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Sample records for avian-like receptor specificity

  1. Avian-like breathing mechanics in maniraptoran dinosaurs.

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    Codd, Jonathan R; Manning, Phillip L; Norell, Mark A; Perry, Steven F

    2008-01-22

    In 1868 Thomas Huxley first proposed that dinosaurs were the direct ancestors of birds and subsequent analyses have identified a suite of 'avian' characteristics in theropod dinosaurs. Ossified uncinate processes are found in most species of extant birds and also occur in extinct non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs. Their presence in these dinosaurs represents another morphological character linking them to Aves, and further supports the presence of an avian-like air-sac respiratory system in theropod dinosaurs, prior to the evolution of flight. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of the presence of uncinate processes in Aves and non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs indicating that these were homologous structures. Furthermore, recent work on Canada geese has demonstrated that uncinate processes are integral to the mechanics of avian ventilation, facilitating both inspiration and expiration. In extant birds, uncinate processes function to increase the mechanical advantage for movements of the ribs and sternum during respiration. Our study presents a mechanism whereby uncinate processes, in conjunction with lateral and ventral movements of the sternum and gastral basket, affected avian-like breathing mechanics in extinct non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs.

  2. Evolution of an Eurasian avian-like influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pigs.

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    Pablo R Murcia

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses are characterized by an ability to cross species boundaries and evade host immunity, sometimes with devastating consequences. The 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza A virus highlights the importance of pigs in influenza emergence, particularly as intermediate hosts by which avian viruses adapt to mammals before emerging in humans. Although segment reassortment has commonly been associated with influenza emergence, an expanded host-range is also likely to be associated with the accumulation of specific beneficial point mutations. To better understand the mechanisms that shape the genetic diversity of avian-like viruses in pigs, we studied the evolutionary dynamics of an Eurasian Avian-like swine influenza virus (EA-SIV in naïve and vaccinated pigs linked by natural transmission. We analyzed multiple clones of the hemagglutinin 1 (HA1 gene derived from consecutive daily viral populations. Strikingly, we observed both transient and fixed changes in the consensus sequence along the transmission chain. Hence, the mutational spectrum of intra-host EA-SIV populations is highly dynamic and allele fixation can occur with extreme rapidity. In addition, mutations that could potentially alter host-range and antigenicity were transmitted between animals and mixed infections were commonplace, even in vaccinated pigs. Finally, we repeatedly detected distinct stop codons in virus samples from co-housed pigs, suggesting that they persisted within hosts and were transmitted among them. This implies that mutations that reduce viral fitness in one host, but which could lead to fitness benefits in a novel host, can circulate at low frequencies.

  3. Avian-like attributes of a virtual brain model of the oviraptorid theropod Conchoraptor gracilis

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    Kundrát, Martin

    2007-06-01

    An almost complete adult endoneurocranium of Conchoraptor gracilis Barsbold 1986 (Oviraptoridae; ZPAL MgD-I/95), discovered at the Hermiin Tsav locality (the Upper Cretaceous) in Mongolia, is analyzed. A virtual model of the endoneurocranial cavity was derived from CT scans and represents the most complete maniraptoran endocast to date. It displays reduced olfactory bulbs, large cerebral hemispheres in contact with the expanded cerebellum, an epiphysial projection, optic lobes displaced latero-ventrally, presumptive cerebellar folia, enlarged cerebellar auricles, and a deep medulla oblongata with a prominent ventral flexure. Contrary to Archaeopteryx, the shortened olfactory tract and cerebellum overtopping cerebral hemispheres of Conchoraptor resemble conditions in modern birds. Calculating brain mass relative to body mass indicates that Conchoraptor falls within the range of extant birds, whereas Archaeopteryx occupies a marginal position. Most of the endoneurocranial attributes, however, have a less birdlike appearance in Conchoraptor than do corresponding structures in Archaeopteryx and modern birds in which 1) postero-laterally expanded hemispheral domains broadly overlap the optic lobes, 2) the epiphysis projects to the posterior cerebrum, 3) lateral extension of the optic lobes substantially decreases a brain length-to-width ratio, 4) optic lobe and anterior hindbrain are superposed in lateral view, and 5) cerebellar and midbrain compartments are in distinct superposition. The endoneurocranial characteristics of Conchoraptor, taken together, suggest that the animal had a keen sense of vision, balance, and coordination. The data presented in this study do not allow an unambiguous assessment whether the avian-like endoneurocranial characteristics of the flightless Conchoraptor evolved convergently to those of avian theropods, or indicate a derivation of oviraptorosaurs from volant ancestors.

  4. Autoantibodies in SLE: Specificities, Isotypes and Receptors

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    Barbara Dema

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is characterized by a wide spectrum of auto-antibodies which recognize several cellular components. The production of these self-reactive antibodies fluctuates during the course of the disease and the involvement of different antibody-secreting cell populations are considered highly relevant for the disease pathogenesis. These cells are developed and stimulated through different ways leading to the secretion of a variety of isotypes, affinities and idiotypes. Each of them has a particular mechanism of action binding to a specific antigen and recognized by distinct receptors. The effector responses triggered lead to a chronic tissue inflammation. DsDNA autoantibodies are the most studied as well as the first in being characterized for its pathogenic role in Lupus nephritis. However, others are of growing interest since they have been associated with other organ-specific damage, such as anti-NMDAR antibodies in neuropsychiatric clinical manifestations or anti-β2GP1 antibodies in vascular symptomatology. In this review, we describe the different auto-antibodies reported to be involved in SLE. How autoantibody isotypes and affinity-binding to their antigen might result in different pathogenic responses is also discussed.

  5. Molecular basis for gene-specific transactivation by nuclear receptors

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    Jørgensen, Mads Aagaard; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key transcriptional regulators of metazoan physiology and metabolism. Different NRs bind to similar or even identical core response elements; however, they regulate transcription in a highly receptor- and gene-specific manner. These differences in gene activation can m...... on the recent advances in the molecular mechanisms responsible for receptor- and gene-specific transcriptional activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease....... most likely be accounted for by mechanisms involving receptor-specific interactions with DNA as well as receptor-specific interactions with protein complexes binding to adjacent and distant DNA sequences. Here, we review key molecular aspects of transactivation by NRs with special emphasis...

  6. Subtype-Specific Agonists for NMDA Receptor Glycine Binding Sites

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    Maolanon, Alex R.; Risgaard, Rune; Wang, Shuang Yan

    2017-01-01

    A series of analogues based on serine as lead structure were designed, and their agonist activities were evaluated at recombinant NMDA receptor subtypes (GluN1/2A-D) using two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology. Pronounced variation in subunit-selectivity, potency, and agonist...... efficacy was observed in a manner that was dependent on the GluN2 subunit in the NMDA receptor. In particular, compounds 15a and 16a are potent GluN2C-specific superagonists at the GluN1 subunit with agonist efficacies of 398% and 308% compared to glycine. This study demonstrates that subunit......-selectivity among glycine site NMDA receptor agonists can be achieved and suggests that glycine-site agonists can be developed as pharmacological tool compounds to study GluN2C-specific effects in NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission....

  7. A regulatory code for neuron-specific odor receptor expression.

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    Anandasankar Ray

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs must select-from a large repertoire-which odor receptors to express. In Drosophila, most ORNs express one of 60 Or genes, and most Or genes are expressed in a single ORN class in a process that produces a stereotyped receptor-to-neuron map. The construction of this map poses a problem of receptor gene regulation that is remarkable in its dimension and about which little is known. By using a phylogenetic approach and the genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species, we systematically identified regulatory elements that are evolutionarily conserved and specific for individual Or genes of the maxillary palp. Genetic analysis of these elements supports a model in which each receptor gene contains a zip code, consisting of elements that act positively to promote expression in a subset of ORN classes, and elements that restrict expression to a single ORN class. We identified a transcription factor, Scalloped, that mediates repression. Some elements are used in other chemosensory organs, and some are conserved upstream of axon-guidance genes. Surprisingly, the odor response spectra and organization of maxillary palp ORNs have been extremely well-conserved for tens of millions of years, even though the amino acid sequences of the receptors are not highly conserved. These results, taken together, define the logic by which individual ORNs in the maxillary palp select which odor receptors to express.

  8. Demonstration of specific dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Masafumi; Nakao, Haruyoshi; Arao, Masayo; Sato, Bunzo; Noma, Keizo; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Kishimoto, Susumu; Mori, Shintaro; Uozumi, Toru

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenoma membranes were characterized using [ 3 H]spiperone as the radioligand. The specific [ 3 H]spiperone binding sites on prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma membranes were recognized as a dopamine receptor, based upon the data showing high affinity binding, saturability, specificity, temperature dependence, and reversibility. All of 14 PRL-secreting adenomas had high affinity dopamine receptors, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.85±0.11 nmol/l (mean±SEM) and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 428±48.6 fmol/mg protein. Among 14 growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas examined, 8 (57%) had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.90±0.47 nmol/l and a Bmax of 131±36.9 fmol/mg protein. Furthermore, 15 of 24 (58%) nonsecreting pituitary adenomas also had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.86±0.37 nmol/l and a Bmax of 162±26.0 fmol/mg protein. These results indicate that some GH-secreting adenomas as well as some nonsecreting pituitary adenomas contain dopamine receptors. But their affinity and number of binding sites are significantly lower (P<0.05) and fewer (P<0.001) respectively, than those in PRL-secreting adenomas. (author)

  9. Selective estrogen receptor modulators: tissue specificity and clinical utility

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    Martinkovich S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Martinkovich,* Darshan Shah,* Sonia Lobo Planey, John A ArnottDepartment of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs are a diverse group of ­nonsteroidal compounds that function as agonists or antagonists for estrogen receptors (ERs in a target gene-specific and tissue-specific fashion. SERM specificity involves tissue-specific expression of ER subtypes, differential expression of co-regulatory proteins in various tissues, and varying ER conformational changes induced by ligand binding. To date, the major clinical applications of SERMs are their use in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, the prevention of osteoporosis, and the maintenance of beneficial serum lipid profiles in postmenopausal women. However, SERMs have also been found to promote adverse effects, including thromboembolic events and, in some cases, carcinogenesis, that have proven to be obstacles in their clinical utility. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of SERM tissue specificity and highlight the therapeutic application of well-known and emergent SERMs.Keywords: selective estrogen receptor modulators, SERMs, estrogen receptors

  10. Avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus antibodies among swine farm residents and pigs in southern China.

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    Zhou, Han; Cao, Zhenpeng; Tan, Likai; Fu, Xinliang; Lu, Gang; Qi, Wenbao; Ke, Changwen; Wang, Heng; Sun, Lingshuang; Zhang, Guihong

    2014-01-01

    Infection of human with avian-like A (H1N1) swine influenza virus (SIV) occasionally occurs in China, suggesting a potential risk of cross-species transmission of the swine influenza H1N1 virus from pigs to humans, particularly to those having direct contact with pigs. A seroepidemiological study was conducted to assess the prevalence of antibodies against the avian-like A (H1N1) SIV among swine farm residents and pigs in southern China to evaluate the risk of infection to swine farm workers. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays revealed that 11.17% (61/546) of the sera samples from swine farm residents in southern China were positive for antibodies against the avian-like A (H1N1) SIV. The difference in numbers of antibody-positive samples obtained from swine farm residents and a control group of healthy city residents was statistically significant (P = 0.031). In addition, 219 of the 1,180 serum samples from pigs were positive for the antibodies against an avian-like A (H1N1) SIV, A/swine/Guangdong/SS1/2013(H1N1), as assessed by HI. The data suggest that occupational exposure of swine farm residents and veterinarians in southern China to pigs may increase their risk of acquiring avian-like A (H1N1) SIV infection. According to a special pig farming model in southern China, the staff and residents are in close contact with infected pigs and may be among the first to become infected.

  11. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

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    Deitcher David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC] to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus, a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher, another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs.

  12. Novel reassortment of Eurasian avian-like and pandemic/2009 influenza viruses in swine: infectious potential for humans.

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    Zhu, Huachen; Zhou, Boping; Fan, Xiaohui; Lam, Tommy T Y; Wang, Jia; Chen, Antony; Chen, Xinchun; Chen, Honglin; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard; Peiris, Joseph S M; Smith, David K; Guan, Yi

    2011-10-01

    Pigs are considered to be intermediate hosts and "mixing vessels," facilitating the genesis of pandemic influenza viruses, as demonstrated by the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pdm/09) virus. The prevalence and repeated introduction of the pdm/09 virus into pigs raises the possibility of generating novel swine influenza viruses with the potential to infect humans. To address this, an active influenza surveillance program was conducted with slaughtered pigs in abattoirs in southern China. Over 50% of the pigs tested were found to be seropositive for one or more H1 influenza viruses, most commonly pdm/09-like viruses. Out of 36 virus isolates detected, one group of novel reassortants had Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 surface genes and pdm/09 internal genes. Animal experiments showed that this virus transmitted effectively from pig to pig and from pig to ferret, and it could also replicate in ex vivo human lung tissue. Immunization against the 2009 pandemic virus gave only partial protection to ferrets. The continuing prevalence of the pdm/09 virus in pigs could lead to the genesis of novel swine reassortant viruses with the potential to infect humans.

  13. TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor

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    Tosoni, Daniela; Puri, Claudia; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Different plasma membrane receptors are internalized through saturable/noncompetitive pathways, suggesting cargo-specific regulation. Here, we report that TTP (SH3BP4), a SH3-containing protein, specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor (TfR). TTP interacts...... with endocytic proteins, including clathrin, dynamin, and the TfR, and localizes selectively to TfR-containing coated-pits (CCP) and -vesicles (CCV). Overexpression of TTP specifically inhibits TfR internalization, and causes the formation of morphologically aberrant CCP, which are probably fission impaired....... This effect is mediated by the SH3 of TTP, which can bind to dynamin, and it is rescued by overexpression of dynamin. Functional ablation of TTP causes a reduction in TfR internalization, and reduced cargo loading and size of TfR-CCV. Tyrosine phosphorylation of either TTP or dynamin prevents...

  14. Evolution of Minimal Specificity and Promiscuity in Steroid Hormone Receptors

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    Eick, Geeta N.; Colucci, Jennifer K.; Harms, Michael J.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    Most proteins are regulated by physical interactions with other molecules; some are highly specific, but others interact with many partners. Despite much speculation, we know little about how and why specificity/promiscuity evolves in natural proteins. It is widely assumed that specific proteins evolved from more promiscuous ancient forms and that most proteins' specificity has been tuned to an optimal state by selection. Here we use ancestral protein reconstruction to trace the evolutionary history of ligand recognition in the steroid hormone receptors (SRs), a family of hormone-regulated animal transcription factors. We resurrected the deepest ancestral proteins in the SR family and characterized the structure-activity relationships by which they distinguished among ligands. We found that that the most ancient split in SR evolution involved a discrete switch from an ancient receptor for aromatized estrogens—including xenobiotics—to a derived receptor that recognized non-aromatized progestagens and corticosteroids. The family's history, viewed in relation to the evolution of their ligands, suggests that SRs evolved according to a principle of minimal specificity: at each point in time, receptors evolved ligand recognition criteria that were just specific enough to parse the set of endogenous substances to which they were exposed. By studying the atomic structures of resurrected SR proteins, we found that their promiscuity evolved because the ancestral binding cavity was larger than the primary ligand and contained excess hydrogen bonding capacity, allowing adventitious recognition of larger molecules with additional functional groups. Our findings provide an historical explanation for the sensitivity of modern SRs to natural and synthetic ligands—including endocrine-disrupting drugs and pollutants—and show that knowledge of history can contribute to ligand prediction. They suggest that SR promiscuity may reflect the limited power of selection within real

  15. Evolution of minimal specificity and promiscuity in steroid hormone receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta N Eick

    Full Text Available Most proteins are regulated by physical interactions with other molecules; some are highly specific, but others interact with many partners. Despite much speculation, we know little about how and why specificity/promiscuity evolves in natural proteins. It is widely assumed that specific proteins evolved from more promiscuous ancient forms and that most proteins' specificity has been tuned to an optimal state by selection. Here we use ancestral protein reconstruction to trace the evolutionary history of ligand recognition in the steroid hormone receptors (SRs, a family of hormone-regulated animal transcription factors. We resurrected the deepest ancestral proteins in the SR family and characterized the structure-activity relationships by which they distinguished among ligands. We found that that the most ancient split in SR evolution involved a discrete switch from an ancient receptor for aromatized estrogens--including xenobiotics--to a derived receptor that recognized non-aromatized progestagens and corticosteroids. The family's history, viewed in relation to the evolution of their ligands, suggests that SRs evolved according to a principle of minimal specificity: at each point in time, receptors evolved ligand recognition criteria that were just specific enough to parse the set of endogenous substances to which they were exposed. By studying the atomic structures of resurrected SR proteins, we found that their promiscuity evolved because the ancestral binding cavity was larger than the primary ligand and contained excess hydrogen bonding capacity, allowing adventitious recognition of larger molecules with additional functional groups. Our findings provide an historical explanation for the sensitivity of modern SRs to natural and synthetic ligands--including endocrine-disrupting drugs and pollutants--and show that knowledge of history can contribute to ligand prediction. They suggest that SR promiscuity may reflect the limited power of

  16. Dopamine Receptor-Specific Contributions to the Computation of Value.

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    Burke, Christopher J; Soutschek, Alexander; Weber, Susanna; Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Fehr, Ernst; Haker, Helene; Tobler, Philippe N

    2017-12-18

    Dopamine is thought to play a crucial role in value-based decision making. However, the specific contributions of different dopamine receptor subtypes to the computation of subjective value remain unknown. Here we demonstrate how the balance between D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes shapes subjective value computation during risky decision making. We administered the D2 receptor antagonist amisulpride or placebo before participants made choices between risky options. Compared with placebo, D2 receptor blockade resulted in more frequent choice of higher risk and higher expected value options. Using a novel model fitting procedure, we concurrently estimated the three parameters that define individual risk attitude according to an influential theoretical account of risky decision making (prospect theory). This analysis revealed that the observed reduction in risk aversion under amisulpride was driven by increased sensitivity to reward magnitude and decreased distortion of outcome probability, resulting in more linear value coding. Our data suggest that different components that govern individual risk attitude are under dopaminergic control, such that D2 receptor blockade facilitates risk taking and expected value processing.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 31 January 2018; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.302.

  17. Manipulation of Very Few Receptor Discriminator Residues Greatly Enhances Receptor Specificity of Non-visual Arrestins*

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    Gimenez, Luis E.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Baameur, Faiza; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity of arrestins and the analysis of the evolution in the arrestin family, we introduced 10 mutations of “receptor discriminator” residues in arrestin-3. The recruitment of these mutants to M2 muscarinic (M2R), D1 (D1R) and D2 (D2R) dopamine, and β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) was assessed using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays in cells. Seven of 10 mutations differentially affected arrestin-3 binding to individual receptors. D260K and Q262P reduced the binding to β2AR, much more than to other receptors. The combination D260K/Q262P virtually eliminated β2AR binding while preserving the interactions with M2R, D1R, and D2R. Conversely, Y239T enhanced arrestin-3 binding to β2AR and reduced the binding to M2R, D1R, and D2R, whereas Q256Y selectively reduced recruitment to D2R. The Y239T/Q256Y combination virtually eliminated the binding to D2R and reduced the binding to β2AR and M2R, yielding a mutant with high selectivity for D1R. Eleven of 12 mutations significantly changed the binding to light-activated phosphorhodopsin. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface modifies receptor preference, enabling the construction of non-visual arrestins specific for particular receptor subtypes. These findings pave the way to the construction of signaling-biased arrestins targeting the receptor of choice for research or therapeutic purposes. PMID:22787152

  18. Manipulation of very few receptor discriminator residues greatly enhances receptor specificity of non-visual arrestins.

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    Gimenez, Luis E; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Baameur, Faiza; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2012-08-24

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity of arrestins and the analysis of the evolution in the arrestin family, we introduced 10 mutations of "receptor discriminator" residues in arrestin-3. The recruitment of these mutants to M2 muscarinic (M2R), D1 (D1R) and D2 (D2R) dopamine, and β(2)-adrenergic receptors (β(2)AR) was assessed using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays in cells. Seven of 10 mutations differentially affected arrestin-3 binding to individual receptors. D260K and Q262P reduced the binding to β(2)AR, much more than to other receptors. The combination D260K/Q262P virtually eliminated β(2)AR binding while preserving the interactions with M2R, D1R, and D2R. Conversely, Y239T enhanced arrestin-3 binding to β(2)AR and reduced the binding to M2R, D1R, and D2R, whereas Q256Y selectively reduced recruitment to D2R. The Y239T/Q256Y combination virtually eliminated the binding to D2R and reduced the binding to β(2)AR and M2R, yielding a mutant with high selectivity for D1R. Eleven of 12 mutations significantly changed the binding to light-activated phosphorhodopsin. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface modifies receptor preference, enabling the construction of non-visual arrestins specific for particular receptor subtypes. These findings pave the way to the construction of signaling-biased arrestins targeting the receptor of choice for research or therapeutic purposes.

  19. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-01-01

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  20. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

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    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  1. Ligand specificity of nuclear hormone receptors: sifting through promiscuity.

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    Noy, Noa

    2007-11-27

    The superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors includes transcription factors that play key roles in regulating multiple biological functions during embryonic development and in adult tissues, as well as in many disease states. The quintessential characteristic of nuclear receptors, and the basis for the name of the family, is that their transcriptional activities can be regulated by small molecules, usually comprised of hydrophobic compounds. However, the endogenous ligands for approximately half of the members of the nuclear receptor family are unknown, and these receptors are thus designated as "orphan receptors". One class of orphan receptors encompasses receptors that display a broad ligand selectivity; i.e., they can promiscuously bind to and may be activated by multiple ligands. This characteristic complicates the identification of physiologically meaningful ligands that activate these receptors in vivo. Here, we discuss a few examples of promiscuous receptors and outline strategies that may be employed in shedding light on the nature of bona fide ligands for such receptors.

  2. A Single-Amino-Acid Substitution at Position 225 in Hemagglutinin Alters the Transmissibility of Eurasian Avian-Like H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeng; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Tao, Shiyu; Liu, Liling; Kong, Huihui; Ma, Shujie; Meng, Fei; Suzuki, Yasuo; Qiao, Chuanling; Chen, Hualan

    2017-11-01

    increasing virus affinity for human-type receptors. In this study, we explored the genetic basis of the transmissibility difference between two Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EAH1N1) swine influenza viruses in guinea pigs and found that the amino acid glutamic acid at position 225 in the HA1 protein plays a critical role in the transmission of EAH1N1 virus by increasing the efficiency of viral assembly and budding. Copyright © 2017 Wang et al.

  3. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the α-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor

  4. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H. (Biopharmaceuticals Div., Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1990-08-14

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the {alpha}-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor.

  5. Identifying specificity groups in the T cell receptor repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, Jacob; Huang, Huang; Nau, Allison; Hatton, Olivia; Wagar, Lisa E; Rubelt, Florian; Ji, Xuhuai; Han, Arnold; Krams, Sheri M; Pettus, Christina; Haas, Nikhil; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam; Sette, Alessandro; Boyd, Scott D; Scriba, Thomas J; Martinez, Olivia M; Davis, Mark M

    2017-07-06

    T cell receptor (TCR) sequences are very diverse, with many more possible sequence combinations than T cells in any one individual. Here we define the minimal requirements for TCR antigen specificity, through an analysis of TCR sequences using a panel of peptide and major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-tetramer-sorted cells and structural data. From this analysis we developed an algorithm that we term GLIPH (grouping of lymphocyte interactions by paratope hotspots) to cluster TCRs with a high probability of sharing specificity owing to both conserved motifs and global similarity of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences. We show that GLIPH can reliably group TCRs of common specificity from different donors, and that conserved CDR3 motifs help to define the TCR clusters that are often contact points with the antigenic peptides. As an independent validation, we analysed 5,711 TCRβ chain sequences from reactive CD4 T cells from 22 individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We found 141 TCR specificity groups, including 16 distinct groups containing TCRs from multiple individuals. These TCR groups typically shared HLA alleles, allowing prediction of the likely HLA restriction, and a large number of M. tuberculosis T cell epitopes enabled us to identify pMHC ligands for all five of the groups tested. Mutagenesis and de novo TCR design confirmed that the GLIPH-identified motifs were critical and sufficient for shared-antigen recognition. Thus the GLIPH algorithm can analyse large numbers of TCR sequences and define TCR specificity groups shared by TCRs and individuals, which should greatly accelerate the analysis of T cell responses and expedite the identification of specific ligands.

  6. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  7. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  8. Novel Receptor Specificity of Avian Gammacoronaviruses That Cause Enteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.; Vries, R.P. de; Weerts, E.A.; Beurden, S.J. van; Peng, W.; McBride, R.; Ducatez, M.; Guy, J.; Brown, P.; Eterradossi, N.; Grone, A.; Paulson, J.C.; Verheije, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses exploit molecules on the target membrane as receptors for attachment and entry into host cells. Thus, receptor expression patterns can define viral tissue tropism and might to some extent predict the susceptibility of a host to a particular virus. Previously, others and we have shown that

  9. Novel Receptor Specificity of Avian Gammacoronaviruses That Cause Enteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I N; de Vries, R P; Weerts, E A W S; van Beurden, S J; Peng, W; McBride, R; Ducatez, M; Guy, J; Brown, P; Eterradossi, N; Gröne, A; Paulson, J C; Verheije, M H

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Viruses exploit molecules on the target membrane as receptors for attachment and entry into host cells. Thus, receptor expression patterns can define viral tissue tropism and might to some extent predict the susceptibility of a host to a particular virus. Previously, others and we have

  10. Radiometallated receptor-avid peptide conjugates for specific in vivo targeting of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, T.J.; Quinn, T.P.; Volkert, W.A. E-mail: VolkertW@health.missouri.edu

    2001-07-01

    New receptor-avid radiotracers are being developed for site-specific in vivo targeting of a myriad of receptors expressed on cancer cells. This review exemplifies strategies being used to design radiometallated peptide conjugates that maximize uptake in tumors and optimize their in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. Efforts to produce synthetic peptide analogues that target the following three receptor systems are highlighted: Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH), and guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) receptors.

  11. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    show for the first time in a broader general context that RSNOs are capable of modulating GPCR signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner. Given that the enzymatic machinery responsible for endogenous NO production is located in close proximity with the GPCR signaling complex, especially with that for several receptors whose signaling is shown here to be modulated by exogenous RSNOs, our data suggest that GPCR signaling in vivo is likely to be subject to substantial, and highly receptor-specific modulation by NO-derived RSNOs.

  12. Construction and comparison of different source neuraminidase candidate vaccine strains for human infection with Eurasian avian-like influenza H1N1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqi; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Jianfang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-12-01

    Human infections with Eurasian avian-like swine influenza H1N1 viruses have been reported in China in past years. One case resulted in death and others were mild case. In 2016, the World Health Organization recommended the use of A/Hunan/42443/2015(H1N1) virus to construct the first candidate vaccine strain for Eurasian avian-like swine influenza H1N1 viruses. Previous reports showed that the neuraminidase of A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1) might improve the viral yield of reassortant viruses. Therefore, we constructed two reassortant candidate vaccine viruses of A/Hunan/42443/2015(H1N1) by reverse genetic technology, with (6+2) and (7+1) gene constitution, respectively. The (6+2) virus had hemagglutinin and neuraminidase from A/Hunan/42443/2015, and the (7+1) one had hemagglutinin from A/Hunan/42443/2015, while all the other genes were from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Our data revealed that although the neuraminidase of the (7+1) virus was from high yield A/Puerto Rico/8/34, the hemagglutination titer and the hemagglutinin protein content of the (7+1) virus was not higher than that of the (6+2) virus. Both of the (7+1) and (6+2) viruses reached a similar level to that of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 at the usual harvest time in vitro. Therefore, both reassortant viruses are potential candidate vaccine viruses, which could contribute to pandemic preparedness. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Ligand-specific allosteric regulation of coactivator functions of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung Hee; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Welsbie, Derek; Chen, Charlie; Sawyers, Charles L.; Rose, David W.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The androgen receptor not only mediates prostate development but also serves as a key regulator of primary prostatic cancer growth. Although initially responsive to selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), which cause recruitment of the nuclear receptor–corepressor (N-CoR) complex, resistance invariably occurs, perhaps in response to inflammatory signals. Here we report that dismissal of nuclear receptor–corepressor complexes by specific signals or androgen receptor overexpression results in recruitment of many of the cohorts of coactivator complexes that permits SARMs and natural ligands to function as agonists. SARM-bound androgen receptors appear to exhibit failure to recruit specific components of the coactivators generally bound by liganded nuclear receptors, including cAMP response element-binding protein (CBP)/p300 or coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) to the SARM-bound androgen receptor, although still causing transcriptional activation of androgen receptor target genes. SARM-bound androgen receptors use distinct LXXLL (L, leucine; X, any amino acid) helices in the p160 nuclear receptor interaction domains that may impose selective allosteric effects, providing a component of the molecular basis of differential responses to different classes of ligands by androgen receptor. PMID:16492776

  14. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...

  15. Crystal structure of human interferon-gamma receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jiří; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 9 (2016), s. 1017-1025 ISSN 2059-7983 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20507S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : interferon-gamma receptor 2 * fibronectin type III domain * class 2 cytokine receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.114, year: 2016

  16. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs, which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.

  17. Pregnane X Receptor and Cancer: Context-Specificity is Key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayana R. Pondugula

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnane X receptor (PXR is an adopted orphan nuclear receptor that is activated by a wide-range of endobiotics and xenobiotics, including chemotherapy drugs. PXR plays a major role in the metabolism and clearance of xenobiotics and endobiotics in liver and intestine via induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug-transporting proteins. However, PXR is expressed in several cancer tissues and the accumulating evidence strongly points to the differential role of PXR in cancer growth and progression as well as in chemotherapy outcome. In cancer cells, besides regulating the gene expression of enzymes and proteins involved in drug metabolism and transport, PXR also regulates other genes involved in proliferation, metastasis, apoptosis, anti-apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the differential role of PXR in a variety of cancers, including prostate, breast, ovarian, endometrial, and colon. We also discuss the future directions to further understand the differential role of PXR in cancer, and conclude with the need to identify novel selective PXR modulators to target PXR in PXR-expressing cancers.

  18. Distinct phosphotyrosines on a growth factor receptor bind to specific molecules that mediate different signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantl, W J; Escobedo, J A; Martin, G A; Turck, C W; del Rosario, M; McCormick, F; Williams, L T

    1992-05-01

    The receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) binds two proteins containing SH2 domains, GTPase activating protein (GAP) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase). The sites on the receptor that mediate this interaction were identified by using phosphotyrosine-containing peptides representing receptor sequences to block specifically binding of either PI3-kinase or GAP. These results suggested that PI3-kinase binds two phosphotyrosine residues, each located in a 5 aa motif with an essential methionine at the fourth position C-terminal to the tyrosine. Point mutations at these sites caused a selective elimination of PI3-kinase binding and loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Mutation of the binding site for GAP prevented the receptor from associating with or phosphorylating GAP, but had no effect on PI3-kinase binding and little effect on DNA synthesis. Therefore, GAP and PI3-kinase interact with the receptor by binding to different phosphotyrosine-containing sequence motifs.

  19. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  20. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  1. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  2. Experimental transmission of avian-like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Lucy E; Jonczyk, Magdalena; Jervis, Carley M; Flack, Deborah J; Lyall, John; Foote, Alasdair; Mumford, Jennifer A; Brown, Ian H; Wood, James L; Elton, Debra M

    2011-09-01

    Infection of pigs with swine influenza has been studied experimentally and in the field; however, little information is available on the natural transmission of this virus in pigs. Two studies in an experimental transmission model are presented here, one in immunologically naïve and one in a combination of vaccinated and naïve pigs. To investigate the transmission of a recent 'avian-like' swine H1N1 influenza virus in naive piglets, to assess the antibody response to a commercially available vaccine and to determine the efficiency of transmission in pigs after vaccination. Transmission chains were initiated by intranasal challenge of two immunologically naïve pigs. Animals were monitored daily for clinical signs and virus shedding. Pairs of pigs were sequentially co-housed, and once virus was detected in recipients, prior donors were removed. In the vaccination study, piglets were vaccinated and circulating antibody levels were monitored by haemagglutination inhibition assay. To study transmission in vaccinates, a pair of infected immunologically naïve animals was co-housed with vaccinated recipient pigs and further pairs of vaccinates were added sequentially as above. The chain was completed by the addition of naive pigs. Transmission of the H1N1 virus was achieved through a chain of six pairs of naïve piglets and through four pairs of vaccinated animals. Transmission occurred with minimal clinical signs and, in vaccinates, at antibody levels higher than previously reported to protect against infection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  4. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  5. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) associates with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-1 (FGFR1). However, the biological significance of this interaction remains largely elusive. In this study, we show that NCAM induces a specific, FGFR1-mediated cellular response that is remarkably...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  6. The Natural Selection of Herpesviruses and Virus-Specific NK Cell Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Sun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During the co-evolution of cytomegalovirus (CMV and natural killer (NK cells, each has evolved specific tactics in an attempt to prevail. CMV has evolved multiple immune evasion mechanisms to avoid detection by NK cells and other immune cells, leading to chronic infection. Meanwhile, the host has evolved virus-specific receptors to counter these evasion strategies. The natural selection of viral genes and host receptors allows us to observe a unique molecular example of "survival of the fittest", as virus and immune cells try to out-maneuver one another or for the virus to achieve détente for optimal dissemination in the population.

  7. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Peng, Wenjie; Grant, Oliver C.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Xueyong; Bouwman, Kim M.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Woods, Robert J.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-06-15

    The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA) mutation (Q226L) that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal), as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  8. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P de Vries

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA mutation (Q226L that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal, as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2 and 1968 (H3N2 human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  9. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    , liver levels of GHR1 and GHR2 transcripts, and liver and muscle levels of IGF-I transcripts were unaffected by fasting. These results clearly indicate tissue specific expression and differential physiological regulation of GH family receptors in the tilapia.

  10. Cell type specificity of signaling: view from membrane receptors distribution and their downstream transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Yu, Zhonghao; Ge, Dongya; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Xie, Lu; Li, Yixue

    2012-09-01

    Studies on cell signaling pay more attention to spatial dynamics and how such diverse organization can relate to high order of cellular capabilities. To overview the specificity of cell signaling, we integrated human receptome data with proteome spatial expression profiles to systematically investigate the specificity of receptors and receptor-triggered transduction networks across 62 normal cell types and 14 cancer types. Six percent receptors showed cell-type-specific expression, and 4% signaling networks presented enriched cell-specific proteins induced by the receptors. We introduced a concept of "response context" to annotate the cell-type dependent signaling networks. We found that most cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, as the "response contexts" presented high functional similarity. Despite this, the subtle spatial diversity can be observed from the difference in network architectures. The architecture of the signaling networks in nerve cells displayed less completeness than that in glandular cells, which indicated cellular-context dependent signaling patterns are elaborately spatially organized. Likewise, in cancer cells most signaling networks were generally dysfunctional and less complete than that in normal cells. However, glioma emerged hyper-activated transduction mechanism in malignant state. Receptor ATP6AP2 and TNFRSF21 induced rennin-angiotensin and apoptosis signaling were found likely to explain the glioma-specific mechanism. This work represents an effort to decipher context-specific signaling network from spatial dimension. Our results indicated that although a majority of cells engage general signaling response with subtle differences, the spatial dynamics of cell signaling can not only deepen our insights into different signaling mechanisms, but also help understand cell signaling in disease.

  11. Analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor specific transcriptome: effect of receptor expression level and an activating mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Pedersen, Nina; Damstrup, Lars

    2005-01-01

    moderately expressed or overexpressed at an in-itself transforming level. These changes were compared to those induced by the naturally occurring constitutively active variant EGFRvIII. This study provides novel insight on the activities and mechanisms of EGFRvIII and EGFR mediated transformation, as genes...... by interferons. Expression of this module was absent in the EGFRvIII-expressing cell line and the parental cell line. Treatment with the specific EGFR inhibitor AG1478 indicated that the regulations were primary, receptor-mediated events. Furthermore, activation of this module correlated with activation of STAT1...

  12. Can Selective MHC Downregulation Explain the Specificity and Genetic Diversity of NK Cell Receptors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs), which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs lose inhibiting signals and the

  13. Tissue-specific Regulation of Porcine Prolactin Receptor Expression by Estrogen, Progesterone and Prolactin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) via both endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine pathways to regulate biological processes including reproduction and lactation. We analyzed the tissue and stage of gestation-specific regulation of PRL and PRLR expression in various tissues of pigs. ...

  14. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  15. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Garde, C.

    2016-01-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical...... strategy with the aim of altering this and construct data sets optimal for training of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions focusing on receptor similarity rather than ligand similarity. We show that this receptor clustering method consistently in benchmarks covering affinity predictions, MHC ligand....... Most often so-called ligand clustering methods have been used to deal with these issues in the context of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions, and the MHC system the approach has proven highly effective for extrapolating information from a limited set of receptors with well characterized binding...

  16. Alterations in hemagglutinin receptor-binding specificity accompany the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Alla; Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-05-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3'SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(c)) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3'SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(x)), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical "poultry-like" receptor, 3'SLN, is provided by substitutions in the receptor

  17. Alterations in Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Specificity Accompany the Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3′SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLec) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3′SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLex), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. IMPORTANCE Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical “poultry-like” receptor, 3′SLN, is provided by

  18. Specific regulation of thermosensitive lipid droplet fusion by a nuclear hormone receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwei; Li, Qi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shuang; Cui, Qingpo; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating fat metabolism and energy production in humans. The regulatory functions and endogenous ligands of many nuclear receptors are still unidentified, however. Here, we report that CYP-37A1 (ortholog of human cytochrome P450 CYP4V2), EMB-8 (ortholog of human P450 oxidoreductase POR), and DAF-12 (homolog of human nuclear receptors VDR/LXR) constitute a hormone synthesis and nuclear receptor pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans This pathway specifically regulates the thermosensitive fusion of fat-storing lipid droplets. CYP-37A1, together with EMB-8, synthesizes a lipophilic hormone not identical to Δ7-dafachronic acid, which represses the fusion-promoting function of DAF-12. CYP-37A1 also negatively regulates thermotolerance and lifespan at high temperature in a DAF-12-dependent manner. Human CYP4V2 can substitute for CYP-37A1 in C. elegans This finding suggests the existence of a conserved CYP4V2-POR-nuclear receptor pathway that functions in converting multilocular lipid droplets to unilocular ones in human cells; misregulation of this pathway may lead to pathogenic fat storage.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  20. Region-specific proteolysis differentially regulates type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Wagner, Larry E; Alzayady, Kamil J; Yule, David I

    2017-07-14

    The inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R) is an intracellular Ca 2+ release channel expressed predominately on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. IP 3 R1 can be cleaved by caspase or calpain into at least two receptor fragments. However, the functional consequences of receptor fragmentation are poorly understood. Our previous work has demonstrated that IP 3 R1 channels, formed following either enzymatic fragmentation or expression of the corresponding complementary polypeptide chains, retain tetrameric architecture and are still activated by IP 3 binding despite the loss of peptide continuity. In this study, we demonstrate that region-specific receptor fragmentation modifies channel regulation. Specifically, the agonist-evoked temporal Ca 2+ release profile and protein kinase A modulation of Ca 2+ release are markedly altered. Moreover, we also demonstrate that activation of fragmented IP 3 R1 can result in a distinct functional outcome. Our work suggests that proteolysis of IP 3 R1 may represent a novel form of modulation of IP 3 R1 channel function and increases the repertoire of Ca 2+ signals achievable through this channel. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Effect of NMDA, a Specific Agonist to NMDA Receptor Complex, on Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, V G; Yasnetsov, V V

    2015-10-01

    Removal of Mg2+ ions from perfusion medium provoked epileptiform activity in CA1 field of surviving rat hippocampal slices manifested in generation of extra population spikes. MK-801 (100 μM), a specific non-competitive antagonist to NMDA-receptor complex, prevented this effect. NMDA (20 μM), the specific agonist to this complex, produced no significant effect on the orthodromic population spikes, but when applied at concentrations of 30 or 40 μM, it inhibited them partially (by 21-28%) or almost completely (by 98-99%), correspondingly. Thus, depending on concentration, NMDA can inhibit the synaptic transmission in Schaffer collaterals-hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons axis without triggering the epileptiform activity. D-AP5 (50 μM), a competitive antagonist to NMDA-receptor complex, completely prevented the inhibitory effect of NMDA (40 μM). While MK-801 (100 μM) almost completely prevented the inhibitory effect of NMDA, it did not eliminate it when applied after the agonist. Thus, MK-801 can prevent the inhibitory action of NMDA on synaptic transmission in Schaffer collaterals-hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons axis via blocking the channel of NMDA-receptor complex, while NMDA exerts its effect only via activation of NMDA receptors.

  2. Development of a high specific activity radioligand, 125I-LSD, and its application to the study of serotonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    125 I-Labeled receptor ligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2000 Ci/mmol, making them nearly 70-fold more sensitive in receptor site assays than (mono) tritiated ligands. We have synthesized and characterized 125 I-lysergic acid diethylamide ( 125 I-LSD), the first radioiodinated ligand for serotonin receptor studies. The introduction of 125 I at the 2 position of LSD increased both the affinity and selectivity of this compound for serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in rat cortex. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD and its high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding make this ligand especially useful for autoradiographic studies of serotonin receptor distribution. We have found that 125 I-LSD binds with high affinity to a class of serotonin receptors in the CNS of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica

  3. Aldehyde Recognition and Discrimination by Mammalian Odorant Receptors via Functional Group-Specific Hydration Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    effect which should suppress gem-diol formation compared to octanal. Though methyl groups are the smallest electron-releasing groups we can use, they are...dipoles, and carbonyl-specific ORs unable to accommodate the two methyls of compound 3. The synthesis of compounds 2−4 is outlined in Scheme 2...Vogel, H., and Pick, H. (2011) The mouse eugenol odorant receptor: Structural and functional plasticity of a broadly tuned odorant binding pocket

  4. Lineage-Specific Loss of Function of Bitter Taste Receptor Genes in Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Yasuhiro; Satta, Yoko; Takenaka, Osamu; Takahata, Naoyuki

    2005-01-01

    Since the process of becoming dead genes or pseudogenes (pseudogenization) is irreversible and can occur rather rapidly under certain environmental circumstances, it is one plausible determinant for characterizing species specificity. To test this evolutionary hypothesis, we analyzed the tempo and mode of duplication and pseudogenization of bitter taste receptor (T2R) genes in humans as well as in 12 nonhuman primates. The results show that primates have accumulated more pseudogenes than mice...

  5. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schols, D.; Baba, M.; Pauwels, R.; Desmyter, J.; De Clercq, E.

    1989-01-01

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 μM in various T4 + cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment

  6. Neurotrophins and specific receptors in the oviduct tracts of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruccio, L; Castaldo, L; D'Angelo, L; Gatta, C; Lucini, C; Cotea, C; Solcan, C; Nechita, E L

    2016-09-01

    Neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF and NT-3) and their specific receptors (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC) were studied in the oviduct of egg laying quails. Neurotrophins (NTs) are mainly involved in the development and maintenance of neuronal populations in the central and peripheral nervous system, but also in reproductive system. In this survey, we first studied the morphological organization of the quail oviduct, distinguished in infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, uterus and vagina, and then we analyzed the expression and localization of NTs and Trks receptors in the whole tracts. By western blotting we detected that the investigated NTs and Trks receptors are expressed in all oviductal tracts. By immunohistochemistry we were able to define the distribution of NTs and Trks. Specifically, NGF, BDNF and NT3 were localized in lining and ductal epithelial cells, and NGF was also detected in secretory cells of tubular glands and in nervous fibers of vessel wall. TrkA and TrkB were present in the lining and ductal epithelium; TrkA and TrkC were present in nervous fibers of vessel wall in all oviductal tracts. Furthermore, we also observed NGF and BDNF co-localized with TrkA and TrkB in cells of the lining and ductal epithelium, suggesting an autocrine mechanism of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A Matter of Taste: Lineage-Specific Loss of Function of Taste Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antinucci

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates can perceive at least five different taste qualities, each of which is thought to have a specific role in the evolution of different species. The avoidance of potentially poisonous foods, which are generally bitter or sour tasting, and the search for more nutritious ones, those with high-fat and high-sugar content, are two of the most well-known examples. The study of taste genes encoding receptors that recognize ligands triggering taste sensations has helped to reconstruct several evolutionary adaptations to dietary changes. In addition, an increasing number of studies have focused on pseudogenes, genomic DNA sequences that have traditionally been considered defunct relatives of functional genes mostly because of the presence of deleterious mutations interrupting their open reading frames. The study of taste receptor pseudogenes has helped to shed light on how the evolutionary history of taste in vertebrates has been the result of a succession of gene gain and loss processes. This dynamic role in evolution has been explained by the “less-is-more” hypothesis, suggesting gene loss as a mechanism of evolutionary change in response to a dietary shift. This mini-review aims at depicting the major lineage-specific loss of function of taste receptor genes in vertebrates, stressing their evolutionary importance and recapitulating signatures of natural selection and their correlations with food habits.

  8. Morphological Specifications of the Bird Schistosome Cercariae and Surface Carbohydrates as Receptors for Lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Moebedi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the morphological specifications of the bird schistosomes cercaria from Lymnaea gedrosiana and to detect the surface carbohydrates as receptors for host lectins in the host-parasite relationship systems such as avian schistosomiasis and human cercarial dermatitis. Methods: One hundred ninety two snails collected from Dezful areas in Khuzestan Province, in the south west of Iran, during 2005-2006 were examined for cercariae using shedding and crushing methods. In addition, surface carbohydrates on the cercariae were detected by lentil (Lens culinaris lectins. Results: From the total number of Lymnaea gedrosiana, which examined for bird schistosomes cercaria, 9(4% snails were found to be infected with furcocercus cercaria of the bird schistosomes (probably Gigantobilharzia sp.. Mannose monosaccharide CH2OH (CHOH4CHO as surface carbohydrate was also detected on the cercariae. Conclusion: Mannose carbohydrate on these cercariae may be used as receptor by lectins.

  9. The beta-glucan receptor dectin-1 recognizes specific morphologies of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Steele

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages represent a first-line innate host defense mechanism for clearing inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus from the lungs, yet contradictory data exist as to which alveolar macrophage recognition receptor is critical for innate immunity to A. fumigatus. Acknowledging that the A. fumigatus cell wall contains a high beta-1,3-glucan content, we questioned whether the beta-glucan receptor dectin-1 played a role in this recognition process. Monoclonal antibody, soluble receptor, and competitive carbohydrate blockage indicated that the alveolar macrophage inflammatory response, specifically the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, CXCL2/macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2, CCL3/macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, and granulocyte monocyte-CSF (GM-CSF, to live A. fumigatus was dependent on recognition via the beta-glucan receptor dectin-1. The inflammatory response was triggered at the highest level by A. fumigatus swollen conidia and early germlings and correlated to the levels of surface-exposed beta glucans, indicating that dectin-1 preferentially recognizes specific morphological forms of A. fumigatus. Intratracheal administration of A. fumigatus conidia to mice in the presence of a soluble dectin-Fc fusion protein reduced both lung proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and cellular recruitment while modestly increasing the A. fumigatus fungal burden, illustrating the importance of beta-glucan-initiated dectin-1 signaling in defense against this pathogen. Collectively, these data show that dectin-1 is centrally required for the generation of alveolar macrophage proinflammatory responses to A. fumigatus and to our knowledge provides the first in vivo evidence for the role of dectin-1 in fungal innate defense.

  10. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Cynthia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC, female breast carcinoma (FBC, and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%, focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%, and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82. Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions.

  11. Subtype-specific mechanisms for functional interaction between α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limapichat, Walrati; Dougherty, Dennis A; Lester, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    P2X receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) display functional and physical interactions in many cell types and heterologous expression systems, but interactions between α6β4-containing (α6β4*) nAChRs and P2X2 receptors and/or P2X3 receptors have not been fully characterized. We measured several types of crosstalk in oocytes coexpressing α6β4 nAChRs and P2X2, P2X3, or P2X2/3 receptors. A novel form of crosstalk occurs between α6β4 nAChRs and P2X2 receptors. P2X2 receptors were forced into a prolonged desensitized state upon activation by ATP through a mechanism that does not depend on the intracellular C terminus of the P2X2 receptors. Coexpression of α6β4 nAChRs with P2X3 receptors shifts the ATP dose-response relation to the right, even in the absence of acetylcholine (ACh). Moreover, currents become nonadditive when ACh and ATP are coapplied, as previously reported for other Cys-loop receptors interacting with P2X receptors, and this crosstalk is dependent on the presence of the P2X3 C-terminal domain. P2X2 receptors also functionally interact with α6β4β3 but through a different mechanism from α6β4. The interaction with P2X3 receptors is less pronounced for the α6β4β3 nAChR than the α6β4 nAChR. We also measured a functional interaction between the α6β4 nAChRs and the heteromeric P2X2/3 receptor. Experiments with the nAChR channel blocker mecamylamine on P2X2-α6β4 oocytes point to the loss of P2X2 channel activity during the crosstalk, whereas the ion channel pores of the P2X receptors were fully functional and unaltered by the receptor interaction for P2X2-α6β4β3, P2X2/3-α6β4, and P2X2/3-α6β4β3. These results may be relevant to dorsal root ganglion cells and to other neurons that coexpress these receptor subunits. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Characterization of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas using novel prolactin receptor isoform specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Christopher D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone responsible for proliferation and differentiation of the mammary gland. More recently, prolactin's role in mammary carcinogenesis has been studied with greater interest. Studies from our laboratory and from others have demonstrated that three specific isoforms of the prolactin receptor (PRLR are expressed in both normal and cancerous breast cells and tissues. Until now, reliable isoform specific antibodies have been lacking. We have prepared and characterized polyclonal antibodies against each of the human PRLR isoforms that can effectively be used to characterize human breast cancers. Methods Rabbits were immunized with synthetic peptides of isoform unique regions and immune sera affinity purified prior to validation by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Sections of ductal and lobular carcinomas were stained with each affinity purified isoform specific antibody to determine expression patterns in breast cancer subclasses. Results We show that the rabbit antibodies have high titer and could specifically recognize each isoform of PRLR. Differences in PRLR isoform expression levels were observed and quantified using histosections from xenografts of established human breast cancer cells lines, and ductal and lobular carcinoma human biopsy specimens. In addition, these results were verified by real-time PCR with isoform specific primers. While nearly all tumors contained LF and SF1b, the majority (76% of ductal carcinoma biopsies expressed SF1a while the majority of lobular carcinomas lacked SF1a staining (72% and 27% had only low levels of expression. Conclusions Differences in the receptor isoform expression profiles may be critical to understanding the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis. Since these antibodies are specifically directed against each PRLR isoform, they are valuable tools for the evaluation of breast cancer PRLR content and have potential clinical importance in

  13. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  14. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  15. Structural analysis of the evolution of steroid specificity in the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollikainen Noah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor (GR and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR evolved from a common ancestor. Still not completely understood is how specificity for glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol and mineralocorticoids (e.g. aldosterone evolved in these receptors. Results Our analysis of several vertebrate GRs and MRs in the context of 3D structures of human GR and MR indicates that with the exception of skate GR, a cartilaginous fish, there is a deletion in all GRs, at the position corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. This deletion occurs in a loop before helix 12, which contains the activation function 2 (AF2 domain, which binds coactivator proteins and influences transcriptional activity of steroids. Unexpectedly, we find that His-950 in human MR, which is conserved in the MR in chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque, is glutamine in all teleost and land vertebrate MRs, including New World monkeys and prosimians. Conclusion Evolution of differences in the responses of the GR and MR to corticosteroids involved deletion in the GR of a residue corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. A mutation corresponding to His-950 in human MR may have been important in physiological changes associated with emergence of Old World monkeys from prosimians.

  16. Use of an α3-β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit concatamer to characterize ganglionic receptor subtypes with specific subunit composition reveals species-specific pharmacologic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug development for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) is challenged by subtype diversity arising from variations in subunit composition. On-target activity for neuronal heteromeric receptors is typically associated with CNS receptors that contain α4 and other subunits, while off-target activity could be associated with ganglionic-type receptors containing α3β4 binding sites and other subunits, including β4, β2, α5, or α3 as a structural subunit in the pentamer. Additional interest in α3 β4 α5-containing receptors arises from genome-wide association studies linking these genes, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in α5 in particular, to lung cancer and heavy smoking. While α3 and β4 readily form receptors in expression system such as the Xenopus oocyte, since α5 is not required for function, simple co-expression approaches may under-represent α5-containing receptors. We used a concatamer of human α3 and β4 subunits to form ligand-binding domains, and show that we can force the insertions of alternative structural subunits into the functional pentamers. These α3β4 variants differ in sensitivity to ACh, nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine. Our data indicated lower efficacy for varenicline and cytisine than expected for β4-containing receptors, based on previous studies of rodent receptors. We confirm that these therapeutically important α4 receptor partial agonists may present different autonomic-based side-effect profiles in humans than will be seen in rodent models, with varenicline being more potent for human than rat receptors and cytisine less potent. Our initial characterizations failed to find functional effects of the α5 SNP. However, our data validate this approach for further investigations. PMID:22580377

  17. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  18. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokoch, Michael P; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup

    2010-01-01

    extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known...... about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the beta(2) adrenergic...

  19. Parathyroid-specific interaction of the calcium-sensing receptor and Gaq

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Min; Chen, Ling; Huang, MinZhao; Luo, Qiang; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2008-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor regulates various parathyroid gland functions, including hormone secretion, gene transcription, and chief cell hyperplasia through Gαq- and Gαi-dependent signaling pathways. To determine the specific function of Gαq in these processes, we generated transgenic mice using the human parathyroid hormone promoter to drive overexpression of a dominant negative Gαqloop minigene to selectively disrupt Gαq function in the parathyroid gland. The Gαqloop mRNA was highly expr...

  20. How an alloreactive T-cell receptor achieves peptide and MHC specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Singh, Nishant K; Spear, Timothy T; Hellman, Lance M; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; McMahan, Rachel H; Rosen, Hugo R; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Nishimura, Michael I; Baker, Brian M

    2017-06-13

    T-cell receptor (TCR) allorecognition is often presumed to be relatively nonspecific, attributable to either a TCR focus on exposed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms or the degenerate recognition of allopeptides. However, paradoxically, alloreactivity can proceed with high peptide and MHC specificity. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, the existence of highly specific alloreactive TCRs has led to their use as immunotherapeutics that can circumvent central tolerance and limit graft-versus-host disease. Here, we show how an alloreactive TCR achieves peptide and MHC specificity. The HCV1406 TCR was cloned from T cells that expanded when a hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected HLA-A2 - individual received an HLA-A2 + liver allograft. HCV1406 was subsequently shown to recognize the HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3):1406-1415 epitope with high specificity when presented by HLA-A2. We show that NS3/HLA-A2 recognition by the HCV1406 TCR is critically dependent on features unique to both the allo-MHC and the NS3 epitope. We also find cooperativity between structural mimicry and a crucial peptide "hot spot" and demonstrate its role, along with the MHC, in directing the specificity of allorecognition. Our results help explain the paradox of specificity in alloreactive TCRs and have implications for their use in immunotherapy and related efforts to manipulate TCR recognition, as well as alloreactivity in general.

  1. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E

    2014-01-01

    of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations(n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. RESULTS: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR...

  2. Differential regulation of the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor through site-specific phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Raj Kumar1, William J Calhoun21Division of Gastroenterology; 2Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, Immunology, Critical Care, and Sleep (APICS, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation are known to play an important role in the gene regulation by the transcription factors including the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of which the glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a member. Protein phosphorylation often switches cellular activity from one state to another. Like many other transcription factors, the GR is a phosphoprotein, and phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of GR activity. Cell signaling pathways that regulate phosphorylation of the GR and its associated proteins are important determinants of GR function under various physiological conditions. While the role of many phosphorylation sites in the GR is still not fully understood, the role of others is clearer. Several aspects of transcription factor function, including DNA binding affinity, interaction of transactivation domains with the transcription initiation complex, and shuttling between the cytoplasmic compartments, have all been linked to site-specific phosphorylation. All major phosphorylation sites in the human GR are located in the N-terminal domain including the major transactivation domain, AF1. Available literature clearly indicates that many of these potential phosphorylation sites are substrates for multiple kinases, suggesting the potential for a very complex regulatory network. Phosphorylated GR interacts favorably with critical coregulatory proteins and subsequently enhances transcriptional activity. In addition, the activities and specificities of coregulators may be subject to similar regulation by phosphorylation. Regulation of the GR activity due to phosphorylation appears to be site-specific and dependent upon specific cell signaling cascade

  3. Charomers-Interleukin-6 Receptor Specific Aptamers for Cellular Internalization and Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ulrich

    2017-12-06

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key player in inflammation and the main factor for the induction of acute phase protein biosynthesis. Further to its central role in many aspects of the immune system, IL-6 regulates a variety of homeostatic processes. To interfere with IL-6 dependent diseases, such as various autoimmune diseases or certain cancers like multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic inflammation, it might be a sensible strategy to target human IL-6 receptor (hIL-6R) presenting cells with aptamers. We therefore have selected and characterized different DNA and RNA aptamers specifically binding IL-6R. These IL-6R aptamers, however, do not interfere with the IL-6 signaling pathway but are internalized with the receptor and thus can serve as vehicles for the delivery of different cargo molecules like therapeutics. We succeeded in the construction of a chlorin e6 derivatized aptamer to be delivered for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT). Furthermore, we were able to synthesize an aptamer intrinsically comprising the cytostatic 5-Fluoro-2'-deoxy-uridine for targeted chemotherapy. The α6β4 integrin specific DNA aptamer IDA, also selected in our laboratory is internalized, too. All these aptamers can serve as vehicles for targeted drug delivery into cells. We call them charomers-in memory of Charon, the ferryman in Greek mythology, who ferried the deceased into the underworld.

  4. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors gate rapid orientation-specific reduction in visual discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario; Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α(1)-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α(1)-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α(1)-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α(1)-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior.

  5. Charomers—Interleukin-6 Receptor Specific Aptamers for Cellular Internalization and Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Hahn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a key player in inflammation and the main factor for the induction of acute phase protein biosynthesis. Further to its central role in many aspects of the immune system, IL-6 regulates a variety of homeostatic processes. To interfere with IL-6 dependent diseases, such as various autoimmune diseases or certain cancers like multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic inflammation, it might be a sensible strategy to target human IL-6 receptor (hIL-6R presenting cells with aptamers. We therefore have selected and characterized different DNA and RNA aptamers specifically binding IL-6R. These IL-6R aptamers, however, do not interfere with the IL-6 signaling pathway but are internalized with the receptor and thus can serve as vehicles for the delivery of different cargo molecules like therapeutics. We succeeded in the construction of a chlorin e6 derivatized aptamer to be delivered for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT. Furthermore, we were able to synthesize an aptamer intrinsically comprising the cytostatic 5-Fluoro-2′-deoxy-uridine for targeted chemotherapy. The α6β4 integrin specific DNA aptamer IDA, also selected in our laboratory is internalized, too. All these aptamers can serve as vehicles for targeted drug delivery into cells. We call them charomers—in memory of Charon, the ferryman in Greek mythology, who ferried the deceased into the underworld.

  6. DMPD: CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities and functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8485905 CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities...) (.html) (.csml) Show CR3 (CD11b, CD18): a phagocyte and NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities...d NK cell membrane receptor with multipleligand specificities and functions. Authors Ross GD, Vetvicka V. Pu

  7. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  8. HIV-specific Immunity Derived From Chimeric Antigen Receptor-engineered Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Kamata, Masakazu; Rezek, Valerie; Rick, Jonathan; Levin, Bernard; Kasparian, Saro; Chen, Irvin Sy; Yang, Otto O; Zack, Jerome A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2015-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is critical in controlling HIV infection. Since the immune response does not eliminate HIV, it would be beneficial to develop ways to enhance the HIV-specific CTL response to allow long-term viral suppression or clearance. Here, we report the use of a protective chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in a hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approach to engineer HIV immunity. We determined that CAR-modified HSPCs differentiate into functional T cells as well as natural killer (NK) cells in vivo in humanized mice and these cells are resistant to HIV infection and suppress HIV replication. These results strongly suggest that stem cell-based gene therapy with a CAR may be feasible and effective in treating chronic HIV infection and other morbidities.

  9. Can Selective MHC Downregulation Explain the Specificity and Genetic Diversity of NK Cell Receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs), which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs lose inhibiting signals and the infected cells become target for NK cell activation (missing-self detection). Although the detection of MHC-I deficient cells can be achieved by conserved receptor-ligand interactions, several iNKRs are encoded by gene families with a remarkable genetic diversity, containing many haplotypes varying in gene content and allelic polymorphism. So far, the biological function of this expansion within the NKR cluster has remained poorly understood. Here, we investigate whether the evolution of diverse iNKRs genes can be driven by a specific viral immunoevasive mechanism: selective MHC downregulation. Several viruses, including EBV, CMV, and HIV, decrease the expression of MHC-I to escape from T cell responses. This downregulation does not always affect all MHC loci in the same way, as viruses target particular MHC molecules. To study the selection pressure of selective MHC downregulation on iNKRs, we have developed an agent-based model simulating an evolutionary scenario of hosts infected with herpes-like viruses, which are able to selectively downregulate the expression of MHC-I molecules on the cell surface. We show that iNKRs evolve specificity and, depending on the similarity of MHC alleles within each locus and the differences between the loci, they can specialize to a particular MHC-I locus. The easier it is to classify an MHC allele to its locus, the lower the required diversity of the NKRs. Thus, the diversification of the iNKR cluster depends on the locus specific MHC structure. PMID:26136746

  10. Cell-specific integration of nuclear receptor function at the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Logan J; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) encompass a family of regulatory proteins that directly couple small-molecule signaling to transcriptional regulation. Initial studies of specific NR targets led to a model in which NRs bind highly specific DNA motifs in proximal promoter regions and strongly induce gene transcription in response to ligand binding. More recently, genome-wide studies have added to the complexity of this classic model of NR function. In particular, binding of NRs at weaker or alternate motifs is common in the context of DNA assembled into chromatin, and ligand responsiveness varies at different NR target genes. Such findings have led to proposed modifications to the classic view of NR regulation, including the 'assisted loading' model in which NRs assist in opening chromatin rather than compete for binding sites, and context-specific models in which genomic and epigenomic features influence the NR function locally at each binding site. Further elucidation of these mechanisms will be particularly important for understanding cell-specific and ligand-specific functions of each NR. Emerging genomic technologies such as ChIP-seq and GRO-seq provide insights on a larger scale leading to deeper understanding of the complexities of transcriptional regulation by NRs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  12. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition.To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter-based imaging.These results support the

  13. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  14. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2018-01-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024–21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. PMID:25078114

  15. DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in the promoter region regulates the transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrat Mamrut

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a peptide hormone, well known for its role in labor and suckling, and most recently for its involvement in mammalian social behavior. All central and peripheral actions of oxytocin are mediated through the oxytocin receptor, which is the product of a single gene. Transcription of the oxytocin receptor is subject to regulation by gonadal steroid hormones, and is profoundly elevated in the uterus and mammary glands during parturition. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene transcription, and has been linked to reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesized that transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor is regulated by DNA methylation of specific sites in its promoter, in a tissue-specific manner. Hypothalamus-derived GT1-7, and mammary-derived 4T1 murine cell lines displayed negative correlations between oxytocin receptor transcription and methylation of the gene promoter, and demethylation caused a significant enhancement of oxytocin receptor transcription in 4T1 cells. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that methylation of specific sites in the gene promoter, including an estrogen response element, significantly inhibits transcription. Furthermore, methylation of the oxytocin receptor promoter was found to be differentially correlated with oxytocin receptor expression in mammary glands and the uterus of virgin and post-partum mice, suggesting that it plays a distinct role in oxytocin receptor transcription among tissues and under different physiological conditions. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the expression of the mouse oxytocin receptor gene is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter.

  16. Determinants of glycan receptor specificity of H2N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Viswanathan

    Full Text Available The H2N2 subtype of influenza A virus was responsible for the Asian pandemic of 1957-58. However, unlike other subtypes that have caused pandemics such as H1N1 and H3N2, which continue to circulate among humans, H2N2 stopped circulating in the human population in 1968. Strains of H2 subtype still continue to circulate in birds and occasionally pigs and could be reintroduced into the human population through antigenic drift or shift. Such an event is a potential global health concern because of the waning population immunity to H2 hemagglutinin (HA. The first step in such a cross-species transmission and human adaptation of influenza A virus is the ability for its surface glycoprotein HA to bind to glycan receptors expressed in the human upper respiratory epithelia. Recent structural and biochemical studies have focused on understanding the glycan receptor binding specificity of the 1957-58 pandemic H2N2 HA. However, there has been considerable HA sequence divergence in the recent avian-adapted H2 strains from the pandemic H2N2 strain. Using a combination of structural modeling, quantitative glycan binding and human respiratory tissue binding methods, we systematically identify mutations in the HA from a recent avian-adapted H2N2 strain (A/Chicken/PA/2004 that make its quantitative glycan receptor binding affinity (defined using an apparent binding constant comparable to that of a prototypic pandemic H2N2 (A/Albany/6/58 HA.

  17. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A single glycine-alanine exchange directs ligand specificity of the elephant progestin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    Full Text Available The primary gestagen of elephants is 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP, which is unlike all other mammals studied until now. The level of DHP in elephants equals that of progesterone in other mammals, and elephants are able to bind DHP with similar affinity to progesterone indicating a unique ligand-binding specificity of the elephant progestin receptor (PR. Using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with in vitro binding studies we here report that this change in specificity is due to a single glycine to alanine exchange at position 722 (G722A of PR, which specifically increases DHP affinity while not affecting binding of progesterone. By conducting molecular dynamics simulations comparing human and elephant PR ligand-binding domains (LBD, we observed that the alanine methyl group at position 722 is able to push the DHP A-ring into a position similar to progesterone. In the human PR, the DHP A-ring position is twisted towards helix 3 of PR thereby disturbing the hydrogen bond pattern around the C3-keto group, resulting in a lower binding affinity. Furthermore, we observed that the elephant PR ligand-binding pocket is more rigid than the human analogue, which probably explains the higher affinity towards both progesterone and DHP. Interestingly, the G722A substitution is not elephant-specific, rather it is also present in five independent lineages of mammalian evolution, suggesting a special role of the substitution for the development of distinct mammalian gestagen systems.

  19. Distinct, genome-wide, gene-specific selectivity patterns of four glucocorticoid receptor coregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Ou, Chen-Yin; Chodankar, Rajas; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Stallcup, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones that bind to and activate the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which then positively or negatively regulates transcription of many genes that govern multiple important physiological pathways such as inflammation and metabolism of glucose, fat and bone. The remodeling of chromatin and regulated assembly or disassembly of active transcription complexes by GR and other DNA-binding transcription factors is mediated and modulated by several hundred transcriptional coregulator proteins. Previous studies focusing on single coregulators demonstrated that each coregulator is required for regulation of only a subset of all the genes regulated by a steroid hormone. We hypothesized that the gene-specific patterns of coregulators may correspond to specific physiological pathways such that different coregulators modulate the pathway-specificity of hormone action, thereby providing a mechanism for fine tuning of the hormone response. We tested this by direct comparison of multiple coregulators, using siRNA to deplete the products of four steroid hormone receptor coregulator genes (CCAR1, CCAR2, CALCOCO1 and ZNF282). Global analysis of glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression after siRNA mediated depletion of coregulators confirmed that each coregulator acted in a selective and gene-specific manner and demonstrated both positive and negative effects on glucocorticoid-regulated expression of different genes. We identified several classes of hormone-regulated genes based on the effects of coregulator depletion. Each coregulator supported hormonal regulation of some genes and opposed hormonal regulation of other genes (coregulator-modulated genes), blocked hormonal regulation of a second class of genes (coregulator-blocked genes), and had no effect on hormonal regulation of a third gene class (coregulator-independent genes). In spite of previously demonstrated physical and functional interactions among these four coregulators, the majority

  20. Activation of spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors specifically suppresses pain hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Chang-Yue; Wang, Yan-Chao; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-04-09

    This study aims to identify the inhibitory role of the spinal glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling in pain hypersensitivity and its mechanism of action in rats and mice. First, GLP-1Rs were identified to be specifically expressed on microglial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, and profoundly upregulated after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, intrathecal GLP-1R agonists GLP-1(7-36) and exenatide potently alleviated formalin-, peripheral nerve injury-, bone cancer-, and diabetes-induced hypersensitivity states by 60-90%, without affecting acute nociceptive responses. The antihypersensitive effects of exenatide and GLP-1 were completely prevented by GLP-1R antagonism and GLP-1R gene knockdown. Furthermore, exenatide evoked β-endorphin release from both the spinal cord and cultured microglia. Exenatide antiallodynia was completely prevented by the microglial inhibitor minocycline, β-endorphin antiserum, and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results illustrate a novel spinal dorsal horn microglial GLP-1R/β-endorphin inhibitory pathway in a variety of pain hypersensitivity states.

  1. Sex-Specific Neurodevelopmental Programming by Placental Insulin Receptors on Stress Reactivity and Sensorimotor Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Stefanie L; Chan, Jennifer C; Bale, Tracy L

    2017-07-15

    Diabetes, obesity, and overweight are prevalent pregnancy complications that predispose offspring to neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia. Although male individuals are three to four times more likely than female individuals to develop these disorders, the mechanisms driving the sex specificity of disease vulnerability remain unclear. Because defective placental insulin receptor (InsR) signaling is a hallmark of pregnancy metabolic dysfunction, we hypothesized that it may be an important contributor and novel mechanistic link to sex-specific neurodevelopmental changes underlying disease risk. We used Cre/loxP transgenic mice to conditionally target InsRs in fetally derived placental trophoblasts. Adult offspring were evaluated for effects of placental trophoblast-specific InsR deficiency on stress sensitivity, cognitive function, sensorimotor gating, and prefrontal cortical transcriptional reprogramming. To evaluate molecular mechanisms driving sex-specific outcomes, we assessed genome-wide expression profiles in the placenta and fetal brain. Male, but not female, mice with placental trophoblast-specific InsR deficiency showed a significantly increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress response and impaired sensorimotor gating, phenotypic effects that were associated with dysregulated nucleotide metabolic processes in the male prefrontal cortex. Within the placenta, InsR deficiency elicited changes in gene expression, predominantly in male mice, reflecting potential shifts in vasculature, amino acid transport, serotonin homeostasis, and mitochondrial function. These placental disruptions were associated with altered gene expression profiles in the male fetal brain and suggested delayed cortical development. Together, these data demonstrate the novel role of placental InsRs in sex-specific neurodevelopment and reveal a potential mechanism for neurodevelopmental disorder risk in

  2. Influence of specific and non-specific endothelin receptor antagonists on renal morphology in rats with surgical renal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, A; Amann, K; Wagner, J; Gehlen, F; Münter, K; Ritz, E

    1996-03-01

    Studies in experimental models of chronic renal failure suggest an important role for the endothelin system in the development of renal scarring. Endothelin receptor (ETR) anatagonists interfere with progression, but it has not been resolved (i) whether this is true for all models of renal damage, (ii) to what extent the effect is modulated by systemic blood pressure and (iii) whether the effect is similar for ETAR and ETA/ETBR antagonists. 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) by surgical ablation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparison of ACE inhibitor Trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day), ETAR antagonist BMS 182874 (30 mg/kg/day) and ETAR/ETBR antagonist Ro 46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) by gavage. Duration of the experiment eight weeks. Systolic blood pressure by tail plethysmography. Perfusion fixation of kidneys and morphometric analysis ET-1 and ETA/ETBR by quantitative PCR. SNX caused a significant (P < 0.01) increase of systolic blood pressure (170 +/- 8.6 mmHg) compared to sham operated controls (131 +/- 5.3 mmHg). Blood pressure was significantly (P < 0.001) lower with Trandolapril (128 +/- 5.3 mmHg), but not with BMS 182874 (153 +/- 5.9 mmHg) or Ro 46-2005 (167 +/- 7.6 mmHg). Compared to sham operated rats (0.03 +/- 0.01) glomerulosclerosis index (GSI) was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the untreated SNX group (0.9 +/- 0.15). Significantly lower GSI was found in Trandolapril treated (0.29 +/- 0.04), BMS 182874 treated (0.36 +/- 0.05), and Ro 46-2005 treated animals (0.45 +/- 0.11). The effect of BMS 182874 was accompanied by lower tubulointerstitial damage index. Mean glomerular volume was dramatically increased (P < 0.001) in SNX rats as compared to sham operated animals. This glomerular enlargement was partially prevented by Trandolapril (P < 0.05), but not by either ETR antagonist. ET-1 mRNA tended to be higher in SNX irrespective of treatment, while ETAR and ETBR mRNA were significantly lower. Both specific (ETAR) and non-specific (ETA/ETBR) endothelin antagonists

  3. Isolation and characterization of a specific receptor for human albumin on a group L Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmler, C

    1988-08-01

    Certain group L streptococci demonstrate surface receptors for human albumin. Binding of 125I-albumin to group L streptococci could be inhibited by unlabelled albumin preparations from humans, dogs, mice and bovines, but not by albumin from rabbits. The albumin-binding proteins (ABP) could be solubilized from the streptococcal surface by hot acid treatment of the bacteria and isolated by affinity chromatography on human-albumin sepharose. ABP and specific antisera produced against ABP inhibited 125I-albumin binding to group L streptococci. The molecular weight of ABP determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, was approximately 48,000 Dalton. ABP preparations of group G streptococci isolated from bovines and humans demonstrated cross reactivity with antiserum produced against group L streptococcal ABP.

  4. Muscle-Specific Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (MuSK) Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rebecca L; Gooch, Clifton L

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is the prototypic, antibody-mediated neuromuscular disease and is characterized by a decrease in the number of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) within the muscle end plate zone of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although the pathophysiology of AChR-mediated myasthenia gravis has been extensively studied over the last 40 years since its original description by Patrick and Lindstrom (Science 180:871-872, 1973), less is known about the much more recently described muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) antibody-mediated MG. MuSK-MG has features clinically distinct from Ach-R MG, as well as a different pattern of response to treatment and a unique immunopathogenesis.

  5. Receptor activity-independent recruitment of βarrestin2 reveals specific signalling modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrillon, Sonia; Bouvier, Michel

    2004-01-01

    The roles of βarrestins in regulating G protein coupling and receptor endocytosis following agonist stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors are well characterised. However, their ability to act on their own as direct modulators or activators of signalling remains poorly characterised. Here, βarrestin2 intrinsic signalling properties were assessed by forcing the recruitment of this accessory protein to vasopressin V1a or V2 receptors independently of agonist-promoted activation of the receptors. Such induction of a stable interaction with βarrestin2 initiated receptor endocytosis leading to intracellular accumulation of the βarrestin/receptor complexes. Interestingly, βarrestin2 association to a single receptor protomer was sufficient to elicit receptor dimer internalisation. In addition to recapitulating βarrestin2 classical actions on receptor trafficking, the receptor activity-independent recruitment of βarrestin2 activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In the latter case, recruitment to the receptor itself was not required since kinase activation could be mediated by βarrestin2 translocation to the plasma membrane in the absence of any interacting receptor. These data demonstrate that βarrestin2 can act as a ‘bonafide' signalling molecule even in the absence of activated receptor. PMID:15385966

  6. Expression analysis and specific blockade of the receptor for human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) by novel antibodies to the human TSLPRα receptor chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Andreas; Vetter, Tina; Kuepper, Michael; Wohlmann, Andreas; Krause, Sebastian; Lorenzen, Thomas; Virchow, Johann Christian; Luttmann, Werner; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2013-02-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an interleukin-7 (IL-7)-like cytokine with a pivotal role in development and maintenance of atopic diseases such as allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. Moreover, recent studies show an involvement of TSLP in the progression of various cancers. TSLP signaling is mediated by the TSLP receptor (TSLPR), a heterodimeric type I cytokine receptor. It consists of the IL-7 receptor alpha chain (IL-7Rα), which is shared with the IL-7 receptor, and the TSLPRα chain as a specific subunit. Blocking signal release by TSLP without affecting IL-7 function is a potentially interesting option for the treatment of atopic diseases or certain tumors. By employing the extracellular domain of human TSLPRα chain (hTSLPRα(ex)) as an antigen, we generated a set of monoclonal antibodies. Several binders to native and/or denatured receptor protein were identified and characterized by cytometry and Western blot analysis. A screen based on a STAT3-driven reporter gene assay in murine pro-B cells expressing a functional hTSLPR yielded two hybridoma clones with specific antagonistic properties towards hTSLP, but not IL-7. Kinetic studies measuring blockade of hTSLP-dependent STAT phosphorylation in a TSLP-responsive cell line revealed an inhibitory constant in the nanomolar range. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell-specific expression of the glucocorticoid receptor within granular convoluted tubules of the rat submaxillary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antakly, T.; Zhang, C.X.; Sarrieau, A.; Raquidan, D. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-01-01

    The submaxillary gland, a heterogeneous tissue composed essentially of two functionally distinct cell types (tubular epithelial and acinar), offers an interesting system in which to study the mechanisms of steroid-dependent growth and differentiation. One cell type, the granular convoluted tubular (GCT) cell, secretes a large number of physiologically important polypeptides, including epidermal and nerve growth factors. Two steroids, androgens and glucocorticoids, greatly influence the growth, differentiation, and secretory activity of GCT cells. Because glucocorticoids can partially mimic or potentiate androgen effects, it has been thought that glucocorticoids act via androgen receptors. Since the presence of glucocorticoid receptors is a prerequisite for glucocorticoid action, we have investigated the presence and cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the rat submaxillary gland. Binding experiments using (3H)dexamethasone revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites in rat submaxillary tissue homogenates. Most of these sites were specifically competed by dexamethasone, corticosterone, and a pure glucocorticoid agonist RU 28362. Neither testosterone nor dihydrotestosterone competed for glucocorticoid binding. The cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the submaxillary gland was investigated by immunocytochemistry, using two highly specific glucocorticoid receptor antibodies. The receptor was localized in the GCT cells, but not in the acinar cells of rat and mouse submaxillary tissue sections. In GCT cells, the glucocorticoid receptor colocalized with several secretory polypeptides, including epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, alpha 2u-globulin, and atrial natriuretic factor.

  8. Cell-specific expression of the glucocorticoid receptor within granular convoluted tubules of the rat submaxillary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antakly, T.; Zhang, C.X.; Sarrieau, A.; Raquidan, D.

    1991-01-01

    The submaxillary gland, a heterogeneous tissue composed essentially of two functionally distinct cell types (tubular epithelial and acinar), offers an interesting system in which to study the mechanisms of steroid-dependent growth and differentiation. One cell type, the granular convoluted tubular (GCT) cell, secretes a large number of physiologically important polypeptides, including epidermal and nerve growth factors. Two steroids, androgens and glucocorticoids, greatly influence the growth, differentiation, and secretory activity of GCT cells. Because glucocorticoids can partially mimic or potentiate androgen effects, it has been thought that glucocorticoids act via androgen receptors. Since the presence of glucocorticoid receptors is a prerequisite for glucocorticoid action, we have investigated the presence and cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the rat submaxillary gland. Binding experiments using [3H]dexamethasone revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites in rat submaxillary tissue homogenates. Most of these sites were specifically competed by dexamethasone, corticosterone, and a pure glucocorticoid agonist RU 28362. Neither testosterone nor dihydrotestosterone competed for glucocorticoid binding. The cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the submaxillary gland was investigated by immunocytochemistry, using two highly specific glucocorticoid receptor antibodies. The receptor was localized in the GCT cells, but not in the acinar cells of rat and mouse submaxillary tissue sections. In GCT cells, the glucocorticoid receptor colocalized with several secretory polypeptides, including epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, alpha 2u-globulin, and atrial natriuretic factor

  9. Highly specific role of the insulin receptor in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Ran; Abelson, Sagi; Bitton-Worms, Keren; Genkin, Inna; Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Dakwar, Maria; Orr, Zila Shen; Caspi, Avishay; Tzukerman, Maty; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence from clinical trials indicates that specific targeting of the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) is not efficient as an anti-breast cancer treatment. One possible reason is that the mitogenic signals from the insulin receptor (IR) can be processed independently or as compensation to inhibition of the IGF1R. In this study, we highlight the role of the IR in mediating breast tumor progression in both WT mice and a hyperinsulinemic MKR mouse model by induction of Ir (Insr) or Igf1r knockdown (KD) in the mammary carcinoma Mvt-1 cell line. By using the specific IR antagonist-S961, we demonstrated that Igf1r-KD induces elevated responses by the IR to IGF1. On the other hand, Ir-KD cells generated significantly smaller tumors in the mammary fat pads of both WT and MKR mice, as opposed to control cells, whereas the Igf1r-KD cells did not. The tumorigenic effects of insulin on the Mvt-1 cells were also demonstrated using microarray analysis, which indicates alteration of genes and signaling pathways involved in proliferation, the cell cycle, and apoptosis following insulin stimulation. In addition, the correlation between IR and the potential prognostic marker for aggressive breast cancer, CD24, was examined in the Ir-KD cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed more than 60% reduction in CD24 expression in the Ir-KD cells when compared with the control cells. Our results also indicate that CD24-expressing cells can restore, at least in part, the tumorigenic capacity of Ir-KD cells. Taken together, our results highlight the mitogenic role of the IR in mammary tumor progression with a direct link to CD24 expression. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Specificity of Signal-Binding via Non-AHL LuxR-Type Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a typical communication system among Gram-negative bacteria used to control group-coordinated behavior via small diffusible molecules dependent on cell number. The key components of a quorum sensing system are a LuxI-type synthase, producing acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules, and a LuxR-type receptor that detects AHLs to control expression of specific target genes. Six conserved amino acids are present in the signal-binding domain of AHL-sensing LuxR-type proteins, which are important for ligand-binding and -specificity as well as shaping the ligand-binding pocket. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR-type regulators without a cognate LuxI synthase, referred to as LuxR solos. The two LuxR solos PluR and PauR from Photorhabdus luminescens and Photorhabdus asymbiotica, respectively, do not sense AHLs. Instead PluR and PauR sense alpha-pyrones and dialkylresorcinols, respectively, and are part of cell-cell communication systems contributing to the overall virulence of these Photorhabdus species. However, PluR and PauR both harbor substitutions in the conserved amino acid motif compared to that in AHL sensors, which appeared to be important for binding the corresponding signaling molecules. Here we analyze the role of the conserved amino acids in the signal-binding domain of these two non-AHL LuxR-type receptors for their role in signal perception. Our studies reveal that the conserved amino acid motif alone is essential but not solely responsible for ligand-binding.

  11. Soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 as a lineage-specific marker in the reactive hemophagocytic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Dominik J; Schleiffenbaum, Boris; Kurrer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    and thus specificity. Serum levels of the macrophage specific scavenger receptor CD163 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were found to be highly increased in patients with RHS (median 39.0 mg/L). Significantly lower levels were determined in patients with sepsis (median 9...

  12. Computational design of the affinity and specificity of a therapeutic T cell receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Pierce

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available T cell receptors (TCRs are key to antigen-specific immunity and are increasingly being explored as therapeutics, most visibly in cancer immunotherapy. As TCRs typically possess only low-to-moderate affinity for their peptide/MHC (pMHC ligands, there is a recognized need to develop affinity-enhanced TCR variants. Previous in vitro engineering efforts have yielded remarkable improvements in TCR affinity, yet concerns exist about the maintenance of peptide specificity and the biological impacts of ultra-high affinity. As opposed to in vitro engineering, computational design can directly address these issues, in theory permitting the rational control of peptide specificity together with relatively controlled increments in affinity. Here we explored the efficacy of computational design with the clinically relevant TCR DMF5, which recognizes nonameric and decameric epitopes from the melanoma-associated Melan-A/MART-1 protein presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. We tested multiple mutations selected by flexible and rigid modeling protocols, assessed impacts on affinity and specificity, and utilized the data to examine and improve algorithmic performance. We identified multiple mutations that improved binding affinity, and characterized the structure, affinity, and binding kinetics of a previously reported double mutant that exhibits an impressive 400-fold affinity improvement for the decameric pMHC ligand without detectable binding to non-cognate ligands. The structure of this high affinity mutant indicated very little conformational consequences and emphasized the high fidelity of our modeling procedure. Overall, our work showcases the capability of computational design to generate TCRs with improved pMHC affinities while explicitly accounting for peptide specificity, as well as its potential for generating TCRs with customized antigen targeting capabilities.

  13. Simultaneous localization of an hepatic binding protein specific for galactose and of galactose-containing receptors on rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisberger, M; VonLanthen, M

    1978-11-01

    The hepatic binding protein, specific for galactose-terminated glycoproteins (asialoglycoproteins) and the receptors for the Ricinus communis lectin, specific for galactose residues (RCA1), were simultaneously localized on isolated rat hepatocytes by the gold method. The marker for the binding protein was prepared from gold granules (5 nm in diam.) labeled with ceruloplasmin and desialylated. The marker specific for galactose-containing receptors consisted of granules (17 nm in diameter) labeled with RCA1. It was established that both markers did not interact. Hepatocytes (fresh or briefly fixed with glutaraldehyde) were successively incubated with the asialoceruloplasmin and the RCA1 marker. Examination of thin sections by electron microscopy indicated that the binding protein and the RCA1 receptors were often in the proximity of each other on the plasmamembrane. Using the same technique, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) receptors were generally found on area of the plasmamembrane poorly marked by the RCA1 gold marker. The binding of asialoceruloplasmin gold markers was studied as a function of the size of the granules. It became insignificant when the size was above 17 nm. Previous results have shown that the binding of RCA1 is low when the marker reaches 50 nm in size while WGA markers up to 75 nm are well bound by hepatocytes. It is therefore hypothesized that the binding protein and RCA1 receptors are located between glycoprotein brushes of increasing spacing while part or all of the WGA receptors are located at the periphery of the brushes.

  14. Endometrial natural killer (NK) cells reveal a tissue-specific receptor repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyaerts, D; Kuret, T; van Cranenbroek, B; van der Zeeuw-Hingrez, S; van der Heijden, O W H; van der Meer, A; Joosten, I; van der Molen, R G

    2018-02-13

    Is the natural killer (NK) cell receptor repertoire of endometrial NK (eNK) cells tissue-specific? The NK cell receptor (NKR) expression profile in pre-pregnancy endometrium appears to have a unique tissue-specific phenotype, different from that found in NK cells in peripheral blood, suggesting that these cells are finely tuned towards the reception of an allogeneic fetus. NK cells are important for successful pregnancy. After implantation, NK cells encounter extravillous trophoblast cells and regulate trophoblast invasion. NK cell activity is amongst others regulated by C-type lectin heterodimer (CD94/NKG2) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors. KIR expression on decidual NK cells is affected by the presence of maternal HLA-C and biased towards KIR2D expression. However, little is known about NKR expression on eNK cells prior to pregnancy. In this study, matched peripheral and menstrual blood (a source of endometrial cells) was obtained from 25 healthy females with regular menstrual cycles. Menstrual blood was collected during the first 36 h of menstruation using a menstrual cup, a non-invasive technique to obtain endometrial cells. KIR and NKG2 receptor expression on eNK cells was characterized by 10-color flow cytometry, and compared to matched pbNK cells of the same female. KIR and HLA-C genotypes were determined by PCR-SSOP techniques. Anti-CMV IgG antibodies in plasma were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay. KIR expression patterns of eNK cells collected from the same female do not differ over consecutive menstrual cycles. The percentage of NK cells expressing KIR2DL2/L3/S2, KIR2DL3, KIR2DL1, LILRB1 and/or NKG2A was significantly higher in eNK cells compared to pbNK cells, while no significant difference was observed for NKG2C, KIR2DL1/S1, and KIR3DL1. The NKR repertoire of eNK cells was clearly different from pbNK cells, with eNK cells co-expressing more than three NKR simultaneously. In addition, outlier analysis revealed 8 and 15 NKR

  15. A single sex pheromone receptor determines chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sakurai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In insects and other animals, intraspecific communication between individuals of the opposite sex is mediated in part by chemical signals called sex pheromones. In most moth species, male moths rely heavily on species-specific sex pheromones emitted by female moths to identify and orient towards an appropriate mating partner among a large number of sympatric insect species. The silkmoth, Bombyx mori, utilizes the simplest possible pheromone system, in which a single pheromone component, (E, Z-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol, is sufficient to elicit full sexual behavior. We have previously shown that the sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 mediates specific detection of bombykol in the antennae of male silkmoths. However, it is unclear whether the sex pheromone receptor is the minimally sufficient determination factor that triggers initiation of orientation behavior towards a potential mate. Using transgenic silkmoths expressing the sex pheromone receptor PxOR1 of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in BmOR1-expressing neurons, we show that the selectivity of the sex pheromone receptor determines the chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth. Bombykol receptor neurons expressing PxOR1 responded to its specific ligand, (Z-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald, in a dose-dependent manner. Male moths expressing PxOR1 exhibited typical pheromone orientation behavior and copulation attempts in response to Z11-16:Ald and to females of P. xylostella. Transformation of the bombykol receptor neurons had no effect on their projections in the antennal lobe. These results indicate that activation of bombykol receptor neurons alone is sufficient to trigger full sexual behavior. Thus, a single gene defines behavioral selectivity in sex pheromone communication in the silkmoth. Our findings show that a single molecular determinant can not only function as a modulator of behavior but also as an all-or-nothing initiator of a complex species-specific

  16. A new PET tracer specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Kashefi, Amir; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) expression could be a valuable tool for evaluation of patients with a variety of malignancies, and particularly for monitoring those undergoing antiangiogenic therapies that block VEGF/VEGFR-2 function. The aim of this study was to develop a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer. The D63AE64AE67A mutant of VEGF 121 (VEGF DEE ) was generated by recombinant DNA technology. VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were purified and conjugated with DOTA for 64 Cu labeling. The DOTA conjugates were tested in vitro for VEGFR-2 specificity and functional activity. In vivo tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of 64 Cu-labeled VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were compared using an orthotopic 4T1 murine breast tumor model. Blocking experiments, biodistribution studies, and immunofluorescence staining were carried out to confirm the noninvasive imaging results. Cell binding assay demonstrated that VEGF DEE had about 20-fold lower VEGFR-1 binding affinity and only slightly lower VEGFR-2 binding affinity as compared with VEGF 121 . MicroPET imaging studies revealed that both 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 and 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE had rapid and prominent activity accumulation in VEGFR-2-expressing 4T1 tumors. The renal uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE was significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 as rodent kidneys expressed high levels of VEGFR-1 based on immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments and biodistribution studies confirmed the VEGFR specificity of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . We have developed a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer, 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . It has comparable tumor targeting efficacy to 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 but much reduced renal toxicity. This tracer may be translated into the clinic for imaging tumor angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic treatment efficacy. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized 125 I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ([ 125 I]R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10 7 cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with [ 125 I]R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of [ 125 I]R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC

  18. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  19. Cocaine abstinence induces emotional impairment and brain region-specific upregulation of the oxytocin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Polymnia; Zanos, Panos; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2016-10-01

    The key problem in treating cocaine addiction is the maintenance of a drug-free state as negative emotional symptoms during abstinence often trigger relapse. The mechanisms underpinning the emotional dysregulation during abstinence are currently not well-understood. There is evidence suggesting a role of the neuropeptide oxytocin in the modulation of drug addiction processes. However, its involvement during long-term abstinence from cocaine use remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to behaviourally characterize a mouse model of long-term cocaine withdrawal and assess the effect of chronic cocaine administration and long-term cocaine abstinence on the central oxytocinergic system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Fourteen-day escalating-dose cocaine administration (3 × 15-30 mg/kg/day) and 14-day withdrawal increased plasma corticosterone levels and oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding in piriform cortex, lateral septum and amygdala. A specific cocaine withdrawal-induced increase in OTR binding was observed in the medial septum. These biochemical alterations occurred concomitantly with the emergence of memory impairment, contextual psychomotor sensitization and an anhedonic and anxiogenic phenotype during withdrawal. Our study established a clear relationship between cocaine abstinence and emotional impairment in a novel translationally relevant model of cocaine withdrawal and demonstrated for the first time brain region-specific neuroadaptations of the oxytocin system, which may contribute to abstinence-induced negative emotional state. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Osteoblast-specific transcription factor Osterix increases vitamin D receptor gene expression in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    Full Text Available Osterix (Osx is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells. In Osx knock-out mice, no bone formation occurs. The vitamin D receptor (VDR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulates target gene transcription to ensure appropriate control of calcium homeostasis and bone development. Here, we provide several lines of evidence that show that the VDR gene is a target for transcriptional regulation by Osx in osteoblasts. For example, calvaria obtained from Osx-null embryos displayed dramatic reductions in VDR expression compared to wild-type calvaria. Stable overexpression of Osx stimulated VDR expression in C2C12 mesenchymal cells. Inhibition of Osx expression by siRNA led to downregulation of VDR. In contrast, Osx levels remained unchanged in osteoblasts in VDR-null mice. Mechanistic approaches using transient transfection assays showed that Osx directly activated a 1 kb fragment of the VDR promoter in a dose-dependent manner. To define the region of the VDR promoter that was responsive to Osx, a series of VDR promoter deletion mutants were examined and the minimal Osx-responsive region was refined to the proximal 120 bp of the VDR promoter. Additional point mutants were used to identify two GC-rich regions that were responsible for VDR promoter activation by Osx. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx was associated with the native VDR promoter in primary osteoblasts in vivo. Cumulatively, these data strongly support a direct regulatory role for Osx in VDR gene expression. They further provide new insight into potential mechanisms and pathways that Osx controls in osteoblasts and during the process of osteoblastic cell differentiation.

  1. Gene silencing for epidermal growth factor receptor variant III induces cell-specific cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoutpour, Farnaz; Bodempudi, Vidya; Park, Shay E; Pan, Weihong; Mauzy, Mary Jean; Kratzke, Robert A; Dudek, Arkadiusz; Potter, David A; Woo, Richard A; O'Rourke, Donald M; Tindall, Donald J; Farassati, Faris

    2008-11-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a constitutively active mutant form of EGFR that is expressed in 40% to 50% of gliomas and several other malignancies. Here, we describe the therapeutic effects of silencing EGFRvIII on glioma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. A small interfering RNA molecule against EGFRvIII was introduced into EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells (U87Delta) by electroporation resulting in complete inhibition of expression of EGFRvIII as early as 48 h post-treatment. During EGFRvIII silencing, a decrease in the proliferation and invasiveness of U87Delta cells was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis (P < 0.05). Notably, EGFRvIII silencing inhibited the signal transduction machinery downstream of EGFRvIII as evidenced by decreases in the activated levels of Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. A lentivirus capable of expressing anti-EGFRvIII short hairpin RNA was also able to achieve progressive silencing of EGFRvIII in U87Delta cells in addition to inhibiting cell proliferation, invasiveness, and colony formation in a significant manner (P < 0.05). Silencing EGFRvIII in U87Delta cultures with this virus reduced the expression of factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition including N-cadherin, beta-catenin, Snail, Slug, and paxillin but not E-cadherin. The anti-EGFRvIII lentivirus also affected the cell cycle progression of U87Delta cells with a decrease in G(1) and increase in S and G(2) fractions. In an in vivo model, tumor growth was completely inhibited in severe combined immunodeficient mice (n = 10) injected s.c. with U87Delta cells treated with the anti-EGFRvIII lentivirus (P = 0.005). We conclude that gene specific silencing of EGFRvIII is a promising strategy for treating cancers that contain this mutated receptor.

  2. Nuclear localization and function of polypeptide ligands and their receptors: a new paradigm for hormone specificity within the mammary gland?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clevenger, Charles V

    2003-01-01

    The specific effects triggered by polypeptide hormone/growth factor stimulation of mammary cells were considered mediated solely by receptor-associated signaling networks. A compelling body of new data, however, clearly indicates that polypeptide ligands and/or their receptors are transported into the nucleus, where they function directly to regulate the expression of specific transcription factors and gene loci. The intranuclear function of these complexes may contribute to the explicit functions associated with a given ligand, and may serve as new targets for pharmacologic intervention

  3. Analog specificity of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the central nervous system: possible clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, E.F.; Engel, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    TRH has rapid-onset (30 sec), slow-offset (1-12 days) clinical benefit in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other motor neuron disorders. This benefit is probably receptor-mediated and may have at least 2 components. To obtain a better understanding of the various responses to TRH of the spinal lower motor neurons (LMNs) in patients, and possibly to help guide selection of additional therapeutic agents, the authors utilized rat CNS (spinal-cord and brain membranes) to analyze the ability of certain molecules to inhibit specific binding of [ 3 H]methyl TRH ([ 3 H]MeTRH) to the TRH receptor. They found: a) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-analog DN-1417 by spinal-cord and brain TRH receptor, despite its known strong TRH-like action physiologically on LMNs; b) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-product cyclo(His-Pro) by spinal cord and brain TRH receptor despite its having some strong TRH-like physiologic actions on the CNS; and c) lack of any identifiable high-affinity receptor for cyclo(His-Pro) in spinal cord and brain. From these data the authors hypothesize that the acute transmitter-like action of DN-1417, TRH, and possibly other TRH-analogs and products on LMNs is via a non-TRH receptor, such as an amine or amino acid neurotransmitter receptor, e.g. a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor. They further postulate that the CNS TRH-receptor may modulate a trophic-like influence of TRH on LMNs

  4. A muscle-specific knockout implicates nuclear receptor coactivator MED1 in the regulation of glucose and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoting; Birsoy, Kivanc; Roeder, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    As conventional transcriptional factors that are activated in diverse signaling pathways, nuclear receptors play important roles in many physiological processes that include energy homeostasis. The MED1 subunit of the Mediator coactivator complex plays a broad role in nuclear receptor-mediated transcription by anchoring the Mediator complex to diverse promoter-bound nuclear receptors. Given the significant role of skeletal muscle, in part through the action of nuclear receptors, in glucose and fatty acid metabolism, we generated skeletal muscle-specific Med1 knockout mice. Importantly, these mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance as well as resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, the white muscle of these mice exhibits increased mitochondrial density and expression of genes specific to type I and type IIA fibers, indicating a fast-to-slow fiber switch, as well as markedly increased expression of the brown adipose tissue-specific UCP-1 and Cidea genes that are involved in respiratory uncoupling. These dramatic results implicate MED1 as a powerful suppressor in skeletal muscle of genetic programs implicated in energy expenditure and raise the significant possibility of therapeutical approaches for metabolic syndromes and muscle diseases through modulation of MED1-nuclear receptor interactions.

  5. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune

    2003-01-01

    part of the receptor gene. DNA corresponding to the corrected gene CG6111 was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, where it was found to code for a receptor that could be activated by low concentrations of crustacean cardioactive peptide, which is a neuropeptide also known to occur in Drosophila....... Furthermore, we identified a gene sequence in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that very likely codes for a crustacean cardioactive peptide receptor....

  6. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  7. PiggyBac-mediated cancer immunotherapy using EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cells expressing HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Yozo; Huye, Leslie E; Salsman, Vita S; Leen, Ann M; Ahmed, Nabil; Rollins, Lisa; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Wilson, Matthew H; Rooney, Cliona M

    2011-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can be modified to function as heterologous tumor directed effector cells that survive longer in vivo than tumor directed T cells without virus specificity, due to chronic stimulation by viral antigens expressed during persistent infection in seropositive individuals. We evaluated the nonviral piggyBac (PB) transposon system as a platform for modifying EBV-CTLs to express a functional human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (HER2-CAR) thereby directing virus-specific, gene modified CTLs towards HER2-positive cancer cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were nucleofected with transposons encoding a HER2-CAR and a truncated CD19 molecule for selection followed by specific activation and expansion of EBV-CTLs. HER2-CAR was expressed in ~40% of T cells after CD19 selection with retention of immunophenotype, polyclonality, and function. HER2-CAR-modified EBV-CTLs (HER2-CTLs) killed HER2-positive brain tumor cell lines in vitro, exhibited transient and reversible increases in HER2-CAR expression following antigen-specific stimulation, and stably expressed HER2-CAR beyond 120 days. Adoptive transfer of PB-modified HER2-CTLs resulted in tumor regression in a murine xenograft model. Our results demonstrate that PB can be used to redirect virus-specific CTLs to tumor targets, which should prolong tumor-specific T cell survival in vivo producing more efficacious immunotherapy.

  8. Prenatal androgen receptor activation determines adult alcohol and water drinking in a sex-specific way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sabine E; Zoicas, Iulia; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Eulenburg, Volker; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Christian P

    2017-08-04

    Alcohol use disorders are major psychiatric disorders. Correlational studies in humans suggested organizational hormonal effects during embryonic development as a risk factor for adult alcohol dependence. Permanent changes can be induced by the activity of sex hormones, like testosterone. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between prenatal androgen receptor (AR)-activation and adult alcohol as well as water drinking in mice in a sex-dependent fashion. Prenatal AR inhibition using the antagonist flutamide decreased adult male alcohol consumption. In contrast, prenatal AR activation by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) led to an increase in adult alcohol consumption in females. These effects were different in adult water drinking, flutamide increased water consumption in females and DHT increased water consumption in males. Prenatal flutamide reduced locomotion and anxiety in adult males but was ineffective in females. We found that prenatal AR activation controls adult levels of monoaminergic modulatory transmitters in the brain and blood hormone levels in a sex-specific way. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed a prenatal AR mediated control of adult expression of alcohol drinking-related genes like Bdnf and Per2. These findings demonstrate that prenatal androgen activity is a risk factor for the establishment of alcohol consumption in adults by its organizational effects. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Systemic Hypoxia Changes the Organ-Specific Distribution of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Its Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Hugo H.; Risau, Werner

    1998-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in physiological blood vessel formation and pathological angiogenesis such as tumor growth and ischemic diseases. Hypoxia is a potent inducer of VEGF in vitro. Here we demonstrate that VEGF is induced in vivo by exposing mice to systemic hypoxia. VEGF induction was highest in brain, but also occurred in kidney, testis, lung, heart, and liver. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that a distinct subset of cells within a given organ, such as glial cells and neurons in brain, tubular cells in kidney, and Sertoli cells in testis, responded to the hypoxic stimulus with an increase in VEGF expression. Surprisingly, however, other cells at sites of constitutive VEGF expression in normal adult tissues, such as epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and kidney glomeruli, decreased VEGF expression in response to the hypoxic stimulus. Furthermore, in addition to VEGF itself, expression of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), but not VEGFR-2, was induced by hypoxia in endothelial cells of lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver. VEGF itself was never found to be up-regulated in endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions, consistent with its paracrine action during normoxia. Our results show that the response to hypoxia in vivo is differentially regulated at the level of specific cell types or layers in certain organs. In these tissues, up- or down-regulation of VEGF and VEGFR-1 during hypoxia may influence their oxygenation after angiogenesis or modulate vascular permeability.

  10. Specific forms of BAFF favor BAFF receptor-mediated epithelial cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Ayan; Varin, Marie-Michèle; Le Pottier, Laëtitia; Pochard, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Youinou, Pierre; Pers, Jacques-Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Although B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor BR3 are produced and expressed by many cells, their role has been restricted to the lymphocyte lineage. Using various techniques (RT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence, flow cytometry analysis), we observed the expression of BR3 and the production of BAFF by the human salivary gland cell line, by epithelial cells from biopsies of Sjögren's syndrome patients and their controls, but also by salivary gland epithelial cells in culture. To decipher the role of BAFF and BR3 on epithelial cells, BAFF and BR3 were neutralized by blocking antibodies or RNA specific inhibitor (siBR3) and epithelial cell survival was analyzed. Blocking BR3 promotes epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro. This apoptosis resulted in the nuclear translocation of PKCδ. BAFF neutralization by various anti-BAFF antibodies leads to different effects depending on the antibody used suggesting that only some forms of BAFF are required for epithelial cell survival. Our study demonstrates that BR3 is involved in the survival of cultured epithelial cells due to an autocrine effect of BAFF. It also suggests that epithelial cells produce different forms of BAFF and that only some of them are responsible for this effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vasopressin and oxytocin receptor systems in the brain: Sex differences and sex-specific regulation of social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Kelly M; Veenema, Alexa H

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptides vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors in the brain are involved in the regulation of various social behaviors and have emerged as drug targets for the treatment of social dysfunction in several sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. Sex differences in the VP and OT systems may therefore be implicated in sex-specific regulation of healthy as well as impaired social behaviors. We begin this review by highlighting the sex differences, or lack of sex differences, in VP and OT synthesis in the brain. We then discuss the evidence showing the presence or absence of sex differences in VP and OT receptors in rodents and humans, as well as showing new data of sexually dimorphic V1a receptor binding in the rat brain. Importantly, we find that there is lack of comprehensive analysis of sex differences in these systems in common laboratory species, and we find that, when sex differences are present, they are highly brain region- and species-specific. Interestingly, VP system parameters (VP and V1aR) are typically higher in males, while sex differences in the OT system are not always in the same direction, often showing higher OT expression in females, but higher OT receptor expression in males. Furthermore, VP and OT receptor systems show distinct and largely non-overlapping expression in the rodent brain, which may cause these receptors to have either complementary or opposing functional roles in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior. Though still in need of further research, we close by discussing how manipulations of the VP and OT systems have given important insights into the involvement of these neuropeptide systems in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior in rodents and humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  13. Context-specific target definition in influenza a virus hemagglutinin-glycan receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Zachary; Raman, Rahul; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-08-28

    Protein-glycan interactions are important regulators of a variety of biological processes, ranging from immune recognition to anticoagulation. An important area of active research is directed toward understanding the role of host cell surface glycans as recognition sites for pathogen protein receptors. Recognition of cell surface glycans is a widely employed strategy for a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, parasites, and viruses. We present here a representative example of such an interaction: the binding of influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) to specific sialylated glycans on the cell surface of human upper airway epithelial cells, which initiates the infection cycle. We detail a generalizable strategy to understand the nature of protein-glycan interactions both structurally and biochemically, using HA as a model system. This strategy combines a top-down approach using available structural information to define important contacts between glycans and HA, with a bottom-up approach using data-mining and informatics approaches to identify the common motifs that distinguish glycan binders from nonbinders. By probing protein-glycan interactions simultaneously through top-down and bottom-up approaches, we can scientifically validate a series of observations. This in turn provides additional confidence and surmounts known challenges in the study of protein-glycan interactions, such as accounting for multivalency, and thus truly defines concepts such as specificity, affinity, and avidity. With the advent of new technologies for glycomics-including glycan arrays, data-mining solutions, and robust algorithms to model protein-glycan interactions-we anticipate that such combination approaches will become tractable for a wide variety of protein-glycan interactions.

  14. Monoterpenoids induce agonist-specific desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid-3 (TRPV3) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherkheli, Muhammad Azhar; Benecke, Heike; Doerner, Julia Franca; Kletke, Olaf; Vogt-Eisele, A K; Gisselmann, Guenter; Hatt, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-3 (TRPV3) is a thermo-sensitive ion channel expressed in skin keratinocytes and in a variety of neural cells. It is activated by warmth as well as monoterpenoids including camphor, menthol, dihydrocarveol and 1,8-cineol. TRPV3 is described as a putative nociceptor and previous studies revealed sensitization of the channel during repeated short-term stimulation with different agonists. In the present investigation TRPV3 was transiently expressed in either Xenopus oocytes or HEK293 cells. Whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques were used to characterize the behavior of TRPV3 when challenged with different agonists. Similarly, a human keratinocyte-derived cell line (HaCaT cells) was used to monitor the behavior of native TRPV3 when challenged with different agonists. We report here that prolonged exposure (5-15 minutes) of monoterpenoids results in agonist-specific desensitization of TRPV3. Long-term exposure to camphor and 1,8-cineol elicits desensitizing currents in TRPV3 expressing oocytes, whereas the non-terpenoid agonist 2-APB induces sustained currents. Agonist-specific desensitization of endogenous TRPV3 was also found in HaCaT cells, which may be taken as a representative for the native system. Terpenoids have a long history of use in therapeutics, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics but knowledge about underpinning molecular mechanisms is incomplete. Our finding on agonist-induced desensitization of TRPV3 by some monoterpenoids displays a novel mechanism through which TRP channels could be functionally modulated. Desensitization of TRPV3 channels might be the molecular basis of action for some of the medicinal properties of camphor and 1,8-cineol.

  15. Tissue-specific regulation of porcine prolactin receptor expression by estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Josephine F; Horigan, Katherine C; Gloviczki, Julia M; Costa, Kristen M; Freking, Bradley A; Farmer, Chantal; Hayashi, Kanako; Spencer, Thomas; Morabito, Joseph E; Hovey, Russell C

    2009-07-01

    Prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) via both endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine pathways to regulate biological processes including reproduction and lactation. We analyzed the tissue- and stage of gestation-specific regulation of PRL and PRLR expression in various tissues of pigs. Abundance of pPRLR-long form (LF) mRNA increased in the mammary gland and endometrium during gestation while in other tissues it remained constant. There was a parallel increase in the abundance of the pPRLR-LF protein in the mammary gland and endometrium during gestation. We determined the hormonal regulation of pPRLR-LF mRNA expression in various tissues from ovariectomized, hypoprolactinemic gilts given combinations of the replacement hormones estrogen (E(2)), progestin (P), and/or haloperidol-induced PRL. Abundance of pPRLR-LF mRNA in kidney and liver was unaffected by hormone treatments. Expression of uterine pPRLR-LF mRNA was induced by E(2) whereas the effect of E(2) was abolished by co-administering P. The expression of pPRLR-LF mRNA in the mammary gland stroma was induced by PRL, whereas E(2) induced its expression in the epithelium. In contrast to these changes in pPRLR expression, pPRL expression was relatively constant and low during gestation in all tissues except the pituitary. Taken together, these data reveal that specific combinations of E(2), P, and PRL differentially regulate pPRLR-LF expression in the endometrium and mammary glands, and that the action of PRL on its target tissues is dependent upon pPRLR-LF abundance more so than the local PRL expression.

  16. Specific Activation of the Alternative Cardiac Promoter ofCacna1cby the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Thassio R; Auguste, Gaelle; Falcón, Debora; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Salazar-Enciso, Rogelio; Sabourin, Jessica; Lefebvre, Florence; Viengchareun, Say; Kobeissy, Hussein; Lechêne, Patrick; Nicolas, Valerie; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Gomez, Susana; Lauton-Santos, Sandra; Morel, Eric; Rueda, Angelica; López-Andrés, Natalia; Gomez, Ana M; Lombes, Marc; Benitah, Jean-Pierre

    2018-02-21

    Rationale: The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists belong to the current therapeutic armamentarium for the management of cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanisms conferring their beneficial effects are poorly understood. Part of the cardiovascular effects of MR are due to the regulation of L-type Ca v 1.2 Ca 2+ channel expression, which is generated by tissue-specific alternative promoters as a long 'cardiac' (Ca v 1.2-LNT) or a short 'vascular' (Ca v 1.2-SNT) N-terminal transcripts. Objective: To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which aldosterone, through MR, modulates Ca v 1.2 expression and function in a tissue-specific manner. Methods and Results: In primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, aldosterone exposure for 24 hours increased in a concentration-dependent manner Ca v 1.2-LNT expression at both mRNA and protein levels, correlating with enhanced concentration-, time- and MR-dependent P1-promoter activity. In silico analysis and mutagenesis identified MR interaction with both specific activating and repressing DNA binding elements on the P1-promoter. The relevance of this regulation is confirmed both ex and in vivo in transgenic mice harboring the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the 'cardiac' P1-promoter. Moreover, we show that this cis-regulatory mechanism is not limited to the heart. Indeed, in smooth muscle cells from different vascular beds, in which the Ca v 1.2-SNT is normally the major isoform, we found that MR signaling activates 'cardiac' Ca v 1.2-LNT expression through P1-promoter activation, leading to vascular contractile dysfunction. These results were further corroborated in hypertensive aldosterone-salt rodent models, showing notably a positive correlation between blood pressure and 'cardiac' P1-promoter activity in aorta. This new vascular Ca v 1.2-LNT molecular signature reduced sensitivity to the Ca 2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, in aldosterone-treated vessels. Conclusions: Our results reveal that

  17. Comparative genomics reveals tissue-specific regulation of prolactin receptor gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin (PRL), acting via the prolactin receptor, fulfills a diversity of biological functions including the maintenance of solute balance and mineral homeostasis via tissues such as the heart, kidneys and intestine. Expression and activity of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) is regulated by various ...

  18. Unique presynaptic alpha 2-receptor selectivity and specificity of the antihypertensive agent moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, B I

    1988-10-01

    The characteristics of the alpha-receptor activating property of the new antihypertensive agent moxonidine (4-chloro-N-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinamine, BDF 5895) was studied using peripheral vasculature and brain membranes of various animals. Moxonidine exerted a full agonist effect in elevating diastolic blood pressure in the pithed rat. Activation of postsynaptic alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors contribute to the vasoconstrictory effect in rats. In the vasculature of the rabbit, moxonidine was a full agonist at presynaptic alpha 2-receptors in inhibiting transmitter release induced by electrical stimulation of pulmonary artery strips. At postsynaptic sites, exogenously applied moxonidine was a full agonist at alpha 1-receptors in the isolated aorta, pulmonary artery and vena cava of the rabbit. Selectivity for alpha 2-receptors in the pulmonary artery was 106-fold. In rat brain membranes, moxonidine showed 288-fold greater selectivity for alpha 2-receptors, when the displacement of [3H]-rauwolscine was compared with the displacement of [3H]-prazosin. On the whole, clonidine exhibited greater potency than moxonidine on both alpha-receptor subtypes, but moxonidine consistently showed greater alpha 2-receptor selectivity than clonidine. In the guinea pig myocardium, moxonidine caused neither bradycardia nor tachycardia in the isolated right atrium and produced a negligible positive inotropic effect at 100 mumol/l in the isolated papillary muscle.

  19. Evidence for specific TRPM8 expression in human prostate secretory epithelial cells: functional androgen receptor requirement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bidaux, G.; Roudbaraki, M.; Merle, C.; Crepin, A.; Delcourt, P.; Slomianny, C.; Thebault, S.C.; Bonnal, J.L.; Benahmed, M.; Cabon, F.; Mauroy, B.; Prevarskaya, N.

    2005-01-01

    TRPM8 (melastatine-related transient receptor potential member 8), a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, has been shown to be a calcium-channel protein. TRPM8 mRNA has also been shown to be overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered to play an

  20. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes

  1. Subregion-specific modulation of excitatory input and dopaminergic output in the striatum by tonically activated glycine and GABAA receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eAdermark

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow of cortical information through the basal ganglia is a complex spatiotemporal pattern of increased and decreased firing. The striatum is the biggest input nucleus to the basal ganglia and the aim of this study was to assess the role of inhibitory GABAA and glycine receptors in regulating synaptic activity in the dorsolateral (DLS and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, nAc. Local field potential recordings from coronal brain slices of juvenile and adult Wistar rats showed that GABAA receptors and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are tonically activated and inhibit excitatory input to the DLS and to the nAc. Strychnine-induced disinhibition of glutamatergic transmission was insensitive to the muscarinic receptor inhibitor scopolamine (10 µM, inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (10 µM and blocked by GABAA receptor inhibitors, suggesting that tonically activated glycine receptors depress excitatory input to the striatum through modulation of cholinergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. As an end-product example of striatal GABAergic output in vivo we measured dopamine release in the DLS and nAc by microdialysis in the awake and freely moving rat. Reversed dialysis of bicuculline (50 μM in perfusate only increased extrasynaptic dopamine levels in the nAc, while strychnine administered locally (200 μM in perfusate decreased dopamine output by 60% in both the DLS and nAc. Our data suggest that GABAA and glycine receptors are tonically activated and modulate striatal transmission in a partially sub-region specific manner.

  2. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eJin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nucleus of amygdala (CeA has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n=9 and matched controls (n=9 were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR. Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-ylpropanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the α2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence.

  3. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan-specific......Motivation: Receptor-ligand interactions play an important role in controlling many biological systems. One prominent example is the binding of peptides to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules controlling the onset of cellular immune responses. Thousands of MHC allelic versions...... exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...

  4. Cell cycle phase-specific surface expression of nerve growth factor receptors TrkA and p75(NTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, J L; Becker, E; Andrieu, M; Thomas, A; Jullien, J; van Grunsven, L A; Menut, S; Evan, G I; Martín-Zanca, D; Rudkin, B B

    1998-09-01

    Expression of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors TrkA and p75(NTR) was found to vary at the surface of PC12 cells in a cell cycle phase-specific manner. This was evidenced by using flow cytometric and microscopic analysis of cell populations labeled with antibodies to the extracellular domains of both receptors. Differential expression of these receptors also was evidenced by biotinylation of surface proteins and Western analysis, using antibodies specific for the extracellular domains of TrkA and p75(NTR). TrkA is expressed most strongly at the cell surface in M and early G1 phases, whereas p75(NTR) is expressed mainly in late G1, S, and G2 phases. This expression reflects the molecular and cellular responses to NGF in specific phases of the cell cycle; in the G1 phase NGF elicits both the anti-mitogenic effect, i.e., inhibition of the G1 to S transition, and the differentiation response whereas a survival effect is provoked elsewhere in the cell cycle. A model is proposed relating these responses to the surface expression of the two receptors. These observations open the way for novel approaches to the investigation of the mechanism of NGF signal transduction.

  5. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Rivailler, Pierre; Hossain, Jaber; Carney, Paul; Balish, Amanda; Perry, Ijeoma; Davis, C. Todd; Garten, Rebecca; Shu, Bo; Xu, Xiyan; Klimov, Alexander; Paulson, James C.; Cox, Nancy J.; Swenson, Sabrina; Stevens, James; Vincent, Amy; Gramer, Marie; Donis, Ruben O.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of classical swine influenza viruses receptor specificity preceding the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical swine influenza viruses from the α, β, and γ antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very similar to that of 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses, with selectivity for α2-6-linked sialosides and very limited binding to α2-3 sialosides. Despite considerable genetic divergence, the ‘human-like’ H1N1 viruses circulating in swine retained strong binding preference for α2-6 sialylated glycans. Interspecies transmission of H1N1 influenza viruses from swine to humans or from humans to swine has not driven selection of viruses with distinct novel receptor binding specificities. Classical swine and human seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses have conserved specificity for similar α2-6-sialoside receptors in spite of long term circulation in separate hosts, suggesting that humans and swine impose analogous selection pressures on the evolution of receptor binding function. PMID:21333316

  6. Ligand specificities of Toll-like receptors in fish: indicatiaons from infection studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietretti, D.; Wiegertjes, G.

    2014-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are present in many different fish families from several different orders, including cyprinid, salmonid, perciform, pleuronectiform and gadiform representatives, with at least some conserved properties among these species. However, low conservation of the leucine-rich

  7. Thyroid hormone and retinoic acid nuclear receptors: specific ligand-activated transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtko, J.

    1998-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation by both the thyroid hormone and the vitamin A-derived 'retinoid hormones' is a critical component in controlling many aspects of higher vertebrate development and metabolism. Their functions are mediated by nuclear receptors, which comprise a large super-family of ligand-inducible transcription factors. Both the thyroid hormone and the retinoids are involved in a complex arrangement of physiological and development responses in many tissues of higher vertebrates. The functions of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T 3 ), the thyromimetically active metabolite of thyroxine as well as all-trans retinoic acid, the biologically active vitamin A metabolite are mediated by nuclear receptor proteins that are members of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid hormone receptor family. The functions of all members of the receptor super family are discussed. (authors)

  8. Muscarinic receptor subtype-specific effects on cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Bos, I. S. T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Wess, Juergen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic tone contributes to airflow obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Accordingly, anticholinergics are effective bronchodilators by blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor on airway smooth muscle. Recent evidence indicates that acetylcholine also contributes to airway

  9. Hemagglutinating and fusogenic activities of Newcastle disease virus: studies on receptor binding specificity and pH-induced conformational changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. S. Couceiro

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinal and wild strains of Newcastle Disease virus (NDV were analyzed for cell receptor binding and fusogenic biological properties associated with their HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and F (fusion protein surface structures respectively. The evaluation of the biological activities of HN and F was carried out respectively by determination of hemagglutinating titers and hemolysis percentages, using erythrocytes from various animal origins at different pH values. Significant differences in hemagglutination titers for some strains of NDV were detected, when interacting with goose, sheep, guinea-pip and human "O" group erythrocytes at neutral pH. Diversity of hemolysis percentagens was observed between different NDV strains at acid pH. These analysis were developed to evaluate particular aspects of the actual influence of the receptor specifity and pH on the receptor binding and fusogenic processes of Newcastle Disease viruses.

  10. Specific labelling of brain receptors with [3H]N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.J.; Coyle, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    N-Acetyl-aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) is a peptide endogenous to brain that exhibits high affinity for a subpopulation of brain receptor sites labeled with ( 3 H)L-glutamate. The excitatory effects of NAAG are, unlike those of l-glutamate itself, antagonized by 2-amino-5-phosphono-butyric acid (APB). The authors' results indicate that [ 3 H]NAAG is a useful ligand for characterizing this subpopulation of glutamate receptors. (Auth.)

  11. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experime...

  12. Sperm Impairment by Sperm Agglutinating Factor Isolated from Escherichia coli: Receptor Specific Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranjeet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier work done in our laboratory, we have been able to isolate a sperm agglutinating strain of Escherichia coli from the semen sample of a male attending infertility clinic. Further, factor responsible for sperm agglutination (SAF was isolated and purified, and, using SAF as a tool, corresponding SAF binding receptor from human spermatozoa has been purified. Characterization of SAF and SAF binding receptor using MALDI-TOF showed homology to glutamate decarboxylase and MHC class I molecule, respectively. Coincubation of SAF with spermatozoa not only resulted in spermagglutination but could also compromise other sperm parameters, namely, Mg2+ dependent ATPase activity and apoptosis. Intravaginal administration of SAF could lead to infertility in Balb/c mice. SAF induced impairment of sperm parameters, and infertility was observed to be due to interaction of SAF with sperm surface receptor component as, when purified receptor was introduced, receptor completely inhibited all the detrimental effects induced by SAF. From these results, it could be concluded that interaction of SAF with spermatozoa is receptor mediated.

  13. Genotype-specific regulation of oral innate immunity by T2R38 taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sucheol; Coldwell, Susan; Drury, Jeanie L; Arroyo, Fabiola; Phi, Tran; Saadat, Sanaz; Kwong, Danny; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-12-01

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to regulate mucosal innate immune responses in the upper airway epithelium. Furthermore, SNPs in T2R38 influence the sensitivity to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and are associated with caries risk/protection. However, no study has been reported on the role of T2R38 in the innate immune responses to oral bacteria. We hypothesize that T2R38 regulates oral innate immunity and that this regulation is genotype-specific. Primary gingival epithelial cells carrying three common genotypes, PAV/PAV (PROP super-taster), AVI/PAV (intermediate) and AVI/AVI (non-taster) were stimulated with cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans, periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis or non-pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum. QRT-PCR analyzed T2R38 mRNA, and T2R38-specific siRNA and ELISA were utilized to evaluate induction of hBD-2 (antimicrobial peptide), IL-1α and IL-8 in various donor-lines. Experiments were set up in duplicate and repeated three times. T2R38 mRNA induction in response to S. mutans was highest in PAV/PAV (4.3-fold above the unstimulated controls; pPAV/PAV, hBD-2 secretion in response to S. mutans was decreased by 77% when T2R38 was silenced. IL-1α secretion was higher in PAV/PAV compared to AVI/PAV or AVI/AVI with S. mutans stimulation, but it was reduced by half when T2R38 was silenced (pPAV/PAV and AVI/PAV remained close to that of the controls. Secretion levels of IL-1α and IL-8 decreased in AVI/AVI in response to P. gingivalis when T2R38 was silenced (pPAV/PAV. Our data suggest that the regulation of gingival innate immunity by T2R38 is genotype-dependent and that the ability to induce a high level of hBD-2 by PAV/PAV carriers may be a reason for protection against caries in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning of a cDNA encoding the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, R.; Nagel, G.; Schmidt, B.

    1987-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor have been isolated from a human placenta library in λgt11. The nucleotide sequence of the 2463-base-pair cDNA insert includes a 145-base-pair 5' untranslated region, an open reading frame of 831 base pairs corresponding to 277 amino acids, and a 1487-base-pair 3' untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with that determined by amino acid sequencing of the N-terminus peptide (41 residues) and nine tryptic peptides (93 additional residues). The receptor is synthesized as a precursor with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The hydrophobicity profile of the receptor indicates a single membrane-spanning domain, which separates an N-terminal region containing five potential N-glycosylation sites from a C-terminal region lacking N-glycosylation sites. Thus the N-terminal (M/sub r/ = 18,299) and C-terminal (M/sub r/ ≤ 7648) segments of the mature receptor are assumed to be exposed to the extracytosolic and cytosolic sides of the membrane, respectively. Analysis of a panel of somatic cell (mouse-human) hybrids shows that the gene for the receptor is located on human chromosome 12

  15. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  16. G protein-coupled receptor quantification using peptide group-specific enrichment combined with internal peptide standard reporter calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, David; Planatscher, Hannes; Hardie, Darryl B; Kraushaar, Udo; Pynn, Christopher J; Stoll, Dieter; Borchers, Christoph; Joos, Thomas O; Poetz, Oliver

    2013-09-02

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family comprises the largest and most diverse group of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. GPCRs are involved in a plethora of physiological functions in all kinds of tissues. Detailed knowledge about GPCR presence and expression levels in tissues can be very helpful for drug development as the majority of drugs are designed to modulate membrane receptors. Furthermore, it is known that many adverse drug effects result from GPCR interactions. However, very few satisfactory methods are currently available for the detection and quantification of GPCRs. The detection is complicated by their three-dimensional structure, their hydrophobic properties, and their localization in the plasma membrane with 7-trans-membrane domains and small cytosolic and extracellular domains. Due to these properties it is very difficult to generate specific antibodies directed against GPCRs for sandwich immunoassays and Western blot. We therefore designed an immunoaffinity- and mass spectrometry-based approach to analyze GPCR-specific signature peptides in tryptic digests in rat tissue lysates. The expression levels of four different GPCRs were determined using chemically labeled synthetic standard peptides. Here, we demonstrate for the first time, that peptide immunoaffinity MS-based methods can render a reliable and quantitative analysis of multi-membrane spanning receptor molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. GABAA receptor in the thalamic specific relay system contributes to the propofol-induced somatosensory cortical suppression in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chaoping; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Interaction with the gamma-aminobutyric-acid-type-A (GABAA) receptors is recognized as an important component of the mechanism of propofol, a sedative-hypnotic drug commonly used as anesthetic. However the contribution of GABAA receptors to the central nervous system suppression is still not well understood, especially in the thalamocortical network. In the present study, we investigated if intracerebral injection of bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) into the thalamus ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM, a thalamus specific relay nuclei that innervated S1 mostly) could reverse propofol-induced cortical suppression, through recording the changes of both spontaneous and somatosensory neural activities in rat's somatosensory cortex (S1). We found that after injection of bicuculline into VPM, significant increase of neural activities were observed in all bands of local field potentials (total band, 182±6%), while the amplitude of all components in somatosensory evoked potentials were also increased (negative, 121±9% and positive, 124±6%).These data support that the potentiation of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in a thalamic specific relay system seems to play a crucial role in propofol-induced cortical suppression in the somatosensory cortex of rats.

  18. REEPs are membrane shaping adapter proteins that modulate specific g protein-coupled receptor trafficking by affecting ER cargo capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Björk

    Full Text Available Receptor expression enhancing proteins (REEPs were identified by their ability to enhance cell surface expression of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, specifically GPCRs that have proven difficult to express in heterologous cell systems. Further analysis revealed that they belong to the Yip (Ypt-interacting protein family and that some REEP subtypes affect ER structure. Yip family comparisons have established other potential roles for REEPs, including regulation of ER-Golgi transport and processing/neuronal localization of cargo proteins. However, these other potential REEP functions and the mechanism by which they selectively enhance GPCR cell surface expression have not been clarified. By utilizing several REEP family members (REEP1, REEP2, and REEP6 and model GPCRs (α2A and α2C adrenergic receptors, we examined REEP regulation of GPCR plasma membrane expression, intracellular processing, and trafficking. Using a combination of immunolocalization and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that this REEP subset is localized primarily to ER, but not plasma membranes. Single cell analysis demonstrated that these REEPs do not specifically enhance surface expression of all GPCRs, but affect ER cargo capacity of specific GPCRs and thus their surface expression. REEP co-expression with α2 adrenergic receptors (ARs revealed that this REEP subset interacts with and alter glycosidic processing of α2C, but not α2A ARs, demonstrating selective interaction with cargo proteins. Specifically, these REEPs enhanced expression of and interacted with minimally/non-glycosylated forms of α2C ARs. Most importantly, expression of a mutant REEP1 allele (hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG31 lacking the carboxyl terminus led to loss of this interaction. Thus specific REEP isoforms have additional intracellular functions besides altering ER structure, such as enhancing ER cargo capacity, regulating ER-Golgi processing, and interacting with select cargo

  19. Expression profile of oestrogen receptors and oestrogen-related receptors is organ specific and sex dependent: the Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, N K M; Cheung, A C K; Ye, R R; Ge, W; Giesy, J P; Au, D W T

    2013-08-01

    Gene expression of all known subtypes of oestrogen receptor (ER) and oestrogen-related receptor (ERR) in multiple organs and both sexes of the Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes was profiled and systematically analysed. As revealed by statistical analyses and low-dimensional projections, the expressions of ERRs proved to be organ and sex dependent, which is in contrast with the ubiquitous nature of ERs. Moreover, expressions of specific ERR isoforms (ERRγ1, ERRγ2) were strongly correlated with that of all ERs (ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2), suggesting the existence of potential interactions. Findings of this study shed light on the co-regulatory role of particular ERRs in oestrogen-ERs signalling and highlight the potential importance of ERRs in determining organ and sex-specific oestrogen responses. Using O. latipes as an alternative vertebrate model, this study provides new directions that call for collective efforts from the scientific community to unravel the mechanistic action of ER-ERR cross-talks, and their intertwining functions, in a cell and sex-specific manner in vivo. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian 'avian-like' H1N1 swine viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian "avian-like" (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. © 2013 The Authors Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  2. Single-cell FRET imaging of transferrin receptor trafficking dynamics by Sfp-catalyzed, site-specific protein labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Lin, Alison J; Buckett, Peter D; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Golan, David E; Walsh, Christopher T

    2005-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging of living cells depends on an efficient and specific method for labeling the target cellular protein with fluorophores. Here we show that Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase-catalyzed protein labeling is suitable for fluorescence imaging of membrane proteins that spend at least part of their membrane trafficking cycle at the cell surface. In this study, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) was fused to peptide carrier protein (PCP), and the TfR1-PCP fusion protein was specifically labeled with fluorophore Alexa 488 by Sfp. The trafficking of transferrin-TfR1-PCP complex during the process of transferrin-mediated iron uptake was imaged by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the fluorescently labeled transferrin ligand and TfR1 receptor. We thus demonstrated that Sfp-catalyzed small molecule labeling of the PCP tag represents a practical and efficient tool for molecular imaging studies in living cells.

  3. Determinants Present in the Receptor Carboxy Tail Are Responsible for Differences in Subtype-Specific Coupling of β-Adrenergic Receptors to Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Simard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An agonist-occupied β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR recruits G protein receptor kinase-2 (GRK2 which is recruited to the membrane. Thus, the physical proximity of activated β2-AR and PI-3K allows the activation of the latter. In contrast, it has been observed that the β1-AR is unable to activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway. We hypothesized that the difference might be due to molecular determinants present in the carboxy termini of the two β-AR subtypes. Using transiently transfected HEK 293 cells expressing either β1- or β2-AR, we also observed that in presence of an agonist, β2-AR, but not β1-AR, is able to activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway. Switching the seventh transmembrane domain and the carboxy tail between the two receptors reverses this phenotype; that is, β1×β2-AR can activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway whereas β2×β1-AR cannot. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin abolished the activation of PI-3K by β2- or β1×β2-AR stimulation. Ligand-mediated internalization of the β2-AR induced by a 15-minute stimulation with agonist was abolished in the presence of a dominant negative of PI-3K or following pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results indicate that the subtype-specific differences in the coupling to PI-3K/Akt pathway are due to molecular determinants present in the carboxy tail of the receptor and further that β2-AR activates PI-3K via a pertussis toxin-sensitive mechanism.

  4. Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5Nx) Viruses with Altered H5 Receptor-Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongbo; de Vries, Erik; McBride, Ryan; Dekkers, Jojanneke; Peng, Wenjie; Bouwman, Kim M; Nycholat, Corwin; Verheije, M Helene; Paulson, James C; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2017-02-01

    Emergence and intercontinental spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5Nx) virus clade 2.3.4.4 is unprecedented. H5N8 and H5N2 viruses have caused major economic losses in the poultry industry in Europe and North America, and lethal human infections with H5N6 virus have occurred in Asia. Knowledge of the evolution of receptor-binding specificity of these viruses, which might affect host range, is urgently needed. We report that emergence of these viruses is accompanied by a change in receptor-binding specificity. In contrast to ancestral clade 2.3.4 H5 proteins, novel clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins bind to fucosylated sialosides because of substitutions K222Q and S227R, which are unique for highly pathogenic influenza virus H5 proteins. North American clade 2.3.4.4 virus isolates have retained only the K222Q substitution but still bind fucosylated sialosides. Altered receptor-binding specificity of virus clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins might have contributed to emergence and spread of H5Nx viruses.

  5. Two specific membrane-bound aminopeptidase N isoforms from Aedes aegypti larvae serve as functional receptors for the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin implicating counterpart specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroonkesorn, Aratee; Pootanakit, Kusol; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-05-29

    The interaction between Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins and their receptors on midgut cells of susceptible insect larvae is the critical determinant in toxin specificity. Besides GPI-linked alkaline phosphatase in Aedes aegypti mosquito-larval midguts, membrane-bound aminopeptidase N (AaeAPN) is widely thought to serve as a Cry4Ba receptor. Here, two full-length AaeAPN isoforms, AaeAPN2778 and AaeAPN2783, predicted to be GPI-linked were cloned and successfully expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells as 112- and 107-kDa membrane-bound proteins, respectively. In the cytotoxicity assay, Sf9 cells expressing each of the two AaeAPN isoforms showed increased sensitivity to the Cry4Ba mosquito-active toxin. Double immunolocalization revealed specific binding of Cry4Ba to each individual AaeAPN expressed on the cell membrane surface. Sequence analysis and homology-based modeling placed these two AaeAPNs to the M1 aminopeptidase family as they showed similar four-domain structures, with the most conserved domain II being the catalytic component. Additionally, the most variable domain IV containing negatively charged surface patches observed only in dipteran APNs could be involved in insect specificity. Overall results demonstrated that these two membrane-bound APN isoforms were responsible for mediating Cry4Ba toxicity against AaeAPN-expressed Sf9 cells, suggesting their important role as functional receptors for the toxin counterpart in A. aegypti mosquito larvae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of neointima formation by local delivery of estrogen receptor alpha and beta specific agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, Y.D.; Pires, N.M.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Vries, M.R. de; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Quax, P.H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Neointima formation is the underlying mechanism of (in-stent) restenosis. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is known to inhibit injury-induced neointima formation and post-angioplasty restenosis. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been demonstrated to mediate E2 anti-restenotic properties. However, the

  7. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  8. Layer-specific modulation of the prefrontal cortex by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, R.B.; Bloem, B.; Schak, B.; Wester, J.; de Kock, C.P.J.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine signaling through nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is crucial for attention. Nicotinic AChRs are expressed on glutamatergic inputs to layer V (LV) cells and on LV interneurons and LVI pyramidal neurons. Whether PFC layers are activated by nAChRs to a similar

  9. A specific multi-nutrient formulation enhances M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor responses in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savelkoul, P.J.M.; Janíčková, Helena; Kuipers, A.A.M.; Hageman, R.J.J.; Kamphuis, P.J.; Doležal, Vladimír; Broersen, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2012), s. 631-640 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptor * docosahexaenoic acid * Alzheimer’s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.973, year: 2012

  10. Deficits in Sensory-Specific Devaluation Task Performance Following Genetic Deletions of Cannabinoid (CB1) Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombag, Hans S.; Johnson, Alexander W.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Holland, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor is abundantly expressed throughout the CNS and is implicated in numerous physiological and behavioral functions, including appetite and feeding. In the present study, wild-type and CB1 heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice were tested on an instrumental outcome-selective devaluation task to assess changes in acquired…

  11. Multiple promoters drive tissue-specific expression of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Bruce, A. W.; Doležal, Vladimír; Tuček, Stanislav; Buckley, N. J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 1 (2004), s. 88-98 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5011306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : M2 muscarinic receptor * neuron-restrictive silence factor * promoter Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.824, year: 2004

  12. Differential pharmacotherapy for subgroups of fibromyalgia patients with specific consideration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Matthias F; Müller, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    The fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has a prevalence of about 2% and is characterized by generalized musculoskeletal pain, reduced pain threshold and autonomic and functional symptoms. It is a multifactorial syndrome with four different subgroups exhibiting pathophysiological and psychiatric findings. No precise treatment strategy is currently available for the different FMS subgroups. This article reviews the evidence for treatment options for the different FMS subgroups. Therapy for the first subgroup of primary FMS, with high levels of pain but no psychopathological alterations, is targeted at nociceptors expressing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine-3; 5-HT3) receptors with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The second and third subgroups are characterized by depressive syndromes with a major indication for antidepressants. The fourth subgroup with psychosomatic syndromes requires psychotherapeutic treatment. Secondary FMS is similar to the primary syndromes but is triggered by a variety of other diseases and frequently responds to 5-HT3 receptor antagonist treatment. Different classes of drug, such as pregabalin, must be tested for efficacy and tolerance. FMS treatment strategies should be tailored after the identification of individual FMS subgroups. Although several groups of drug have been studied extensively, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are most effective in patients without psychopathological alterations.

  13. Detection of phenols in potable water using SPR and specific receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Jennifer Valerie

    2002-07-01

    The potential of thin films of a range of molecular receptors for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing of a range of phenolic molecules in water has been explored. Receptors included molecular clips based on diarylglycouril units with two aromatic 'walls'; and polyalkylviologen (PAV) and cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CPP) dications, two examples with polystyrene sulphonate (PSS) counterions. Films containing sulphonated polycyclodextrins were also evaluated. Target phenols included phenol, three benzene diols and two triols, three hydroxylated biphenyls and a range of related molecules. Receptor films were spin-coated, at up to 10,000rpm, as thin films (<200nm) onto glass slides coated with 48nm of silver. Effects of aqueous analytes on the position and profile of their SPR were examined by goniometer scanning and fixed angle measurement of intensity changes using a 632.8nm laser. A novel CCD array detector, utilising LED narrow band illumination peaking at 654nm, later yielded whole curve, real-time observations. Fixed-angle SPR responses of all viologen film types tested varied in direction, size and rate for different phenols, and depended on both the concentration of the phenol and on the age of its aqueous solution, permitting detection down to 10ppm. GC/MS studies confirmed the presence of polyphenols as oxidatively coupled phenolic breakdown products in the aged solutions. Greater sensitivity to polyphenols than to the original monomers was observed. The mechanistic basis of these observations is discussed with reference to SPR responses of the receptors to a series of model compounds designed to clarify the relative roles of hydrogen bonding, charge transfer and {pi}-{pi} interactions. Theoretical modelling of the responses has also been undertaken. Based on these results, time-dependent SPR response patterns for films of three different receptors were shown to permit unambiguous identification of simple phenols in water. The potential of

  14. Flat clathrin lattices are dynamic actin-controlled hubs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis and signalling of specific receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Isogai, Tadamoto; Argenzio, Elisabetta; van den Broek, Bram; Klarenbeek, Jeffrey; Janssen, Hans; Jalink, Kees; Innocenti, Metello

    2017-07-13

    Clathrin lattices at the plasma membrane coat both invaginated and flat regions forming clathrin-coated pits and clathrin plaques, respectively. The function and regulation of clathrin-coated pits in endocytosis are well understood but clathrin plaques remain enigmatic nanodomains. Here we use super-resolution microscopy, molecular genetics and cell biology to show that clathrin plaques contain the machinery for clathrin-mediated endocytosis and cell adhesion, and associate with both clathrin-coated pits and filamentous actin. We also find that actin polymerization promoted by N-WASP through the Arp2/3 complex is crucial for the regulation of plaques but not pits. Clathrin plaques oppose cell migration and undergo actin- and N-WASP-dependent disassembly upon activation of LPA receptor 1, but not EGF receptor. Most importantly, plaque disassembly correlates with the endocytosis of LPA receptor 1 and down-modulation of AKT activity. Thus, clathrin plaques serve as dynamic actin-controlled hubs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis and signalling that exhibit receptor specificity.

  15. (S)-homo-AMPA, a specific agonist at the mGlu6 subtype of metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadian, H; Nielsen, B; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1997-01-01

    of the spectroscopic configurational assignments. The activities of 6 and 7 at ionotropic EAA (iGlu) receptors and at mGlu1-7 were studied. (S)-Homo-AMPA (6) was shown to be a specific agonist at mGlu6 (EC50 = 58 +/- 11 microM) comparable in potency with the endogenous mGlu agonist (S)-glutamic acid (EC50 = 20 +/- 3......Our previous publication (J. Med. Chem. 1996, 39, 3188-3194) described (RS)-2-amino-4-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)butyric acid (Homo-AMPA) as a highly selective agonist at the mGlu6 subtype of metabotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. Homo-AMPA has already become a standard agonist...... microM). Although Homo-AMPA did not show significant effects at iGlu receptors, (R)-Homo-AMPA (7), which was inactive at mGlu1-7, turned out to be a weak N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist (IC50 = 131 +/- 18 microM)....

  16. Reproductive physiology of a humanized GnRH receptor mouse model: application in evaluation of human-specific analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Javier A; Kohout, Trudy; Pineda, Rafael; Maki, Richard A; Scott Struthers, R; Millar, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    The human GnRH receptor (GNRHR1) has a specific set of properties with physiological and pharmacological influences not appropriately modeled in laboratory animals or cell-based systems. To address this deficiency, we have generated human GNRHR1 knock-in mice and described their reproductive phenotype. Measurement of pituitary GNRHR1 transcripts from homozygous human GNRHR1 knock-in (ki/ki) mice revealed a severe reduction (7- to 8-fold) compared with the mouse Gnrhr1 in wild-type mice. ¹²⁵I-GnRH binding assays on pituitary membrane fractions corroborated reduced human GNRHR1 protein expression in ki/ki mice, as occurs with transfection of human GNRHR1 in cell lines. Female homozygous knock-in mice displayed normal pubertal onset, indicating that a large reduction in GNRHR1 expression is sufficient for this process. However, ki/ki females exhibited periods of prolonged estrous and/or metestrous and reduced fertility. No impairment was found in reproductive maturity or adult fertility in male ki/ki mice. Interestingly, the serum LH response to GnRH challenge was reduced in both knock-in males and females, indicating a reduced GNRHR1 signaling capacity. Small molecules targeting human GPCRs usually have poor activities at homologous rodent receptors, thus limiting their use in preclinical development. Therefore, we tested a human-specific GnRH1 antagonist, NBI-42902, in our mouse model and demonstrated abrogation of a GnRH1-induced serum LH rise in ki/ki mice and an absence of effect in littermates expressing the wild-type murine receptor. This novel model provides the opportunity to study the human receptor in vivo and for screening the activity of human-specific GnRH analogs.

  17. Site-specific and synergistic stimulation of methylation on the bacterial chemotaxis receptor Tsr by serine and CheW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Robert M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific glutamates in the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs of Escherichia coli are modified during sensory adaptation. Attractants that bind to MCPs are known to increase the rate of receptor modification, as with serine and the serine receptor (Tsr, which contributes to an increase in the steady-state (adapted methylation level. However, MCPs form ternary complexes with two cytoplasmic signaling proteins, the kinase (CheA and an adaptor protein (CheW, but their influences on receptor methylation are unknown. Here, the influence of CheW on the rate of Tsr methylation has been studied to identify contributions to the process of adaptation. Results Methyl group incorporation was measured in a series of membrane samples in which the Tsr molecules were engineered to have one available methyl-accepting glutamate residue (297, 304, 311 or 493. The relative rates at these sites (0.14, 0.05, 0.05 and 1, respectively differed from those found previously for the aspartate receptor (Tar, which was in part due to sequence differences between Tar and Tsr near site four. The addition of CheW generated unexpectedly large and site-specific rate increases, equal to or larger than the increases produced by serine. The increases produced by serine and CheW (added separately were the largest at site one, ~3 and 6-fold, respectively, and the least at site four, no change and ~2-fold, respectively. The rate increases were even larger when serine and CheW were added together, larger than the sums of the increases produced by serine and CheW added separately (except site four. This resulted in substantially larger serine-stimulated increases when CheW was present. Also, CheW enhanced methylation rates when either two or all four sites were available. Conclusion The increase in the rate of receptor methylation upon CheW binding contributes significantly to the ligand specificity and kinetics of sensory adaptation. The synergistic effect of

  18. A modular interface of IL-4 allows for scalable affinity without affecting specificity for the IL-4 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebald Walter

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 4 (IL-4 is a key regulator of the immune system and an important factor in the development of allergic hypersensitivity. Together with interleukin 13 (IL-13, IL-4 plays an important role in exacerbating allergic and asthmatic symptoms. For signal transduction, both cytokines can utilise the same receptor, consisting of the IL-4Rα and the IL-13Rα1 chain, offering an explanation for their overlapping biological functions. Since both cytokine ligands share only moderate similarity on the amino acid sequence level, molecular recognition of the ligands by both receptor subunits is of great interest. IL-4 and IL-13 are interesting targets for allergy and asthma therapies. Knowledge of the binding mechanism will be important for the generation of either IL-4 or IL-13 specific drugs. Results We present a structure/function analysis of the IL-4 ligand-receptor interaction. Structural determination of a number of IL-4 variants together with in vitro binding studies show that IL-4 and its high-affinity receptor subunit IL-4Rα interact via a modular protein-protein interface consisting of three independently-acting interaction clusters. For high-affinity binding of wild-type IL-4 to its receptor IL-4Rα, only two of these clusters (i.e. cluster 1 centered around Glu9 and cluster 2 around Arg88 contribute significantly to the free binding energy. Mutating residues Thr13 or Phe82 located in cluster 3 to aspartate results in super-agonistic IL-4 variants. All three clusters are fully engaged in these variants, generating a three-fold higher binding affinity for IL-4Rα. Mutagenesis studies reveal that IL-13 utilizes the same main binding determinants, i.e. Glu11 (cluster 1 and Arg64 (cluster 2, suggesting that IL-13 also uses this modular protein interface architecture. Conclusion The modular architecture of the IL-4-IL-4Rα interface suggests a possible mechanism by which proteins might be able to generate binding affinity

  19. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  20. HIV-specific Cytotoxic T Cells from Long-Term Survivors Select a Unique T Cell Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Chen, Nan; Easterbrook, Philippa; Xu, Xiaoning; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Weekes, Michael; Conlon, Chris; Spina, Celsa; Little, Susan; Screaton, Gavin; van der Merwe, Anton; Richman, Douglas D.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2004-01-01

    HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important in controlling HIV replication, but the magnitude of the CTL response does not predict clinical outcome. In four donors with delayed disease progression we identified Vβ13.2 T cell receptors (TCRs) with very similar and unusually long β-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) regions in CTL specific for the immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)-B8–restricted human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) nef epitope, FLKEKGGL (FL8). CTL expressing Vβ13.2 TCRs tolerate naturally arising viral variants in the FL8 epitope that escape recognition by other CTL. In addition, they expand efficiently in vitro and are resistant to apoptosis, in contrast to FL8–specific CTL using other TCRs. Selection of Vβ13.2 TCRs by some patients early in the FL8-specific CTL response may be linked with better clinical outcome. PMID:15596521

  1. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, A. M.; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 21 (2016), s. 2903-2913 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alanine scanning mutagenesis * high-affinity binding * type 1 IGF receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.biochem.6b00140

  2. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  3. Specific alleles of bitter receptor genes influence human sensitivity to the bitterness of aloin and saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Alexey N; Xu, Hong; Tang, Huixian; Zhang, Lan; Li, Qing; Li, Xiaodong

    2007-08-21

    Variation in human taste is a well-known phenomenon. However, little is known about the molecular basis for it. Bitter taste in humans is believed to be mediated by a family of 25 G protein-coupled receptors (hT2Rs, or TAS2Rs). Despite recent progress in the functional expression of hT2Rs in vitro, up until now, hT2R38, a receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), was the only gene directly linked to variations in human bitter taste. Here we report that polymorphism in two hT2R genes results in different receptor activities and different taste sensitivities to three bitter molecules. The hT2R43 gene allele, which encodes a protein with tryptophan in position 35, makes people very sensitive to the bitterness of the natural plant compounds aloin and aristolochic acid. People who do not possess this allele do not taste these compounds at low concentrations. The same hT2R43 gene allele makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of an artificial sweetener, saccharin. In addition, a closely related gene's (hT2R44's) allele also makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of saccharin. We also demonstrated that some people do not possess certain hT2R genes, contributing to taste variation between individuals. Our findings thus reveal new examples of variations in human taste and provide a molecular basis for them.

  4. Cell specific effects of PCB 126 on aryl hydrocarbone receptors in follicular cells of porcine ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Augustowska, K.; Gregoraszczuk, E. [Lab. of Physiology and Toxicology of Reproduction, Dept. of Animal Physiology, Inst. of Zoology, Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs) like other endocrine disrupters could interfere with natural hormones by binding to their receptors and thus mimicking the cellular response to them. They are known to possess either estrogenic or antiestrogenic properties. In our previous papers we demonstrated that PCBs are able to disrupt ovarian steroidogenesis. We found that the coplanar PCB 126 caused the decrease in estradiol secretion in whole cultured pig ovarian follicles. PCB 126 congener is structurally related to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Since TCDD effects are known to be mediated by aryl hydrocarbone receptors (AhRs), we decided to determine if PCB 126 affects signal transduction pathway activated by these receptors. It has been reported that the functional AhR is present in ovary including oocytes, granulosa and theca cells of rat, mouse, rhesus monkey and human ovary. Moreover, the expression of AhR in the rat ovary appeared to be estrous cycle-dependent, thus suggesting that AhR expression may be regulated by fluctuating hormone levels. This study was designed to investigate the effects of the non-ortho-substituted 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) on the AhR activation, localization and protein level in pig ovarian follicle cells.

  5. Neurokinin B- and specific tachykinin NK3 receptor agonists-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoui, Samira; Naline, Emmanuel; Lagente, Vincent; Emonds-Alt, Xavier; Advenier, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether neurokinin B (NKB) or specific agonists of tachykinin NK3 receptors, [MePhe7]NKB and senktide, were able to induce airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea-pigs. The effects of these compounds were compared to those of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and the preferential tachykinin NK1 ([Sar9, Met(02)11]SP) or NK2 ([βAla8]NKA (4-10)) receptor agonists.In guinea-pigs pretreated with phosphoramidon (10−4 M aerosol for 10 min) and salbutamol (8.7×10−3 M for 10 min), all tachykinins administrated by aerosol (3×10−7 to 10−4 M) induced airway hyperresponsiveness 24 h later, displayed by an exaggerated response to the bronchoconstrictor effect of acetylcholine (i.v.). The rank order of potency was: [βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKA=NKB=senktide=[MePhe7]NKB=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP>SP.Airway hyperresponsiveness induced by [MePhe7]NKB was prevented by the tachykinin NK3 (SR 142801) and NK2 (SR 48968) receptor antagonists.Bronchoconstriction induced by tachykinins administered by aerosol was also determined. SP, NKA, NKB and the tachykinin NK1 and NK2 receptor agonist induced bronchoconstriction. The rank order of potency was: NKA=[βAla8]NKA (4-10)>NKB=SP=[Sar9,Met(02)11]SP. Under similar conditions, and for concentrations which induce airway hyperresponsiveness, senktide and [MePhe7]NKB failed to induce bronchoconstriction.It is concluded that tachykinin NK3-receptor stimulation can induce airway hyperresponsiveness and that this effect is not related to the ability of tachykinins to induce bronchoconstriction. PMID:10780997

  6. Haploinsufficiency in the PPARα and LDL receptor genes leads to gender- and age-specific obesity and hyperinsulinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Eiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Nakajima, Tamie; Kamijo, Yuji; Yokoyama, Shin; Li Yufeng; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-01-01

    When preparing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α:low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (-/-) double knockout mice, we unexpectedly found a unique gender- and age-specific obesity in the F1 generation, PPARα (+/-):LDLR (+/-), even in mice fed standard chow. Body weights of the male heterozygous mice increased up to about 60 g at 75 weeks of age, then decreased by about 30 g at 100 weeks of age. More than 95% of the heterozygous mice between 35- and 75-week-olds were overweight. Of interest, the obese heterozygous mice also exhibited hyperinsulinemia correlating with moderate insulin resistance. Hepatic gene expression of LDLR was lower than expected in the heterozygous mice, particularly at 50 and 75 weeks of age. In contrast, the hepatic expression of PPARα was higher than expected in obese heterozygous mice, but decreased in non-obese older heterozygous mice. Modulated expression of these genes may be partially associated with the onset of the hyperinsulinemia

  7. Megalin is a receptor for apolipoprotein M, and kidney-specific megalin-deficiency confers urinary excretion of apolipoprotein M

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Kirsten; Hvidberg, Vibeke; Moestrup, Søren K

    2006-01-01

    . In addition, apoM is expressed at high levels in the kidney tubule cells. In this study, we show that the multiligand receptor megalin, which is expressed in kidney proximal tubule cells, is a receptor for apoM and mediates its uptake in the kidney. To examine apoM binding to megalin, a recombinant apo....... To examine the importance of apoM binding by megalin in vivo, we analyzed mice with a tissue-specific deficiency of megalin in the kidney. Megalin deficiency was associated with pronounced urinary excretion of apoM, whereas apoM was not detected in normal mouse, human, or rat urine. Gel filtration analysis...... showed that the urinary apoM-containing particles were small and devoid of apoA-I. The results suggest that apoM binds to megalin and that megalin-mediated endocytosis in kidney proximal tubules prevents apoM excretion in the urine....

  8. Associations of parity-related reproductive histories with ER± and HER2± receptor-specific breast cancer aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, William F; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    were estimated with Poisson regression models. Results: With nearly 31 million women-years of follow-up, 45 786 Danish women aged 20-84 years developed invasive breast cancer during 1992-2011. ER± expression was available for the entire study period and HER2± after 2006. Of the breast cancers...... before age 50. Parity and early [not later] AFLB showed a protective association with ER+/HER2- and risk association with ER-/HER2- cancers. Conclusion: Associations of reproductive history with breast cancer risk varied among Danish women by ER± and ER±/HER2± expression and age-at-diagnosis, consistent......Background: Associations of reproductive history with breast cancer risk differ by oestrogen receptor (ER±) status and possibly by the joint expression of ER and the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ER±/HER2±). However, large sample sizes are needed to establish ER-specific risks by HER2...

  9. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  10. A high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptor redirects lymphocytes to target human melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William R; Zhao, Yangbing; Frankel, Timothy L; Hinrichs, Christian S; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Ferrone, Soldano; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2010-04-15

    Immunotherapy, particularly the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), is a very promising therapy for metastatic melanoma. Some patients unable to receive TIL have been successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen-restricted, melanoma antigen-reactive T-cell receptors; however, substantial numbers of patients remain ineligible due to the lack of expression of the restricting HLA class I allele. We sought to overcome this limitation by designing a non-MHC-restricted, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), which is highly expressed on more than 90% of human melanomas but has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. HMW-MAA-specific CARs containing an antigen recognition domain based on variations of the HMW-MAA-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28S and a T-cell activation domain based on combinations of CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3zeta activation motifs were constructed within a retroviral vector to allow stable gene transfer into cells and their progeny. Following optimization of the HMW-MAA-specific CAR for expression and function in human PBL, these gene-modified T cells secreted cytokines, were cytolytic, and proliferated in response to HMW-MAA-expressing cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor functioned in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, was non-MHC restricted, and reacted against explanted human melanomas. To evaluate this HMW-MAA-specific CAR in patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a clinical-grade retroviral packaging line. This may represent a novel means to treat the majority of patients with advanced melanoma, most notably those unable to receive current ACT therapies. (c)2010 AACR.

  11. Structure-function analysis of barley NLR immune receptor MLA10 reveals its cell compartment specific activity in cell death and disease resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, S.; Liu, J.; Chang, C.; Zhang, L.; Maekawa, T.; Wang, Q.; Xiao, W.; Liu, Y.; Chai, J.; Takken, F.L.W.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Shen, Q.H.

    2012-01-01

    Plant intracellular immune receptors comprise a large number of multi-domain proteins resembling animal NOD-like receptors (NLRs). Plant NLRs typically recognize isolate-specific pathogen-derived effectors, encoded by avirulence (AVR) genes, and trigger defense responses often associated with

  12. Sex-specific influence of angiotensin type 2 receptor stimulation on renal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilliard, Lucinda M; Jones, Emma S; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is a powerful regulator of arterial pressure and body fluid volume. Increasing evidence suggests that the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), which mediates the vasodilatory and natriuretic actions of angiotensin peptides, is enhanced in females and may, therefore......)R agonist, compound 21 (100, 200, and 300 ng/kg per minute), in the presence and absence of AT(2)R blockade (PD123319; 1 mg/kg per hour). Direct AT(2)R stimulation significantly increased renal blood flow in both males and females, without influencing arterial pressure. This was dose dependent...

  13. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  14. Identification of the First Receptor for a Pregnancy Specific Glycoprotein. Tetraspanins Find Their Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-13

    Kameda. T. , Taniguchi , T. . Takagi. T .. Saji , F. and Tanizawa, 0. , ) C/ill Endocrino ! M elab 71 . 436-41 . 1990. 37. Turner. M. , Chantry. D. and...qfrhe promonO(I’le eelliine THP-1. Mo l. Endocrino !. , 1995. 9(10): p. 1297-305. 52. Ruos laht i, E.,lnlegril1s. J Clin Invest. 1991. 87( [): p. 1-5...choriollic gonadotropill by activating IL-6 and IL-6-receptor system ill first trimester Illiman trophoblast.\\·. J Clin Endocrino ! Metab. 199 1. 72(3

  15. Cell-Specific Cre Recombinase Expression Allows Selective Ablation of Glutamate Receptors from Mouse Horizontal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Schultz, Konrad; Cimiotti, Kerstin; Weiler, Reto; Willecke, Klaus; Dedek, Karin

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse retina, horizontal cells form an electrically coupled network and provide feedback signals to photoreceptors and feedforward signals to bipolar cells. Thereby, horizontal cells contribute to gain control at the first visual synapse and to the antagonistic organization of bipolar and ganglion cell receptive fields. However, the nature of horizontal cell output remains a matter of debate, just as the exact contribution of horizontal cells to center-surround antagonism. To facilitate studying horizontal cell function, we developed a knockin mouse line which allows ablating genes exclusively in horizontal cells. This knockin line expresses a Cre recombinase under the promoter of connexin57 (Cx57), a gap junction protein only expressed in horizontal cells. Consistently, in Cx57+/Cre mice, Cre recombinase is expressed in almost all horizontal cells (>99%) and no other retinal neurons. To test Cre activity, we crossbred Cx57+/Cre mice with a mouse line in which exon 11 of the coding sequence for the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluA4 was flanked by two loxP sites (GluA4fl/fl). In GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, GluA4 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced (∼50%) in the outer retina where horizontal cells receive photoreceptor inputs, confirming the functionality of the Cre/loxP system. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from isolated horizontal cell somata showed a reduction of glutamate-induced inward currents by ∼75%, suggesting that the GluA4 subunit plays a major role in mediating photoreceptor inputs. The persistent current in GluA4-deficient cells is mostly driven by AMPA and to a very small extent by kainate receptors as revealed by application of the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI52466 and concanavalin A, a potentiator of kainate receptor-mediated currents. In summary, the Cx57+/Cre mouse line provides a versatile tool for studying horizontal cell function. GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, in which horizontal cells receive less excitatory input

  16. Fluorescence Techniques for Measuring Kinetics of Specific Binding of Hormone to Cell Surface Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Edward Herbert

    This thesis presents theoretical calculations and technical advances relevant to total internal reflection/ fluorescence photobleaching recovery (tir/fpr), and results from experiments using tir/fpr to measure the dissociation rate constant of epidermal growth factor (egf) hormone interacting with its receptor molecule on A431 cells. The classical electromagnetic calculations describe fluorescence emission from fluorophores near an interface (possibly metal coated). It is well known that an interface alters the emission properties of nearby fluorophores. Most previous classical calculations model the fluorophore as a fixed-amplitude dipole oscillator. However, for fluorophores under steady illumination, a fixed-power dipole is more appropriate. This modification corresponds to normalizing the fixed-amplitude dipole's intensity by its total dissipated power. The results for the fixed-power model differ nontrivially from the fixed-amplitude model. The observation-angle -dependent intensity as a function of the fluorophore's orientation and distance from the surface is calculated. General expressions are derived for the emission power as observed through a circular-aperture collection system located on either side of the interface. A system for maintaining long-term focus of samples under high-magnification quantitative observation in an epi-illumination optical microscope is described. Focus -dependent changes in the backreflection of an off-axis HeNe laser generate negative feedback signals which drive a dc motor coupled to the fine-focus knob of the microscope. This system has several advantages: (1) it is compatible and nonobstructive with concurrent data acqusition of sample intensities; (2) it requires no alteration of the sample, stage, or objective; (3) it monitors the position of sample areas very near to those under observation; (4) it is inexpensive. The system can hold a glass coverslip sample to within 0.5 μm of its preset focus position. Prismless tir

  17. Oxidation-specific epitopes are danger-associated molecular patterns recognized by pattern recognition receptors of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Yury I; Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    , such as oxidized phospholipids and oxidized cholesteryl esters, and mediate a variety of immune responses, from expression of proinflammatory genes to excessive intracellular lipoprotein accumulation to atheroprotective humoral immunity. These insights may lead to improved understanding of inflammation......Oxidation reactions are vital parts of metabolism and signal transduction. However, they also produce reactive oxygen species, which damage lipids, proteins and DNA, generating "oxidation-specific" epitopes. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that such common oxidation-specific epitopes...... are a major target of innate immunity, recognized by a variety of "pattern recognition receptors" (PRRs). By analogy with microbial "pathogen-associated molecular patterns" (PAMPs), we postulate that host-derived, oxidation-specific epitopes can be considered to represent "danger (or damage...

  18. Specific recycling receptors are targeted to the immune synapse by the intraflagellar transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Masi, Giulia; Onnis, Anna; Galgano, Donatella; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Pazour, Gregory J.; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT T cell activation requires sustained signaling at the immune synapse, a specialized interface with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) that assembles following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptide. Central to sustained signaling is the continuous recruitment of TCRs to the immune synapse. These TCRs are partly mobilized from an endosomal pool by polarized recycling. We have identified IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, as a central regulator of TCR recycling to the immune synapse. Here, we have investigated the interplay of IFT20 with the Rab GTPase network that controls recycling. We found that IFT20 forms a complex with Rab5 and the TCR on early endosomes. IFT20 knockdown (IFT20KD) resulted in a block in the recycling pathway, leading to a build-up of recycling TCRs in Rab5+ endosomes. Recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), but not of CXCR4, was disrupted by IFT20 deficiency. The IFT components IFT52 and IFT57 were found to act together with IFT20 to regulate TCR and TfR recycling. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms that control TCR recycling and immune synapse assembly, and underscore the trafficking-related function of the IFT system beyond ciliogenesis. PMID:24554435

  19. Tissue factor is an angiogenic-specific receptor for factor VII-targeted immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jijun; Xu, Jie; Ruf, Wolfram; Lockwood, Charles J

    2017-02-01

    Identification of target molecules specific for angiogenic vascular endothelial cells (VEC), the inner layer of pathological neovasculature, is critical for discovery and development of neovascular-targeting therapy for angiogenesis-dependent human diseases, notably cancer, macular degeneration and endometriosis, in which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a central pathophysiological role. Using VEGF-stimulated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) isolated from microvessels, venous and arterial blood vessels as in vitro angiogenic models and unstimulated VECs as a quiescent VEC model, we examined the expression of tissue factor (TF), a membrane-bound receptor on the angiogenic VEC models compared with quiescent VEC controls. We found that TF is specifically expressed on angiogenic VECs in a time-dependent manner in microvessels, venous and arterial vessels. TF-targeted therapeutic agents, including factor VII (fVII)-IgG1 Fc and fVII-conjugated photosensitizer, can selectively bind angiogenic VECs, but not the quiescent VECs. Moreover, fVII-targeted photodynamic therapy can selectively and completely eradicate angiogenic VECs. We conclude that TF is an angiogenic-specific receptor and the target molecule for fVII-targeted therapeutics. This study supports clinical trials of TF-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as cancer, macular degeneration and endometriosis.

  20. Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) promotes cell migration Involvement of a specific C1P receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, María H; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; González, Monika; Trueba, Miguel; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that is implicated in the regulation of cell homeostasis and the control of inflammation. It is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages, and has been described as potent inhibitor of apoptosis. Using RAW 264.7 macrophages we have now discovered a new biological activity of C1P: stimulation of cell migration. This novel action can only be observed when C1P is applied exogenously to the cells in culture, and not by increasing the intracellular levels of C1P. This fact led to identify a specific receptor through which C1P stimulates cell migration. The receptor is coupled to G(i) proteins and causes phosphorylation of extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2, and protein kinase B (also known as Akt) upon ligation with C1P. Inhibition of either of these pathways completely abolished C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. In addition, C1P stimulated the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B, and blockade of this transcription factor resulted in complete inhibition of macrophage migration. This newly identified receptor could be an important drug target for treatment of illnesses that are associated to inflammatory processes, or to diseases in which cell migration is a major cause of pathology, as it occurs in metastatic tumors.

  1. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  2. Exendin-3, a novel peptide from Heloderma horridum venom, interacts with vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors and a newly described receptor on dispersed acini from guinea pig pancreas. Description of exendin-3(9-39) amide, a specific exendin receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, J P; Singh, L; Eng, J

    1991-02-15

    Exendin-3 increased cellular cAMP levels and amylase release from dispersed acini from guinea pig pancreas. Low concentrations (0.1-3 nM) caused a 12-fold increase in cAMP, whereas higher concentrations (0.3-3 microM) caused an additional 24-fold increase in cAMP. Maximal cAMP with the highest concentration tested was the same as the maximal response with secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine, helodermin, or helospectin-I. In terms of amylase release, exendin-3 had the same efficacy but was the least potent of these peptides. Exendin-3-induced increases in amylase release were inhibited by VIP receptor antagonists and the new peptide (greater than 0.1 microM) competed with radiolabeled VIP for binding sites on dispersed acini. Increasing concentrations of an exendin-3 fragment, exendin-3(9-39) amide, did not increase cAMP or amylase release but inhibited the increase in cAMP observed with 0.1-3 nM exendin-3. The fragment did not alter the effects of other peptides that are known to increase acinar cAMP. We conclude that exendin-3 interacts with at least two receptors on guinea pig pancreatic acini; at high concentrations (greater than 100 nM) the peptide interacts with VIP receptors, thereby causing a large increase in cAMP and stimulating amylase release; at lower concentrations (0.1-3 nM) the peptide interacts with a putative exendin receptor, thereby causing a smaller increase in cAMP of undetermined function. Exendin-3(9-39) amide is a specific exendin receptor antagonist.

  3. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  4. In vitro and in vivo characterization of a novel nonsteroidal, species-specific progesterone receptor modulator, PRA-910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Lundeen, S G; Slayden, O; Zhu, Y; Cohen, J; Berrodin, T J; Bretz, J; Chippari, S; Wrobel, J; Zhang, P; Fensome, A; Winneker, R C; Yudt, M R

    2007-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) is an important regulator of female reproduction. Consequently, PR modulators have found numerous pharmaceutical utilities in women's reproductive health. In the process of identifying more receptor-specific and tissue-selective PR modulators, we discovered a novel nonsteroidal, 6-aryl benzoxazinone compound, PRA-910, that displays unique in vitro and in vivo activities. In a PR/PRE reporter assay in COS-7 cells, PRA-910 shows potent PR antagonist activity with an IC50 value of approximately 20 nM. In the alkaline phosphatase assay in the human breast cancer cell line T47D, PRA-910 is a partial progesterone antagonist at low concentrations and is also an effective PR agonist at higher concentrations (EC50 value of approximately 700 nM). PRA-910 binds to the human PR with high affinity (Kd = 4 nM) and was previously shown to exhibit greater than 100-fold selectivity for the PR versus other steroid receptors. In the adult ovariectomized rat, PRA-910 is a potent PR antagonist. It inhibits progesterone-induced uterine decidual response with an ED50 value of 0.4 mg/kg, p.o., and reverses progesterone suppression of estradiol-induced complement C3 expression with potency similar to RU-486. In the nonhuman primate, however, PRA-910 is a PR agonist. The effect on endometrial histology strongly resembles that of progesterone. This unique compound also suppresses estradiol-induced epithelial cell proliferation and both estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the uterine endometrium as a PR agonist would. In summary, PRA-910 is a structurally and biologically novel selective PR modulator with either PR agonist or antagonist activity, depending on context, concentration, and species.

  5. Analysis of the mitogenic pathway of the FLT3 receptor and characterization in its C terminal region of a specific binding site for the PI3' kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteran, N; Rottapel, R; Beslu, N; Lecocq, E; Birnbaum, D; Dubreuil, P

    1994-05-01

    The FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) belongs to the class III subfamily which includes PDGF, CSF1 and SLF receptors. The recent cloning of the FLT3 ligand suggesting its important role in the differentiation and proliferation of the hematopoietic stem cells, has confirmed the initial expression analysis showing restricted pattern of receptor expression within the primitive hematopoietic population. To better understand the function of the FLT3 receptor and its relationship with the other hematopoietic RTKs, we analyzed the mitogenic pathway and substrate specificity of this receptor. The construction of a chimeric receptor called FF3, between the extracellular region of the CSF1 receptor fused with the transmembrane and the cytoplasmic regions of FLT3, has allowed an analysis in the absence of FLT3 ligand. We have shown in previous studies that FF3 is able to transduce the signal induced by CSF1, to induce tyrosine phosphorylation and/or association of several cytoplasmic proteins. We show here that this new receptor is fully functional in Ba/F3 hematopoietic cells, inducing a CSF1 dependence when expressed at the surface of this IL3 dependent cell line. The PI3' Kinase interacts with the FF3 receptor through SH2 domains and its binding site is localized on the tyrosine residue 958 in the C terminal part of the receptor.

  6. Complex Determinants in Specific Members of the Mannose Receptor Family Govern Collagen Endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer...... invasion, and fibrosis protection. This functional relationship is suggested by a common endocytic capability and a candidate collagen-binding domain. Here we conducted a comparative investigation of each member's ability to facilitate intracellular collagen degradation. As expected, the family members u......PARAP/Endo180 and MR bound collagens in a purified system and internalized collagens for degradation in cellular settings. In contrast, the remaining family members, PLA2R and DEC-205, showed no collagen binding activity and were unable to mediate collagen internalization. To pinpoint the structural elements...

  7. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    -limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...... viruses from The Netherlands in 2003 maintained the classic avian-binding preference for alpha2-3-linked sialic acids (SA) and are not readily transmissible in ferrets, as observed previously for highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. However, H7N3 viruses isolated from Canada in 2004 and H7N2 viruses from...... in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets and was capable of transmission in this species by direct contact. These results indicate that H7 influenza viruses from the North American lineage have acquired sialic acid-binding properties that more closely resemble those of human influenza viruses and have...

  8. Profiling of benzophenone derivatives using fish and human estrogen receptor-specific in vitro bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Molina, Jose-Manuel; Escande, Aurelie; Pillon, Arnaud; Gomez, Elena; Pakdel, Farzad; Cavailles, Vincent; Olea, Nicolas; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Balaguer, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Benzophenone (BP) derivatives, BP1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone), BP2 (2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone), BP3 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone), and THB (2,4,4'-trihydroxybenzophenone) are UV-absorbing chemicals widely used in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and industrial applications, such as topical sunscreens in lotions and hair sprays to protect skin and hair from UV irradiation. Studies on their endocrine disrupting properties have mostly focused on their interaction with human estrogen receptor alpha (hERα), and there has been no comprehensive analysis of their potency in a system allowing comparison between hERα and hERβ activities. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive ER activation profile of BP derivatives using ER from human and fish origin in a battery of in vitro tests, i.e., competitive binding, reporter gene based assays, vitellogenin (Vtg) induction in isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes, and proliferation based assays. The ability to induce human androgen receptor (hAR)-mediated reporter gene expression was also examined. All BP derivatives tested except BP3 were full hERα and hERβ agonists (BP2 > THB > BP1) and displayed a stronger activation of hERβ compared with hERα, the opposite effect to that of estradiol (E 2 ). Unlike E 2 , BPs were more active in rainbow trout ERα (rtERα) than in hERα assay. All four BP derivatives showed anti-androgenic activity (THB > BP2 > BP1 > BP3). Overall, the observed anti-androgenic potencies of BP derivatives, together with their proposed greater effect on ERβ versus ERα activation, support further investigation of their role as endocrine disrupters in humans and wildlife

  9. Stage specific requirement of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chen; Wong, Carol Wing Yan; Wu, Zhongluan; He, Qiuming; Xia, Huimin; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang; Wong, Kenneth Kak Yuen; Lui, Vincent Chi Hang

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is a cell-surface receptor tyrosine kinase for platelet-derived growth factors. Correct timing and level of Pdgfra expression is crucial for embryo development, and deletion of Pdgfra caused developmental defects of multiple endoderm and mesoderm derived structures, resulting in a complex phenotypes including orofacial cleft, spina bifida, rib deformities, and omphalocele in mice. However, it is not clear if deletion of Pdgfra at different embryonic stages differentially affects these structures. To address the temporal requirement of Pdgfra in embryonic development. We have deleted the Pdgfra in Pdgfra-expressing tissues at different embryonic stages in mice, examined and quantified the developmental anomalies. Current study showed that (i) conditional deletion of Pdgfra at different embryonic days (between E7.5 and E10.5) resulted in orofacial cleft, spina bifida, rib cage deformities, and omphalocele, and (ii) the day of Pdgfra deletion influenced the combinations, incidence and severities of these anomalies. Deletion of Pdgfra caused apoptosis of Pdgfra-expressing tissues, and developmental defects of their derivatives. Orofacial cleft, spina bifida and omphalocele are among the commonest skeletal and abdominal wall defects of newborns, but their genetic etiologies are largely unknown. The remarkable resemblance of our conditional Pdgfra knockout embryos to theses human congenital anomalies, suggesting that dysregulated PDGFRA expression could cause these anomalies in human. Future work should aim at defining (a) the regulatory elements for the expression of the human PDGFRA during embryonic development, and (b) if mutations / sequence variations of these regulatory elements cause these anomalies.

  10. Mechanism of the tissue-specific action of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-101479.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Morikyu, Teruyuki; Ishige, Hirohide; Albers, Michael; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) comprise a new class of molecules that induce anabolic effects with fewer side effects than those of other anabolic agents. We previously reported that the novel SARM S-101479 had a tissue-selective bone anabolic effect with diminished side effects in female animals. However, the mechanism of its tissue selectivity is not well known. In this report, we show that S-101479 increased alkaline phosphatase activity and androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cell lines in the same manner as the natural androgen ligand dihydrotestosterone (DHT); conversely, stimulation of AR dimerization was very low compared with that of DHT (34.4%). S-101479 increased bone mineral content in ovariectomized rats without promoting endometrial proliferation. Yeast two-hybrid interaction assays revealed that DHT promoted recruitment of numerous cofactors to AR such as TIF2, SRC1, β-catenin, NCoA3, gelsolin and PROX1 in a dose-dependent manner. SARMs induced recruitment of fewer cofactors than DHT; in particular, S-101479 failed to induce recruitment of canonical p160 coactivators such as SRC1, TIF2 and notably NCoA3 but only stimulated binding of AR to gelsolin and PROX1. The results suggest that a full capability of the AR to dimerize and to effectively and unselectively recruit all canonical cofactors is not a prerequisite for transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cells and resulting anabolic effects in bone tissues. Instead, few relevant cofactors might be sufficient to promote AR activity in these tissues.

  11. Presence of specific growth hormone binding sites in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissues: characterization of the hepatic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.; Niu, P.D.; Le Gac, F.; Le Bail, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The present work outlines the presence of specific binding for chinook salmon growth hormone (sGH) in different tissue preparations of rainbow trout. Optimal incubation conditions (pH, Tris, MgCl 2 ) were determined. Specific binding was very sensitive to salt concentration during incubation. The specific binding reached a plateau after 15 and 25 hr of incubation at 12 and 4 degree. At 20 degree, specific and nonspecific binding were not stable. Specific binding dissociation was slower than association and was only partial. The binding was saturable (Bmax = 187 +/- 167 pmol), of high affinity (Ka = 2.4 +/- 0.8 10(9) M-1), and very specific for GH, properties which are in agreement with the characteristics of hormonal receptors. Sea bream and mammalian GH appeared 2- and 30-fold, respectively, less potent than cold sGH2 for displacing 125 I-sGH2. Tissue preparations from ovary, testis, fat, skin, cartilage, gill, blood pellet, brain, spleen, kidney, and muscle showed significant saturable binding

  12. Prostate-specific G-protein-coupled receptor collaborates with loss of PTEN to promote prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Siwko, S; Zeng, L; Li, J; Yi, Z; Liu, M

    2016-03-03

    Among frequent events in prostate cancer are loss of the tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and overexpression of prostate-specific G-protein-coupled receptor (PSGR), but the potential tumorigenic synergy between these lesions is unknown. Here, we report a new mouse model (PSGR-Pten(Δ/Δ)) combining prostate-specific loss of Pten with probasin promoter-driven PSGR overexpression. By 12 months PSGR-Pten(Δ/Δ) mice developed invasive prostate tumors featuring Akt activation and extensive inflammatory cell infiltration. PSGR-Pten(Δ/Δ) tumors exhibited E-cadherin loss and increased stromal androgen receptor (AR) expression. PSGR overexpression increased LNCaP proliferation, whereas PSGR short hairpin RNA knockdown inhibited proliferation and migration. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PSGR overexpression synergizes with loss of PTEN to accelerate prostate cancer development, and present a novel bigenic mouse model that mimics the human condition, where both PSGR overexpression and loss of PTEN occur concordantly in the majority of advanced prostate cancers, yielding an environment more relevant to studying human prostate cancer.

  13. An amphipathic sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env alters cell tropism and modulates viral receptor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vzorov, A N; Yang, C; Compans, R W

    2015-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 92UG046 Env protein, obtained from a CD4-independent HIV-1 primary isolate (Zerhouni et al., 2004), has the ability to initiate an infection in HeLa cells expressing CD4 when carrying the full-length (FL) Env, but uses CD8 molecules for receptor-mediated entry when carrying a truncated Env (CT84). To determine whether a specific length or structure in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) is responsible for this alteration of tropism, we compared a series of Env constructs with different CT truncations and the presence or absence of an amphipathic alpha- helical sequence. We found that truncated constructs containing the alpha-helical LLP-2 structure in their CT domains conferred a switch from CD4 to CD8 tropism. The results support the conclusion that the structure of the CT domain can play an important role in determining receptor specificity.

  14. Region-specific associations between sex, social status, and oxytocin receptor density in the brains of eusocial rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, S J; Coen, C W; Holmes, M M; Beery, A K

    2015-09-10

    Naturally occurring variations in neuropeptide receptor distributions in the brain contribute to numerous mammalian social behaviors. In naked mole-rats, which live in large social groups and exhibit remarkable reproductive skew, colony-related social behaviors vary with reproductive status. Here we examined whether variation in social status is associated with variations in the location and/or density of oxytocin binding in this species. Autoradiography was performed to assess forebrain oxytocin receptor (OTR) densities in breeding and non-breeding naked mole-rats of both sexes. Overall, males exhibited higher OTR binding in the medial amygdala in comparison to females. While there were no main effects of reproductive status in any region, a sex difference in OTR binding in the nucleus accumbens was mediated by status. Specifically, breeding males tended to have more OTR binding than breeding females in the nucleus accumbens, while no sex difference was observed in subordinates. These effects suggest that oxytocin may act in a sex- and region-specific way that corresponds to reproductive status and associated social behaviors. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC...... complexes have been less well characterized. We have used a complete set of singly substituted analogs of a mouse MHC class I, Kk-restricted peptide, influenza hemagglutinin (Ha)255-262, to address the binding specificity of this MHC molecule. Using the same peptide-MHC complexes we determined the fine...... each other showing that peptide residues 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were exposed on the MHC surface and recognized by the T cells. Thus, the majority, and perhaps all, of the side chains of the non-primary anchor residues may be available for T-cell recognition, and contribute to the stringent specificity of T...

  16. Variable Extent of Lineage-Specificity and Developmental Stage-Specificity of Cohesin and CCCTC-Binding Factor Binding Within the Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is largely responsible for the 3D architecture of the genome, in concert with the action of cohesin, through the creation of long-range chromatin loops. Cohesin is hypothesized to be the main driver of these long-range chromatin interactions by the process of loop extrusion. Here, we performed ChIP-seq for CTCF and cohesin in two stages each of T and B cell differentiation and examined the binding pattern in all six antigen receptor (AgR loci in these lymphocyte progenitors and in mature T and B cells, ES cells, and fibroblasts. The four large AgR loci have many bound CTCF sites, most of which are only occupied in lymphocytes, while only the CTCF sites at the end of each locus near the enhancers or J genes tend to be bound in non-lymphoid cells also. However, despite the generalized lymphocyte restriction of CTCF binding in AgR loci, the Igκ locus is the only locus that also shows significant lineage-specificity (T vs. B cells and developmental stage-specificity (pre-B vs. pro-B in CTCF binding. We show that cohesin binding shows greater lineage- and stage-specificity than CTCF at most AgR loci, providing more specificity to the loops. We also show that the culture of pro-B cells in IL7, a common practice to expand the number of cells before ChIP-seq, results in a CTCF-binding pattern resembling pre-B cells, as well as other epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of pre-B cells. Analysis of the orientation of the CTCF sites show that all sites within the large V portions of the Igh and TCRβ loci have the same orientation. This suggests either a lack of requirement for convergent CTCF sites creating loops, or indicates an absence of any loops between CTCF sites within the V region portion of those loci but only loops to the convergent sites at the D-J-enhancer end of each locus. The V region portions of the Igκ and TCRα/δ loci, by contrast, have CTCF sites in both orientations, providing many options for

  17. DC-ATLAS: a systems biology resource to dissect receptor specific signal transduction in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalieri, Duccio; Rivero, Damariz; Beltrame, Luca; Buschow, Sonja I.; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, Maria C.; Reith, Walter; Baur, Andreas; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Brandizi, Marco; De Filippo, Carlotta; D'Oro, Ugo; Draghici, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advent of Systems Biology has been accompanied by the blooming of pathway databases. Currently pathways are defined generically with respect to the organ or cell type where a reaction takes place. The cell type specificity of the reactions is the foundation of immunological research, and capturing this specificity is of paramount importance when using pathway-based analyses to decipher complex immunological datasets. Here, we present DC-ATLAS, a novel and versatile resource fo...

  18. Defining Binding Efficiency and Specificity of Auxins for SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA Co-receptor Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Structure–activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure–activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding. PMID:24313839

  19. Heart-specific overexpression of (pro)renin receptor induces atrial fibrillation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Hong; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Li; Lu, Yingdong; Yang, Yanmin; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, causing substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of AF. The (pro)renin receptor [(p)RR] is the last identified member of RAS. However, the role of (p)RR in AF is still unknown. Circulating levels of (p)RR were determined using an immunosorbent assay in 22 patients with AF (paroxysmal or persistent) and 22 healthy individuals. The plasma levels of (p)RR increased 3.6-fold in AF patients (Patrial flutter since 2 months, then spontaneously converted to atrial fibrillation by 10 months. The atria of the transgenic mice demonstrated significant dilation and fibrosis, and exhibited a high incidence of sudden death. Additionally, the genes of SERCA and HCN4, which are involved in the electrophysiology of AF, were significantly down-regulated and up-regulated respectively in transgenic mice atria. The phosphorylation of Erk1/2 significantly increased in the atria of the transgenic mice, and the activated Erk1/2 was found predominantly in cardiac fibroblasts, suggesting that the transgenic (p)RR gene may induce atrial fibrillation by activation of Erk1/2 in the cardiac fibroblasts of the atria. (p)RR promotes atrial structural and electrical remodeling in vivo, which indicates that (p)RR plays an important role in the pathological development of AF. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J D A Excoffon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7 and CAR(Ex8. We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8 isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8 providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8 in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8 may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  1. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffon, Katherine J D A; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Mobily, Matthew E; Karp, Philip H; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Zabner, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7) and CAR(Ex8)). We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8) isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8) providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8) in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8) may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  2. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  3. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Development of a Tc-99m labeled sigma-2 receptor-specific ligand as a potential breast tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok-Rye; Yang, Biao; Ploessl, Karl; Chumpradit, Sumalee; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Acton, Paul D.; Wheeler, Kenneth; Mach, Robert H.; Kung, Hank F.

    2001-01-01

    A novel in vivo imaging agent, 99m Tc labeled [(N-[2-((3'-N'-propyl-[3,3,1]aza-bicyclononan-3α-yl)(2''-methoxy-5- methyl-phenylcarbamate) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato] technetium(V) oxide), [ 99m Tc]2, displaying specific binding towards sigma-2 receptors was prepared and characterized. In vitro binding assays showed that the rhenium surrogate of [ 99m Tc]2, Re-2, displayed excellent binding affinity and selectivity towards sigma-2 receptors (K i = 2,723 and 22 nM for sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor, respectively). Preparation of [ 99m Tc]2 was achieved by heating the S-protected starting material, 1, in the presence of acid, reducing agent (stannous glucoheptonate) and sodium [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate. The lipophilic racemic mixture was successfully prepared in 10 to 50% yield and the radiochemical purity was >98%. Separation of the isomers, peak A and peak B, was successfully achieved by using a chiralpak AD column eluted with an isocratic solvent (n-hexane/isopropanol; 3:1; v/v). The peak A and peak B appear to co-elute with the isomers of the surrogate, Re-2, under the same HPLC condition. Biodistribution studies in tumor bearing mice (mouse mammary adenocarcinoma, cell line 66, which is known to over-express sigma-2 receptors) showed that the racemic [ 99m Tc]2 localized in the tumor. Uptake in the tumor was 2.11, 1.30 and 1.11 %dose/gram at 1, 4 and 8 hr post iv injection, respectively, suggesting good uptake and retention in the tumor cells. The tumor uptake was significantly, but incompletely, blocked (about 25-30% blockage) by co-injection of 'cold' (+)pentazocine or haloperidol (1 mg/Kg). A majority of the radioactivity localized in the tumor tissue was extractable (>60%), and the HPLC analysis showed that it is the original compound, racemic [ 99m Tc]2 (>98% pure). The distribution of the purified peak A and peak B was determined in the same tumor bearing mice at 4 hr post iv injection. The tumor uptake was similar for both isomers

  5. Receptor Inhibition by Immunoglobulins: Specific Inhibition by Autistic Children, Their Relatives, and Control Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Edwin H., Jr.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Forty-two parents of children with autistic disorder, 15 children with autistic disorder, 17 siblings of children with autistic disorder, and 12 unrelated normal controls were studied for binding characteristics of their immunoglobulins. Results did not support the hypothesis that two specific autoantibodies are characteristic of autism.…

  6. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  7. DC-ATLAS: a systems biology resource to dissect receptor specific signal transduction in dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalieri, D.; Rivero, D.; Beltrame, L.; Buschow, S.I.; Calura, E.; Rizzetto, L.; Gessani, S.; Gauzzi, M.C.; Reith, W.; Baur, A.; Bonaiuti, R.; Brandizi, M.; Filippo, C. De; D'Oro, U.; Draghici, S.; Dunand-Sauthier, I.; Gatti, E.; Granucci, F.; Gundel, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuka, M.; Lanyi, A.; Melief, C.J.; Montfoort, N. van; Ostuni, R.; Pierre, P.; Popovici, R.; Rajnavolgyi, E.; Schierer, S.; Schuler, G.; Soumelis, V.; Splendiani, A.; Stefanini, I.; Torcia, M.G.; Zanoni, I.; Zollinger, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Austyn, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advent of Systems Biology has been accompanied by the blooming of pathway databases. Currently pathways are defined generically with respect to the organ or cell type where a reaction takes place. The cell type specificity of the reactions is the foundation of immunological research,

  8. High sensitivity and specificity in proposed clinical diagnostic criteria for anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Alvin C C; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Pillai, Sekhar C; Tantsis, Esther; Jones, Hannah; Ho, Reena; Lim, Ming; Hacohen, Yael; Vincent, Angela; Dale, Russell C

    2017-12-01

    To determine the validity of the proposed clinical diagnostic criteria for anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis in paediatric patients. The diagnostic criteria for anti-NMDAR encephalitis proposed by Graus et al. (2016) use clinical features and conventional investigations to facilitate early immunotherapy before antibody status is available. The criteria are satisfied if patients develop four out of six symptom groups within 3 months, together with at least one abnormal investigation (electroencephalography/cerebrospinal fluid) and reasonable exclusion of other disorders. We evaluated the validity of the criteria using a retrospective cohort of paediatric patients with encephalitis. Twenty-nine patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 74 comparison children with encephalitis were included. As expected, the percentage of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis who fulfilled the clinical criteria increased over time. During the hospital inpatient admission, most patients (26/29, 90%) with anti-NMDAR encephalitis fulfilled the criteria, significantly more than the comparison group (3/74, 4%) (panti-NMDAR encephalitis was 2 weeks from first symptom onset (range 1-6). The sensitivity of the criteria was 90% (95% confidence interval 73-98) and the specificity was 96% (95% confidence interval 89-99). The proposed diagnostic criteria for anti-NMDAR encephalitis have good sensitivity and specificity. Incomplete criteria do not exclude the diagnosis. The proposed clinical diagnostic criteria for anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis by Graus et al. (2016) have high sensitivity and specificity in paediatric patients. The median time of fulfilling the criteria in patients with anti-NMDAR was 2 weeks from first symptom onset. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aronoff

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200µm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.

  10. Endogenous Nur77 Is a Specific Indicator of Antigen Receptor Signaling in Human T and B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Judith F; Weiss, Arthur

    2017-01-15

    Distinguishing true Ag-stimulated lymphocytes from bystanders activated by the inflammatory milieu has been difficult. Nur77 is an immediate early gene whose expression is rapidly upregulated by TCR signaling in murine T cells and human thymocytes. Nur77-GFP transgenes serve as specific TCR and BCR signaling reporters in murine transgenic models. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous Nur77 protein expression can serve as a reporter of TCR and BCR specific signaling in human PBMCs. Nur77 protein amounts were assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry in T and B cells isolated from human PBMCs obtained from healthy donors that had been stimulated by their respective Ag receptors. We demonstrate that endogenous Nur77 is a more specific reporter of Ag-specific signaling events than the commonly used CD69 activation marker in both human T and B cells. This is reflective of the disparity in signaling pathways that regulate the expression of Nur77 and CD69. Assessing endogenous Nur77 protein expression has great potential to identify Ag-activated lymphocytes in human disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  12. Tissue-Specific Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Expression and Metabolic Effects of Telmisartan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2013), s. 829-835 ISSN 0895-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0505; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11049; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : telmisartan * metabolic effects * tissue-specific Pparg knockout mice Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.402, year: 2013

  13. Genetics, receptor binding property, and transmissibility in mammals of naturally isolated H9N2 Avian Influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyong Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available H9N2 subtype influenza viruses have been detected in different species of wild birds and domestic poultry in many countries for several decades. Because these viruses are of low pathogenicity in poultry, their eradication is not a priority for animal disease control in many countries, which has allowed them to continue to evolve and spread. Here, we characterized the genetic variation, receptor-binding specificity, replication capability, and transmission in mammals of a series of H9N2 influenza viruses that were detected in live poultry markets in southern China between 2009 and 2013. Thirty-five viruses represented 17 genotypes on the basis of genomic diversity, and one specific "internal-gene-combination" predominated among the H9N2 viruses. This gene combination was also present in the H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that have infected humans in China. All of the 35 viruses preferentially bound to the human-like receptor, although two also retained the ability to bind to the avian-like receptor. Six of nine viruses tested were transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet; two were highly transmissible. Some H9N2 viruses readily acquired the 627K or 701N mutation in their PB2 gene upon infection of ferrets, further enhancing their virulence and transmission in mammals. Our study indicates that the widespread dissemination of H9N2 viruses poses a threat to human health not only because of the potential of these viruses to cause an influenza pandemic, but also because they can function as "vehicles" to deliver different subtypes of influenza viruses from avian species to humans.

  14. Roles of specific membrane lipid domains in EGF receptor activation and cell adhesion molecule stabilization in a developing olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nicholas J; Tolbert, Leslie P; Oland, Lynne A

    2009-09-29

    Reciprocal interactions between glial cells and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) cause ORN axons entering the brain to sort, to fasciculate into bundles destined for specific glomeruli, and to form stable protoglomeruli in the developing olfactory system of an experimentally advantageous animal species, the moth Manduca sexta. Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and the cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs) neuroglian and fasciclin II are known to be important players in these processes. We report in situ and cell-culture studies that suggest a role for glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains in neuron-glia interactions. Disruption of these subdomains by the use of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin results in loss of EGFR activation, depletion of fasciclin II in ORN axons, and loss of neuroglian stabilization in the membrane. At the cellular level, disruption leads to aberrant ORN axon trajectories, small antennal lobes, abnormal arrays of olfactory glomerul, and loss of normal glial cell migration. We propose that glycosphingolipid-rich membrane subdomains (possible membrane rafts or platforms) are essential for IgCAM-mediated EGFR activation and for anchoring of neuroglian to the cytoskeleton, both required for normal extension and sorting of ORN axons.

  15. The Serum Concentrations of Chemokine CXCL12 and Its Specific Receptor CXCR4 in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Łukaszewicz-Zając

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Recent investigations have suggested that upregulated levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as chemokines, may be associated with development of many malignancies, including esophageal cancer (EC. Based on our knowledge, this study is the first to assess the serum concentration of chemokine CXCL12 and its specific receptor CXCR4 in the diagnosis of EC patients. Material and Methods. The present study included 79 subjects: 49 patients with EC and 30 healthy volunteers. The serum concentrations of CXCL12 and CXCR4 and classical tumor markers such as carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag were measured using immunoenzyme assays, while C-reactive protein (CRP levels were assessed by immunoturbidimetric method. Moreover, diagnostic criteria of all proteins tested and the survival of EC patients were assessed. Results. The serum concentrations of CXCL12 were significantly higher, while those of its receptor CXCR4 were significantly lower in EC patients compared to healthy controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXCR4 were the highest among all analyzed proteins and increased for combined analysis with classical tumor markers and CRP levels. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that serum CXCR4 may improve the diagnosis of EC patients, especially in combination with classical tumor markers.

  16. Far-western blotting as a solution to the non-specificity of the anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecková, Barbora; Kimáková, Patrícia; Ilkovičová, Lenka; Szentpéteriová, Erika; Debeljak, Nataša; Solárová, Zuzana; Sačková, Veronika; Šemeláková, Martina; Bhide, Mangesh; Solár, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is a member of the cytokine receptor family. The interaction between erythropoietin (Epo) and EpoR is important for the production and maturation of erythroid cells, resulting in the stimulation of hematopoiesis. The fact that EpoR was also detected in neoplastic cells has opened the question about the relevance of anemia treatment with recombinant Epo in cancer patients. Numerous studies have reported pro-stimulating and anti-apoptotic effects of Epo in cancer cells, thus demonstrating EpoR functionality in these cells. By contrast, a previous study claims the absence of EpoR in tumor cells. This apparent discrepancy is based, according to certain authors, on the use of non-specific anti-EpoR antibodies. With the aim of bypassing the direct detection of EpoR with an anti-EpoR antibody, the present authors propose a far-western blot methodology, which in addition, confirms the interaction of Epo with EpoR. Applying this technique, the presence of EpoR and its interaction with Epo in human ovarian adenocarcinoma A2780 and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells was confirmed. Furthermore, modified immunoprecipitation of EpoR followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed a 57 kDa protein as a human Epo-interacting protein in both cell lines.

  17. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor responsive element-luciferase reporter mouse reveals gender specificity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Paolo; Biserni, Andrea; Tatangelo, Laura; Tiveron, Cecilia; Sciarroni, Anna Floriana; Ottobrini, Luisa; Maggi, Adriana

    2007-02-01

    There is a growing interest in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) as major players in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Drugs targeting PPARs were in fact shown to have major relevance for the treatment of diseases associated with aging, such as arteriosclerosis and diabetes. However, a variety of toxic effects associated with PPAR ligand administration has been documented, including hepatocarcinogenesis, which may severely limit its therapeutic use. A better comprehension of the multiplicity of PPAR physiological functions is therefore mandatory for the development of novel, safer drugs. We here describe the generation of a novel transgenic mouse for the detection of the generalized activities of PPARs, the PPAR responsive element-Luc reporter mouse. In this model luciferase expression is under the control of a PPAR-inducible promoter in all target organs. By optical imaging and ex vivo analysis, we were able to demonstrate the remarkable gender specificity of the PPAR transcriptional activity in liver. In fact, in the liver of female PPAR responsive element-Luc, the PPAR reporter transgene is more than one order of magnitude less expressed, thus leading to the conclusion that the signaling in females is much less activated than in males. Diet or hormonal manipulations as demonstrated here by treatments with high-fat diet or gonad removal and hormone replacement do not influence this low activation. The extent of the gender difference in PPAR transcriptional activity and the ineffectiveness of hormone treatments or diet to significantly elevate liver PPAR activity in females led us to hypothesize that gender-specific epigenetic events occurring during development may affect PPAR signaling in the liver. This study sets the ground for understanding the differential susceptibility of the two genders to metabolic disorders; furthermore, the model generated provides a novel opportunity for the molecular characterization of PPAR

  18. In vitro comparison of renal handling and uptake of two somatostatin receptor-specific peptides labeled with indium-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trejtnar, F.; Novy, Z.; Petrik, M.; Laznickova, A.; Melicharova, L.; Vankova, M.; Laznicek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolabeled receptor-specific somatostatin analogs labeled with gamma- or beta-emitting radionuclides are useful for scintigraphic imaging and/or therapy of selected neuroendocrine tumors. However, significant renal uptake may result in radiotoxicological injury of the kidney and can limit clinical application of the agents. The aim of the study was to analyze renal handling, rate, and mechanism of renal accumulation of two somatostatin receptor-targeted peptides, [DOTA 0 , Tyr 3 , Thr 8 ]-octreotide (DOTA-TATE) and [DOTA 0 , 1-Nal 3 ]-octreotide (DOTA-NOC), labeled with indium-111 using in vitro methods. The perfused rat kidney and freshly isolated rat renal cells were used as experimental models. The perfusion was performed in a recirculation regimen at constant pressure with solution containing bovine albumin, erythrocytes, and a mixture of essential substrates. The renal cells were isolated from rat kidneys using two-phase collagenase perfusion. Accumulation studies were used to evaluate the renal uptake of the peptides and to compare their accumulation with that of passively or actively transported model drugs. The influence of selected inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis and the inhibition of energy-dependent transport processes on the uptake were also investigated using isolated renal cells. The renal clearance of 111 In-DOTA-NOC in the perfused rat kidney was significantly lower than that of 111 In-DOTA-TATE. Reverse situation was found in the case of renal retention. Pretreatment of the perfused kidney with maleate markedly decreased the renal retention. 111 In-DOTA-NOC was accumulated in the isolated renal cells at a higher rate than 111 In-DOTA-TATE (ratio 3:1). The uptake of the radiopeptides in renal cells was higher than the uptake of not only the passively transported sucrose but also actively transported and accumulated methylglucose. The rank order of potency to inhibit the uptake by active endocytosis was approximately aprotinin

  19. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...

  20. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Enhances the Suppressive Function of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Mainly through Axl Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ju Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growth arrest-specific (Gas 6 is one of the endogenous ligands of TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk, and its role as an immune modulator has been recently emphasized. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study was designed to investigate whether Tregs express TAM receptors and the potential role of Gas6-TAM signal in regulating the suppressive function of Tregs. Methods. The protein and mRNA levels of TAM receptors were determined by using Western blot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. Then, TAM receptors were silenced using targeted siRNA or blocked with specific antibody. The suppressive function of Tregs was assessed by using a CFSE-based T cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of Foxp3 and CTLA4 whereas cytokines secretion levels were measured by ELISA assay. Results. Tregs express both Axl and Mertk receptors. Gas6 increases the suppressive function of Tregs in vitro and in mice. Both Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression on Tregs are enhanced after Gas6 stimulation. Gas6 enhances the suppressive activity of Tregs mainly through Axl receptor. Conclusion. Gas6 has a direct effect on the functions of CD4+CD25+Tregs mainly through its interaction with Axl receptor.

  1. Sertoli cell specific knockdown of RAR-related orphan receptor (ROR) alpha at puberty reduces sperm count in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kamal; Sarkar, Rajesh K; Sen Sharma, Souvik; Jain, Ayushi; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2018-01-30

    Globally, there is an alarming decline in sperm count. Very often hormonal supplementation fails to restore normal sperm count. Sertoli cells (Sc) present within seminiferous tubules provide appropriate niche and factors required for the differentiation of germ cells (Gc) into mature sperm (spermatogenesis). Functionally compromised Sc may be one of the reasons for failure of hormones to facilitate normal spermatogenesis. Although role of secretory proteins and signaling molecules of Sc has been studied well, role of transcription factors regulating sperm count has not been addressed appropriately. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-alpha is one of such transcription factors reported in testis but its role in testicular function is not yet known. In a separate study, we found abundant ROR-alpha binding sites on promoter regions of several genes upregulated in pubertal rat Sc as compared to infant Sc. Immunostaining studies also revealed presence of ROR alpha in nucleus of pubertal Sc. We generated a transgenic knockdown rat model expressing shRNA targeted to ROR-alpha under Sc specific promoter, which is transcriptionally active only at and after puberty. ROR-alpha knockdown animals were found to have abnormal association of Sc and Gc, including Gc sloughing and restricted release of sperm. The knockdown animals displayed compromised spermatogenesis leading to significant reduction in sperm count. This is the first report describing the Sc specific role of ROR-alpha in maintaining quantitatively normal sperm output. Identification of various such molecules can generate avenues to limit or reverse an alarmingly declining sperm count witnessed globally in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High tumour cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity negatively impacts disease-specific survival in stage II microsatellite stable colorectal cancer.

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    Sofia B Gustafsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is good evidence in the literature that the cannabinoid system is disturbed in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether CB(1 receptor immunoreactive intensity (CB(1IR intensity is associated with disease severity and outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB(1IR was assessed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens collected with a consecutive intent during primary tumour surgical resection from a series of cases diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Tumour centre (n = 483 and invasive front (n = 486 CB(1IR was scored from 0 (absent to 3 (intense staining and the data was analysed as a median split i.e. CB(1IR <2 and ≥2. In microsatellite stable, but not microsatellite instable tumours (as adjudged on the basis of immunohistochemical determination of four mismatch repair proteins, there was a significant positive association of the tumour grade with the CB(1IR intensity. The difference between the microsatellite stable and instable tumours for this association of CB(1IR was related to the CpG island methylation status of the cases. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses indicated a significant contribution of CB(1IR to disease-specific survival in the microsatellite stable tumours when adjusting for tumour stage. For the cases with stage II microsatellite stable tumours, there was a significant effect of both tumour centre and front CB(1IR upon disease specific survival. The 5 year probabilities of event-free survival were: 85±5 and 66±8%; tumour interior, 86±4% and 63±8% for the CB(1IR<2 and CB(1IR≥2 groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The level of CB(1 receptor expression in colorectal cancer is associated with the tumour grade in a manner dependent upon the degree of CpG hypermethylation. A high CB(1IR is indicative of a poorer prognosis in stage II microsatellite stable tumour patients.

  3. Lineage-specific evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in the giant and red pandas implies dietary adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lei; Wu, Qi; Wang, Le; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Fuwen

    2018-03-01

    Taste 2 receptors (TAS2R) mediate bitterness perception in mammals, thus are called bitter taste receptors. It is believed that these genes evolved in response to species-specific diets. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani) in the order Carnivora are specialized herbivores with an almost exclusive bamboo diet (>90% bamboo). Because bamboo is full of bitter tasting compounds, we hypothesized that adaptive evolution has occurred at TAS2R genes in giant and red pandas throughout the course of their dietary shift. Here, we characterized 195 TAS2R genes in 9 Carnivora species and examined selective pressures on these genes. We found that both pandas harbor more putative functional TAS2R genes than other carnivores, and pseudogenized TAS2R genes in the giant panda are different from the red panda. The purifying selection on TAS2R1, TAS2R9 and TAS2R38 in the giant panda, and TAS2R62 in the red panda, has been strengthened throughout the course of adaptation to bamboo diet, while selective constraint on TAS2R4 and TAS2R38 in the red panda is relaxed. Remarkably, a few positively selected sites on TAS2R42 have been specifically detected in the giant panda. These results suggest an adaptive response in both pandas to a dietary shift from carnivory to herbivory, and TAS2R genes evolved independently in the 2 pandas. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular basis of mammalian sensory evolution and the process of adaptation to new ecological niches. © 2017 The Authors. Integrative Zoology published by International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Antibody Probes to Estrogen Receptor-alpha Transcript-Specific Upstream Peptides: Alternates ER-alpha Promoter Use and Breast Cancer Etiology/Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    cells recovered in the expressed milk of lactating healthy donors as part of a biomarkers study. Preparing for potential handling of ductal lavage...specificity for the assay (Fig. 17). It is quite feasible to isolate sufficient cells from milk samples and our potential collaorator’s lab was able...Speirs, V., 2001. Expression of alternatively spliced estrogen Uht , R.M., Webb, P., 2000. Estrogen receptor pathways to AP-I. J. receptor alpha mRNAs is

  5. Prolactin Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Imaging Agents Detects Epithelial Ovarian Cancer with Enhanced Sensitivity and Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Karthik M; Zhang, Yilin; Mitra, Anirban K; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Gwin, Katja; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Roman, Brian B; Lengyel, Ernst; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2017-04-01

    Poor prognosis of ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecologic malignancies, reflects major limitations associated with detection and diagnosis. Current methods lack high sensitivity to detect small tumors and high specificity to distinguish malignant from benign tissue, both impeding diagnosis of early and metastatic cancer stages and leading to costly and invasive surgeries. Tissue microarray analysis revealed that >98% of ovarian cancers express the prolactin receptor (PRLR), forming the basis of a new molecular imaging strategy. We fused human placental lactogen (hPL), a specific and tight binding PRLR ligand, to magnetic resonance imaging (gadolinium) and near-infrared fluorescence imaging agents. Both in tissue culture and in mouse models, these imaging bioconjugates underwent selective internalization into ovarian cancer cells via PRLR-mediated endocytosis. Compared with current clinical MRI techniques, this targeted approach yielded both enhanced signal-to-noise ratio from accumulation of signal via selective internalization and improved specificity conferred by PRLR upregulation in malignant ovarian cancer. These features endow PRLR-targeted imaging with the potential to transform ovarian cancer detection. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1684-96. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Genome-wide Specificity of Highly Efficient TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 for T Cell Receptor Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Knipping

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In T cells with transgenic high-avidity T cell receptors (TCRs, endogenous and transferred TCR chains compete for surface expression and may pair inappropriately, potentially causing autoimmunity. To knock out endogenous TCR expression, we assembled 12 transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and five guide RNAs (gRNAs from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas9 system. Using TALEN mRNA, TCR knockout was successful in up to 81% of T cells. Additionally, we were able to verify targeted gene addition of a GFP gene by homology-directed repair at the TALEN target site, using a donor suitable for replacement of the reporter transgene with therapeutic TCR chains. Remarkably, analysis of TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 specificity using integrase-defective lentiviral vector capture revealed only one off-target site for one of the gRNAs and three off-target sites for both of the TALENs, indicating a high level of specificity. Collectively, our work shows highly efficient and specific nucleases for T cell engineering.

  7. Nematode-specific cadherin CDH-8 acts as a receptor for Cry5B toxin in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Wan, Danfeng; Cheng, Chunsheng; Ye, Xiaobo; Sun, Ming

    2018-04-01

    Parasitic nematodes of animals and plants cause worldwide devastating impacts on people's lives and agricultural crops. The crystal protein Cry5B produced by Bacillus thuringiensis has efficient and specific activity against a wide range of nematodes. However, the action mode of this toxin has not yet been thoroughly determined. Here, a nematode-specific cadherin CDH-8 was demonstrated to be a receptor for Cry5B toxin by using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, providing evidence that the cadherin mutant worm cdh-8(RB815) possesses significant resistance to Cry5B, and the CDH-8 fragments bind specifically to Cry5B. Furthermore, CDH-8 was identified to be required for the oligomerization of Cry5B toxin in vivo and contribute to the internalization and pore formation of Cry5B in nematode cells. This study will facilitate a better understanding of the action mode of nematicidal Cry toxins and help the design of Cry toxin-based products for the control of plant or animal parasitic nematodes.

  8. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    Full Text Available New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R, which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  9. The cytokines cardiotrophin-like cytokine/cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC/CLF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) differ in their receptor specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Aurélie Jeanne; Letellier, Marie-Claude; Lissilaa, Rami; Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Sharma, Mukut; Ferlin, Walter; Elson, Greg; Crabé, Sandrine; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC) are two cytokines with neurotrophic and immunomodulatory activities. CNTF is a cytoplasmic factor believed to be released upon cellular damage, while CLC requires interaction with a soluble cytokine receptor, cytokine-like factor 1 (CLF), to be efficiently secreted. Both cytokines activate a receptor complex comprising the cytokine binding CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) and two signaling chains namely, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) and gp130. Human CNTF can recruit and activate an alternative receptor in which CNTFRα is substituted by IL-6Rα. As both CNTF and CLC have immune-regulatory activities in mice, we compared their ability to recruit mouse receptors comprising both gp130 and LIFRβ signaling chains and either IL-6Rα or IL-11Rα which, unlike CNTFRα, are expressed by immune cells. Our results indicate that 1) mouse CNTF, like its human homologue, can activate cells expressing gp130/LIFRβ with either CNTFRα or IL-6Rα and, 2) CLC/CLF is more restricted in its specificity in that it activates only the tripartite CNTFR. Several gp130 signaling cytokines influence T helper cell differentiation. We therefore investigated the effect of CNTF on CD4 T cell cytokine production. We observed that CNTF increased the number of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. As IFN-γ is considered a mediator of the therapeutic effect of IFN-β in multiple sclerosis, induction of IFN-γ by CNTF may contribute to the beneficial immunomodulatory effect of CNTF in mouse multiple sclerosis models. Together, our results indicate that CNTF activates the same tripartite receptors in mouse and human cells and further validate rodent models for pre-clinical investigation of CNTF and CNTF derivatives. Furthermore, CNTF and CLC/CLF differ in their receptor specificities. The receptor α chain involved in the immunomodulatory effects of CLC/CLF remains to be identified. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by

  10. Deep sequencing of the olfactory epithelium reveals specific chemosensory receptors are expressed at sexual maturity in the European eel Anguilla anguilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churcher, Allison M; Hubbard, Peter C; Marques, João Pedro; Canário, Adelino V M; Huertas, Mar

    2015-02-01

    Vertebrate genomes encode a diversity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that belong to large gene families and are used by olfactory systems to detect chemical cues found in the environment. It is not clear however, if individual receptors from these large gene families have evolved roles that are specific to certain life stages. Here, we used deep sequencing to identify differentially expressed receptor transcripts in the olfactory epithelia (OE) of freshwater, seawater and sexually mature male eels (Anguilla anguilla). This species is particularly intriguing because of its complex life cycle, extreme long-distance migrations and early-branching position within the teleost phylogeny. In the A. anguillaOE, we identified full-length transcripts for 13, 112, 6 and 38 trace amine-associated receptors, odorant receptors (OR) and type I and type II vomeronasal receptors (V1R and V2R). Most of these receptors were expressed at similar levels at different life stages and a subset of OR and V2R-like transcripts was more abundant in sexually mature males suggesting that ORs and V2R-like genes are important for reproduction. We also identified a set of GPCR signal transduction genes that were differentially expressed indicating that eels make use of different GPCR signal transduction genes at different life stages. The finding that a diversity of chemosensory receptors is expressed in the olfactory epithelium and that a subset is differentially expressed suggests that most receptors belonging to large chemosensory gene families have functions that are important at multiple life stages, while a subset has evolved specific functions at different life stages. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A Role of Endogenous Progesterone in Stroke Cerebroprotection Revealed by the Neural-Specific Deletion of Its Intracellular Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Fréchou, Magalie; Liere, Philippe; Zhang, Shaodong; Pianos, Antoine; Fernandez, Neïké; Denier, Christian; Mattern, Claudia; Schumacher, Michael; Guennoun, Rachida

    2017-11-08

    Treatment with progesterone protects the male and female brain against damage after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). However, in both sexes, the brain contains significant amounts of endogenous progesterone. It is not known whether endogenously produced progesterone enhances the resistance of the brain to ischemic insult. Here, we used steroid profiling by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) for exploring adaptive and sex-specific changes in brain levels of progesterone and its metabolites after MCAO. We show that, in the male mouse brain, progesterone is mainly metabolized via 5α-reduction leading to 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5α-DHP), also a progesterone receptor (PR) agonist ligand in neural cells, then to 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5α-THP). In the female mouse brain, levels of 5α-DHP and 3α,5α-THP are lower and levels of 20α-DHP are higher than in males. After MCAO, levels of progesterone and 5α-DHP are upregulated rapidly to pregnancy-like levels in the male but not in the female brain. To assess whether endogenous progesterone and 5α-DHP contribute to the resistance of neural cells to ischemic damage, we inactivated PR selectively in the CNS. Deletion of PR in the brain reduced its resistance to MCAO, resulting in increased infarct volumes and neurological deficits in both sexes. Importantly, endogenous PR ligands continue to protect the brain of aging mice. These results uncover the unexpected importance of endogenous progesterone and its metabolites in cerebroprotection. They also reveal that the female reproductive hormone progesterone is an endogenous cerebroprotective neurosteroid in both sexes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The brain responds to injury with protective signaling and has a remarkable capacity to protect itself. We show here that, in response to ischemic stroke, levels of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite 5α-dihydroprogesterone are upregulated rapidly in the male mouse brain but not in the

  12. LPA receptor activity is basal specific and coincident with early pregnancy and involution during mammary gland postnatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Deanna; Bagchi, Susmita; Broin, Pilib Ó; Hollern, Daniel; Racedo, Silvia E.; Morrow, Bernice; Sellers, Rani S.; Greally, John M.; Golden, Aaron; Andrechek, Eran; Wood, Teresa; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, luminal and basal epithelial cells of the adult mammary gland proliferate and differentiate resulting in remodeling of the adult gland. While pathways that control this process have been characterized in the gland as a whole, the contribution of specific cell subtypes, in particular the basal compartment, remains largely unknown. Basal cells provide structural and contractile support, however they also orchestrate the communication between the stroma and the luminal compartment at all developmental stages. Using RNA-seq, we show that basal cells are extraordinarily transcriptionally dynamic throughout pregnancy when compared to luminal cells. We identified gene expression changes that define specific basal functions acquired during development that led to the identification of novel markers. Enrichment analysis of gene sets from 24 mouse models for breast cancer pinpoint to a potential new function for insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1r) in the basal epithelium during lactogenesis. We establish that β-catenin signaling is activated in basal cells during early pregnancy, and demonstrate that this activity is mediated by lysophosphatidic acid receptor 3 (Lpar3). These findings identify novel pathways active during functional maturation of the adult mammary gland. PMID:27808166

  13. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  14. Circuit-specific intracortical hyperconnectivity in mice with deletion of the autism-associated Met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shenfeng; Anderson, Charles T; Levitt, Pat; Shepherd, Gordon M G

    2011-04-13

    Local hyperconnectivity in the neocortex is a hypothesized pathophysiological state in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). MET, a receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates dendrite and spine morphogenesis, has been established as a risk gene for ASD. Here, we analyzed the synaptic circuit organization of identified pyramidal neurons in the anterior frontal cortex of mice with a dorsal pallium-derived, conditional knock-out (cKO) of Met. Synaptic mapping by glutamate uncaging identified layer 2/3 as the main source of local excitatory input to layer 5 projection neurons in controls. In both cKO and heterozygotes, this pathway was stronger by a factor of approximately 2. This increase was both sublayer and projection-class specific, restricted to corticostriatal neurons in upper layer 5B and not neighboring corticopontine neurons. Paired recordings in cKO slices demonstrated increased unitary connectivity. We propose that excitatory hyperconnectivity in specific neocortical microcircuits constitutes a physiological basis for Met-mediated ASD risk.

  15. Disparate Degrees of Hypervariable Loop Flexibility Control T-Cell Receptor Cross-Reactivity, Specificity, and Binding Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel R.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-06-19

    {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize multiple antigenic peptides bound and presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules. TCR cross-reactivity has been attributed in part to the flexibility of TCR complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, yet there have been limited direct studies of loop dynamics to determine the extent of its role. Here we studied the flexibility of the binding loops of the {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 using crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational methods. A significant role for flexibility in binding and cross-reactivity was indicated only for the CDR3{alpha} and CDR3{beta} hypervariable loops. Examination of the energy landscapes of these two loops indicated that CDR3{beta} possesses a broad, smooth energy landscape, leading to rapid sampling in the free TCR of a range of conformations compatible with different ligands. The landscape for CDR3{alpha} is more rugged, resulting in more limited conformational sampling that leads to specificity for a reduced set of peptides as well as the major histocompatibility complex protein. In addition to informing on the mechanisms of cross-reactivity and specificity, the energy landscapes of the two loops indicate a complex mechanism for TCR binding, incorporating elements of both conformational selection and induced fit in a manner that blends features of popular models for TCR recognition.

  16. Parathyroid-specific epidermal growth factor-receptor inactivation prevents uremia-induced parathyroid hyperplasia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Maria Vittoria; Yang, Jing; Fernandez, Elvira; Dusso, Adriana

    2015-03-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), parathyroid hyperplasia contributes to high serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and also to an impaired suppression of secondary hyperparathyroidism by calcium, vitamin D and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In rats, systemic inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation markedly attenuated uremia-induced parathyroid hyperplasia and vitamin D receptor (VDR) loss, hence restoring the response to vitamin D. Therefore, we propose that parathyroid-specific EGFR inactivation should prevent CKD-induced parathyroid hyperplasia. A dominant-negative human EGFR mutant, which forms non-functional heterodimers with full-length endogenous EGFR, was successfully targeted to the parathyroid glands (PTGs) of FVB/N mice, using the 5' regulatory sequence of the PTH promoter. The parathyroid phenotype and serum chemistries of wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice were examined after 14 weeks of either sham operation or 75% renal mass reduction (NX). Both genotypes had similar morphology and body weight, and NX-induction enhanced similarly serum blood urea nitrogen compared with sham-operated controls. However, despite similar serum calcium, phosphate and FGF23 levels in NX mice of both genotypes, parathyroid EGFR inactivation sufficed to completely prevent the marked increases in PTG enlargement, serum PTH and in parathyroid levels of transforming growth factor-α, a powerful EGFR-activator, and the VDR reductions observed in WT mice. In CKD, parathyroid EGFR activation is essential for parathyroid hyperplasia and VDR loss, rendering this transgenic mouse a unique tool to scrutinize the pathogenesis of parathyroid and multiple organ dysfunction of CKD progression unrelated to parathyroid hyperplasia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Parathyroid-specific epidermal growth factor-receptor inactivation prevents uremia-induced parathyroid hyperplasia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Maria Vittoria; Yang, Jing; Fernandez, Elvira; Dusso, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic kidney disease (CKD), parathyroid hyperplasia contributes to high serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and also to an impaired suppression of secondary hyperparathyroidism by calcium, vitamin D and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In rats, systemic inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation markedly attenuated uremia-induced parathyroid hyperplasia and vitamin D receptor (VDR) loss, hence restoring the response to vitamin D. Therefore, we propose that parathyroid-specific EGFR inactivation should prevent CKD-induced parathyroid hyperplasia. Methods A dominant-negative human EGFR mutant, which forms non-functional heterodimers with full-length endogenous EGFR, was successfully targeted to the parathyroid glands (PTGs) of FVB/N mice, using the 5′ regulatory sequence of the PTH promoter. The parathyroid phenotype and serum chemistries of wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice were examined after 14 weeks of either sham operation or 75% renal mass reduction (NX). Results Both genotypes had similar morphology and body weight, and NX-induction enhanced similarly serum blood urea nitrogen compared with sham-operated controls. However, despite similar serum calcium, phosphate and FGF23 levels in NX mice of both genotypes, parathyroid EGFR inactivation sufficed to completely prevent the marked increases in PTG enlargement, serum PTH and in parathyroid levels of transforming growth factor-α, a powerful EGFR-activator, and the VDR reductions observed in WT mice. Conclusion In CKD, parathyroid EGFR activation is essential for parathyroid hyperplasia and VDR loss, rendering this transgenic mouse a unique tool to scrutinize the pathogenesis of parathyroid and multiple organ dysfunction of CKD progression unrelated to parathyroid hyperplasia. PMID:25324357

  18. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    to selectively redirect therapeutic T cells against myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T lymphocytes implicated in MS. We generated two heterodimeric receptors that genetically link the human MBP(84-102) epitope to HLA-DR2 and either incorporate or lack a TCRzeta signaling domain. The Ag-MHC domain serves...... mouse model system. Finally, the chimeric receptor-modified CTL ameliorated or blocked experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease mediated by MBP(84-102)/DR2-specific T lymphocytes. These results provide support for the further development of redirected therapeutic T cells able to counteract...

  19. The identification and functional implications of human-specific "fixed" amino acid substitutions in the glutamate receptor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiyama Asao

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glutamate receptors (GluRs play a vital role in the mediation of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. To clarify the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of the GluR genes in the lineage leading to humans, we determined the complete sequences of the coding regions and splice sites of 26 chimpanzee GluR genes. Results We found that all of the reading frames and splice sites of these genes reported in humans were completely conserved in chimpanzees, suggesting that there were no gross structural changes in humans after their divergence from the human-chimpanzee common ancestor. We observed low KA/KS ratios in both humans and chimpanzees, and we found no evidence of accelerated evolution. We identified 30 human-specific "fixed" amino acid substitutions in the GluR genes by analyzing 80 human samples of seven different populations worldwide. Grantham's distance analysis showed that GRIN2C and GRIN3A are the most and the second most diverged GluR genes between humans and chimpanzees. However, most of the substitutions are non-radical and are not clustered in any particular region. Protein motif analysis assigned 11 out of these 30 substitutions to functional regions. Two out of these 11 substitutions, D71G in GRIN3A and R727H in GRIN3B, caused differences in the functional assignments of these genes between humans and other apes. Conclusion We conclude that the GluR genes did not undergo drastic changes such as accelerated evolution in the human lineage after the divergence of chimpanzees. However, there remains a possibility that two human-specific "fixed" amino acid substitutions, D71G in GRIN3A and R727H in GRIN3B, are related to human-specific brain function.

  20. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  1. Embryonic GABA(B receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Stratton

    Full Text Available Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17 during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  2. Modeling of the Renal Kinetics of the AT1 Receptor Specific PET Radioligand [11C]KR31173

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim C. M. Gulaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The radioligand [11C]KR31173 has been introduced for PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor (AT1R. The purpose of the present project was to employ and validate a compartmental model for quantification of the kinetics of this radioligand in a porcine model of renal ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR. Procedures. Ten domestic pigs were included in the study: five controls and five experimental animals with IR of the left kidney. To achieve IR, acute ischemia was created with a balloon inserted into the left renal artery and inflated for 60 minutes. Reperfusion was achieved by deflation and removal of the balloon. Blood chemistries, urine specific gravity and PH values, and circulating hormones of the renin angiotensin system were measured and PET imaging was performed one week after IR. Cortical time-activity curves obtained from a 90 min [11C]KR31173 dynamic PET study were processed with a compartmental model that included two tissue compartments connected in parallel. Radioligand binding quantified by radioligand retention (80 min value to maximum value ratio was compared to the binding parameters derived from the compartmental model. A binding ratio was calculated as DVR=DVS/DVNS, where DVS and DVNS represented the distribution volumes of specific binding and nonspecific binding. Receptor binding was also determined by autoradiography in vitro. Results. Correlations between rate constants and binding parameters derived by the convolution and deconvolution curve fittings were significant (r>0.9. Also significant was the correlation between the retention parameter derived from the tissue activity curve (Yret and the retention parameter derived from the impulse response function (fret. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between these two retention parameters and DVR. Measurements with PET showed no significant changes in the radioligand binding parameters caused by IR, and these in vivo findings were

  3. Post-endocytotic Deubiquitination and Degradation of the MetabotropicAminobutyric Acid Receptor by the Ubiquitin-specific Protease 14

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lahaie, N.; Králíková, Michaela; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Bouvier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 13 (2016), s. 7156-7170 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) * biosensor * deubiquitylation * G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) * GABA receptor * protein degradation * receptor endocytosis * ubiquitination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  4. In-vivo characteristics of high and low specific activity radioiodinated (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperidino] cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] for imaging sigma-1 receptor in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Nasima; Kinuya, Seigo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuma; Mori, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In this study, (+)-enantiomer of radioiodinated 2-[4-(4- iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-[ 125 I]-p- iodovesamicol) [(+)-[ 125 I]pIV], which is reported to bind with high affinity to the sigma-1 receptor both in vitro and in vivo, was tested to compare the in vivo characteristics between high and low specific activity (+)-[ 125 I]pIV to image sigma-1 receptor in the central nervous system. In the biodistribution study, no significant difference was observed between two methods. Accumulation of (+)- [ 125 I]pIV in rat brain was significant (approximately 3% of the injected dose) and its retention was prolonged. In the blocking study, the accumulation of (+)-[ 125 I] pIV in the rat brain was significantly reduced by the co-administration of sigma ligands such as pentazocine, haloperidol or SA4503 in both methods. But the blocking effect was relatively stronger in the study using high specific activity radioiodinated (+)pIV. Though, the distribution of high and low specific activity (+)-[ 125 I] pIV was more or less similar to bind to sigma-1 receptor in the central nervous system in vivo, high specific activity radioiodinated (+) pIV might have a better specificity to bind sigma-1 receptor in brain. (author)

  5. Both IIC and IID Components of Mannose Phosphotransferase System Are Involved in the Specific Recognition between Immunity Protein PedB and Bacteriocin-Receptor Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Zhou

    Full Text Available Upon exposure to exogenous pediocin-like bacteriocins, immunity proteins specifically bind to the target receptor of the mannose phosphotransferase system components (man-PTS IIC and IID, therefore preventing bacterial cell death. However, the specific recognition of immunity proteins and its associated target receptors remains poorly understood. In this study, we constructed hybrid receptors to identify the domains of IIC and/or IID recognized by the immunity protein PedB, which confers immunity to pediocin PA-1. Using Lactobacillus plantarum man-PTS EII mutant W903, the IICD components of four pediocin PA-1-sensitive strains (L. plantarum WQ0815, Leuconostoc mesenteroides 05-43, Lactobacillus salivarius REN and Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172 were respectively co-expressed with the immunity protein PedB. Well-diffusions assays showed that only the complex formed by LpIICD from L. plantarum WQ0815 with pediocin PA-1 could be recognized by PedB. In addition, a two-step PCR approach was used to construct hybrid receptors by combining LpIIC or LpIID recognized by PedB with the other three heterologous IID or IIC compounds unrecognized by PedB, respectively. The results showed that all six hybrid receptors were recognized by pediocin PA-1. However, when IIC or IID of L. plantarum WQ0815 was replaced with any corresponding IIC or IID component from L. mesenteroides 05-43, L. salivarius REN and L. acidophilus 05-172, all the hybrid receptors could not be recognized by PedB. Taken altogether, we concluded that both IIC and IID components of the mannose phosphotransferase system play an important role in the specific recognition between the bacteriocin-receptor complex and the immunity protein PedB.

  6. Oral antiplatelet efficacy and specificity of a novel nonpeptide platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor antagonist, DMP 802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, S A; Olson, R E; Bozarth, J M; Lorelli, W; Forsythe, M S; Racanelli, A; Gibbs, S; Schlingman, K; Bozarth, T; Kapil, R; Wityak, J; Sielecki, T M; Wexler, R R; Thoolen, M J; Slee, A; Reilly, T M; Anderson, P S; Friedman, P A

    1998-08-01

    100 microM ADP. DMP 802 has an oral bioavailability of 14.9% in dogs. In conclusion, the alpha sulfonamide isoxazoline analog, DMP 802, is a novel oral antiplatelet agent with high affinity, relatively slow dissociation rate and specificity for human platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptors.

  7. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators and the Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex: Analysis of Cell Type-Specific Effects Using In Vivo Imaging of a Reporter Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Sara Della; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are a class of compounds that act differentially on the estrogen receptor (ER) in various tissues with a mixed agonist/antagonistic activity (agonistic in some tissues while antagonist in others). This peculiarity represents a challenge for developing new hormone replacement therapies (HRTs) and highlights the need of new tools to evaluate the specific effects of a given SERM in different organs/tissues of an entire organism and with time. Reporter mice represent invaluable tools in pharmacology to analyze specific signaling in physiological conditions and monitor the effects of drugs acting on these signals in a spatio-temporal dimension. Here, we describe an in vivo protocol to examine the effects of different SERMs on estrogen receptor activity by using the ERE-Luc reporter model, a mouse that reports ER transcriptional activity.

  8. Isoform-specific expression of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in neuromuscular junction and cardiac intercalated discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Christian A; Holland, Paul C; Sinnreich, Michael; Allen, Carol; Sollerbrant, Kerstin; Karpati, George; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2004-01-01

    Background The Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has a restricted expression pattern in the adult. In skeletal muscle, although CAR is expressed in immature fibers, its transcript levels are barely detectable in mature muscle. This is in contrast to the robust expression observed in the heart. However, both heart and skeletal muscle are susceptible to infection with the Coxsackie B virus which utilizes primarily CAR for cellular internalization. The specific point of viral entry in skeletal and heart muscle remains unknown. Results Using antibodies directed against the extracellular and the cytoplasmic domains of CAR, we show CAR in normal human and mouse skeletal muscle to be a novel component of the neuromuscular junction. In cardiac muscle, CAR immunoreactivity is observed at the level of intercalated discs. We demonstrate a single isoform of CAR to be expressed exclusively at the human neuromuscular junction whereas both predominant CAR isoforms are expressed at the intercalated discs of non-diseased human heart. Conclusion The localization of CAR to these important junctional complexes suggests that CAR may play both a structural and a regulatory role in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and that these complexes may serve as a point of entry for Coxsackie B virus. PMID:15533241

  9. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  10. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  11. Design and synthesis of a stable oxidized phospholipid mimic with specific binding recognition for macrophage scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, William W; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Boullier, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors appear to play a major role in the clearance of oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) products. Discrete peptide-phospholipid conjugates with the phosphatidylcholine headgroup have been shown to exhibit binding affinity for these receptors. We report the preparation of a water...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against the human mannose receptor as a specific marker in flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry for macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, F.; Braat, E.A.M.; Barrett-Bergshoeff, M.M.; Barbé, E.; Leeuwen, A. van; Lindeman, J.; Rijken, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recently we developed mouse monocloual antibodies (mAb) against the isolated human 175-kDa mannose receptor. In the present study we tested whether these mAb are suitable for the detection of the mannose receptor on cultured macrophages using flow cytometry and on cells in human tissues using

  13. Cell Type-specific β2-Adrenergic Receptor Clusters Identified Using Photoactivated Localization Microscopy Are Not Lipid Raft Related, but Depend on Actin Cytoskeleton Integrity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarselli, Marco; Annibale, Paolo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of optical super-resolution techniques allow both a 10-fold increase in resolution as well as an increased ability to quantify the number of labeled molecules visualized in the fluorescence measurement. By using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and an experimental approach based on the systematic comparison with a nonclustering peptide as a negative control, we found that the prototypical G protein-coupled receptor β2-adrenergic receptor is partially preassociated in nanoscale-sized clusters only in the cardiomyocytes, such as H9C2 cells, but not in other cell lines, such as HeLa and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO). The addition of the agonist for very short times or the addition of the inverse agonist did not significantly affect the organization of receptor assembly. To investigate the mechanism governing cluster formation, we altered plasma membrane properties with cholesterol removal and actin microfilament disruption. Although cholesterol is an essential component of cell membranes and it is supposed to be enriched in the lipid rafts, its sequestration and removal did not affect receptor clustering, whereas the inhibition of actin polymerization did decrease the number of clusters. Our findings are therefore consistent with a model in which β2 receptor clustering is influenced by the actin cytoskeleton, but it does not rely on lipid raft integrity, thus ruling out the possibility that cell type-specific β2 receptor clustering is associated with the raft. PMID:22442147

  14. In vitro assessment of attachment pattern and replication efficiency of H5N1 influenza A viruses with altered receptor specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Chutinimitkul (Salin); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); V.J. Munster (Vincent); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); E. de Wit (Emmie)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe continuous circulation of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been a cause of great concern. The possibility of this virus acquiring specificity for the human influenza A virus receptor, α2,6-linked sialic acids (SA), and being able to transmit efficiently

  15. The Fas/CD95 receptor regulates the death of autoreactive B cells and the selection of antigen-specific B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Odile eHUEBER

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell death receptors have crucial roles in the regulation of immune responses. Here we review recent in vivo data confirming that the Fas death receptor (TNFSR6 on B cells is important for the regulation of autoimmunity since the impairment of only Fas function on B cells results in uncontrolled autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Fas plays a role in the elimination of the non-specific and auto-reactive B cells in germinal center, while during the selection of antigen specific B cells different escape signals ensure the resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Antigen specific survival such as BCR or MHCII signal or coreceptors (CD19 cooperating with BCR inhibits the formation of death inducing signaling complex. Antigen-specific survival can be reinforced by antigen-independent signals of IL4 or CD40 overproducing the anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family proteins.

  16. Sex-specific effects of prenatal chronic mild stress on adult spatial learning capacity and regional glutamate receptor expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Xinxin; Cheng, Wenwen; Jiang, Han; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Zhang, Xiaosong; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-07-01

    Both animal experiments and clinical studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress can cause cognitive disorders in offspring. To explore the scope of these deficits and identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the spatial learning and memory performance and glutamate receptor (GluR) expression patterns of adult rats exposed to prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the interrelationships among spatial learning indices and GluR expression changes. Female PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited markedly impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) task compared to control females, while PCMS-exposed males showed better initial spatial learning in the MWM compared to control males. PCMS also altered basal and post-MWM glutamate receptor expression patterns, but these effects differed markedly between sexes. Male PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited elevated basal expression of NR1, mGluR5, and mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas females showed no basal expression changes. Following MWM training, PCMS-exposed males expressed higher NR1 in the PFC and mammillary body (MB), higher mGluR2/3 in PFC, and lower NR2B in the hippocampus (HIP), PFC, and MB compared to unstressed MWM-trained males. Female PCMS-exposed offspring showed strongly reduced NR1 in MB and NR2B in the HIP, PFC, and MB, and increased mGluR2/3 in PFC compared to unstressed MWM-trained females. This is the first report suggesting that NMDA subunits in the MB are involved in spatial learning. Additionally, PCA further suggests that the NR1-NR2B form is the most important for spatial memory formation. These results reveal long-term sex-specific effects of PCMS on spatial learning and memory performance in adulthood and implicate GluR expression changes within HIP, PFC, and MB as possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in offspring exposed to prenatal stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  17. Demonstration of specific E-type prostaglandin receptors using enriched preparations of canine parietal cells and [3H]misoprostol free acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Schoenhard, G.; Collins, P.W.; Bauer, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity, E-type prostaglandin binding sites in enriched canine parietal cell preparations were identified with [ 3 H] misoprostol free acid, a prostaglandin E1 analogue. Saturable, reversible, and highly stereospecific binding was identified, with approximately 8000 binding sites per cell. Prostaglandin I and F bound weakly, and cimetidine and histamine did not bind. The results indicate that [ 3 H] misoprostol free acid binds to E-type prostaglandin receptors, which suggests that the ulcer-healing inhibition of gastric acid secretion by misoprostol results from its interaction with a specific E-type prostaglandin receptor

  18. Demonstration of specific E-type prostaglandin receptors using enriched preparations of canine parietal cells and (/sup 3/H)misoprostol free acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Schoenhard, G.; Collins, P.W.; Bauer, R.F.

    1987-07-27

    High-affinity, E-type prostaglandin binding sites in enriched canine parietal cell preparations were identified with (/sup 3/H) misoprostol free acid, a prostaglandin E1 analogue. Saturable, reversible, and highly stereospecific binding was identified, with approximately 8000 binding sites per cell. Prostaglandin I and F bound weakly, and cimetidine and histamine did not bind. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H) misoprostol free acid binds to E-type prostaglandin receptors, which suggests that the ulcer-healing inhibition of gastric acid secretion by misoprostol results from its interaction with a specific E-type prostaglandin receptor.

  19. Androgen receptor functional analyses by high throughput imaging: determination of ligand, cell cycle, and mutation-specific effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available Understanding how androgen receptor (AR function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS, and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors.We report the development of a high throughput (HT image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5-24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear "speckling" were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions.HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations.

  20. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. PCB 126 and Other Dioxin-Like PCBs Specifically Suppress Hepatic PEPCK Expression via the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenshuo; Sargis, Robert M.; Volden, Paul A.; Carmean, Christopher M.; Sun, Xiao J.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds encompass a group of structurally related heterocyclic compounds that bind to and activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The prototypical dioxin is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a highly toxic industrial byproduct that incites numerous adverse physiological effects. Global commercial production of the structurally similar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), however, commenced early in the 20th century and continued for decades; dioxin-like PCBs therefore contribute significantly to total dioxin-associated toxicity. In this study, PCB 126, the most potent dioxin-like PCB, was evaluated with respect to its direct effects on hepatic glucose metabolism using primary mouse hepatocytes. Overnight treatment with PCB 126 reduced hepatic glycogen stores in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, PCB 126 suppressed forskolin-stimulated gluconeogenesis from lactate. These effects were independent of acute toxicity, as PCB 126 did not increase lactate dehydrogenase release nor affect lipid metabolism or total intracellular ATP. Interestingly, provision of cells with glycerol instead of lactate as the carbon source completely restored hepatic glucose production, indicating specific impairment in the distal arm of gluconeogenesis. In concordance with this finding, PCB 126 blunted the forskolin-stimulated increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA levels without affecting glucose-6-phosphatase expression. Myricetin, a putative competitive AhR antagonist, reversed the suppression of PEPCK induction by PCB 126. Furthermore, other dioxin-like PCBs demonstrated similar effects on PEPCK expression in parallel with their ability to activate AhR. It therefore appears that AhR activation mediates the suppression of PEPCK expression by dioxin-like PCBs, suggesting a role for these pollutants as disruptors of energy metabolism. PMID:22615911

  2. Generation of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre Mice for Gene Expression in an Oxytocin Receptor Specific Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidema, Shizu; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryotaro; Otsuka, Ayano; Suzuki, Shingo; Miyazaki, Shinji; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The neurohypophysial hormone oxytocin (OXT) and its receptor (OXTR) have critical roles in the regulation of pro-social behaviors, including social recognition, pair bonding, parental behavior, and stress-related responses. Supporting this hypothesis, a portion of patients suffering from autism spectrum disorder have mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications in their OXTR gene. We previously reported that OXTR-deficient mice exhibit pervasive social deficits, indicating the critical role of OXTR in social behaviors. In the present study, we generated Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice, expressing both OXTR and Cre recombinase under the control of the endogenous Oxtr promoter. Knock-in cassette of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre consisted of Oxtr cDNA tagged with the hemagglutinin epitope at the 3' end (Oxtr cDNA(HA)), internal ribosomal entry site (Ires), and Cre. Cre was expressed in the uterus, mammary gland, kidney, and brain of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice. Furthermore, the distribution of Cre in the brain was similar to that observed in Oxtr-Venus fluorescent protein expressing mice (Oxtr-Venus), another animal model previously generated by our group. Social behavior of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice was similar to that of wild-type animals. We demonstrated that this construct is expressed in OXTR-expressing neurons specifically after an infection with the recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the flip-excision switch vector. Using this system, we showed the transport of the wheat-germ agglutinin tracing molecule from the OXTR-expressing neurons to the innervated neurons in knock-in mice. This study might contribute to the monosynaptic analysis of neuronal circuits and to the optogenetic analysis of neurons expressing OXTR. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. PCB 126 and other dioxin-like PCBs specifically suppress hepatic PEPCK expression via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenshuo Zhang

    Full Text Available Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds encompass a group of structurally related heterocyclic compounds that bind to and activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. The prototypical dioxin is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a highly toxic industrial byproduct that incites numerous adverse physiological effects. Global commercial production of the structurally similar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, however, commenced early in the 20(th century and continued for decades; dioxin-like PCBs therefore contribute significantly to total dioxin-associated toxicity. In this study, PCB 126, the most potent dioxin-like PCB, was evaluated with respect to its direct effects on hepatic glucose metabolism using primary mouse hepatocytes. Overnight treatment with PCB 126 reduced hepatic glycogen stores in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, PCB 126 suppressed forskolin-stimulated gluconeogenesis from lactate. These effects were independent of acute toxicity, as PCB 126 did not increase lactate dehydrogenase release nor affect lipid metabolism or total intracellular ATP. Interestingly, provision of cells with glycerol instead of lactate as the carbon source completely restored hepatic glucose production, indicating specific impairment in the distal arm of gluconeogenesis. In concordance with this finding, PCB 126 blunted the forskolin-stimulated increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK mRNA levels without affecting glucose-6-phosphatase expression. Myricetin, a putative competitive AhR antagonist, reversed the suppression of PEPCK induction by PCB 126. Furthermore, other dioxin-like PCBs demonstrated similar effects on PEPCK expression in parallel with their ability to activate AhR. It therefore appears that AhR activation mediates the suppression of PEPCK expression by dioxin-like PCBs, suggesting a role for these pollutants as disruptors of energy metabolism.

  4. Structure-kinetic relationship studies of cannabinoid CB2receptor agonists reveal substituent-specific lipophilic effects on residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; Hoorens, Mark W H; Doelman, Ward; Martella, Andrea; van der Stelt, Mario; Heitman, Laura H

    2018-03-21

    A decade ago, the drug-target residence time model has been (re-)introduced, which describes the importance of binding kinetics of ligands on their protein targets. Since then, it has been applied successfully for multiple protein targets, including GPCRs, for the development of lead compounds with slow dissociation kinetics (i.e. long target residence time) to increase in vivo efficacy or with short residence time to prevent on-target associated side effects. To date, this model has not been applied in the design and pharmacological evaluation of novel selective ligands for the cannabinoid CB 2 receptor (CB 2 R), a GPCR with therapeutic potential in the treatment of tissue injury and inflammatory diseases. Here, we have investigated the relationships between physicochemical properties, binding kinetics and functional activity in two different signal transduction pathways, G protein activation and β-arrestin recruitment. We synthesized 24 analogues of 3-cyclopropyl-1-(4-(6-((1,1-dioxidothiomorpholino)methyl)-5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)benzyl)imidazoleidine-2,4-dione (LEI101), our previously reported in vivo active and CB 2 R-selective agonist, with varying basicity and lipophilicity. We identified a positive correlation between target residence time and functional potency due to an increase in lipophilicity on the alkyl substituents, which was not the case for the amine substituents. Basicity of the agonists did not show a relationship with affinity, residence time or functional activity. Our findings provide important insights about the effects of physicochemical properties of the specific substituents of this scaffold on the binding kinetics of agonists and their CB 2 R pharmacology. This work therefore shows how CB 2 R agonists can be designed to have optimal kinetic profiles, which could aid the lead optimization process in drug discovery for the study or treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  6. Ligand-specific Deactivation Time Course of GluN1/GluN2D NMDA Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Vance; N Simorowski; S Traynelis; H Furukawa

    2011-12-31

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate a majority of excitatory synaptic transmission. One unique property of GluN1/GluN2D NMDA receptors is an unusually prolonged deactivation time course following the removal of L-glutamate. Here we show, using x-ray crystallography and electrophysiology, that the deactivation time course of GluN1/GluN2D receptors is influenced by the conformational variability of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as the structure of the activating ligand. L-glutamate and L-CCG-IV induce significantly slower deactivation time courses compared with other agonists. Crystal structures of the isolated GluN2D LBD in complex with various ligands reveal that the binding of L-glutamate induces a unique conformation at the backside of the ligand-binding site in proximity to the region at which the transmembrane domain would be located in the intact receptors. These data suggest that the activity of the GluN1/GluN2D NMDA receptor is controlled distinctively by the endogenous neurotransmitter L-glutamate.

  7. Antigen-Specific IgG ameliorates allergic airway inflammation via Fcγ receptor IIB on dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasuyama Hajime

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been few reports on the role of Fc receptors (FcRs and immunoglobulin G (IgG in asthma. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of inhibitory FcRs and antigen presenting cells (APCs in pathogenesis of asthma and to evaluate antigen-transporting and presenting capacity by APCs in the tracheobronchial mucosa. Methods In FcγRIIB deficient (KO and C57BL/6 (WT mice, the effects of intratracheal instillation of antigen-specific IgG were analysed using the model with sensitization and airborne challenge with ovalbumin (OVA. Thoracic lymph nodes instilled with fluorescein-conjugated OVA were analysed by fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, we analysed the CD11c+ MHC class II+ cells which intaken fluorescein-conjugated OVA in thoracic lymph nodes by flow cytometry. Also, lung-derived CD11c+ APCs were analysed by flow cytometry. Effects of anti-OVA IgG1 on bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs in vitro were also analysed. Moreover, in FcγRIIB KO mice intravenously transplanted dendritic cells (DCs differentiated from BMDCs of WT mice, the effects of intratracheal instillation of anti-OVA IgG were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Results In WT mice, total cells and eosinophils in BAL fluid reduced after instillation with anti-OVA IgG1. Anti-OVA IgG1 suppressed airway inflammation in hyperresponsiveness and histology. In addition, the number of the fluorescein-conjugated OVA in CD11c+ MHC class II+ cells of thoracic lymph nodes with anti-OVA IgG1 instillation decreased compared with PBS. Also, MHC class II expression on lung-derived CD11c+ APCs with anti-OVA IgG1 instillation reduced. Moreover, in vitro, we showed that BMDCs with anti-OVA IgG1 significantly decreased the T cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrated that the lacking effects of anti-OVA IgG1 on airway inflammation on FcγRIIB KO mice were restored with WT-derived BMDCs transplanted intravenously. Conclusion Antigen-specific IgG ameliorates

  8. Site-specificO-Glycosylation by PolypeptideN-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GalNAc-transferase T2) Co-regulates β1-Adrenergic Receptor N-terminal Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goth, Christoffer K; Tuhkanen, Hanna E; Khan, Hamayun; Lackman, Jarkko J; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Hansen, Lasse H; Overall, Christopher M; Clausen, Henrik; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E

    2017-03-17

    The β 1 -adrenergic receptor (β 1 AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and the predominant adrenergic receptor subtype in the heart, where it mediates cardiac contractility and the force of contraction. Although it is the most important target for β-adrenergic antagonists, such as β-blockers, relatively little is yet known about its regulation. We have shown previously that β 1 AR undergoes constitutive and regulated N-terminal cleavage participating in receptor down-regulation and, moreover, that the receptor is modified by O -glycosylation. Here we demonstrate that the polypeptide GalNAc-transferase 2 (GalNAc-T2) specifically O -glycosylates β 1 AR at five residues in the extracellular N terminus, including the Ser-49 residue at the location of the common S49G single-nucleotide polymorphism. Using in vitro O -glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage assays, a cell line deficient in O -glycosylation, GalNAc-T-edited cell line model systems, and a GalNAc-T2 knock-out rat model, we show that GalNAc-T2 co-regulates the metalloproteinase-mediated limited proteolysis of β 1 AR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that impaired O -glycosylation and enhanced proteolysis lead to attenuated receptor signaling, because the maximal response elicited by the βAR agonist isoproterenol and its potency in a cAMP accumulation assay were decreased in HEK293 cells lacking GalNAc-T2. Our findings reveal, for the first time, a GPCR as a target for co-regulatory functions of site-specific O -glycosylation mediated by a unique GalNAc-T isoform. The results provide a new level of β 1 AR regulation that may open up possibilities for new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  10. Transfer of mRNA Encoding Invariant NKT Cell Receptors Imparts Glycolipid Specific Responses to T Cells and γδT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawamura, Masami; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Sato, Yusuke; Iyoda, Tomonori; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using genetically engineered lymphocytes expressing antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) hold promise for the treatment of several types of cancers. Almost all studies using this modality have focused on transfer of TCR from CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The transfer of TCR from innate lymphocytes to other lymphocytes has not been studied. In the current study, innate and adaptive lymphocytes were transfected with the human NKT cell-derived TCRα and β chain mRNA (the Vα24 and Vβ11 TCR chains). When primary T cells transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR were subsequently stimulated with the NKT ligand, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), they secreted IFN-γ in a ligand-specific manner. Furthermore when γδT cells were transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR mRNA, they demonstrated enhanced proliferation, IFN-γ production and antitumor effects after α-GalCer stimulation as compared to parental γδT cells. Importantly, NKT cell TCR-transfected γδT cells responded to both NKT cell and γδT cell ligands, rendering them bi-potential innate lymphocytes. Because NKT cell receptors are unique and universal invariant receptors in humans, the TCR chains do not yield mispaired receptors with endogenous TCR α and β chains after the transfection. The transfection of NKT cell TCR has the potential to be a new approach to tumor immunotherapy in patients with various types of cancer.

  11. Regional specific binding of [11C]RO 15 1788 to central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain: quantitative evaluation by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappata, S.; Samson, Y.; Chavoix, C.; Prenant, C.; Maziere, M.; Baron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The central type benzodiazepine receptors were studied in 17 healthy human subjects with 11 C-RO 15 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). The brain regional distribution of the tracer in eight control studies performed after injection of trace doses of 11 C-RO 15 1788 was consistent with that of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation studies with co-injected cold RO 15 1788 in the remaining subjects showed a dose-dependent decrease of brain radiotracer until full inhibition of specific binding was achieved with doses above 0.1 mg/kg (four studies). Based on the results, a simple method to estimate the specifically bound 11 C-RO 15 1788 regionally in a single PET study is proposed, using the data from the full-saturation studies as a stable estimate of the nondisplaceable radioligand concentration. Using this method, it was found that quasiequilibrium between the estimated specifically bound and nondisplaceable components was achieved at times equal to or longer than 20 min after tracer administration. The validity of this method was partly supported by further results, showing a good agreement between the regional specific binding so calculated and postmortem data of receptor density

  12. Bitistatin-functionalized fluorescent nanodiamond particles specifically bind to purified human platelet integrin receptor αIIbβ3 and activated platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcinkiewicz C

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cezary Marcinkiewicz,1,2 Jonathan A Gerstenhaber,1 Mark Sternberg,2 Peter I Lelkes,1 Giora Feuerstein1,2 1Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, 2Debina Diagnostic, Inc., Newton Square, PA, USA Abstract: Thromboembolic events (TEE underwrite key causes of death in developed countries. While advanced imaging technologies such as computed tomography scans serve to diagnose blood clots during acute cardiovascular events, no such technology is available in routine primary care for TEE risk assessment. Here, we describe an imaging platform technology based on bioengineered fluorescent nanodiamond particles (F-NDPs functionalized with bitistatin (Bit, a disintegrin that specifically binds to the αIIbβ3 integrin, platelet fibrinogen receptor (PFR on activated platelets. Covalent linkage of purified Bit to F-NDP was concentration-dependent and saturable, as validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using specific anti-Bit antibodies. F-NDP–Bit interacted with purified PFR, either in immobilized or soluble form. Lotrafiban, a nonpeptide, αIIbβ3 receptor antagonist, specifically blocked F-NDP–Bit–PFR complex formation. Moreover, F-NDP–Bit specifically binds to activated platelets incorporated into a clot generated by thrombin-activated rat platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Our results suggest that engineered F-NDP–Bit particles could serve as noninvasive, “real-time” optical diagnostics for clots present in blood vessels. Keywords: carbon nanoparticles, blood clots, imaging, platelet fibrinogen receptor, fluorescence, disintegrin, thromboembolic complications, thrombosis

  13. [Evolution of the receptor specificity of influenza viruses hemagglutinin in its transfer from duck to pig and man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinina, V P; Gambarian, A S; Tuzikov, A B; Pozynina, G V; Bovin, N V; Fediakina, I T; Iamnikova, S S; L'vov, D K; Matrosevich, M N

    2004-01-01

    The receptor properties of H1 and H2 influenza viruses (IV), isolated from duck, pig and man were studied by using the natural and synthetic sialoglycoconjugates. It was shown that viruses, isolated from different hosts, adapt themselves to the host cell receptors. The IV affinity was increasing to 6'sialy(N-acetyllactosamine) in proportion as amino acids (in positions 138, 190, 194 and 225), which are for avian IV, were increasingly replacing. Some of the porcine viruses display adaptation to the human receptor, i.e. 6'sialy(N-acetyllactosamine), however, all tested porcine influenza viruses, belonging to different evolution branches, acquired even more affinity to sulphated and fucozyled derivatives of 3'sialy(N-acetyliactosamine)-(Neu5AC alpha 2-3 g AL beta 1-4(fUC alpha 1-3)(6-sulfo)GlcNAc beta).

  14. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) T cell receptor loci exhibit V subgroup synteny and chain-specific evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaux, Breanna; Hunter, Margaret; Cruz-Schneider, Maria Paula; Sena, Leonardo; Bonde, Robert K.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2018-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has limited diversity in the immunoglobulin heavy chain. We therefore investigated the antigen receptor loci of the other arm of the adaptive immune system: the T cell receptor. Manatees are the first species from Afrotheria, a basal eutherian superorder, to have an in-depth characterization of all T cell receptor loci. By annotating the genome and expressed transcripts, we found that each chain has distinct features that correlates to their individual functions. The genomic organization also plays a role in modulating sequence conservation between species. There were extensive V subgroup synteny blocks in the TRA and TRB loci between T. m. latirostrisand human. Increased genomic locus complexity correlated to increased locus synteny. We also identified evidence for a VHD pseudogene for the first time in a eutherian mammal. These findings emphasize the value of including species within this basal eutherian radiation in comparative studies.

  15. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Identification of novel peptide ligands for the cancer-specific receptor mutation EFGRvIII using a mixture-based synthetic combinatorial library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    . This study demonstrates the value of using mixture-based combinatorial positional scanning libraries for the identification of novel peptide ligands targeted against the cancer-specific EGFRvIII. Our best candidate H-FALGEA-NH(2) will be radioactively labeled and evaluated as an imaging agent for positron......We report here, the design and synthesis of a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library for the identification of novel peptide ligands targeted against the cancer-specific epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor mutation variant III (EGFRvIII). This receptor is expressed...... in several kinds of cancer, in particular, ovarian, glioblastomas, and breast cancer, but not in normal tissue. The library consisted of six individual positional sublibraries in the format, H-O(1-6)XXXXX-NH(2), O being one of the 19 proteinogenic amino acids (cysteine omitted) and X an equimolar mixture...

  17. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of 125 [I] labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation

  18. Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor (MISIIR): a novel, tissue-specific target expressed by gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N; Aletti, Giovanni; Lewis, Kriste A; Keeney, Gary L; Thomas, Bijoy M; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Cliby, William A

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian inhibiting substance type II receptor (MISIIR) is expressed by ovarian, breast, and prostate cancers [Masiakos PT, et al. Human ovarian cancer, cell lines, and primary ascites cells express the human Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) Type II Receptor, bind, and are responsive to MIS. Clin Cancer Res 1999;5:3488-99; Hoshiya Y, et al. Mullerian inhibiting substance promotes interferon {gamma}-induced gene expression and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. J Biol Chem 2003;278:51703-12; Hoshiya Y, et al. Mullerian inhibiting substance induces NFkB signaling in breast and prostate cancer cells. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 2003;211:43-9. [1-3

  19. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  20. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  1. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  2. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Eric L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1, and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3. PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. Results We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. Conclusion These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1

  3. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  4. Evidence for ligand and/or receptor-specific mechanisms of internalization and processing in cultured H35 hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, R.I.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L.

    1987-05-01

    Total cell associated (TC) and intracellularly accumulated (IC) SVI-labeled insulin (INS) or -2-macroglobulin ( 2M) were assessed in cultured H35 hepatoma cells which were preincubated with various agents. Cytochalasin D or sodium azide, which affect microfilament- or energy-dependent receptor internalization, had no significant effects on INS TC or IC but each decreased 2M TC and IC to 50-75% of control. Monensin and chloroquine, acidotrophic agents, each increased INS TC and IC to 150-300% of control yet decreased TC and IC of 2M to 20-50% of control. Only leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, caused an increase in both INS and 2M TC and IC. These data suggest significant differences exist in the biochemical regulation or structural routes of INS and 2M receptors and/or receptor-ligand complexes in their (1) internalization, (2) processing in acidic organelles, (3) recycling to the cell surface or in combinations of the above. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies are being performed on the H35 hepatoma cell which will characterize the processing of INS and 2M receptors and provide an explanation for the differences observed.

  5. The Staphylococcal Toxins γ-Hemolysin AB and CB Differentially Target Phagocytes by Employing Specific Chemokine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaan, András N.; Vrieling, Manouk; Wallet, Pierre; Badiou, Cédric; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Ohneck, Elizabeth A.; Benito, Yvonne; de Haas, Carla J.C.; Day, Christopher J.; Jennings, Michael P.; Lina, Gérard; Vandenesch, François; van Kessel, Kok P.M.; Torres, Victor J.; van Strijp, Jos A.G.; Henry, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of the host phagocyte response by Staphylococcus aureus is crucial to successful infection with the pathogen. γ-Hemolysin AB and CB (HlgAB, HlgCB) are bicomponent pore-forming toxins present in almost all human S. aureus isolates. Cellular tropism and contribution of the toxins to S. aureus pathophysiology are poorly understood. Here, we identify the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR2 and CCR2 as targets for HlgAB, and the complement receptors C5aR and C5L2 as targets for HlgCB. The receptor expression patterns allow the toxins to efficiently and differentially target phagocytic cells. Murine neutrophils are resistant to HlgAB and HlgCB. CCR2 is the sole murine receptor orthologue compatible with γ-Hemolysin. In a murine peritonitis model, HlgAB contributes to S. aureus bacteremia in a CCR2-dependent manner. HlgAB-mediated targeting of CCR2+ cells highlights the involvement of inflammatory macrophages during S. aureus infection. Functional quantification identifies HlgAB and HlgCB as major secreted staphylococcal leukocidins. PMID:25384670

  6. Intestinal cell-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated transcriptional regulation of CYP3A4 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pávek, P.; Pospěchová, K.; Švecová, L.; Syrová, Zdeňka; Stejskalová, L.; Blažková, Jana; Dvořák, Z.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2010), s. 277-287 ISSN 0006-2952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : pharmacokinetics * cytochrome P450 * nuclear receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.889, year: 2010

  7. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  8. Evidence for ligand and/or receptor-specific mechanisms of internalization and processing in cultured H35 hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, R.I.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L.

    1987-01-01

    Total cell associated (TC) and intracellularly accumulated (IC) 125 I-labeled insulin (INS) or α-2-macroglobulin (α2M) were assessed in cultured H35 hepatoma cells which were preincubated with various agents. Cytochalasin D or sodium azide, which affect microfilament- or energy-dependent receptor internalization, had no significant effects on INS TC or IC but each decreased α2M TC and IC to 50-75% of control. Monensin and chloroquine, acidotrophic agents, each increased INS TC and IC to 150-300% of control yet decreased TC and IC of α2M to 20-50% of control. Only leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, caused an increase in both INS and α2M TC and IC. These data suggest significant differences exist in the biochemical regulation or structural routes of INS and α2M receptors and/or receptor-ligand complexes in their (1) internalization, (2) processing in acidic organelles, (3) recycling to the cell surface or in combinations of the above. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies are being performed on the H35 hepatoma cell which will characterize the processing of INS and α2M receptors and provide an explanation for the differences observed

  9. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  10. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2010-02-12

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF)-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional regulation mechanisms.

  11. Three-dimensional autoradiographic localization of quench-corrected glycine receptor specific activity in the mouse brain using 3H-strychnine as the ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.F.; O'Gorman, S.; Roe, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The autoradiographic analysis of neurotransmitter receptor distribution is a powerful technique that provides extensive information on the localization of neurotransmitter systems. Computer methodologies are described for the analysis of autoradiographic material which include quench correction, 3-dimensional display, and quantification based on anatomical boundaries determined from the tissue sections. These methodologies are applied to the problem of the distribution of glycine receptors measured by 3H-strychnine binding in the mouse CNS. The most distinctive feature of this distribution is its marked caudorostral gradient. The highest densities of binding sites within this gradient were seen in somatic motor and sensory areas; high densities of binding were seen in branchial efferent and special sensory areas. Moderate levels were seen in nuclei related to visceral function. Densities within the reticular formation paralleled the overall gradient with high to moderate levels of binding. The colliculi had low and the diencephalon had very low levels of binding. No binding was seen in the cerebellum or the telencephalon with the exception of the amygdala, which had very low levels of specific binding. This distribution of glycine receptors correlates well with the known functional distribution of glycine synaptic function. These data are illustrated in 3 dimensions and discussed in terms of the significance of the analysis techniques on this type of data as well as the functional significance of the distribution of glycine receptors

  12. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  13. In vitro assessment of attachment pattern and replication efficiency of H5N1 influenza A viruses with altered receptor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutinimitkul, Salin; van Riel, Debby; Munster, Vincent J; van den Brand, Judith M A; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; de Wit, Emmie

    2010-07-01

    The continuous circulation of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been a cause of great concern. The possibility of this virus acquiring specificity for the human influenza A virus receptor, alpha2,6-linked sialic acids (SA), and being able to transmit efficiently among humans is a constant threat to human health. Different studies have described amino acid substitutions in hemagglutinin (HA) of clinical HPAI H5N1 isolates or that were introduced experimentally that resulted in an increased, but not exclusive, binding of these virus strains to alpha2,6-linked SA. We introduced all previously described amino acid substitutions and combinations thereof into a single genetic background, influenza virus A/Indonesia/5/05 HA, and tested the receptor specificity of these 27 mutant viruses. The attachment pattern to ferret and human tissues of the upper and lower respiratory tract of viruses with alpha2,6-linked SA receptor preference was then determined and compared to the attachment pattern of a human influenza A virus (H3N2). At least three mutant viruses showed an attachment pattern to the human respiratory tract similar to that of the human H3N2 virus. Next, the replication efficiencies of these mutant viruses and the effects of three different neuraminidases on virus replication were determined. These data show that influenza virus A/Indonesia/5/05 potentially requires only a single amino acid substitution to acquire human receptor specificity, while at the same time remaining replication competent, thus suggesting that the pandemic threat posed by HPAI H5N1 is far from diminished.

  14. Highly specific detection of muscarinic M3 receptor, G protein interaction and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor using Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt-Paetz, Mandy; Herbst, Luise; Weimann, Annett; Gonsior, Andreas; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2018-03-15

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) regulate a number of important physiological functions. Alteration of mAChR expression or function has been associated in the etiology of several pathologies including functional bladder disorders (e.g bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis - BPS/IC). In a previous study we found specific mAChR expression patterns associated with BPS/IC, while correlation between protein and gene expression was lacking. Posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, e.g. altered intracellular receptor trafficking, could explain those differences. In addition, alternative G protein (GP) coupling could add to the pathophysiology via modulation of muscarinic signaling. In our proof-of-principle study, we addressed these questions in situ. We established PLA in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy (CLSM) and 3D object reconstruction for highly specific detection and analysis of muscarinic 3 receptors (M3), G protein (GP) coupling and intracellular trafficking in human detrusor samples. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed bladder tissue (FFPE) of BPS/IC patients receiving transurethral biopsy were examined by Cy3-PLA for M3 expression, coupling of M3 to GPs (G αq/11 , G αs , G αi ) and interaction of M3 with endocytic regulator proteins. Membranes were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor ® 488, nuclei were stained with DAPI. Object density and co-localization were analyzed in 3D-reconstruction of high resolution confocal z-stacks. Confocal image stack processing resulted in well demarcated objects. Calculated receptor densities correlated significantly with existing confocal expression data, while significantly improved specificity of M3 detection by PLA was verified using bladder tissue samples from transgenic mice. 50-60% of the M3 receptor complexes were plasma membrane associated in human bladder detrusor. Application of PLA for M3 and GPs allowed visualization of M3-GP interactions and revealed individual GP

  15. Small Interfering RNA Specific for N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor 2B Offers Neuroprotection to Dopamine Neurons through Activation of MAP Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia T.W. Ng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B-specific siRNA was applied in parkinsonian models. Our previous results showed that reduction in expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1, the key subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, by antisense oligos amelio-rated the motor symptoms in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rat, an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD [Lai et al.: Neurochem Int 2004;45:11-22]. To further the investigation on the efficacy of gene silencing, small interference RNA (siRNA specific for the NR2B subunit was designed and administered in the striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The present results show that administration of NR2B-specific siRNA decreased the number of apomorphine-induced rotations in the lesioned rats and that there was a significant reduction in NR2B proteins levels after NR2B-specific siRNA administration. Furthermore, attenuation of the loss of dopaminergic neurons was found in both the striatal and substantia nigra regions of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that had been continuously infused with siRNA for 7 days. In addition, a significant upregulation of p-p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2; Thr202/Tyr204 and p-CREB (Ser133 in striatal neurons was found. These results suggest that application of the gene silencing targeting NR2B could be a potential treatment of PD, and they also revealed the possibility of NR2B-specific siRNA being involved in the prosurvival pathway.

  16. [POSSIBILITIES OF APPLICATION OF MALDI-TOF MASS-SPECTROMETRY FOR STUDY OF CARBOHYDRATE-SPECIFIC RECEPTORS FOR DIAGNOSTIC BACTERIOPHAGE EL TOR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesmanich, N R; Goncharenko, E V; Chaika, S O; Chaika, I A; Telicheva, V O

    2016-01-01

    Study mechanisms of interaction of diagnostic bacteriophage El Tor with sensitive strain Vibrio cholerae El Tor 18507 using direct protein profiling, identification of constant and variable proteins, taking part in interaction of the phage and cell, as well as carbohydrate-specific phage receptors. . A commercial preparation of cholera diagnostic bacteriophage El Tor, strain V. cholerae El Tor 18507 were used. Effect of carbohydrates on bacteriophage activity was determined in experiments with phage by a classic and modified by us method. Protein profiles of the studied objects were studied using MSP-analysis method. Sucrose was shown to inhibit lytic activity of bacteriophage. Proteome profiles of El Tor bacteriophage and sensitive indicator strains were studied, identification of constant and variable proteins of the studied objects by MSP Peak-list program was carried out. Analysis of changes of profiles of phage and microbial cell during interaction with sucrose gave a basis for assuming, that sucrose in the mixture of culture-phage enters interaction namely with phage protein receptors, blocking receptors specific for cholera vibrio, that subsequently manifests in a sharp decrease of phage activity against the sensitive strain.

  17. High specific activity tritiation of the pyridazin-3-one histamine H{sub 3} receptor inverse agonist CEP-27088

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joseph R. [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Filer, Crist N., E-mail: crist.filer@perkinelmer.com [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Maniscalco, Mario [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Becknell, Nadine C.; Hudkins, Robert L. [Discovery Research, Cephalon, Inc. 145 Brandywine Parkway, West Chester, PA 19380 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Methods are presented to tritiate and characterize radioligand (3). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper addresses a useful compound to study the histamine-3 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compound is a member of the pyridazin-3-one heterocycle class. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the paper describes the installation of tritium in the compound of interest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Furthermore, tritium NMR has been employed to characterize the tritiated compound.

  18. Molecule-specific Effects of Angiotensin II–Receptor Blockers Independent of the Renin–Angiotensin System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurtz, T. W.; Pravenec, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2008), s. 852-859 ISSN 0895-7061 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA MZd(CZ) NR8545 Grant - others:EURATOOLS(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015; HHMI(US) 55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : angiotensin-receptor blockers * cardiovascular protection * renin-angiotensin system Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2008

  19. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, P.; Srb, Pavel; Williams, C.; Crump, M. P.; Tošner, Z.; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 40 (2016), s. 21234-21245 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : insulin * IGF-2 * receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016 http://www.jbc.org/content/291/40/21234.full

  20. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  1. The impact of HLA class I-specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on antibody-dependent natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and organ allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Rajalingam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self HLA class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during a developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR binding self HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  2. Effect of tissue-specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 on α3β4 and αβεδ acetylcholine receptors in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindovský, Jiří; Petrov, Konstantin; Krůšek, Jan; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2012-08-05

    The C-547 is the most effective muscle and tissue-specific anticholinesterase among alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS) acting in nanomolar concentrations on locomotor muscles but not on respiratory muscles, smooth muscles and heart and brain acetylcholine esterases (AChE). When applied systematically it could influence peripheral acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C-547 on rat α3β4 (ganglionic type) and αβεδ (muscle type) nicotinic receptors expressed in COS cells. Currents evoked by rapid application of acetylcholine or nicotine were recorded in whole-cell mode by electrophysiological patch-clamp technique 2-4 days after cell transfection by plasmids coding the α3β4 or αβεδ combination of receptor subunits. In cells sensitive to acetylcholine, the application of C-547 evoked no responses. When acetylcholine was applied during an already running application of C-547, acetylcholine responses were only inhibited at concentrations higher than 10(-7)M. This inhibition is not voltage-dependent, but is accompanied by an increased rate of desensitization. Thus in both types of receptors, effective doses are approximately 100 times higher than those inhibiting AChE in leg muscles and similar to those inhibiting respiratory diaphragm muscles and external intercostal muscles. These observations show that C-547 can be considered for symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and other congenital myasthenic syndromes as an inhibitor of AChE in leg muscles at concentrations much lower than those inhibiting muscle and ganglion types of acetylcholine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Premature aging phenotype in mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors: region specific changes in layer V pyramidal cell morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Konsolaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which aging leads to alterations in brain structure and cognitive deficits are unclear. A central yet presently unresolved issue in aging research concerns the distinction between normal/successful aging, consisting of a moderate decline in cognitive performance, and pathological aging, manifested as mild cognitive impairment or full-blown neurodegeneration and dementia. In particular, it has been proposed that the age-related decline in cognitive abilities may be an age-related escalation of early-life cognitive limitations, rather than an abruptly emerging neuropathological process that occurs in old age (Elias et al., 2000; Small et al., 2000; Sarter and Bruno, 2004; Amieva et al., 2005; Tyas et al., 2007. In this scenario, early abnormalities or incompletely matured neural systems would interact with age-related processes to explain the cognitive decline in later ages. However this proposal remains controversial (Nilsson et al., 2009; Salthouse, 2009 and, to our knowledge, has not been explored at the morphological/structural level. Hence it is important to identify factors that may confer a predisposition to pathological aging and examine how they interact with the process of aging per se. One such factor is the integrity of the cholinergic system: cholinergic basal forebrain neurons and their projections to the cortex show increased vulnerability to aging (Fischer et al., 1987; Altavista et al., 1990; Casu et al., 2002 and cognitive decline is associated with selective loss of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR function (Hellstrom-Lindahl and Court, 2000; Schliebs and Arendt, 2011. In this respect, animals with specific cholinergic deficits are important tools for understanding the neurobiology of successful aging. One such animal model is the β2-/- mouse, in which the gene encoding the β2 subunit of the nAChR is genetically deleted (Picciotto et al., 1995. Aged β2-/- mice have been proposed as a model of

  4. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a 35...... kDa protein salt-washed from membranes (referred as TIP 91-M and TIP 35-M) were found to interact with the cytoplasmic receptor tail as assayed by cross-linkage with recombinant [32P] labeled MPR 300-CT. Subcellular fractionation revealed a distinct pattern of distribution of TIP 35-M and TIP 91-M...

  5. A species-specific amino acid difference in the macaque CD4 receptor restricts replication by global circulating HIV-1 variants representing viruses from recent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Daryl; Emery, Sandra; Laws, Elizabeth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-12-01

    HIV-1 replicates poorly in macaque cells, and this had hindered the advancement of relevant nonhuman primate model systems for HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis. Several host restriction factors have been identified that contribute to this species-specific restriction to HIV-1 replication, but these do not fully explain the poor replication of most strains of HIV-1 in macaque cells. Only select HIV-1 envelope variants, typically those derived from viruses that have been adapted in cell culture, result in infectious chimeric SIVs encoding HIV-1 envelope (SHIVs). Here we demonstrate that most circulating HIV-1 variants obtained directly from infected individuals soon after virus acquisition do not efficiently mediate entry using the macaque CD4 receptor. The infectivity of these viruses is ca. 20- to 50-fold lower with the rhesus and pig-tailed macaque versus the human CD4 receptor. In contrast, culture-derived HIV-1 envelope variants that facilitate efficient replication in macaques showed similar infectivity with macaque and human CD4 receptors (within ∼2-fold). The ability of an envelope to mediate entry using macaque CD4 correlated with its ability to mediate entry of cells expressing low levels of the human CD4 receptor and with soluble CD4 sensitivity. Species-specific differences in the functional capacity of the CD4 receptor to mediate entry mapped to a single amino acid difference at position 39 that is under strong positive selection, suggesting that the evolution of CD4 may have been influenced by its function as a viral receptor. These results also suggest that N39 in human CD4 may be a critical residue for interaction of transmitted HIV-1 variants. These studies provide important insights into virus-host cell interactions that have hindered the development of relevant nonhuman primate models for HIV-1 infection and provide possible markers, such as sCD4 sensitivity, to identify potential HIV-1 variants that could be exploited for development of better

  6. Bitistatin-functionalized fluorescent nanodiamond particles specifically bind to purified human platelet integrin receptor αIIbβ3 and activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A; Sternberg, Mark; Lelkes, Peter I; Feuerstein, Giora

    2017-01-01

    Thromboembolic events (TEE) underwrite key causes of death in developed countries. While advanced imaging technologies such as computed tomography scans serve to diagnose blood clots during acute cardiovascular events, no such technology is available in routine primary care for TEE risk assessment. Here, we describe an imaging platform technology based on bioengineered fluorescent nanodiamond particles (F-NDPs) functionalized with bitistatin (Bit), a disintegrin that specifically binds to the α IIb β 3 integrin, platelet fibrinogen receptor (PFR) on activated platelets. Covalent linkage of purified Bit to F-NDP was concentration-dependent and saturable, as validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using specific anti-Bit antibodies. F-NDP-Bit interacted with purified PFR, either in immobilized or soluble form. Lotrafiban, a nonpeptide, α IIb β 3 receptor antagonist, specifically blocked F-NDP-Bit-PFR complex formation. Moreover, F-NDP-Bit specifically binds to activated platelets incorporated into a clot generated by thrombin-activated rat platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our results suggest that engineered F-NDP-Bit particles could serve as noninvasive, "real-time" optical diagnostics for clots present in blood vessels.

  7. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P; Woodall, Meryl C; Luongo, Timothy S; Grisanti, Laurel A; Tilley, Douglas G; Elrod, John W; Koch, Walter J

    2016-10-14

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl ) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β 2 AR-induced hypertrophy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Adipose Tissues Reveals that ECM-Receptor Interaction Is Involved in the Depot-Specific Adipogenesis in Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available Adipocytes mainly function as energy storage and endocrine cells. Adipose tissues showed the biological and genetic difference based on their depots. The difference of adipocytes between depots might be influenced by the inherent genetic programing for adipogenesis. We used RNA-seq technique to investigate the transcriptomes in 3 adipose tissues of omental (O, subcutaneous (S and intramuscular (I fats in cattle. Sequence reads were obtained from Illumina HiSeq2000 and mapped to the bovine genome using Tophat2. Differentially expressed genes (DEG between adipose tissues were detected by EdgeR. We identified 5797, 2156, and 5455 DEGs in the comparison between OI, OS, and IS respectively and also found 5657 DEGs in the comparison between the intramuscular and the combined omental and subcutaneous fats (C (FDR<0.01. Depot specifically up- and down- regulated DEGs were 853 in S, 48 in I, and 979 in O. The numbers of DEGs and functional annotation studies suggested that I had the different genetic profile compared to other two adipose tissues. In I, DEGs involved in the developmental process (eg. EGR2, FAS, and KLF7 were up-regulated and those in the immune system process were down-regulated. Many DEGs from the adipose tissues were enriched in the various GO terms of developmental process and KEGG pathway analysis showed that the ECM-receptor interaction was one of commonly enriched pathways in all of the 3 adipose tissues and also functioned as a sub-pathway of other enriched pathways. However, genes involved in the ECM-receptor interaction were differentially regulated depending on the depots. Collagens, main ECM constituents, were significantly up-regulated in S and integrins, transmembrane receptors, were up-regulated in I. Different laminins were up-regulated in the different depots. This comparative transcriptome analysis of three adipose tissues suggested that the interactions between ECM components and transmembrane receptors of fat cells

  9. Structure-function analysis of barley NLR immune receptor MLA10 reveals its cell compartment specific activity in cell death and disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shiwei; Liu, Jie; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Maekawa, Takaki; Wang, Qiuyun; Xiao, Wenkai; Liu, Yule; Chai, Jijie; Takken, Frank L W; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Plant intracellular immune receptors comprise a large number of multi-domain proteins resembling animal NOD-like receptors (NLRs). Plant NLRs typically recognize isolate-specific pathogen-derived effectors, encoded by avirulence (AVR) genes, and trigger defense responses often associated with localized host cell death. The barley MLA gene is polymorphic in nature and encodes NLRs of the coiled-coil (CC)-NB-LRR type that each detects a cognate isolate-specific effector of the barley powdery mildew fungus. We report the systematic analyses of MLA10 activity in disease resistance and cell death signaling in barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. MLA10 CC domain-triggered cell death is regulated by highly conserved motifs in the CC and the NB-ARC domains and by the C-terminal LRR of the receptor. Enforced MLA10 subcellular localization, by tagging with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES), shows that MLA10 activity in cell death signaling is suppressed in the nucleus but enhanced in the cytoplasm. By contrast, nuclear localized MLA10 is sufficient to mediate disease resistance against powdery mildew fungus. MLA10 retention in the cytoplasm was achieved through attachment of a glucocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domain (GR), by which we reinforced the role of cytoplasmic MLA10 in cell death signaling. Together with our data showing an essential and sufficient nuclear MLA10 activity in disease resistance, this suggests a bifurcation of MLA10-triggered cell death and disease resistance signaling in a compartment-dependent manner.

  10. Structure-function analysis of barley NLR immune receptor MLA10 reveals its cell compartment specific activity in cell death and disease resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Bai

    Full Text Available Plant intracellular immune receptors comprise a large number of multi-domain proteins resembling animal NOD-like receptors (NLRs. Plant NLRs typically recognize isolate-specific pathogen-derived effectors, encoded by avirulence (AVR genes, and trigger defense responses often associated with localized host cell death. The barley MLA gene is polymorphic in nature and encodes NLRs of the coiled-coil (CC-NB-LRR type that each detects a cognate isolate-specific effector of the barley powdery mildew fungus. We report the systematic analyses of MLA10 activity in disease resistance and cell death signaling in barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. MLA10 CC domain-triggered cell death is regulated by highly conserved motifs in the CC and the NB-ARC domains and by the C-terminal LRR of the receptor. Enforced MLA10 subcellular localization, by tagging with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS or a nuclear export sequence (NES, shows that MLA10 activity in cell death signaling is suppressed in the nucleus but enhanced in the cytoplasm. By contrast, nuclear localized MLA10 is sufficient to mediate disease resistance against powdery mildew fungus. MLA10 retention in the cytoplasm was achieved through attachment of a glucocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domain (GR, by which we reinforced the role of cytoplasmic MLA10 in cell death signaling. Together with our data showing an essential and sufficient nuclear MLA10 activity in disease resistance, this suggests a bifurcation of MLA10-triggered cell death and disease resistance signaling in a compartment-dependent manner.

  11. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P.; Woodall, Meryl C.; Luongo, Timothy S.; Grisanti, Laurel A.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Elrod, John W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β2AR-induced hypertrophy. PMID:27566547

  12. Defective postnatal endochondral bone development by chondrocyte-specific targeted expression of parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dibyendu Kumar; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew C

    2012-12-15

    The human parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor (PTH2R) is activated by PTH and by tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), the latter likely acting as its natural ligand. Although the receptor is expressed at highest levels in the nervous system, we have observed that both PTH2R and TIP39 are expressed in the newborn mouse growth plate, with the receptor localizing in the resting zone and the ligand TIP39 localizing exclusively in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. To address the role of PTH2R in postnatal skeletal growth and development, Col2a1-hPTH2R (PTH2R-Tg) transgenic mice were generated. The mice were viable and of nearly normal size at birth. Expression of the transgene in the growth plate was limited to chondrocytes. We found that chondrocyte proliferation was decreased, as determined by in vivo BrdU labeling of proliferating chondrocytes and CDK4 and p21 expression in the growth plate of Col2a1-hPTH2R transgenic mice. Similarly, the differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes was delayed, as characterized by decreased Sox9 expression and weaker immunostaining for the chondrocyte differentiation markers collagen type II and type X and proteoglycans. As well, there was altered expression of Gdf5, Wdr5, and β-catenin, factors implicated in chondrocyte maturation, proliferation, and differentiation.These effects impacted on the process of endochondral ossification, resulting in delayed formation of the secondary ossification center, and diminished trabecular bone volume. The findings substantiate a role for PTH2R signaling in postnatal growth plate development and subsequent bone mass acquisition.

  13. Pichia pastoris-produced mucin-type fusion proteins with multivalent O-glycan substitution as targeting molecules for mannose-specific receptors of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anki; Sjöblom, Magnus; Strindelius, Lena; Johansson, Tomas; Fleckenstein, Tilly; Chatzissavidou, Nathalie; Lindberg, Linda; Angström, Jonas; Rova, Ulrika; Holgersson, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Mannose-binding proteins like the macrophage mannose receptor (MR), the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Immunoglobulin fusion proteins of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b)) carrying mostly O-glycans and, as a control, the α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP/mIgG(2b)) carrying mainly N-linked glycans were stably expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Pichia pastoris-produced PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) was shown to carry O-glycans that mediated strong binding to mannose-specific lectins in a lectin array and were susceptible to cleavage by α-mannosidases including an α1,2- but not an α1,6-mannosidase. Electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of O-glycans containing up to nine hexoses with the penta- and hexasaccharides being the predominant ones. α1,2- and α1,3-linked, but not α1,6-linked, mannose residues were detected by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirming the results of the mannosidase cleavage. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constants for binding of PNGase F-treated mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) to MR, DC-SIGN and MBL were shown by surface plasmon resonance to be 126, 56 and 16 nM, respectively. In conclusion, PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) expressed in P. pastoris carried O-glycans mainly comprised of α-linked mannoses and with up to nine residues. It bound mannose-specific receptors with high apparent affinity and may become a potent targeting molecule for these receptors in vivo.

  14. Acquisition of human-type receptor binding specificity by new H5N1 influenza virus sublineages during their emergence in birds in Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Watanabe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 is currently widespread in Asia, Europe, and Africa, with 60% mortality in humans. In particular, since 2009 Egypt has unexpectedly had the highest number of human cases of H5N1 virus infection, with more than 50% of the cases worldwide, but the basis for this high incidence has not been elucidated. A change in receptor binding affinity of the viral hemagglutinin (HA from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA is thought to be necessary for H5N1 virus to become pandemic. In this study, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H5N1 viruses isolated between 2006 and 2009 in Egypt. The phylogenetic results showed that recent human isolates clustered disproportionally into several new H5 sublineages suggesting that their HAs have changed their receptor specificity. Using reverse genetics, we found that these H5 sublineages have acquired an enhanced binding affinity for α2,6 SA in combination with residual affinity for α2,3 SA, and identified the amino acid mutations that produced this new receptor specificity. Recombinant H5N1 viruses with a single mutation at HA residue 192 or a double mutation at HA residues 129 and 151 had increased attachment to and infectivity in the human lower respiratory tract but not in the larynx. These findings correlated with enhanced virulence of the mutant viruses in mice. Interestingly, these H5 viruses, with increased affinity to α2,6 SA, emerged during viral diversification in bird populations and subsequently spread to humans. Our findings suggested that emergence of new H5 sublineages with α2,6 SA specificity caused a subsequent increase in human H5N1 influenza virus infections in Egypt, and provided data for understanding the virus's pandemic potential.

  15. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  16. Identification of receptors responsible for binding of the mannose specific lectin to the gut epithelial membrane of the target insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Pralay; Banerjee, Santanu; Das, Sampa

    2004-01-01

    The sap-sucking homopteran insects, commonly known as aphids and leafhoppers are responsible for a huge amount of lost productivity of mustard, chickpea, cabbage, rice and many other important crops. Due to their unique feeding habits and ability to build up a huge population in a very short time, they are very difficult to control. The objective of the ongoing program is to develop insect-resistant crop species through genetic engineering techniques to combat the yield losses, which necessitates the identification of appropriate control elements. In this direction, mannose-binding 25 kDa lectins have been purified from leaves of garlic, Diffenbachia sequina and tubers of Colocasia esculanta. The purified lectins have been analyzed in SDS-PAGE. The effectiveness of these lectins against chickpea aphids, mustard aphids and green leaf hoppers of rice have been tested. The LC(50) value of each lectin against different insects had been monitored [1,2]. Through immunolocalization analysis, the binding of the lectin had been demonstrated at the epithelial membrane of the midgut of the lectin-treated insects [1]. Receptor proteins of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) of the target insects, responsible for binding of the lectin to the midgut of the epithelial layer have been purified and analyzed through ligand assay. Biochemical studies have been undertaken to investigate the lectin-receptor interaction at molecular level.

  17. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  18. Rat intra-hippocampal NMDA infusion induces cell-specific damage and changes in expression of NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambousek, Lukas; Kleteckova, Lenka; Kubesova, Anna; Jirak, Daniel; Vales, Karel; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2016-06-01

    Excessive stimulation of NMDA receptors with glutamate or other potent agonists such as NMDA leads to excitotoxicity and neural injury. In this study, we aimed to provide insight into an animal model of brain excitotoxic damage; single unilateral infusion of NMDA at mild dose into the hippocampal formation. NMDA infusion induced chronic, focal neurodegeneration in the proximity of the injection site. The lesion was accompanied by severe and progressive neuroinflammation and affected preferentially principal neurons while sparing GABAergic interneurons. Furthermore, the unilateral lesion did not cause significant impairment of spatial learning abilities. Finally, GluN1 and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptor were significantly upregulated up to 3 days after the NMDA infusion, while GABAA α5 subunit was downregulated at 30 days after the lesion. Taken together, a single infusion of NMDA into the hippocampal formation represents an animal model of excitotoxicity-induced chronic neurodegeneration of principal neurons accompanied by severe neuroinflammation and subunit specific changes in NMDA and GABAA receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Herpes simplex viruses lacking glycoprotein D are unable to inhibit virus penetration: quantitative evidence for virus-specific cell surface receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Ligas, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in the entry of virus into cells. HSV mutants unable to express gD were constructed. The mutants can be propagated on VD60 cells, which supply the viruses with gD; however, virus particles lacking gD were produced in mutant-infected Vero cells. Virus particles with or without gD adsorbed to a large number of sites on the cell surface; however, virions lacking gD did not enter cells. Cells pretreated with UV-inactivated virions containing gD were resistant to infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. In contrast, cell pretreated with UV-inactivated virions lacking gD could be infected with HSV-1 and HSV-2. If infectious HSV-1 was added prior to UV-inactivated virus particles containing gD, the infectious virus entered cells and replicated. Therefore, virus particles containing gD appear to block specific cell surface receptors which are very limited in number. Particles lacking gD are presumably unable to interact with these receptors, suggesting that gD is an essential receptor-binding polypeptide

  20. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado; Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-01-01

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway

  1. Involvement of tachykinins and NK1 receptor in the joint inflammation with collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Akira; Sakai, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromoto; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic multisystem disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation associated with severe pain. Because RA is an immune-mediated joint disease and because type II collagen is considered an autoantigen, rodent models of arthritis using collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibodies are valuable for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and for evaluating therapeutic strategies. The tachykinin family peptides, substance P (SP) and hemokinin-1 (HK-1), are expressed in the nervous systems and in many peripheral organs and immunocompetent cells and activate tachykinin NK1 receptors with similar affinities. NK1 receptors are involved in the inflammation and hyperalgesia associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined the involvement of SP and HK-1 in the joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of the TAC1 gene encoding SP and of the TAC4 gene encoding HK-1 were decreased in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord at the peak of the inflammatory symptoms in CAIA. Systemic injection of an NK1 receptor antagonist, WIN 51708, significantly inhibited the joint swelling, but not the mechanical allodynia, on day 7 in CAIA mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of TAC1 and TAC4 in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord were unaffected by treatment with WIN 51708. These findings suggest that tachykinins and NK1 receptors play a key role in joint inflammation, rather than in nociceptive sensitization, in CAIA.

  2. Characterization of a Ca2+ response to both UTP and ATP at human P2Y11 receptors: evidence for agonist-specific signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Pamela J; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    2003-06-01

    Previous reports on heterologously-expressed human P2Y11 receptors have indicated that ATP, but not UTP, is an agonist stimulating both phosphoinositidase C and adenylyl cyclase. Consistent with these findings, we report that in 1321N1 cells expressing human P2Y11 receptors, UTP stimulation did not lead to accumulation of inositol(poly)phosphates under conditions in which ATP gave a robust, concentration-dependent effect. Unexpectedly, however, both UTP and ATP stimulated increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), with both nucleotides achieving similar EC50 and maximal responses. The responses to maximally effective concentrations of ATP and UTP were not additive. The [Ca2+]c increase in response to UTP was less dependent on extracellular Ca2+ than was the response to ATP. AR-C67085 (2-propylthio-beta,gamma-difluoromethylene-d-ATP, a P2Y11-selective agonist), adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), and benzoyl ATP were all full agonists with potencies similar to those of ATP and UTP. In desensitization experiments, exposure to ATP resulted in loss of the UTP response; this response was more sensitive to desensitization than that of ATP. Pertussis toxin pretreatment attenuated the response to UTP but left the ATP response unaffected. The presence of 2-aminoethyl diphenylborate differentially affected the responses of ATP and UTP. No mRNA transcripts for P2Y2 or P2Y4 were detectable in the P2Y11-expressing cells. We conclude that UTP is a Ca2+-mobilizing agonist at P2Y11 receptors and that ATP and UTP acting at the same receptor recruit distinct signaling pathways. This example of agonist-specific signaling is discussed in terms of agonist trafficking and differential signal strength.

  3. Non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are direct agonists for the human pregnane-X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and activate target gene expression in a tissue-specific manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Salman, Fadheela; Plant, Nick, E-mail: N.Plant@Surrey.ac.uk

    2012-08-15

    The polychlorinated biphenyl group possesses high environmental persistence, leading to bioaccumulation and a number of adverse effects in mammals. Whilst coplanar PCBs elicit their toxic effects through agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, non-coplanar PCBs are not ligands for AhR, but may be ligands for members of the nuclear receptor family of proteins. To better understand the biological actions of non-coplanar PCBs, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of their ability to activate PXR and CAR-mediated effects. Cells were exposed to a range of non-coplanar PCBs (99, 138, 153, 180 and 194), or the coplanar PCB77: Direct activation of PXR and CAR was measured using a mammalian receptor activation assay in human liver cells, with rifampicin and CITCO used as positive controls ligands for PXR and CAR, respectively; activation of target gene expression was examined using reporter gene plasmids for CYP3A4 and MDR1 transfected into liver, intestine and lung cell lines. Several of the non-coplanar PCBs directly activated PXR and CAR, whilst the coplanar PCB77 did not. Non-coplanar PCBs were also able to activate PXR/CAR target gene expression in a substitution- and tissue-specific manner. Non-coplanar PCBs act as direct activators for the nuclear receptors PXR and CAR, and are able to elicit transcriptional activation of target genes in a substitution- and tissue-dependent manner. Chronic activation of PXR/CAR is linked to adverse effects and must be included in any risk assessment of PCBs. -- Highlights: ► Several Non-coplanar PCBs are able to directly activate both PXR and CAR in vitro. ► PCB153 is the most potent direct activator of PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. ► Non-coplanar PCB activation of CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes is structure-dependent. ► Non-coplanar PCB activate CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes in a tissue-dependent. ► PCB153 is the most potent activator of PXR/CAR target gene in all tissues.

  4. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eLachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  5. Normalized Synergy Predicts That CD8 Co-Receptor Contribution to T Cell Receptor (TCR and pMHC Binding Decreases As TCR Affinity Increases in Human Viral-Specific T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Williams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of naturally occurring T cell receptors (TCRs that confer specific, high-affinity recognition of pathogen and cancer-associated antigens remains a major goal in cellular immunotherapies. The contribution of the CD8 co-receptor to the interaction between the TCR and peptide-bound major histocompatibility complex (pMHC has previously been correlated with the activation and responsiveness of CD8+ T cells. However, these studies have been limited to model systems of genetically engineered hybridoma TCRs or transgenic mouse TCRs against either a single epitope or an array of altered peptide ligands. CD8 contribution in a native human antigen-specific T cell response remains elusive. Here, using Hepatitis C Virus-specific precursor CTLs spanning a large range of TCR affinities, we discovered that the functional responsiveness of any given TCR correlated with the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHC binding. Furthermore, we found that CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding in the two-dimensional (2D system was more accurately reflected by normalized synergy (CD8 cooperation normalized by total TCR/pMHC bonds rather than synergy (total CD8 cooperation alone. While synergy showed an increasing trend with TCR affinity, normalized synergy was demonstrated to decrease with the increase of TCR affinity. Critically, normalized synergy was shown to correlate with CTL functionality and peptide sensitivity, corroborating three-dimensional (3D analysis of CD8 contribution with respect to TCR affinity. In addition, we identified TCRs that were independent of CD8 for TCR/pMHC binding. Our results resolve the current discrepancy between 2D and 3D analysis on CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding, and demonstrate that naturally occurring high-affinity TCRs are more capable of CD8-independent interactions that yield greater functional responsiveness even with CD8 blocking. Taken together, our data suggest that addition of the normalized synergy parameter to our

  6. Normalized Synergy Predicts That CD8 Co-Receptor Contribution to T Cell Receptor (TCR) and pMHC Binding Decreases As TCR Affinity Increases in Human Viral-Specific T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chad M; Schonnesen, Alexandra A; Zhang, Shu-Qi; Ma, Ke-Yue; He, Chenfeng; Yamamoto, Tori; Eckhardt, S Gail; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Jiang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring T cell receptors (TCRs) that confer specific, high-affinity recognition of pathogen and cancer-associated antigens remains a major goal in cellular immunotherapies. The contribution of the CD8 co-receptor to the interaction between the TCR and peptide-bound major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) has previously been correlated with the activation and responsiveness of CD8 + T cells. However, these studies have been limited to model systems of genetically engineered hybridoma TCRs or transgenic mouse TCRs against either a single epitope or an array of altered peptide ligands. CD8 contribution in a native human antigen-specific T cell response remains elusive. Here, using Hepatitis C Virus-specific precursor CTLs spanning a large range of TCR affinities, we discovered that the functional responsiveness of any given TCR correlated with the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHC binding. Furthermore, we found that CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding in the two-dimensional (2D) system was more accurately reflected by normalized synergy (CD8 cooperation normalized by total TCR/pMHC bonds) rather than synergy (total CD8 cooperation) alone. While synergy showed an increasing trend with TCR affinity, normalized synergy was demonstrated to decrease with the increase of TCR affinity. Critically, normalized synergy was shown to correlate with CTL functionality and peptide sensitivity, corroborating three-dimensional (3D) analysis of CD8 contribution with respect to TCR affinity. In addition, we identified TCRs that were independent of CD8 for TCR/pMHC binding. Our results resolve the current discrepancy between 2D and 3D analysis on CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding, and demonstrate that naturally occurring high-affinity TCRs are more capable of CD8-independent interactions that yield greater functional responsiveness even with CD8 blocking. Taken together, our data suggest that addition of the normalized synergy parameter to our previously

  7. Regulatory region of the vitellogenin receptor gene sufficient for high-level, germ line cell-specific ovarian expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kook-Ho; Cheon, Hyang-Mi; Kokoza, Vladimir; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2006-04-01

    Vitellogenin receptor (VgR) is responsible for the receptor-mediated endocytosis of vitellogenin (Vg) in the egg formation of an oviparous animal, including insects. Little is known about regulation of VgR gene expression. We analyzed the upstream region of the VgR gene from Aedes aegypti (AaVgR) to identify regulatory elements responsible for its expression in germ cell-specific ovarian expression. Experiments with genetic transformation using the transgene containing the 1.5-Kb upstream portion of the AaVgR gene fused with DsRed and the piggyBac vector showed that this regulatory region is sufficient for correct female and ovary-specific expression of the transgene. This 1.5-Kb upstream region contained binding sites for the ecdysone regulatory hierarchy early gene products E74 and BR-C, as well as transcription factors determining correct tissue- and stage-specific expression of GATA and HNF3/fkh. In situ hybridization demonstrated that in the ovaries of transgenic females DsRed mRNA was present in ovarian germ cells and nurse cells of mature ovarian follicles, together with VgR mRNA. In contrast, DsRed mRNA was absent in the oocyte that had a high level of endogenous VgR mRNA. Although the 1.5-Kb upstream region was sufficient to drive a high-level germ line cell-specific expression of the reporter, additional signals were required for translocation of exogenous mRNA from nurse cells into the oocyte.

  8. Defining binding efficiency and specificity of auxins for SCF(TIR1/AFB)-Aux/IAA co-receptor complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Sundaram, Shanthy; Armitage, Lynne; Evans, John P; Hawkes, Tim; Kepinski, Stefan; Ferro, Noel; Napier, Richard M

    2014-03-21

    Structure-activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure-activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding.

  9. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  10. Asymmetric regulation of quorum-sensing receptors drives autoinducer-specific gene expression programs in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Amanda; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell-population density and coordinate group behaviors. QS relies on the production, detection, and group-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Vibrio cholerae employs parallel QS circuits that converge into a shared signaling pathway. At high cell density, the CqsS and LuxPQ QS receptors detect the intra-genus and inter-species autoinducers CAI-1 and AI-2, respectively, to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. We show that positive feedback, mediated by the QS pathway, increases CqsS but not LuxQ levels during the transition into QS-mode, which amplifies the CAI-1 input into the pathway relative to the AI-2 input. Asymmetric feedback on CqsS enables responses exclusively to the CAI-1 autoinducer. Because CqsS exhibits the dominant QS signaling role in V. cholerae, agonism of CqsS with synthetic compounds could be used to control pathogenicity and host dispersal. We identify nine compounds that share no structural similarity to CAI-1, yet potently agonize CqsS via inhibition of CqsS autokinase activity.

  11. Sub-unit Specific Regulation of Type-A GABAergic Receptors during Post-Natal Development of the Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa A. Tremere

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The GABA-A receptor has been strongly implicated in the organization and function of cortical sensory circuits in the adult mammal. In the present work, changes in the expression patterns of select GABA-A subunits were examined as a function of development. The RNA expression profiles for three subunit types were studied, α1, β2/3 and δ at four developmental time points, (p0, p15, p30 and p90. The o1, β2/3 subunits were present at birth and following a modest increase early in life; mRNA expression for these subunits were found at stable levels throughout life. The expression pattern for the δ subunit showed the most dramatic changes in the number of positive cells as a function of age. In early life, p0 through p15 expression of mRNA for the δ subunit was quite low but increased in later life, p30 and p90. Together these data suggest that much of the potential for inhibitory connectivity is laid down in the pre and early post-natal periods.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Species-Specific Interaction with the Basement Membrane-Resident Non-Heparan Sulfate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Richards

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a cell culture model where virus is bound to the extracellular matrix (ECM prior to cell surface binding, we determined that human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 utilizes ECM resident laminin (LN 332 as an attachment receptor for infectious entry. In presence of LN332, soluble heparin can function as ligand activator rather than competitive inhibitor of HPV16 infection. We also show that the ability to use LN332 binding as a productive attachment step for infectious entry is not conserved amongst HPV types. In the alpha genus, species 9 members (HPV16 attach to ECM via LN332, while members of species 7 (HPV18 are completely inhibited by heparin pre-incubation due to an inability to use LN332. Since HPV species 7 and 9 are preferentially associated with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, respectively, our data provide first evidence that pre-entry events may contribute to the anatomical-site preference of HPV species.

  13. Growth hormone-specific induction of the nuclear localization of porcine growth hormone receptor in porcine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, H N; Hong, P; Li, R N; Shan, A S; Zheng, X

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of nuclear translocation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in human, rat, and fish has been reported. To date, this phenomenon has not been described in a domestic animal (such as pig). In addition, the molecular mechanisms of GHR nuclear translocation have not been thoroughly elucidated. To this end, porcine hepatocytes were isolated and used as a cell model. We observed that porcine growth hormone (pGH) can induce porcine GHR's nuclear localization in porcine hepatocytes. Subsequently, the dynamics of pGH-induced pGHR's nuclear localization were analyzed and demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear localization occurs in a time-dependent manner. Next, we explored the mechanism of pGHR nuclear localization using different pGHR ligands, and we demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear translocation is GH(s)-dependent. We also observed that pGHR translocates into cell nuclei in a pGH dimerization-dependent fashion, whereas further experiments indicated that IMPα/β is involved in the nuclear translocation of the pGH-pGHR dimer. The pGH-pGHR dimer may form a pGH-GHR-JAK2 multiple complex in cell nuclei, which would suggest that similar to its function in the cell membrane, the nuclear-localized pGH-pGHR dimer might still have the ability to signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell-specific immuno-localization of progesterone receptor alpha in the rabbit ovary during pregnancy and after parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elkareem, Mahmoud

    2017-05-01

    Progesterone receptor alpha (PRA) has a central coordinator role in the ovarian functions in mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunolocalization of PRA in the rabbit ovary during pregnancy and after parturition. The rabbit ovary during pregnancy and after parturition had moderate cytoplasmic and moderate to intense nuclear PRA immunostaining in the ovarian surface epithelial cells, stromal cells and interstitial gland cells. The PRA was also present in granulosa cells and theca interna cells of the growing, small antral and mature Graafian follicles. Theca interna cells of the atretic antral follicle in addition to endothelial and fibroblast cells had PRA immunoreactivity. The PRA were also observed in the theca externa smooth muscle-like cells of the growing and antral follicles and in the telocytes. In the present study, the corpora haemorrhagica and early developing corpora lutea had, slight cytoplasmic and nuclear PRA immunostaining in the large lutein and small lutein cells. The endothelial cells of the corpora haemorrhagica and corpora lutea had an intense nuclear PRA immune signal. The corpora lutea at an advanced stage of development had moderate cytoplasmic and nuclear PRA immunostaining in the large lutein cells and intense nuclear PRA immunostaining in the small lutein cells. The regressed corpora lutea did not have PRA immunostaining in the apoptotic large lutein cells and moderate cytoplasmic and intense nuclear PRA immunostaining in the small lutein cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Species-specific pharmacology of maximakinin, an amphibian homologue of bradykinin: putative prodrug activity at the human B2 receptor and peptidase resistance in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Charest-Morin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximakinin (MK, an amphibian peptide possessing the C-terminal sequence of bradykinin (BK, is a BK B2 receptor (B2R agonist eliciting prolonged signaling. We reinvestigated this 19-mer for species-specific pharmacologic profile, in vivo confirmation of resistance to inactivation by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, value as a module for the design of fusion proteins that bind to the B2R in mammalian species and potential activity as a histamine releaser. Competition of the binding of [3H]BK to recombinant human myc-B2Rs in cells that express these receptors revealed that MK possessed a tenuous fraction (<0.1% of the affinity of BK, despite being only ∼20-fold less potent than BK in a contractility assay based on the human isolated umbilical vein. These findings are reconciled by the generation of C-terminal fragments, like Lys-Gly-Pro-BK and Gly-Pro-BK, when the latent MK is incubated with human venous tissue (LC-MS, supporting activation via hydrolysis upstream of the BK sequence. At the rat recombinant myc-B2R, MK had a lesser affinity than that of BK, but with a narrower margin (6.2-fold, radioligand binding competition. Accordingly, MK (10 nM stimulated calcium transients in cells that expressed the rat receptors, but not the human B2R. Recombinant MRGPRX2, a receptor that mediates cationic peptide-induced mast cell secretion, minimally responded by increased [Ca+2]i to MK at 10 µM. Enhanced green fluorescent protein fused to MK (EGFP-MK labeled cells that expressed rat, but not human B2Rs. Intravenous MK induced dose-dependent hypotensive, vasodilator and tachycardic responses in anesthetized rats and the effects were antagonized by pretreatment with icatibant but not modified by pyrilamine or enalaprilat. Strong species-specific responses to the toxin-derived peptide MK and its prodrug status in the isolated human vein were evidenced. Accordingly, MK in the EGFP-MK fusion protein is a pharmacophore module that confers affinity for

  16. Three distinct epitopes on the extracellular face of the glucagon receptor determine specificity for the glucagon amino terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Steffen; Gram, Christian; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2003-01-01

    . Only 4 of 15 residues are divergent in the glucagon and GLP-1 amino termini; Ser2, Gln3, Tyr10, and Lys12 in glucagon and the corresponding Ala8, Glu9, Val16, and Ser18 in GLP-1. In this study, individual substitution of these four residues of glucagon with the corresponding residues of GLP-1 decreased...... are close to and determine specificity for Gln3 and Ser2 of glucagon, respectively. Furthermore, the second extracellular loop and/or proximal segments of TM4 and/or TM5 are close to and determine specificity for Lys12 of glucagon....

  17. alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene promoter polymorphisms in inbred mice affect expression in a cell type-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, Sharon; Jenkins, Paul M; Lautner, Meeghan A; Iacob, Eli; Crouch, Eric L; Stitzel, Jerry A

    2007-05-04

    Inbred mouse strains display significant differences in their levels of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) expression, as measured by binding of the alpha7-selective antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. Variations in alpha-bungarotoxin binding have been shown to correlate with an animal's sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures and sensory gating. In two inbred mouse strains, C3H/2Ibg (C3H) and DBA/2Ibg (DBA/2), the inter-strain binding differences are linked to a restriction length polymorphism in the alpha7 nAChR gene, Chrna7. Despite this finding, the molecular mechanism(s) through which genetic variability in Chrna7 may contribute to alpha7 nAChR expression differences remains unknown. However, studies of the human alpha7 nAChR gene (CHRNA7) previously have demonstrated that CHRNA7 promoter polymorphisms are associated with differences in promoter activity as well as differences in sensory processing. In the present study, a 947-base pair region of the Chrna7 promoter was cloned from both the C3H and DBA/2 inbred mouse strains in an attempt to identify polymorphisms that may underlie alpha7 nAChR differential expression. Sequence analysis of these fragments identified 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A combination of two of these SNPs affects promoter activity in an in vitro luciferase reporter assay. These results suggest a mechanism through which the Chrna7 promoter genotype may influence interstrain variations in alpha7 nAChR expression.

  18. In ovo leptin administration modulates glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression specifically in the hypothalamus of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Wang, Yufeng; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Ruqian

    2017-01-18

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is well documented to play a crucial role in the central control of energy homeostasis in mammals. However, the distribution and function of the GR in the chicken brain are less clear. Leptin is a key hormone regulating energy homeostasis in mammals, yet its action in the chicken is still under debate. In this study, the distribution of GR mRNA in the chicken brain and the effects of in ovo administration of leptin and its antagonist on early post-hatch growth and GR mRNA expression in different hypothalamic nuclei were investigated via in situ hybridization (ISH) and quantitative PCR. GR mRNA was widely expressed in the chicken brain, mainly in the corpus striatum, nucleus rotundus, dorsolateral nucleus, nucleus ovoidalis, nucleus reticularis superior and the hippocampus (Hp) and in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. High doses of leptin (5.0μg) significantly promoted post-hatch growth, resulting in a significant high body weight increased by 24.64% at day (D) 21 of life. Meanwhile, hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in the LL and HL groups was down-regulated significantly by 7.02% and 13.65% respectively (Phypothalamus of D21 broiler chickens. The leptin antagonist was able to reverse the effect of leptin on the growth rate and hypothalamic GR mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that in ovo administration of leptin influences early post-hatch growth and the hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in broiler chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tissue-specific expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and putative developmental regulatory modules in Baltic salmon yolk-sac fry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, Kristiina A.; Nordlund, Eija; Kallio, Jenny; Salakoski, Tapio; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an ancient protein that is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, indicating its important function throughout evolution. AhR has been studied largely because of its role in toxicology-gene expression via AhR is induced by many aromatic hydrocarbons in mammals. Recently, however, it has become clear that AhR is involved in various aspects of development such as cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell motility and migration. The mechanisms by which AhR regulates these various functions remain poorly understood. Across-species comparative studies of AhR in invertebrates, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals may help to reveal the multiple functions of AhR. Here, we have studied AhR during larval development of Baltic salmon (Salmon salar). Our results indicate that AhR protein is expressed in nervous system, liver and muscle tissues. We also present putative regulatory modules and module-matching genes, produced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning and in silico analysis, which may be associated with evolutionarily conserved functions of AhR during development. For example, the module NFKB-AHRR-CREB found from salmon ChIP sequences is present in human ULK3 (regulating formation of granule cell axons in mouse and axon outgrowth in Caernohabditis elegans) and SRGAP1 (GTPase-activating protein involved in the Slit/Robo pathway) promoters. We suggest that AhR may have an evolutionarily conserved role in neuronal development and nerve cell targeting, and in Wnt signaling pathway

  20. Tissue-specific expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and putative developmental regulatory modules in Baltic salmon yolk-sac fry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, Kristiina A. [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)], E-mail: kristiina.vuori@utu.fi; Nordlund, Eija [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kallio, Jenny [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Salakoski, Tapio [Department of Information Technology, University of Turku, and Turku Centre for Computer Science (TUCS), FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Nikinmaa, Mikko [Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Genetics and Physiology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2008-04-08

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an ancient protein that is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates, indicating its important function throughout evolution. AhR has been studied largely because of its role in toxicology-gene expression via AhR is induced by many aromatic hydrocarbons in mammals. Recently, however, it has become clear that AhR is involved in various aspects of development such as cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell motility and migration. The mechanisms by which AhR regulates these various functions remain poorly understood. Across-species comparative studies of AhR in invertebrates, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals may help to reveal the multiple functions of AhR. Here, we have studied AhR during larval development of Baltic salmon (Salmon salar). Our results indicate that AhR protein is expressed in nervous system, liver and muscle tissues. We also present putative regulatory modules and module-matching genes, produced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning and in silico analysis, which may be associated with evolutionarily conserved functions of AhR during development. For example, the module NFKB-AHRR-CREB found from salmon ChIP sequences is present in human ULK3 (regulating formation of granule cell axons in mouse and axon outgrowth in Caernohabditis elegans) and SRGAP1 (GTPase-activating protein involved in the Slit/Robo pathway) promoters. We suggest that AhR may have an evolutionarily conserved role in neuronal development and nerve cell targeting, and in Wnt signaling pathway.

  1. Comparison of a new P2Y12 receptor specific platelet aggregation test with other laboratory methods in stroke patients on clopidogrel monotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa Bagoly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical studies suggest that 10-50% of patients are resistant to clopidogrel therapy. ADP induced platelet aggregation, a widely used test to monitor clopidogrel therapy, is affected by aspirin and is not specific for the P2Y12 receptor inhibited by clopidogrel. OBJECTIVES: To develop a P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation test and to compare it with other methods used for monitoring clopidogrel therapy. PATIENTS/METHODS: Study population included 111 patients with the history of ischemic stroke being on clopidogrel monotherapy and 140 controls. The effect of clopidogrel was tested by a newly developed ADP(PGE1 aggregation test in which prostaglandin E1 treated platelets are used. Results of conventional ADP induced platelet aggregation, VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and ADP(PGE1 aggregation were compared to those obtained by flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation. Reference intervals for all assays were determined according to the guidelines of Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. RESULTS: The P2Y12-specificity of ADP(PGE1 test was proven by comparing it with ADP aggregation in the presence of P2Y1 antagonist, adenosine 3', 5'-diphosphate. The method was not influenced by aspirin treatment. Approximately 50% of patients were clopidogrel resistant by conventional ADP aggregation and VerifyNow tests. The ADP(PGE1 method and the VASP phosphorylation assay identified 25.9% and 11.7% of patients as non-responders, respectively. ADP(PGE1 aggregation showed good correlation with VASP phosphorylation and had high diagnostic efficiency. CONCLUSION: The new ADP(PGE1 method is a reliable test for monitoring P2Y12 receptor inhibition by platelet aggregation. As a subset of patients are non-responders, monitoring clopidogrel therapy by adequate methods is essential.

  2. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Quantification of human opiate receptor concentration and affinity using high and low specific activity ( sup 11 C)diprenorphine and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadzot, B.; Price, J.C.; Mayberg, H.S.; Douglass, K.H.; Dannals, R.F.; Lever, J.R.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Feldman, M.A. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    (11C)Diprenorphine, a weak partial opiate agonist, and positron emission tomography were used to obtain noninvasive regional estimates of opiate receptor concentration (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) in human brain. Different compartmental models and fitting strategies were compared statistically to establish the most reliable method of parameter estimation. Paired studies were performed in six normal subjects using high (769-5,920 Ci/mmol) and low (27-80 Ci/mmol) specific activity (SA) (11C)diprenorphine. Two subjects were studied a third time using high SA (11C)diprenorphine after a pretreatment with 1-1.5 mg/kg of the opiate antagonist naloxone. After the plasma radioactivity was corrected for metabolites, the brain data were analyzed using a three-compartment model and nonlinear least-squares curve fitting. Linear differential equations were used to describe the high SA (low receptor occupancy) kinetics. The k3/k4 ratio varied from 1.0 +/- 0.2 (occipital cortex) to 8.6 +/- 1.6 (thalamus). Nonlinear differential equations were used to describe the low SA (high receptor occupancy) kinetics and the curve fits provided the konf2 product. The measured free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in plasma (f1) was 0.30 +/- 0.03, the average K1/k2 ratio from the two naloxone studies was 1.1 +/- 0.2, and the calculated free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in the brain (f2) was 0.3. Using the paired SA studies, the estimated kinetic parameters, and f2, separate estimates of Bmax and Kd were obtained. Bmax varied from 2.3 +/- 0.5 (occipital cortex) to 20.6 +/- 7.3 (cingulate cortex) nM. The average Kd (eight brain regions) was 0.85 +/- 0.17 nM.

  4. Evidence for a Specific Integrative Mechanism for Episodic Memory Mediated by AMPA/kainate Receptors in a Circuit Involving Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampal CA3 Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Silva, Maria A; Huston, Joseph P; Wang, An-Li; Petri, David; Chao, Owen Yuan-Hsin

    2016-07-01

    We asked whether episodic-like memory requires neural mechanisms independent of those that mediate its component memories for "what," "when," and "where," and if neuronal connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (HPC) CA3 subregion is essential for episodic-like memory. Unilateral lesion of the mPFC was combined with unilateral lesion of the CA3 in the ipsi- or contralateral hemispheres in rats. Episodic-like memory was tested using a task, which assesses the integration of memories for "what, where, and when" concomitantly. Tests for novel object recognition (what), object place (where), and temporal order memory (when) were also applied. Bilateral disconnection of the mPFC-CA3 circuit by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) lesions disrupted episodic-like memory, but left the component memories for object, place, and temporal order, per se, intact. Furthermore, unilateral NMDA lesion of the CA3 plus injection of (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) (CNQX) (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist), but not AP-5 (NMDA receptor antagonist), into the contralateral mPFC also disrupted episodic-like memory, indicating the mPFC AMPA/kainate receptors as critical for this circuit. These results argue for a selective neural system that specifically subserves episodic memory, as it is not critically involved in the control of its component memories for object, place, and time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  6. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  7. Sex-specific effects of daily gavage with a mixed progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor antagonist on hypoxic ventilatory response in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Stéphanie; Doan, Van Diep; Joseph, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that daily gavage with mifepristone, a mixed progesterone/glucocorticoid receptor antagonist would alter hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in newborn male and female rats. Rats were treated with mifepristone (40µg/g/day), or vehicle between postnatal days 3-12, and used at 10-12 days of age to record baseline ventilatory and metabolic values using whole body plethysmography. HVR was tested by exposing the animals to 14% and 12% O(2) for 20 minutes each. HVR was enhanced by mifepristone treatment, mainly due to an effect on tidal volume that remained higher in mifepristone treated rats during both levels of hypoxic exposure. This effect was sex-specific being apparent only in male rats. In Vehicle treated rats, HVR was higher in females than in males, which was also due to a higher tidal volume in hypoxia (at 14 and 12% O(2)). We conclude that the activity of the progesterone and/or glucocorticoid receptors modulates respiratory control in rat pups, and that these effects are different in males and females.

  8. The search for novel insecticide targets in the post-genomics era, with a specific focus on G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Ngai

    Full Text Available Insects are considered pests globally, implicated in the destruction of agricultural fields and transmission of pathogens that cause deadly human diseases, such as dengue, Zika and malaria. The diversity of the insecticide arsenal has remained stagnant for decades, but the recent rise of insecticide resistance fueled the discovery of novel modes of action, and the power of genomics has reinvigorated this search. This review discusses the importance of comparative and functional insect genomics in the identification of potential gene targets for an insecticidal mode of action with low off-target toxicity. Due to the global participation in the sequencing and annotation of insect genomes, the targeting of specific genes with molecular tools like RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 for genome engineering and consequent functional identification and validation has become more efficient. While there are multiple avenues to explore for insecticidal candidates, this review identifies G-protein coupled receptors as attractive targets, and hones in on the octopamine and dopamine receptors due to their potential.

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) contributes to the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine bone marrow via PACAP-specific receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhifang; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Jun; Miyamoto, Kazuyuki; Murai, Norimitsu; Sasaki, Shun; Matsumoto, Minako; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hiraizumi, Yutaka; Numazawa, Satoshi; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-02-29

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, encoded by adcyap1) plays an important role in ectodermal development. However, the involvement of PACAP in the development of other germ layers is still unclear. This study assessed the expression of a PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1) gene and protein in mouse bone marrow (BM). Cells strongly expressing PAC1(+) were large in size, had oval nuclei, and merged with CD34(+) cells, suggesting that the former were hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Compared with wild-type mice, adcyap1(-/-) mice exhibited lower multiple potential progenitor cell populations and cell frequency in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Exogenous PACAP38 significantly increased the numbers of colony forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) with two peaks in semi-solid culture. PACAP also increased the expression of cyclinD1 and Ki67 mRNAs. These increases were completely and partially inhibited by the PACAP receptor antagonists, PACAP6-38 and VIP6-28, respectively. Little or no adcyap1 was expressed in BM and the number of CFU-GM colonies was similar in adcyap1(-/-) and wild-type mice. However, PACAP mRNA and protein were expressed in paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, which innervate tibial BM, and in the sympathetic fibers of BM cavity. These results suggested that sympathetic nerve innervation may be responsible for PACAP-regulated hematopoiesis in BM, mainly via PAC1.

  10. Cloning of a human epididymis-specific mRNA, HE6, encoding a novel member of the seven transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, C; Ivell, R; Kirchhoff, C

    1997-04-01

    A novel gene product, HE6, showing homology to the seven transmembrane-domain (Tm7) receptor superfamily, has been cloned by differential screening from a human epididymal cDNA library. The cDNA clone represented an abundant approximately 5-kb mRNA, comprising 0.01% of the cDNA library. Northern blot analysis including various human tissues revealed an epididymis-specific expression. In situ transcript hybridization localized the mRNA within the epithelial cells lining the epididymal duct. Southern blot analysis, employing a fragment encoding part of the amino-terminal extracellular domain as a probe, identified an autosomal single-copy gene in the human genome. Homologous cDNA products showing 90% sequence identity were observed in the epididymides of all mammalian species investigated. A cloning and sequencing strategy, combining approximately 3.7-kb cDNA fragments obtained by conventional cDNA library construction with overlapping 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) fragments, yielded total sequence information of 4.7 kb for the human mRNA. This sequence comprises a long open reading frame of 3.1 kb. A homology search for related sequences revealed highest similarity (25% amino acid identity) with the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. The predicted extracellular amino-terminal extension, however, was much longer than in the other members, and showed similarity to highly glycosylated mucin-like cell-surface molecules.

  11. Safety, tumor trafficking and immunogenicity of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells specific for TAG-72 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Kristen M; Bergsland, Emily K; Fisher, George A; Nemunaitis, John J; Warren, Robert S; McArthur, James G; Lin, Andy A; Schlom, Jeffrey; June, Carl H; Sherwin, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have established efficacy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, but their relevance in solid tumors remains undefined. Here we report results of the first human trials of CAR-T cells in the treatment of solid tumors performed in the 1990s. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) were treated in two phase 1 trials with first-generation retroviral transduced CAR-T cells targeting tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 and including a CD3-zeta intracellular signaling domain (CART72 cells). In trial C-9701 and C-9702, CART72 cells were administered in escalating doses up to 10 10 total cells; in trial C-9701 CART72 cells were administered by intravenous infusion. In trial C-9702, CART72 cells were administered via direct hepatic artery infusion in patients with colorectal liver metastases. In both trials, a brief course of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was given with each CART72 infusion to upregulate expression of TAG-72. Fourteen patients were enrolled in C-9701 and nine in C-9702. CART72 manufacturing success rate was 100% with an average transduction efficiency of 38%. Ten patients were treated in CC-9701 and 6 in CC-9702. Symptoms consistent with low-grade, cytokine release syndrome were observed in both trials without clear evidence of on target/off tumor toxicity. Detectable, but mostly short-term (≤14 weeks), persistence of CART72 cells was observed in blood; one patient had CART72 cells detectable at 48 weeks. Trafficking to tumor tissues was confirmed in a tumor biopsy from one of three patients. A subset of patients had 111 Indium-labeled CART72 cells injected, and trafficking could be detected to liver, but T cells appeared largely excluded from large metastatic deposits. Tumor biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TAG-72 were measured in serum; there was a precipitous decline of TAG-72, but not CEA, in some patients due to induction of an interfering antibody to the TAG-72

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab in human breast cancer cell lines: effect of specific activity and HER2 receptor heterogeneity on survival fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Carlin, Sean [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Welsh, Phil [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)]. E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2006-04-15

    Introduction: Radioimmunotherapy with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as trastuzumab is a promising strategy for treating HER2-positive breast and ovarian carcinoma patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effectiveness of trastuzumab labeled with the 7.2-h half-life {alpha}-particle emitter {sup 211}At. Methods: Experiments were performed on SKBr-3, BT-474 and the transfected MCF7/HER2-18 human breast carcinoma cell lines. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was determined after exposure to external beam irradiation. The cytotoxicity of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab was measured by clonogenic assays. The distribution of HER2 receptor expression on the cell lines was measured using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. A pharmacokinetic (PK)/microdosimetric model was established to assess the effects of specific activity (SA), HER2 receptor expression and absorbed dose on survival fraction (SF). Results: With external beam irradiation, the 2-Gy SF for BT-474, SKBr-3 and MCF7/HER2-18 cells was 0.78, 0.53 and 0.64 Gy, respectively. Heterogeneous HER2 expression was observed, with a subpopulation of cells lacking measurable receptor (14.5%, SKBr-3; 0.34%, MCF-7/HER2; 1.73%, BT-474). When plotted as a function of activity concentration, SF curves were biphasic and inversely proportional to SA; however, when the model was applied and absorbed doses calculated, the SF curve was monoexponential independent of SA. Thus, the PK model was able to demonstrate the effects of competition between cold and labeled mAb. These studies showed that the relative biological effectiveness of {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzaumab was about 10 times higher than that of external beam therapy. Conclusion: These in vitro studies showed that {sup 211}At-labeled trastuzumab mAb is an effective cytotoxic agent for the treatment of HER2-positive tumor cells. The SA of the labeled mAb and the homogeneity of HER2 receptor expression are important variables influencing

  13. Isolation and functional characterization of hepatitis B virus-specific T-cell receptors as new tools for experimental and clinical use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Wisskirchen

    Full Text Available T-cell therapy of chronic hepatitis B is a novel approach to restore antiviral T-cell immunity and cure the infection. We aimed at identifying T-cell receptors (TCR with high functional avidity that have the potential to be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. To this end, we cloned HLA-A*02-restricted, hepatitis B virus (HBV-specific T cells from patients with acute or resolved HBV infection. We isolated 11 envelope- or core-specific TCRs and evaluated them in comprehensive functional analyses. T cells were genetically modified by retroviral transduction to express HBV-specific TCRs. CD8+ as well as CD4+ T cells became effector T cells recognizing even picomolar concentrations of cognate peptide. TCR-transduced T cells were polyfunctional, secreting the cytokines interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-2, and effectively killed hepatoma cells replicating HBV. Notably, our collection of HBV-specific TCRs recognized peptides derived from HBV genotypes A, B, C and D presented on different HLA-A*02 subtypes common in areas with high HBV prevalence. When co-cultured with HBV-infected cells, TCR-transduced T cells rapidly reduced viral markers within two days. Our unique set of HBV-specific TCRs with different affinities represents an interesting tool for elucidating mechanisms of TCR-MHC interaction and dissecting specific anti-HBV mechanisms exerted by T cells. TCRs with high functional avidity might be suited to redirect T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy of chronic hepatitis B and HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Identification of prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8(+ T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Matsueda

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among elderly men in the US, and immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising strategy to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Efforts to identify novel prostate specific tumor antigens will facilitate the development of effective cancer vaccines against prostate cancer. Prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR is a novel antigen that has been shown to be specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer tissues. In this study, we describe the identification of PSGR-derived peptide epitopes recognized by CD8(+ T cells in an HLA-A2 dependent manner.Twenty-one PSGR-derived peptides were predicted by an immuno-informatics approach based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptides were examined for their ability to induce peptide-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from either HLA-A2(+ healthy donors or HLA-A2(+ prostate cancer patients. The recognition of HLA-A2 positive and PSGR expressing LNCaP cells was also tested. Among the 21 PSGR-derived peptides, three peptides, PSGR3, PSGR4 and PSGR14 frequently induced peptide-specific T cell responses in PBMCs from both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Importantly, these peptide-specific T cells recognized and killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells in an HLA class I-restricted manner.We have identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted PSGR-derived peptides recognized by CD8(+ T cells, which, in turn, recognize HLA-A2(+ and PSGR(+ tumor cells. The PSGR-derived peptides identified may be used as diagnostic markers as well as immune targets for development of anticancer vaccines.

  15. Towards kit formulation of 99mTc labelled somatostatin receptor binding peptides of high specific activity for tumour localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behe, M.; Powell, P.; Maecke, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    The project aimed to develop 99m Tc octreotide analogue for use in nuclear oncology. Several attempts to label SRIF analogues with 99m Tc have used a direct labelling approach but, for this project, HYNIC was chosen as a technetium ligand. A comparison of two different SRIF analogues designed for high specific activity labelling with 99m Tc was done. HYNIC-Octreotide and HYNIC-TOC were prepared and a kit formulation that can be labelled conveniently is currently being studied in a clinical setting. (author)

  16. A useful PET probe [11C]BU99008 with ultra-high specific radioactivity for small animal PET imaging of I2-imidazoline receptors in the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Shimoda, Yoko; Yui, Joji; Zhang, Yiding; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A positron emission tomography (PET) probe with ultra-high specific radioactivity (SA) enables measuring high receptor specific binding in brain regions by avoiding mass effect of the PET probe itself. It has been reported that PET probe with ultra-high SA can detect small change caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand. Recently, Kealey et al. developed [ 11 C]BU99008, a more potent PET probe for I 2 -imidazoline receptors (I 2 Rs) imaging, with a conventional SA (mean 76 GBq/μmol) showed higher specific binding in the brain. Here, to detect small change of specific binding for I 2 Rs caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand in an extremely small region, such as hypothalamus in the brain, we synthesized and evaluated [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA as a useful PET probe for small-animal PET imaging of I 2 Rs. Methods: [ 11 C]BU99008 was prepared by [ 11 C]methylation of N-desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. Biodistribution, metabolite analysis, and brain PET studies were conducted in rats. Results: [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA in the range of 5400–16,600 GBq/μmol were successfully synthesized (n = 7), and had appropriate radioactivity for in vivo study. In the biodistribution study, the mean radioactivity levels in all investigated tissues except for the kidney did not show significant difference between [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA and that with conventional SA. In the metabolite analysis, the percentage of unchanged [ 11 C]BU99008 at 30 min after the injection of probes with ultra-high and conventional SA was similar in rat brain and plasma. In the PET study of rats' brain, radioactivity level (AUC 30–60 min ) in the hypothalamus of rats injected with [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (64 [SUV ∙ min]) was significantly higher than that observed for that with conventional SA (50 [SUV ∙ min]). The specific binding of [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (86% of total binding) for I 2 R was higher than that of

  17. Mitigation of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced side effects utilizing melanin and vascular-specific lasers: A case report series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Karen Y; Kwong, Bernice; Rahman, Zakia

    2017-10-01

    The advent of targeted chemotherapy has led to the emergence of new dermatologic toxicities. We sought to use lasers and light devices to treat recalcitrant cutaneous adverse effects related to cancer treatment. Three stage III or IV cancer patients with cutaneous complications due to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors were treated with melanin and vascular-specific laser and light technologies. Two patients reported reduction in papulopustular eruption following pulse dye laser (PDL) treatment. Two patients noted reduction in hair growth following intense pulsed light (IPL) and/or Alexandrite laser treatments. One patient was treated with both the PDL and IPL and reported improvement of both EGFR-induced hypertrichosis and papulopustular eruption. Laser and light devices targeting melanin and hemoglobin can be utilized to mitigate the cutaneous adverse effects associated with EGFR inhibitors in patients who have failed traditional therapies. This represents a new option for the cancer patient who is suffering from chemotherapy-induced side effects.

  18. Reciprocal exchange of minor components of type 1 and F1C fimbriae results in hybrid organelles with changed receptor specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, P; Christiansen, Gunna; Kreft, B

    1994-01-01

    recognition proteins present in the organelles as minor structural elements. The organization of the fim and foc gene clusters encoding these fimbriae, as well as the structures of the organelles, are very similar, although the actual sequence homology of the structural elements is not remarkable; notably...... to epithelial cells in the collecting ducts of the human kidney as well as to cells of various cell lines. This report addresses the question of fimbrial promiscuity. Our data indicate that minor fimbrial structural elements can be exchanged between the two fimbrial systems, resulting in hybrid organelles...... with changed receptor specificity. This is the first study on reciprocal exchange of structural components from two different fimbrial systems....

  19. Intestinal epithelial restitution. Involvement of specific laminin isoforms and integrin laminin receptors in wound closure of a transformed model epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, M M; Nusrat, A; Madara, J L

    1997-01-01

    laminins 5, 6, and 7 as indicated by immunostaining using laminin subunit-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A MAb (BM2) specific for the laminin alpha 3 subunit, a component of laminins 5, 6, and 7, completely inhibited the closure of mechanical wounds in T84 monolayers. Confocal microscopy using MAbs...... BM2 (laminin alpha 3 subunit) and 6F12 (laminin beta 3 subunit) revealed that laminin-5 is deposited in a basal matrix that extends into the wound. The MAbs 4E10 (laminin beta 1 subunit) and C4 (laminin beta 2 subunit) stained the lateral membranes between T84 cells. This staining was enhanced...... in cells adjoining wounds. Because T84 cells stained faintly with MAbs 4C7 (laminin alpha 1 subunit) and with MAbs 4F11 and 1B4 (laminin alpha 2 subunit), we suggest that expression of laminins 6 and 7 is enhanced in response to wounding. The alpha 3 beta 1 integrin and the alpha 6-containing integrins...

  20. Automated pipeline to analyze non-contact infrared images of the paraventricular nucleus specific leptin receptor knock-out mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Martinez, Myriam; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Gifford, Aliya; Cone, Roger; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Evidence of leptin resistance is indicated by elevated leptin levels together with other hallmarks of obesity such as a defect in energy homeostasis.1 As obesity is an increasing epidemic in the US, the investigation of mechanisms by which leptin resistance has a pathophysiological impact on energy is an intensive field of research.2 However, the manner in which leptin resistance contributes to the dysregulation of energy, specifically thermoregulation,3 is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the leptin receptor expressed in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons plays a role in thermoregulation at different temperatures. Non-contact infrared (NCIR) thermometry was employed to measure surface body temperature (SBT) of nonanesthetized mice with a specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the PVN after exposure to room (25 °C) and cold (4 °C) temperature. Dorsal side infrared images of wild type (LepRwtwt/sim1-Cre), heterozygous (LepRfloxwt/sim1-Cre) and knock-out (LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre) mice were collected. Images were input to an automated post-processing pipeline developed in MATLAB to calculate average and maximum SBTs. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between sex, cold exposure and leptin genotype with SBT measurements. Findings indicate that average SBT has a negative relationship to the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype, the female sex and cold exposure. However, max SBT is affected by the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype and the female sex. In conclusion this data suggests that leptin within the PVN may have a neuroendocrine role in thermoregulation and that NCIR thermometry combined with an automated imaging-processing pipeline is a promising approach to determine SBT in non-anesthetized mice.

  1. Divergent oestrogen receptor-specific breast cancer trends in Ireland (2004-2013): Amassing data from independent Western populations provide etiologic clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullooly, Maeve; Murphy, Jeanne; Gierach, Gretchen L; Walsh, Paul M; Deady, Sandra; Barron, Thomas I; Sherman, Mark E; Rosenberg, Philip S; Anderson, William F

    2017-11-01

    The aetiology and clinical behaviour of breast cancers vary by oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, HER2 expression and over time. Data from the United States and Denmark show rising incidence rates for ER+ and falling incidence rates for ER- breast cancers. Given that Ireland is a somewhat similar Western population but with distinctive risk exposures (especially for lactation), we analysed breast cancer trends by ER status; and for the first time, by the joint expression of ER±/HER2±. We assessed invasive breast cancers (n = 24,845; 2004-2013) within the population-based National Cancer Registry of Ireland. The population at risk was obtained from the Irish Central Statistics Office (n = 10,401,986). After accounting for missing ER and HER2 data, we assessed receptor-specific secular trends in age-standardised incidence rates (ASRs) with the estimated annual percentage change (EAPC) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Age-period-cohort models were also fitted to further characterise trends accounting for age, calendar-period and birth-cohort interactions. ASRs increased for ER+ (EAPC: 2.2% per year [95% CI: 0.97, 3.45%/year]) and decreased for ER- cancers (EAPC: -3.43% per year [95% CI: -5.05, -1.78%/year]), as well as for specific age groups at diagnosis (Ireland were like those previously observed. Stratification by HER2± expression did not substantively alter ER± trends. The divergence of ER± incidence rates among independent Western populations likely reflects calendar-period and/or risk factor changes with differential effects for ER+ and ER- breast cancers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-T Cells Engineered to Target B Cell Follicles and Suppress SIV Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudhini Preethi Haran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop improved methods to treat and potentially cure HIV infection. During chronic HIV infection, replication is concentrated within T follicular helper cells (Tfh located within B cell follicles, where low levels of virus-specific CTL permit ongoing viral replication. We previously showed that elevated levels of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-specific CTL in B cell follicles are linked to both decreased levels of viral replication in follicles and decreased plasma viral loads. These findings provide the rationale to develop a strategy for targeting follicular viral-producing (Tfh cells using antiviral chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells co-expressing the follicular homing chemokine receptor CXCR5. We hypothesize that antiviral CAR/CXCR5-expressing T cells, when infused into an SIV-infected animal or an HIV-infected individual, will home to B cell follicles, suppress viral replication, and lead to long-term durable remission of SIV and HIV. To begin to test this hypothesis, we engineered gammaretroviral transduction vectors for co-expression of a bispecific anti-SIV CAR and rhesus macaque CXCR5. Viral suppression by CAR/CXCR5-transduced T cells was measured in vitro, and CXCR5-mediated migration was evaluated using both an in vitro transwell migration assay, as well as a novel ex vivo tissue migration assay. The functionality of the CAR/CXCR5 T cells was demonstrated through their potent suppression of SIVmac239 and SIVE660 replication in in vitro and migration to the ligand CXCL13 in vitro, and concentration in B cell follicles in tissues ex vivo. These novel antiviral immunotherapy products have the potential to provide long-term durable remission (functional cure of HIV and SIV infections.

  3. The adipokinetic hormone receptor modulates sexual behavior, pheromone perception and pheromone production in a sex-specific and starvation-dependent manner in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eLebreton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food availability and nutritional status shape the reproductive activity of many animals. In rodents, hormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, restore energy homeostasis not only through regulating e.g. caloric intake and energy housekeeping, but also through modulating sex drive. We investigated whether the insect homologue of the GnRH receptor, the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR modulates sexual behavior of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster depending on nutritional status. We found that AKHR regulates male, but not female sexual behavior in a starvation-dependent manner. Males lacking AKHR showed a severe decrease in their courtship activity when starved, as well as an increase in mating duration when fed. AKHR expression is particularly strong in the subesophageal zone (SEZ, Ito et al. 2014. We found axonal projections from AKHR-expressing neurons to higher brain centers including specific glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Among the glomeruli that received projections were those dedicated to detecting the male specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA. Accordingly, responses to cVA were dependent on the nutritional status of flies. AKHR was also involved in the regulation of the production of cuticular pheromones, 7,11-heptacosadiene and 7-tricosene. This effect was observed only in females and depended on their feeding state. AKHR has therefore a dual role on both pheromone perception and production. For the first time our study shows an effect of AKHR on insect sexual behavior and physiology. Our results support the hypothesis of a conserved role of the GnRH/AKH pathway on a nutritional state-dependent regulation of reproduction in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  4. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three...... specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor interfaces....... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3...

  5. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part II: combination with external radiation improves survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,5,6 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USABackground: A peptide mimetic of a ligand for the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptors (GCLR exhibited monocyte-stimulating activity, but did not extend survival when applied alone against a syngeneic murine malignant glioma. In this study, the combined effect of GCLRP with radiation was investigated.Methods: C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells. Animals were grouped based on randomized tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging on day seven. One group that received cranial radiation (4 Gy on days seven and nine only were compared with animals treated with radiation and GCLRP (4 Gy on days seven and nine combined with subcutaneous injection of 1 nmol/g on alternative days beginning on day seven. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor growth and correlated with survival rate. Blood and brain tissues were analyzed with regard to tumor and contralateral hemisphere using fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: GCLRP activated peripheral monocytes and was associated with increased blood precursors of dendritic cells. Mean survival increased (P < 0.001 and tumor size was smaller (P < 0.02 in the GCLRP + radiation group compared to the radiation-only group. Accumulation of dendritic cells in both the tumoral hemisphere (P < 0.005 and contralateral tumor-free hemisphere (P< 0.01 was

  6. The Ewing sarcoma protein (EWS) binds directly to the proximal elements of the macrophage-specific promoter of the CSF-1 receptor (csf1r) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Sasmono, Tedjo; Himes, S Roy; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Constantin, Myrna; Ostrowski, Michael C; Ross, Ian L

    2008-05-15

    Many macrophage-specific promoters lack classical transcriptional start site elements such as TATA boxes and Sp1 sites. One example is the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R, CD115, c-fms), which is used as a model of the transcriptional regulation of macrophage genes. To understand the molecular basis of start site recognition in this gene, we identified cellular proteins binding specifically to the transcriptional start site (TSS) region. The mouse and human csf1r TSS were identified using cap analysis gene expression (CAGE) data. Conserved elements flanking the TSS cluster were analyzed using EMSAs to identify discrete DNA-binding factors in primary bone marrow macrophages as candidate transcriptional regulators. Two complexes were identified that bind in a highly sequence-specific manner to the mouse and human TSS proximal region and also to high-affinity sites recognized by myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (Mzf1). The murine proteins were purified by DNA affinity isolation from the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line and identified by mass spectrometry as EWS and FUS/TLS, closely related DNA and RNA-binding proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in bone marrow macrophages confirmed that EWS, but not FUS/TLS, was present in vivo on the CSF-1R proximal promoter in unstimulated primary macrophages. Transfection assays suggest that EWS does not act as a conventional transcriptional activator or repressor. We hypothesize that EWS contributes to start site recognition in TATA-less mammalian promoters.

  7. Transgenic Adipose-specific Expression of the Nuclear Receptor RORα Drives a Striking Shift in Fat Distribution and Impairs Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Kelvin Tuong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available RORα is a member of the nuclear receptor (NR superfamily and analysis of the (global RORα-deficient mouse model revealed this NR has a role in glycemic control and fat deposition. Therefore, we generated an adipose-specific RORα ‘gain of function’ mouse model under the control of the fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 promoter to elucidate the function of RORα in adipose tissue. The Tg-FABP4-RORα4 mice demonstrated a shift in fat distribution to non-adipose tissues when challenged with a high fat diet (HFD. Specifically, we observed a subcutaneous lipodystrophy, accompanied by hepatomegaly (fatty liver/mild portal fibrosis and splenomegaly; in a background of decreased weight gain and total body fat after HFD. Moreover, we observed significantly higher fasting blood glucose and impaired clearance of glucose in Tg-FABP4-RORα4 mice. Genome wide expression and qPCR profiling analysis identified: (i subcutaneous adipose specific decreases in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, lipid droplet expansion and glycemic control, and (ii the fibrosis pathway as the most significant pathway [including dysregulation of the collagen/extracellular matrix (ECM pathways] in subcutaneous adipose and liver. The pathology presented in the Tg-FABP4-RORα4 mice is reminiscent of human metabolic disease (associated with aberrant ECM expression highlighting the therapeutic potential of this NR.

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Xenograft Tumors Using an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Affibody Molecule Labeled with a Near-infrared Fluorophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff with a near-infrared (NIR dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800 in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors.

  9. Prolactin receptors in liver, kidney, and gill of the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): Characterization and effect of salinity on specific binding of iodinated ovine prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauder, S.; Young, G.; Hass, L.; Bern, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Specific binding of 125 I-ovine prolactin (oPRL) to microsomal fractions from gill, kidney, and liver of adult tilapia was determined. Specific binding varied among tissues, the highest values being displayed by kidney membranes. In the liver, the binding of oPRL was not strongly displaced by tilapia prolactins (tPRL177 and tPRL188), although tPRL177 was six times more potent than tPRL188. On the other hand, in kidney and gill membranes, the two tPRLs were equipotent. Tilapia PRLs showed low potency in competing for oPRL-binding sites when pregnant rat liver membranes were utilized. Tilapia growth hormone (tGH) and human growth hormone (hGH) displaced 125 I-oPRL from liver as well as did tPRL177 but were not recognized well by renal or branchial receptors. Two 125 I-oPRL-binding sites were detected in every tissue tested. These binding sites are subject to physiological regulation since adaptation to seawater resulted in a significant decrease in specific binding

  10. Progesterone receptor isoform-specific promoter methylation: association of PRA promoter methylation with worse outcome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiraja, Thushangi N; Shetty, Priya B; Jelinek, Jaroslav; He, Rong; Hartmaier, Ryan; Margossian, Astrid L; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-06-15

    ERα and PR levels are critical determinants for breast cancer prognosis and response to endocrine therapy. Although PR is known to be silenced by methylation of its promoter, few studies have correlated methylation with PR levels and outcome in breast cancer. There is only one previous small study comparing methylation of the two PR isoforms, PRA and PRB, which are expressed from different promoters, and finally, there is no prior knowledge of associations between isoform-specific methylation and outcome. We conducted a cohort-based study to test for associations between PRA and PRB methylation, expression, and clinical outcome in tamoxifen-treated patients (n = 500), and in patients who underwent surgery only (n = 500). Methylation and PR levels were measured by bisulfite pyrosequencing and ligand-binding assay, respectively. Low PR levels were significantly associated with worse outcome in all patients. PRA and PRB promoters were methylated in 9.6% and 14.1% of the breast tumors, respectively. The majority (74%) of PR-negative tumors were not methylated despite the significant inverse correlation of methylation and PR levels. PRA methylation was significantly associated with PRB methylation, although a subset of tumors had PRA only (3.9%) or PRB only (8.3%) methylated. Methylation of PRA, but not PRB was significantly associated with worse outcome in the tamoxifen-treated group. Mechanisms other than promoter methylation may be more dominant for loss of PR. Isoform-specific methylation events suggest independent regulation of PRA and PRB. Finally, this article shows for the first time that PRA methylation plays a unique role in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  11. Progesterone receptor isoform-specific promoter methylation — Association of PRA promoter methylation with worse outcome in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiraja, Thushangi N; Shetty, Priya B; Jelinek, Jaroslav; He, Rong; Hartmaier, Ryan; Margossian, Astrid L; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose ERα and PR levels are critical determinants for breast cancer prognosis and response to endocrine therapy. Although PR is known to be silenced by methylation of its promoter, few studies have correlated methylation with PR levels and outcome in breast cancer. There is only one previous small study comparing methylation of the two PR isoforms, PRA and PRB, which are expressed from different promoters, and finally, there is no prior knowledge of associations between isoform-specific methylation and outcome. Experimental Design We conducted a cohort-based study to test for associations between PRA and PRB methylation, expression, and clinical outcome in tamoxifen-treated patients (n=500), and in patients who underwent surgery only (n=500). Methylation and PR levels were measured by bisulfite pyrosequencing and ligand binding assay, respectively. Results Low PR levels were significantly associated with worse outcome in all patients. PRA and PRB promoters were methylated in 9.6% and 14.1% of the breast tumors, respectively. The majority (74%) of PR-negative tumors were not methylated despite the significant inverse correlation of methylation and PR levels. PRA methylation was significantly associated with PRB methylation, although a subset of tumors had PRA only (3.9%) or PRB only (8.3%) methylated. Methylation of PRA, but not PRB was significantly associated with worse outcome in the tamoxifen treated group. Conclusions Mechanisms other than promoter methylation may be more dominant for loss of PR. Isoform-specific methylation events suggest independent regulation of PRA and PRB. Finally, this study shows for the first time that PRA methylation plays a unique role in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. PMID:21459801

  12. α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-specific antibody induces inflammation and amyloid β42 accumulation in the mouse brain to impair memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Lykhmus

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs expressed in the brain are involved in regulating cognitive functions, as well as inflammatory reactions. Their density is decreased upon Alzheimer disease accompanied by accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ42, memory deficit and neuroinflammation. Previously we found that α7 nAChR-specific antibody induced pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 production in U373 glioblastoma cells and that such antibodies were present in the blood of humans. We raised a hypothesis that α7 nAChR-specific antibody can cause neuroinflammation when penetrating the brain. To test this, C57Bl/6 mice were either immunized with extracellular domain of α7 nAChR subunit α7(1-208 or injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 5 months. We studied their behavior and the presence of α3, α4, α7, β2 and β4 nAChR subunits, Aβ40 and Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain by sandwich ELISA and confocal microscopy. It was found that either LPS injections or immunizations with α7(1-208 resulted in region-specific decrease of α7 and α4β2 and increase of α3β4 nAChRs, accumulation of Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain of mice and worsening of their episodic memory. Intravenously transferred α7 nAChR-specific-antibodies penetrated the brain parenchyma of mice pre-injected with LPS. Our data demonstrate that (1 neuroinflammation is sufficient to provoke the decrease of α7 and α4β2 nAChRs, Aβ42 accumulation and memory impairment in mice and (2 α7(1-208 nAChR-specific antibodies can cause inflammation within the brain resulting in the symptoms typical for Alzheimer disease.

  13. ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-alpha IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN THE BRAINSTEM AND SPINAL CORD OF THE FEMALE RHESUS MONKEY : SPECIES-SPECIFIC CHARACTERISTICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, V. G. J. M.; Terasawa, E.; Ralston, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution pattern of estrogen receptors in the rodent CNS has been reported extensively, but mapping of estrogen receptors in primates is incomplete. In this study we describe the distribution of estrogen receptor alpha immunoreactive (ER-alpha 1R) neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord of

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  15. Evolution of hepatic steatosis to fibrosis and adenoma formation in liver specific growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRLD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eFan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most common forms of chronic liver diseases closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance; deficient growth hormone (GH action in liver has been implicated as a mechanism. Here, we investigated the evolution of NAFLD in aged mice with liver-specific GHR deletion. Methods: We examined glucose tolerance, insulin responsiveness and lipid profiles in aged male mice (44-50 weeks with GHRLD. We performed proteomics analysis, pathway-based Superarray assay, as well as quantitative RT-PCR to gain molecular insight into the mechanism(s of GHR-deficiency mediated NAFLD. In addition, we examined the pathological changes of livers of aged GHRLD male mice. Results: The biochemical profile was consistent with that of the metabolic syndrome: abnormal glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and hyperlipidemia. RT-qPCR analysis of key markers of inflammation revealed a 3-5 fold increase in TNFα and CCL3, confirming the presence of inflammation. Expression of fibrotic markers (e.g., Col1A2 and Col3A1 was significantly increased, together with a 2-3 fold increase in TGFβ transcripts. Proteomics analyses showed a marked decrease of Mup1 and Selenbp2. In addition, pathway-analysis showed that the expression of cell cycle and growth relevant genes (i.e., Ccnd1, Socs2, Socs3 and Egfr were markedly affected in GHRLD liver. Microscopic analyses (H&E of GHRLD livers revealed the presence of hepatic adenomas of different stages of malignancy. Conclusion: Abrogation of GH-signaling in male liver leads to metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis, increased inflammation and fibrosis, and development of hepatic tumor. Since obesity, a common precursor of NAFLD, is a state of deficient GH secretion and action, the GHRLD model could be used to unravel the contribution of compromised hepatic GH-signaling in these pathological processes, and help to identify potential targets for intervention.

  16. Eradication of large solid tumors by gene therapy with a T cell receptor targeting a single cancer-specific point mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Schreiber, Karin; Yew, Poh Yin; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Idel, Christian; Arina, Ainhoa; Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schreiber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancers usually contain multiple unique tumor-specific antigens produced by single amino acid substitutions (AAS) and encoded by somatic non-synonymous single nucleotide substitutions. We determined whether adoptively transferred T cells can reject large, well-established solid tumors when engineered to express a single type of T cell receptor (TCR) that is specific for a single AAS. Experimental Design By exome and RNA sequencing of an UV-induced tumor, we identified an AAS in p68 (mp68), a co-activator of p53. This AAS seemed to be an ideal tumor-specific neoepitope because it is encoded by a trunk mutation in the primary autochthonous cancer and binds with highest affinity to the MHC. A high-avidity mp68-specific TCR was used to genetically engineer T cells as well as to generate TCR-transgenic mice for adoptive therapy. Results When the neoepitope was expressed at high levels and by all cancer cells, their direct recognition sufficed to destroy intra-tumor vessels and eradicate large, long-established solid tumors. When the neoepitope was targeted as autochthonous antigen, T cells caused cancer regression followed by escape of antigen-negative variants. Escape could be thwarted by expressing the antigen at increased levels in all cancer cells or by combining T cell therapy with local irradiation. Therapeutic efficacies of TCR-transduced and TCR-transgenic T cells were similar. Conclusions Gene therapy with a single TCR targeting a single AAS can eradicate large established cancer but a uniform expression and/or sufficient levels of the targeted neoepitope or additional therapy are required to overcome tumor escape. PMID:26667491

  17. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence JN; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAKS2580F or ERBB2H473Y or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IPE805G were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ+ T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27−CD45RA−) and less-differentiated (CD27+CD45RA+) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens. PMID:26945006

  18. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations based on mutation specific immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Iqbal, Sobuhi; Walia, Ritika; Malik, Prabhat; Cyriac, Sunu; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Sharma, Mehar C.; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Bhalla, Ashu; Pathy, Sushmita; Kumar, Lalit; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies have shown that immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation specific antibodies, is an easy and cost-effective, screening method compared with molecular techniques. The purpose of present study was to assess the percentage positivity of IHC using EGFR mutation specific antibodies in lung biopsy samples from patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Methods: Two hundred and six biopsies of primary lung ADC were subjected to EGFR mutation specific antibodies against del E746-A750 and L858R. Detection of EGFR mutation done by high resolution melting analysis (HRM) was used as gold standard. A concordance was established between molecular and IHC results. Frequency of IHC positivity was assessed. Results: Of the 206 patients, 129 were male and 77 were female patients, with a mean age of 54.1 yr. Fifty five (26.6%) patients (36 men; 19 women) showed positivity for IHC of del E746-A750 (33) and L858R (22). HRM results were available in 14 patients which showed EGFR mutations in correspondence with del E746-750 or L858R in 64.2 per cent cases. Positive cases on HRM were further confirmed by DNA sequencing and fragment analysis. Three patients showed exon20 variation. Two cases were negative for mutation. The genotype of del E746-750 mutation was more common than L858R. A concordance was established between molecular mutation and IHC in 85.7 per cent cases. Interpretation & conclusions: In this preliminary study from India mutation specific IHC was used for assessment of mutation status of EGFR. Although the number tested was small, a good concordance was observed between molecular EGFR mutation and IHC expression. IHC methodology is a potentially useful tool to guide clinicians for personalized treatment in lung ADC, especially where facilities for molecular analysis are not readily available and for use in small biopsies where material is scant for molecular tests. PMID:27241644

  19. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations based on mutation specific immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Iqbal, Sobuhi; Walia, Ritika; Malik, Prabhat; Cyriac, Sunu; Mathur, Sandeep R; Sharma, Mehar C; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Bhalla, Ashu; Pathy, Sushmita; Kumar, Lalit; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown that immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation specific antibodies, is an easy and cost-effective, screening method compared with molecular techniques. The purpose of present study was to assess the percentage positivity of IHC using EGFR mutation specific antibodies in lung biopsy samples from patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Two hundred and six biopsies of primary lung ADC were subjected to EGFR mutation specific antibodies against del E746-A750 and L858R. Detection of EGFR mutation done by high resolution melting analysis (HRM) was used as gold standard. A concordance was established between molecular and IHC results. Frequency of IHC positivity was assessed. Of the 206 patients, 129 were male and 77 were female patients, with a mean age of 54.1 yr. Fifty five (26.6%) patients (36 men; 19 women) showed positivity for IHC of del E746-A750 (33) and L858R (22). HRM results were available in 14 patients which showed EGFR mutations in correspondence with del E746-750 or L858R in 64.2 per cent cases. Positive cases on HRM were further confirmed by DNA sequencing and fragment analysis. Three patients showed exon[20] variation. Two cases were negative for mutation. The genotype of del E746-750 mutation was more common than L858R. A concordance was established between molecular mutation and IHC in 85.7 per cent cases. In this preliminary study from India mutation specific IHC was used for assessment of mutation status of EGFR. Although the number tested was small, a good concordance was observed between molecular EGFR mutation and IHC expression. IHC methodology is a potentially useful tool to guide clinicians for personalized treatment in lung ADC, especially where facilities for molecular analysis are not readily available and for use in small biopsies where material is scant for molecular tests.

  20. Specific receptors for epidermal growth factor in human bone tumour cells and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin E2 by cultured osteosarcoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Y.; Uchihashi, M.; Nakashima, H.; Fujita, T.; Matsukura, S.; Matsui, K.

    1984-01-01

    Using tumour cell lines derived from human bone tumours, specific binding sites for epidermal growth factor (EGF), a potent growth stimulator in many tissues, and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E 2 , a potent bone-resorbing factor, by cultured osteosarcoma cell line were studied. Three tumour cell lines, one osteosarcoma (HOSO) and two giant cell tumours of the bone (G-1 and G-2), all possessed specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled EGF: the apparent dissociation constant was approximately 4-10 x 10 -10 M and the maximal binding capacity was 50 000-80 000 sites/cell. EGF had no mitogenic effect in these cell lines. However, these cell lines did not have specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled parathyroid hormone (PTH) or calcitonin. HOSO line produced and secreted PGE 2 into medium, while no significant amount of PGE 2 was demonstrated in G-1 or G-2 line. EGF significantly stimulated PGE 2 production in HOSO line in a dose-dependent manner (0.5-50 ng/ml); its stimulatory effect was completely abolished by indomethacin, an inhibitor of PG biosynthesis. Exogenous PGE 1 significantly stimulated cyclic AMP formation in HOSO line, whereas PGFsub(2α) PTH, calcitonin, or EGF had no effect. None of these calcium-regulating hormones affected cyclic AMP generation in either G-1 of G-2 line. These data indicate that human bone tumour cells have specific EGF receptors unrelated to cell growth, and suggest that EGF may be involved in bone resorption through a PGE 2 -mediated process in human osseous tissues. (author)

  1. Neuromedin U can exert colon-specific, enteric nerve-mediated prokinetic activity, via a pathway involving NMU1 receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, N B; Bassil, A K; North-Laidler, V J; Morrow, R; Aziz, E; Tuladhar, B R; Sanger, G J

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The neuromedin U (NMU) receptors, NMU1 and NMU2, are expressed in the gut but their functions are unclear. This study explores the role of NMU in gastrointestinal motility. Experimental approach: The effects of NMU were examined in the forestomach and colon isolated from NMU2R wild-type and NMU2R-/- (knockout) mice, looking for changes in muscle tension and in nerve-mediated responses evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS), and in models of peristalsis in mouse colon and faecal pellet transit in guinea-pig colon. Key results: In the mouse forestomach, NMU (1 nM-10 μM) concentration-dependently induced muscle contraction, in the presence of tetrodotoxin and atropine, in preparations from both wild-type and NMU2R-/- mice (pEC50: 7.9, 7.6, Emax: 0.26, 0.20g tension, respectively, n=8 each concentration). The same concentrations of NMU had no consistent effects on the responses to EFS (n=8). In the mouse colon, NMU (0.1 nM-1 μM) had no significant effect on baseline muscle tension (n=8), but concentration-dependently potentiated EFS-evoked contractions in preparations from both wild-type and NMU2R-/- mice, pEC50: 8.1, 7.8, Emax: 24%, 21%, respectively, n=6-11. NMU (0.01 nM-0.1 μM, n=5-7) concentration-dependently decreased the interval between waves of peristalsis in the mouse colon (pEC50: 8.8) and increased the rate at which a faecal pellet moved along the guinea-pig colon. Conclusions and implications: These results demonstrate that NMU exerts colon-specific, nerve-mediated, prokinetic activity, via a pathway involving activation of NMU1 receptors. This suggests that this receptor may represent a molecular target for the treatment of intestinal motility disorders. PMID:17211455

  2. The Tol2 transposon system mediates the genetic engineering of T-cells with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, T; Iwase, N; Kawakami, K; Iwasaki, M; Yamamoto, C; Ohmine, K; Uchibori, R; Teruya, T; Ido, H; Saga, Y; Urabe, M; Mizukami, H; Kume, A; Nakamura, M; Brentjens, R; Ozawa, K

    2015-02-01

    Engineered T-cell therapy using a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR) is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced B-cell malignancies. Gene transfer of CARs to T-cells has widely relied on retroviral vectors, but transposon-based gene transfer has recently emerged as a suitable nonviral method to mediate stable transgene expression. The advantages of transposon vectors compared with viral vectors include their simplicity and cost-effectiveness. We used the Tol2 transposon system to stably transfer CD19-CAR into human T-cells. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were co-nucleofected with the Tol2 transposon donor plasmid carrying CD19-CAR and the transposase expression plasmid and were selectively propagated on NIH3T3 cells expressing human CD19. Expanded CD3(+) T-cells with stable and high-level transgene expression (~95%) produced interferon-γ upon stimulation with CD19 and specifically lysed Raji cells, a CD19(+) human B-cell lymphoma cell line. Adoptive transfer of these T-cells suppressed tumor progression in Raji tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) immunodeficient mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that the Tol2 transposon system could be used to express CD19-CAR in genetically engineered T-cells for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies.

  3. Functional analysis of the CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) on virus-specific CD8+ T cells following coronavirus infection of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, William G.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2003-01-01

    Intracranial infection of C57BL/6 mice with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) results in an acute encephalomyelitis followed by a demyelinating disease similar in pathology to the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). T cells participate in both defense and disease progression following MHV infection. Expression of chemokine receptors on activated T cells is important in allowing these cells to traffic into and accumulate within the central nervous system (CNS) of MHV-infected mice. The present study evaluated the contributions of CCR5 to the activation and trafficking of virus-specific CD8 + T cells into the MHV-infected CNS mice. Comparable numbers of virus-specific CD8 + T cells derived from immunized CCR5 +/+ or CCR5 -/- mice were present within the CNS of MHV-infected RAG1 -/- mice following adoptive transfer, indicating that CCR5 is not required for trafficking of these cells into the CNS. RAG1 -/- recipients of CCR5 -/- -derived CD8 + T cells exhibited a modest, yet significant (P ≤ 0.05), reduction in viral burden within the brain which correlated with increased CTL activity and IFN-γ expression. Histological analysis of RAG1 -/- recipients of either CCR5 +/+ or CCR5 -/- -derived CD8 + T cells revealed only focal areas of demyelination with no significant differences in white matter destruction. These data indicate that CCR5 signaling on CD8 + T cells modulates antiviral activities but is not essential for entry into the CNS

  4. Selective Inhibition of Tumor Growth by Clonal NK Cells Expressing an ErbB2/HER2-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  5. Selective inhibition of tumor growth by clonal NK cells expressing an ErbB2/HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Premature Aging Phenotype in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors: Region-Specific Changes in Layer V Pyramidal Cell Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Skaliora, Irini

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms by which aging leads to alterations in brain structure and cognitive deficits are unclear. Α deficient cholinergic system has been implicated as one of the main factors that could confer a heightened vulnerability to the aging process, and mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors (β2(-/-)) have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated cognitive aging. To date, however, age-related changes in neuronal microanatomy have not been studied in these mice. In the present study, we examine the neuronal structure of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP(+)) layer V neurons in 2 cytoarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in wild-type (WT) and β2(-/-) animals. We find that (1) substantial morphological differences exist between YFP(+) cells of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and primary visual cortex (V1), in both genotypes; (2) in WT animals, ACC cells are more susceptible to aging compared with cells in V1; and (3) β2 deletion is associated with a regionally and temporally specific increase in vulnerability to aging. ACC cells exhibit a prematurely aged phenotype already at 4-6 months, whereas V1 cells are spared in adulthood but strongly affected in old animals. Collectively, our data reveal region-specific synergistic effects of aging and genotype and suggest distinct vulnerabilities in V1 and ACC neurons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-05-15

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft.

  8. A kainate receptor subunit promotes the recycling of the neuron-specific K+-Cl-co-transporter KCC2 in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressey, Jessica C; Mahadevan, Vivek; Khademullah, C Sahara; Dargaei, Zahra; Chevrier, Jonah; Ye, Wenqing; Huang, Michelle; Chauhan, Alamjeet K; Meas, Steven J; Uvarov, Pavel; Airaksinen, Matti S; Woodin, Melanie A

    2017-04-14

    Synaptic inhibition depends on a transmembrane gradient of chloride, which is set by the neuron-specific K + -Cl - co-transporter KCC2. Reduced KCC2 levels in the neuronal membrane contribute to the generation of epilepsy, neuropathic pain, and autism spectrum disorders; thus, it is important to characterize the mechanisms regulating KCC2 expression. In the present study, we determined the role of KCC2-protein interactions in regulating total and surface membrane KCC2 expression. Using quantitative immunofluorescence in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, we discovered that the kainate receptor subunit GluK2 and the auxiliary subunit Neto2 significantly increase the total KCC2 abundance in neurons but that GluK2 exclusively increases the abundance of KCC2 in the surface membrane. Using a live cell imaging assay, we further determined that KCC2 recycling primarily occurs within 1-2 h and that GluK2 produces an ∼40% increase in the amount of KCC2 recycled to the membrane during this time period. This GluK2-mediated increase in surface recycling translated to a significant increase in KCC2 expression in the surface membrane. Moreover, we found that KCC2 recycling is enhanced by protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of the GluK2 C-terminal residues Ser-846 and Ser-868. Lastly, using gramicidin-perforated patch clamp recordings, we found that the GluK2-mediated increase in KCC2 recycling to the surface membrane translates to a hyperpolarization of the reversal potential for GABA (E GABA ). In conclusion, our results have revealed a mechanism by which kainate receptors regulate KCC2 expression in the hippocampus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A highly conserved glycine within linker I and the extreme C terminus of G protein alpha subunits interact cooperatively in switching G protein-coupled receptor-to-effector specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostenis, Evi; Martini, Lene; Ellis, James

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have attested to the importance of the extreme C terminus of G protein alpha subunits in determining their selectivity of receptor recognition. We have previously reported that a highly conserved glycine residue within linker I is important for constraining the fidelity of receptor...... recognition by Galpha(q) proteins. Herein, we explored whether both modules (linker I and extreme C terminus) interact cooperatively in switching G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-to-effector specificity and created as models mutant Galpha(q) proteins in which glycine was replaced with various amino acids...... and the C-terminal five Galpha(q) residues with the corresponding Galpha(i) or Galpha(s) sequence. Coupling properties of the mutated Galpha(q) proteins were determined after coexpression with a panel of 13 G(i)-and G(s) -selective receptors and compared with those of Galpha proteins modified in only one...

  11. Lysophosphatidic Acid signals through specific lysophosphatidic Acid receptor subtypes to control key regenerative responses of human gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joju; Headen, Karmel V; Ogunleye, Afolabi O; Perry, Greg A; Wilwerding, Terrence M; Parrish, Lawrence C; McVaney, Timothy P; Mattson, John S; Cerutis, D Roselyn

    2009-08-01

    We showed that the pluripotent platelet growth factor and mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) controls key regenerative responses of human gingival fibroblasts (GFs) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs) and positively modulates their responses to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). This study determined which LPA receptor (LPAR) subtype(s) LPA signals through to stimulate mitogenic extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling and chemotaxis and to elicit intracellular Ca(2+) increases in GFs and PDLFs because many healing responses are calcium-dependent. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase was determined using Western blotting with an antibody to phosphorylated ERK1/2. Migration responses were measured using a microchemotaxis chamber. GF and PDLF intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization responses to multiple LPA species and LPAR subtype-specific agonists were measured by using a cell-permeable fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dye. LPA stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation via LPA(1)(-3). For GFs, LPA(1) preferentially elicited chemotaxis, and LPA(1-3) for PDLFs, as confirmed using subtype-specific agonists. Elevation of intracellular calcium seems to be mediated through LPA(1) and LPA(3), with little, if any, contribution from LPA(2). To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that LPA signals through specific LPAR subtypes to stimulate human oral fibroblast regenerative responses. These data, in conjunction with our previous findings showing that LPA modulates GF and PDLF responses to PDGF, suggest that LPA is a factor of emerging importance to oral wound healing.

  12. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection – Influence on receptor binding☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S.; Childs, Robert A.; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A.; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J.; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H.Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S.; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J.; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J.; Hay, Alan J.; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; Feizi, Ten

    2013-01-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. PMID:24050651

  13. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  14. Targeted Elimination of G Proteins and Arrestins Defines Their Specific Contributions to Both Intensity and Duration of G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Inoue, Asuka; Jenkins, Laura; Raihan, Sheikh Zahir; Prihandoko, Rudi; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-12-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can initiate intracellular signaling cascades by coupling to an array of heterotrimeric G proteins and arrestin adaptor proteins. Understanding the contribution of each of these coupling options to GPCR signaling has been hampered by a paucity of tools to selectively perturb receptor function. Here we employ CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to eliminate selected G proteins (Gα q and Gα 11 ) or arrestin2 and arrestin3 from HEK293 cells together with the elimination of receptor phosphorylation sites to define the relative contribution of G proteins, arrestins, and receptor phosphorylation to the signaling outcomes of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4). A lack of FFA4-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ in Gα q /Gα 11 -null cells and agonist-mediated receptor internalization in arrestin2/3-null cells confirmed previously reported canonical signaling features of this receptor, thereby validating the genome-edited HEK293 cells. FFA4-mediated ERK1/2 activation was totally dependent on G q / 11 but intriguingly was substantially enhanced for FFA4 receptors lacking sites of regulated phosphorylation. This was not due to a simple lack of desensitization of G q / 11 signaling because the G q / 11 -dependent calcium response was desensitized by both receptor phosphorylation and arrestin-dependent mechanisms, whereas a substantially enhanced ERK1/2 response was only observed for receptors lacking phosphorylation sites and not in arrestin2/3-null cells. In conclusion, we validate CRISPR/Cas9 engineered HEK293 cells lacking G q / 11 or arrestin2/3 as systems for GPCR signaling research and employ these cells to reveal a previously unappreciated interplay of signaling pathways where receptor phosphorylation can impact on ERK1/2 signaling through a mechanism that is likely independent of arrestins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor gene (PNR) accounts for retinitis pigmentosa in the Crypto-Jews from Portugal (Marranos), survivors from the Spanish Inquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, S; Rozet, J M; Takezawa, S I; dos Santos, L C; Lopes, L; Gribouval, O; Penet, C; Perrault, I; Ducroq, D; Souied, E; Jeanpierre, M; Romana, S; Frézal, J; Ferraz, F; Yu-Umesono, R; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    2000-09-01

    The last Crypto-Jews (Marranos) are the survivors of Spanish Jews who were persecuted in the late fifteenth century, escaped to Portugal and were forced to convert to save their lives. Isolated groups still exist in mountainous areas such as Belmonte in the Beira-Baixa province of Portugal. We report here the genetic study of a highly consanguineous endogamic population of Crypto-Jews of Belmonte affected with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A genome-wide search for homozygosity allowed us to localize the disease gene to chromosome 15q22-q24 (Zmax=2.95 at theta=0 at the D15S131 locus). Interestingly, the photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) gene, the expression of which is restricted to the outer nuclear layer of retinal photoreceptor cells, was found to map to the YAC contig encompassing the disease locus. A search for mutations allowed us to ascribe the RP of Crypto-Jews of Belmonte to a homozygous missense mutation in the PNR gene. Preliminary haplotype studies support the view that this mutation is relatively ancient but probably occurred after the population settled in Belmonte.

  16. Investigating mutation-specific biological activities of small molecules using quantitative structure-activity relationship for epidermal growth factor receptor in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosha, P; Sakthivel, R; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-12-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a potential drug target in cancer therapy. Missense mutations play major roles in influencing the protein function, leading to abnormal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. A number of EGFR inhibitor molecules targeting ATP binding domain were developed for the past two decades. Unfortunately, they become inactive due to resistance caused by new mutations in patients, and previous studies have also reported noticeable differences in inhibitor binding to distinct known driver mutants as well. Hence, there is a high demand for identification of EGFR mutation-specific inhibitors. In our present study, we derived a set of anti-cancer compounds with biological activities against eight typical EGFR known driver mutations and developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for each separately. The compounds are grouped based on their functional scaffolds, which enhanced the correlation between compound features and respective biological activities. The models for different mutants performed well with a correlation coefficient, (r) in the range of 0.72-0.91 on jack-knife test. Further, we analyzed the selected features in different models and observed that hydrogen bond and aromaticity-related features play important roles in predicting the biological activity of a compound. This analysis is complimented with docking studies, which showed the binding patterns and interactions of ligands with EGFR mutants that could influence their activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Laminin binding protein, 34/67 laminin receptor, carries stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope defined by monoclonal antibody Raft.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Yohko U.; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Kyoko; Takenouchi, Hisami; Taguchi, Tomoko; Okita, Hajime; Umezawa, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2005-01-01

    We previously produced monoclonal antibodies against the detergent-insoluble microdomain, i.e., the raft microdomain, of the human renal cancer cell line ACHN. Raft.2, one of these monoclonal antibodies, recognizes sialosyl globopentaosylceramide, which has the stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 epitope. Although the mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line F9 does not express SSEA-4, some F9 cells stained with Raft.2. Western analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identified the Raft.2 binding molecule as laminin binding protein (LBP), i.e., 34/67 laminin receptor. Weak acid treatment or digestion with Clostridium perfringens sialidase reduced Raft.2 binding to LBP on nitrocellulose sheets and [ 14 C]galactose was incorporated into LBP, indicating LBP to have a sialylated carbohydrate moiety. Subcellular localization analysis by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and examination by confocal microscopy revealed LBP to be localized on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. An SSEA-4-positive human EC cell line, NCR-G3 cells, also expressed Raft.2-binding LBP

  18. RAG-mediated DNA double-strand breaks activate a cell type–specific checkpoint to inhibit pre–B cell receptor signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, Jeffrey J.; Pandey, Ruchi; Schulte, Emily; White, Lynn S.; Chen, Bo-Ruei; Sandoval, Gabriel J.; Kohyama, Masako; Haldar, Malay; Nickless, Andrew; Trott, Amanda; Cheng, Genhong; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Bassing, Craig H.; Payton, Jacqueline E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) activate a canonical DNA damage response, including highly conserved cell cycle checkpoint pathways that prevent cells with DSBs from progressing through the cell cycle. In developing B cells, pre–B cell receptor (pre–BCR) signals initiate immunoglobulin light (Igl) chain gene assembly, leading to RAG-mediated DNA DSBs. The pre–BCR also promotes cell cycle entry, which could cause aberrant DSB repair and genome instability in pre–B cells. Here, we show that RAG DSBs inhibit pre–BCR signals through the ATM- and NF-κB2–dependent induction of SPIC, a hematopoietic-specific transcriptional repressor. SPIC inhibits expression of the SYK tyrosine kinase and BLNK adaptor, resulting in suppression of pre–BCR signaling. This regulatory circuit prevents the pre–BCR from inducing additional Igl chain gene rearrangements and driving pre–B cells with RAG DSBs into cycle. We propose that pre–B cells toggle between pre–BCR signals and a RAG DSB-dependent checkpoint to maintain genome stability while iteratively assembling Igl chain genes. PMID:26834154

  19. Nucleic Acid Sensors Involved in the Recognition of HBV in the Liver–Specific in vivo Transfection Mouse Models—Pattern Recognition Receptors and Sensors for HBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chean Ring Leong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular innate immune system recognizing pathogen infection is critical for the host defense against viruses. Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a DNA virus with a unique life cycle whereby the DNA and RNA intermediates present at different phases. However, it is still unclear whether the viral DNA or RNA templates are recognized by the pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs to trigger host antiviral immune response. Here in this article, we review the recent advances in the progress of the HBV studies, focusing on the nucleic acid sensors and the pathways involved in the recognition of HBV in the liver–specific in vivo transfection mouse models. Hydrodynamic injection transfecting the hepatocytes in the gene-disrupted mouse model with the HBV replicative genome DNA has revealed that IFNAR and IRF3/7 are indispensable in HBV eradication in the mice liver but not the RNA sensing pathways. Interestingly, accumulating evidence of the recent studies has demonstrated that HBV markedly interfered with IFN-β induction and antiviral immunity mediated by the Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which has been identified as a central factor in foreign DNA recognition and antiviral innate immunity. This review will present the current understanding of innate immunity in HBV infection and of the challenges for clearing of the HBV infection.

  20. Intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse skeletal muscle in response to single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, resulting from single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise. At 1, 4, and 24 h after single-dose treatment with clenbuterol or after acute running exercise, the soleus and TA muscles were isolated and subjected to analysis. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise in the soleus muscle but not in the TA muscle. Although there was no change in the phosphorylation of Akt after acute exercise in either muscle, phosphorylation of Akt in the soleus muscle increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment, whereas that in the TA muscle remained unchanged. These results suggest that p38 MAPK and Akt pathways play a functional role in the adaptation to clenbuterol treatment and exercise, particularly in slow-twitch muscles.

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam3CSK4 enhances the induction of antigen-specific tolerance via the sublingual route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, V; Van Overtvelt, L; Horiot, S; Moussu, H; Chabre, H; Louise, A; Balazuc, A-M; Mascarell, L; Moingeon, P

    2008-11-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been established in humans as a safe and efficacious treatment for type I respiratory allergies. In this study, we compared three Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 ligands (Pam3CSK4, Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid) as potential adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines. These molecules were tested in co-cultures of adjuvant-pre-treated dendritic cells (DCs) with murine naïve CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Patterns of cytokine production, phenotype, proliferation and gene expression were analysed by ELISA, cytofluorometry and quantitative PCR, respectively. TLR2 ligands were subsequently tested in a model of SLIT in BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). Among the three TLR2 ligands tested, the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3CSK4 is the most potent inducer of IL-12p35 and IL-10 gene expression in murine bone marrow-derived DCs, as well as in purified oral myeloid DCs. Only Pam3CSK4-treated DCs induce IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion by naïve CD4(+) T cells. Sublingual administration of Pam3CSK4 together with the antigen in BALB/c mice sensitized to OVA decreases airway hyperresponsiveness as well as OVA-specific T-helper type 2 (Th2) responses in cervical lymph nodes dramatically. Pam3CSK4 induces Th1/regulatory T cell responses, and as such, is a valid candidate adjuvant for sublingual allergy vaccines.

  2. PET imaging evaluation of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10, a novel radioligand specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Ansel T.; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Li, Songye; Lin, Shu-fei; Holden, Daniel; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun [Yale University, PET Center, 801 Howard Ave, PO Box 208048, New Haven, CT (United States); Scheunemann, Matthias; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) afford in vivo imaging of this receptor for neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. This work aims to characterize the kinetic properties of an α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific radioligand, 7-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluorodibenzo[b,d]thiophene 5,5-dioxide ([{sup 18}F]DBT-10), in nonhuman primates. [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced via nucleophilic substitution of the nitro-precursor. Four Macaca mulatta subjects were imaged with [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 PET, with measurement of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 parent concentrations and metabolism in arterial plasma. Baseline PET scans were acquired for all subjects. Following one scan, ex vivo analysis of brain tissue was performed to inspect for radiolabeled metabolites in brain. Three blocking scans with 0.69 and 1.24 mg/kg of the α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific ligand ASEM were also acquired to assess dose-dependent blockade of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 binding. Kinetic analysis of PET data was performed using the metabolite-corrected input function to calculate the parent fraction corrected total distribution volume (V{sub T}/f{sub P}). [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced within 90 min at high specific activities of 428 ± 436 GBq/μmol at end of synthesis. Metabolism of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 varied across subjects, stabilizing by 120 min post-injection at parent fractions of 15-55 %. Uptake of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 in brain occurred rapidly, reaching peak standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 2.9-3.7 within 30 min. The plasma-free fraction was 18.8 ± 3.4 %. No evidence for radiolabeled [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 metabolites was found in ex vivo brain tissue samples. Kinetic analysis of PET data was best described by the two-tissue compartment model. Estimated V{sub T}/f{sub P} values were 193-376 ml/cm{sup 3} across regions, with regional rank order of thalamus > frontal cortex > striatum

  3. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of a specific anti-insulin-like growth factor I receptor single chain antibody on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Younesi, Vahid; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Nickho, Hamid; Safarzadeh, Elham; Ahmadi, Majid; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Hosseini, Ahmad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) is expressed on breast cancer cells and involves in metastasis, survival, and proliferation. Currently, application of IGF-IR-targeting monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), alone or in combination with other drugs, is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy. Single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies have been introduced as appropriate tools for tumor-targeting purposes because of their advantages over whole antibodies. In the present study, we employed a naïve phage library and isolated scFvs against a specific epitope from extracellular domain of IGF-IR by panning process. The selected scFvs were further characterized using polyclonal and monoclonal phage ELISA, soluble monoclonal ELISA, and colony PCR and sequencing. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selected scFv antibodies on breast cancer cell lines were also evaluated by MTT and Annexin V/PI assays. The results of ELISA indicated specific reactions of the isolated scFvs against the IGF-IR peptide, and analyses of PCR product and sequencing confirmed the presence of full length V H and Vκ inserts. Treatment of MCF7 and SKBR3 cells with anti-IGF-IR scFv led to a significant growth inhibition. The results also showed that scFv treatment significantly augmented trastuzumab growth inhibitory effects on SKBR3 cells. The percentage of the apoptotic MCF7 and SKBR3 cells after 24-h treatment with scFv was 39 and 30.70 %, respectively. Twenty-four-hour treatment with scFv in combination with trastuzumab resulted in 44.75 % apoptosis of SKBR3 cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the targeting of IGF-IR by scFv can be an effective strategy in the treatment of breast cancer and provide further evidence for effectiveness of dual targeting of HER2 and IGF-IR in breast cancer therapy.

  4. Temporal changes of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the basal ganglia as a possible structure-specific plasticity process in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela P Chaves-Kirsten

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in several neurobiological processes, including neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity. The CB1 cannabinoid receptors are abundantly expressed in the basal ganglia, the circuitry that is mostly affected in Parkinson's Disease (PD. Some studies show variation of CB1 expression in basal ganglia in different animal models of PD, however the results are quite controversial, due to the differences in the procedures employed to induce the parkinsonism and the periods analyzed after the lesion. The present study evaluated the CB1 expression in four basal ganglia structures, namely striatum, external globus pallidus (EGP, internal globus pallidus (IGP and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr of rats 1, 5, 10, 20, and 60 days after unilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine injections, that causes retrograde dopaminergic degeneration. We also investigated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, parvalbumin, calbindin and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD expression to verify the status of dopaminergic and GABAergic systems. We observed a structure-specific modulation of CB1 expression at different periods after lesions. In general, there were no changes in the striatum, decreased CB1 in IGP and SNpr and increased CB1 in EGP, but this increase was not sustained over time. No changes in GAD and parvalbumin expression were observed in basal ganglia, whereas TH levels were decreased and the calbindin increased in striatum in short periods after lesion. We believe that the structure-specific variation of CB1 in basal ganglia in the 6-hydroxydopamine PD model could be related to a compensatory process involving the GABAergic transmission, which is impaired due to the lack of dopamine. Our data, therefore, suggest that the changes of CB1 and calbindin expression may represent a plasticity process in this PD model.

  5. Structure-Based Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii Profilin: A Parasite-Specific Motif Is Required for Recognition by Toll-Like Receptor 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Kucera; A Koblansky; L Saunders; K Frederick; E De La Cruz; S Ghosh; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Profilins promote actin polymerization by exchanging ADP for ATP on monomeric actin and delivering ATP-actin to growing filament barbed ends. Apicomplexan protozoa such as Toxoplasma gondii invade host cells using an actin-dependent gliding motility. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 11 generates an innate immune response upon sensing T. gondii profilin (TgPRF). The crystal structure of TgPRF reveals a parasite-specific surface motif consisting of an acidic loop, followed by a long {beta}-hairpin. A series of structure-based profilin mutants show that TLR11 recognition of the acidic loop is responsible for most of the interleukin (IL)-12 secretion response to TgPRF in peritoneal macrophages. Deletion of both the acidic loop and the {beta}-hairpin completely abrogates IL-12 secretion. Insertion of the T. gondii acidic loop and {beta}-hairpin into yeast profilin is sufficient to generate TLR11-dependent signaling. Substitution of the acidic loop in TgPRF with the homologous loop from the apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum does not affect TLR11-dependent IL-12 secretion, while substitution with the acidic loop from Plasmodium falciparum results in reduced but significant IL-12 secretion. We conclude that the parasite-specific motif in TgPRF is the key molecular pattern recognized by TLR11. Unlike other profilins, TgPRF slows nucleotide exchange on monomeric rabbit actin and binds rabbit actin weakly. The putative TgPRF actin-binding surface includes the {beta}-hairpin and diverges widely from the actin-binding surfaces of vertebrate profilins.

  6. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  7. Urokinase receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) is expressed in connection with malignant as well as benign lesions of the human breast and occurs in specific populations of stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnack Nielsen, Boye; Rank, Fritz; Engelholm, Lars H

    2002-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor (uPAR) are key components in the plasminogen activation system, serving to promote specific events of extracellular matrix degradation in connection with tissue remodeling and cancer invasion. We recently described a new u...

  8. The effects of human TSH receptor gene transfection on iodide uptake and thyroid-specific gene expression in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Shasha; Wang Hui; Feng Fang; Lin Ning; Fu Hongliang; Du Xueliang; Wu Jingchuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of iodide uptake and the expression of thyroid-specific genes in poorly differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) cells after transfection of human TSH receptor (hTSHR) gene in vitro. Methods: The recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid PcDNA3.1/hTSHR-cDNA was transformed into DH 5a bacterial for amplification and then the recombinant plasmid was extracted. The recombinant was identified with PCR amplifying, restriction enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1/hTSHR was transfected into FTC-133 cell line by lipofectin method in vitro. Immunofluorescence, iodide uptake studies and real time-PCR were applied to detect target protein expression. Statistical analysis was performed with t-test using SPSS 13.0 software. Results: Kpn I and Xba I restriction enzyme digestion, PCR amplifying and DNA sequencing confirmed that pcDNA3.1/hTSHR was successfully constructed. After transfection of the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1/hTSHR-cDNA and the stimulation of hTSH, the tumor cells displayed the expression of hTSHR protein at cell surface and cytoplasm. The iodine uptake in pcDNA3.1/hTSHR transfected cells was 2.9 times higher than that of control(pcDNA3.1(+) transfected cells) group(t = 28.63, P<0.01). The expression of TSHR, NIS, TPO and Tg (mRNA levels) in pcDNA3.1/hTSHR transfected cells were also significantly elevated by 1.74 (t =5.959, P<0.01), 7.2 (t =3.807, P<0.05), 2.88 (t=4.769, P<0.01) and 2.67 times (t=6.388, P<0.01) respectively compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that iodide uptake may be reactivated by hTSHR receptor gene transfection in poorly differentiated FTC cell. (authors)

  9. Specific efficacy of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate in advanced neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabet, Amir; Dautzenberg, Kristina; Haslerud, Torjan; Aouf, Anas; Sabet, Amin; Biersack, Hans-Juergen [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Simon, Birgit [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Mayer, Karin [University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Oncology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Saarland University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Increasing evidence supports the value of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET), but there are limited data on its specific efficacy in NET of small intestinal (midgut) origin. This study aims to define the benefit of PRRT with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate for this circumscribed entity derived by a uniformly treated patient cohort. A total of 61 consecutive patients with unresectable, advanced small intestinal NET G1-2 stage IV treated with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate (4 intended cycles at 3-month intervals, mean activity per cycle 7.9 GBq) were analysed. Sufficient tumour uptake on baseline receptor imaging and either documented tumour progression (n = 46) or uncontrolled symptoms (n = 15) were prerequisites for treatment. Response was evaluated according to modified Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) criteria and additionally with Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1. Assessment of survival was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards model for uni- and multivariate analyses. Toxicity was assessed according to standardized follow-up laboratory work-up including blood counts, liver and renal function, supplemented with serial {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance measurements. The median follow-up period was 62 months. Reversible haematotoxicity (≥ grade 3) occurred in five patients (8.2 %). No significant nephrotoxicity (≥ grade 3) was observed. Treatment response according to modified SWOG criteria consisted of partial response in 8 (13.1 %), minor response in 19 (31.1 %), stable disease in 29 (47.5 %) and progressive disease in 5 (8.2 %) patients. The disease control rate was 91.8 %. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was 33 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 25-41] and 61 months (95 % CI NA), respectively. Objective response was associated with longer survival (p = 0.005). Independent predictors of shorter PFS were

  10. Cardioprotection of controlled and cardiac-specific over-expression of A(2A-adenosine receptor in the pressure overload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman A Hamad

    Full Text Available Adenosine binds to three G protein-coupled receptors (R located on the cardiomyocyte (A(1-R, A(2A-R and A(3-R and provides cardiac protection during both ischemic and load-induced stress. While the role of adenosine receptor-subtypes has been well defined in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion, far less is known regarding their roles in protecting the heart during other forms of cardiac stress. Because of its ability to increase cardiac contractility and heart rate, we hypothesized that enhanced signaling through A(2A-R would protect the heart during the stress of transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Using a cardiac-specific and inducible promoter, we selectively over-expressed A(2A-R in FVB mice. Echocardiograms were obtained at baseline, 2, 4, 8, 12, 14 weeks and hearts were harvested at 14 weeks, when WT mice developed a significant decrease in cardiac function, an increase in end systolic and diastolic dimensions, a higher heart weight to body weight ratio (HW/BW, and marked fibrosis when compared with sham-operated WT. More importantly, these changes were significantly attenuated by over expression of the A(2A-R. Furthermore, WT mice also demonstrated marked increases in the hypertrophic genes β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC, and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF--changes that are mediated by activation of the transcription factor GATA-4. Levels of the mRNAs encoding β-MHC, ANP, and GATA-4 were significantly lower in myocardium from A(2A-R TG mice after TAC when compared with WT and sham-operated controls. In addition, three inflammatory factors genes encoding cysteine dioxygenase, complement component 3, and serine peptidase inhibitor, member 3N, were enhanced in WT TAC mice, but their expression was suppressed in A(2A-R TG mice. A(2A-R over-expression is protective against pressure-induced heart failure secondary to TAC. These cardioprotective effects are associated with attenuation of GATA-4 expression and inflammatory factors. The A(2A

  11. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Undernutrition on Cannabinoid Receptor-Related Behaviors: Sex and Tissue-Specific Alterations in the mRNA Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors and Lipid Metabolic Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-López, María T.; Arco, Rocío; Decara, Juan; Vázquez, Mariam; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Rosario Noemi; Alén, Francisco; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition causes long-lasting alterations in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in offspring. It is still unknown whether both, the endocannabinoid (eCB) machinery and the lipid metabolism are implicated in long-term adaptive responses to fetal reprogramming caused by maternal undernutrition. We investigated the long-term effects of maternal exposure to a 20% standard diet restriction during preconceptional and gestational periods on the metabolically-relevant tissues hypothalamus, liver, and perirenal fat (PAT) of male and female offspring at adulthood. The adult male offspring from calorie-restricted dams (RC males) exhibited a differential response to the CB1 antagonist AM251 in a chocolate preference test as well as increased body weight, perirenal adiposity, and plasma levels of triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, bilirubin, and leptin. The gene expression of the cannabinoid receptors Cnr1 and Cnr2 was increased in RC male hypothalamus, but a down-expression of most eCBs-metabolizing enzymes (Faah, Daglα, Daglβ, Mgll) and several key regulators of fatty-acid β-oxidation (Cpt1b, Acox1), mitochondrial respiration (Cox4i1), and lipid flux (Pparγ) was found in their PAT. The female offspring from calorie-restricted dams exhibited higher plasma levels of LDL and glucose as well as a reduction in chocolate and caloric intake at post-weaning periods in the feeding tests. Their liver showed a decreased gene expression of Cnr1, Pparα, Pparγ, the eCBs-degrading enzymes Faah and Mgll, the de novo lipogenic enzymes Acaca and Fasn, and the liver-specific cholesterol biosynthesis regulators Insig1 and Hmgcr. Our results suggest that the long-lasting adaptive responses to maternal caloric restriction affected cannabinoid-regulated mechanisms involved in feeding behavior, adipose β-oxidation, and hepatic lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:28082878

  12. Novel fusion proteins for the antigen-specific staining and elimination of B cell receptor-positive cell populations demonstrated by a tetanus toxoid fragment C (TTC) model antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Diana; Saunders, Ute; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Jacobi, Annett Marita; Nachreiner, Thomas

    2016-02-17

    In an earlier study we developed a unique strategy allowing us to specifically eliminate antigen-specific murine B cells via their distinct B cell receptors using a new class of fusion proteins. In the present work we elaborated our idea to demonstrate the feasibility of specifically addressing and eliminating human memory B cells. The present study reveals efficient adaptation of the general approach to selectively target and eradicate human memory B cells. In order to demonstrate the feasibility we engineered a fusion protein following the principle of recombinant immunotoxins by combining a model antigen (tetanus toxoid fragment C, TTC) for B cell receptor targeting and a truncated version of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA') to induce apoptosis after cellular uptake. The TTC-ETA' fusion protein not only selectively bound to a TTC-reactive murine B cell hybridoma cell line in vitro but also to freshly isolated human memory B cells from immunized donors ex vivo. Specific toxicity was confirmed on an antigen-specific population of human CD27(+) memory B cells. This protein engineering strategy can be used as a generalized platform approach for the construction of therapeutic fusion proteins with disease-relevant antigens as B cell receptor-binding domains, offering a promising approach for the specific depletion of autoreactive B-lymphocytes in B cell-driven autoimmune diseases.

  13. T-Cell Receptor (TCR) Clonotype-Specific Differences in Inhibitory Activity of HIV-1 Cytotoxic T-Cell Clones Is Not Mediated by TCR Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flerin, Nina C; Chen, Huabiao; Glover, Tynisha D; Lamothe, Pedro A; Zheng, Jian Hua; Fang, Justin W; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Newell, Evan W; Davis, Mark M; Walker, Bruce D; Goldstein, Harris

    2017-03-15

    Functional analysis of T-cell responses in HIV-infected individuals has indicated that virus-specific CD8 + T cells with superior antiviral efficacy are well represented in HIV-1 controllers but are rare or absent in HIV-1 progressors. To define the role of individual T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes in differential antiviral CD8 + T-cell function, we performed detailed functional and mass cytometric cluster analysis of multiple CD8 + T-cell clones recognizing the identical HLA-B*2705-restricted HIV-1 epitope KK10 (KRWIILGLNK). Effective and ineffective CD8 + T-cell clones segregated based on responses to HIV-1-infected and peptide-loaded target cells. Following cognate peptide stimulation, effective HIV-specific clones displayed significantly more rapid TCR signal propagation, more efficient initial lytic granule release, and more sustained nonlytic cytokine and chemokine secretion than ineffective clones. To evaluate the TCR clonotype contribution to CD8 + T-cell function, we cloned the TCR α and β chain genes from one effective and two ineffective CD8 + T-cell clones from an elite controller into TCR-expressing lentivectors. We show that Jurkat/MA cells and primary CD8 + T cells transduced with lentivirus expressing TCR from one of the ineffective clones exhibited a level of activation by cognate peptide and inhibition of in vitro HIV-1 infection, respectively, that were comparable to those of the effective clonotype. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent antiviral capacity of some HIV-specific CD8 + T cells is a consequence of factors in addition to TCR sequence that modulate functionality and contribute to the increased antiviral capacity of HIV-specific CD8 + T cells in elite controllers to inhibit HIV infection. IMPORTANCE The greater ex vivo antiviral inhibitory activity of CD8 + T cells from elite controllers than from HIV-1 progressors supports the crucial role of effective HIV-specific CD8 + T cells in controlling HIV-1 replication. The

  14. High Expression of Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor Associates with Unfavorable Cancer-Specific Survival of Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Liu, Yidong; An, Huimin; Chang, Yuan; Zhang, Weijuan; Zhu, Yu; Xu, Le; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-03-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), a single-pass type III transmembrane tyrosine-protein kinase, is mainly involved in inflammation and immune regulation to facilitate the progression of solid tumors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of CSF-1R expression on clinical outcome of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) after surgery. We retrospectively enrolled 268 patients with ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy between 2001 and 2004. Clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were collected. Western blot analysis was performed in the pairwise comparisons of CSF-1R expression in peritumor and tumor tissues of patients with ccRCC. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to determine CSF-1R expression level in tumor specimens. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the impact of prognostic factors on CSS. A concordance index was calculated to measure prognostic accuracy. A prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the identified independent prognostic factors. CSF-1R expression in tumor tissues was higher than in peritumor tissues in 71.4% (5 of 7) patients. CSF-1R expression of tumor tissues was positively associated with metastasis, tumor, node, metastasis classification system (TNM) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score and poor CSS. CSF-1R expression was determined as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, extension of the well-established prognostic models with CSF-1R expression presented significantly improved prognostic accuracy. An efficient prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the independent prognostic factors. High CSF-1R expression is a potential independent adverse prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC.

  15. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaalani, R., E-mail: rita.machaalani@sydney.edu.au [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Ghazavi, E. [Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hinton, T. [School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Waters, K.A. [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Hennessy, A. [School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, NSW 2751 (Australia); Heart Research Institute, 7 Eliza St Newtown, NSW 2042 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta.

  16. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaalani, R.; Ghazavi, E.; Hinton, T.; Waters, K.A.; Hennessy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta

  17. Preliminary study of the specific endothelin a receptor antagonist zibotentan in combination with docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Payne, Heather; Miller, Kurt; de Bono, Johann S; Stephenson, Joe; Burris, Howard A; Nathan, Faith; Taboada, Maria; Morris, Thomas; Hubner, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    This two-part study assessed the safety and tolerability of combined treatment with zibotentan (ZD4054), a specific endothelin A receptor antagonist, plus docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Part A was an open-label, dose-finding phase to determine the safety and toxicity profile of zibotentan in combination with docetaxel. Patients received once-daily oral zibotentan 10 mg (initial cohort) or 15 mg in combination with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) (administered on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) for up to 10 cycles. Part B was a double-blind phase which evaluated the safety and preliminary activity of zibotentan plus docetaxel. Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive zibotentan (at the highest tolerated dose identified in part A) plus docetaxel or placebo plus docetaxel. Six patients were enrolled in part A (n  = 3, zibotentan 10 mg; n = 3, zibotentan 15 mg). No dose-limiting toxicity was observed, thus zibotentan 15 mg in combination with docetaxel was evaluated in part B (n = 20, zibotentan plus docetaxel; n = 11, placebo plus docetaxel). CTCAE grade ≥3, most commonly neutropenia or leucopenia, were reported in 10 (50%) and nine (82%) patients in the zibotentan and placebo groups, respectively. One (17%) patient receiving placebo achieved complete response, two (22%) patients receiving zibotentan achieved partial response and stable disease occurred in six (67%) and three (50%) patients receiving zibotentan and placebo, respectively. The tolerability of zibotentan plus docetaxel was consistent with the known profiles of each drug. Sufficient preliminary activity was seen with this combination to merit continued development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. NR2A and NR2B receptor gene variations modify age at onset in Huntington disease in a sex-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, Larissa; Saft, Carsten; Wieczorek, Stefan; Andrich, Jürgen; Kraus, Peter H; Epplen, Jörg T

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the pathogenetic CAG repeat expansion other genetic factors play a significant role in determining age at onset (AO) in Huntington disease (HD), e.g. variations in the NR2A and NR2B glutamate receptor subunit genes (GRIN2A, GRIN2B). In order to expand these findings we fine-mapped a larger HD patient panel (n = 250) using densely spaced markers flanking the originally associated SNPs in GRIN2A and GRIN2B. In GRIN2A association fine-mapping based on eight additional SNPs confirmed intron 2 as the region of strongest association. In GRIN2B fine-mapping with seven additional SNPs consolidated C2664T as causal genetic variation. Gender stratification of patients revealed differences in the variability in AO attributable to the CAG repeat number and highly significant differences in the AO association with the C2664T and rs8057394/ rs2650427 variations. Addition of the corresponding genotype variations to the effect of CAG repeat lengths resulted in a significant increase of the R2 values only in females. The sex-specific effect for C2664T is underscored by differences in the genotype and allele frequencies observed for female versus male HD patients (P = 0.01) caused by decreased CC frequency in females. Overall, female HD patients homozygous for the CC genotype tended to have later AO compared to the other two genotypes. Stratification of the results by presumed menopausal status demonstrated that the significant findings were predominantly observed in pre-menopausal patients. We speculate that altered hormone levels herald protective effects of this genotype. Together, GRIN2A and GRIN2B genotype variations explain 7.2% additional variance in AO for HD.

  19. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Sushant V; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R

    2014-03-01

    Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (PPSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (PPSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (PPSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression.

  20. Immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a defined ratio of CD8+ and CD4+ CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Hudecek, Michael; Pender, Barbara; Robinson, Emily; Hawkins, Reed; Chaney, Colette; Cherian, Sindhu; Chen, Xueyan; Soma, Lorinda; Wood, Brent; Li, Daniel; Heimfeld, Shelly; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies, but factors that impact toxicity and efficacy have been difficult to define because of differences in lymphodepletion regimens and heterogeneity of CAR-T cells administered to individual patients. We conducted a clinical trial in which CD19 CAR-T cells were manufactured from defined T cell subsets and administered in a 1:1 CD4+:CD8+ ratio of CAR-T cells to 32 adults with relapsed and/or refractory B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma after cyclophosphamide (Cy)-based lymphodepletion chemotherapy with or without fludarabine (Flu). Patients who received Cy/Flu lymphodepletion had markedly increased CAR-T cell expansion and persistence, and higher response rates (50% CR, 72% ORR, n=20) than patients who received Cy-based lymphodepletion without Flu (8% CR, 50% ORR, n=12). The complete response (CR) rate in patients treated with Cy/Flu at the maximally tolerated dose was 64% (82% ORR, n=11). Cy/Flu minimized the effects of an immune response to the murine scFv component of the CAR, which limited CAR-T cell expansion, persistence, and clinical efficacy in patients who received Cy-based lymphodepletion without Flu. Severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS) and grade ≥ 3 neurotoxicity were observed in 13% and 28% of all patients, respectively. Serum biomarkers one day after CAR-T cell infusion correlated with subsequent development of sCRS and neurotoxicity. Immunotherapy with CD19 CAR-T cells in a defined CD4+:CD8+ ratio allowed identification of correlative factors for CAR-T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity, and facilitated optimization of a lymphodepletion regimen that improved disease response and overall and progression-free survival. PMID:27605551

  1. Antibody Probes to Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Transcript-Specific Upstream Peptides: Alternate ER-Alpha Promoter Use and Breast Cancer Etiology/Outcome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pentecost, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Positive Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER) status correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer recurrence in the first years after resection of tumors, and predicts a favorable response to adjuvant anti-estrogens...

  2. Chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum disrupts corticosterone receptor signalling in a tissue-specific manner in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stress-induced concentrations of glucocorticoid hormones (including corticosterone, CORT) can be suppressed by chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum. However, endocrine-disrupting chemicals could interfere with CORT signalling beyond the disruption of hormone titres, including effects on receptors in different target tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of exposure to a petroleum-laced diet (1% oil weight:food weight) on tissue mass and intracellular CORT receptors in liver, fat, muscle and kidney (metabolic tissues), spleen (an immune tissue) and testes (a reproductive tissue). In the laboratory, male house sparrows were fed either a 1% weathered crude oil (n = 12) or a control diet (n = 12); glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors were quantified using radioligand binding assays. In oil-exposed birds, glucocorticoid receptors were lower in one metabolic tissue (liver), higher in another metabolic tissue (fat) and unchanged in four other tissues (kidney, muscle, spleen and testes) compared with control birds. We saw no differences in mineralocorticoid receptors between groups. We also saw a trend towards reduced mass of the testes in oil-exposed birds compared with controls, but no differences in fat, kidney, liver, muscle or spleen mass between the two groups. This is the first study to examine the effects of petroleum on CORT receptor density in more than one or two target tissues. Given that a chronic low dose of ingested petroleum can affect stress-induced CORT titres as well as receptor density, this demonstrates that oil can act at multiple levels to disrupt an animal's response to environmental stressors. This also highlights the potential usefulness of the stress response as a bioindicator of chronic crude oil exposure.

  3. Rat intra-hippocampal NMDA infusion induces cell-specific damage and changes in expression of NMDA and GABA(A) receptor subunits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rambousek, Lukáš; Kletečková, Lenka; Kubesová, A.; Jirák, D.; Valeš, Karel; Fritschy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 105, Jun (2016), s. 594-606 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20613S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1464 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : excitotoxicity * NMDA receptor * GABA A receptor * hippocampus * neuroinflammation * neurodegeneration * interneurons * spatial learning * carousel maze Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  4. The contribution of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors to adult motor neuron survival in vivo is specific to insult type and distinct from that for embryonic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Spearry, Rachel P; Robitz, Rachel; Maclennan, A John

    2013-10-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes motor neuron (MN) survival following trauma and in genetic models of MN disease. Unconditional disruption of the mouse CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene leads to MN loss, demonstrating a developmental role for endogenous CNTF receptor signaling. These data also suggest that CNTF receptors may promote adult MN survival and that appropriately manipulating the receptors could effectively treat adult MN disorders. This effort would greatly benefit from a better understanding of the roles played by CNTF receptors in adult MNs. We have previously found that adult onset disruption of CNTFRα in facial MNs of "floxed CNTFRα" mice by AAV-Cre vector injection leads to significantly more MN loss than in identically treated controls. While indicating that CNTF receptors can promote adult MN survival, the data did not distinguish between potential roles in MN maintenance versus roles in protecting MNs from the injection associated trauma or the toxicity of the chronic Cre recombinase (Cre) produced by the AAV-Cre. Here we used an inducible Cre gene construct to produce adult-onset CNTFRα disruption in facial MNs without the traumatic and toxic effects of the AAV-Cre procedure. The MNs survive without CNTFRα, even when challenged by facial nerve crush or the injection-associated trauma, thereby suggesting, in conjunction with our previous study, that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling can protect MNs against toxic insult, such as that produced by chronic Cre. The data also indicate that in vivo CNTF receptors play very different roles in adult and embryonic MNs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  6. Genome-wide progesterone receptor binding: cell type-specific and shared mechanisms in T47D breast cancer cells and primary leiomyoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Roqueiro, Damian; Huang, Lei; Owen, Jonas K; Xie, Anna; Navarro, Antonia; Monsivais, Diana; Coon, John S; Kim, J Julie; Dai, Yang; Bulun, Serdar E

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone, via its nuclear receptor (PR), exerts an overall tumorigenic effect on both uterine fibroid (leiomyoma) and breast cancer tissues, whereas the antiprogestin RU486 inhibits growth of these tissues through an unknown mechanism. Here, we determined the interaction between common or cell-specific genome-wide binding sites of PR and mRNA expression in RU486-treated uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells. ChIP-sequencing revealed 31,457 and 7,034 PR-binding sites in breast cancer and uterine leiomyoma cells, respectively; 1,035 sites overlapped in both cell types. Based on the chromatin-PR interaction in both cell types, we statistically refined the consensus progesterone response element to G•ACA• • •TGT•C. We identified two striking differences between uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells. First, the cis-regulatory elements for HSF, TEF-1, and C/EBPα and β were statistically enriched at genomic RU486/PR-targets in uterine leiomyoma, whereas E2F, FOXO1, FOXA1, and FOXF sites were preferentially enriched in breast cancer cells. Second, 51.5% of RU486-regulated genes in breast cancer cells but only 6.6% of RU486-regulated genes in uterine leiomyoma cells contained a PR-binding site within 5 kb from their transcription start sites (TSSs), whereas 75.4% of RU486-regulated genes contained a PR-binding site farther than 50 kb from their TSSs in uterine leiomyoma cells. RU486 regulated only seven mRNAs in both cell types. Among these, adipophilin (PLIN2), a pro-differentiation gene, was induced via RU486 and PR via the same regulatory region in both cell types. Our studies have identified molecular components in a RU486/PR-controlled gene network involved in the regulation of cell growth, cell migration, and extracellular matrix function. Tissue-specific and common patterns of genome-wide PR binding and gene regulation may determine the therapeutic effects of antiprogestins in uterine fibroids and breast cancer.

  7. Genome-wide progesterone receptor binding: cell type-specific and shared mechanisms in T47D breast cancer cells and primary leiomyoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    Full Text Available Progesterone, via its nuclear receptor (PR, exerts an overall tumorigenic effect on both uterine fibroid (leiomyoma and breast cancer tissues, whereas the antiprogestin RU486 inhibits growth of these tissues through an unknown mechanism. Here, we determined the interaction between common or cell-specific genome-wide binding sites of PR and mRNA expression in RU486-treated uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells.ChIP-sequencing revealed 31,457 and 7,034 PR-binding sites in breast cancer and uterine leiomyoma cells, respectively; 1,035 sites overlapped in both cell types. Based on the chromatin-PR interaction in both cell types, we statistically refined the consensus progesterone response element to G•ACA• • •TGT•C. We identified two striking differences between uterine leiomyoma and breast cancer cells. First, the cis-regulatory elements for HSF, TEF-1, and C/EBPα and β were statistically enriched at genomic RU486/PR-targets in uterine leiomyoma, whereas E2F, FOXO1, FOXA1, and FOXF sites were preferentially enriched in breast cancer cells. Second, 51.5% of RU486-regulated genes in breast cancer cells but only 6.6% of RU486-regulated genes in uterine leiomyoma cells contained a PR-binding site within 5 kb from their transcription start sites (TSSs, whereas 75.4% of RU486-regulated genes contained a PR-binding site farther than 50 kb from their TSSs in uterine leiomyoma cells. RU486 regulated only seven mRNAs in both cell types. Among these, adipophilin (PLIN2, a pro-differentiation gene, was induced via RU486 and PR via the same regulatory region in both cell types.Our studies have identified molecular components in a RU486/PR-controlled gene network involved in the regulation of cell growth, cell migration, and extracellular matrix function. Tissue-specific and common patterns of genome-wide PR binding and gene regulation may determine the therapeutic effects of antiprogestins in uterine fibroids and breast cancer.

  8. Role of Site-Specific N-Glycans Expressed on GluA2 in the Regulation of Cell Surface Expression of AMPA-Type Glutamate Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takeuchi

    Full Text Available The AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR, which is a tetrameric complex composed of four subunits (GluA1-4 with several combinations, mediates the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmissions in the nervous system. Cell surface expression levels of AMPAR modulate synaptic plasticity, which is considered one of the molecular bases for learning and memory formation. To date, a unique trisaccharide (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc, human natural killer-1 (HNK-1 carbohydrate, was found expressed specifically on N-linked glycans of GluA2 and regulated the cell surface expression of AMPAR and the spine maturation process. However, evidence that the HNK-1 epitope on N-glycans of GluA2 directly affects these phenomena is lacking. Moreover, it is thought that other N-glycans on GluA2 also have potential roles in the regulation of AMPAR functions. In the present study, using a series of mutants lacking potential N-glycosylation sites (N256, N370, N406, and N413 within GluA2, we demonstrated that the mutant lacking the N-glycan at N370 strongly suppressed the intracellular trafficking of GluA2 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in HEK293 cells. Cell surface expression of GluA1, which is a major subunit of AMPAR in neurons, was also suppressed by co-expression of the GluA2 N370S mutant. The N370S mutant and wild-type GluA2 were co-immunoprecipitated with GluA1, suggesting that N370S was properly associated with GluA1. Moreover, we found that N413 was the main potential site of the HNK-1 epitope that promoted the interaction of GluA2 with N-cadherin, resulting in enhanced cell surface expression of GluA2. The HNK-1 epitope on N-glycan at the N413 of GluA2 was also involved in the cell surface expression of GluA1. Thus, our data suggested that site-specific N-glycans on GluA2 regulate the intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of AMPAR.

  9. Evaluation of organ-specific glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice as a model of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao; Nakamura, Akinobu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shinoda, Kazuaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauchi, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio; Goto, Atsuhi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which the body produces insulin but does not result in a sufficient biological effect. Insulin resistance is usually asymptomatic but is associated with health problems and is a factor in the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to clarify organ-specific insulin resistance in normal daily conditions using [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]-FDG was examined in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice, an animal model of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice with and without insulin loading. Mice received 0.5 MBq of [ 18 F]-FDG injected into the tail vein, immediately followed by nothing (control cohorts) or an intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mU/g body weight of human insulin as an insulin loading test. Blood glucose concentrations for all of the experimental animals were assessed at 0, 20, 40, and 60 min post-injection. The mice were subsequently killed, and tissue was collected for evaluation of [ 18 F]-FDG biodistribution. The radioactivity of each organ was measured using a gamma counter. In the absence of insulin, the blood glucose concentrations of wild-type mice (132±26 mg/dl) and IRS-1 knockout mice (134±18 mg/dl) were not significantly different. Blood glucose concentrations decreased following insulin administration, with lower concentrations in wild-type mice than in knockout mice at 20, 40, and 60 min. A statistically significant difference in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake between wild-type mice and IRS-1 knockout mice was confirmed in the heart, abdominal muscle, and femoral muscle. With insulin loading, [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart, back muscle, and abdominal muscle was significantly increased compared to without insulin loading in both wild-type mice and knockout mice. Our results showed that IR significantly affected [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart in normal daily conditions. IR was associated with

  10. Antibody-targeted NY-ESO-1 to mannose receptor or DEC-205 in vitro elicits dual human CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses with broad antigen specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Kelly, Marcus P; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; He, Li-Zhen; Keler, Tibor; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2011-01-15

    Immunization of cancer patients with vaccines containing full-length tumor Ags aims to elicit specific Abs and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination with protein Ags, however, often elicits only CD4(+) T cell responses without inducing Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, as exogenous protein is primarily presented to CD4(+) T cells. Recent data revealed that Ab-mediated targeting of protein Ags to cell surface receptors on dendritic cells could enhance the induction of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We investigated in this study if these observations were applicable to NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis Ag widely used in clinical cancer vaccine trials. We generated two novel targeti