencia general y la memoria operativa. Cuando se divide el grupo entre los niveles más altos y más bajos se encuentran correlaciones moderadas entre la complejidad léxica y la memoria operativa sólo para el grupo de proficiencia alta. Los resultados se analizan en base a los

  5. Using memories to understand others: the role of episodic memory in theory of mind impairment in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Noémie; Viallet, François; Champagne-Lavau, Maud

    2013-09-01

    Theory of mind (TOM) refers to the ability to infer one's own and other's mental states. Growing evidence highlighted the presence of impairment on the most complex TOM tasks in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, how TOM deficit is related to other cognitive dysfunctions and more specifically to episodic memory impairment - the prominent feature of this disease - is still under debate. Recent neuroanatomical findings have shown that remembering past events and inferring others' states of mind share the same cerebral network suggesting the two abilities share a common process .This paper proposes to review emergent evidence of TOM impairment in AD patients and to discuss the evidence of a relationship between TOM and episodic memory. We will discuss about AD patients' deficit in TOM being possibly related to their difficulties in recollecting memories of past social interactions.

  6. Roles for NF-κB and gene targets of NF-κB in synaptic plasticity, memory, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Wanda M; Stoesz, Brenda M; Kelly, Debbie M; Albensi, Benedict C

    2014-04-01

    Although traditionally associated with immune function, the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has garnered much attention in recent years as an important regulator of memory. Specifically, research has found that NF-κB, localized in both neurons and glia, is activated during the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), a paradigm of synaptic plasticity and correlate of memory. Further, experimental manipulation of NF-κB activation or its blockade results in altered memory and spatial navigation abilities. Genetic knockout of specific NF-κB subunits in mice results in memory alterations. Collectively, such data suggest that NF-κB may be a requirement for memory, although the direction of the response (i.e., memory enhancement or deficit) is inconsistent. A limited number of gene targets of NF-κB have been recently identified in neurons, including neurotrophic factors, calcium-regulating proteins, other transcription factors, and molecules associated with neuronal outgrowth and remodeling. In turn, several key molecules are activators of NF-κB, including protein kinase C and [Ca(++)]i. Thus, NF-κB signaling is complex and under the regulation of numerous proteins involved in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. The purpose of this review is to highlight the literature detailing a role for NF-κB in synaptic plasticity, memory, and spatial navigation. Secondly, this review will synthesize the research evaluating gene targets of NF-κB in synaptic plasticity and memory. Although there is ample evidence to suggest a critical role for NF-κB in memory, our understanding of its gene targets in neurons is limited and only beginning to be appreciated.

  7. Roles of body image-related experiential avoidance and uncommitted living in the link between body image and women's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Inês A; Ferreira, Cláudia; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2016-12-07

    The current study aimed to test whether the associations of body mass index, body image discrepancy, and social comparison based on physical appearance with women's psychological quality of life (QoL) would be explained by the mechanisms of body image-related experiential avoidance and patterns of uncommitted living. The sample was collected from October 2014 to March 2015 and included 737 female college students (aged between 18 and 25 years) who completed validated self-report measures. Results demonstrated that the final path model explained 43% of psychological QoL and revealed an excellent fit. Body image-related experiential avoidance had a meditational role in the association between body image discrepancy and psychological QoL. Further, the link between social comparison based on physical appearance and psychological QoL was partially mediated by body image-related experiential avoidance and uncommitted living. These findings indicate that the key mechanisms of the relationship between body image and young women's QoL were those related to maladaptive emotion regulation. It thus seems that interventions aiming to promote mental health in this population should promote acceptance of internal experiences related to physical appearance (e.g., sensations, thoughts, or emotions) and the engagement in behaviors committed to life values.

  8. Highly specific role of hypocretin (orexin) neurons: differential activation as a function of diurnal phase, operant reinforcement vs. operant avoidance and light level

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Ronald; Wu, Ming-Fung; Barber, Grace; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin (Hcrt) cell loss is responsible for narcolepsy, but Hcrt's role in normal behavior is unclear. We found that Hcrt KO mice were unable to work for food or water reward during the light phase. However, they were unimpaired relative to wild type (WT) mice when working for reward during the dark phase or when working to avoid shock in the light or dark phases. In WT, expression of Fos in Hcrt neurons occurs only in the light phase when working for positive reinforcement. Expression was...

  9. Effects of suppressing negative memories on intrusions and autobiographical memory specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, Elke; Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether avoidance of negative memories results in intrusions as well as reduced memory specificity. Healthy participants suppressed memories of either a negative or a neutral autobiographical event. Individuals who suppressed negative memories tended to demonstrate smaller increa

  10. Effects of suppressing negative memories on intrusions and autobiographical memory specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, Elke; Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether avoidance of negative memories results in intrusions as well as reduced memory specificity. Healthy participants suppressed memories of either a negative or a neutral autobiographical event. Individuals who suppressed negative memories tended to demonstrate smaller increa

  11. Role conflict, uncertainty in illness, and illness-related communication avoidance: College students facing familial chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    Suchak, Meghana

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the current study was on examining possible differences in college students' adjustment based on residency status (i.e., international Asian vs. domestic students) and illness status (i.e., having a family member with a chronic illness vs. not having a family member with a chronic illness). The study also examined the associations between overall college student adjustment and the family and illness-related factors of role conflict, uncertainty in illness, and illness-related com...

  12. A role for central nervous growth hormone-releasing hormone signaling in the consolidation of declarative memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Hallschmid

    Full Text Available Contributions of somatotropic hormonal activity to memory functions in humans, which are suggested by clinical observations, have not been systematically examined. With previous experiments precluding a direct effect of systemic growth hormone (GH on acute memory formation, we assessed the role of central nervous somatotropic signaling in declarative memory consolidation. We examined the effect of intranasally administered growth hormone releasing-hormone (GHRH; 600 µg that has direct access to the brain and suppresses endogenous GHRH via an ultra-short negative feedback loop. Twelve healthy young men learned word-pair associates at 2030 h and were administered GHRH and placebo, respectively, at 2100 h. Retrieval was tested after 11 hours of wakefulness. Compared to placebo, intranasal GHRH blunted GH release within 3 hours after substance administration and reduced the number of correctly recalled word-pairs by ∼12% (both P<0.05. The impairment of declarative memory consolidation was directly correlated to diminished GH concentrations (P<0.05. Procedural memory consolidation as examined by the parallel assessment of finger sequence tapping performance was not affected by GHRH administration. Our findings indicate that intranasal GHRH, by counteracting endogenous GHRH release, impairs hippocampal memory processing. They provide first evidence for a critical contribution of central nervous somatotropic activity to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation.

  13. The advantage of reading over listening text comprehension in Down syndrome: what is the role of verbal memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Maja; Florit, Elena; Levorato, M Chiara

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the role played by verbal memory in the advantage shown by individuals with Down syndrome in reading over listening text comprehension (Roch & Levorato, 2009). Two different aspects of verbal memory were analyzed: processing load and coding modality. Participants were 20 individuals with Down syndrome, aged between 11 and 26 years who were matched for reading comprehension with a group of 20 typically developing children aged between 6;3 and 7;3 years. The two groups were presented with a listening comprehension test and four verbal memory tasks in which the degree of processing load and the coding modality were manipulated. The results of the study confirmed the advantage of reading over listening comprehension for individuals with Down syndrome. Furthermore, it emerged that different aspects of verbal memory were related respectively to reading and to listening comprehension: visual memory with low processing load was related to the former and oral memory with high processing load to the latter. Finally, it was demonstrated that verbal memory contributed to explain the advantage of reading over listening comprehension in Down syndrome. The results are discussed in light of their theoretical relevance and practical implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Human Dentate Gyrus Plays a Necessary Role in Discriminating New Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stevenson; Vieweg, Paula; Gao, Fuqiang; Gilboa, Asaf; Wolbers, Thomas; Black, Sandra E; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-10-10

    Our day-to-day experiences are often similar to one another, occurring in the same place at the same time of day, with common people and objects, and with a shared purpose. Humans have an episodic memory to represent unique, personal events that are rich in detail [1]. For this to occur, at least two basic neural mechanisms are required: one to orthogonalize or "separate" overlapping input patterns at encoding and another to reinstate or "complete" memories from partial cues at retrieval [2-6]. To what extent do these purported "pattern separation" and "pattern completion" mechanisms rely on distinct subfields of the hippocampus [6]? Computational models [4-6] and lesion and genetic studies in rodents [7-12] largely point to the dentate gyrus as responsible for pattern separation and the CA3 and CA1 subfields for pattern completion (but see [13-16]). In high-resolution fMRI studies of humans, behavioral discrimination and completion tasks designed to approximate pattern separation and pattern completion, respectively, elicit the predicted pattern of activity in the dentate gyrus and CA3/CA1 [17-21]. Likewise, impaired behavioral discrimination has been demonstrated in individuals with hippocampal lesions [22, 23], but the lesions most likely encompass other subfields. Examination of these processes in individuals with selective lesions to hippocampal subfields is needed to infer causation [19]. Here, we report the rare case of BL, a 54-year-old man with bilateral ischemic lesions to the hippocampus [24] primarily affecting the dentate gyrus. Studying BL provides the unique opportunity to directly evaluate theories of hippocampal function that assign the dentate gyrus a specific role in discriminating old from new memories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex during the disambiguation of social cues in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert S; LoPresti, Matthew L; Schon, Karin; Stern, Chantal E

    2013-12-01

    Human social interactions are complex behaviors requiring the concerted effort of multiple neural systems to track and monitor the individuals around us. Cognitively, adjusting our behavior on the basis of changing social cues such as facial expressions relies on working memory and the ability to disambiguate, or separate, the representations of overlapping stimuli resulting from viewing the same individual with different facial expressions. We conducted an fMRI experiment examining the brain regions contributing to the encoding, maintenance, and retrieval of overlapping identity information during working memory using a delayed match-to-sample task. In the overlapping condition, two faces from the same individual with different facial expressions were presented at sample. In the nonoverlapping condition, the two sample faces were from two different individuals with different expressions. fMRI activity was assessed by contrasting the overlapping and nonoverlapping conditions at sample, delay, and test. The lateral orbitofrontal cortex showed increased fMRI signal in the overlapping condition in all three phases of the delayed match-to-sample task and increased functional connectivity with the hippocampus when encoding overlapping stimuli. The hippocampus showed increased fMRI signal at test. These data suggest that lateral orbitofrontal cortex helps encode and maintain representations of overlapping stimuli in working memory, whereas the orbitofrontal cortex and hippocampus contribute to the successful retrieval of overlapping stimuli. We suggest that the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and hippocampus play a role in encoding, maintaining, and retrieving social cues, especially when multiple interactions with an individual need to be disambiguated in a rapidly changing social context in order to make appropriate social responses.

  16. Physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A

    1998-01-01

    Multiple 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors have been identified (5-HT1A/1B/1D/1E/1F, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3A/3B, 5-HT4A/4B, 5-HT5A/5B, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7A/7B/7C/7D) and extensive evidence suggests that 5-HT receptors have a role in learning and memory. Indeed, available evidence strongly supports physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in cognitive processes, although the evidence seems incomplete. Indeed, there has been a clear tendency to use pre-learning administration most frequently, whereas post-learning and pre-retention administration protocols have been utilized in only a few studies, and probably this trend has led to missed relevant information. For instance, when pre- vs post-training administration of 5-HT1A agonist, 5-HT2 antagonists and 5-HT4 agonists have been compared contrasting findings were reported in aversive and appetitive learning tasks. Emerging evidence also indicates that 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, as well as, 5-HT1A antagonists, 5-HT2 antagonists, 5-HT3 antagonists and 5-HT uptake inhibitors may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and amnesia. Inasmuch as the activation or blockade of diverse 5-HT receptors is able to modulate cognitive processes, and 5-HT uptake inhibition could have therapeutic applications in the treatment of cognitive disorders, it seems evident that the role of 5-HT in learning and memory is more complex than a simple imbalance. Consequently, the notion that activation of the 5-HT systems impairs performance, whereas reduced serotonergic function may facilitate learning, must be reconsidered.

  17. Maternal child-centered attributions and harsh discipline: the moderating role of maternal working memory across socioeconomic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Suor, Jennifer H; Skibo, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive models of parenting give emphasis to the central role that parental cognitions may play in parental socialization goals. In particular, dual process models suggest that parental attribution styles affect the way parents interpret caregiving situations and enact behaviors, particularly within the realm of discipline. Although research has documented the negative behavioral repercussions of dysfunctional child-centered responsibility biases, there is heterogeneity in the level of these associations. Research has also demonstrated that parental working memory capacity may serve as an individual difference factor in influencing caregiving behaviors. Thus, our first aim was to document how maternal working memory capacity may moderate the association between mother's dysfunctional child-oriented attributions and use of harsh discipline. In addition, from an ecological perspective, a second aim was to examine how socioeconomic risk may further potentiate the impact of maternal working memory. To accomplish these aims, a socioeconomically diverse sample of 185 mothers and their 3-year old children were recruited to participate in a laboratory-based research assessment. Findings revealed that lower maternal working memory capacity may operate as a risk factor for attributional biases and harsh discipline, and higher working memory may serve as a protective factor in this relationship. Socioeconomic risk further moderated these findings. Results suggest that the moderating role of working memory may be particularly pronounced under conditions of socioeconomic risk. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. The roles of the nucleus accumbens core, dorsomedial striatum, and dorsolateral striatum in learning: performance and extinction of Pavlovian fear-conditioned responses and instrumental avoidance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Etieli; Gaspar, Jessica C C; Ferreira, Tatiana L; Barbiero, Janaína K; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F; Blaha, Charles D; Winn, Philip; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the effects of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the nucleus accumbens core (NAc-co), dorsomedial striatum (DMS) or dorsolateral striatum (DLS) of rats on the learning and extinction of Pavlovian and instrumental components of conditioned avoidance responses (CARs). None of the lesions caused sensorimotor deficits that could affect locomotion. Lesions of the NAc-co, but not DMS or DLS, decreased unconditioned and conditioned freezing. The NAc-co and DLS lesioned rats learned the 2-way active avoidance task more slowly. These results suggest: (i) CARs depend on both Pavlovian and instrumental learning; (ii) learning the Pavlovian component of CARs depends on the NAc-co; learning the instrumental component of CARs depends on the DLS, NAc and DMS; (iii) although the NAc-co is also needed for learning the instrumental component, it is not clear whether it plays a role in learning the instrumental component per se or if it simply allows learning of the Pavlovian component which is a pre-condition for learning the instrumental component; (iv) we did not find evidence that the DMS and DLS play the same roles in habit and goal-directed aspects of the instrumental component of CARs as observed in appetitive motivated instrumental responding.

  19. Role of aging and hippocampus in Time-Place Learning: link to episodic-like memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Kees Mulder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: with time-place learning (TPL, animals link an event with the spatial location and the time of day. The what-where-when TPL components make the task putatively episodic-like in nature. Animals use an internal sense of time to master TPL, which is circadian system based. Finding indications for a role of the hippocampus and (early aging-sensitivity in TPL would strengthen the episodic-like memory nature of the paradigm. Methods: previously, we used C57Bl/6 mice for our TPL research. Here, we used CD1 mice which are less hippocampal-driven and age faster compared to C57Bl/6 mice. To demonstrate the low degree of hippocampal-driven performance in CD1 mice, a cross maze was used. The spontaneous alternation test was used to score spatial working memory in CD1 mice at four different age categories (young (3-6 months, middle-aged (7-11 months, aged (12-18 months and old (>19 months. TPL performance of middle-aged and aged CD1 mice was tested in a setup with either two or three time points per day (2-arm or 3-arm TPL task. Immunostainings was applied on brains of young and middle-aged C57Bl/6 mice that had successfully mastered the 3-arm TPL task. Results: in contrast to C57Bl/6 mice, middle-aged and aged CD1 mice were less hippocampus-driven and failed to master the 3-arm TPL task. They could, however, master the 2-arm TPL task primarily via an ordinal (non-circadian timing system. c-Fos, CRY2, vasopressin (AVP, and pCREB were investigated. We found no differences at the level of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; circadian master clock, whereas CRY2 expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The most pronounced difference between TPL trained and control mice was found in c-Fos expression in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, a circadian system relay station. Conclusions: These results further indicate a key role of CRY proteins in TPL and confirm the limited role of the SCN in TPL. Based on the poor TPL performance of

  20. Role of sustained antigen release from nanoparticle vaccines in shaping the T cell memory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demento, Stacey L; Cui, Weiguo; Criscione, Jason M; Stern, Eric; Tulipan, Jacob; Kaech, Susan M; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2012-06-01

    Particulate vaccines are emerging promising technologies for the creation of tunable prophylactics against a wide variety of conditions. Vesicular and solid biodegradable polymer platforms, exemplified by liposomes and polyesters, respectively, are two of the most ubiquitous platforms in vaccine delivery studies. Here we directly compared the efficacy of each in a long-term immunization study and in protection against a model bacterial antigen. Immunization with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles elicited prolonged antibody titers compared to liposomes and alum. The magnitude of the cellular immune response was also highest in mice vaccinated with PLGA, which also showed a higher frequency of effector-like memory T cell phenotype, leading to an effective clearance of intracellular bacteria. The difference in performance of these two common particulate platforms is shown not to be due to material differences but appears to be connected to the kinetics of antigen delivery. Thus, this study highlights the importance of sustained antigen release mediated by particulate platforms and its role in the long-term appearance of effector memory cellular response.

  1. Acute stress and working memory: The role of sex and cognitive stress appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandara, M; Garcia-Lluch, M; Pulopulos, M M; Hidalgo, V; Villada, C; Salvador, A

    2016-10-01

    Sex is considered a moderating factor in the relationship between stress and cognitive performance. However, sex differences and the impact of cognitive stress appraisal on working memory performance have not received much attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of physiological responses (heart rate and salivary cortisol) and cognitive stress appraisal in Working Memory (WM) performance in males and females. For this purpose, we subjected a comparable number of healthy young adult males (N=37) and females (N=45) to a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and we evaluated WM performance before and after the stress task. Females performed better on attention and maintenance after the TSST, but males did not. Moreover, we found that attention and maintenance performance presented a negative relationship with cortisol reactivity in females, but not in males. Nevertheless, we observed that only the females who showed a cortisol decrease after the TSST performed better after the stress task, whereas females and males who showed an increase or no change in cortisol levels, and males who showed a cortisol decrease, did not change their performance over time. In females, we also found that the global indexes of cognitive stress appraisal and cognitive threat appraisal were negatively related to attention and maintenance performance, whereas the Self-concept of Own Competence was positively related to it. However, these relationships were not found in males. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of collective memory in emotional recovery of political violence in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Villa Gómez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article enquires about the role of collective memory events of political violence victims of some organizations in three regions of Colombia, eastern Antioquia, southern Cordoba, and Medellin city on the processes of subjective and emotional transformations. It is made from a psychosocial perspective using a hermeneutic phenomenology approach. Life stories were developed with in-depth interviews to 32 people (26 women and 6 men of Eastern Antioquia, 13 people in southern Córdoba (10 women and 3 men and 13 mothers of Candelaria; 4 women life stories of the three regions studied; and 19 focus groups with participants of victims processes of the three regions. All these stories were transcribed and analyzed by the categorical analysis method by matrix. Emotional affectations of the victims and following emotional transformations arising by group, collective and public memory events in individuals and collectives involved in the execution of these actions are presented outlining a Psychosocial view that allows to approach from research and intervention to psychological, social and political phenomenon.

  3. Memory clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

    2006-01-01

    Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring ...

  4. Roles of SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and GEN1 in avoiding genome instability and mitotic catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbajna, Shriparna; Davies, Derek; West, Stephen C

    2014-05-15

    The resolution of recombination intermediates containing Holliday junctions (HJs) is critical for genome maintenance and proper chromosome segregation. Three pathways for HJ processing exist in human cells and involve the following enzymes/complexes: BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR complex), SLX1-SLX4-MUS81-EME1 (SLX-MUS complex), and GEN1. Cycling cells preferentially use the BTR complex for the removal of double HJs in S phase, with SLX-MUS and GEN1 acting at temporally distinct phases of the cell cycle. Cells lacking SLX-MUS and GEN1 exhibit chromosome missegregation, micronucleus formation, and elevated levels of 53BP1-positive G1 nuclear bodies, suggesting that defects in chromosome segregation lead to the transmission of extensive DNA damage to daughter cells. In addition, however, we found that the effects of SLX4, MUS81, and GEN1 depletion extend beyond mitosis, since genome instability is observed throughout all phases of the cell cycle. This is exemplified in the form of impaired replication fork movement and S-phase progression, endogenous checkpoint activation, chromosome segmentation, and multinucleation. In contrast to SLX4, SLX1, the nuclease subunit of the SLX1-SLX4 structure-selective nuclease, plays no role in the replication-related phenotypes associated with SLX4/MUS81 and GEN1 depletion. These observations demonstrate that the SLX1-SLX4 nuclease and the SLX4 scaffold play divergent roles in the maintenance of genome integrity in human cells.

  5. The role of reconsolidation and the dynamic process of long-term memory formation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Alberini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the processes of memory formation and storage are exquisitely dynamic. Elucidating the nature and temporal evolution of the biological changes that accompany encoding, storage and retrieval is key to understand memory formation. For explicit or medial temporal lobe-dependent memories that form after a discrete event and are stored for a long time, the physical changes underlying the encoding and processing of the information (memory trace or engram remain in a fragile state for some time. However, over time, the new memory becomes increasingly resistant to disruption until it is consolidated. Retrieval or reactivation of an apparently consolidated memory can render the memory labile again, and reconsolidation is the process that occurs to mediate its restabilization. Reconsolidation also evolves with the age of the memory: Young memories are sensitive to postreactivation disruption, but older memories are more resistant. Why does a memory become labile again if it is retrieved or reactivated? Here I suggest that the main function of reconsolidation is to contribute to the lingering consolidation process and mediate memory strengthening. I also discuss the literature and results regarding the influence of the passage of time on the reconsolidation of memory. These points have important implications for the use of reconsolidation in therapeutic settings.

  6. Role of Glia in Stress-Induced Enhancement and Impairment of Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Jiah ePearson-Leary; Danielle Maria Osborne; Ewan eMcnay

    2016-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affects hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesi...

  7. The role of sleep in declarative memory consolidation--direct evidence by intracranial EEG.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Axmacher, N.; Haupt, S.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2008-01-01

    Two step theories of memory formation assume that an initial learning phase is followed by a consolidation stage. Memory consolidation has been suggested to occur predominantly during sleep. Very recent findings, however, suggest that important steps in memory consolidation occur also during waking

  8. Individual differences in experiencing intrusive memories : The role of the ability to resist proactive interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, Johan; Wessel, Ineke; de Jong, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored whether a relatively poor ability to resist or inhibit interference from irrelevant information in working memory is associated with experiencing undesirable intrusive memories. Non-selected participants (N = 91) completed a self-report measure of intrusive memories, and carried

  9. The role of negative and positive memories in fear of dental treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Søren Risløv; Jøssing, Marit; Krohn, Christina

    2017-01-01

    memories would show the opposite relation. Methods One hundred thirty-six young adults leaving childhood dental care responded to a online measures of dental fear, the most negative and most positive memory of dental treatment, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Results Negative memories...

  10. Refinement of humoral immune monitoring in kidney transplantation: the role of "hidden" alloreactive memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Sergi; Lúcia, Marc; Bestard, Oriol

    2017-10-01

    The advent of novel sensitive assays assessing circulating anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies has allowed recognizing humoral alloimmunity as the main immune-mediated mechanism responsible for allograft rejection and graft loss in kidney transplantation. However, current immune-monitoring techniques, exclusively focusing on circulating anti-HLA antibodies, may underestimate the magnitude of humoral immune response as they exclude the memory B-cell (mBC) pool. Different biological compartments are involved in the intricate mechanisms triggering humoral alloimmune responses even in absence of detectable circulating alloantibodies. Recent studies in animal models as well as in clinical kidney transplantation have shown the key role of this B-cell subset triggering allograft rejection, thus emphasizing the value of recognizing antidonor mBC both as a biomarker of allosensitization and as therapeutic targets. Therefore, considerable efforts are being made among the transplant research community to better understand the role, hierarchy, and impact of mBC in the context of organ transplantation. In this review article, we provide a deep insight into the biology of mBC as well as main evidence of their role orchestrating allograft rejection. Also, we provide a thorough description of main immune-monitoring tools aiming at tracking mBC and a rational for their potential use to refine current humoral immune-risk assessment in kidney transplantation. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  12. Role of stressful life events, avoidant coping styles, and neuroticism in online game addiction among college students: a moderated mediation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huanhuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Online game addiction (OGA is becoming a significant problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence of OGA and the roles of stressful life events, avoidant coping styles (ACSs, and neuroticism in OGA. A total of 651 Chinese college students were selected by random cluster sampling. Subjects completed the Chinese version of Young’s eight-item Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS, Online Game Cognition Addiction Scale (OGCAS, Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Short Scale in Chinese (EPQ-RSC, Chinese College-student Stress Questionnaire (CCSQ, and Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to explore the interactive effects of stressful life events, ACSs, and neuroticism on OGA. Of the 651 participants in the sample, 31 (4.8% were identified as addicts. The incidence of OGA was two times higher for males than females. The addicts had markedly higher scores on the neuroticism subscale of the EPQ-RSC than non-addicts. Compared to non-addicts, addicts were more apt to use ACSs. Having an avoidant coping strategy mediated the effect of stressful life events on OGA. Furthermore, neuroticism moderated the indirect effect of stressful life events on OGA via ACSs. Applications of these findings to etiological research and clinical treatment programs are discussed.

  13. Highly specific role of hypocretin (orexin) neurons: differential activation as a function of diurnal phase, operant reinforcement versus operant avoidance and light level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Ronald; Wu, Ming-Fung; Barber, Grace; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2011-10-26

    Hypocretin (Hcrt) cell loss is responsible for narcolepsy, but Hcrt's role in normal behavior is unclear. We found that Hcrt knock-out mice were unable to work for food or water reward during the light phase. However, they were unimpaired relative to wild-type (WT) mice when working for reward during the dark phase or when working to avoid shock in the light or dark phase. In WT mice, expression of Fos in Hcrt neurons occurs only in the light phase when working for positive reinforcement. Expression was seen throughout the mediolateral extent of the Hcrt field. Fos was not expressed when expected or unexpected unearned rewards were presented, when working to avoid negative reinforcement, or when given or expecting shock, even though these conditions elicit maximal electroencephalogram (EEG) arousal. Fos was not expressed in the light phase when light was removed. This may explain the lack of light-induced arousal in narcoleptics and its presence in normal individuals. This is the first demonstration of such specificity of arousal system function and has implications for understanding the motivational and circadian consequences of arousal system dysfunction. The current results also indicate that comparable and complementary specificities must exist in other arousal systems.

  14. Role of Stressful Life Events, Avoidant Coping Styles, and Neuroticism in Online Game Addiction among College Students: A Moderated Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanhuan; Zou, Yingmin; Wang, Jiaqi; Yang, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Online game addiction (OGA) is becoming a significant problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence of OGA and the roles of stressful life events, avoidant coping styles (ACSs), and neuroticism in OGA. A total of 651 Chinese college students were selected by random cluster sampling. Subjects completed the Chinese version of Young’s eight-item Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS), Online Game Cognition Addiction Scale (OGCAS), Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Short Scale in Chinese (EPQ-RSC), Chinese College-student Stress Questionnaire, and Coping Style Questionnaire. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the interactive effects of stressful life events, ACSs, and neuroticism on OGA. Of the 651 participants in the sample, 31 (4.8%) were identified as addicts. The incidence of OGA was two times higher for males than females. The addicts had markedly higher scores on the neuroticism subscale of the EPQ-RSC than non-addicts. Compared to non-addicts, addicts were more apt to use ACSs. Having an avoidant coping strategy mediated the effect of stressful life events on OGA. Furthermore, neuroticism moderated the indirect effect of stressful life events on OGA via ACSs. Applications of these findings to etiological research and clinical treatment programs are discussed. PMID:27920734

  15. Mood congruent memory in dysphoria: the roles of state affect and cognitive style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direnfeld, David M; Roberts, John E

    2006-09-01

    Biases in incidental memory for self-referent adjectives and intentional memory were compared across nondysphoric (ND; n=48), experimentally induced dysphoric (EXP; n=49), and naturally dysphoric (NAT; n=48) individuals. Negative biases, "evenhandedness", and positive biases were demonstrated among NAT, EXP and ND participants, respectively, in terms of incidental memory. Correlation analyses suggested that the effects of cognitive style (self-esteem, dysfunctional attitudes, and attributional style) are limited to negative stimuli. Memory for incidental positive stimuli was only predicted by state affect. Groups did not differ in performance on an intentional memory task. Implications for network and schema models of depression are explored.

  16. Superadditive Memory Strength for Item and Source Recognition: The Role of Hierarchical Relational Binding in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Arthur P.; Wickens, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Source memory depends on our ability to recollect contextual information--such as the time, place, feelings, and thoughts associated with a past event. It is acknowledged that the medial temporal lobe (MTL) plays a critical role in binding such episodic features. Yet, controversy exists over the nature of MTL binding--whether it contributes…

  17. A new perspective on the role of the CREB family of transcription factors in memory consolidation via adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eOrtega-Martinez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is the process by which new neurons are generated in the brains of adults. Since its discovery 50 years ago, adult neurogenesis has been widely studied in the mammalian brain and has provided a new perspective on the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, some of which affect memory. In this regard, adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN, which occurs in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, has been suggested to play a role in the formation and consolidation of new memories. This process involves many transcription factors, of which cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB is a well-documented one. In the developing brain, CREB regulates crucial cell stages, (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, and survival, and in the adult brain, it participates in neuronal plasticity, learning, and memory. In addition, new evidence supports the hypothesis that CREB may also participate in learning and memory through its involvement in AHN. This review examines the CREB family of transcription factors, including the different members and known signaling pathways. It highlights the role of CREB as a modulator of AHN, which could underlie its function in memory consolidation mechanisms.

  18. Sleep to find your way: the role of sleep in the consolidation of memory for navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Iaria, Giuseppe; Tempesta, Daniela; Curcio, Giuseppe; Moroni, Fabio; Marzano, Cristina; De Gennaro, Luigi; Pacitti, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence indicates that sleep plays an important role in learning and memory processes, the actual existence of a sleep-dependent spatial memory consolidation has been not firmly established. Here, by using a computerized 3D virtual navigation tool, we were able to show that topographical orientation in humans largely benefits from sleep after learning, while 10 h of wakefulness during the daytime do not exert similar beneficial effects. In particular, navigation performance enhancement needs sleep in the first post-training night, and no further improvements were seen after a second night of sleep. On the other hand, sleep deprivation hinders any performance enhancement and exerts a proactive disruption of spatial memory consolidation, since recovery sleep do not revert its effects. Spatial memory performance does not benefit from the simple passage of time, and a period of wakefulness between learning and sleep does not seem to have the role of stabilizing memory traces. In conclusion, our results indicate that spatial performance improvement is observed only when learning is followed by a period of sleep, regardless of the retention interval length.

  19. Semantic memory retrieval circuit: role of pre-SMA, caudate, and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John; Maguire, Mandy J; Motes, Michael; Mudar, Raksha Anand; Chiang, Hsueh-Sheng; Womack, Kyle B; Kraut, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    We propose that pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA)-thalamic interactions govern processes fundamental to semantic retrieval of an integrated object memory. At the onset of semantic retrieval, pre-SMA initiates electrical interactions between multiple cortical regions associated with semantic memory subsystems encodings as indexed by an increase in theta-band EEG power. This starts between 100-150 ms after stimulus presentation and is sustained throughout the task. We posit that this activity represents initiation of the object memory search, which continues in searching for an object memory. When the correct memory is retrieved, there is a high beta-band EEG power increase, which reflects communication between pre-SMA and thalamus, designates the end of the search process and resultant in object retrieval from multiple semantic memory subsystems. This high beta signal is also detected in cortical regions. This circuit is modulated by the caudate nuclei to facilitate correct and suppress incorrect target memories.

  20. A Role for the Lateral Dorsal Tegmentum in Memory and Decision Neural Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redila, Van; Kinzel, Chantelle; Jo, Yong Sang; Puryear, Corey B.; Mizumori, Sheri J.Y.

    2017-01-01

    A role for the hippocampus in memory is clear, although the mechanism for its contribution remains a matter of debate. Converging evidence suggests that hippocampus evaluates the extent to which context-defining features of events occur as expected. The consequence of mismatches, or prediction error, signals from hippocampus is discussed in terms of its impact on neural circuitry that evaluates the significance of prediction errors: Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine cells burst fire to rewards or cues that predict rewards (Schultz et al., 1997). Although the lateral dorsal tegmentum (LDTg) importantly controls dopamine cell burst firing (Lodge & Grace, 2006) the behavioral significance of the LDTg control is not known. Therefore, we evaluated LDTg functional activity as rats performed a spatial memory task that generates task-dependent reward codes in VTA (Jo et al., 2013; Puryear et al., 2010) and another VTA afferent, the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg, Norton et al., 2011). Reversible inactivation of the LDTg significantly impaired choice accuracy. LDTg neurons coded primarily egocentric information in the form of movement velocity, turning behaviors, and behaviors leading up to expected reward locations. A subset of the velocity-tuned LDTg cells also showed high frequency bursts shortly before or after reward encounters, after which they showed tonic elevated firing during consumption of small, but not large, rewards. Cells that fired before reward encounters showed stronger correlations with velocity as rats moved toward, rather than away from, rewarded sites. LDTg neural activity was more strongly regulated by egocentric behaviors than that observed for PPTg or VTA cells that were recorded by Puryear et al. and Norton et al. While PPTg activity was uniquely sensitive to ongoing sensory input, all three regions encoded reward magnitude (although in different ways), reward expectation, and reward encounters. Only VTA encoded reward prediction errors. LDTg

  1. Amygdala’s involvement in facilitating associative learning-induced plasticity: a promiscuous role for the amygdala in memory acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily S Chau

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a critical role in acquisition and consolidation of fear-related memories. Some of the more widely employed behavioral paradigms that have assisted in solidifying the amygdala’s role in fear-related memories are associative learning paradigms. With most associative learning tasks, a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS is paired with a salient unconditioned stimulus (US that elicits an unconditioned response (UR. After multiple CS-US pairings, the subject learns that the CS predicts the onset or delivery of the US, and thus elicits a learned conditioned response (CR. Most fear-related associative paradigms have suggested that an aspect of the fear association is stored in the amygdala; however, some fear-motivated associative paradigms suggest that the amygdala is not a site of storage, but rather facilitates consolidation in other brain regions. Based upon various learning theories, one of the most likely sites for storage of long-term memories is the neocortex. In support of these theories, findings from our laboratory, and others, have demonstrated that trace-conditioning, an associative paradigm where there is a separation in time between the CS and US, induces learning-specific neocortical plasticity. The following review will discuss the amygdala’s involvement, either as a site of storage or facilitating storage in other brain regions such as the neocortex, in fear- and non-fear-motivated associative paradigms. In this review, we will discuss recent findings suggesting a broader role for the amygdala in increasing the saliency of behaviorally relevant information, thus facilitating acquisition for all forms of memory, both fear- and non-fear-related. This proposed promiscuous role of the amygdala in facilitating acquisition for all memories further suggests a potential role of the amygdala in general learning disabilities.

  2. Amygdala's involvement in facilitating associative learning-induced plasticity: a promiscuous role for the amygdala in memory acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Lily S; Galvez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a critical role in acquisition and consolidation of fear-related memories. Some of the more widely employed behavioral paradigms that have assisted in solidifying the amygdala's role in fear-related memories are associative learning paradigms. With most associative learning tasks, a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) is paired with a salient unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits an unconditioned response (UR). After multiple CS-US pairings, the subject learns that the CS predicts the onset or delivery of the US, and thus elicits a learned conditioned response (CR). Most fear-related associative paradigms have suggested that an aspect of the fear association is stored in the amygdala; however, some fear-motivated associative paradigms suggest that the amygdala is not a site of storage, but rather facilitates consolidation in other brain regions. Based upon various learning theories, one of the most likely sites for storage of long-term memories is the neocortex. In support of these theories, findings from our laboratory, and others, have demonstrated that trace-conditioning, an associative paradigm where there is a separation in time between the CS and US, induces learning-specific neocortical plasticity. The following review will discuss the amygdala's involvement, either as a site of storage or facilitating storage in other brain regions such as the neocortex, in fear- and non-fear-motivated associative paradigms. In this review, we will discuss recent findings suggesting a broader role for the amygdala in increasing the saliency of behaviorally relevant information, thus facilitating acquisition for all forms of memory, both fear- and non-fear-related. This proposed promiscuous role of the amygdala in facilitating acquisition for all memories further suggests a potential role of the amygdala in general learning disabilities.

  3. Role of the hippocampus in contextual memory after classical aversive conditioning in pigeons (C. livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of hippocampal lesions with ibotenic acid (IBO on the memory of the sound-context-shock association during reexposure to the conditioning context. Twenty-nine adult pigeons were assigned to a non-lesioned control group (CG, N = 7, a sham-lesioned group (SG, N = 7, a hippocampus-lesioned experimental group (EG, N = 7, and to an unpaired nonlesioned group (tone-alone exposure (NG, N = 8. All pigeons were submitted to a 20-min session in the conditioning chamber with three associations of sound (1000 Hz, 85 dB, 1 s and shock (10 mA, 1 s. Experimental and sham lesions were performed 24 h later (EG and SG when EG birds received three bilateral injections (anteroposterior (A, 4.5, 5.25 and 7.0 of IBO (1 µl and 1 µg/µl and SG received one bilateral injection (A, 5.25 of PBS. The animals were reexposed to the training context 5 days after the lesion. Behavior was videotaped for 20 min and analyzed at 30-s intervals. A significantly higher percent rating of immobility was observed for CG (median, 95.1; range, 79.2 to 100.0 and SG (median, 90.0; range, 69.6 to 95.0 compared to EG (median, 11.62; range, 3.83 to 50.1 and NG (median, 7.33; range, 6.2 to 28.1 (P<0.001 in the training context. These results suggest impairment of contextual fear in birds who received lesions one day after conditioning and a role for the hippocampus in the modulation of emotional aversive memories in pigeons.

  4. Understanding the role of mind wandering in stress-related working memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan B; Boals, Adriel

    2016-05-04

    Mind wandering has been identified as a possible cause for stress-related working memory (WM) task impairments following laboratory stressors. The current study attempted to induce mind wandering regarding negative, positive, or neutral events using an expressive writing task and examined the impact on WM task performance. We examined the role of mind wandering in understanding the impact of life stress on WM. Additionally, we explored the role of thought suppression on the relationship between mind wandering and WM. One hundred and fifty participants completed WM measures before (Time 1) and after (Time 2) the writing manipulation. The writing manipulation did not alter mind wandering or WM task performance. Time 1 WM predicted mind wandering during the Time 2 WM task, which subsequently predicted poorer Time 2 WM task performance. The impact of daily life stress on WM was mediated by mind wandering. Trait levels of thought suppression moderated the impact of mind wandering on WM. Specifically, higher levels of suppression resulted in stronger negative impact of mind wandering on WM task performance. Findings are discussed in terms of the impact of mind wandering on WM task performance.

  5. Distinct roles for the deacetylase domain of HDAC3 in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in the formation and extinction of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghband, Yasaman; Kwapis, Janine L; López, Alberto J; White, André O; Aimiuwu, Osasumwen V; Al-Kachak, Amni; Bodinayake, Kasuni K; Oparaugo, Nicole C; Dang, Richard; Astarabadi, Mariam; Matheos, Dina P; Wood, Marcelo A

    2017-09-07

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin modifying enzymes that have been implicated as powerful negative regulators of memory processes. HDAC3 has been shown to play a pivotal role in long-term memory for object location as well as the extinction of cocaine-associated memory, but it is unclear whether this function depends on the deacetylase domain of HDAC3. Here, we tested whether the deacetylase domain of HDAC3 has a role in object location memory formation as well as the formation and extinction of cocaine-associated memories. Using a deacetylase-dead point mutant of HDAC3, we found that selectively blocking HDAC3 deacetylase activity in the dorsal hippocampus enhanced long-term memory for object location, but had no effect on the formation of cocaine-associated memory. When this same point mutant virus of HDAC3 was infused into the prelimbic cortex, it failed to affect cocaine-associated memory formation. With regards to extinction, impairing the HDAC3 deacetylase domain in the infralimbic cortex had no effect on extinction, but a facilitated extinction effect was observed when the point mutant virus was delivered to the dorsal hippocampus. These results suggest that the deacetylase domain of HDAC3 plays a selective role in specific brain regions underlying long-term memory formation of object location as well as cocaine-associated memory formation and extinction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The role of cortisol reactivity in children's and adults' memory of a prior stressful experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quas, Jodi A; Yim, Ilona S; Edelstein, Robin S; Cahill, Larry; Rush, Elizabeth B

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify whether cortisol reactivity to a stressful laboratory event was related to children's memory of that event and to determine whether this relation was comparable to that observed in adults. Nine- to 12-year-olds and young adults completed an impromptu speech and math task during which repeated cortisol samples and self-reported stress ratings were collected. Two weeks later, participants' memory for the tasks was examined. Greater cortisol reactivity was associated with enhanced memory, most prominently in children. Self-reported stress was unrelated to memory. Findings reveal that an important mechanism underlying the association between emotion and memory in adults, namely activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, appears to operate similarly in late childhood. Findings also demonstrate that positive associations between cortisol reactivity and memory are evident when the event that actually elicited that reactivity serves as the to-be-remembered event.

  7. The role of negative and positive memories in fear of dental treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Søren Risløv; Jøssing, Marit; Krohn, Christina

    2016-01-01

    is influenced by memories of positive and negative childhood experiences with dental care. More specifically, we predicted that the emotional impact, sense of reliving, rehearsal, and belief in the accuracy of a negative treatment memory would be associated with increased dental fear, while positive treatment...... memories would show the opposite relation. Methods One hundred thirty-six young adults leaving childhood dental care responded to a online measures of dental fear, the most negative and most positive memory of dental treatment, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Results Negative memories...... of events that involved pain and dentist behaviors such as impatience or scolding were frequently described and significantly associated with dental fear and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Positive memories were more frequent, but did not show a consistent relationship with dental fear. Conclusions...

  8. Memory amplification for trauma: Investigating the role of analogue PTSD symptoms in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulton, Jacinta M; Takarangi, Melanie K T; Strange, Deryn

    2016-08-01

    Victims of trauma often remember their experience as being more traumatic later, compared to immediately after, the event took place. This finding-the "memory amplification effect"-is associated with increased re-experiencing symptoms. However, the effect has been found almost exclusively in field-based studies. We examined whether the effect could be replicated in the laboratory. In two studies, we exposed participants to negative photographs and assessed their memory for the photographs and analogue PTSD symptoms on two occasions. In Study 1, analogue symptoms at follow-up were positively associated with remembering more negative photos over time. In Study 2, we focused on "memory amplifiers": people whose memory of the photos amplified over time. Consistent with field research, analogue re-experiencing symptoms were associated with memory amplification. Overall, our findings confirm that analogue PTSD symptoms are also associated with an amplified memory for a trauma analogue.

  9. The role of negative and positive memories in fear of dental treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Søren Risløv; Jøssing, Marit; Krohn, Christina

    2016-01-01

    memories would show the opposite relation. Methods One hundred thirty-six young adults leaving childhood dental care responded to a online measures of dental fear, the most negative and most positive memory of dental treatment, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Results Negative memories...... is influenced by memories of positive and negative childhood experiences with dental care. More specifically, we predicted that the emotional impact, sense of reliving, rehearsal, and belief in the accuracy of a negative treatment memory would be associated with increased dental fear, while positive treatment...... of events that involved pain and dentist behaviors such as impatience or scolding were frequently described and significantly associated with dental fear and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Positive memories were more frequent, but did not show a consistent relationship with dental fear. Conclusions...

  10. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  11. A boost of confidence: The role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in memory, decision-making, and schemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebscher, Melissa; Gilboa, Asaf

    2016-09-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has been implicated in a wide array of functions across multiple domains. In this review, we focus on the vmPFC's involvement in mediating strategic aspects of memory retrieval, memory-related schema functions, and decision-making. We suggest that vmPFC generates a confidence signal that informs decisions and memory-guided behaviour. Confidence is central to these seemingly diverse functions: (1) Strategic retrieval: lesions to the vmPFC impair an early, automatic, and intuitive monitoring process ("feeling of rightness"; FOR) often associated with confabulation (spontaneous reporting of erroneous memories). Critically, confabulators typically demonstrate high levels of confidence in their false memories, suggesting that faulty monitoring following vmPFC damage may lead to indiscriminate confidence signals. (2) Memory schemas: the vmPFC is critically involved in instantiating and maintaining contextually relevant schemas, broadly defined as higher level knowledge structures that encapsulate lower level representational elements. The correspondence between memory retrieval cues and these activated schemas leads to FOR monitoring. Stronger, more elaborate schemas produce stronger FOR and influence confidence in the veracity of memory candidates. (3) Finally, we review evidence on the vmPFC's role in decision-making, extending this role to decision-making during memory retrieval. During non-mnemonic and mnemonic decision-making the vmPFC automatically encodes confidence. Confidence signal in the vmPFC is revealed as a non-linear relationship between a first-order monitoring assessment and second-order action or choice. Attempting to integrate the multiple functions of the vmPFC, we propose a posterior-anterior organizational principle for this region. More posterior vmPFC regions are involved in earlier, automatic, subjective, and contextually sensitive functions, while more anterior regions are involved in controlled actions

  12. The role of childhood and adulthood trauma and appraisal of self-discrepancy in overgeneral memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Miyuki; Devilly, Grant J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contributory role of childhood and adulthood trauma events and the appraisal of self-discrepancy (the magnitude and distress) in overgeneral memory retrieval (OGM) using a non-clinical sample. Participants with a history of childhood trauma (n=29); adulthood trauma only (n=17) or no-trauma (n=26) participated in this study. The childhood trauma group showed a significantly higher level of general negative memory retrieval than the no-trauma group. Conversely, the adulthood trauma group showed a significantly higher level of general threat memory retrieval than the no-trauma group. The perceived similarity and distress relating to the perceived similarity between participants' "actual self" and "feared self" significantly predicted the level of OGM, even after controlling for the impact of a history of adult or child trauma.

  13. The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study

    OpenAIRE

    Mednick, Sara C.; McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Walsh, James K.; Wamsley, Erin; Paulus, Martin; Kanady, Jennifer C; Sean P.A. Drummond

    2013-01-01

    An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention...

  14. The Role of Reward Expectations for Prospective Memory : An investigation with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gäbel, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Prospective memory is the ability to remember to carry out an intended action after a delay. However, it remains unclear how motivational aspects of the intended action,such as reward expectations, are integrated into the processes subserving intact prospective memory. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the effects of motivational incentives on prospective memory on the behavioral and on the neural level, while taking into account individual differences in reward sensitivity and ...

  15. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Timing

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Thomas; Mikkel Malling Beck; Rune Rasmussen Lind; Line Korsgaard Johnsen; Svend Sparre Geertsen; Lasse Christiansen; Christian Ritz; Marc Roig; Jesper Lundbye-Jensen

    2016-01-01

    High intensity aerobic exercise amplifies offline gains in procedural memory acquired during motor practice. This effect seems to be evident when exercise is placed immediately after acquisition, during the first stages of memory consolidation, but the importance of temporal proximity of the exercise bout used to stimulate improvements in procedural memory is unknown. The effects of three different temporal placements of high intensity exercise were investigated following visuomotor skill acq...

  16. Role of alloying additions on the properties of Cu–Al–Mn shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Rupa, E-mail: rupadasgupta@ampri.res.in; Jain, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Pravir; Hussain, Shahadat; Pandey, Abhishek

    2015-01-25

    are significantly high than conventionally reported except with the addition of Mg in which case no distinct peaks have been recorded. The range of martensite retention is the maximum in ternary Cu–Al–Mn alloys; addition of quaternary elements decreases this range significantly. Presence of Ni delays austenite formation and completion [As and Af] significantly as compared to the ternary alloys; whereas with other additions the As and Af temperatures are brought forward. This means that whereas the alloys without quaternary additions would be better suited for its shape memory properties, ternary alloys would be better suited for higher transition temperatures. The role of different alloying additions has been highlighted in the findings. Variations in properties have been attained due to different additions and improvements attained in terms of higher transformation temperatures and martensite formation due to the alloying additions.

  17. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-05-12

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised.

  18. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised. PMID:25918368

  19. Role of the thalamic nucleus reuniens in mediating interactions between the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex during spatial working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the neural mechanisms of spatial working memory remain poorly understood. Although the dorsal hippocampus is known to be critical for memory-guided behavior, experimental evidence suggests that spatial working memory depends not only on the hippocampus itself, but also on the circuit comprised of the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Disruption of hippocampal-mPFC interactions may result in failed transfer of spatial and contextual information processed by the hippocampus to the circuitry in mPFC responsible for decision making and goal-directed behavior. Oscillatory synchrony between the hippocampus and mPFC has been shown to increase in tasks with high spatial working memory demand. However, the mechanisms and circuitry supporting hippocampal-mPFC interactions during these tasks is unknown. The midline thalamic nucleus reuniens (RE is reciprocally connected to both the hippocampus and the mPFC and has been shown to be critical for a variety of working memory tasks. Therefore, it is likely that hippocampal-mPFC oscillatory synchrony is modulated by RE activity. This article will review the anatomical connections between the hippocampus, mPFC and RE along with the behavioral studies that have investigated the effects of RE disruption on working memory task performance. The article will conclude with suggestions for future directions aimed at identifying the specific role of the RE in regulating functional interactions between the hippocampus and the PFC and investigating the degree to which these interactions contribute to spatial working memory.

  20. Long-term memory consolidation: The role of RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakaran, Indulekha P; Ramaswami, Mani

    2016-10-11

    Long-term and short-term memories differ primarily in the duration of their retention. At a molecular level, long-term memory (LTM) is distinguished from short-term memory (STM) by its requirement for new gene expression. In addition to transcription (nuclear gene expression) the translation of stored mRNAs is necessary for LTM formation. The mechanisms and functions for temporal and spatial regulation of mRNAs required for LTM is a major contemporary problem, of interest from molecular, cell biological, neurobiological and clinical perspectives. This review discusses primary evidence in support for translational regulatory events involved in LTM and a model in which different phases of translation underlie distinct phases of consolidation of memories. However, it focuses largely on mechanisms of memory persistence and the role of prion-like domains in this defining aspect of long-term memory. We consider primary evidence for the concept that Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding (CPEB) protein enables the persistence of formed memories by transforming in prion-like manner from a soluble monomeric state to a self-perpetuating and persistent polymeric translationally active state required for maintaining persistent synaptic plasticity. We further discuss prion-like domains prevalent on several other RNA-binding proteins involved in neuronal translational control underlying LTM. Growing evidence indicates that such RNA regulatory proteins are components of mRNP (RiboNucleoProtein) granules. In these proteins, prion-like domains, being intrinsically disordered, could mediate weak transient interactions that allow the assembly of RNP granules, a source of silenced mRNAs whose translation is necessary for LTM. We consider the structural bases for RNA granules formation as well as functions of disordered domains and discuss how these complicate the interpretation of existing experimental data relevant to general mechanisms by which prion-domain containing RBPs

  1. Paradoxical role of an Egr transcription factor family member, Egr2/Krox20, in learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Poirier

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that Egr1/zif268, a member of the Egr family of transcription factors, is critical for the consolidation of several forms of memories. Recently, the Egr3 family member has also been implicated in learning and memory. Because Egr family members encode closely related zinc-finger transcription factors sharing a highly homologous DNA binding domain that recognises the same DNA sequence, they may have related functions in brain. Another Egr family member expressed in brain, Egr2/Krox20 is known to be crucial for normal hindbrain development and has been implicated in several inherited peripheral neuropathies; however, due to Egr2-null mice perinatal lethality, its potential role in cognitive functions in the adult has not been yet explored. Here, we generated Egr2 conditional mutant mice allowing postnatal, forebrain-specific Cre-mediated Egr2 excision and tested homozygous, heterozygous and control littermates on a battery of behavioural tasks to evaluate motor capacity, exploratory behaviour, emotional reactivity and learning and memory performance in spatial and non-spatial tasks. Egr2-deficient mice had no sign of locomotor, exploratory or anxiety disturbances. Surprisingly, they also had no impairment in spatial learning and memory, taste aversion memory or fear memory using a trace conditioning paradigm. On the contrary, Egr2-deficient mice had improved performance in motor learning on a rotarod, and in object recognition memory. These results clearly do not extend the phenotypic consequences resulting from either Egr1 or Egr3 loss-of-function to Egr2. In contrast, they indicate that Egr family members may have different, and in certain circumstances antagonistic functions in the adult brain.

  2. AMisfit Theory of Spontaneous Conscious Odor Perception (MITSCOP: reflections on the role and function of odor memory in everyday life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egon P Köster

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Our senses have developed as an answer to the world we live in (Gibson, 1966 and so have the forms of memory that accompany them. All senses serve different purposes and do so in different ways. In vision, where orientation and object recognition are important, memory is strongly linked to identification. In olfaction, the guardian of vital functions such as breathing and food ingestion, perhaps the most important (and least noticed and researched role of odor memory is to help us not to notice the well-known odors or flavors in our everyday surroundings, but to react immediately to the unexpected ones. At the same time it provides us with a feeling of safety when our expectancies are met. All this happens without any smelling intention or conscious knowledge of our expectations. Identification by odor naming is not involved in this and people are notoriously bad at it. Odors are usually best identified via the episodic memory of the situation in which they once occurred. Spontaneous conscious odor perception normally only occurs in situations where attention is demanded, either because the inhaled air or the food smell is particularly good or particularly bad and people search for its source or because people want to actively enjoy the healthiness and pleasantness of their surroundings or food. Odor memory is concerned with novelty detection rather than with recollection of odors. In this paper, these points are illustrated with experimental results and their consequences for doing ecologically valid odor memory research are drawn. Furthermore, suggestions for ecologically valid research on everyday odor memory and some illustrative examples are given.

  3. The role of sleep in cognitive processing: focusing on memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Alexis M

    2017-05-01

    Research indicates that sleep promotes various cognitive functions, such as decision-making, language, categorization, and memory. Of these, most work has focused on the influence of sleep on memory, with ample work showing that sleep enhances memory consolidation, a process that stores new memories in the brain over time. Recent psychological and neurophysiological research has vastly increased understanding of this process. Such work not only suggests that consolidation relies on plasticity-related mechanisms that reactivate and stabilize memory representations, but also that this process may be experimentally manipulated by methods that target which memory traces are reactivated during sleep. Furthermore, aside from memory storage capabilities, memory consolidation also appears to reorganize and integrate memories with preexisting knowledge, which may facilitate the discovery of underlying rules and associations that benefit other cognitive functioning, including problem solving and creativity. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1433. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1433 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The role of metacognition in prospective memory: anticipated task demands influence attention allocation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Jan; Meiser, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates how individuals distribute their attentional resources between a prospective memory task and an ongoing task. Therefore, metacognitive expectations about the attentional demands of the prospective-memory task were manipulated while the factual demands were held constant. In Experiments 1a and 1b, we found attentional costs from a prospective-memory task with low factual demands to be significantly reduced when information about the low to-be-expected demands were provided, while prospective-memory performance remained largely unaffected. In Experiment 2, attentional monitoring in a more demanding prospective-memory task also varied with information about the to-be-expected demands (high vs. low) and again there were no equivalent changes in prospective-memory performance. These findings suggest that attention-allocation strategies of prospective memory rely on metacognitive expectations about prospective-memory task demands. Furthermore, the results suggest that attentional monitoring is only functional for prospective memory to the extent to which anticipated task demands reflect objective task demands.

  5. Critical Role of the Circadian Clock in Memory Formation: Lessons from Aplysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Carlson Lyons

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the complexities of learning and the formation of memory requires identification of the cellular and molecular processes through which neural plasticity arises as well as recognition of the conditions or factors through which those processes are modulated. With its relatively simple nervous system, the marine mollusk Aplysia californica has proven an outstanding model system for studies of memory formation and identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying learned behaviors, including classical and operant associative learning paradigms and non-associative behaviors. In vivo behavioral studies in Aplysia have significantly furthered our understanding of how the endogenous circadian clock modulates memory formation. Sensitization of the tail-siphon withdrawal reflex represents a defensive non-associative learned behavior for which the circadian clock strongly modulates intermediate and long-term memory formation. Likewise, Aplysia exhibit circadian rhythms in long-term memory, but not short-term memory, for an operant associative learning paradigm. This review focuses on circadian modulation of intermediate and long-term memory and the putative mechanisms through which this modulation occurs. Additionally, potential functions and the adaptive advantages of time of day pressure on memory formation are considered. The influence of the circadian clock on learning and memory crosses distant phylogeny highlighting the evolutionary importance of the circadian clock on metabolic, physiological and behavioral processes. Thus, studies in a simple invertebrate model system have and will continue to provide critical mechanistic insights to complementary processes in higher organisms.

  6. A role for the insular cortex in long-term memory for context-evoked drug craving in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Marco; Billeke, Pablo; Vicencio, Sergio; Madrid, Carlos; Perdomo, Guetón; González, Marcela; Torrealba, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Drug craving critically depends on the function of the interoceptive insular cortex, and may be triggered by contextual cues. However, the role of the insula in the long-term memory linking context with drug craving remains unknown. Such a memory trace probably resides in some neocortical region, much like other declarative memories. Studies in humans and rats suggest that the insula may include such a region. Rats chronically implanted with bilateral injection cannulae into the high-order rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC) or the primary interoceptive posterior insula (pIC) were conditioned to prefer the initially aversive compartment of a 2-compartment place preference apparatus by repeatedly pairing it to amphetamine. We found a reversible but long-lasting loss (ca. 24 days) of amphetamine-conditioned place preference (CPP) and a decreased expression in the insula of zif268, a crucial protein in memory reconsolidation, when anisomycin (ANI) was microinjected into the RAIC immediately after the reactivation of the conditioned amphetamine/context memory. ANI infusion into the RAIC without reactivation did not change CPP, whereas ANI infusion into pIC plus caused a 15 days loss of CPP. We also found a 24 days loss of CPP when we reversibly inactivated pIC during extinction trials. We interpret these findings as evidence that the insular cortex, including the RAIC, is involved in a context/drug effect association. These results add a drug-related memory function to the insular cortex to the previously found role of the pIC in the perception of craving or malaise.

  7. Is external memory memory? Biological memory and extended mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelian, Kourken

    2012-09-01

    Clark and Chalmers (1998) claim that an external resource satisfying the following criteria counts as a memory: (1) the agent has constant access to the resource; (2) the information in the resource is directly available; (3) retrieved information is automatically endorsed; (4) information is stored as a consequence of past endorsement. Research on forgetting and metamemory shows that most of these criteria are not satisfied by biological memory, so they are inadequate. More psychologically realistic criteria generate a similar classification of standard putative external memories, but the criteria still do not capture the function of memory. An adequate account of memory function, compatible with its evolution and its roles in prospection and imagination, suggests that external memory performs a function not performed by biological memory systems. External memory is thus not memory. This has implications for: extended mind theorizing, ecological validity of memory research, the causal theory of memory.

  8. Response to psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: the role of pretreatment verbal memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Mirjam J; de Vries, Giel-Jan; Gersons, Berthold P R; Olff, Miranda

    2015-08-01

    Neuropsychological studies have consistently demonstrated impaired verbal memory in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Trauma-focused treatment for PTSD is thought to rely on memory, but it is largely unknown whether treatment outcome is influenced by memory performance. The aim of the study, therefore, was to examine the relationship between verbal memory performance and treatment response to trauma-focused psychotherapy. Participants were referred to our outpatient clinic and recruited between December 2003 and January 2009 upon diagnosis of PTSD according to DSM-IV. Secondary analyses of a randomized controlled trial comparing eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (n = 70) and brief eclectic psychotherapy (n = 70), a cognitive-behavioral intervention, are reported. Response to treatment was measured by self-reported PTSD symptom severity (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) over 17 weeks. Pretreatment verbal memory measures (California Verbal Learning Test, Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test) were included in the mixed linear model analyses in order to investigate the influence of memory on treatment outcome. Pretreatment encoding, short-term retrieval, long-term retrieval, and recognition performance were significantly associated with treatment response in terms of self-reported PTSD symptom severity for both treatments (P ≤ .013). Receiver operating characteristic curves predicting treatment response with pretreatment memory indices showed that 75.6% of the patients could be correctly classified as responder. Poor verbal memory performance represents a risk factor for worse treatment response to trauma-focused psychotherapy. Memory measures can be helpful in determining which patients are unable to benefit from trauma-focused psychotherapy. Future research should explore how treatment perspectives of patients with poor verbal memory can be improved. ISRCTN.com identifier: ISRCTN64872147. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. The role of 5-HT7 receptor antagonism in the amelioration of MK-801-induced learning and memory deficits by the novel atypical antipsychotic drug lurasidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisawa, Tomoko; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Toma, Satoko; Ikeda, Atsushi; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Ono, Michiko; Ishiyama, Takeo; Taiji, Mutsuo

    2013-05-01

    Lurasidone is a novel atypical antipsychotic with high affinity for dopamine D2, serotonin 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors. We previously reported that lurasidone and the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-656104-A improved learning and memory deficits induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in the rat passive avoidance test. In this study, we first examined the role of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonistic activity of lurasidone in its pro-cognitive effect to ameliorate MK-801-induced deficits in the rat passive avoidance test. The 5-HT7 receptor agonist, AS19, (2S)-(+)-5-(1,3,5-trimethylpyrazol-4-yl)-2-(dimethylamino) tetralin, (3 mg/kg, s.c.) completely blocked the attenuating effects of lurasidone (3 mg/kg, p.o.), highlighting the importance of 5-HT7 receptor antagonism in the pro-cognitive effect of lurasidone. AS19 (3 mg/kg, s.c.) also blocked the ameliorating effect of SB-656104-A (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the same experimental paradigm. To further extend our observation, we next tested whether 5-HT7 receptor antagonism still led to the amelioration of MK-801-induced deficits when combined with D2 and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, and found that SB-656104-A (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced deficits even in the presence of the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (1 mg/kg, s.c.). Taken together, these results suggest that the 5-HT7 receptor antagonistic activity of lurasidone plays an important role in its effectiveness against MK-801-induced deficits, and may contribute to its pharmacological actions in patients with schizophrenia.

  10. A Study on Associative Neural Memories

    OpenAIRE

    B.D.C.N.Prasad; P. E. S. N. Krishna Prasad; Sagar Yeruva; P Sita Rama Murty

    2011-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in Artificial Neural Networks. Without memory, Neural Network can not be learned itself. One of the primary concepts of memory in neural networks is Associative neural memories. A survey has been made on associative neural memories such as Simple associative memories (SAM), Dynamic associative memories (DAM), Bidirectional Associative memories (BAM), Hopfield memories, Context Sensitive Auto-associative memories (CSAM) and so on. These memories can be applied in vari...

  11. Collaging Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  12. The role of sleep in forming a memory representation of a two-dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutanche, Marc N; Gianessi, Carol A; Chanales, Avi J H; Willison, Kate W; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2013-12-01

    There is ample evidence from human and animal models that sleep contributes to the consolidation of newly learned information. The precise role of sleep for integrating information into interconnected memory representations is less well understood. Building on prior findings that following sleep (as compared to wakefulness) people are better able to draw inferences across learned associations in a simple hierarchy, we ask how sleep helps consolidate relationships in a more complex representational space. We taught 60 subjects spatial relationships between pairs of buildings, which (unknown to participants) formed a two-dimensional grid. Critically, participants were only taught a subset of the many possible spatial relations, which allowed them to potentially infer the remainder. After a 12 h period that either did or did not include a normal period of sleep, participants returned to the lab. We examined the quality of each participant's map of the two-dimensional space, and their knowledge of relative distances between buildings. After 12 h with sleep, subjects could more accurately map the full space than subjects who experienced only wakefulness. The incorporation of untaught, but inferable, associations was particularly improved. We further found that participants' distance judgment performance related to self-reported navigational style, but only after sleep. These findings demonstrate that consolidation over a night of sleep begins to integrate relations into an interconnected complex representation, in a way that supports spatial relational inference.

  13. Listen up, eye movements play a role in verbal memory retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz, Agnes; Mehlhorn, Katja; Krems, Josef F

    2014-01-01

    People fixate on blank spaces if visual stimuli previously occupied these regions of space. This so-called ‘‘looking at nothing’’ (LAN) phenomenon is said to be a part of information retrieval from internal memory repre- sentations, but the exact nature of the relationship between LAN and memory ret

  14. Sleep, Dreams, and Memory Consolidation: The Role of the Stress Hormone Cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jessica D.; Nadel, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the relationship between sleep, dreams, and memory, proposing that the content of dreams reflects aspects of memory consolidation taking place during the different stages of sleep. Although we acknowledge the likely involvement of various neuromodulators in these phenomena, we focus on the hormone cortisol, which is known to exert…

  15. The role of the different layers of primary visual cortex in working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2015-01-01

    Imaging studies have revealed a neuronal correlate of working memory in primary visual cortex (Harrison & Tong, Nature, 2009). However, it is unknown if working memories influence spiking activity in the primary visual cortex. To address this question, we recorded neuronal activity in the primary vi

  16. The Roles of Protein Expression in Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali eRosenberg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The amount and availability of proteins are regulated by their synthesis, degradation, and transport. These processes can specifically, locally, and temporally regulate a protein or a population of proteins, thus affecting numerous biological processes in health and disease states. Accordingly, malfunction in the processes of protein turnover and localization underlies different neuronal diseases. However, as early as a century ago, it was recognized that there is a specific need for normal macromolecular synthesis in a specific fragment of the learning process, memory consolidation, which takes place minutes to hours following acquisition. Memory consolidation is the process by which fragile short-term memory is converted into stable long-term memory. It is accepted today that synaptic plasticity is a cellular mechanism of learning and memory processes. Interestingly, similar molecular mechanisms subserve both memory and synaptic plasticity consolidation. In this review, we survey the current view on the connection between memory consolidation processes and proteostasis, i.e., maintaining the protein contents at the neuron and the synapse. In addition, we describe the technical obstacles and possible new methods to determine neuronal proteostasis of synaptic function and better explain the process of memory and synaptic plasticity consolidation.

  17. Text Composition by Deaf and Hearing Middle-School Students: The Role of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamargot, Denis; Lambert, Eric; Thebault, Claire; Dansac, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the compositional performances of deaf and hearing students and to investigate the relationships between these performances and working memory capacities. Fifteen prelingually deaf, sign-using students and 15 hearing students composed a descriptive text and performed working memory tasks. The deaf students had…

  18. [Role of context recall in destination memory decline in normal aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Allain, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Until recently, little was known about destination memory, or memory for the destination of outputted information. In the present work, this memory was evaluated in 32 older adults and 36 younger adults, who had to associate proverbs to pictures of famous people and decide, on a subsequent recognition task, whether they had previously told that proverb to that face or not. When deciding about the destination, participants had to provide contextual judgment, that is, whether each picture had been previously exposed in color or in black and white. Participants also performed a neuropsychological battery tapping episodic memory and executive functions. Findings showed poor destination recall in older participants. Destination recall in older adults was reliably predicted by with their context recall. Destination memory seems to be particularly affected by aging, a deterioration that can be related to deficits in processing contextual features during encoding.

  19. Specific Downregulation of Hippocampal ATF4 Reveals a Necessary Role in Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pasini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies suggested that the transcription factor ATF4 negatively regulates synaptic plastic and memory. By contrast, we provide evidence from direct in vitro and in vivo knockdown of ATF4 in rodent hippocampal neurons and from ATF4-null mice that implicate ATF4 as essential for normal synaptic plasticity and memory. In particular, hippocampal ATF4 downregulation produces deficits in long-term spatial memory and behavioral flexibility without affecting associative memory or anxiety-like behavior. ATF4 knockdown or loss also causes profound impairment of both long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD as well as decreased glutamatergic function. We conclude that ATF4 is a key regulator of the physiological state necessary for neuronal plasticity and memory.

  20. Bindings in working memory: The role of object-based attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zaifeng; Wu, Fan; Qiu, Fangfang; He, Kaifeng; Yang, Yue; Shen, Mowei

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, it has been debated whether retaining bindings in working memory (WM) requires more attention than retaining constituent features, focusing on domain-general attention and space-based attention. Recently, we proposed that retaining bindings in WM needs more object-based attention than retaining constituent features (Shen, Huang, & Gao, 2015, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, doi: 10.1037/xhp0000018 ). However, only unitized visual bindings were examined; to establish the role of object-based attention in retaining bindings in WM, more emperical evidence is required. We tested 4 new bindings that had been suggested requiring no more attention than the constituent features in the WM maintenance phase: The two constituent features of binding were stored in different WM modules (cross-module binding, Experiment 1), from auditory and visual modalities (cross-modal binding, Experiment 2), or temporally (cross-time binding, Experiments 3) or spatially (cross-space binding, Experiments 4-6) separated. In the critical condition, we added a secondary object feature-report task during the delay interval of the change-detection task, such that the secondary task competed for object-based attention with the to-be-memorized stimuli. If more object-based attention is required for retaining bindings than for retaining constituent features, the secondary task should impair the binding performance to a larger degree relative to the performance of constituent features. Indeed, Experiments 1-6 consistently revealed a significantly larger impairment for bindings than for the constituent features, suggesting that object-based attention plays a pivotal role in retaining bindings in WM.

  1. Constrained by our connections: white matter's key role in interindividual variability in visual working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestani, Ali M; Miles, Laura; Babb, James; Castellanos, F Xavier; Malaspina, Dolores; Lazar, Mariana

    2014-11-05

    Visual working memory (VWM) plays an essential role in many perceptual and higher-order cognitive processes. Despite its reliance on a broad network of brain regions, VWM has a capacity limited to a few objects. This capacity varies substantially across individuals and relates closely to measures of overall cognitive function (Luck and Vogel, 2013). The mechanisms underlying these properties are not completely understood, although the amplitude of neural signal oscillations (Vogel and Machizawa, 2004) and brain activation in specific cortical regions (Todd and Marois, 2004) have been implicated. Variability in VWM performance may also reflect variability in white matter structural properties. However, data based primarily on diffusion tensor imaging approaches remain inconclusive. Here, we investigate the relationship between white matter and VWM capacity in human subjects using an advanced diffusion imaging technique, diffusion kurtosis imaging. Diffusion kurtosis imaging provides several novel quantitative white mater metrics, among them the axonal water fraction (f(axon)), an index of axonal density and caliber. Our results show that 59% of individual variability in VWM capacity may be explained by variations in f(axon) within a widely distributed network of white matter tracts. Increased f(axon) associates with increased VWM capacity. An additional 12% in VWM capacity variance may be explained by diffusion properties of the extra-axonal space. These data demonstrate, for the first time, the key role of white matter in limiting VWM capacity in the healthy adult brain and suggest that white matter may represent an important therapeutic target in disorders of impaired VWM and cognition.

  2. Temporary inactivation reveals that the CA1 region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus plays an equivalent role in the retrieval of long-term object memory and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackman, Robert W; Cohen, Sarah J; Lora, Joan C; Rios, Lisa M

    2016-09-01

    Recognition of a previously experienced item or object depends upon the successful retrieval of memory for the object. The neural mechanisms that support object recognition memory in the mammalian brain are not well understood. The rodent hippocampus plays a well-established role in spatial memory, and we previously demonstrated that temporary inactivation of the mouse hippocampus impairs object memory, as assessed with a novel object preference (NOP) test. The present studies were designed to test some remaining issues regarding the contribution of the CA1 sub-region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus to long-term object memory. Specifically, we examined whether the retrieval of spatial memory (as assessed by the Morris water maze; MWM) and object recognition memory are differentially sensitive to inactivation of the CA1 region. The current study used pre-test local microinfusion of muscimol directly into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus to temporarily interrupt its function during the respective retrieval phases of both behavioral tasks, in order to compare the contribution of the CA1 to object memory and spatial memory. Histological analyses revealed that local intra-CA1 injection of muscimol diffused within, and not beyond, the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus. The degree of memory retrieval impairment induced by muscimol was comparable in the two tasks, supporting the view that object memory and spatial memory depend similarly on the CA1 region of rodent hippocampus. Further, we confirmed that the muscimol-induced impairment of CA1 function is temporary. First, mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval immediately after intra-CA1 muscimol, subsequently exhibited unimpaired retrieval of object memory when tested 24h later. Secondly, a cohort of mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval after intra-CA1 muscimol later acquired spatial memory in the MWM comparable to that of control mice. Together, these results offer further support for the

  3. Memory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sisse

    Mind and Matter - Nordik 2009 Conference for Art Historians Design Matters Contributed Memory design BACKGROUND My research concerns the use of memory categories in the designs by the companies Alessi and Georg Jensen. When Alessi's designers create their products, they are usually inspired...... by cultural forms, often specifically by the concept of memory in philosophy, sociology and psychology, while Danish design traditionally has been focusing on form and function with frequent references to the forms of nature. Alessi's motivation for investigating the concept of memory is that it adds...... a cultural dimension to the design objects, enabling the objects to make an identity-forming impact. Whether or not the concept of memory plays a significant role in Danish design has not yet been elucidated fully. TERMINOLOGY The concept of "memory design" refers to the idea that design carries...

  4. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle eDominguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC and the hippocampus (dHPC in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non stress condition to mPFC-dependent memory retrieval pattern and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.

  5. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushka B P Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food or aversive (e.g. electric shock. We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala’s mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes.

  6. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Murray, Jennifer E.; Milton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food) or aversive (e.g. electric shock). We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala's mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes. PMID:24367307

  7. Visual imagery in autobiographical memory: The role of repeated retrieval in shifting perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew C; Rice, Heather J; Wooldridge, Cynthia L; Rubin, David C

    2016-05-01

    Recent memories are generally recalled from a first-person perspective whereas older memories are often recalled from a third-person perspective. We investigated how repeated retrieval affects the availability of visual information, and whether it could explain the observed shift in perspective with time. In Experiment 1, participants performed mini-events and nominated memories of recent autobiographical events in response to cue words. Next, they described their memory for each event and rated its phenomenological characteristics. Over the following three weeks, they repeatedly retrieved half of the mini-event and cue-word memories. No instructions were given about how to retrieve the memories. In Experiment 2, participants were asked to adopt either a first- or third-person perspective during retrieval. One month later, participants retrieved all of the memories and again provided phenomenology ratings. When first-person visual details from the event were repeatedly retrieved, this information was retained better and the shift in perspective was slowed.

  8. Listen up, eye movements play a role in verbal memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Agnes; Mehlhorn, Katja; Krems, Josef F

    2016-01-01

    People fixate on blank spaces if visual stimuli previously occupied these regions of space. This so-called "looking at nothing" (LAN) phenomenon is said to be a part of information retrieval from internal memory representations, but the exact nature of the relationship between LAN and memory retrieval is unclear. While evidence exists for an influence of LAN on memory retrieval for visuospatial stimuli, evidence for verbal information is mixed. Here, we tested the relationship between LAN behavior and memory retrieval in an episodic retrieval task where verbal information was presented auditorily during encoding. When participants were allowed to gaze freely during subsequent memory retrieval, LAN occurred, and it was stronger for correct than for incorrect responses. When eye movements were manipulated during memory retrieval, retrieval performance was higher when participants fixated on the area associated with to-be-retrieved information than when fixating on another area. Our results provide evidence for a functional relationship between LAN and memory retrieval that extends to verbal information.

  9. Sentence Comprehension in Adolescents with down Syndrome and Typically Developing Children: Role of Sentence Voice, Visual Context, and Auditory-Verbal Short-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miolo, Giuliana; Chapman, Robins S.; Sindberg, Heidi A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors evaluated the roles of auditory-verbal short-term memory, visual short-term memory, and group membership in predicting language comprehension, as measured by an experimental sentence comprehension task (SCT) and the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language--Third Edition (TACL-3; E. Carrow-Woolfolk, 1999) in 38 participants: 19 with…

  10. From the Search for a Molecular Code of Memory to the Role of Neurotransmitters: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Chapouthier

    2004-01-01

    The history of the neurochemistry of mnesic processes can be divided into two main periods: the first (1946-1978) was inspired by the results of molecular genetics, providing evidence for storage of hereditary information in the DNA of genes. Therefore, the chemical bases for memory were investigated in the macromolecules of the brain. Such attempts were relatively unsuccessful, which led to a second period (starting in 1978) with the research emphasizing, in a less ambitious way, the role of...

  11. The Role of L1 and L2 Working Memory in Literal and Inferential Comprehension in L2 Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Cem; Ercetin, Gulcan

    2010-01-01

    Reading span as a measure of L1 or L2 working memory capacity is shown to be related to L2 reading comprehension. Albeit limited, there is research on the relationship between both L1 and L2 reading spans and their roles in L2 reading comprehension, yet these studies take reading as a global construct rather than delving into its multi-level…

  12. Role of the RuvAB protein in avoiding spontaneous formation of deletion mutations in the Escherichia coli K-12 endogenous tonB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Kazumi; Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-10-08

    The endogenous tonB gene of Escherichia coli was used as a target for spontaneous deletion mutations which were isolated from ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. The rates of tonB mutation were essentially the same in ruv+, ruvAB-, recG-, and ruvC- cells. We analyzed tonB mutants by sequencing. In the ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- strains, the spectra were different from those obtained from the ruvAB- cells, where deletions dominated followed by IS insertions, base substitutions, and frameshifts, in that order. We then analyzed the tonB-trp large deletion, due to simultaneous mutations of the trp operon, and found that the frequency in ruvAB- was higher than those in ruv+, recG-, and ruvC- cells. To characterize deletion formation further, we analyzed all the tonB mutants from one colicin plate. Seven deletions were identified at five sites from the 45 tonB mutants of ruv+ cells and 24 deletions at 11 sites from the 43 tonB mutants of ruvAB- cells. Thus, the ruvAB- strain is a deletion mutator. We discuss the role of RuvAB in avoiding deletions. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Sex-related Differences in the Development of the Motive to Avoid Success, Sex Role Identity, and Performance in Competitive and Noncompetitive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Nancy

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Educational Research Association, Washington, D.C., April 1975, replicates Horner's (1968) study of the motive to avoid success (M-s) on fifty-through eleventh-grade males (N=169) and females (N=168). Sex and grade differences were found in the specific reasons given for avoiding success. (Author)

  14. The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Herz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the special features of odor-evoked memory and the current state-of-the-art in odor-evoked memory research to show how these unique experiences may be able to influence and benefit psychological and physiological health. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that odors that evoke positive autobiographical memories have the potential to increase positive emotions, decrease negative mood states, disrupt cravings, and reduce physiological indices of stress, including systemic markers of inflammation. Olfactory perception factors and individual difference characteristics that would need to be considered in therapeutic applications of odor-evoked-memory are also discussed. This article illustrates how through the experimentally validated mechanisms of odor-associative learning and the privileged neuroanatomical relationship that exists between olfaction and the neural substrates of emotion, odors can be harnessed to induce emotional and physiological responses that can improve human health and wellbeing.

  15. The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the special features of odor-evoked memory and the current state-of-the-art in odor-evoked memory research to show how these unique experiences may be able to influence and benefit psychological and physiological health. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that odors that evoke positive autobiographical memories have the potential to increase positive emotions, decrease negative mood states, disrupt cravings, and reduce physiological indices of stress, including systemic markers of inflammation. Olfactory perception factors and individual difference characteristics that would need to be considered in therapeutic applications of odor-evoked-memory are also discussed. This article illustrates how through the experimentally validated mechanisms of odor-associative learning and the privileged neuroanatomical relationship that exists between olfaction and the neural substrates of emotion, odors can be harnessed to induce emotional and physiological responses that can improve human health and wellbeing. PMID:27447673

  16. Mechanisms governing the reactivation-dependent destabilization of memories and their role in extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rachael Flavell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The extinction of learned associations has traditionally been considered to involve new learning, which competes with the original memory for control over behaviour. However, a recent resurgence of interest in reactivation-dependent amnesia has revealed that the retrieval of fear-related memory (with what is essentially a brief extinction session can result in it’s destabilization. This review discusses some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in the destabilization of a memory following it’s reactivation and/or extinction, and investigates the evidence that extinction may involve both new learning as well as a partial destabilization-induced erasure of the original memory trace.

  17. Fostering multidisciplinary learning through computer-supported collaboration script: The role of a transactive memory script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Weinberger, A.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Teasley, S.D.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    For solving many of today's complex problems, professionals need to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. Facilitation of knowledge awareness and coordination among group members, that is through a Transactive Memory System (TMS), is vital in multidisciplinary collaborative settings. Online platfo

  18. Fostering multidisciplinary learning through computer-supported collaboration script: The role of a transactive memory script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Weinberger, A.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Teasley, S.D.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    For solving many of today's complex problems, professionals need to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. Facilitation of knowledge awareness and coordination among group members, that is through a Transactive Memory System (TMS), is vital in multidisciplinary collaborative settings. Online

  19. Role of parietal regions in episodic memory retrieval: the dual attentional processes hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Although parietal cortex is frequently activated during episodic memory retrieval, damage to this region does not markedly impair episodic memory. To account for these and other findings, a new dual attentional processes (DAP) hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, dorsal parietal cortex (DPC) contributes top-down attentional processes guided by retrieval goals, whereas ventral parietal cortex (VPC) contributes bottom-up attentional processes captured by the retrieval output. Consistent with this hypothesis, DPC activity increases with retrieval effort whereas VPC activity increases with confidence in old and new responses. The DAP hypothesis can also account for the overlap of parietal activations across different cognitive domains and for opposing effects of parietal activity on encoding vs. retrieval. Finally, the DAP hypothesis explains why VPC lesions yield a memory neglect syndrome: a deficit in spontaneously reporting relevant memory details but not in accessing the same details when guided by specific questions.

  20. The role of verbal labels on flexible memory retrieval at 12-months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gemma; Liu, Hao; Herbert, Jane S

    2016-11-01

    The provision of verbal labels enhances 12-month-old infants' memory flexibility across a form change in a puppet imitation task (Herbert, 2011), although the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here we investigate whether verbal labels can scaffold flexible memory retrieval when task difficulty increases and consider the mechanism responsible for the effect of language cues on early memory flexibility. Twelve-month-old infants were provided with English, Chinese, or empty language cues during a difficult imitation task, a combined change in the puppet's colour and form at the test (Hayne et al., 1997). Imitation performance by infants in the English language condition only exceeded baseline performance after the 10-min delay. Thus, verbal labels facilitated flexible memory retrieval on this task. There were no correlations between infants' language comprehension and imitation performance. Thus, it is likely that verbal labels facilitate both attention and categorisation during encoding and retrieval.

  1. Memory for emotional events: The role of time of testing and type of test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Goergen Brust

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of emotion on memory performance is widely debated in the scientific literature. In the present paper, the relation between emotion and memory was addressed in three experiments using the Slideshow Procedure. In the first experiment, 128 participants’ memory was tested for one of two versions of the Procedure (arousal or neutral through free recall. In the second experiment, 75 participants were asked to recall the information of the arousal version immediately after or one week after watching it. In the third experiment, 75 participants watched the arousal version and answered either a free recall or a recognition test one week after. The results suggested that memory for arousal events is better when tested immediately after the stimuli using free recall.

  2. Unforgettable film music: the role of emotion in episodic long-term memory for music

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eschrich, Susann; Münte, Thomas F; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2008-01-01

    .... Also, we examined the influence of musical structure on memory performance. Recognition of 40 musical excerpts was investigated as a function of arousal, valence, and emotional intensity ratings of the music...

  3. ROLE OF THE ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM IN REGULATING GLUCOCORTICOID EFFECTS ON MEMORY FOR EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsak, P.; Roozendaal, B.; Campolongo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex, have potent modulatory effects on emotional memory. Whereas early studies focused mostly on the detrimental effects of chronic stress and glucocorticoid exposure on cognitive performance and the classic genomic pathways that mediate

  4. Acute exercise and motor memory consolidation: The role of exercise timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Richard; Beck, Mikkel Malling; Lind, Rune Rasmussen;

    2016-01-01

    greater for EX90 than CON (p higher than CON (p ... diminish as the temporal proximity of exercise from acquisition is increased. Timing of exercise following motor practice is important for motor memory consolidation....

  5. The role of relational binding in item memory: evidence from face recognition in a case of developmental amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Lee, Yunjo; Kube, Jana; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Grady, Cheryl L; Moscovitch, Morris; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-04-01

    Current theories state that the hippocampus is responsible for the formation of memory representations regarding relations, whereas extrahippocampal cortical regions support representations for single items. However, findings of impaired item memory in hippocampal amnesics suggest a more nuanced role for the hippocampus in item memory. The hippocampus may be necessary when the item elements need to be bound within and across episodes to form a lasting representation that can be used flexibly. The current investigation was designed to test this hypothesis in face recognition. H.C., an individual who developed with a compromised hippocampal system, and control participants incidentally studied individual faces that either varied in presentation viewpoint across study repetitions or remained in a fixed viewpoint across the study repetitions. Eye movements were recorded during encoding and participants then completed a surprise recognition memory test. H.C. demonstrated altered face viewing during encoding. Although the overall number of fixations made by H.C. was not significantly different from that of controls, the distribution of her viewing was primarily directed to the eye region. Critically, H.C. was significantly impaired in her ability to subsequently recognize faces studied from variable viewpoints, but demonstrated spared performance in recognizing faces she encoded from a fixed viewpoint, implicating a relationship between eye movement behavior in the service of a hippocampal binding function. These findings suggest that a compromised hippocampal system disrupts the ability to bind item features within and across study repetitions, ultimately disrupting recognition when it requires access to flexible relational representations.

  6. Why are you late? Investigating the role of time management in time-based prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Emily R; McDaniel, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Time-based prospective memory tasks (TBPM) are those that are to be performed at a specific future time. Contrary to typical laboratory TBPM tasks (e.g., hit the Z key every 5 min), many real-world TBPM tasks require more complex time-management processes. For instance, to attend an appointment on time, one must estimate the duration of the drive to the appointment and then use this estimate to create and execute a secondary TBPM intention (e.g., "I need to start driving by 1:30 to make my 2:00 appointment on time"). Future under- and overestimates of drive time can lead to inefficient TBPM performance with the former lending to missed appointments and the latter to long stints in the waiting room. Despite the common occurrence of complex TBPM tasks in everyday life, to date, no studies have investigated how components of time management, including time estimation, affect behavior in such complex TBPM tasks. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate timing biases in both older and younger adults and, further, to determine how such biases along with additional time management components including planning and plan fidelity influence complex TBPM performance. Results suggest for the first time that younger and older adults do not always utilize similar timing strategies, and as a result, can produce differential timing biases under the exact same environmental conditions. These timing biases, in turn, play a vital role in how efficiently both younger and older adults perform a later TBPM task that requires them to utilize their earlier time estimate. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. The Role of Working Memory for Cognitive Control in Anorexia Nervosa versus Substance Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Brooks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prefrontal cortex executive functions, such as working memory (WM interact with limbic processes to foster impulse control. Such an interaction is referred to in a growing body of publications by terms such as cognitive control, cognitive inhibition, affect regulation, self-regulation, top-down control, and cognitive–emotion interaction. The rising trend of research into cognitive control of impulsivity, using various related terms reflects the importance of research into impulse control, as failure to employ cognitions optimally may eventually result in mental disorder. Against this background, we take a novel approach using an impulse control spectrum model – where anorexia nervosa (AN and substance use disorder (SUD are at opposite extremes – to examine the role of WM for cognitive control. With this aim, we first summarize WM processes in the healthy brain in order to frame a systematic review of the neuropsychological, neural and genetic findings of AN and SUD. In our systematic review of WM/cognitive control, we found n = 15 studies of AN with a total of n = 582 AN and n = 365 HC participants; and n = 93 studies of SUD with n = 9106 SUD and n = 3028 HC participants. In particular, we consider how WM load/capacity may support the neural process of excessive epistemic foraging (cognitive sampling of the environment to test predictions about the world in AN that reduces distraction from salient stimuli. We also consider the link between WM and cognitive control in people with SUD who are prone to ‘jumping to conclusions’ and reduced epistemic foraging. Finally, in light of our review, we consider WM training as a novel research tool and an adjunct to enhance treatment that improves cognitive control of impulsivity.

  8. Mechanisms governing the reactivation-dependent destabilization of memories and their role in extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Rachael Flavell; Elliot eLambert; Winters, Boyer D.; Bredy, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The extinction of learned associations has traditionally been considered to involve new learning, which competes with the original memory for control over behaviour. However, a recent resurgence of interest in reactivation-dependent amnesia has revealed that the retrieval of fear-related memory (with what is essentially a brief extinction session) can result in it’s destabilization. This review discusses some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in the destabilization of...

  9. Role of parietal regions in episodic memory retrieval: The dual attentional processes hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cabeza, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Although parietal cortex is frequently activated during episodic memory retrieval, damage to this region does not markedly impair episodic memory. To account for these and other findings, a new dual attentional processes (DAP) hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, dorsal parietal cortex (DPC) contributes top-down attentional processes guided by retrieval goals, whereas ventral parietal cortex (VPC) contributes bottom-up attentional processes captured by the retrieval output. C...

  10. Explicit memory creation during sleep demonstrates a causal role of place cells in navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lavilléon, Gaetan; Lacroix, Marie Masako; Rondi-Reig, Laure; Benchenane, Karim

    2015-04-01

    Hippocampal place cells assemblies are believed to support the cognitive map, and their reactivations during sleep are thought to be involved in spatial memory consolidation. By triggering intracranial rewarding stimulations by place cell spikes during sleep, we induced an explicit memory trace, leading to a goal-directed behavior toward the place field. This demonstrates that place cells' activity during sleep still conveys relevant spatial information and that this activity is functionally significant for navigation.

  11. A simple neural network model of the hippocampus suggesting its pathfinding role in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonovich, Alexei V; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to extend the theoretical understanding of the relationship between hippocampal spatial and memory functions to the level of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying spatial navigation and episodic memory retrieval. The proposed unifying theory describes both phenomena within a unique framework, as based on one and the same pathfinding function of the hippocampus. We propose a mechanism of reconstruction of the context of experience involving a search for a nearly shortest path in the space of remembered contexts. To analyze this concept in detail, we define a simple connectionist model consistent with available rodent and human neurophysiological data. Numerical study of the model begins with the spatial domain as a simple analogy for more complex phenomena. It is demonstrated how a nearly shortest path is quickly found in a familiar environment. We prove numerically that associative learning during sharp waves can account for the necessary properties of hippocampal place cells. Computational study of the model is extended to other cognitive paradigms, with the main focus on episodic memory retrieval. We show that the ability to find a correct path may be vital for successful retrieval. The model robustly exhibits the pathfinding capacity within a wide range of several factors, including its memory load (up to 30,000 abstract contexts), the number of episodes that become associated with potential target contexts, and the level of dynamical noise. We offer several testable critical predictions in both spatial and memory domains to validate the theory. Our results suggest that (1) the pathfinding function of the hippocampus, in addition to its associative and memory indexing functions, may be vital for retrieval of certain episodic memories, and (2) the hippocampal spatial navigation function could be a precursor of its memory function.

  12. Effects of eating rate on satiety: A role for episodic memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriday, Danielle; Bosworth, Matthew L; Lai, Samantha; Godinot, Nicolas; Martin, Nathalie; Martin, Ashley A; Rogers, Peter J; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2015-12-01

    Eating slowly is associated with a lower body mass index. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, our objective was to determine whether eating a meal at a slow rate improves episodic memory for the meal and promotes satiety. Participants (N=40) consumed a 400ml portion of tomato soup at either a fast (1.97ml/s) or a slow (0.50ml/s) rate. Appetite ratings were elicited at baseline and at the end of the meal (satiation). Satiety was assessed using; i) an ad libitum biscuit 'taste test' (3h after the meal) and ii) appetite ratings (collected 2h after the meal and after the ad libitum snack). Finally, to evaluate episodic memory for the meal, participants self-served the volume of soup that they believed they had consumed earlier (portion size memory) and completed a rating of memory 'vividness'. Participants who consumed the soup slowly reported a greater increase in fullness, both at the end of the meal and during the inter-meal interval. However, we found little effect of eating rate on subsequent ad libitum snack intake. Importantly, after 3h, participants who ate the soup slowly remembered eating a larger portion. These findings show that eating slowly promotes self-reported satiation and satiety. For the first time, they also suggest that eating rate influences portion size memory. However, eating slowly did not affect ratings of memory vividness and we found little evidence for a relationship between episodic memory and satiety. Therefore, we are unable to conclude that episodic memory mediates effects of eating rate on satiety.

  13. Unforgettable film music: The role of emotion in episodic long-term memory for music

    OpenAIRE

    Altenmüller Eckart O; Münte Thomas F; Eschrich Susann

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Specific pieces of music can elicit strong emotions in listeners and, possibly in connection with these emotions, can be remembered even years later. However, episodic memory for emotional music compared with less emotional music has not yet been examined. We investigated whether emotional music is remembered better than less emotional music. Also, we examined the influence of musical structure on memory performance. Results Recognition of 40 musical excerpts was investiga...

  14. Memory storage fidelity in the hippocampal circuit: the role of subregions and input statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Neher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades a standard model regarding the function of the hippocampus in memory formation has been established and tested computationally. It has been argued that the CA3 region works as an auto-associative memory and that its recurrent fibers are the actual storing place of the memories. Furthermore, to work properly CA3 requires memory patterns that are mutually uncorrelated. It has been suggested that the dentate gyrus orthogonalizes the patterns before storage, a process known as pattern separation. In this study we review the model when random input patterns are presented for storage and investigate whether it is capable of storing patterns of more realistic entorhinal grid cell input. Surprisingly, we find that an auto-associative CA3 net is redundant for random inputs up to moderate noise levels and is only beneficial at high noise levels. When grid cell input is presented, auto-association is even harmful for memory performance at all levels. Furthermore, we find that Hebbian learning in the dentate gyrus does not support its function as a pattern separator. These findings challenge the standard framework and support an alternative view where the simpler EC-CA1-EC network is sufficient for memory storage.

  15. Nap and melatonin-induced changes in hippocampal activation and their role in verbal memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfine, Tali; Yeshurun, Yaara; Zisapel, Nava

    2007-11-01

    Overnight sleep contributes to memory consolidation; even a short nap improves memory performance. Such improvement has been linked to hippocampal activity during sleep. Melatonin has been shown to affect the human hippocampus and to induce 'sleep like' changes in brain activation. We therefore conducted and compared two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies: the first study assessed the effect of a 2-hr mid-day nap versus an equal amount of wakefulness on a verbal memory task (unrelated word pair association); the second assessed the effect of melatonin versus placebo (both conditions without nap) on a similar task. We report that following a nap relative to wakefulness, successful retrieval-related activation in the parahippocampus is decreased. A smaller decrease is seen in wakefulness with melatonin but not placebo. In parallel, an improvement in verbal memory recall was found after a nap compared with wakefulness but not with melatonin during wakefulness compared with placebo. Our findings demonstrate effects of melatonin that resemble those of sleep on verbal memory processing in the hippocampus thus suggesting that melatonin, like sleep, can initiate offline plastic changes underlying memory consolidation; they also suggest that concomitant rest without interferences is necessary for enhanced performance.

  16. Order recall in verbal short-term memory: The role of semantic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Marie; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Mair, Ali; Tehan, Gerry; Tolan, Anne

    2015-04-01

    In their recent article, Acheson, MacDonald, and Postle (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 37:44-59, 2011) made an important but controversial suggestion: They hypothesized that (a) semantic information has an effect on order information in short-term memory (STM) and (b) order recall in STM is based on the level of activation of items within the relevant lexico-semantic long-term memory (LTM) network. However, verbal STM research has typically led to the conclusion that factors such as semantic category have a large effect on the number of correctly recalled items, but little or no impact on order recall (Poirier & Saint-Aubin, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 48A:384-404, 1995; Saint-Aubin, Ouellette, & Poirier, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 12:171-177, 2005; Tse, Memory 17:874-891, 2009). Moreover, most formal models of short-term order memory currently suggest a separate mechanism for order coding-that is, one that is separate from item representation and not associated with LTM lexico-semantic networks. Both of the experiments reported here tested the predictions that we derived from Acheson et al. The findings show that, as predicted, manipulations aiming to affect the activation of item representations significantly impacted order memory.

  17. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Richard; Beck, Mikkel Malling; Lind, Rune Rasmussen; Korsgaard Johnsen, Line; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Christiansen, Lasse; Ritz, Christian; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    High intensity aerobic exercise amplifies offline gains in procedural memory acquired during motor practice. This effect seems to be evident when exercise is placed immediately after acquisition, during the first stages of memory consolidation, but the importance of temporal proximity of the exercise bout used to stimulate improvements in procedural memory is unknown. The effects of three different temporal placements of high intensity exercise were investigated following visuomotor skill acquisition on the retention of motor memory in 48 young (24.0 ± 2.5 yrs), healthy male subjects randomly assigned to one of four groups either performing a high intensity (90% Maximal Power Output) exercise bout at 20 min (EX90), 1 h (EX90+1), 2 h (EX90+2) after acquisition or rested (CON). Retention tests were performed at 1 d (R1) and 7 d (R7). At R1 changes in performance scores after acquisition were greater for EX90 than CON (p Exercise-induced improvements in procedural memory diminish as the temporal proximity of exercise from acquisition is increased. Timing of exercise following motor practice is important for motor memory consolidation.

  18. The Role of Emotional Engagement and Mood Valence in Retrieval Fluency of Mood Incongruent Autobiographical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eGreenberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retrieval of opposite mood autobiographical memories serves emotion regulation, yet the factors influencing this ability are poorly understood. Methods: Three studies examined the effect of mood valence (sad vs. happy and degree of emotional engagement on fluency of mood incongruent retrieval by manipulating emotional engagement and examining the effect of emotional film clips on the Fluency of Autobiographical Memory task. Results: Following both sad and happy film clips, participants who received emotionally engaging instructions exhibited a greater recall latency of the first opposite mood memory, and had generated less such memories than those receiving emotionally disengaging instructions (Studies 1 and 2. A happy mood induction resulted in recollection of fewer mood incongruent memories compared to a sad mood induction. Providing emotionally engaging instructions was found to specifically hinder mood incongruent retrieval, without impairing mood congruent retrieval (Study 3. Conclusion: High emotional engagement seems to impair the retrieval of mood incongruent memories. Being in a happy mood may also partially impair such retrieval. Implications regarding emotional regulation are discussed.

  19. Differential role of dopamine in emotional attention and memory: evidence from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Assuras, Stephanie; Creighton, Judy; Borod, Joan C; Tse, Winona; Frisina, Pasquale G; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Gracies, Jean-Michel; Olanow, C Warren

    2011-08-01

    Consistent with the hypothesis that dopamine is implicated in the processing of salient stimuli relevant to the modification of various behavioral responses, Parkinson's disease is associated with emotional blunting. To address the hypothesis that emotional attention and memory are modulated by dopaminergic neurotransmission in Parkinson's disease, we assessed 15 nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease while on and off dopaminergic medication and 15 age-matched healthy controls. Visual stimuli were presented, and recognition was used to assess emotional memory. Response latency was used as a measure of emotional attention modulation. Stimuli were varied based on valence (pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant) and arousal (high and low) dimensions. Controls had significantly better memory for positive than negative stimuli, whereas patients with Parkinson's disease tested off medication had significantly better memory for negative than positive items. This negativity bias was lost when they were tested while on dopaminergic medication. Reaction times in patients with Parkinson's disease off medication were longer than in healthy controls and, paradoxically, were even longer when on medication. Further, although both healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease in the "off" state had arousal-induced prolongation of reaction time, this effect was not seen in patients with Parkinson's disease on medication. These data indicate that dopaminergic neurotransmission is implicated in emotional memory and attention and suggest that dopamine mediates emotional memory via the valence dimension and emotional attention via arousal. Furthermore, our findings suggest that emotional changes in Parkinson's disease result from the effects of both the disease process and dopaminergic treatment.

  20. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for novel object learning and extinction of contextual memory: role of cAMP signaling in primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-04-13

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects, and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein-coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase, this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3(-/-) mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3(-/-) mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociative passive avoidance. Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia, we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory, including extinction of contextual fear conditioning.

  1. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gaelle; Faucher, Pierre; Henkous, Nadia; Krazem, Ali; Piérard, Christophe; Béracochéa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each) delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP) in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non-stress condition) to mPFC-dependent MRP and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.

  2. The role of chronic physical exercise and selective attention at encoding on implicit and explicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Concepción; Mayas, Julia; Ballesteros, Soledad; Andrés, Pilar

    2016-11-02

    Despite the evidence revealing benefits of chronic cardiovascular exercise on executive functions, little research has been conducted on long-term memory. We aimed to investigate the effect of physical exercise on implicit and explicit memory when attention was modulated at encoding in two groups of active and sedentary participants. With this purpose, attention was manipulated in a similar way in the implicit and explicit memory tasks by presenting picture outlines of two familiar objects, one in blue and the other in green, and participants were asked to pay attention only to one of them. Implicit memory was assessed through conceptual priming and explicit memory through a free recall task followed by recognition. The results did not reveal significant differences between groups in conceptual priming or free recall. However, in recognition, while both groups had similar discrimination for attended stimuli, active participants showed lower discrimination between unattended and new stimuli. These results suggested that exercise may have effects on specific cognitive processes, that is, that active participants may suppress non-relevant information better than sedentary participants, making the discrimination between unattended and new items more difficult.

  3. Remembering beauty: Roles of orbitofrontal and hippocampal regions in successful memory encoding of attractive faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiura, Takashi; Cabeza, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral data have shown that attractive faces are better remembered but the neural mechanisms of this effect are largely unknown. To investigate this issue, female participants were scanned with event-related functional MRI (fMRI) while rating the attractiveness of male faces. Memory for the faces was tested after fMRI scanning and was used to identify successful encoding activity (subsequent memory paradigm). As expected, attractive faces were remembered better than other faces. The study yielded three main fMRI findings. First, activity in the right orbitofrontal cortex increased linearly as a function of attractiveness ratings. Second, activity in the left hippocampus increased as a function of subsequent memory (subsequent missesmemory for attractive faces reflects greater interaction between a region associated with reward, the orbitofrontal cortex, and a region associated with successful memory encoding, the hippocampus. PMID:20659568

  4. Melatonin prevents memory impairment induced by high-fat diet: Role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Mayyas, Fadia A; Mahafzah, Rania; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-09-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) induces oxidative stress in the hippocampus that leads to memory impairment. Melatonin has antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we hypothesized that chronic administration of melatonin can prevent memory impairment induced by consumption of HFD. Melatonin was administered to rats via oral gavage (100mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. HFD was also instituted for the same duration. Behavioral studies were conducted to test spatial memory using the radial arm water maze. Additionally, oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed in the hippocampus. Results showed that HFD impaired both short- and long- term memory (P<0.05), while melatonin treatment prevented such effects. Furthermore, melatonin prevented HFD-induced reduction in levels of GSH, and ratio of GSH/GSSG, and increase in GSSG in the hippocampus. Melatonin also prevented reduction in the catalase activity in hippocampus of animals on HFD. In conclusion, HFD induced memory impairment and melatonin prevented this impairment probably by preventing alteration of oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autonoetic consciousness: Reconsidering the role of episodic memory in future-oriented self-projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stanley B

    2016-01-01

    Following the seminal work of Ingvar (1985. "Memory for the future": An essay on the temporal organization of conscious awareness. Human Neurobiology, 4, 127-136), Suddendorf (1994. The discovery of the fourth dimension: Mental time travel and human evolution. Master's thesis. University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand), and Tulving (1985. Memory and consciousness. Canadian Psychology/PsychologieCanadienne, 26, 1-12), exploration of the ability to anticipate and prepare for future contingencies that cannot be known with certainty has grown into a thriving research enterprise. A fundamental tenet of this line of inquiry is that future-oriented mental time travel, in most of its presentations, is underwritten by a property or an extension of episodic recollection. However, a careful conceptual analysis of exactly how episodic memory functions in this capacity has yet to be undertaken. In this paper I conduct such an analysis. Based on conceptual, phenomenological, and empirical considerations, I conclude that the autonoetic component of episodic memory, not episodic memory per se, is the causally determinative factor enabling an individual to project him or herself into a personal future.

  6. Role of gonadal hormones in anxiety and fear memory formation and inhibition in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Carmel M; Liu, Dana; Schrader, Laura A

    2012-03-20

    Recent research investigating Pavlovian fear conditioning and fear extinction has elucidated the neurocircuitry involved in acquisition and inhibition of fear responses. Modulatory factors that may underlie individual differences in fear acquisition and inhibition, however, are not well understood. Testosterone is known to affect anxiety-like behavior and cognitive processing. In this study, we hypothesized that castration would increase anxiety and reduce memory for contextual fear conditioning in an age-dependent manner. In addition, castration would reduce the rate of extinction to context, as high levels of testosterone correlate with reduced PTSD-like symptoms. We compared behaviors in male mice that were castrated at one of two different time points, either before puberty (at 4 weeks) or after puberty (at 10 weeks) to sham-operated control mice. The behaviors investigated included: anxiety, cued and contextual fear conditioning, and extinction of the fear memory. An interaction of hormone status and age and a significant effect of age were measured in the elevated plus maze, a measure of anxiety. Castration caused a significant reduction of contextual fear memory, but no effect on cued fear memory. There was no significant effect of castration on extinction. Interestingly, a significant effect of age of the mouse at the time of testing was observed on extinction. These results suggest that endogenous androgens during puberty are important for anxiety and fear memory formation. In addition, these results define a late post-adolescent developmental time point for changes in anxiety and fear extinction.

  7. The role of prefrontal cortex in working memory: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Homero Lara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A prominent account of prefrontal cortex (PFC function is that single neurons within the PFC maintain representations of task-relevant stimuli in working memory. Evidence for this view comes from studies in which subjects hold a stimulus across a delay lasting up to several seconds. Persistent elevated activity in the PFC has been observed in animal models as well as in humans performing these tasks. This persistent activity has been interpreted as evidence for the encoding of the stimulus itself in working memory. However, recent findings have posed a challenge to this notion. A number of recent studies have examined neural data from the PFC and posterior sensory areas, both at the single neuron level in primates, and at a larger scale in humans, and have failed to find encoding of stimulus information in the PFC during tasks with a substantial working memory component. Strong stimulus related information, however, was seen in posterior sensory areas. These results suggest that delay period activity in the PFC might be better understood not as a signature of memory storage per se, but as a top down signal that influences posterior sensory areas where the actual working memory representations are maintained.

  8. The vigilance-avoidance model of avoidant recognition: An ERP study under threat priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jing; Chen, Xu; Ma, Jianling; Yang, Qingqing; Liu, Ying

    2016-12-30

    Our study examined attachment-related electrophysiological differences in recognition using event-related potentials (ERPs) measured during a study-test paradigm after threat priming. We identified ERP correlates of recognition by comparing the ERPs of attachment-related positive and negative images between avoidant and secure attachment orientations. Our results revealed that the distribution of early old/new effects was broader in avoidant individuals than in secure individuals, and an early parietal old/new effect was observed in avoidant individuals, which reflected their implicit memory. The late old/new effect was found only in secure individuals when evoked by negative pictures, and was not observed in avoidant individuals. The results suggest that avoidant individuals adopt the "vigilance-avoidance" dual-process model to recognize both positive and negative attachment-related stimuli and carry out preferential familiarity matching at the automatic level and avoidant retrieval at the controlled-processing level.

  9. Spatial Inferences in Narrative Comprehension: the Role of Verbal and Spatial Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrazabal, Natalia; Burin, Debora

    2016-01-01

    During the comprehension of narrative texts, readers keep a mental representation of the location of protagonists and objects; a breach in spatial coherence is detected by longer online reading times (consistency effect). We addressed whether these spatial inferences involve verbal or spatial working memory in two experiments, combining the consistency paradigm with selective verbal and spatial working memory concurrent tasks. The first experiment found longer reading times with a concurrent spatial task under imagery instructions (t33 = 2.87, p = .021). The second experiment, under comprehension reading instructions, found effects of verbal interference on reading times and accuracy. With a verbal secondary task, reading times for the target sentence were shorter (t45 = 3.60, p = .004) and the error rate was significantly higher (t47 = 2.95, p = .005) than without interference. This pattern of results suggests that spatial inferences in narrative comprehension rely mainly on verbal resources, and spatial working memory resources are recruited when imagery is required.

  10. Complementary roles for primate frontal and parietal cortex in guarding working memory from distractor stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Simon Nikolas; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-07-02

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) and posterior parietal cortex are important for maintaining behaviorally relevant information in working memory. Here, we challenge the commonly held view that suppression of distractors by PFC neurons is the main mechanism underlying the filtering of task-irrelevant information. We recorded single-unit activity from PFC and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP) of monkeys trained to resist distracting stimuli in a delayed-match-to-numerosity task. Surprisingly, PFC neurons preferentially encoded distractors during their presentation. Shortly after this interference, however, PFC neurons restored target information, which predicted correct behavioral decisions. In contrast, most VIP neurons only encoded target numerosities throughout the trial. Representation of target information in VIP was the earliest and most reliable neuronal correlate of behavior. Our data suggest that distracting stimuli can be bypassed by storing and retrieving target information, emphasizing active maintenance processes during working memory with complementary functions for frontal and parietal cortex in controlling memory content.

  11. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - emerging roles in neuronal memory, learning, synaptic plasticity and neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed.

  12. Distinctive roles of 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine in Anterior Agranular Insular and Basolateral Amygdala in Reconsolidation of aversive memory associated with Morphine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza, an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, has been implicated in aversive memory and the function of brain region which processing affect. However, little is known about the role of 5-aza in the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory. In the present study, using the morphine-naloxone induced conditioned place aversion (CPA model in rats, we injected 5-aza into agranular insular (AI, granular insular (GI, basolateral amygdala (BLA and central amygdala (CeA immediately after the memory retrieval and tested the behavioral consequences at 24hours, 7 days and 14days after retrieval test. We found that 5-aza injection into AI disrupted the reconsolidation of morphine-associated withdrawal memory, but 5-aza injection into GI had no impact on the reconsolidation. Meanwhile, 5-aza injection into BLA but not CeA attenuated the withdrawal memory trace 14 days later. However, 5-aza administration to rats, in the absence of memory reactivation, had no effect on morphine-associated withdrawal memory. These findings suggest that 5-aza interfere with the reconsolidation of opiate withdrawal memory, and the roles of insular and amygdala in reconsolidation are distinctive.

  13. 工作记忆在阅读理解中的关系和作用%The Relation and the Role of Working Memory in Reading Comprehension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭美玲; 康光明

    2013-01-01

      Working memory is the activated part of the long-term memory. Working memory is an important portion in reading comprehension. Working memory work should include short-term memory and long-term memory. This article from the character⁃istics, concept of working memory and composition as well as the role of reading comprehension, it points out that the effective use of working memory is of great help to improve the reading ability and function. Therefore, improving working memory is an impor⁃tant measure to promote reading teaching.%  长时记忆中被激活的部分被称作工作记忆。它在语篇阅读理解中具有重要的作用。工作记忆应该包括短时工作记忆和长时工作记忆两部分。该文将从工作记忆的概念和组成以及对阅读理解的作用几个方面,指出有效运用工作记忆对提高阅读能力有很大的帮助和作用。因此,提高工作记忆是促进阅读教学的一项重要措施。

  14. From hippocampus to whole-brain: The role of integrative processing in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Benjamin R; Stanley, Matthew L; Dennis, Nancy A; Woldorff, Marty G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2017-01-23

    Multivariate functional connectivity analyses of neuroimaging data have revealed the importance of complex, distributed interactions between disparate yet interdependent brain regions. Recent work has shown that topological properties of functional brain networks are associated with individual and group differences in cognitive performance, including in episodic memory. After constructing functional whole-brain networks derived from an event-related fMRI study of memory retrieval, we examined differences in functional brain network architecture between forgotten and remembered words. This study yielded three main findings. First, graph theory analyses showed that successfully remembering compared to forgetting was associated with significant changes in the connectivity profile of the left hippocampus and a corresponding increase in efficient communication with the rest of the brain. Second, bivariate functional connectivity analyses indicated stronger interactions between the left hippocampus and a retrieval assembly for remembered versus forgotten items. This assembly included the left precuneus, left caudate, bilateral supramarginal gyrus, and the bilateral dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus. Integrative properties of the retrieval assembly were greater for remembered than forgotten items. Third, whole-brain modularity analyses revealed that successful memory retrieval was marginally significantly associated with a less segregated modular architecture in the network. The magnitude of the decreases in modularity between remembered and forgotten conditions was related to memory performance. These findings indicate that increases in integrative properties at the nodal, retrieval assembly, and whole-brain topological levels facilitate memory retrieval, while also underscoring the potential of multivariate brain connectivity approaches for providing valuable new insights into the neural bases of memory processes. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High intensity aerobic exercise amplifies offline gains in procedural memory acquired during motor practice. This effect seems to be evident when exercise is placed immediately after acquisition, during the first stages of memory consolidation, but the importance of temporal proximity of the exercise bout used to stimulate improvements in procedural memory is unknown. The effects of three different temporal placements of high intensity exercise were investigated following visuomotor skill acquisition on the retention of motor memory in 48 young (24.0 ± 2.5 yrs, healthy male subjects randomly assigned to one of four groups either performing a high intensity (90% Maximal Power Output exercise bout at 20 min (EX90, 1 h (EX90+1, 2 h (EX90+2 after acquisition or rested (CON. Retention tests were performed at 1 d (R1 and 7 d (R7. At R1 changes in performance scores after acquisition were greater for EX90 than CON (p<0.001 and EX90+2 (p=0.001. At R7 changes in performance scores for EX90, EX90+1, and EX90+2 were higher than CON (p<0.001, p=0.008, and p=0.008, resp.. Changes for EX90 at R7 were greater than EX90+2 (p=0.049. Exercise-induced improvements in procedural memory diminish as the temporal proximity of exercise from acquisition is increased. Timing of exercise following motor practice is important for motor memory consolidation.

  16. Role of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors in memory restoration induced by morphine sensitization phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijanpour, S; Tirgar, F; Zarrindast, M-R

    2016-01-15

    The present study was examined the blockade of CA1 orexin-1 receptors (OX1Rs) of the dorsal hippocampus in the induction or expression phase on morphine sensitization-induced memory restoration using the Morris water maze (MWM) apparatus. Results showed that pre-training administration of morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.) increases escape latency and traveled distance, while does not alter swimming speed. This supports the impairing effect of morphine on the spatial memory acquisition in male adult rats. Also, in the retrieval session (probe trial) this treatment decreased the time spent in the target quadrant. Moreover, morphine-induced sensitization (15 or 20mg/kg, s.c.; once daily for 3days and followed by 5days no drug treatment) restored the memory acquisition/retrieval deficit which had been induced by pre-training administration of morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.). Intra-CA1 microinjection of subthreshold doses of SB-334867 (OX1Rs antagonist; 10, 20 and 40nmol/rat), 5min before morphine (20mg/kg/day×3days, s.c.; induction phase for morphine sensitization) did not alter restoration of memory acquisition/retrieval produced by the morphine sensitization phenomenon. In contrast, microinjection of subthreshold doses of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol/rat) into the CA1 region in the training session, 5min prior to morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.; expression phase for morphine sensitization) blocked the spatial memory acquisition/retrieval in morphine-sensitized rats. In conclusion, these findings show that morphine sensitization reverses morphine-induced amnesia. Furthermore, the blockade of CA1 OX1Rs in the expression phase, but not in the induction phase, disrupts memory restoration induced by morphine sensitization.

  17. Role of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity in long-term associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemenes, Ildikó; Straub, Volko A; Nikitin, Eugeny S; Staras, Kevin; O'Shea, Michael; Kemenes, György; Benjamin, Paul R

    2006-07-11

    It is now well established that persistent nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity occurs after learning and, like synaptic plasticity, it can be the substrate for long-term memory. What still remains unclear, though, is how nonsynaptic plasticity contributes to the altered neural network properties on which memory depends. Understanding how nonsynaptic plasticity is translated into modified network and behavioral output therefore represents an important objective of current learning and memory research. By using behavioral single-trial classical conditioning together with electrophysiological analysis and calcium imaging, we have explored the cellular mechanisms by which experience-induced nonsynaptic electrical changes in a neuronal soma remote from the synaptic region are translated into synaptic and circuit level effects. We show that after single-trial food-reward conditioning in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, identified modulatory neurons that are extrinsic to the feeding network become persistently depolarized between 16 and 24 hr after training. This is delayed with respect to early memory formation but concomitant with the establishment and duration of long-term memory. The persistent nonsynaptic change is extrinsic to and maintained independently of synaptic effects occurring within the network directly responsible for the generation of feeding. Artificial membrane potential manipulation and calcium-imaging experiments suggest a novel mechanism whereby the somal depolarization of an extrinsic neuron recruits command-like intrinsic neurons of the circuit underlying the learned behavior. We show that nonsynaptic plasticity in an extrinsic modulatory neuron encodes information that enables the expression of long-term associative memory, and we describe how this information can be translated into modified network and behavioral output.

  18. The Role of Working Memory and Contextual Constraints in Children's Processing of Relative Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieghall, Anna R.; Altmann, Gerry T. M.

    2011-01-01

    An auditory sentence comprehension task investigated the extent to which the integration of contextual and structural cues was mediated by verbal memory span with 32 English-speaking six- to eight-year-old children. Spoken relative clause sentences were accompanied by visual context pictures which fully (depicting the actions described within the…

  19. The role of left prefrontal cortex in language and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, John D. E.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Desmond, John E.

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews attempts to characterize the mental operations mediated by left inferior prefrontal cortex, especially the anterior and inferior portion of the gyrus, with the functional neuroimaging techniques of positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Activations in this region occur during semantic, relative to nonsemantic, tasks for the generation of words to semantic cues or the classification of words or pictures into semantic categories. This activation appears in the right prefrontal cortex of people known to be atypically right-hemisphere dominant for language. In this region, activations are associated with meaningful encoding that leads to superior explicit memory for stimuli and deactivations with implicit semantic memory (repetition priming) for words and pictures. New findings are reported showing that patients with global amnesia show deactivations in the same region associated with repetition priming, that activation in this region reflects selection of a response from among numerous relative to few alternatives, and that activations in a portion of this region are associated specifically with semantic relative to phonological processing. It is hypothesized that activations in left inferior prefrontal cortex reflect a domain-specific semantic working memory capacity that is invoked more for semantic than nonsemantic analyses regardless of stimulus modality, more for initial than for repeated semantic analysis of a word or picture, more when a response must be selected from among many than few legitimate alternatives, and that yields superior later explicit memory for experiences. PMID:9448258

  20. The role of working memory and divided attention in metaphor interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Sam; Baird, Anne D

    2014-10-01

    Although several types of figurative language exist, neuropsychological tests of non-literal language have focused on proverbs. Metaphors in the form X is (a) Y (e.g., The body's immunological response is a battle against disease.) place a lower demand on language skills and are more easily manipulated for novelty than proverbs. Forty healthy participants completed the Metaphor Interpretation Test (developed by the authors). The task includes 20 items chosen from a list of metaphors that were rated on several scales (e.g. imagery, aptness) in a study by Katz et al. (Metaphor Symb Act 3(4):191-214, 1988). Participants were asked to rate the familiarity and provide an explanation of each metaphor. A scoring system was developed to categorize answers into: abstract complete (AC), abstract partial (AP), concrete (CT), and other/unrelated (OT) types. Participants also completed short-term memory and divided attention tests. Overall, participants produced 56 % AC, 25.38 % AP, 7.88 % CT, and 10.88 % OT responses. It was found that a measure of verbal short-term memory span was the best predictor of performance on this task (adjusted R(2) = .369). It appears that short-term memory span, not working memory or divided attention, contributes most to providing abstract responses in explaining metaphors. This is in line with the idea that when one accesses the semantic network associated with a novel metaphor, one must hold this information in mind long enough to search for and link similar cognitive networks.

  1. Unforgettable film music: The role of emotion in episodic long-term memory for music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrich, Susann; Münte, Thomas F; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2008-01-01

    Background Specific pieces of music can elicit strong emotions in listeners and, possibly in connection with these emotions, can be remembered even years later. However, episodic memory for emotional music compared with less emotional music has not yet been examined. We investigated whether emotional music is remembered better than less emotional music. Also, we examined the influence of musical structure on memory performance. Results Recognition of 40 musical excerpts was investigated as a function of arousal, valence, and emotional intensity ratings of the music. In the first session the participants judged valence and arousal of the musical pieces. One week later, participants listened to the 40 old and 40 new musical excerpts randomly interspersed and were asked to make an old/new decision as well as to indicate arousal and valence of the pieces. Musical pieces that were rated as very positive were recognized significantly better. Conclusion Musical excerpts rated as very positive are remembered better. Valence seems to be an important modulator of episodic long-term memory for music. Evidently, strong emotions related to the musical experience facilitate memory formation and retrieval. PMID:18505596

  2. Exploring Expressive Vocabulary Variability in Two-Year-Olds: The Role of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Jayne; Klee, Thomas; Stokes, Stephanie F.; Moran, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether measures of working memory ability contribute to the wide variation in 2-year-olds' expressive vocabulary skills. Method: Seventy-nine children (aged 24-30 months) were assessed by using standardized tests of vocabulary and visual cognition, a processing speed measure, and behavioral measures of verbal working…

  3. The critical roles of localization and physiology for understanding parietal contributions to memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven M; McDermott, Kathleen B; Wig, Gagan S; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2013-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of recognition memory ubiquitously demonstrate retrieval-related activity in left lateral parietal cortex (LLPC) when contrasting studied ("old") items with unstudied ("new") items. Recent work demonstrates that there is considerable functional-anatomical heterogeneity in LLPC. One implication of this observation is that single- or dual-process models fall short of characterizing LLPC contributions to memory retrieval. Instead of considering LLPC as a single entity, functional accounts must be given for each of the distinct regions that show retrieval-related effects; we posit there are a minimum of four such regions and very likely more. Identification of these LLPC regions requires careful analysis to map the boundaries and the extent of the regions precisely. In addition, characterizing the functional responses as activations or deactivations relative to baseline will be crucial in understanding the underlying cognitive processes. Considering LLPC in both memory and "nonmemory" domains will also illuminate the contribution of these regions, because it is certainly unlikely they serve only the domain of memory retrieval.

  4. Protective Role of Educational Level on Episodic Memory Aging: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Lucie; Fay, Severine; Bouazzaoui, Badiaa; Baudouin, Alexia; Isingrini, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to investigate whether educational level could modulate the effect of aging on episodic memory and on the electrophysiological correlates of retrieval success. Participants were divided into four groups based on age (young vs. older) and educational level (high vs. low), with 14 participants in each group.…

  5. The role of sleep in declarative memory consolidation--direct evidence by intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Haupt, Sven; Fernández, Guillén; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2008-03-01

    Two step theories of memory formation assume that an initial learning phase is followed by a consolidation stage. Memory consolidation has been suggested to occur predominantly during sleep. Very recent findings, however, suggest that important steps in memory consolidation occur also during waking state but may become saturated after some time awake. Sleep, in this model, specifically favors restoration of synaptic plasticity and accelerated memory consolidation while asleep and briefly afterwards. To distinguish between these different views, we recorded intracranial electroencephalograms from the hippocampus and rhinal cortex of human subjects while they retrieved information acquired either before or after a "nap" in the afternoon or on a control day without nap. Reaction times, hippocampal event-related potentials, and oscillatory gamma activity indicated a temporal gradient of hippocampal involvement in information retrieval on the control day, suggesting hippocampal-neocortical information transfer during waking state. On the day with nap, retrieval of recent items that were encoded briefly after the nap did not involve the hippocampus to a higher degree than retrieval of items encoded before the nap. These results suggest that sleep facilitates rapid processing through the hippocampus but is not necessary for information transfer into the neocortex per se.

  6. Direct evidence for a role of working memory in the attentional blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G; Hommel, Bernhard; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Theories of selective attention often have a central memory component, which is commonly thought to be limited in some way and is thereby a potential bottleneck in the attentional process. There have been only a few attempts to validate this assertion, and they have produced mixed results. This stud

  7. Unforgettable film music: The role of emotion in episodic long-term memory for music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altenmüller Eckart O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific pieces of music can elicit strong emotions in listeners and, possibly in connection with these emotions, can be remembered even years later. However, episodic memory for emotional music compared with less emotional music has not yet been examined. We investigated whether emotional music is remembered better than less emotional music. Also, we examined the influence of musical structure on memory performance. Results Recognition of 40 musical excerpts was investigated as a function of arousal, valence, and emotional intensity ratings of the music. In the first session the participants judged valence and arousal of the musical pieces. One week later, participants listened to the 40 old and 40 new musical excerpts randomly interspersed and were asked to make an old/new decision as well as to indicate arousal and valence of the pieces. Musical pieces that were rated as very positive were recognized significantly better. Conclusion Musical excerpts rated as very positive are remembered better. Valence seems to be an important modulator of episodic long-term memory for music. Evidently, strong emotions related to the musical experience facilitate memory formation and retrieval.

  8. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  9. Unforgettable film music: the role of emotion in episodic long-term memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrich, Susann; Münte, Thomas F; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2008-05-28

    Specific pieces of music can elicit strong emotions in listeners and, possibly in connection with these emotions, can be remembered even years later. However, episodic memory for emotional music compared with less emotional music has not yet been examined. We investigated whether emotional music is remembered better than less emotional music. Also, we examined the influence of musical structure on memory performance. Recognition of 40 musical excerpts was investigated as a function of arousal, valence, and emotional intensity ratings of the music. In the first session the participants judged valence and arousal of the musical pieces. One week later, participants listened to the 40 old and 40 new musical excerpts randomly interspersed and were asked to make an old/new decision as well as to indicate arousal and valence of the pieces. Musical pieces that were rated as very positive were recognized significantly better. Musical excerpts rated as very positive are remembered better. Valence seems to be an important modulator of episodic long-term memory for music. Evidently, strong emotions related to the musical experience facilitate memory formation and retrieval.

  10. Early Adolescent Sexual Debut: The Mediating Role of Working Memory Ability, Sensation Seeking, and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Atika; Romer, Daniel; Betancourt, Laura M.; Brodsky, Nancy L.; Giannetta, Joan M.; Hurt, Hallam

    2012-01-01

    Although deficits in working memory ability have been implicated in suboptimal decision making and risk taking among adolescents, its influence on early sexual initiation has so far not been examined. Analyzing 2 waves of panel data from a community sample of adolescents (N = 347; Mean age[subscript baseline] = 13.4 years), assessed 1 year apart,…

  11. Role of signal transduction crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase and MAP kinase in hippocampus-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2012-08-16

    One of the intriguing questions in neurobiology is how long-term memory (LTM) traces are established and maintained in the brain. Memory can be divided into at least two temporally and mechanistically distinct forms. Short-term memory (STM) lasts no longer than several hours, while LTM persists for days or longer. A crucial step in the generation of LTM is consolidation, a process in which STM is converted to LTM. Hippocampus-dependent LTM depends on activation of Ca(2+), Erk/MAP kinase (MAPK), and cAMP signaling pathways, as well as de novo gene expression and translation. One of the transcriptional pathways strongly implicated in LTM is the CREB/CRE (calcium, cAMP response element) transcriptional pathway. Interestingly, this transcriptional pathway may also contribute to other forms of neuroplasticity including adaptive responses to drugs. Evidence discussed in this review indicates that activation of the Erk1/2 MAP Kinase (MAPK)/CRE transcriptional pathway during the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory depends on calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

  12. Dream actors in the theatre of memory: their role in the psychoanalytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Mauro

    2003-08-01

    The author notes that neuropsychological research has discovered the existence of two long-term memory systems, namely declarative or explicit memory, which is conscious and autobiographical, and non-declarative or implicit memory, which is neither conscious nor verbalisable. It is suggested that pre-verbal and pre-symbolic experience in the child's primary relations is stored in implicit memory, where it constitutes an unconscious nucleus of the self which is not repressed and which influences the person's affective, emotional, cognitive and sexual life even as an adult. In the analytic relationship this unconscious part can emerge essentially through certain modes of communication (tone of voice, rhythm and prosody of the voice, and structure and tempo of speech), which could be called the 'musical dimension' of the transference, and through dream representations. Besides work on the transference, the critical component of the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis is stated to consist in work on dreams as pictographic and symbolic representations of implicit pre-symbolic and pre-verbal experiences. A case history is presented in which dream interpretation allowed some of a patient's early unconscious, non-repressed experiences to be emotionally reconstructed and made thinkable even though they were not actually remembered.

  13. The Role of Text Memory in Inferencing and in Comprehension Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Anh N.; Keenan, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehension tests often compare accuracy on inferential versus literal questions and find inferential harder than literal, and poor comprehenders performing worse than controls. Difficulties in integration are assumed to be the reason. This research explores another reason--differences in memory for the passage information underlying the…

  14. The Role of Statistical Learning and Working Memory in L2 Speakers' Pattern Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether second language (L2) speakers' morphosyntactic pattern learning was predicted by their statistical learning and working memory abilities. Across three experiments, Thai English as a Foreign Language (EFL) university students (N = 140) were exposed to either the transitive construction in Esperanto (e.g., "tauro…

  15. Two Hemispheres for Better Memory in Old Age: Role of Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Lucie; Fay, Severine; Bouazzaoui, Badiaa; Isingrini, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This experiment explored the functional significance of age-related hemispheric asymmetry reduction associated with episodic memory and the cognitive mechanisms that mediate this brain pattern. ERPs were recorded while young and older adults performed a word-stem cued-recall task. Results confirmed that the parietal old/new effect was of larger…

  16. Exploring Expressive Vocabulary Variability in Two-Year-Olds: The Role of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Jayne; Klee, Thomas; Stokes, Stephanie F.; Moran, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether measures of working memory ability contribute to the wide variation in 2-year-olds' expressive vocabulary skills. Method: Seventy-nine children (aged 24-30 months) were assessed by using standardized tests of vocabulary and visual cognition, a processing speed measure, and behavioral measures of verbal working…

  17. The Role of Anxiety and Working Memory in Gender Differences in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Colleen M.; Vasilyeva, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This research examined a potential mechanism underlying gender differences in math performance by testing a mediation model in which women's higher anxiety taxes their working memory resources, leading to underperformance on a mathematics test. Participants for the 2 studies were college students (N = 87, N = 118) who completed an anxiety measure,…

  18. Revisiting the age-prospective memory-paradox: the role of planning and task experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hering, A.; Cortez, S.A.; Kliegel, M.; Altgassen, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating age-related differences in prospective memory performance using a paradigm with high ecological validity and experimental control. Thirty old and 30 young adults completed the Dresden Breakfast task; a meal preparation task in the lab that comprises several s

  19. Facilitation of Memory for Extinction of Drug-Induced Conditioned Reward: Role of Amygdala and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jason P.; Packard, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    eThese experiments examined the effects of posttrial peripheral and intra-amygdala injections of the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine on memory consolidation underlying extinction of amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior. Male Long-Evans rats were initially trained and tested for an amphetamine (2 mg/kg) CPP.…

  20. The Roles of Encoding and Retrieval Processes in Associative and Categorical Memory Illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Bould, Emma; Knott, Lauren M.; Thorley, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the origin of associative and categorical memory illusions by comparing the effects of study and test associations on Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) and categorized lists. Experiments 1 and 2 found that levels of false recognition with both list types were increased by manipulations that facilitated the generation of…