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Sample records for avian tracheal epithelial

  1. The infection of chicken tracheal epithelial cells with a H6N1 avian influenza virus.

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    Ching-I Shen

    Full Text Available Sialic acids (SAs linked to galactose (Gal in α2,3- and α2,6-configurations are the receptors for avian and human influenza viruses, respectively. We demonstrate that chicken tracheal ciliated cells express α2,3-linked SA, while goblet cells mainly express α2,6-linked SA. In addition, the plant lectin MAL-II, but not MAA/MAL-I, is bound to the surface of goblet cells, suggesting that SA2,3-linked oligosaccharides with Galβ1-3GalNAc subterminal residues are specifically present on the goblet cells. Moreover, both α2,3- and α2,6-linked SAs are detected on single tracheal basal cells. At a low multiplicity of infection (MOI avian influenza virus H6N1 is exclusively detected in the ciliated cells, suggesting that the ciliated cell is the major target cell of the H6N1 virus. At a MOI of 1, ciliated, goblet and basal cells are all permissive to the AIV infection. This result clearly elucidates the receptor distribution for the avian influenza virus among chicken tracheal epithelial cells and illustrates a primary cell model for evaluating the cell tropisms of respiratory viruses in poultry.

  2. Tropism and Infectivity of Influenza Virus, Including Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Virus, in Ferret Tracheal Differentiated Primary Epithelial Cell Cultures

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    Zeng, Hui; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Maines, Taronna R.; Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Pekosz, Andrew; Zaki, Sherif R.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (α2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (α2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses. PMID:23255802

  3. Replication of avian influenza viruses in equine tracheal epithelium but not in horses

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    Chambers, Thomas M.; Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.; Reedy, Stephanie E.; Tiwari, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a hypothesis that horses are susceptible to avian influenza viruses by in vitro testing, using explanted equine tracheal epithelial cultures, and in vivo testing by aerosol inoculation of ponies. Results showed that several subtypes of avian influenza viruses detectably replicated in vitro. Three viruses with high in vitro replication competence were administered to ponies. None of the three demonstrably replicated or caused disease signs in ponies. While these results do not exh...

  4. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

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    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  5. Nucleoside transport in primary cultured rabbit tracheal epithelial cells.

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    Mathias, Neil R; Wu, Sharon K; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lee, Vincent H L

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of nucleoside transport in primary cultured rabbit tracheal epithelial cells (RTEC) grown on a permeable filter support. Uptake of (3)H-uridine, the model nucleoside substrate, from the apical fluid of primary cultured RTEC was examined with respect to its dependence on Na(+), substrate concentration, temperature and its sensitivity to inhibitors, other nucleosides and antiviral nucleoside analogs. Apical (3)H-uridine uptake in primary cultured RTEC was strongly dependent on an inward Na(+) gradient and temperature. Ten micromolar nitro-benzyl-mercapto-purine-ribose (NBMPR) (an inhibitor of es-type nucleoside transport in the nanomolar range) did not further inhibit this process. (3)H-uridine uptake from apical fluid was inhibited by basolateral ouabain (10 microM) and apical phloridzin (100 microM), indicating that uptake may involve a secondary active transport process. Uridine uptake was saturable with a K(m) of 3.4 +/- 1.8 microM and the V(max) of 24.3 +/- 5.2 pmoles/mg protein/30 s. Inhibition studies indicated that nucleoside analogs that have a substitution on the nucleobase competed with uridine uptake from apical fluid, but those with modifications on the ribose sugar including acyclic analogs were ineffective. The pattern of inhibition of apical (3)H-uridine, (3)H-inosine and (3)H-thymidine uptake into RTEC cells by physiological nucleosides was consistent with multiple systems: A pyrimidine-selective transport system (CNT1); a broad nucleoside substrate transport system that excludes inosine (CNT4) and an equilibrative NBMPR-insensitive nucleoside transport system (ei type). These results indicate that the presence of apically located nucleoside transporters in the epithelial cells lining the upper respiratory tract can lead to a high accumulation of nucleosides in the trachea. At least one Na(+)-dependent, secondary, active transport process may mediate the apical absorption of nucleosides or

  6. Avian metapneumovirus infection of chicken and turkey tracheal organ cultures: comparison of virus-host interactions.

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    Hartmann, Sandra; Sid, Hicham; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a pathogen with worldwide distribution, which can cause high economic losses in infected poultry. aMPV mainly causes infection of the upper respiratory tract in both chickens and turkeys, although turkeys seem to be more susceptible. Little is known about virus-host interactions at epithelial surfaces after aMPV infection. Tracheal organ cultures (TOC) are a suitable model to investigate virus-host interaction in the respiratory epithelium. Therefore, we investigated virus replication rates and lesion development in chicken and turkey TOC after infection with a virulent aMPV subtype A strain. Aspects of the innate immune response, such as interferon-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression, as well as virus-induced apoptosis were determined. The aMPV-replication rate was higher in turkey (TTOC) compared to chicken TOC (CTOC) (P < 0.05), providing circumstantial evidence that indeed turkeys may be more susceptible. The interferon-α response was down-regulated from 2 to 144 hours post infection in both species compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05); this was more significant for CTOC than TTOC. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly up-regulated in aMPV-A-infected TTOC and CTOC compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05). However, the results suggest that NO may play a different role in aMPV pathogenesis between turkeys and chickens as indicated by differences in apoptosis rate and lesion development between species. Overall, our study reveals differences in innate immune response regulation and therefore may explain differences in aMPV - A replication rates between infected TTOC and CTOC, which subsequently lead to more severe clinical signs and a higher rate of secondary infections in turkeys.

  7. Replication and adaptive mutations of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in tracheal organ cultures of different avian species.

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    Henning Petersen

    Full Text Available Transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV between different avian species may require genome mutations that allow efficient virus replication in a new species and could increase virulence. To study the role of domestic poultry in the evolution of AIV we compared replication of low pathogenic (LP AIV of subtypes H9N2, H7N7 and H6N8 in tracheal organ cultures (TOC and primary embryo fibroblast cultures of chicken, turkey, Pekin duck and homing pigeon. Virus strain-dependent and avian species-related differences between LPAIV were observed in growth kinetics and induction of ciliostasis in TOC. In particular, our data demonstrate high susceptibility to LPAIV of turkey TOC contrasted with low susceptibility of homing pigeon TOC. Serial virus passages in the cells of heterologous host species resulted in adaptive mutations in the AIV genome, especially in the receptor-binding site and protease cleavage site of the hemagglutinin. Our data highlight differences in susceptibility of different birds to AIV viruses and emphasizes potential role of poultry in the emergence of new virus variants.

  8. Oncogene-induced progression of preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial cells to neoplasia

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    Thomassen, D.G.; Kelly, G.

    1988-01-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) induced preneoplastic variants of rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells can be neo plastically transformed following transfection with oncogenic DNA. Variants differ with respect to the oncogenes required for neoplastic conversion. Polyma virus DNA transformed each of four variants neo plastically, whereas viral ras DNA only transformed two of four variants. These data demonstrate that preneoplastic variants of RTE cells differ with respect to the changes needed for conversion to neoplastic cells and that the variants tested are either at different stages or on different pathways of progression to neoplasia. (author)

  9. Effects of α-particle radiation on rat tracheal epithelial cells

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    Ford, J.R. Jr.

    1992-08-01

    By a combination of methods, which included flow cytometry and magnetic cell sorting, we have demonstrated that the cells of the rat tracheal epithelium which have the greatest proliferative capacity in culture and in vivo are the basal cells. Because of these findings it seems reasonable to suppose that the basal cells are the most likely target for the action of α-particle radiation in pseudostratified respiratory epithelium. This hypothesis is further supported by the finding that the basal cells are the cells which appear to respond to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The effects of 210 Po α-particles on the survival and oncogenic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells in suspension were investigated. Since these effects were assayed in culture, the results pertain to the reaction of only the basal cells to irradiation. The results indicate that α-particles are extremely cytotoxic in that a track segment of 4 μm, on average, is sufficient to cause the reproductive death of basal cells. This finding is supported by similar results obtained with two cell lines, Mv1Lu and CHO-K1 BH 4 . Production of proliferating epithelial foci by α-particles was not distinguishable from control and sham treatments. These results are in direct conflict with many of the results that have been obtained with C3H 1OT1/2 cells in similar transformation assays. Some possible reasons for these disparities are discussed and supporting evidence is provided

  10. Effect of retinol and cigarette-smoke and condensate on dye-coupled intercellular communication between hamster tracheal epithelial cells

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    Rutten, A.A.J.J.L.; Jongen, W.M.F.; Haan, L.H.J.de; Hendriksen, E.G.J.; Koeman, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The dye-coupled intercellular communication across gap junctions in primary hamster tracheal epithelial cells has been studied in serum-free, hormone-supplemented medium. In the absence of vitamin A, non-cytotoxic concentrations of cigarette-smoke condensate (CSC) inhibited intercellular

  11. Radiosensitivity and ras oncogene expression in preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, D.G.; Wuensch, S.A.; Kelly, G.

    1988-01-01

    The sensitivity of preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells to the cytotoxic effects of high- and low-LET radiation, and the modulating effect of the viral ras oncogene on this sensitivity were determined. Two lines of preneoplastic RTE cells have the same responsiveness to high-LET radiation, but differ in their responsiveness to a transfected ras oncogene and in their sensitivities to low-LET radiation. Cells that respond to ras by becoming neoplastic are more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of low-LET radiation than cells that are not transformable by ras. The radiosensitivity of ras-responsive cells was not altered by transfection with ras. However, transfection of ras-non responsive cells with ras decreased their sensitivity to low-LET radiation. These data suggest that the ability of cells to repair radiation damage changes as they progress to neoplasia. (author)

  12. Syngeneic immune response to rat tracheal epithelial cells transformed in vitro by N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

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    Braslawsky, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Steele, V.; Kennel, S.J.; Nettesheim, P.

    1981-01-01

    Two cell lines (2-10-1 and 8-10-2) derived by exposure of primary tracheal explants to MNNG in vitro were not tumorigenic in syngeneic F-334 rats or athymic BALb/c (nu/nu) mice at early passage, but became tumorigenic at late passage. These cell lines are therefore suited to study the expression of neoantigens during neoplastic development. Transplantation resistance to late-passage, tumorigenic cells was induced in syngeneic rats using an immunization protocol of repeated cell inoculation and tumour ablation. Spleen cells from such animals were reactive in 20h microcytotoxicity assays against neoplastic cell lines, but unreactive to normal tracheal epithelial cells. Similarly, immune spleen cells co-cultivated in vitro for 6 days with irradiated neoplastic cell lines before assay for microcytotoxicity were strongly reactive, whereas co-cultivation with normal epithelial cells did not stimulate reactivity. Antibody to these neoplastic cell lines was demonstrated in sera of tumor-resistant rats by an indirect radiolabelled-antibody binding test and by indirect immunofluorescence. There was no significant binding to normal tracheal epithelial cell outgrowths.

  13. Establishment and functional characterization of a tracheal epithelial cell line RTEC11 from transgenic rats harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen.

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    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Doi, Takeshi; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Ri-ichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Obinata, Masuo

    2008-11-01

    A tracheal epithelial cell line RTEC11 was established from transgenic rats harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen. The cells grew continuously at a permissive temperature of 33 degrees C but not at a non-permissive temperature of 39 degrees C. Morphological and functional investigations demonstrated that the cells were polarized epithelial cells maintaining a regulated permeability barrier function. Interestingly, the expression levels of Muc1 (mucin 1) and Scgb1a1 (uteroglobin), non-ciliated secretory cell markers, and Tubb4 (tubulin beta 4), a ciliated cell marker, were significantly increased under the cell growth-restricted condition. Global gene expression and computational network analyses demonstrated a significant genetic network associated with cellular development and differentiation in cells cultured at the non-permissive temperature. The tracheal epithelial cell line RTEC11 with unique characteristics should be useful as an in vitro model for studies of the physiological functions and gene expression of tracheal epithelial cells.

  14. Inhibitor production by normal rat tracheal epithelial cells influences the frequency of spontaneous and X-ray-induced enhanced growth variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzaghi-Howe, M.

    1989-01-01

    A cell culture model was used to assay for the induction of cell populations with enhanced growth capacity in culture in irradiated normal rat tracheal epithelial cells (NTEC). Some growth conditions appear to favor the proliferation of both normal and carcinogen-exposed populations, while others appear to select for populations previously exposed to carcinogen. In the present report we focus on what growth conditions are critical for controlling the emergence of spontaneous and X-ray induced proliferating epithelial foci (PEF) and what factor(s) directly influences the relative frequency of PEF in irradiated and control NTEC cultures. (author)

  15. Uptake and metabolism of [11-3H] all-trans retinoic acid by rabbit tracheal epithelial cells

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    Bhat, P.V.; Jetten, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits squamous cell differentiation of rabbit tracheal epithelial cells in culture at concentrations as low as 10 -9 - 10 -10 M. These cells take up 11-[ 3 H]-RA readily when added to the cells either as free RA or as RA complexed to serum retinol binding protein (SRBP) or albumin. The uptake of RA by RTE cells as SRBP or albumin complexes was significantly lower than that of free RA. Metabolites were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography. This analysis showed that RTE cells metabolized RA to polar metabolites (Peak I) and to a less polar metabolite (Peak III). The metabolite in Peak III constituted 13-20% of the cell-associated radioactivity after 24 hrs. incubation with RA. Formation of the Peak I and Peak III metabolites from RA was observed both in undifferentiated as well as in cells that underwent terminal differentiation to squamous cells and their synthesis appeared constitutive. When cells were treated for 6 hrs with 3 H-RA and then further in the absence of RA 75% of the cell-associated radioactivity was released in the medium within 24 hrs, thereafter the release was slow. Analysis of the metabolites secreted by the cells into the medium showed only the presence of Peak I metabolites. The authors data show that RTE cells metabolize RA into polar metabolites which are rapidly released into the medium and into a less polar metabolite, possibly an ester of retinoic acid, which is retained by the cell

  16. Effect of Propionibacterium freudenreichii on Salmonella multiplication, motility, and association with avian epithelial cells1.

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    V T Nair, Divek; Kollanoor-Johny, A

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of a probiotic bacterium, Propionibacterium freudenreichii, on Salmonella multiplication, motility, and association to and invasion of avian epithelial cells in vitro. Two subspecies of P. freudenreichii (P. freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii and P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii) were tested against 3 Salmonella serotypes in poultry, namely, S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and S. Heidelberg, using co-culture-, motility, multiplication, cell association, and invasion assays. Both strains of P. freudenreichii were effective in reducing or inhibiting multiplication of all 3 Salmonella serotypes in co-culture and turkey cecal contents (P ≤ 0.05). P. freudenreichii significantly reduced Salmonella motility (P ≤ 0.05). Cell culture studies revealed that P. freudenreichii associated with the avian epithelial cells effectively and reduced S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, and S. Typhimurium cell association in the range of 1.0 to 1.6 log10 CFU/mL, and invasion in the range of 1.3 to 1.5 log10 CFU/mL (P ≤ 0.05), respectively. Our current in vitro results indicate the potential of P. freudenreichii against Salmonella in poultry. Follow-up in vivo studies are underway to evaluate this possibility. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Glucocorticoids and erythropoietin in chronic lung disease of prematurity: Proliferative potential in lung fibroblast and epithelial cells exposed to tracheal aspirates.

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    Ohnishi, Satoshi; Ichiba, Hiroyuki; Saito, Mika; Hamazaki, Takashi; Matsumura, Hisako; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effects of glucocorticoids, erythropoietin (EPO) and spironolactone (SPL) n human fetal lung fibroblasts and human alveolar epithelial cells exposed to tracheal aspirate fluid (TAF) from extremely premature infants with chronic lung disease (CLD), characterized by fibrosis and changes in the alveolar epithelium. Fibroblasts and epithelial cells (FHs 738Lu and A549, respectively) were treated with different concentrations of hydrocortisone (HDC), dexamethasone (DEX), betamethasone (BET), SPL, and EPO in the absence or presence of TAF from infants with CLD (gestational age, 25.3 ± 0.8 weeks; birthweight, 658 ± 77 g; postnatal age, 0-28 days) and assayed for proliferation. Exposure to TAF resulted in a concentration-dependent proliferation of fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Proliferation of TAF-exposed fibroblasts was suppressed most significantly by 100 μmol/L DEX (21%, P = 0.046) and 300 mIU/mL EPO (18%, P = 0.02) and promoted most significantly by 0.4 μmol/L HDC (10%, P = 0.04). Epithelial proliferation was promoted by 4 μmol/L HDC (15%, P = 0.04), 10 μmol/L DEX (53%, P glucocorticoids alone did not significantly affect fibroblast proliferation. Glucocorticoids and EPO reduced fibroproliferation while promoting epithelial cell growth in vitro within certain dose ranges. Appropriate doses of glucocorticoids and EPO may be useful in the prevention and resolution of CLD in extremely premature infants. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

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    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

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    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections of the avian lung.

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    Jimoh, S A; Maina, J N

    2013-02-23

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs.

  1. Interleukin-13-induced MUC5AC expression is regulated by a PI3K–NFAT3 pathway in mouse tracheal epithelial cells

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    Yan, Fugui; Li, Wen; Zhou, Hongbin; Wu, Yinfang; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua [Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Shen, Huahao, E-mail: huahaoshen@163.com [Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); State Key Lab. of Respiratory Disease (SKLRS) (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • IL-13 specifically induced NFAT3 activation in mouse tracheal epithelial cells. • CsA and LY294002 significantly blocked IL-13-induced MUC5AC production. • The PI3K–NFAT3 pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced MUC5AC production. - Abstract: Interleukin-13 (IL-13) plays a critical role in asthma mucus overproduction, while the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, but whether it can directly regulate IL-13-induced mucus (particularly MUC5AC) production is still not clear. Here we showed that IL-13 specifically induced NFAT3 activation through promoting its dephosphorylation in air–liquid interface (ALI) cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs). Furthermore, both Cyclosporin A (CsA, a specific NFAT inhibitor) and LY294002 (a Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor) significantly blocked IL-13-induced MUC5AC mRNA and protein production through the inhibition of NFAT3 activity. We also confirmed that CsA could not influence the forkhead Box A2 (Foxa2) and mouse calcium dependent chloride channel 3 (mClca3) expression in IL-13-induced MUC5AC production, which both are known to be important in IL-13-stimulated mucus expression. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the PI3K–NFAT3 pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, and provided novel insights into the molecular mechanism of asthma mucus hypersecretion.

  2. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  3. Three-Dimensional Human Bronchial-Tracheal Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLAs) as Hosts for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV Infection

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    Suderman, M. T.; McCarthy, M.; Mossell, E.; Watts, D. M.; Peters, C. J.; Shope, R.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like assembly (TLA) of human bronchial-tracheal mesenchymal (HBTC) cells with an overlay of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells was constructed using a NASA Bioreactor to survey the infectivity of SARS-CoV. This TLA was inoculated with a low passage number Urbani strain of SARS-CoV. At selected intervals over a 10-day period, media and cell aliquots of the 3-D TLA were harvested for viral titer assay and for light and electron microscopy examination. All viral titer assays were negative in both BEAS-2B two-dimensional monolayer and TLA. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry demonstrated antigen-antibody reactivity with anti-SARS-CoV polyclonal antibody to spike and nuclear proteins on cell membranes and cytoplasm. Coronavirus Group 2 cross-reactivity was demonstrated by positive reaction to anti-FIPV 1 and anti-FIPV 1 and 2 antibodies. TLA examination by transmission electron microscopy indicated increasing cytoplasmic vacuolation with numerous electron-dense bodies measuring 45 to 270 nm from days 4 through 10. There was no evidence of membrane blebbing, membrane duplication, or fragmentation of organelles in the TLAs. However, progressive disruption of endoplasmic reticulum was observed throughout the cells. Antibody response to SARS-CoV specific spike and nucleocapsid glycoproteins, cross-reactivity with FIPV antibodies, and the cytoplasmic pathology suggests this HBTE TLA model is permissive to SARS-CoV infection.

  4. Advances in tracheal reconstruction.

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    Haykal, Siba; Salna, Michael; Waddell, Thomas K; Hofer, Stefan O

    2014-07-01

    A recent revival of global interest for reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects, which represents one of the most interesting and complex problems in head and neck and thoracic reconstructive surgery, has been witnessed. The trachea functions as a conduit for air, and its subunits including the epithelial layer, hyaline cartilage, and segmental blood supply make it particularly challenging to reconstruct. A myriad of attempts at replacing the trachea have been described. These along with the anatomy, indications, and approaches including microsurgical tracheal reconstruction will be reviewed. Novel techniques such as tissue-engineering approaches will also be discussed. Multiple attempts at replacing the trachea with synthetic scaffolds have been met with failure. The main lesson learned from such failures is that the trachea must not be treated as a "simple tube." Understanding the anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, and diseases affecting the trachea are required for solving this problem.

  5. Bat lung epithelial cells show greater host species-specific innate resistance than MDCK cells to human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Tessa; Eckerle, Isabella; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2018-04-10

    With the recent discovery of novel H17N10 and H18N11 influenza viral RNA in bats and report on high frequency of avian H9 seroconversion in a species of free ranging bats, an important issue to address is the extent bats are susceptible to conventional avian and human influenza A viruses. To this end, three bat species (Eidolon helvum, Carollia perspicillata and Tadarida brasiliensis) of lung epithelial cells were separately infected with two avian and two human influenza viruses to determine their relative host innate immune resistance to infection. All three species of bat cells were more resistant than positive control Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells to all four influenza viruses. TB1-Lu cells lacked sialic acid α2,6-Gal receptors and were most resistant among the three bat species. Interestingly, avian viruses were relatively more replication permissive in all three bat species of cells than with the use of human viruses which suggest that bats could potentially play a role in the ecology of avian influenza viruses. Chemical inhibition of the JAK-STAT pathway in bat cells had no effect on virus production suggesting that type I interferon signalling is not a major factor in resisting influenza virus infection. Although all three species of bat cells are relatively more resistant to influenza virus infection than control MDCK cells, they are more permissive to avian than human viruses which suggest that bats could have a contributory role in the ecology of avian influenza viruses.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Avian and Swine Influenza Viruses Infections of Well Differentiated Lung Epithelial Cells of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Abd El Rahman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses initiate infection by binding of the viral hemagglutinin to the cellular sialic acid residues. The precision-cut lung slice, as a valuable cultural tool of differentiated respiratory epithelial cells, is characterized by its ability to be viable for at least six days in-vitro, mimic in-vivo original cells and simply monitored by an inverted microscope. The aims of the study were to analyse the distribution of different sialic acid types in bronchus and parabronchial tissues of Turkey Precision Lung Slices (TPCLS, investigate the infection susceptibility of TPCLS by avian influenza (H9N2 and H7N7 and swine influenza (H3N2 viruses and evaluate the infection expression of TPCLS by different influenza viruses in correlation to the cellular sialic acids distribution after infection. The lectin stains and monoclonal antibodies prepared against nucleoprotein of influenza virus were used for analysing sialic acids distributions and viral antigen detection of TPCLS by immunoflourescent technique. The viral infective particles released from infected TPCLS by different avian and swine influenza viruses were titrated at different time intervals after infection. Both α2,3-linked and α2,6-linked sialic acids were expressed in the bronchus of TPCLS, while only α2,6-linked sialic acid was expressed in the parabronchial tissues. The indirect immunoflourescent technique showed variation of infection susceptibility of TPCLS parts by avian and swine influenza viruses. Infection was expressed in the bronchial epithelium by H9N2, H7N7 and H3N2, while in the parabronchial tissue by H9N2 and H3N2. Titration of the released infective viruses in the supernatant of infected TPCLS revealed that H9N2 could replicate faster than the other influenza viruses. TPCLS is a promising in-vitro model for viral infection study of turkey.

  7. Residual oil fly ash induces cytotoxicity and mucin secretion by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells via an oxidant-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, N; Dreher, K L; Dye, J A; Li, Y; Richards, J H; Martin, L D; Adler, K B

    2000-03-15

    Inhalation of ambient air particulate matter (PM) is associated with pulmonary injury and inflammation. Using primary cultures of guinea pig tracheal epithelial (GPTE) cells as an in vitro model of airway epithelium, we examined effects of exposure to suspensions of six different emission and ambient air PM samples: residual oil fly ash (ROFA) from an electrical power plant; fly ash from a domestic oil burning furnace (DOFA); ambient air dust from St. Louis (STL), Ottawa (OT), and Washington, DC (WDC); and volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Saint Helens (MSH) in 1980. Effects of these particulates on cell viability (assessed via LDH assay), secretion of mucin (measured by a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA), and steady-state mRNA levels of the mucin gene MUC2 were determined. ROFA was the most toxic of the dusts tested, as it significantly increased LDH release following a 24-h incubation with 50 microg/cm(2) ROFA. ROFA also enhanced MUC2 mRNA after 4-h exposure, and mucin secretion after 8 h. ROFA-induced mucin secretion and cytotoxicity were attenuated by the oxidant scavenger, dimethylthiourea (DMTU). ROFA exposure also depleted cells of glutathione (GSH). Relatedly, depletion of intracellular GSH by treatment of the cells with buthionine sulfoxamine (BSO) also provoked mucin secretion, as well as enhancing the secretory effect of ROFA when the two agents were added together. L-NMA, the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, did not affect ROFA-induced mucin secretion. Of the soluble transition metals in ROFA (nickel, iron, vanadium), only vanadium individually, or combinations of the metals containing vanadium, provoked secretion. The results suggest ROFA enhances mucin secretion and generates toxicity in vitro to airway epithelium via a mechanism(s) involving generation of oxidant stress, perhaps related to depletion of cellular antioxidant capacity. Deleterious effects of inhalation of ROFA in the respiratory tract in vivo may relate to these cellular

  8. Differential replication of avian influenza H9N2 viruses in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiris Malik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avian influenza virus H9N2 isolates cause a mild influenza-like illness in humans. However, the pathogenesis of the H9N2 subtypes in human remains to be investigated. Using a human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 as host, we found that A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2/G1, which shares 6 viral "internal genes" with the lethal A/Hong Kong/156/97 (H5N1/97 virus, replicates efficiently whereas other H9N2 viruses, A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2/Y280 and A/Chicken/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2/G9, replicate poorly. Interestingly, we found that there is a difference in the translation of viral protein but not in the infectivity or transcription of viral genes of these H9N2 viruses in the infected cells. This difference may possibly be explained by H9N2/G1 being more efficient on viral protein production in specific cell types. These findings suggest that the H9N2/G1 virus like its counterpart H5N1/97 may be better adapted to the human host and replicates efficiently in human alveolar epithelial cells.

  9. Tracheal resection and anastomosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R E; Schwartz, A; Buergelt, C D

    1980-01-15

    Resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the trachea is a practical procedure for the correction of various forms of tracheal stenosis. Preplacing retention sutures facilitates manipulation of the trachea and rapid apposition of the tracheal ends. These same sutures then relieve tension on the primary suture line, assuring early epithelialization. Two dogs with tracheal stenosis were treated by use of this technique. Slight narrowing of the trachea was evident postoperatively in both dogs, but neither dyspnea nor coughing occurred during the follow-up period.

  10. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p line compared to non-virus-cultured A549 cells and were significant in both IL-1β (p < 0.05 in 18 hours and p < 0.001 in 24-48 hours harvested supernatant) and IL-6 (p < 0.001). Silencing the p65 component of NF-κB in A549 cells suppressed the stimulatory effects of influenza virus on secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  11. Transcriptional profiling avian beta-defensins in chicken oviduct epithelial cells before and after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE colonizes the ovary and oviduct of chickens without causing overt clinical signs which can lead to SE-contamination of the content and membrane of shell-eggs as well as hatchery eggs. The organism utilizes the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island-2 encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2 to promote persistence in the oviduct of laying hens. In this study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was carried out to determine the expression profiles of 14 known avian beta defensins (AvBDs in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC before and after infections with a wild type SE strain and T3SS mutant SE strains carrying an inactivated sipA or pipB gene. Results Based on the expression levels in uninfected COEC, AvBDs can be loosely grouped into three categories with AvBD4-5 and AvBD9-12 being constitutively expressed at high levels; AvBD1, AvBD3, and AvBD13-14 at moderate levels; and AvBD2 and AvBD6-8 at minimal levels. Infection with the wild type SE strain temporarily repressed certain highly expressed AvBDs and induced the expression of minimally expressed AvBDs. The pipB mutant, compared to the wild type strain, had reduced suppressive effect on the expression of highly expressed AvBDs. Moreover, the pipB mutant elicited significantly higher levels of the minimally expressed AvBDs than the wild type SE or the sipA mutant did. Conclusion Chicken oviduct epithelial cells express most of the known AvBD genes in response to SE infection. PipB, a T3SS-2 effector protein, plays a role in dampening the β-defensin arm of innate immunity during SE invasion of chicken oviduct epithelium.

  12. Transcriptional profiling avian beta-defensins in chicken oviduct epithelial cells before and after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebers, Katie L; Zhang, C Yan; Zhang, M Zhenyu; Bailey, R Hartford; Zhang, Shuping

    2009-07-30

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) colonizes the ovary and oviduct of chickens without causing overt clinical signs which can lead to SE-contamination of the content and membrane of shell-eggs as well as hatchery eggs. The organism utilizes the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island-2 encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2) to promote persistence in the oviduct of laying hens. In this study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out to determine the expression profiles of 14 known avian beta defensins (AvBDs) in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) before and after infections with a wild type SE strain and T3SS mutant SE strains carrying an inactivated sipA or pipB gene. Based on the expression levels in uninfected COEC, AvBDs can be loosely grouped into three categories with AvBD4-5 and AvBD9-12 being constitutively expressed at high levels; AvBD1, AvBD3, and AvBD13-14 at moderate levels; and AvBD2 and AvBD6-8 at minimal levels. Infection with the wild type SE strain temporarily repressed certain highly expressed AvBDs and induced the expression of minimally expressed AvBDs. The pipB mutant, compared to the wild type strain, had reduced suppressive effect on the expression of highly expressed AvBDs. Moreover, the pipB mutant elicited significantly higher levels of the minimally expressed AvBDs than the wild type SE or the sipA mutant did. Chicken oviduct epithelial cells express most of the known AvBD genes in response to SE infection. PipB, a T3SS-2 effector protein, plays a role in dampening the beta-defensin arm of innate immunity during SE invasion of chicken oviduct epithelium.

  13. Supporting cells eliminate dying sensory hair cells to maintain epithelial integrity in the avian inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jonathan E; Daudet, Nicolas; Warchol, Mark E; Gale, Jonathan E

    2010-09-15

    Epithelial homeostasis is essential for sensory transduction in the auditory and vestibular organs of the inner ear, but how it is maintained during trauma is poorly understood. To examine potential repair mechanisms, we expressed β-actin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the chick inner ear and used live-cell imaging to study how sensory epithelia responded during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell trauma. We found that glial-like supporting cells used two independent mechanisms to rapidly eliminate dying hair cells. Supporting cells assembled an actin cable at the luminal surface that extended around the pericuticular junction and constricted to excise the stereocilia bundle and cuticular plate from the hair cell soma. Hair bundle excision could occur within 3 min of actin-cable formation. After bundle excision, typically with a delay of up to 2-3 h, supporting cells engulfed and phagocytosed the remaining bundle-less hair cell. Dual-channel recordings with β-actin-EGFP and vital dyes revealed phagocytosis was concurrent with loss of hair cell integrity. We conclude that supporting cells repaired the epithelial barrier before hair cell plasmalemmal integrity was lost and that supporting cell activity was closely linked to hair cell death. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 did not prevent bundle excision but prolonged phagocytic engulfment and resulted in hair cell corpses accumulating within the epithelium. Our data show that supporting cells not only maintain epithelial integrity during trauma but suggest they may also be an integral part of the hair cell death process itself.

  14. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections of the avian lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoh, S. A.; Maina, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs. PMID:23193049

  15. CT of tracheal agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Newman, Beverley [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Pediatric Radiology; Afshani, Ehsan [Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, NY (United States). Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics; Bommaraju, Mahesh [Women' s and Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, Division of Neonatology, University Pediatrics Associates, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  16. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  17. Iatrogenic tracheal tear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dias, A

    2010-10-01

    Large post intubation tracheal tears are usually detected intra-operatively due to unstable signs namely impaired ventilation and mediastinal emphysema and often require surgical management. Smaller tracheal tears are often missed during anaesthesia and recognized during the postoperative period. Conservative management should be considered in these latter cases.

  18. Avian metapneumovirus in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States of America (USA), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes an upper respiratory tract infection in turkeys; no outbreaks have been reported in commercial chicken flocks. Typical clinical signs of the disease in turkey poults include coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, tracheal rale...

  19. Posterior tracheal diverticulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Das, Chandan J; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-10-01

    Multiple tracheal diverticulosis is a rare clinical entity. Tracheal diverticula are usually recognized radiologically as solitary right paratracheal air collections on thoracic computed tomography examination. They are usually asymptomatic but can occasionally present with persistent symptoms. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old male patient who underwent extensive evaluation for persistent cough. Multiple posterior right paratracheal air collections were recognized on thoracic multidetector computed tomography examination, which was confirmed as multiple-acquired posterior upper tracheal diverticula on flexible bronchoscopy. The patient improved with conservative medical management.

  20. Transmission of Avian Influenza Virus (H3N2) to Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Daesub; Kang, Bokyu; Lee, Chulseung; Jung, Kwonil; Ha, Gunwoo; Kang, Dongseok; Park, Seongjun; Park, Bongkyun

    2008-01-01

    In South Korea, where avian influenza virus subtypes H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, and H9N2 circulate or have been detected, 3 genetically similar canine influenza virus (H3N2) strains of avian origin (A/canine/Korea/01/2007, A/canine/Korea/02/2007, and A/canine/Korea/03/2007) were isolated from dogs exhibiting severe respiratory disease. To determine whether the novel canine influenza virus of avian origin was transmitted among dogs, we experimentally infected beagles with this influenza virus (H3N2) isolate. The beagles shed virus through nasal excretion, seroconverted, and became ill with severe necrotizing tracheobronchitis and bronchioalveolitis with accompanying clinical signs (e.g., high fever). Consistent with histologic observation of lung lesions, large amounts of avian influenza virus binding receptor (SAα 2,3-gal) were identified in canine tracheal, bronchial, and bronchiolar epithelial cells, which suggests potential for direct transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) from poultry to dogs. Our data provide evidence that dogs may play a role in interspecies transmission and spread of influenza virus. PMID:18439355

  1. Large-segment tracheal resection and interannular anastomosis with a tension-release technique in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, M J; Bojrab, M J

    1982-02-01

    Tracheal resection and anastomosis were done on 7 dogs, and a modified procedure to provide optimum first-intention healing, minimum connective tissue proliferation, and optimum epithelialization was used. To test the integrity of the technique at high incision-line tensile forces, 15 to 17 tracheal rings were excised. Excessive tracheal manipulation resulted in an increased amount of lamina propria and submucosa collagenous tissue, increased size and number of blood vessels, and increased leukocytic invasion. Criteria for a successful anastomosis were minimum postoperative coughing, good mucosal apposition and epithelialization, and tracheal lumen diameters that were at least 80% of the preoperative measurement.

  2. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  3. Influence of growth factors and medium composition on benzo[a]pyrene- and vitamin A-induced cell proliferation and differentiation in hamster tracheal epithelium in organ culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Ciotti, M.A.L.T.; Schoevers, E.J.; Roggeband, R.; Baan, R.A.; Feron, V.J.; Rutten, A.A.J.J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Tracheal organ cultures and isolated tracheal epithelial cells are frequently used to study effects of carcinogens and retinoids on both proliferation and differentiation of respiratory tract epithelial cells. For each of these in vitro models, optimal culture conditions have been established,

  4. Tracheal restoration in dogs with umbilical cord membrane of bovine preserved in glicerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mazzanty

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The viability of the use the bovine umbilical membrane preserved in 98% glycerin implanted in the cervical trachea was studied. Seven adult mongrel dogs, three males and four females weighting 6 to 14 kg, were used. After the usual anesthesia protocol and asseptic technique, three tracheal rings were partially removed for implantation of a segment of the umbilical membrane. The animals were observed during 30 days and then reoperated for macroscopic observations and for fragment collection for histological evaluation. It occurred a repair of the tracheal lesion, with formation of granulation tissue rich in collagen fibers linking the extremities of the tracheal cartilages. Epithelial migration over the tracheal surface was also seen. It is concluded that the segment of the bovine umbilical cord preserved in 98% glycerin can be used in the repair of tracheal defects. It offers a temporary support for granulation tissue formation and epithelization in the implanted area.

  5. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  6. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  7. Canine tracheal collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, S W

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal collapse occurs most commonly in middle-aged, small breed dogs. Clinical signs are usually proportional to the degree of collapse, ranging from mild airway irritation and paroxysmal coughing to respiratory distress and dyspnoea. Diagnosis is made by documenting dynamic airway collapse with radiographs, bronchoscopy or fluoroscopy. Most dogs respond well to medical management and treatment of any concurrent comorbidities. Surgical intervention may need to be considered in dogs that do not respond or have respiratory compromise. A variety of surgical techniques have been reported although extraluminal ring prostheses or intraluminal stenting are the most commonly used. Both techniques have numerous potential complications and require specialised training and experience but are associated with good short- and long-term outcomes. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  9. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  10. CYP1B1, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in the Etiology of Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Using an Avian Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hales, Dale B

    2007-01-01

    .... Research in ovarian cancer has been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models. With the exception of the laying hen, no other animal gets ovarian epithelial cancer analogous to the human disease...

  11. Changes in neuroreceptor funtion of tracheal smooth muscle following acute ozone exposure of guinea pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, H.J.M.; Voss, H.P.; Kramer, K.; Boere, A.J.F.; Dormans, J.A.M.A.; van Bree, L.; Bast, A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effect of in vivo ozone inhalation (3 ppm, 2 h) on neuroreceptor function in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle in vitro and the role of the epithelial layer in this process. Changes in smooth muscle tension after stimulation of the muscarinic- and β-adrenergic receptor were recorded

  12. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersain A. Reyes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds’ amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63 breaths-per-minute (bpm for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57 bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  13. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis. (a) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a silicone...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian Metapneumovirus Subtype A Strain Isolated from Chicken (Gallus gallus) in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rizotto, La?s S.; Scagion, Guilherme P.; Cardoso, Tereza C.; Sim?o, Raphael M.; Caserta, Leonardo C.; Benassi, Julia C.; Keid, Lara B.; Oliveira, Tr?cia M. F. de S.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Arns, Clarice W.; Van Borm, Steven; Ferreira, Helena L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequence of an avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) isolated from a tracheal tissue sample of a commercial layer flock. The complete genome sequence of aMPV-A/chicken/Brazil-SP/669/2003 was obtained using MiSeq (Illumina, Inc.) sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome classified the isolate as avian metapneumovirus subtype A.

  15. Double-chamber rotating bioreactor for dynamic perfusion cell seeding of large-segment tracheal allografts: comparison to conventional static methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykal, Siba; Salna, Michael; Zhou, Yingzhe; Marcus, Paula; Fatehi, Mostafa; Frost, Geoff; Machuca, Tiago; Hofer, Stefan O P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2014-08-01

    Tracheal transplantation with a long-segment recellularized tracheal allograft has previously been performed without the need for immunosuppressive therapy. Recipients' mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and tracheal epithelial cells (TEC) were harvested, cultured, expanded, and seeded on a donor trachea within a bioreactor. Prior techniques used for cellular seeding have involved only static-seeding methods. Here, we describe a novel bioreactor for recellularization of long-segment tracheae. Tracheae were recellularized with epithelial cells on the luminal surface and bone marrow-derived MSC on the external surface. We used dynamic perfusion seeding for both cell types and demonstrate an increase in both cellular counts and homogeneity scores compared with traditional methods. Despite these improvements, orthotopic transplantation of these scaffolds revealed no labeled cells at postoperative day 3 and lack of re-epithelialization within the first 2 weeks. The animals in this study had postoperative respiratory distress and tracheal collapse that was incompatible with life.

  16. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  17. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  18. Tracheal agenesis, a frightening scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, H; West, K; Bewick, J; Wickstead, M

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses three cases of tracheal agenesis that presented within a six-week period to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. By reviewing the available literature on tracheal agenesis, the report aims to outline a protocol for future prenatal and postnatal management. A case series and a literature review. Three cases of tracheal agenesis presented in the classical manner, with respiratory distress and unsuccessful intubation following delivery. A literature review confirmed that prenatal diagnosis requires future innovation; survival is rare and is predominately reliant on intubation of the oesophagus when a patent tracheoesophageal fistula is present. In most cases, tracheal agenesis represents part of the 'VATER' association: vertebral defects, anal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula with oesophageal atresia, and radial or renal dysplasia. Complex, multiple-stage surgical procedures have been described; however, no survival to adolescence is documented. There is a call for improved prenatal diagnosis to allow both adequate counselling of parents and preparation for multi-specialty management at delivery. In addition, these cases highlight the ongoing need for improved congenital anomaly data within the UK, with currently only 49 per cent of England's births being registered.

  19. Transcrition factor c-Myb is involved in the regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the avian neural crest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karafiát, Vít; Dvořáková, Marta; Krejčí, E.; Králová, Jarmila; Pajer, Petr; Šnajdr, P.; Mandíková, Sonja; Bartůněk, Petr; Grim, M.; Dvořák, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 21 (2005), s. 2516-2525 ISSN 1420-682X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/0463; GA AV ČR IAA5052309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : c-myb gene * epithelial-mesenchymal transition * neural crest Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.582, year: 2005

  20. Avian Metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is an economically important virus that is the primary causal agent of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT), also known as avian rhinotracheitis (ART). The virus causes an acute highly contagious infection of the upper respiratory tract in turkeys and was first isolated from tur...

  1. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoosh Farhad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. Methods We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Results Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Conclusion Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis

  2. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosh, Farhad; Hodjati, Hossain; Dehghani, Seifollah; Tanideh, Nader; Kumar, Perikala V

    2009-06-09

    Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis.

  3. Tracheal stoma necrosis: a case repor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute tracheal dilatation, due to an overinflated cuff, has been reported early in the course of mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube. Tracheal stoma necrosis is a rare complication, but such can accompany acute tracheal dilation. Herein, we report a case of tracheal necrosis 9 days following tracheostomy placement in a 71-year old woman associated with overinflation of the tracheal tube cuff. This case report aims to 1 add to the scant body of knowledge about the diagnosis and management for the patients with tracheal stoma necrosis and 2 raise awareness for error-traps in interpreting diagnostic images, specifically satisfaction of search error, inattentional blindness error, and alliterative error.

  4. on Guinea Pig Tracheal Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Keyhanmanesh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: In regard to the high incidence of asthma and the side-effects of the drugs used, finding novel treatments for this disease is necessary. Our previous studies demonstrated the preventive effect of Nigella sativa extract on ovalbumin-induced asthma. In addition, water-soluble substances of N. sativa extract and methanol fraction of this plant were responsible for the relaxant effect of this plant on tracheal chains of guinea pigs. Therefore, for the first time, in the present study, in order to identify main constituents of the methanolic extract, the relaxant effects of five different methanolic fractions (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of N. sativa   on tracheal chains of guinea pigs were examined.     Materials and Methods:     The relaxant effects of four cumulative concentrations of each fraction (0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 g% in comparison with saline as negative control and four cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mM were examined by their relaxant effects on precontracted tracheal chains of guinea pig by 60 mM KCl (group 1 and 10 μM methacholine (group 2.     Results: In group 1, all concentrations of only theophylline showed significant relaxant effects but all concentrations of these methanolic fractions showed significant contractile effects compared with that of saline (P

  5. Avian Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) generate new individuals through differentiation, maturation and fertilization. This means that the manipulation of PGCs is directly linked to the manipulation of individuals, making PGCs attractive target cells in the animal biotechnology field. A unique biological property of avian PGCs is that they circulate temporarily in the vasculature during early development, and this allows us to access and manipulate avian germ lines. Following the development of a technique for transplantation, PGCs have become central to avian biotechnology, in contrast to the use of embryo manipulation and subsequent transfer to foster mothers, as in mammalian biotechnology. Today, avian PGC transplantation combined with recent advanced manipulation techniques, including cell purification, cryopreservation, depletion, and long-term culture in vitro, have enabled the establishment of genetically modified poultry lines and ex-situ conservation of poultry genetic resources. This chapter introduces the principles, history, and procedures of producing avian germline chimeras by transplantation of PGCs, and the current status of avian germline modification as well as germplasm cryopreservation. Other fundamental avian reproductive technologies are described, including artificial insemination and embryo culture, and perspectives of industrial applications in agriculture and pharmacy are considered, including poultry productivity improvement, egg modification, disease resistance impairment and poultry gene "pharming" as well as gene banking.

  6. Activation of type I and III interferon signalling pathways occurs in lung epithelial cells infected with low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutejo

    Full Text Available The host response to the low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI H5N2, H5N3 and H9N2 viruses were examined in A549, MDCK, and CEF cells using a systems-based approach. The H5N2 and H5N3 viruses replicated efficiently in A549 and MDCK cells, while the H9N2 virus replicated least efficiently in these cell types. However, all LPAI viruses exhibited similar and higher replication efficiencies in CEF cells. A comparison of the host responses of these viruses and the H1N1/WSN virus and low passage pH1N1 clinical isolates was performed in A549 cells. The H9N2 and H5N2 virus subtypes exhibited a robust induction of Type I and Type III interferon (IFN expression, sustained STAT1 activation from between 3 and 6 hpi, which correlated with large increases in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression by 10 hpi. In contrast, cells infected with the pH1N1 or H1N1/WSN virus showed only small increases in Type III IFN signalling, low levels of ISG expression, and down-regulated expression of the IFN type I receptor. JNK activation and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic XAF1 protein was observed in A549 cells infected with all viruses except the H1N1/WSN virus, while MAPK p38 activation was only observed in cells infected with the pH1N1 and the H5 virus subtypes. No IFN expression and low ISG expression levels were generally observed in CEF cells infected with either AIV, while increased IFN and ISG expression was observed in response to the H1N1/WSN infection. These data suggest differences in the replication characteristics and antivirus signalling responses both among the different LPAI viruses, and between these viruses and the H1N1 viruses examined. These virus-specific differences in host cell signalling highlight the importance of examining the host response to avian influenza viruses that have not been extensively adapted to mammalian tissue culture.

  7. Anesthesia for tracheal resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Chhangani, Sanjeev V; Alfille, Paul H

    2012-12-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) is the treatment of choice for most patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheal tumors. Anesthesia for TRR offers distinct challenges, especially for the less experienced practitioner. This article explores the preoperative assessment, strategies for induction and emergence from anesthesia, the essential coordination between the surgical and anesthesia teams during airway excision and anastomosis, and postoperative care. The most common complications are reviewed. Targeted readership is practitioners with less extensive experience in managing airway surgery cases. As such, the article focuses first on the most common proximal tracheal resection. Final sections discuss specific considerations for more complicated cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop flu-like symptoms within 10 days of handling infected birds or being in an area with ... your provider if you become sick after you return from your trip. Current information regarding avian flu ...

  9. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodjati Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. Methods: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. Results: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Conclusion: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  10. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodjati, Hossein; Baezzat, Saeed Reza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Tanideh, Nader; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  11. Avian Flu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  12. Evidence that CFTR is expressed in rat tracheal smooth muscle cells and contributes to bronchodilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mettey Yvette

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway functions are profoundly affected in many diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cystic fibrosis (CF. CF the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease is caused by mutations of the CFTR gene, which normally encodes a multifunctional and integral membrane protein, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR expressed in airway epithelial cells. Methods To demonstrate that CFTR is also expressed in tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMC, we used iodide efflux assay to analyse the chloride transports in organ culture of rat TSMC, immunofluorescence study to localize CFTR proteins and isometric contraction measurement on isolated tracheal rings to observe the implication of CFTR in the bronchodilation. Results We characterized three different pathways stimulated by the cAMP agonist forskolin and the isoflavone agent genistein, by the calcium ionophore A23187 and by hypo-osmotic challenge. The pharmacology of the cAMP-dependent iodide efflux was investigated in detail. We demonstrated in rat TSMC that it is remarkably similar to that of the epithelial CFTR, both for activation (using three benzo [c]quinolizinium derivatives and for inhibition (glibenclamide, DPC and CFTRinh-172. Using rat tracheal rings, we observed that the activation of CFTR by benzoquinolizinium derivatives in TSMC leads to CFTRinh-172-sensitive bronchodilation after constriction with carbachol. An immunolocalisation study confirmed expression of CFTR in tracheal myocytes. Conclusion Altogether, these observations revealed that CFTR in the airways of rat is expressed not only in the epithelial cells but also in tracheal smooth muscle cells leading to the hypothesis that this ionic channel could contribute to bronchodilation.

  13. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, H; Mostafa, A M; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, A A; El-Bawab, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13-77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0-45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7-21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres.

  14. Avian influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon; Bicout, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Previous introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) to the EU were most likely via migratory wild birds. A mathematical model has been developed which indicated that virus amplification and spread may take place when wild bird populations of sufficient size within EU become...... infected. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) may reach similar maximum prevalence levels in wild bird populations to HPAIV but the risk of LPAIV infection of a poultry holding was estimated to be lower than that of HPAIV. Only few non-wild bird pathways were identified having a non...

  15. Conservative management of iatrogenic tracheal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Rade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The difficulties during airway management can lead to iatrogenic tracheal injury. Conservative and surgical treatments are possible treatments. We present the case of a patient with iatrogenic tracheal injury treated conservatively. Case report: 55 years old female patient was transferred to our intensive care unit from a regional health center. Edema compromised airway as a consequence of anaphylactic shock was difficult to establish. Three days after tracheal injury the patient was transported to our institution. At admission, patient was under sedation with trachea intubated with tracheal tube and mechanically ventilated. Physical examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema in the region of head, neck, chest and upper extremities. Multi slice computerized tomography and tracheo-bronchoscopic exploration revealed longitudinal gap localized at posterior wall of the trachea, approximately 5 cm long, with distal end 1.5 cm above the tracheal carina. Tracheal split was completely closed after 13 days. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 22 days. Conclusion: Iatrogenic tracheal injury can be treated successfully using conservative measures after appropriate patient assessment and treatment planning. .

  16. Tracheal resection and anastomosis after traumatic tracheal stenosis in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy P; Hawkes, Claire S; Dixon, Padraic M

    2015-02-01

    To report a resection and anastomosis technique to treat trauma-induced tracheal stenosis. Case report. A 9-year-old Warmblood gelding. Endoscopy, radiography, and ultrasonography were used to diagnose a single ring tracheal stenosis; the stenotic region was resected and adjacent tracheal rings anastomosed with an end-to-end technique. The anastomosis healed completely despite formation of a unilateral partial mucosal stenosis "web," which was subsequently removed by transendoscopic laser surgery. During tracheal anastomosis, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was damaged, causing laryngeal hemiplegia, later treated successfully by laryngoplasty. The horse returned to its previous level of work. This tracheal resection and anastomosis technique successfully provided the horse with a large tracheal lumen, and despite major complications, allowed a return to full athletic work. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Cellular distribution and function of ion channels involved in transport processes in rat tracheal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Anne; Faulhaber, Johannes; Srisawang, Lalita; Stortz, Andreas; Salomon, Johanna J; Mall, Marcus A; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Transport of water and electrolytes in airway epithelia involves chloride-selective ion channels, which are controlled either by cytosolic Ca 2+ or by cAMP The contributions of the two pathways to chloride transport differ among vertebrate species. Because rats are becoming more important as animal model for cystic fibrosis, we have examined how Ca 2+ - dependent and cAMP- dependent Cl - secretion is organized in the rat tracheal epithelium. We examined the expression of the Ca 2+ -gated Cl - channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1), the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl - channel, the epithelial Na + channel ENaC, and the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in rat tracheal epithelium. The contribution of ANO1 channels to nucleotide-stimulated Cl - secretion was determined using the channel blocker Ani9 in short-circuit current recordings obtained from primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells in Ussing chambers. We found that ANO1, CFTR and AQP5 proteins were expressed in nonciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium, whereas ENaC was expressed in ciliated cells. Among nonciliated cells, ANO1 occurred together with CFTR and Muc5b and, in addition, in a different cell type without CFTR and Muc5b. Bioelectrical studies with the ANO1-blocker Ani9 indicated that ANO1 mediated the secretory response to the nucleotide uridine-5'-triphosphate. Our data demonstrate that, in rat tracheal epithelium, Cl - secretion and Na + absorption are routed through different cell types, and that ANO1 channels form the molecular basis of Ca 2+ -dependent Cl - secretion in this tissue. These characteristic features of Cl - -dependent secretion reveal similarities and distinct differences to secretory processes in human airways. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  18. Tracheal and laryngeal tumors in the dog and cat: literature review and 13 additional patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlisle, C.H.; Biery, D.N.; Thrall, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Primary tumors of the larynx or trachea are uncommon in the dog and cat. In a review of the English language literature, description of 65 such patients were found. In a search of the Veterinary Teaching Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania and North Carolina State University, an additional 13 previously unreported patients were identified, bringing the total to at least 78. Of these 78, there have been 16 canine tracheal, 7 feline tracheal, 34 canine laryngeal and 21 feline laryngeal tumors. In the canine and feline trachea, osteochondroma and epithelial malignancies, respectively, appear to be the most common. Epithelial malignancies appear to be the most common tumor of the canine larynx whereas lymphosarcoma appears to be the most common feline laryngeal tumor. In patients described herein, tumors produced clinical signs consistent with airway obstruction. Voice alteration was common in patients with laryngeal tumors. Patients were middle-aged to older, except for dogs with osteochondroma. This compares favorably to historical data. All tumors in this study were readily seen radiographically, with most laryngeal and tracheal tumors appearing as masses within the lumen of the airway. Mineralization was uncommon except for canine osteochondromas. Feline laryngeal tumors in this study appeared as generalized laryngeal thickening rather than as a distinct mass. Response of canine and feline tracheal and laryngeal thickening rather than as a distinct mass. Response of canine and feline tracheal and laryngeal tumors to treatment can not be adequately assessed from available data. Benign tumors of the larynx or trachea may be amenable to complete excision. Neoplastic lesions must be differentiated from polyps or abscesses within the upper airway as these may appear radiographically identical to primary tumors. This can be achieved by endoscopic evaluation and biopsy of airway masses before formulating a prognosis

  19. Avian Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  20. Avian cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian cholera is a contagious disease resulting from infection by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida. Several subspecies of bacteria have been proposed for P. multocida, and at least 16 different P. multocida serotypes or characteristics of antigens in bacterial cells that differentiate bacterial variants from each other have been recognized. The serotypes are further differentiated by other methods, including DNA fingerprinting. These evaluations are useful for studying the ecology of avian cholera (Fig. 7.1), because different serotypes are generally found in poultry and free-ranging migratory birds. These evaluations also show that different P. multocida serotypes are found in wild birds in the eastern United States than those that are found in the birds in the rest of the Nation (Fig. 7.2).

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian Metapneumovirus Subtype A Strain Isolated from Chicken (Gallus gallus) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizotto, Laís S; Scagion, Guilherme P; Cardoso, Tereza C; Simão, Raphael M; Caserta, Leonardo C; Benassi, Julia C; Keid, Lara B; Oliveira, Trícia M F de S; Soares, Rodrigo M; Arns, Clarice W; Van Borm, Steven; Ferreira, Helena L

    2017-07-20

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) isolated from a tracheal tissue sample of a commercial layer flock. The complete genome sequence of aMPV-A/chicken/Brazil-SP/669/2003 was obtained using MiSeq (Illumina, Inc.) sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome classified the isolate as avian metapneumovirus subtype A. Copyright © 2017 Rizotto et al.

  2. Effects of successive tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Souza, Carlos Henrique; Reinero, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of successive large-segment tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs. ANIMALS 5 adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Right lateral radiographs were obtained for all dogs and used to measure tracheal length. Dogs were then euthanized, and successive segmental tracheal resections (intervals of 10% from 20% to 50% of the tracheal length), each of which was followed by anastomosis, were performed in each cadaver. Tracheobronchoscopy was performed before the first tracheal resection and after each of the anastomoses to evaluate tracheal diameter and changes in position of lobar bronchi. RESULTS Tracheal diameter was minimally affected by resections up to 50% of the tracheal length. Diameter of the trachea and position of bronchi were not affected by resection of 20% of the tracheal length. Changes in the position of various lobar bronchi were detected after resection of 30% of the tracheal length. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINCIAL RELEVANCE In this study, tracheal resections of 20% of the tracheal length were accommodated, possibly as a result of stretching of the annular ligament. Resections of ≥ 30% of the tracheal length altered the position of lobar bronchi. Clinical effects, if any, attributable to these changes in bronchial position remain to be elucidated.

  3. Evaluation of tracheal bronchus in Chinese children using multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Zhu; Lin, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Tracheal bronchus is a congenital bronchial anomaly. The diagnosis should be considered early in intubated patients. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the newest modality for evaluating tracheal bronchus. To evaluate the utility of 16-slice MDCT in children with tracheal bronchus and to characterize the frequency of tracheal bronchus in children with congenital heart disease. From June 2005 to May 2007, 3,187 consecutive children (1,124 with congenital heart disease and 2,063 without congenital heart disease) underwent MDCT examination. Minimum-intensity projection reconstruction was performed to show the tracheobronchial tree in every case. Tracheal bronchus was found in 42 children (3.74%) with congenital heart disease but in only 6 children (0.29%) without congenital heart disease. Among the 48 children with tracheal bronchus, 45 had right-side tracheal bronchus and 3 had bilateral tracheal bronchi with heterotaxy syndrome. The diagnostic sensitivity of MDCT was 100% (48/48). MDCT is a reliable imaging technique for the diagnosis of tracheal bronchus. Our data showed that right-side tracheal bronchus was more common and bilateral tracheal bronchi usually occurred with heterotaxy syndrome. In addition, tracheal bronchus often occurred with congenital heart disease. The angle between the tracheal bronchus and the trachea is important and should be measured. (orig.)

  4. Biocompatibility of a new device of self-expandable covered and non-covered tracheal stent: comparative study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Ribeiro Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the compatibility of a new model of self-expandable tracheal stent in rats. METHODS: A new device of polyurethane covered and non - covered stent was placed in the trachea of Wistar rats. Animals were distributed in two groups: the polyurethane covered and non-covered group. Macroscopic parameters included position within the tracheal lumen, adherence to the mucosa, degree of dilatation, permeability and internal diameter. Microscopic findings evaluated were: incorporation, inflammatory activity, granulation tissue and epithelial revetment injuries. The observation follow-up was six weeks. All parameters were quantified based on determined score values. Incorporation of the stents was evaluated based on the observation if the stent was fixed into the trachea or if it could be removed. Degree of dilatation was performed by external diameter measurements. Granulation tissue was evaluated by measurements of height of the tissue growing into the tracheal lumen. RESULTS: 100% of non-covered stents had total attachment to mucosa and 100% of polyurethane covered type had adherence only. Regarding dilatation, granulation tissue, inflammatory activity and internal diameter measurements, there were no significant differences between the groups. Pathological tracheal wall injuries were present in both groups. CONCLUSION: Both models of stent demonstrated biocompatibility with the trachea. Rats are suitable for an experimental model of tracheal stent study.

  5. Avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza, or “bird flu”, is a contagious disease of animals which crossed the species barrier to infect humans and gave a quite impact on public health in the world since 2004, especially due to the threat of pandemic situation. Until 1st March 2006, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in seven countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Iraq and Turkey with a total of 174 cases and 94 dead (54.02%. Indonesia has 27 cases, 20 were dead (74.07%. AI cases in Indonesia are more in male (62.5% and all have a symptom of fever. An influenza pandemic is a rare but recurrent event. An influenza pandemic happens when a new subtype emerges that has not previously circulated in humans. For this reason, avian H5N1 is a strain with pandemic potential, since it might ultimately adapt into a strain that is contagious among humans. Impact of the pandemic could include high rates of illness and worker absenteeism are expected, and these will contribute to social and economic disruption. Historically, the number of deaths during a pandemic has varied greatly. Death rates are largely determined by four factors: the number of people who become infected, the virulence of the virus, the underlying characteristics and vulnerability of affected populations, and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Accurate predictions of mortality cannot be made before the pandemic virus emerges and begins to spread. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:125-8Keywords: Avian Influenza, Pandemic

  6. [Segmental tracheal resection and anastomosis for the treatment of cicatricial stenosis in cervical tracheal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, P C; Luo, J S; Liu, Z; Bian, K; Guo, Z H; Ma, R N

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis for cicatricial cervical tracheal stenosis. The clinical outcomes of 40 patients treated with tracheal resection were retrospectively reviewed. There were 28 male patients and 12 female patients with the age ranged from 6 to 64 years (mean 33.7 years). The degree of stenosis was classified according to Myer-Cotton classification as follows: grade Ⅱ (n=7), grade Ⅲ (n=22) and grade Ⅳ (n=11). The stenosis extension ranged from 1.0 to 4.3 cm (mean 2.5 cm). The causes of the stenosis were postintubation (n=33), cervical trauma (n=6) and resection of tracheal neoplasm (n=1). Thirty-four(85.0%) patients were decannulated and 6 failed. Of the 6 patients failed, 4 were decannulated after reoperation with the sternohyoid myocutaneous flap or thyroid alar cartilage graft. Complications occurred in 10 patients. In 8 patients granulation tissues formed at the site of the tracheal anastomosis, which needed endoscopic resction, and in 2 patients anastomosic dehiscence occurred. No injury to recurrent laryngeal nerve or trachoesophageal fistula occurred. Segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis is an effective surgical method for tracheal stenosis, which has a higher successful rate for primary operation and shorter therapeutic period.

  7. [An experimental study on SIS in reconstruction of tracheal defect in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangping; Xiang, Zhou; Yang, Zhiming; Liang, Xingang; Li, Xiuqun; Xie, Huiqi; Deng, Li

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of polypropylene mesh (PPM) coated with SIS to reconstruct tracheal defect and the efficiency of SIS in improving epithelialization of the reconstructed trachea and reducing the postoperative complications. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were chosen and divided randomly into 2 groups: PPM reconstruction group (n=6) and SIS-PPM reconstruction group (n=6). A tracheal full defect with a size of 1.2 cm x 0.6 cm was created. A PPM coated with SIS of 1.4 cm x 0.8 cm was inserted to the defect in SIS-PPM reconstruction group, pure PPM of 1.4 cm x 0.8 cm in PPM reconstruction group. Complications such as death, local inflammation, tracheal stenosis and subcutaneous emphysema were documented. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, tracheal histological examination and SEM examination were performed. In SIS-PPM reconstruction group, all animals survived at the end of the experiment, no infection, subcutaneous emphysema and breathing difficulties occurred. In PPM reconstruction group, there was 2 deaths because of infection of lumina and suffocation after 6 and 18 days of implantation; all rabbits had local subcutaneous emphysema. The histological examination showed that there was no obvious granulation tissue and scar in two groups and that the mucous membrane and cilia grew more normally in SIS-PPM reconstruction group than in PPM reconstruction group. SEM observation: At 8 weeks after implantation, most of the reconstructed area of the trachea in SIS-PPM reconstruction group was covered by relatively mature cilia; the corresponding area in PPM reconstruction group was covered by the naive cilia. At 12 weeks after implantation, the cilia in SIS-PPM reconstruction group grew orderly without obvious secretion adherence; while the cilia in PPM reconstruction group grew in a disorderly manner and were attached by an abundance of secretion. Good epithelial regeneration can be achieved after repair of tracheal defect using PPM coated with SIS. SIS can promote

  8. MDCT Findings of Tracheal Agenesis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jee Eun; Son, Dong Woo; Kim, Ha Na; Hwang, Hee Young [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly with fatal consequences. We report a case of tracheal agenesis in a newborn infant who presented with no self-respiration and cyanosis that was confirmed by the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction images clearly delineated the aberrant anatomy of tracheal agenesis and demonstrated the presence of a tracheoesophageal fistula.

  9. MDCT Findings of Tracheal Agenesis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jee Eun; Son, Dong Woo; Kim, Ha Na; Hwang, Hee Young

    2009-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly with fatal consequences. We report a case of tracheal agenesis in a newborn infant who presented with no self-respiration and cyanosis that was confirmed by the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction images clearly delineated the aberrant anatomy of tracheal agenesis and demonstrated the presence of a tracheoesophageal fistula

  10. Tracheal Configuration as a Radiographic Predictor of Difficult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Goiters producing tracheal deviation or tracheal narrowing (TN) or both may cause difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). This study is to determine whether pre-operative assessment of trachea on neck radiograph can serve to predict DTI in goiters. Methods: Pre- thyroidectomy radiographs of 160 patients were ...

  11. Tracheal resection for laryngotracheal stenosis: A retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laryngotracheal stenosis develops when scar tissue forms in the trachea and, rarely, in the larynx itself. Symptoms depend on the degree of airway obstruction and can range from asymptomatic to upper airway obstruction severe enough to cause death. We report on 21 patients who underwent tracheal resection for severe ...

  12. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  13. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Subtypes Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People Related Links Research Glossary of Influenza (Flu) Terms ...

  14. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  15. Avian Influenza in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... However, some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Top of Page Avian Influenza in Wild Birds Avian influenza A viruses have ... hours. Some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Avian influenza outbreaks are of concern in domesticated birds for ...

  16. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  17. SIS with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages patch tracheoplasty in a rabbit model for tracheal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longfang; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Pengcheng; Zhao, Daqing; Chen, Wenxian

    2007-06-01

    In the rabbit model, small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compounded with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages appeared to be an efficacious method for the patch repair of partial circumferential tracheal defects instead of autologous grafts. SIS appears to be a safe and promising means of facilitating neovascularization and tissue regeneration. The long-term use of SIS and tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages warrants further investigation. Tracheal defect reparation remains a challenging surgical problem that can require reconstruction using autologous grafts or artificial stents. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of SIS, a biocompatible, acellular matrix, compounded with different tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages, in the repair of a critical-size tracheal defect. A full-thickness defect (4 x 8 mm) was created in tracheal rings four to six in adult rabbits. A piece of 8-ply SIS sandwiched in thyroid cartilage, auricular cartilage, or without cartilage, respectively (designated experiment 1, 2, or 3, respectively), was sutured to the edges of the defect with interrupted 4-0 polypropylene sutures. In control animals, the defect was closed with lamina praetrachealis. All animals were followed until signs of dyspnea became apparent or for 4 or 12 weeks. After follow-up and euthanasia, the trachea was harvested and prepared for histologic evaluation using conventional techniques. All animals tolerated the procedure well but two animals in group 1 (n=5), three in group 2 (n=5), and one in group 3 (n=5) had stridor after operation and expired within 1 month. Histologically, neovascularization of the patch was noted with moderate inflammation. The surface of the SIS patch was covered with a lining of ciliated epithelial cells. The tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages degraded to some extent.

  18. Medical image of the week: tracheal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 45 year old Caucasian man with a history of HIV/AIDS was admitted for septic shock secondary to right lower lobe community acquired pneumonia. The patient’s respiratory status continued to decline requiring emergency intubation in a non-ICU setting. Four laryngoscope intubation attempts were made including an inadvertent esophageal intubation. Subsequent CT imaging revealed a tracheal defect (Figure 1, red arrow with communication to the mediastinum and air around the trachea consistent with pneumomediastinum (Figure 2, orange arrow and figure 3, yellow arrow. Pneumopericardium (figure 4, blue arrow was also evident post-intubation. The patient’s hemodynamic status remained stable. Two days following respiratory intubation subsequent chest imaging revealed resolution of the pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium and patient continued to do well without hemodynamic compromise or presence of subcutaneous emphysema. Post-intubation tracheal perforation is a rare complication of traumatic intubation and may be managed with surgical intervention or conservative treatment (1.

  19. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musah Sadiatu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine is a widely used toxic compound that is considered a chemical threat agent. Chlorine inhalation injures airway epithelial cells, leading to pulmonary abnormalities. Efficient repair of injured epithelium is necessary to restore normal lung structure and function. The objective of the current study was to characterize repair of the tracheal epithelium after acute chlorine injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to chlorine and injected with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU to label proliferating cells prior to sacrifice and collection of tracheas on days 2, 4, 7, and 10 after exposure. Airway repair and restoration of a differentiated epithelium were examined by co-localization of EdU labeling with markers for the three major tracheal epithelial cell types [keratin 5 (K5 and keratin 14 (K14 for basal cells, Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP for Clara cells, and acetylated tubulin (AcTub for ciliated cells]. Morphometric analysis was used to measure proliferation and restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium. Results Epithelial repair was fastest and most extensive in proximal trachea compared with middle and distal trachea. In unexposed mice, cell proliferation was minimal, all basal cells expressed K5, and K14-expressing basal cells were absent from most sections. Chlorine exposure resulted in the sloughing of Clara and ciliated cells from the tracheal epithelium. Two to four days after chlorine exposure, cell proliferation occurred in K5- and K14-expressing basal cells, and the number of K14 cells was dramatically increased. In the period of peak cell proliferation, few if any ciliated or Clara cells were detected in repairing trachea. Expression of ciliated and Clara cell markers was detected at later times (days 7–10, but cell proliferation was not detected in areas in which these differentiated markers were re-expressed. Fibrotic lesions were observed at days 7–10 primarily in distal trachea. Conclusion

  20. Tracheal Constriction In A Growing Dog

    OpenAIRE

    DeArmond, Christina; Niimura del Barrio, Maria Chie; Rosati, Tomasso; McAllister, Hester; Ryan, John

    2017-01-01

    A six-month-old castrated male German Shepherd/Husky cross was presented for investigation of a progressive dyspnoea and regurgitation. A circumferential cervical wound had been identified and closed following debridement by the primary care veterinarian when the dog was three months old. There was an extraluminal tracheal compression on radiographs. Surgical exploration revealed a plastic band tied and embedded in the dorsal musculature of the neck. The band had been increasingly constrictin...

  1. Avian colibacillosis caused by an intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate from calf diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kiku; Chaudhari, Atul A; Lee, John Hwa

    2010-10-01

    An intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate from calf diarrhea, containing the iutA, f17A, afa-8D, and cnf2 genes, was able to cause avian colibacillosis after experimental infection in chickens. Intra-tracheal inoculation and spray of this strain caused 10% of mortality and gross lesions, including airsacculitis, pericarditis, and perihepatitis. These results suggest that some bovine pathogenic E. coli can cause extra-intestinal infections in other animal species. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:27853078

  3. Effects of irradiation on canine tracheal epithelium: a physiological and morphological correlate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, S.F.; Logus, J.W.; Mok, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Ahmed, I.H.; Man, G.C.; Hulbert, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    We delivered 20 Gy irradiation in one fraction to a 6 cm segment of trachea in 11 dogs. Tracheal mucous transport was studied before and whenever possible at weekly intervals after irradiation using a gamma camera system and /sup 99m/technetium labeled sulfur colloid. Ten of the eleven animals were sacrificed at three different time intervals (1-2, 15-16 and 30-34 weeks) post-irradiation, and the tracheal epithelium removed for studies using Ussing chambers followed by preparation for microscopic analysis. Mucous transport along the length of the trachea was normal before irradiation, but following irradiation it became abnormal in the irradiated zone. Compared to the epithelium from the cranial and caudal segments, the irradiated epithelium had similar bioelectric measurements (potential difference, short-circuit current and resistance) and mannitol permeability. Also, the changes in the bioelectric measurements following indomethacin (10(-6) M) and epinephrine (10(-6) M) used sequentially, were similar in both the control and irradiated tissues. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the irradiated zone revealed patches of nonciliated epithelial cells among the ciliates. We conclude that irradiation caused a persistent replacement of ciliated cells with nonciliates throughout the entire study period and that this alteration impaired mucous transport but did not affect epithelial ion secretion or barrier function

  4. Influenza A infection attenuates relaxation responses of mouse tracheal smooth muscle evoked by acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Esther Y; Mann, Tracy S; Burcham, Philip C; Henry, Peter J

    2015-02-15

    The airway epithelium is an important source of relaxant mediators, and damage to the epithelium caused by respiratory tract viruses may contribute to airway hyperreactivity. The aim of this study was to determine whether influenza A-induced epithelial damage would modulate relaxation responses evoked by acrolein, a toxic and prevalent component of smoke. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with influenza A/PR-8/34 (VIRUS-infected) or allantoic fluid (SHAM-infected). On day 4 post-inoculation, isometric tension recording studies were conducted on carbachol pre-contracted tracheal segments isolated from VIRUS and SHAM mice. Relaxant responses to acrolein (30 μM) were markedly smaller in VIRUS segments compared to SHAM segments (2 ± 1% relaxation vs. 28 ± 5%, n=14, pacrolein and SP were reduced in VIRUS segments (>35% reduction, n=6, pacrolein were profoundly diminished in tracheal segments isolated from influenza A-infected mice. The mechanism through which influenza A infection attenuates this response appears to involve reduced production of PGE2 in response to SP due to epithelial cell loss, and may provide insight into the airway hyperreactivity observed with influenza A infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mast cells present protrusions into blood vessels upon tracheal allergen challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oishee Bose

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MC and myeloid dendritic cells (DC act proximally in detecting and processing antigens and immune insults. We sought to understand their comparative dynamic behavior with respect to the airway epithelium in the steady state and in response to an allergic stimulus in mouse trachea. We devised methods to label MC in living trachea and to demonstrate that MC and DC occupy distinct layers of the tracheal mucosa, with DC being closer to the lumen. DC numbers doubled after allergen challenge, but MC numbers remained stable. MC and DC migrated minimally in either steady state or allergen-challenge conditions, and their interactions with one another appeared to be stochastic and relatively infrequent. While DC, unlike MC, exhibited probing behaviors involving dendrites, these projections did not cross the epithelium into the airway lumen. MC typically were located too far from the epithelial surface to contact the tracheal lumen. However, MC had protrusions toward and into blood vessels, likely to load with IgE. Thus, DC and MC occupy distinct niches and engage in sessile surveillance in the mouse trachea. Little or no access of these cell types to the airway lumen suggests that trans-epithelial transport of proteins in the steady state would be required for them to access luminal antigens.

  6. Avian influenza in backyard poultry of the Mopti region, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molia, Sophie; Traoré, Abdallah; Gil, Patricia; Hammoumi, Saliha; Lesceu, Stéphanie; Servan de Almeida, Renata; Albina, Emmanuel; Chevalier, Véronique

    2010-06-01

    This study reports the first evidence of circulation of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in domestic poultry in Mali. In the Mopti region, where AIV have already been isolated in migratory water birds, we sampled 223 backyard domestic birds potentially in contact with wild birds and found that 3.6% had tracheal or cloacal swabs positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) for type A influenza viruses (IVA) and that 13.7% had sera positive by commercial ELISA test detecting antibodies against IVA. None of the birds positive by rRT-PCR for IVA was positive by rRT-PCR for H5 and H7 subtypes, and none showed any clinical signs therefore indicating the circulation of low pathogenic avian influenza. Unfortunately, no virus isolation was possible. Further studies are needed to assess the temporal evolution of AIV circulation in the Mopti region and its possible correlation with the presence of wild birds.

  7. Circumferential tracheal resection with primary anastomosis for post-intubation tracheal stenosis: study of 24 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Hesham; Mosleh, Mohamed; Fathy, Hesham

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the results of circumferential tracheal and cricotracheal resection with primary anastomosis for the treatment of post-intubation tracheal and cricotracheal stenosis. This is a retrospective analytical study. A total number of 24 patients were included in this study. The relevant preoperative, operative and postoperative records were collected and analyzed. Twenty patients were finally symptom-free reflecting an anastomosis success rate of 83.3 %. Variable grades of anastomotic restenosis occurred in 11 (45.8 %) patients, three patients were symptom-free and eight had airway obstructive symptoms. Four out of the eight patients with symptomatic restenosis were symptom-free with endoscopic dilatation while the remaining four patients required a permanent airway appliance (T-tube, tracheostomy) for the relief of airway obstruction and this group was considered as anastomotic failure. Cricoid involvement, associated cricoid resection and the type of anastomosis were the variables that had statistical impact on the occurrence of restenosis (P = 0.017, 0.017, 0.05; respectively). Tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe effective treatment method for post-intubation tracheal stenosis in carefully selected patients. Restenosis does not always mean failure of the procedure since it may be successfully managed with endoscopic dilatation.

  8. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N6 Viruses Exhibit Enhanced Affinity for Human Type Sialic Acid Receptor and In-Contact Transmission in Model Ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Wei, Yandi; Sun, Yipeng; Hu, Jiao; Liu, Litao; Xu, Guanlong; Gao, Weihua; Li, Chong; Zhang, Xuxiao; Huang, Yinhua; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Xiufan; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-07-15

    Since May 2014, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N6 virus has been reported to cause six severe human infections three of which were fatal. The biological properties of this subtype, in particular its relative pathogenicity and transmissibility in mammals, are not known. We characterized the virus receptor-binding affinity, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in mice and ferrets of four H5N6 isolates derived from waterfowl in China from 2013-2014. All four H5N6 viruses have acquired a binding affinity for human-like SAα2,6Gal-linked receptor to be able to attach to human tracheal epithelial and alveolar cells. The emergent H5N6 viruses, which share high sequence similarity with the human isolate A/Guangzhou/39715/2014 (H5N6), were fully infective and highly transmissible by direct contact in ferrets but showed less-severe pathogenicity than the parental H5N1 virus. The present results highlight the threat of emergent H5N6 viruses to poultry and human health and the need to closely track their continual adaptation in humans. Extended epizootics and panzootics of H5N1 viruses have led to the emergence of the novel 2.3.4.4 clade of H5 virus subtypes, including H5N2, H5N6, and H5N8 reassortants. Avian H5N6 viruses from this clade have caused three fatalities out of six severe human infections in China since the first case in 2014. However, the biological properties of this subtype, especially the pathogenicity and transmission in mammals, are not known. Here, we found that natural avian H5N6 viruses have acquired a high affinity for human-type virus receptor. Compared to the parental clade 2.3.4 H5N1 virus, emergent H5N6 isolates showed less severe pathogenicity in mice and ferrets but acquired efficient in-contact transmission in ferrets. These findings suggest that the threat of avian H5N6 viruses to humans should not be ignored. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. QUALITATIVE ABNORMAL FETAL BREATHING MOVEMENTS, ASSOCIATED WITH TRACHEAL ATRESIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAARSMA, R; BEKEDAM, DJ; VISSER, GHA

    A case is reported in which qualitatively, grossly abnormal fetal breathing movements turned out to be indicative of complete tracheal atresia. Fetal breathing movements were vigorous and jerky and of large amplitude; similarly abnormal movements were observed after birth. At postmortem tracheal

  10. Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal intubation. P Smith, F.J Smith, P.J Becker. Abstract. Introduction Tracheal intubation is accompanied by an increased blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this study was to find the most important source of this haemodynamic response, namely ...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868.5795 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a...

  12. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system: morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenlee, K.J.; Henry, J.R.; Kirkton, S.D.; Westneat, M.W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O 2 ) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O 2 ), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  13. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system : morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenlee, K. J.; Henry, J. R.; Kirkton, S. D.; Westneat, M. W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J. F.; North Dakota State Univ.; Arizona State Univ.; Union Coll.; Field Museum of Natural History

    2009-11-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  14. Tracheal agenesis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Desai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly involving the respiratory system. It is generally associated with anomalies of other systems. Antenatal diagnosis of this condition is difficult; therefore, it presents as a medical emergency in the labor room. Intubation in these babies is difficult. As many of these babies are born prematurely, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS adds to the management difficulties. Here, we describe two babies with this lethal anomaly and RDS where esophageal intubation and surfactant therapy proved beneficial. Furthermore, described are other associated anomalies.

  15. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, P.; Bardin, P.G.; Lau, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  16. Tracheal transplantation for carinal reconstruction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, K; Inutsuka, K; Hiratsuka, M; Makihata, S; Okabayashi, K; Shiraishi, T; Shirakusa, T

    1998-09-01

    Experimental carinal allotransplantation has been performed with tracheocarinal Y-shaped allografts in dogs. In this study we tried canine carinal reconstruction with cylindrical allografts. Carinal reconstruction was performed with allotransplantation of cylindrical trachea in dogs, and graft healing was evaluated by bronchoscopic observation, mucosal blood flow measurement, and histologic examination. A section of the recipient carina containing five tracheal rings and two main stem bronchi was removed, and a donor trachea seven rings long was inserted between the recipient trachea and the left main stem bronchus; then side-to-end anastomosis was performed between the graft midportion and recipient right main stem bronchus (new carina). The grafts were wrapped with pedicled omentum. Fresh grafts were transplanted into one group of dogs (n=8 ), and grafts cryopreserved for 1 week were transplanted into another group (n=7). No anastomotic leakage occurred in any dog. Excellent healing of grafts and graft anastomoses was observed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy in six dogs (75%) in the fresh graft group and in four dogs (57%) in the cryopreserved graft group. The mucosal blood flow in the new carina decreased remarkably and, although it recovered, mucosal blood flow remained under the preoperative level on day 28 after the operation. Cylindrical tracheal allotransplantation is useful for carinal reconstruction, and the method of side-to-end anastomosis between the donor trachea and recipient bronchus is a feasible and accessible procedure in dogs.

  17. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  18. Treatment of a case of tracheal stenosis in a dog with tracheal resection and anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutlu, Z.; Acar, S.E.; Perk, C.

    2003-01-01

    A case of tracheal stenosis in the cervical portion of the trachea was encountered in a 5.5-month-old St. Bernard-Rottweiler cross dog. Breathing difficulty was seen in the clinical examination and presence of an obvious narrowing between the 3rd-5th cervical tracheal rings was determined in the radiological examination. Under general anesthesia the portion with stenosis was resected and the healthy trachea ends were anastomosed using the split cartilage technique. In the postoperative period the breathing difficulty disappeared and there was no development of a new stenosis in the anastomosis region. In the late period check-up the patient was seen to lead a healthy life

  19. Tracheal growth after resection and anastomosis in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, H; Brochu, P; Bensoussan, A L; Lagacé, G; Khan, A H

    1986-09-01

    Tracheal morphology, morphometric changes, and growth and histologic changes were studied in puppies submitted to tracheal resection and anastomosis. Fifteen mongrel puppies about 12 weeks old and weighing on an average 5.5 kg were operated under general anesthesia using fluothane. A median cervicotomy incision was made in ten puppies (experimental group, EG) and the proximal 14 tracheal rings were resected (average length 5.08 cm or about 35% to 38% of total tracheal length). One layer anastomosis was done using vicryl 4.0 maintaining the average tension of 1,450 g. Five puppies (control group, CG) were submitted to tracheal transection and anastomosis and the following parameters were studied. Tracheal morphology the trachea of the EG was a rounded triangle whereas in the CG it was oval in shape, there was increase in the intercartilageneous spaces in the EG, no granulation tissue was present, two mucous webs were seen in the EG and one in the CG. Morphometric changes average tracheal length EG 13 cm, CG 17.7 cm, intercartilagenous space EG 3.08 mm, CG 1.3 mm, intercricothyroid space EG 1.2 cm, CG 0.53 cm, sagittal and transverse tracheal thickness at the anastomosis EG 2.6 and 3.3 mm, CG 2 and 1.5 mm, sagittal and transverse diameter reduced on an average 2 mm in EG. Histology Moderate fibrosis was found at the level of anastomosis with no modification of chondrocytes at the cartilagenous rings in the EG. Even with high anastomotic tension, the dogs had normal tracheal growth without stenosis; the sagittal and transverse growth at the anastomosis in the EG was 90% and 85%, respectively, when compared with the CG.

  20. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and complete tracheal rings: Repair on ECMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J. Tharakan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A term newborn female presented with prenatally diagnosed congenital diaphragmatic hernia and postnatally diagnosed complete tracheal rings and tracheal stenosis. Initially, the spells associated with tracheal stenosis were misdiagnosed as pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed a critically narrowed airway, and veno-arterial ECMO stabilized the baby for further workup. The endotracheal tube was removed while on ECMO to avoid further injury to the airway. Staged CDH repair followed by slide tracheoplasty were performed on ECMO. The multidisciplinary approach included neonatology, general surgery, otolaryngology, cardiac surgery and anesthesiology.

  1. Snake Envenomation Causing Distant Tracheal Myonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Khimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are often believed to be poisonous. However, this is not always the case. In fact, each bite differs from snake to snake, depending on if the snake is poisonous and if there is envenomation. Venom in pit viper snakebites is often associated with local necrosis. The abundant literature selections and research articles justify local myonecrosis due to envenomation, but there is not much in the literature regarding myonecrosis at a site distant from the snakebite. We hereby present a case of a 42-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department after a rattlesnake bit him twice. The patient, besides developing local myonecrosis at the site of the snakebite, developed necrosis of the scrotum as well as tracheal pressure myonecrosis at the site of the endotracheal tube balloon. In this review, we will attempt to discuss the myonecrosis pathophysiology and management related to the rattle snakebite.

  2. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  3. Profilactic role of simvastatin and mitomycin C in tracheal stenosis after tracheal damage: Study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Adnan; Koc, Sema; Erdoğan, Ahmet Serhat; Kesici, Hakan

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the prophylactic effect simvastatin of and mitomycin C (MMC) on laryngeal and tracheal stenosis in tracheotomised rats by histopathological evaluation of laryngotracheal segment. Randomized prospective single-blind. Standard vertical tracheotomy was performed on 24 rats. Then the animals were randomly divided into three groups as A, B and C. In group A 0.4 mg/day once daily mitomycin C was injected to the paratracheal region for 14 days. In group B daily 30 mg/kg/day simvastatin was given via gavage to rats for 14 days. In group C 2 cc/day intraperitoneal saline given to rats and the created control group by 14 days follow up. After 10 days, tracheal cannulas were removed. Three weeks later, all animals were euthanized and trachea specimens were harvested. The present study investigates the effects of MMC and Simvastatin on fibrosis, inflammation, stenosis index and tracheal wall thickness in a tracheal injury model. The difference between the groups in terms of degree of inflammation scores was statistically insignificant (P = 0,187). Differences between the groups were found to be insignificant in terms of the preventionof fibrosis (P = 0,993). There was no significant difference between groups in terms of stenosis index (P = 0.645). In terms of wall thickness, control, simvastatin and mitomycin C groups were statistically different (p = 0.038). The difference between post-hoc test results was between Mitomycin C and control groups (p = 0.036). Maximum wall thickness in the MMC group (0,299 mm) was significantly lower compared to the control group (0,382 mm)(P C group (0,160 mm) comparison to the control group (0,200 mm) (P < 0.0001). It was detected that the simvastatin and MMC is not effective in preventing the tracheal stenosis, inflammation and fibrosis formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing.

  5. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC, RADIOGRAPHIC, AND ENDOSCOPIC TRACHEAL DIMENSIONS IN ENGLISH BULLDOGS WITH GRADE 1 CLINICAL SIGNS OF BRACHYCEPHALIC AIRWAY SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaye, Benjamin M; Boroffka, Susanne A E B; Haagsman, Annika N; Haar, Gert Ter

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal hypoplasia is commonly seen in English Bulldogs affected with brachycephalic airway syndrome. Previously published diagnostic criteria for tracheal hypoplasia in this breed have been a radiographic tracheal diameter:tracheal inlet ratio (TD:TI) < 0.12 or a tracheal diameter:third rib

  6. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis associated with tracheal stenosis : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Ki Soo; Pi, Soo Young

    1998-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly and is frequently associated with other congenital anomalies. We report a case of left pulmonary agenesis associated with congenital tracheal stenosis in a newborn infant. Simple chest radiographs showed an overinflate right lung and mediastinal shifting to the left side. Chest ST and reconstructed three-dimensional images showed left pulmonary agenesis and tracheal stenosis. These anomalies of the tracheobronchial system were confirmed by bronchography. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  7. The Efficacy of Polydioxanone Monofilament Absorbable Suture for Tracheal Anastomosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Katsunobu; Yamasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Akamine, Shinji; Takahashi, Takao; Tomita, Masao

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of polydioxanon absorbable suture for tracheal anastomoses, we performed an experimental study using dose. Eight adult mongrel dogs underwent sleeve resection of the mediastinal trachea. A length of ten to twelve cartilage rings was resected. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed using either interrupted or continuous running 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS) suture. There was no detectable difference bronchoscopically, microangiografically, or histologically, in tracheal ana...

  8. Family Presence During Pediatric Tracheal Intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ronald C; Nett, Sholeen T; Davis, Katherine Finn; Parker, Margaret M; Bysani, G Kris; Adu-Darko, Michelle; Bird, Geoffrey L; Cheifetz, Ira M; Derbyshire, Ashley T; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Giuliano, John S; Graciano, Ana Lia; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Hefley, Glenda; Ikeyama, Takanari; Jarvis, J Dean; Kamat, Pradip; Krishna, Ashwin S; Lee, Anthony; Lee, Jan Hau; Li, Simon; Meyer, Keith; Montgomery, Vicki L; Nagai, Yuki; Pinto, Matthew; Rehder, Kyle J; Saito, Osamu; Shenoi, Asha N; Taekema, Hester Christianne; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Thompson, Ann E; Turner, David A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Family-centered care, which supports family presence (FP) during procedures, is now a widely accepted standard at health care facilities that care for children. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the practice of FP during tracheal intubation (TI) in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Family presence during procedures in PICUs has been advocated. To describe the current practice of FP during TI and evaluate the association with procedural and clinician (including physician, respiratory therapist, and nurse practitioner) outcomes across multiple PICUs. Prospective cohort study in which all TIs from July 2010 to March 2014 in the multicenter TI database (National Emergency Airway Registry for Children [NEAR4KIDS]) were analyzed. Family presence was defined as a family member present during TI. This study included all TIs in patients younger than 18 years in 22 international PICUs. Family presence and no FP during TI in the PICU. The percentage of FP during TIs. First attempt success rate, adverse TI-associated events, multiple attempts (≥ 3), oxygen desaturation (oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry <80%), and self-reported team stress level. A total of 4969 TI encounters were reported. Among those, 81% (n = 4030) of TIs had documented FP status (with/without). The median age of participants with FP was 2 years and 1 year for those without FP. The average percentage of TIs with FP was 19% and varied widely across sites (0%-43%; P < .001). Tracheal intubations with FP (vs without FP) were associated with older patients (median, 2 years vs 1 year; P = .04), lower Paediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, and pediatric resident as the first airway clinician (23%, n = 179 vs 18%, n = 584; odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Tracheal intubations with FP and without FP were no different in the first attempt success rate (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.85-1.18), adverse TI-associated events (any events: OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.85-1.30 and severe events: OR

  9. Treatment of postoperative tracheal granulation tissue with inhaled budesonide in congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Akiko; Nakao, Makoto; Bitoh, Yuko; Arai, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Nishijima, Eiji

    2014-02-01

    Tracheal obstruction by granulation tissue can compromise the postoperative course in congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS). Balloon dilatation and stenting may be required. Budesonide is a corticosteroid with topical anti-inflammatory effects. In 2008, we used inhaled budesonide for treatment of postoperative granulation tissue for the first time in CTS, resulting in significant improvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of inhaled budesonide for treatment of postoperative granulation tissue in CTS. Retrospective chart review was conducted. From 2004 through 2011, we performed 39 tracheoplasties. Forced stenting ± balloon dilatation (S/B) was required when airway obstruction with tissue granulation was life-threatening. We compared the requirement for S/B between the early group without budesonide (2004-Nov. 2008, Early) and the late group with budesonide (Dec. 2008-2011, Late). Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's Exact test. Eleven of 22 in Early and 8 of 17 in Late were successfully extubated, never having had life-threatening tissue granulation. The remaining patients in each group (11 in Early and 9 in Late) required tracheostomies due to postoperative complication. Ten in Early and 5 in Late with tracheostomies developed granulation tissue. Of these patients, the 10 in Early required S/B, while none of the 5 in Late required S/B (P=.0003). Bronchoscopy demonstrated significant regression of granulation tissue in all cases treated with inhaled budesonide. Inhaled budesonide is effective for treatment of tracheal granulation tissue in patients with tracheostomies after repair of CTS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Troop education and avian influenza surveillance in military barracks in Ghana, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoom, John Kofi; Bel-Nono, Samuel; Rodgers, David; Agbenohevi, Prince G; Dafeamekpor, Courage K; Sowa, Roland M L; Danso, Fenteng; Tettey, Reuben; Suu-Ire, Richard; Bonney, Joseph H K; Asante, Ivy A; Aboagye, James; Abana, Christopher Zaab-Yen; Frimpong, Joseph Asamoah; Kronmann, Karl C; Oyofo, Buhari A; Ampofo, William K

    2012-11-08

    Influenza A viruses that cause highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) also infect humans. In many developing countries such as Ghana, poultry and humans live in close proximity in both the general and military populations, increasing risk for the spread of HPAI from birds to humans. Respiratory infections such as influenza are especially prone to rapid spread among military populations living in close quarters such as barracks making this a key population for targeted avian influenza surveillance and public health education. Twelve military barracks situated in the coastal, tropical rain forest and northern savannah belts of the country were visited and the troops and their families educated on pandemic avian influenza. Attendants at each site was obtained from the attendance sheet provided for registration. The seminars focused on zoonotic diseases, influenza surveillance, pathogenesis of avian influenza, prevention of emerging infections and biosecurity. To help direct public health policies, a questionnaire was used to collect information on animal populations and handling practices from 102 households in the military barracks. Cloacal and tracheal samples were taken from 680 domestic and domesticated wild birds and analysed for influenza A using molecular methods for virus detection. Of the 1028 participants that took part in the seminars, 668 (65%) showed good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza and the risks associated with its infection. Even though no evidence of the presence of avian influenza (AI) infection was found in the 680 domestic and wild birds sampled, biosecurity in the households surveyed was very poor. Active surveillance revealed that there was no AI circulation in the military barracks in April 2011. Though participants demonstrated good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza, biosecurity practices were minimal. Sustained educational programs are needed to further strengthen avian influenza surveillance and prevention in military barracks.

  11. Troop education and avian influenza surveillance in military barracks in Ghana, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odoom John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A viruses that cause highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI also infect humans. In many developing countries such as Ghana, poultry and humans live in close proximity in both the general and military populations, increasing risk for the spread of HPAI from birds to humans. Respiratory infections such as influenza are especially prone to rapid spread among military populations living in close quarters such as barracks making this a key population for targeted avian influenza surveillance and public health education. Method Twelve military barracks situated in the coastal, tropical rain forest and northern savannah belts of the country were visited and the troops and their families educated on pandemic avian influenza. Attendants at each site was obtained from the attendance sheet provided for registration. The seminars focused on zoonotic diseases, influenza surveillance, pathogenesis of avian influenza, prevention of emerging infections and biosecurity. To help direct public health policies, a questionnaire was used to collect information on animal populations and handling practices from 102 households in the military barracks. Cloacal and tracheal samples were taken from 680 domestic and domesticated wild birds and analysed for influenza A using molecular methods for virus detection. Results Of the 1028 participants that took part in the seminars, 668 (65% showed good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza and the risks associated with its infection. Even though no evidence of the presence of avian influenza (AI infection was found in the 680 domestic and wild birds sampled, biosecurity in the households surveyed was very poor. Conclusion Active surveillance revealed that there was no AI circulation in the military barracks in April 2011. Though participants demonstrated good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza, biosecurity practices were minimal. Sustained educational programs are needed to further strengthen

  12. Pathogenesis of avian pneumovirus infection in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirjis, F F; Noll, S L; Halvorson, D A; Nagaraja, K V; Shaw, D P

    2002-05-01

    Avian pneumovirus (APV) is the cause of a respiratory disease of turkeys characterized by coughing, ocular and nasal discharge, and swelling of the infraorbital sinuses. Sixty turkey poults were reared in isolation conditions. At 3 weeks of age, serum samples were collected and determined to be free of antibodies against APV, avian influenza, hemorrhagic enteritis, Newcastle disease, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, and Bordetella avium. When the poults were 4 weeks old, they were inoculated with cell culture-propagated APV (APV/Minnesota/turkey/2a/97) via the conjunctival spaces and nostrils. After inoculation, four poults were euthanatized every 2 days for 14 days, and blood, swabs, and tissues were collected. Clinical signs consisting of nasal discharge, swelling of the infraorbital sinuses, and frothy ocular discharge were evident by 2 days postinoculation (PI) and persisted until day 12 PI. Mild inflammation of the mucosa of the nasal turbinates and infraorbital sinuses was present between days 2 and 10 PI. Mild inflammatory changes were seen in tracheas of poults euthanatized between days 4 and 10 PI. Antibody to APV was detected by day 7 PI. The virus was detected in tissue preparations and swabs of nasal turbinates and infraorbital sinuses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, and immunohistochemical staining methods between days 2 and 10 PI. Virus was detected in tracheal tissue and swabs between days 2 and 6 PI using the same methods. In this experiment, turkey poults inoculated with tissue culture-propagated APV developed clinical signs similar to those seen in field cases associated with infection with this virus.

  13. Epidemiology of avian influenza H5N1 virus in Egypt and its zoonotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahed Hamed Ghoneim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the epidemiology of avian influenza H5N1 virus in domestic poultry and its zoonotic potential in Egypt. Methods: Tracheal swabs were collected from two hundred and forty three domestic poultry (chickens, ducks and geese from commercial farms and backyards, and thirty two blood samples from unvaccinated chickens. Fifty two throat swabs and twenty blood samples were collected from persons who are in contact with diseased and/or infected birds. Tracheal and throat swabs were examined for the presence of avian influenza virus H5N1 genome by real-time RT-PCR whereas blood samples were tested by competitive ELISA for the presence of avian influenza virus H5 antibodies. Results: The overall prevalence of H5N1 in the examined birds was 5.3% while the prevalence rates among different poultry species were 9%, 4.7% and 0% for ducks, chicken and geese respectively. Moreover, we detected H5 antibodies in 12.5% of the examined backyard chickens. All examined humans were negative for both viral RNA and antibodies. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the broad circulation of H5N1 virus among poultry in Egypt whereas it still has a limited zoonotic potential so far.

  14. Successful Treatment of Anterior Tracheal Necrosis after Total Thyroidectomy Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy involving the adjacent structures of the trachea can cause tracheal damage such as early tracheal necrosis. The authors describe the first case of anterior tracheal necrosis following total thyroidectomy treated using vacuum-assisted closure device. After two weeks of VAC  therapy, there was no evidence of ongoing infection and the trachea was partially closed around a tracheotomy cannula, removed after 3 months. The use of a VAC  therapy to reduce and close the tracheal rent and to create a rapid granulation tissue over tracheal structure appeared as a good opportunity after anterior tracheal necrosis.

  15. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  16. The current state of congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, P; Caldarone, C; Forte, V; Campisi, P; Holtby, H; Chait, P; Chiu, P; Cox, P; Yoo, S-J; Manson, D; Kim, P C W

    2007-11-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is an uncommon condition that has challenged pediatric surgeons for decades. Patients with CTS can present with a wide spectrum of symptoms and varying degrees of severity. In addition, a variety of techniques have been devised to repair this malformation. A review of these procedures and our suggestions for clinical standards and practice guidelines will be presented in this paper. A retrospective review of the literature on CTS from 1964 to 31 March, 2006. There is not one standard technique for the repair of CTS, as individualized approach to each patient and airway lesion is necessary to optimize patient management; nevertheless there is a consensus about segmental resection and anastomosis being best for short segment stenosis while slide tracheoplasty is most effective for the long-segment ones. Conservative management is also an option for select group of patients with careful and close follow up. Survival following surgery over the years has improved, but mortality remained high, particularly in a specific subset of patients presenting at the age less than 1 month with associated cardiac malformations. In conclusion, CTS remains a significant challenge for pediatric surgeons. Additional research is required to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CTS, and to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for the entire spectrum of presentation including conservative management.

  17. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20251 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: wedegaer@uke.uni-hamburg.de; Schroeder, Hobe J. [Experimental Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods.

  18. Anterior tracheal suspension for tracheobronchomalacia in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael E; Rumman, Nisreen; Chun, Robert H; Rao, Aparna; Martin, Timothy; Beste, David J; Berens, Richard J; Parakininkas, Daiva E; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Hubert, Mary J; Uhing, Michael; Simpson, Pippa; Sato, Thomas T; Tweddell, James S; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2014-10-01

    Severe tracheobronchomalacia significantly complicates the postoperative course of infants and children with congenital heart disease, tracheoesophageal fistula, and tracheal stenosis. We have found that traditional approaches, including aortopexy, have been inconsistent in preventing acute life threatening events (ALTEs). In order to directly support the anterior tracheal wall, we have adopted the use of direct anterior tracheal suspension (ATS). Twenty-one children, median age 5 months (35 days to 11 years) and weight 5.0 (2.3 to 28.0) kg have undergone anterior tracheal suspension for severe tracheobronchomalacia through median sternotomy; 15 for inability to ventilate despite mechanical respiratory support, 3 for intermittent ALTEs without mechanical respiratory support, and 3 for recurrent respiratory admissions. Nine procedures were performed as isolated ATS and 12 procedures were combined with at least 1 of the following: repair of ventricular septal defect; vascular ring; atrioventricular canal; tracheal reconstruction or arterial-pexy. Level of respiratory support was graded at preoperative (preop), discharge, and follow-up, and respiratory clinical status was graded at preop and follow-up. Median follow-up was 30.0 months (2.0 to 57.0 months). There was no mortality. Both level of respiratory support and the clinical status improved at all time points studied compared with preoperative score (p < 0.001) after ATS. Whether ATS was performed in isolation or combined with other procedures did not impact these findings. Anterior tracheal suspension is feasible and appears effective in dramatically improving respiratory clinical status. Tracheal suspension is applicable to a wide range of anatomic variants. Additional study is needed to characterize long-term functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical Treatment for Patients With Tracheal and Subgllotic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nematollah Mokhtari

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Iatrogenic airway injury after endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy remains a serious clinical problem.In this study we reviewed post-intubation and traumatic tracheal stenosis in 47 patients with a special attention to the cause,hense surgical treatment of the stenosis was performed and the results compared with the literatures.Methods:Since February 1995 through January 2005 a total of 47 patients with tracheal stenosis and subgllotic as a result of tracheostomy or intubation in a single   institution, were explored in this study and examined for the outcomes of stenosis   management.There were 39 tracheal and 8 infraglottic stenosis. Our management strategy for stenosis was end-to-end anastomosis, and cartilage graft tracheoplasty. Results: Our management strategy for treatment of tracheal stenosis with resection and end-to-end anastomosis was associated with good outcomes. Patients were   treated by tracheal or partial laryngotracheal resection. The overall success rate was 93% with the complication rate of 18%. A second operation was required on 2 patients (4%.Conclusions: Long term tracheal tubes or intubation tubes and poor quality material tubes were the most common causes of these respiratory strictures .Our current procedures of choice for tracheal stenosis is sleeve resection with end- to -end anastomosis for short- segment stenoses (up to six rings. Cartilaginous homograft was performed when the loss the cartilage limited to the anterior part of trachea. The most common late complication was the formation of the granulations at the suture line.Granulation tissues can usually be managed with Laser or bronchoscopic removal.  

  20. Tracheal measurement by computed tomography in Korean adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deock Hee; Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1988-01-01

    The knowledge of normal tracheal morphology is helpful during endotracheal intubation for anesthesia as well as detecting tracheal and paratracheal disorders. Tracheal measurement by simple X-ray is not accurate due to image imagnification and overlapping of the shoulders in the lateral projection. CT, however, is highly accurate to measure the normal tracheal morphology and paratracheal anatomy. The study was undertaken to obtain standard values of normal Korean tracheae. Healthy cases of 50 males and 50 females who had no neck and mediastinal pathology or respiratory difficult were selected. The trachea was measured by CT. The results were as follows: 1. Tracheal lengths were 126.1mm (SD 11.6) in males and 116.0mm (SD 8.4) in females. 2. AP diameters of trachea were 18.9mm (SD 2.1) in males and 15.5mm (SD 1.3) in females. The transverse diameters were 17.7mm (SD 1.9) in males and 15.3mm (SD 1.2) in females. 3. Tracheal cross-sectional areas were 288mm 2 (SD 54) in males and 204mm 2 (SD 31) in females. Mean cross-sectional area of level 4 was greater in 16.6% than that of level 1. 4. Tracheal cross-sectional areas and diameters were dependent on sex but not on weight and height. And cross-sectional areas and AP diameters were positively correlated with age in male. 5. The shape of the trachea showed that the ovoid shape was most common at the level 1, the C-shape was most common at the level 2 and 3, horizontal oval or D-shape were more common at the level 4.

  1. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ...

  2. Tracheal wall thickening is associated with the granulation tissue formation around silicone stents in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Kim, Hojoong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-07-01

    Tracheal restenosis due to excessive granulation tissue around a silicone stent requires repeated bronchoscopic interventions in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis (PTTS). The current study was conducted to identify the risk factors for granulation tissue formation after silicone stenting in PTTS patients. A retrospective study was conducted between January 1998 and December 2010. Forty-two PTTS patients with silicone stenting were selected. Clinical and radiological variables were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Tracheal restenosis due to granulation tissue formation were found in 20 patients (47.6%), and repeated bronchoscopic interventions were conducted. In multivariate analysis, tracheal wall thickness, measured on axial computed tomography scan, was independently associated with granulation tissue formation after silicone stenting. Furthermore, the degree of tracheal wall thickness was well correlated with the degree of granulation tissue formation. Tracheal wall thickening was associated with granulation tissue formation around silicone stents in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis.

  3. [The source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao-hua; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jian; Mu, Ling; Wang, Li

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal. The adult mongrel dog was intubated after anesthesia. The tracheal tube was modified by attaching a disposable pediatric pulse oximeter to the cuff. The chest of the dog was cut open and a red light from the tracheal oximeter was aligned with the deeper artery. The changes in tracheal pulse oxygen saturation (SptO2) signal were observed after the deeper artery was blocked temporarily. The photoplethysmography (PPG) and readings were recorded at different intracuff pressures. The influence of mechanical ventilation on the signal was also tested and compared with pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2). The SptO2 signal disappeared after deeper artery was blocked. The SptO2 signal changed with different intracuff pressures (P signal appeared under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure than under 0-10 cm H2O of intracuff pressure(P signal under a condition with mechanical ventilation differed from that without mechanical ventilation (P signal is primarily derived from deeper arteries around the trachea, not from the tracheal wall. Both intracuff pressures and mechanical ventilation can influence SptO2 signal. The SptO2 signal under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure is stronger than that under 0-10 em H2O of intracuff pressure. Mechanical ventilation mainly changes PPG.

  4. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  5. [Difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation: observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rebeca Gonelli Albanez da Cunha; Lima, Bruno Luís Soares; Lopes, Douglas Kaíque de Oliveira; Couceiro Filho, Roberto Oliveira; Lima, Luciana Cavalcanti; Couceiro, Tania Cursino de Menezes

    Since anesthesia complications associated with unexpected difficult airway are potentially catastrophic, they should be avoided. The modified Mallampati test and jaw-thrust maneuver enable the identification of difficult airway. The aim of this study was to associate the modified Mallampati test and the jaw-thrust maneuver with laryngoscopy (Cormack-Lehane) in an attempt to identify a better predictor of difficult airway in an adult population undergoing elective surgery. A cross-sectional study in which 133 adult patients undergoing elective surgery requiring tracheal intubation were analyzed. The accuracy and specificity of the modified Mallampati test and jaw-thrust maneuver were assessed by correlating them with difficult laryngoscopy (Cormack-Lehane Degrees 3 and 4). In the 133 patients evaluated the difficult intubation rate found was 0.8%; there was association between the two predictive tests proposed (p=0.012). The values of 94.5% for specificity and 95.4% for accuracy were found for the jaw-thrust maneuver and for the modified Mallampati test, the values found were 81.1% and 81.2%, respectively. Kappa agreement identified a result of 0.240 between jaw-thrust maneuver and Cormarck-Lehane, which was considered reasonable. On the other hand, a poor agreement (κ=0.06) was seen between modified Mallampati test and Cormarck-Lehane test. The jaw-thrust maneuver presented superior accuracy and agreement than the modified Mallampati test, showing the ability to identify a difficult airway. It is necessary to emphasize the association of tests in the evaluation of patients, emphasizing their complementarity to minimize the negative consequences of repeated laryngoscopies. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Congenital Complete Tracheal Ring in a Neonate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra ARUN ÖZER

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the upper airway tract lead to congenital high airway obstruction and may complicate neonatal airway management in the delivery room. Congenital complete tracheal rings are a rare and unusual tracheal anomaly, usually presenting in the neonate or infant as respiratory distress. The clinical presentation can vary from almost asymptomatic patients to near-fatal airway obstruction. It may exist as an isolated entity, or in association with other congenital malformations, in particular, cardiac anomalies along with vascular rings and pulmonary slings. Other associated anomalies have also been reported, for example, chromosomal anomalies, malformation of other parts of the respiratory tract, esophagus and skeletal systems. Here, we report an extreme case of VACTERL/TACRD association presented with congenital complete tracheal ring, encephalocele, bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, equinovalgus deformity on right foot, low-set ears and micrognathia.

  7. Two-piece cryopreserved tracheal allotransplantation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyikesici, Tuncel; Tuncozgur, Bulent; Sanli, Maruf; Isik, Ahmet Feridun; Meteroglu, Fatih; Elbeyli, Levent

    2009-10-01

    For successful reconstruction with tracheal allotransplants following long tracheal resections, problems related to the preservation and vascularisation of the tracheal graft have to be solved. In this study, instead of using a long-segment single-piece graft, we used a graft that has been split into two. The aim was to use this graft after cryopreservation in order to ease neo-vascularisation and to maintain tracheal integrity by transplanting it to two separate regions of the dog cervical trachea. This experimental study was conducted in animal laboratories of the medical school on 11 half-blood dogs. The trachea obtained from the first dog was 8 cm in length; it was split into two pieces of 4 cm each and stored in the preservation solution at -80 degrees C for 4 weeks. Following this, the dog was sacrificed. Two 2 cm portions of cervical trachea were excised from the second dog. These parts were then reconstructed with two tracheal grafts of the same length as the cryopreserved ones. Ten dogs that were grouped into five groups of two dogs each underwent the same procedure. The subjects had a bronchoscopic evaluation on the third postoperative week. Anastomosis regions of the test tracheas were resected to be examined histopathologically. Seven subjects were found to have third-degree obstructions during bronchoscopy; two had close to fourth-degree obstructions. In the histopathological examination, contrary to the findings of the bronchoscopies, 75% of the anastomoses had intact epithelium. The cartilage was seen to have well-preserved structural characteristics in all the anastomoses. Twelve anastomoses had moderate, seven mild and one had severe inflammation. All anastomoses had either good or very good level of vascularisation. The integrity of the tracheal epithelium can be maintained with cryopreservation and split anastomosis technique. The cartilage preserves its structural characteristics despite losing its viability, thereby offering an advantage to

  8. Stent placement for tracheal stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Keigo; Hata, Yoshinobu; Sasamoto, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoji; Sato, Fumitomo; Tamaki, Kazuyoshi; Goto, Hidenori; Yuasa, Rena

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal invasion including tracheal bifurcation due to esophageal cancer can sometimes cause serious complications of the airway, but such cases sometimes improve quickly following chemoradiation treatment. The absolute indications for stent replacement in the airway for this disorder and the optimal choice of stent are herein discussed. Between 1992 and 2010, 28 patients with airway stenosis, including 7 patients with esophago-tracheal fistula, were treated by placement of various stents; namely, 12 patients received Dumon stents, 3 patients had Dynamic stents, 10 patients were given Ultraflex stents, while 3 other patients were treated without the use of stents. Severe dyspnea in the supine position was observed, which mainly originated from invasion to the membranous portion of the trachea. Airway patency was maintained after stent replacement, although the median survival time of such cases was only 4 months. Three patients with severe dyspnea who could lie in a supine position recovered after undergoing chemoradiation treatment without stent replacement. No cases of stent removal were observed after chemoradiation treatment. Chemoradiation treatment for esophageal cancer was found to be effective for the management of airway disturbances, and thus the absolute indications for stent replacement are restricted to patients who cannot lie in a supine position due to severe impairment of ventilation during radiation therapy, as well as patients presenting with tracheobroncho-esophageal fistula. Concerning stent selection, a metal stent should be the first choice for tracheal stenosis due to its ease of insertion, because there is no substantial difference between silicone and metal stents regarding the treatment of tracheal stenosis. However, it is important to note that a silicone Y stent is useful for the treatment of tracheal bifurcation. (author)

  9. Effects of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Wu, Chi-Chung

    2008-06-01

    Oxymetazoline is often used as a decongestant in rhinitis patients who are suffering from nasal obstruction. It is used as a nasal drop or spray solution. The effect on nasal mucosa in vitro or in vivo is well known. However, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. During administration of the drug to the nose, it might affect the trachea via inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Kreb's solution in a muscle bath at 37 degrees C. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraphy software. The following assessments were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6)M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of oxymetazoline on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Addition of parasympathetic mimetics to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of oxymetazoline induced a significant relaxation response when the preparation was up to 10(-4) M. At the same concentration, the drug also could inhibit EFS induced spike contraction. Oxymetazoline had negligible effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. The degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. The study indicated that high concentrations of oxymetazoline might actually antagonize cholinergic receptors of the trachea.

  10. Surgery for postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, M.; Al-Kattan, K.; Rafay, M.A.; El-Bakry, A.K.; El-Dawlatly, A.; Naguib, M.; Seraj, M.; Joharjy, I.; Al-Serhani, A.

    1996-01-01

    Postintubation tracheal stenosis is a recognized problem. Although its incidence has recently decreased, it is still a difficult complication to treat. We have reviewed our experience with 10 patients with tracheal stenosis over the last five years between 1990 and 1995. There were seven male and three female patients with an average age of 14.2+-4 years (range 6 to 48 years). Resection and reconstruction with primary anastomosis was performed in seven patients, while conservative treatment with dilation was performed in two patients. One patient refused surgery. Operations performed included resection of tracheocricoid segment with tracheothyroid anastomosis (N=3) and tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis (N=4). The resected airway ranged from 3 cm to 6 cm. In view of the intense inflammatory and fibrotic process in and around stenotic segment, the practice of tracheostomy for the relief of postintubation acute tracheal obstruction should not be taken lightly, as it adds not only to the severity of the inflammatory process, but also increases the length of the tracheal segment to be resected. Postoperatively, all patients were extubated; this was accomplished by the end of surgery in six patients, while the seventh patient was extubated three weeks later. There was no mortality in this series. When normal functional activity and airway patency were taken as two parameters to judge the outcome of the surgery, results were good in six (86%) patients and satisfactory in one. These results support the validity of the one-stage reconstruction approach as one alternative for the treatment of postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions. (author)

  11. Thyroidectomy improves tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with nodular goiter. A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Lauridsen, Jeppe Killerich; Døssing, Helle

    Background: A large goiter may cause compression of the trachea and lead to respiratory insufficiency. We aimed at investigating the effects of thyroidectomy on tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with benign nodular goiter, employing a prospective observational study. Methods: Magnetic reso...... improvement in tracheal compression, but only minor improvements in tracheal airflow. This information is pertinent when counselling patients before choice of treatment....

  12. Imaging diagnosis of primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Qing; Cai Chaoda

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To improve the imaging diagnosis of the primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Methods: Clinical manifestations and imaging findings were retrospectively studied in 20 cases of ACC proved by histological examinations. Results: ACC is often found in the posterior wall of trachea in younger patients. ACC grew slowly and lymphatic metastasis was rare. The nodular, diffuse or infiltrative growth of ACC was revealed on tomography, CT, MPR with spiral CT scan and MRI. Conclusion: Like other tracheal tumor, ACC can easily be miss-diagnosed. With further understanding of imaging findings and a clinical concern, the early diagnosis can be obtained in most patients with ACC

  13. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  14. A new retrograde transillumination technique for videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biro, P; Fried, E; Schlaepfer, M

    2018-01-01

    This single-centre, prospective trial was designed to assess the efficacy of a new retrograde transillumination device called the 'Infrared Red Intubation System' (IRRIS) to aid videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation. We included 40 adult patients, who were undergoing elective urological surgery......-10])), credibility (10 (8-10 [5-10])) and ease of use (10 (9-10 [8-10])). Tracheal intubation with the system lasted 26 (16-32 [6-89]) s. No alternative technique of securing the airway was necessary. The lowest SpO2 during intubation was 98 (97-99 [91-100])%. We conclude that this method of retrograde...

  15. Tracheal dimness as a sign of mediastinal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavon, F.; Nardini, S.; Giannico, S.

    1987-01-01

    Some cases of mediastinal pathology in which the only pathological pattern was a dimness of the tracheal transparency are described. This sign is not described in previous report and is described as a short break in the aerial tracheogram as seen on the frontal roentgenograph. This sign is produced by an increase in the structures outside the trachea or by a decrease in the air column inside the trachea. Conventional and CT anatomic findings which account for the sign are discussed. A short review of the normal causes of tracheal dimness is presented. This sign may be useful expecially in emergency radiology, since it provides additional information to a simple routine chest roentgenograph

  16. Tracheal stent placement for the emergency management of tracheal collapse in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Dogs with tracheal collapse may present with life-threatening upper airway obstruction. In most instances, a conservative approach to treatment including oxygen support coupled with sedation and cooling measures will relieve respiratory effort and thus relieve airway obstruction. Dogs that fail this conservative approach require endotracheal intubation to ensure a patent airway. This population of patients would benefit from a more definitive, yet palliative treatment option to acutely relieve upper airway obstruction. Placement of a self-expanding metallic stent that spans the affected portion of the trachea will acutely provide the patient with a sustained patent airway and optimize the likelihood of a positive outcome. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acrolein relaxes mouse isolated tracheal smooth muscle via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Esther Y; Burcham, Philip C; Mann, Tracy S; Henry, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Airway sensory C-fibres express TRPA1 channels which have recently been identified as a key chemosensory receptor for acrolein, a toxic and highly prevalent component of smoke. TRPA1 likely plays an intermediary role in eliciting a range of effects induced by acrolein including cough and neurogenic inflammation. Currently, it is not known whether acrolein-induced activation of TRPA1 produces other airway effects including relaxation of mouse airway smooth muscle. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of acrolein on airway smooth muscle tone in mouse isolated trachea, and to characterise the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the effects of acrolein. Isometric tension recording studies were conducted on mouse isolated tracheal segments to characterise acrolein-induced relaxation responses. Release of the relaxant PGE₂ was measured by EIA to examine its role in the response. Use of selective antagonists/inhibitors permitted pharmacological characterisation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this relaxation response. Acrolein induced dose-dependent relaxation responses in mouse isolated tracheal segments. Importantly, these relaxation responses were significantly inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonists AP-18 and HC-030031, an NK₁ receptor antagonist RP-67580, and the EP₂ receptor antagonist PF-04418948, whilst completely abolished by the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin. Acrolein also caused rapid PGE₂ release which was suppressed by HC-030031. In summary, acrolein induced a novel bronchodilator response in mouse airways. Pharmacologic studies indicate that acrolein-induced relaxation likely involves interplay between TRPA1-expressing airway sensory C-fibres, NK₁ receptor-expressing epithelial cells, and EP₂-receptor expressing airway smooth muscle cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Avian influenza virus infection in apparently healthy domestic birds in Sokoto, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent Okwundu Nwankwo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted among apparently healthy birds brought from different local government areas, neighbouring states and across international boundaries to the Sokoto central live bird market between October 2008 and March 2009. Tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected from 221 apparently healthy birds comprising 182 chickens, 3 turkeys, 11 guineafowl, 17 ducks and 8 pigeons. These samples were analysed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR to check for the presence of avian influenza virus. An overall prevalence of 1.4% (3 positive cases was detected with two cases observed in chickens and one in a pigeon. The findings indicate the circulation of avian influenza in the study area. This raises concern for human and animal health due to zoonotic and economic implications of this virus.

  19. A National Emergency Airway Registry for children: landscape of tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishisaki, Akira; Turner, David A; Brown, Calvin A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2013-03-01

    To characterize the landscape of process of care and safety outcomes for tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units Procedural process of care and safety outcomes of tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units has not been described. We hypothesize that the novel National Emergency Airway Registry for Children registry is a feasible tool to capture tracheal intubation process of care and outcomes. Prospective, descriptive. Fifteen academic PICUs in North America. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation in PICUs. Tracheal intubation quality improvement data were prospectively collected for all initial tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs from July 2010 to December 2011 using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children tool with explicit site-specific compliance plans and operational definitions including adverse tracheal intubation associated events. One thousand seven hundred fifteen tracheal intubation encounters were reported (averaging 1/3.4 days, or 1/86 bed days). Ninety-eight percent of primary tracheal intubation were successful; 86% were successful with less than or equal to two attempts. First attempt was by pediatric residents in 23%, pediatric critical care fellows in 41%, and critical care attending physicians in 13%: first attempt success rate was 62%, first provider success rate was 79%. The first method was oral intubation in 1,659 (98%) and nasal in 55 (2%). Direct laryngoscopy was used in 96%. Ninety percent of tracheal intubation were with cuffed tracheal tubes. Adverse tracheal intubation associated events were reported in 20% of intubations (n = 372), with severe tracheal intubation associated events in 6% (n = 115). Esophageal intubation with immediate recognition was the most common tracheal intubation associated events (n = 167, 9%). History of difficult airway, diagnostic category, unstable hemodynamics, and resident provider as first airway provider were associated with occurrence of tracheal

  20. Laryngeal Preservation in Managing Advanced Tracheal Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavakumar Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male athlete was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma following investigation for dyspnea, wheeze, and eventual stridor. Preoperative bronchoscopy revealed a highly vascular tumor 4 cm distal to the cricoid with no gross disease extending to the carina. Imaging revealed circumferential tracheal irregularity immediately inferior to the cricoid, with no definite cricoid invasion. Locoregional extension of disease was noted invading the thyroid and abutment of the carotid approximately 180°. Intraoperative findings identified tracheal mucosal disease extending distal to the carina and proximally at the cricothyroid joints where bilateral functional recurrent nerves were preserved. A decision made to preserve the larynx given the inability to fully resect distal tracheal disease. A 5 cm sleeve resection of the trachea was made with a cricotracheal anastomosis following suprahyoidal muscle release and laryngeal drop-down. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy including platinum based chemotherapy in an effort to maximise local control. PET scanning three months after therapy revealed no FDG uptake locally or distally.

  1. Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studio G5

    ABSTRACT. Introduction. Tracheal intubation is accompanied by an increased blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this study was to find the most important source of this haemodynamic response, namely laryngoscopy or intubation. Method. A standard induction technique was used for all patients. Eighty patients ...

  2. Tracheoesophageal Fistula due to a Damaged Tracheal Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management of a tracheoesophageal fistula due to a damaged tracheal stent, which was first inserted to treat tracheal stenosis. A 29-year-old woman with a history of treated epilepsy had a seizure and suffered from smoke inhalation during a fire. Breathing difficulties appeared and gradually worsened; consultation was obtained two years afterward. After undergoing a thorough examination, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal strangulation. A noncovered, metallic stent was inserted. When the patient was 37 years old, she was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of a tracheoesophageal fistula. We diagnosed it as a tracheoesophageal fistula due to the collapse of the damaged tracheal stent toward the esophageal side, and we decided to perform a mediastinal tracheostomy. Granulation may be formed in the circumference of a stent that has been present for a prolonged period, and removal of the stent may become difficult. This case suggests that insertion of a noncovered, metallic stent is contraindicated for a benign disease.

  3. Difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation due to calcified stylohyoid ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, O O; Elegbe, E O

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation caused by calcified stylohyoid ligaments are presented. Neither patient exhibited a skin crease over the hyoid bone. It is suggested that inability to lift up the epiglottis from the posterior pharyngeal wall be taken as a more useful sign of this condition than the presence of the skin crease.

  4. [Circular tracheal resection for cicatrical stenosis and functioning tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V D; Titov, V A; Parshin, V V; Parshin, A V; Berikkhanov, Z; Amangeldiev, D M

    To analyze the results of tracheal resection for cicatricial stenosis depending on the presence of tracheostomy. 1128 patients with tracheal cicatricial stenosis were treated for the period 1963-2015. The first group consisted of 297 patients for the period 1963-2000, the second group - 831 patients for the period 2001-2015. Most of them 684 (60.6%) were young and able-bodied (age from 21 to 50 years). In the first group 139 (46.8%) out of 297 patients had functioning tracheostomy. For the period 2001-2015 tracheostomy was made in 430 (51.7%) out of 831 patients with cicatricial stenosis. Time of cannulation varied from a few weeks to 21 years. Re-tracheostomy within various terms after decanulation was performed in 68 (15.8%) patients. Tracheal resection with anastomosis was performed in 59 and 330 in both groups respectively. At present time these operations are performed more often in view of their standard fashion in everyday practice. In the second group tracheal resection followed by anastomosis was observed in 110 (25.6%) out of 430 patients with tracheostomy that is 4.4 times more often than in previous years. In total 2 patients died after 330 circular tracheal resections within 2001-2015 including one patient with and one patient without tracheostomy. Mortality was 0.6%. Moreover, this value was slightly higher in patients operated with a functioning tracheostomy compared with those without it - 0.9 vs. 0.5% respectively. The causes of death were bleeding into tracheobronchial lumen and pulmonary embolism. The source of bleeding after tracheal resection was innominate artery. Overall incidence of postoperative complications was 2 times higher in tracheostomy patients compared with those without it - 22 (20%) vs. 26 (11.8%) cases respectively. Convalescence may be achieved in 89.8% patients after circular tracheal resection. Adverse long-term results are associated with postoperative complications. So their prevention and treatment will improve the

  5. Tracheal and Crico-Tracheal Resection and Anastomosis for Malignancies Involving the Thyroid Gland and the Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cesare; Del Bon, Francesca; Barbieri, Diego; Grazioli, Paola; Paderno, Alberto; Perotti, Pietro; Lombardi, Davide; Peretti, Giorgio; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate outcomes in different malignancies involving the thyroid and infiltrating the airway submitted to tracheal (TRA) or crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis (CTRA). Retrospective charts review of 27 patients affected by thyroid malignancies involving the airway treated by TRA/CTRA in a single academic institution. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate the overall (OS) and disease-specific (DSS) survivals and local (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC). Impact on survival of age, comorbidities, previous radiotherapy, types of TRA/CTRA, Shin's stage (II, III, IV), grading (well vs poorly differentiated), and length of airway resected was calculated by the log-rank test. Overall survival and DSS at 3 and 5 years were 82.3% and 71.6%, respectively. Local control and LRC in the entire group were 82.3% at 3 and 5 years. Crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis involving the cricoid arch and plate (type C) and tumor differentiation significantly affected OS and DSS (both P < .001). Type C CTRA and tumor differentiation significantly impacted on LC (P = .002 and P = .009, respectively). Grading and extension of CTRA to the cricoid plate are the most important factors for oncologic outcomes in thyroid malignancies infiltrating the airway. Except for poorly differentiated tumors, TRA/CTRA allows adequate LC even in advanced stage lesions involving the crico-tracheal junction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Automated extraction of avian influenza virus for rapid detection using real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Deepanker; Zellers, Corey; Acland, Helen; Pedersen, Janice C

    2007-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza (AI) poses a grave risk to human health. An important aspect of influenza control is rapid diagnosis. This study describes the efficiency of AI-RNA extraction utilizing silica-based magnetic beads with robotics and its detection with an influenza A matrix gene real-time RT-PCR from tracheal swabs, and compares it to virus isolation and manual spin column extractions. Analytical sensitivity was assessed by performing dilution analysis and detection of H2N2 AI viral RNA. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was assessed by analyzing tracheal swabs collected from H7N2 infected and uninfected chickens. Both manual and robotic extractions detected AI virus at 1log(10)EID(50)/ml. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of matrix gene detection with the automated extraction method for chicken tracheal swab specimens was similar to that of virus isolation and the manual extraction method. There were only three discordant results among 212 tested specimens. The main advantages of automated robotic viral nucleic acid extraction are high throughput processing; hands-free operation; and reduction in human and technical error. This study demonstrates successful detection of influenza A virus with magnetic beads utilizing the Qiagen MagAttract cell kit on a BioRobot M48 platform.

  7. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  8. Avian pox in blue-fronted Amazon parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S E; Lowenstine, L J; Ardans, A A

    1981-12-01

    During a 1-month period at a quarantine station, an epornitic of avian pox occurred in blue-fronted Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva). Clinical signs included conjunctivitis, blepharitis, and varying degrees of anorexia and respiratory distress. Lesions included periocular ulcerations and scabs and necrotic plaques in the oral cavity. Histologically, the lesions consisted of epithelial hyperplasia, secondary inflammatory changes, and eosinophilic inclusions which, by electron microscopy, were shown to contain poxvirus. When chicken embryos were inoculated with material from eyelid scabs and pharyngeal plaques, lesions of avian pox developed on the chorioallantoic membrane. The death rate of infected birds was high because of secondary bacterial and fungal infections, but uncomplicated cases were usually self-limiting. Periocular lesions also developed in 2 other species of psittacine birds housed in the same facility.

  9. The use of tracheal sounds for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have been the subject of many research studies. In this review, we describe the state of the art, original work relevant to upper airways obstruction during sleep, and ongoing research concerning the methods used when analysing tracheal sounds. Tracheal sound sensors are a simple and noninvasive means of measurement and are more reliable than other breathing sensors. Developments in acoustic processing techniques and enhancements in tracheal sound signals over the past decade have led to improvements in the accuracy and clinical relevance of diagnoses based on this technology. Past and current research suggests that they may have a significant role in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea. Key points Tracheal sounds are currently a topic of significant interest but are not yet used in most routine sleep study systems. Measured at the suprasternal notch, tracheal sounds can provide reliable information on breathing sounds, snoring sounds and respiratory efforts. Tracheal sounds may be used as a noninvasive method of studying abnormalities of the upper airways during wakefulness. Educational aims To understand the principles of tracheal sound measurement and analysis. To highlight the importance of tracheal sounds for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea–hypopnoea syndrome. To present the most relevant clinical studies that have validated the use of tracheal sound sensors and to make future clinical validation studies possible. PMID:29184596

  10. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  11. Drosophila syndecan regulates tracheal cell migration by stabilizing Robo levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim G; Ceulemans, Helga; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Baietti, Maria F; Affolter, Markus; Hassan, Bassem A; David, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify a new role for Syndecan (Sdc), the only transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan in Drosophila, in tracheal development. Sdc is required cell autonomously for efficient directed migration and fusion of dorsal branch cells, but not for dorsal branch formation per se. The cytoplasmic domain of Sdc is dispensable, indicating that Sdc does not transduce a signal by itself. Although the branch-specific phenotype of sdc mutants resembles those seen in the absence of Slit/Robo2 signalling, genetic interaction experiments indicate that Sdc also helps to suppress Slit/Robo2 signalling. We conclude that Sdc cell autonomously regulates Slit/Robo2 signalling in tracheal cells to guarantee ordered directional migration and branch fusion. PMID:21836636

  12. Tracheal stenting under flexible bronchoscopy for large tracheoesophageal malignant lymphadenopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Irfan Ismail; Kannan, Kalaichelvi; Dhenesh, R; Thiagarajan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with poorly controlled chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with progressive dysphagia and was diagnosed with locally advanced carcinoma of the esophagus. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography staging showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy including a large lymph node in the tracheoesophageal groove with moderate tracheal compression. He was advised chemoradiotherapy but was reluctant to proceed with the same. He developed stridor 2 months later and repeat imaging showed increased size of the tracheoesophageal lymph node with critical airway narrowing. Since he was not fit for general anesthesia, he was subjected to tracheal stenting with self-expandable metal stent under flexible bronchoscopy. Following stent placement, there was relief of dyspnea, and stridor and the patient was discharged. PMID:28474657

  13. Effect of aging on tracheal mucociliary clearance in Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, S.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Tracheal mucous velocity measurements were made in 24 Beagle dogs, in 5 age groups, using a gamma camera to detect movement on instilled radiolabeled material. Age groups were defined as immature, young adult, middle-aged, mature, and aged dogs. Mean velocities (+/- SE) were 3.6 +/- 0.4 mm/min in the immature dogs, 9.8 +/- 0.7 mm/min in the young adults, 6.9 +/- 0.5 mm/min in the middle-aged dogs, 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min in the mature dogs, and 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm/min in the aged dogs. Tracheal mucous velocity was significantly faster in the young adult and middle-aged groups than in the immature, mature, and aged dog groups. 4 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  14. Transoral tracheal intubation of rodents using a fiberoptic laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D L; Lehmann, J R; Harold, W M; Drew, R T

    1986-06-01

    A fiberoptic laryngoscope which allows direct visualization of the deep pharynx and epiglottis has been developed for transoral tracheal intubation of small laboratory mammals. The device has been employed in the intubation and instillation of a variety of substances into the lungs of rats, and with minor modification, has had similar application in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. The simplicity and ease of handling of the laryngoscope permits one person to intubate large numbers of enflurane anesthetized animals either on an open counter top or in a glove-box, as may be required for administration of carcinogenic materials. Instillation of 7Be-labeled carbon particles into the lungs of mice, hamsters, rats, and guinea pigs resulted in reasonably consistent interlobal distribution of particles for each test animal species with minimal tracheal deposition. However, actual lung tissue doses of carbon exhibited some species dependence.

  15. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchelle Edith

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa.

  16. Gene expression profiling of Drosophila tracheal fusion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Rachana R; Iordanou, Ekaterini; Ajja, Crystal; Wille, Michael; Jiang, Lan

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila trachea is a premier genetic system to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of tubular organ formation. Tracheal fusion cells lead the branch fusion process to form an interconnected tubular network. Therefore, fusion cells in the Drosophila trachea will be an excellent model to study branch fusion in mammalian tubular organs, such as kidneys and blood vessels. The fusion process is a dynamic cellular process involving cell migration, adhesion, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and membrane fusion. To understand how these cellular events are coordinated, we initiated the critical step to assemble a gene expression profile of fusion cells. For this study, we analyzed the expression of 234 potential tracheal-expressed genes in fusion cells during fusion cell development. 143 Tracheal genes were found to encode transcription factors, signal proteins, cytoskeleton and matrix proteins, transporters, and proteins with unknown function. These genes were divided into four subgroups based on their levels of expression in fusion cells compared to neighboring non-fusion cells revealed by in situ hybridization: (1) genes that have relative high abundance in fusion cells, (2) genes that are dynamically expressed in fusion cells, (3) genes that have relative low abundance in fusion cells, and (4) genes that are expressed at similar levels in fusion cells and non-fusion tracheal cells. This study identifies the expression profile of fusion cells and hypothetically suggests genes which are necessary for the fusion process and which play roles in distinct stages of fusion, as indicated by the location and timing of expression. These data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of branch fusion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  18. Cigarette smoke causes rapid lipid peroxidation of rat tracheal epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Churg, A.; Cherukupalli, K.

    1993-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced lipid peroxidation may be an important mechanism of smoke toxicity, but attempts to demonstrate peroxidation of pulmonary tissues after smoke exposure have yielded conflicting results. To examine this question, we exposed rat tracheal explants to whole smoke for 10 minutes followed by air recovery for periods up to 50 minutes (test), or to air alone (controls) and measured conjugated diene levels in the tissue. A dose-related increase in conjugated diene levels was see...

  19. Recurrent Obstructive Fibrinous Tracheal Pseudomembranes in a Young English Bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, E; Guieu, L V; Le Boedec, K

    2017-03-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a common procedure, rarely associated with life-threatening complications (e.g., tracheal rupture, necrosis, foreign body). A 1.5-year-old English Bulldog was presented for respiratory distress, with increased respiratory efforts and stridor, 2 days after endotracheal intubation. Cervical and thoracic radiographs disclosed a severe narrowing of the tracheal lumen associated with an intraluminal soft-tissue structure at the thoracic inlet. Tracheoscopy confirmed the presence of an obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane (OFTP) creating a 1-way valve obstruction. Removal of the OFTP dramatically improved the dog's respiratory function, but the lesion reformed twice despite corticosteroid and antibiotic therapy PO, warranting repeated endoscopic removal of the OFTP. No additional recurrences were observed after treatment with inhaled heparin and N-acetylcysteine q4h. No respiratory signs were reported 9 months after discharge. Postintubation OFTP has been reported rarely in humans and never described in dogs. Unexplained signs of upper airway obstruction shortly after endotracheal intubation should prompt consideration of OFTP in dogs, even if intubation was uneventful. Unlike its counterpart in humans, OFTP in dogs can reoccur after endoscopic removal, warranting repeated endoscopic extraction. A combination of corticosteroid therapy PO and heparin and N-acetylcysteine inhalation q4h may be attempted if recurrence is observed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Multimodal non-surgical treatment of a feline tracheal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Azevedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old, castrated male domestic shorthair cat presented with a 2–3 month history of weight loss, lethargy and coughing. Thoracic radiographs revealed a soft tissue opacity overlying the dorsal trachea from the first rib to second rib and the ventral aspect of the trachea extending from the second rib to approximately the fourth rib. CT confirmed a mass involving the dorsal, right lateral and ventral aspects of the trachea narrowing the lumen and extending from vertebra C7 through T4. Bronchoscopy revealed a partially circumferential irregular and multilobulated tracheal mass, which was biopsied. The histopathological diagnosis was tracheal adenocarcinoma. The cat was treated with a definitive course of external beam radiation therapy (RT; 3 Gy × 18, cytotoxic chemotherapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and palliative RT. The cat remained asymptomatic for 2 months and the mass remained stable radiographically for 11 months after RT. Relevance and novel information With multimodal treatment the cat had a survival time of 755 days. Initial treatment included definitive RT, carboplatin and piroxicam, followed by toceranib phosphate and palliative RT when the mass recurred. This case report describes the first documented use of non-surgical treatment and long-term outcome of tracheal adenocarcinoma in a cat. This case report is an indication that prolonged survival can be achieved with multimodal therapy.

  1. Successful Healing of Tracheal Radionecrosis: Role of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel; Morales, Arturo; Grajeda, Jose; López-Lisbona, Rosa; Cubero, Noelia; Dorca, Jordi; Rosell, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the administration of 100% oxygen at pressures > 1 atm, is believed to promote wound healing by increasing angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. To our knowledge, this treatment modality has never been described in patients with tracheal radionecrosis. Here, we report the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with stage IIIB lung adenocarcinoma who was treated with chemotherapy and concomitant external intensity-modulated radiotherapy involving the left lung and mediastinum. Nine months later, he presented with neck pain, cough with mucopurulent sputum, and fever. A PET-CT scan revealed a fissure in the posterior wall of the left upper trachea. Flexible bronchoscopy showed a tracheal ulceration with a small left posterior wall fissure that extended into the mediastinum. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that suggests that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, local debridement, and antibiotics is a feasible and successful management option for patients with complicated tracheal radionecrosis. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Avian and human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broor, Shobha; Bharaj, Preeti

    2007-04-01

    Pneumovirus infection remains a significant problem for both human and veterinary medicine. Both avian pneumovirus (aMPV, Turkey rhinotracheitis virus) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are pathogens of birds and humans, which are associated with respiratory tract infections. Based on their different genomic organization and low level of nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity with paramyxoviruses in the genus Pneumovirus, aMPV and hMPV have been classified into a new genus referred to as Metapneumovirus. The advancement of our understanding of pneumovirus biology and pathogenesis of pneumovirus disease in specific natural hosts can provide us with strategies for vaccine formulations and combined antiviral and immunomodulatory therapies.

  3. Thyroidectomy improves tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with nodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Lauridsen, Jeppe Killerich; Døssing, Helle

    Objectives: A large goiter may cause compression of the trachea and lead to respiratory insufficiency. We aimed at investigating the effects of thyroidectomy on tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with benign nodular goiter, employing a prospective observational study. Methods: Magnetic reso...... to substantial improvement in tracheal compression, but only minor improvements in tracheal airflow. This information is pertinent when counselling patients before choice of treatment....

  4. Efficacy of gamithromycin against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkey poults pre-infected with avian metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watteyn, Anneleen; Devreese, Mathias; Plessers, Elke; Wyns, Heidi; Garmyn, An; Reddy, Vishwanatha R A P; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2016-10-01

    Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale is an avian respiratory pathogen that affects turkeys. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of gamithromycin (GAM) against O. rhinotracheale in turkeys. The birds were inoculated oculonasally with 10(8) colony-forming units (cfu) of O. rhinotracheale, preceded by infection with avian metapneumovirus. In addition to a negative (CONTR-) and a positive control group (CONTR+) there were two treated groups administered GAM (6 mg/kg) either subcutaneously (GAM SC) or orally (GAM PO) by administration as a single bolus at one-day post-bacterial infection (p.b.i.). From the start of the avian metapneumovirus infection until the end of the experiment, the turkeys were examined clinically and scored daily. In addition, tracheal swabs were collected at several days p.b.i. Necropsy was performed at 4, 8 and 12 days p.b.i. to evaluate the presence of gross lesions, and to collect trachea and lung tissue samples and air sac swabs for O. rhinotracheale quantification. The clinical score of the GAM SC group showed slightly lower values and birds recovered earlier than those in the GAM PO and CONTR+ groups. O. rhinotracheale cfus were significantly reduced in tracheal swabs of the SC group between 2 and 4 days p.b.i. At necropsy, CONTR+ showed higher O. rhinotracheale cfu in lung tissues compared to the treated groups. Moreover, at 8 days p.b.i. only the lung samples of CONTR+ were positive. In conclusion, the efficacy of GAM against O. rhinotracheale was demonstrated, especially in the lung tissue. However, the PO bolus administration of the commercially available product was not as efficacious as the SC bolus.

  5. Teaching tracheal intubation: Airtraq is superior to Macintosh laryngoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope is taught to medical students as it is a lifesaving procedure. However, it is a difficult technique to learn and the consequences of intubation failure are potentially serious. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a relatively novel intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic plane without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, possessing advantages over Macintosh for novice personnel. We introduced a teaching mode featured with a progressive evaluation scheme for preparation and performance of tracheal intubation with medical students in this prospective randomized crossover trial who had no prior airway management experience to find the superior one. Methods Twenty-six medical students of the 8-year programme in the 6th year participated in this trial, when they did their one-week rotation in the department of anaesthesiology. Each of the students intubated 6 patients, who were scheduled for surgeries under general anaesthesia, each laryngoscope for 3 patients respectively. One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients scheduled for surgical procedures requiring tracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to undergo tracheal intubation using Macintosh (n = 75) or Airtraq (n =74) laryngoscope. The progressive evaluation scheme was applied to each intubation attempt. Results Intubation success rate was significantly higher in Airtraq group than Macintosh group (87.8% vs. 66.7%, P Cormack and Lehane glottic view was obtained in 94.6% of patients in the Airtraq group versus 32% of patients in the Macintosh group (P <0.001). Duration of intubation in Airtraq group was significantly shorter (68 ± 21 s vs. 96 ± 22 s, P < 0.05) compared to Macintosh group. Conclusions Airtraq laryngoscope is easier to master for novice personnel with a higher intubation success rate and shorter intubation duration compared with the Macintosh

  6. Huge Tracheal Diverticulum in a Patient with Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mondoni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal diverticulum is a rare benign entity. Tracheobronchomegaly (TBM, also known as Mounier-Kuhn syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by marked dilation of the trachea and main bronchi, associated with thinning or atrophy of the elastic tissue. Because of the weakened trachea and increased intraluminal pressure related to chronic cough, some patients may develop mucosal herniation leading to tracheal diverticulosis. We report the case of a patient with TBM with a huge tracheal diverticulum, diagnosed by bronchoscopy and computed tomography with three-dimensional reconstruction. To our knowledge this is the largest tracheal diameter described in a patient affected by this syndrome.

  7. Tracheal Penetration and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Caused by an Esophageal Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Venuthurimilli, Arun; Ahuja, Vineet; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal penetration of esophageal self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) with/without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) formation is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 66-year-old female patient with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone palliative esophageal stenting on three occasions for recurrent esophageal stent obstruction. On evaluation of symptoms of breathing difficulty and aspiration following third esophageal stent placement, tracheal erosion and TEF formation due to the tracheal penetration by esophageal stent were diagnosed. The patient was successfully managed by covered tracheal SEMS placement under flexible bronchoscopy. PMID:25276461

  8. Tracheal Penetration and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Caused by an Esophageal Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Madan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal penetration of esophageal self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS with/without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF formation is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 66-year-old female patient with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone palliative esophageal stenting on three occasions for recurrent esophageal stent obstruction. On evaluation of symptoms of breathing difficulty and aspiration following third esophageal stent placement, tracheal erosion and TEF formation due to the tracheal penetration by esophageal stent were diagnosed. The patient was successfully managed by covered tracheal SEMS placement under flexible bronchoscopy.

  9. Avian Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Takahiro; Miyahara, Daichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Germ cells transmit genetic information to the next generation through gametogenesis. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ-cell population established during development, and are the common origins of both oocytes and spermatogonia. Unlike in other species, PGCs in birds undergo blood circulation to migrate toward the genital ridge, and are one of the major biological properties of avian PGCs. Germ cells enter meiosis and arrest at prophase I during embryogenesis in females, whereas in males they enter mitotic arrest during embryogenesis and enter meiosis only after birth. In chicken, gonadal sex differentiation occurs as early as embryonic day 6, but meiotic initiation of female germ cells starts from a relatively late stage (embryonic day 15.5). Retinoic acid controls meiotic entry in developing chicken gonads through the expressions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2, a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme, and cytochrome P450 family 26, subfamily B member 1, a major retinoic acid-degrading enzyme. The other major biological property of avian PGCs is that they can be propagated in vitro for the long term, and this technique is useful for investigating proliferation mechanisms. The main factor involved in chicken PGC proliferation is fibroblast growth factor 2, which activates the signaling of MEK/ERK and thus promotes the cell cycle and anti-apoptosis. Furthermore, the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling is indispensable for the proliferation and survival of chicken PGCs.

  10. Isolation and characterization of virus of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wiyono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the isolation and characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia was conducted at Indonesian Research Institute for Veterinary Science. Outbreaks of avian disease had been reported in Indonesia since August 2003 affecting commercial layer, broiler, quail, and ostrich and also native chicken with showing clinical signs such as cyanosis of wattle and comb, nasal discharges and hypersalivation, subcutaneous ptechiae on foot and leg, diarre and sudden high mortality. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the causal agent of the disease. Samples of serum, feather follicle, tracheal swab, as well as organs of proventriculus, intestine, caecal tonsil, trachea and lungs were collected from infected animals. Serum samples were tested haemaglutination/haemaglutination inhibition to Newcastle Disease and Egg Drop Syndrome viruses. Isolation of virus of the causal agent of the outbreak was conducted from samples of feather follicle, tracheal swab, and organs using 11 days old specific pathogen free (SPF embryonated eggs. The isolated viruses were then characterised by agar gel precipitation test using swine influenza reference antisera, by haemaglutination inhibition using H1 to H15 reference antisera, and by electron microscope examination. The pathogenicity of the viruses was confirmed by intravenous pathogenicity index test and its culture in Chicken Embryo Fibroblast primary cell culture without addition of trypsin. The study revealed that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus based upon serological tests, virus isolation and characterization using swine influenza reference antisera, and electron microscope examination. While subtyping of the viruses using H1 to H15 reference antisera suggested that the virus is very likely to be an avian influenza H5N1 subtype virus. The pathogenicity test confirmed that the viruses

  11. Difficulty with cuff deflation of reinforced tracheal tube caused by inflation line occlusion with silk thread ligation and fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Sayoko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Imai, Eriko; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-03-05

    A reinforced tracheal tube, ligated with silk threads, was inserted into a tracheostomy orifice and fixed to the skin. The cuff inflation line of the reinforced tracheal tube became occluded. Reinforced 'armoured' tracheal tubes have a spiral of wire embedded into the wall of the tube to give strength and flexibility, and may be sharply bent without compromising the tube lumen. The tracheal cuff attached to the tube is inflated by injecting air through a narrow-diameter tube welded to the outside of the tracheal tube. When a reinforced tracheal tube is ligated and fixed with silk threads, it should be confirmed whether the tracheal tube cuff can be deflated and inflated after fixation. Moreover, because occlusion can be eliminated by removing all silk threads used to ligate a tracheal tube, they should be removed before extubation. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consultations Fact sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic) Fact sheet ... respiratory tract infection (fever and cough), early sputum production and rapid progression to severe pneumonia, sepsis with ...

  13. Protective roles of free avian respiratory macrophages in captive birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbuvi P. Mutua

    Full Text Available In the mammalian lung, respiratory macrophages provide front line defense against invading pathogens and particulate matter. In birds, respiratory macrophages are known as free avian respiratory macrophages (FARM and a dearth of the cells in the avian lung has been purported to foreordain a weak first line of pulmonary defense, a condition associated with high mortality of domestic birds occasioned by respiratory inflictions. Avian pulmonary mechanisms including a three tiered aerodynamic filtration system, tight epithelial junctions and an efficient mucociliary escalator system have been known to supplement FARM protective roles. Current studies, however, report FARM to exhibit an exceptionally efficient phagocytic capacity and are effective in elimination of invading pathogens. In this review, we also report on effects of selective synthetic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ agonists on non phlogistic phagocytic properties in the FARM. To develop effective therapeutic interventions targeting FARM in treatment and management of respiratory disease conditions in the poultry, further studies are required to fully understand the role of FARM in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  14. Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia: retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica de Fátima de Assunção Braga

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The temporary fetal tracheal occlusion performed by fetoscopy accelerates lung development and reduces neonatal mortality. The aim of this paper is to present an anesthetic experience in pregnant women, whose fetuses have diaphragmatic hernia, undergoing fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO. Method: Retrospective, descriptive study, approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were obtained from medical and anesthetic records. Results: FETO was performed in 28 pregnant women. Demographic characteristics: age 29.8 ± 6.5; weight 68.64 ± 12.26; ASA I and II. Obstetric: IG 26.1 ± 1.10 weeks (in FETO; 32.86 ± 1.58 (reversal of occlusion; 34.96 ± 2.78 (delivery. Delivery: cesarean section, vaginal delivery. Fetal data: Weight (g in the occlusion and delivery times, respectively (1045.82 ± 222.2 and 2294 ± 553; RPC in FETO and reversal of occlusion: 0.7 ± 0.15 and 1.32 ± 0.34, respectively. Preoperative maternal anesthesia included ranitidine and metoclopramide, nifedipine (VO and indomethacin (rectal. Preanesthetic medication with midazolam IV. Anesthetic techniques: combination of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5-10 mg and sufentanil; continuous epidural predominantly with 0.5% bupivacaine associated with sufentanil, fentanyl, or morphine; general. In 8 cases, there was need to complement via catheter, with 5 submitted to PC and 3 to BC. Thirteen patients required intraoperative sedation; ephedrine was used in 15 patients. Fetal anesthesia: fentanyl 10-20 mg.kg-1 and pancuronium 0.1-0.2 mg.kg-1 (IM. Neonatal survival rate was 60.7%. Conclusion: FETO is a minimally invasive technique for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair. Combined blockade associated with sedation and fetal anesthesia proved safe and effective for tracheal occlusion.

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF TRACHEAL SOUNDS PRECEDING, DURING AND FOLLOWING HYPOPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA--HYPOPNEA SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    大西, 徳信

    2000-01-01

    The author analyzed night tracheal sounds of hypopnea events in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Tracheal sounds were recorded on a video tape recorder through a microphone attached to the anterior neck over the trachea during overnight polysomnography. In each patient ten hypopnea episodes were selected for analysis. Tracheal sounds were analyzed using sound-spectrogram and power spectra. Mean power spectra of inspiratory and expiratory tracheal sounds with...

  16. Reconstruction of a large tracheal defect using Gore-Tex and external wire stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiqing; Huang, Jie; Hu, Hao; Geng, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of a tracheal defect remains to be one of the biggest challenges in thoracic surgery. We present a case in which we used Gore-Tex and an external wire stent to reconstruct 7 cm of the trachea and obtained satisfactory outcomes. Gore-Tex appears to be a biocompatible, stable, and reversible material that can be safely used to reconstruct tracheal defects.

  17. Incidence and treatment of tracheal cancer: a nationwide study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honings, J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Marres, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and survival of patients with tracheal malignancies in the Netherlands. METHODS: All cases of tracheal cancer entered into the database of the Netherlands Cancer Registry in the period 1989-2002 were selected.

  18. Tracheal involvement of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Kyung Sik; Jeon, Kyung Neough; Kang, Duk Sik

    2002-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the trachea are rare, the most prevalent histologies beeing squamous cell and adenoid cystic carcinoma. A review of the literature revealed only ten cases of primary tracheal or bronchial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We describe a case in which tracheal involvement of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, a subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, occurred

  19. Medical image of the week: severe atelectasis with tracheal shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojary I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old woman with severe oxygen dependent COPD presented with acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and was found to have left lower lobe collapse with tracheal shift. Her past medical history consists of severe malnutrition, alcohol abuse, and emphysema with recurrent pneumonias associated with acute respiratory failure often requiring intubation. She has greater than a 50-pack year history of tobacco use. She has undergone bronchoscopy and multiple CT Chest imaging without evidence of an endobronchial lesion or malignancy. Postural drainage and percussion along with antibiotics and inhaled bronchodilators resulted in marked improvement in the left lower lobe.

  20. Video laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of video-assisted laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation. Video-assisted, rigid laryngoscopes have been recently introduced that allow for the illumination of the airway and the accurate placement of the endotracheal tube. Two such devices are available in Canada: the Bullard® Laryngoscope that relies on fibre optics for illumination and the GlideScope® that uses a video camera and a light source to illuminate the airway. Both are connected to an external monitor so health professionals other than the operator can visualize the insertion of the tube. These devices therefore may be very useful as teaching aids for tracheal intubation. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of the most commonly used video-assisted rigid laryngoscopes used in Canada for tracheal intubation. According to the Medical Advisory Secretariat standard search strategy, a literature search for current health technology assessments and peer-reviewed literature from Medline (full citations, in-process and non-indexed citations) and Embase for was conducted for citations from January 1994 to January 2004. Key words used in the search were as follows: Video-assisted; video; emergency; airway management; tracheal intubation and laryngoscopy. Two video-assisted systems are available for use in Canada. The Bullard® video laryngscope has a large body of literature associated with it and has been used for the last 10 years, although most of the studies are small and not well conducted. The literature on the GlideScope® is limited. In general, these devices provide better views of the airway but are much more expensive than conventional direct laryngoscopes. As with most medical procedures, video-assisted laryngoscopy requires training and skill maintenance for successful use. There seems to be a discrepancy between the seeming advantages of these devices in the

  1. Detection of Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR in tracheal swabs from wildlife birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, T; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A; Bancerz-Kisiel, A

    2017-03-28

    Bordetella avium, the causing agent of bordetellosis, a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract in young poultry, causes significant losses in poultry farming throughout the world. Wildlife birds can be a reservoir of various pathogens that infect farm animals. For this reason the studies were conducted to estimate the prevalence of Bordetella avium in wildlife birds in Poland. Tracheal swab samples were collected from 650 birds representing 27 species. The bacterial DNA was isolated directly from the swabs and screened for Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR. The assay specificity was evaluated by testing DNA isolated from 8 other bacteria that can be present in avian respiratory tract, and there was no amplification from non-Bordetella avium agents. Test sensitivity was determined by preparing standard tenfold serial dilutions of DNA isolated from positive control. The assay revealed to be sensitive, with detection limit of approximately 4.07x10^2 copies of Bordetella avium DNA. The genetic material of Bordetella avium was found in 54.54% of common pheasants, in 9.09% of Eurasian coots, in 3.22% of black-headed gulls and in 2.77% of mallard ducks. The results of this study point to low prevalence of Bordetella avium infections in wildlife birds. The results also show that described molecular assay proved to be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of bordetellosis in the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  2. Increased Occurrence of Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events During Nights and Weekends in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Kyle J; Giuliano, John S; Napolitano, Natalie; Turner, David A; Nuthall, Gabrielle; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events are common in PICUs. Prior studies suggest provider and practice factors are important contributors to tracheal intubation-associated events. Little is known about how the incidence of tracheal intubation-associated events is affected by the time of day, day of the week, or presence of in-hospital attending-level intensivists. We hypothesize that tracheal intubations occurring during nights and weekends are associated with a higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events. Retrospective observational cohort study. Twenty international PICUs. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation. None. We analyzed 5,096 tracheal intubation courses from July 2010 to March 2014 from the prospective multicenter National Emergency Airway Registry for Children. Frequency of a priori-defined tracheal intubation-associated events was the primary outcome. Occurrence of any tracheal intubation-associated events and severe tracheal intubation-associated events were more common during nights (19:00 to 06:59) and weekends compared with weekdays (19% vs 16%, p = 0.01; 7% vs 6%, p = 0.05, respectively). This difference was significant in emergent intubations after adjusting for site-level clustering and patient factors: for any tracheal intubation-associated events: adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41; p = 0.03; but not significant in nonemergent intubations: adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.63-1.40; p = 0.75. For emergent intubations, PICUs with home-call attending coverage had a significantly higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events during nights and weekends (adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66; p = 0.04), and this difference was attenuated in PICUs with in-hospital attending coverage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.39; p = 0.28). Higher occurrence of tracheal intubation-associated events was observed during nights and weekends. This difference was primarily attributed to

  3. Use of tracheal stenting in the palliation of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: tertiary centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, K; Mathew, R; Odutoye, B; Williamson, P; Madden, B

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is rare but carries a poor prognosis. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma leads to tracheal compression, airway compromise and eventually death. Airway compromise, a particularly distressing symptom, can be palliated with tracheal stenting. A retrospective case note analysis was conducted of patients diagnosed with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma between July 2003 and July 2013. Twelve patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were identified. Four patients underwent palliative tracheal stenting. Three patients had no dyspnoea at the time of stenting. Two stented patients subsequently developed dyspnoea secondary to stent migration; this was managed successfully with stent exchange. The other stented patient remained asymptomatic with regards to dyspnoea. All non-stented patients died with or from airway compromise. Tracheal stenting is a relatively safe and effective method for palliation of distressing airway symptoms in patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Early prophylactic tracheal stenting in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma may be an effective option to prevent development of airway compromise as the disease progresses.

  4. Development of a Quality Improvement Bundle to Reduce Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events in Pediatric ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simon; Rehder, Kyle J; Giuliano, John S; Apkon, Michael; Kamat, Pradip; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Napolitano, Natalie; Thompson, Ann E; Tucker, Craig; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Advanced airway management in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is hazardous, with associated adverse outcomes. This report describes a methodology to develop a bundle to improve quality and safety of tracheal intubations. A prospective observational cohort study was performed with expert consensus opinion of 1715 children undergoing tracheal intubation at 15 PICUs. Baseline process and outcomes data in tracheal intubation were collected using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children reporting system. Univariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with adverse tracheal intubation-associated events. A multidisciplinary quality improvement committee was formed. Workflow analysis of tracheal intubation and pilot testing were performed to develop the Airway Bundle Checklist with 4 parts: (1) risk factor assessment, (2) plan generation, (3) preprocedure time-out to ensure that providers, equipment, and plans are prepared, (4) postprocedure huddle to identify improvement opportunities. The Airway Bundle Checklist developed may lead to improvement in airway management. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Development of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis: design, mechanical behavior analysis and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua C H, Matthew; Chui, Chee Kong; Rai, Bina; Lau D P, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to create patient specific organ replacements as there are differences in the anatomical dimensions among individuals. High failure rates in tracheal prosthesis are attributed to the lack of mechanical strength and flexibility, slow rate of growth of ciliated epithelium and leakage of interstitial fluid into the lumen. This paper proposes a methodology of design, simulations and fabrication of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis for implantation to closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the natural trachea, and describes the prototype device and its materials. Results show that the patient-specific trachea prosthesis has mechanical properties approximate that of normal tracheal rings. The user centric tracheal prosthesis is demonstrated to be a promising candidate for tracheal replacement.

  6. Penicillium species as a rare isolate in tracheal granulation tissue: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Premjit S; Nouraei, SA Reza; Howard, David J; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Petrou, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Granulation tissue formation is a major problem complicating the treatment of upper airway stenosis. We present two cases of recurrent tracheal granulation tissue colonisation by Penicillium species in patients undergoing laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. We believe that although most Penicillium species do not cause invasive disease they can be a contributory factor to the occurrence of upper airway stenosis. Case presentation A microbiological and mycological study of tracheal granulation tissue in two patients with recurrent laryngotracheal stenosis was carried out. Penicillium species was seen microscopically and cultured from tracheal granulation tissue. Neither patient grew any bacteria known to be associated with airway granulation tissue formation. Amphotericin B, itraconazole, flucytosine voriconazole and caspofungin were highly active against both isolates. Conclusion A search for a fungal cause should form part of the investigation for recurrent tracheal granulation tissue during laryngotracheal reconstruction. PMID:18346276

  7. Effects of hydration and physical therapy on tracheal transport velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, S.K.; Taplin, G.V.; Simmons, D.H.; Coulson, A.; Elam, D.

    1976-01-01

    A new tracer method for quantitative measurements of tracheal transport velocity (TTV) in mm/min in dogs has been described recently. Using the same technique, the effects of dehydration, hydration, postural drainage and physical therapy on TTV were studied. There was a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in TTV following dehydration and these values reverted to normal with hydration in all ten dogs. Tracheal transport velocity increased on the average of 39.7 percent with a mean change of 7.7 mm/min (p < 0.01) following postural drainage in seven dogs. On the other hand, TTV increased on the average of 51 percent with a mean change of 8.2 mm/min (p <0.01) following chest percussion in six dogs. Postural drainage and chest percussion each increased TTV significantly beyond the base-line values. However, hydration only restored TTV to base-line values when applied to dogs in the hydropenic state. These therapeutic measures have been used empirically in the past. The present study gives objective evidence of their beneficial effects in dogs and suggests that such treatments may have a definite scientific basis for clinical application in chronic obstructive airways disease

  8. Association of tracheal mucus or blood and airway neutrophilia with racing performance in Thoroughbred horses in an Australian racing yard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, R O; Ahern, B J; Boston, R; Begg, L M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the variation of tracheal mucus scores, tracheal blood scores and transendoscopic tracheal wash (TW) cytology in a population of Thoroughbred (TB) racehorses and assess their association with racing performance. A total of 220 endoscopic examinations were performed and TWs obtained from 155 TB racehorses. Samples were collected 60-120 min following gallop work. Tracheal mucus score, tracheal blood score and TW cytology were analysed and their association with racing performance assessed. Of the total examinations and samples, 194 from 135 horses fitted the criteria for inclusion. The overall prevalence of visible tracheal mucus was 2.5% (5/194) and of increased tracheal mucus was 0%. The prevalence of visible tracheal blood was 8.8% (17/194) and of increased tracheal blood was 4.6% (9/194). A total of 36% (70/194) of TWs contained elevated percentages of neutrophils and of these, 96% (67/70) occurred in the absence of any visible tracheal mucus. There was no significant association between tracheal mucus score or TW cytology and subsequent racing performance. There was a statistically significant association (P = 0.004) between increased tracheal blood scores and poor racing performance. Visible tracheal blood seen after strenuous exercise in clinically normal TB racehorses was a risk factor for poor racing performance, but the presence of airway neutrophilia was not. No horses in this study were found to have increased tracheal mucus, so the association of increased tracheal mucus with racing performance could not be assessed. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Avian mycoplasmosis update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ER Nascimento

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian mycoplasmas occur in a variety of bird species. The most important mycoplasmas for chickens and turkeys are Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, M. synoviae (MS, and M. meleagridis. Besides, M. iowe (MI is an emerging pathogen in turkeys, but of little concern for chickens. Mycoplasmas are bacteria that lack cell wall and belong to the class Mollicutes. Although they have been considered extracellular agents, scientists admit nowadays that some of them are obligatory intracellular microorganisms, whereas all other mycoplasmas are considered facultative intracellular organisms. Their pathogenic mechanism for disease include adherence to host target cells, mediation of apoptosis, innocent bystander damage to host cell due to intimate membrane contact, molecular (antigen mimicry that may lead to tolerance, and mitotic effect for B and/or T lymphocytes, which could lead to suppressed T-cell function and/or production of cytotoxic T cell, besides mycoplasma by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. Moreover, mycoplasma ability to stimulate macrophages, monocytes, T-helper cells and NK cells, results in the production of substances, such as tumor necrosing factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-1, 2, 6 and interferon (a, b, g. The major clinical signs seen in avian mycoplasmosis are coughing, sneezing, snicks, respiratory rales, ocular and nasal discharge, decreased feed intake and egg production, increased mortality, poor hatchability, and, primarily in turkeys, swelling of the infraorbital sinus(es. Nevertheless, chronic and unapparent infections are most common and more threatening. Mycoplasmas are transmitted horizontally, from bird to bird, and vertically, from dam to offspring through the eggs. Losses attributed to mycoplasmosis, mainly MG and MS infections, result from decreased egg production and egg quality, poor hatchability (high rate of embryonic mortality and culling of day-old birds, poor feed efficiency, increase in

  10. Molecular detection and isolation of avian metapneumovirus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Ríos-Cambre, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study to detect and isolate avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) in two highly productive poultry areas in Mexico. A total of 968 breeder hens and pullets from 2 to 73 weeks of age were analysed. Serology was performed to detect aMPV antibodies and 105 samples of tracheal tissue were collected, pooled by age, and used for attempted virus isolation and aMPV nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). The serological analysis indicated that 100% of the sampled chickens showed aMPV antibodies by 12 weeks of age. Five pools of pullet samples collected at 3 to 8 weeks of age were positive by nRT-PCR and the sequences obtained indicated 98 to 99% similarity with the reported sequences for aMPV subtype A. Virus isolation of nRT-PCR-positive samples was successfully attempted using chicken embryo lung and trachea mixed cultures with subsequent adaptation to Vero cells. This is the first report of detection and isolation of aMPV in Mexico.

  11. Avian influenza : a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provides general information about avian influenza (bird flu and specific information about one type of bird flu, called avian influenza A (H5N1, that has caused infections in birds in Asia and Europe and in human in Asia. The main materials in this report are based on the World Health Organization (WHO , world organization for animal health (OIE , food and agriculture organization of the united nations (FAO information and recommendations and review of the published literature about avian influenza. Since December 2003, highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have swept through poultry populations across Asia and parts of Europe. The outbreaks are historically unprecedented in scale and geographical spread. Their economic impact on the agricultural sector of the affected countries has been large. Human cases, with an overall fatality rate around 50%, have also been reported and almost all human infections can be linked to contact with infected poultry. Influenza viruses are genetically unstable and their behaviour cannot be predicted so the risk of further human cases persists. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a re-assortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic.

  12. An overview on avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Rodrigo da Silva Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is considered an exotic disease in the Brazilian poultry industry, according to the National Avian Health Program (PNSA, with permanent monitoring of domestic, exotic and native avian species. Brazil presents privileged environmental conditions of reduced risk. In addition, all commercial poultry and conservation holdings are registered in state or national inventories and geographically located (GPS for health control. Poultry health standards are adopted for the conformity to the international market, mostly for the intensified poultry destined for exportation, but also for companion exotic and native conservation facilities. Guidelines for monitoring and the diagnosis of AI are published by the PNSA and follow the standards proposed by the international health code (World Organization for Animal Health, Organization International des Epizooties - OIE and insure the free of status for avian influenza virus (AIV of LPAIV-low pathogenicity AIV and HPAIV-high pathogenicity AIV. In addition, the infections by mesogenic and velogenic Newcastle disease virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, M. synoviae and M. meleagridis, Salmonella enteric subspecies enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum are eradicated from reproduction. Controlled infections by S.enterica subspecies enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are monitored for breeders. The vaccination of chickens in ovo or at hatch against Marek's disease is mandatory. Broiler production is an indoor activity, confinement which insures biosecurity, with safe distances from the potential AIV reservoir avian species. Worldwide HPAIV H5N1 notifications to the OIE, in March 2011, included 51 countries.

  13. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  14. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  15. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  16. Differential infection efficiencies of peripheral lung and tracheal tissues in sheep infected with Visna/maedi virus via the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeilly, Tom N; Tennant, Peter; Luján, Lluís; Pérez, Marta; Harkiss, Gordon D

    2007-02-01

    The main routes of transmission of Visna/maedi virus (VMV), an ovine lentivirus, are thought to be through ingestion of infected colostrum and/or milk or through inhalation of respiratory secretions. Whereas oral transmission appears to be mediated via epithelial cells within the small intestine, the mechanism of virus uptake in the respiratory tract is unknown. In addition, it is not known whether infection is mediated by cell-associated or cell-free VMV, previous studies having not addressed this question. Intratracheal (i.t.) injection of VMV is known to be a highly efficient method of experimental infection, requiring as little as 10(1) TCID(50) VMV for successful infection. However, using a tracheal organ culture system, we show here that ovine tracheal mucosa is relatively resistant to VMV, with detectable infection only seen after incubation with high titres of virus (> or =10(5) TCID(50) ml(-1)). We also demonstrate that i.t. injection results in exposure of both trachea and the lower lung and that the time taken for viraemia and seroconversion to occur after lower lung instillation of VMV was significantly shorter than that observed for tracheal instillation of an identical titre of virus (P=0.030). This indicates that lower lung and not the trachea is a highly efficient site for VMV entry in vivo. Furthermore, cell-free virus was identified within the lung-lining fluid of naturally infected sheep for the first time. Together, these results suggest that respiratory transmission of VMV is mediated by inhalation of aerosols containing free VMV, with subsequent virus uptake in the lower lung.

  17. COMPARISON OF FLUOROSCOPY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR TRACHEAL LUMEN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT AND DETERMINATION OF INTRALUMINAL STENT SIZE IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jackie M; Krebs, Ingar A; Riedesel, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Qianqian

    2016-05-01

    Tracheal collapse is a progressive airway disease that can ultimately result in complete airway obstruction. Intraluminal tracheal stents are a minimally invasive and viable treatment for tracheal collapse once the disease becomes refractory to medical management. Intraluminal stent size is chosen based on the maximum measured tracheal diameter during maximum inflation. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to compare tracheal lumen diameter measurements and subsequent selected stent size using both fluoroscopy and CT and to evaluate inter- and intraobserver variability of the measurements. Seventeen healthy Beagles were anesthetized and imaged with fluoroscopy and CT with positive pressure ventilation to 20 cm H2 O. Fluoroscopic and CT maximum tracheal diameters were measured by three readers. Three individual measurements were made at eight predetermined tracheal sites for dorsoventral (height) and laterolateral (width) dimensions. Tracheal diameters and stent sizes (based on the maximum tracheal diameter + 10%) were analyzed using a linear mixed model. CT tracheal lumen diameters were larger compared to fluoroscopy at all locations (P-value fluoroscopy compared to CT, both within and among observers. The greater tracheal diameter measured with CT and lower measurement variability has clinical significance, as this may be the imaging modality of choice for appropriate stent selection to minimize complications in veterinary patients. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  19. Tracheal foreign bodies in the cat and the use of fluoroscopy for removal: 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivers, M S; Moore, A Hotston

    2006-03-01

    To gather information to support the use of fluoroscopically guided removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. It was also the intent to produce a case series and look at the long-term outcome following tracheal foreign body removal. A retrospective study was performed. This looked at cases of tracheal foreign bodies in cats seen at the University of Bristol veterinary school at Langford over an eight-year period. Outcome was assessed via telephone conversations with the owners. Twelve cats were presented with tracheal foreign bodies during this time. Ten of these foreign bodies were successfully removed using fluoroscopy and two using bronchoscopy. All cats survived. Follow-up was available for nine cats and showed no long-term complications. Forceps removal under fluoroscopic guidance is a rapid, safe, and effective method for removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. It should be considered as an alternative to bronchoscopy for removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. Indeed, in cases where bronchoscopy has failed, it can be attempted to avoid thoracotomy. Successful removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats is associated with a good long-term outcome.

  20. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  1. To assess the changes of tracheal cuff pressure after a calibrating orogastric tube insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    Insertion of a medical instrument into the esophagus may affect tracheal tube pressure. This study evaluated the potential effect of a calibrating orogastric tube insertion on tracheal cuff pressure in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Adult patients who were scheduled for elective bariatric surgery requiring insertion of a calibrating orogastric tube were assessed for eligibility for this study. After successful tracheal intubation, the tracheal tube with a high-volume, low-pressure cuff was adjusted to range from 25 to 30 cmH2O using a manometer. Tracheal cuff pressure was monitored continuously while the calibrating orogastric tube was being advanced. The change of tracheal cuff pressure was recorded after the calibrating orogastric tube had been left in situ for 3 min. After insertion of the calibrating orogastric tube, the median tracheal cuff pressure increased from 28 [27-28 (25-30)] to 36 [30-42 (26-64)] cmH2O (P pressure should be routinely monitored in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery requiring insertion of a calibrating orogastric tube.

  2. Cell autonomy of HIF effects in Drosophila: tracheal cells sense hypoxia and induce terminal branch sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Gorr, Thomas A; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-04-01

    Drosophila tracheal terminal branches are plastic and have the capacity to sprout out projections toward oxygen-starved areas, in a process analogous to mammalian angiogenesis. This response involves the upregulation of FGF/Branchless in hypoxic tissues, which binds its receptor Breathless on tracheal cells. Here, we show that extra sprouting depends on the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-alpha homolog Sima and on the HIF-prolyl hydroxylase Fatiga that operates as an oxygen sensor. In mild hypoxia, Sima accumulates in tracheal cells, where it induces breathless, and this induction is sufficient to provoke tracheal extra sprouting. In nontracheal cells, Sima contributes to branchless induction, whereas overexpression of Sima fails to attract terminal branch outgrowth, suggesting that HIF-independent components are also required for full induction of the ligand. We propose that the autonomous response to hypoxia that occurs in tracheal cells enhances tracheal sensitivity to increasing Branchless levels, and that this mechanism is a cardinal step in hypoxia-dependent tracheal sprouting.

  3. Clinical application of self-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weitao; Shi Haibin; Yang Zhengqiang; Liu Sheng; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Methods: Under general anesthesia the placement of self-expandable metallic stent was performed in 10 patients with malignant tracheal stenosis, the procedure was completed under fluoroscopic guidance in all patients. Results: Successful tracheal stenting was achieved in all 10 patients. In one patient, a Y-shaped stent was used as the tracheal carina was involved in the airway stenosis. The symptoms of dyspnea and asthma were markedly improved immediately after the implantation of stent in all patients. Conclusion: Tracheal implantation of self-expandable metallic stent under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance is a safe and effective treatment for malignant tracheal stenosis, it can promptly relieve various symptoms caused by malignant tracheal stenosis and obviously improve patient's living quality, therefore,t his technique is of great value in clinical practice. (authors)

  4. Detection and Management of Air Sac Trematodes (Szidatitrema Species) in Captive Multispecies Avian Exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaski, Kristina M; Nelson, Sudona; Dronen, Norman O; Craig, Thomas M; Pond, Joel; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2015-12-01

    From 2 exhibits in a zoological collection, 2 juvenile fairy bluebirds ( Irena puella ) and 1 adult blue-grey tanager (Thraupis episcopus) died within 3 months of one another. The cause of death was attributed to air sac trematodes, which were identified as Szidatitrema species based on morphology of adult trematodes and miracidia isolated from a snail intermediate host. To determine the extent of trematodiasis in the collection, individual exhibits within the same building as the original presenting cases were assessed, with birds representing 27 avian species from 9 orders. Sampling consisted of individual (n = 244) and pooled same-species group (n = 193) fecal examinations, and for some individuals, and tracheal swab (n = 106), resulting in a total of 543 samples. In addition, tracheal swabs were performed on 14 birds for comparative cytology, but no parasites were found. Flukes were positively identified in 4 tracheal swab samples (4%), 37 individual fecal samples (15%), and 52 of the group fecal samples (27%). When results of the swab method were compared with those of fecal examination, fecal testing was significantly associated (P fecal samples evaluated by both sedimentation and flotation techniques 2 weeks before outgoing shipments or intrazoo transfers of birds housed in exhibits known to have snail populations. Snail control methods also were initiated in all exhibits. Treatment with praziquantel was carried out on a case-by-case basis, and included oral, parenteral, and nebulized administration. Although control measures were expected to manage the infection and reduce distribution of the parasite to other collections, complete eradication of trematodes in the population is unlikely.

  5. Use of the peritracheal fold in the dog tracheal transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, P J; Costantino, P D; Lueg, E A; Chaplin, J M; Brandwein, M S; Passalaqua, P J; Fliegelman, L J; Laitman, J T; Marquez, S; Urken, M L

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the technical aspects of the canine model of human tracheal transplantation for potential application to reconstruction of extremely long tracheal defects (> 10 cm). In phase 1, long tracheal segments were skeletonized and pedicled with the thyroid glands, cranial thyroid arteries and veins, and internal jugular vein branches. The segments were elevated completely, attached to the vascular pedicle only, and replaced with primary tracheal anastomoses. In phase 2, long segments were elevated along with a diffuse soft tissue "blanket" that envelops the trachea and thyroid glands. Because this study was designed to primarily address, in situ, tracheal perfusion territories of a cranially located vascular pedicle, microvascular anastomoses were not conducted. Two small-bodied beagles (10-15 kg) and 5 large-bodied mixed-breed dogs (20-30 kg) were humanely killed 2 to 41 days after surgery, and anatomic and histological analyses were conducted. Unlike that of humans, the thyroid gland complex of dogs is not intimately associated with the trachea but is conjoined with a peritracheal soft tissue "fold." Within this fold, blood is transmitted to the trachea via a diffuse, segmental vascular plexus. In phase 1, pronounced tracheal necrosis occurred within 2 to 5 days. In phase 2, extremely long tracheal segments (10-12 cm), based only on a cranially located pedicle, were still viable at 2 to 6 weeks. Preservation of the "peritracheal fold" in the dog model of tracheal transplantation is critical to the onset and maintenance of vascular perfusion in a long tracheal segment. Furthermore, the use of large-bodied dogs is necessary to provide for a usable venous efflux component.

  6. Designing a tissue-engineered tracheal scaffold for preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cameron A; Pepper, Victoria K; Ohst, Devan; Bodnyk, Kyle; Heuer, Eric; Onwuka, Ekene A; King, Nakesha; Strouse, Robert; Grischkan, Jonathan; Breuer, Christopher K; Johnson, Jed; Chiang, Tendy

    2018-01-01

    Recent efforts to tissue engineer long-segment tracheal grafts have been complicated by stenosis and malacia. It has been proposed that both the mechanical characteristics and cell seeding capacity of TETG scaffolds are integral to graft performance. Our aim was to design a tracheal construct that approximates the biomechanical properties of native sheep trachea and optimizes seeding with bone marrow derived mononuclear cells prior to preclinical evaluation in an ovine model. A solution of 8% polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and 3% polyurethane (PU) was prepared at a ratio of either 8:2 or 2:8 and electrospun onto a custom stainless steel mandrel designed to match the dimensional measurements of the juvenile sheep trachea. 3D-printed porous or solid polycarbonate C-shaped rings were embedded within the scaffolds during electrospinning. The scaffolds underwent compression testing in the anterior-posterior and lateral-medial axes and the biomechanical profiles compared to that of a juvenile ovine trachea. The most biomimetic constructs then underwent vacuum seeding with ovine bone marrow derived mononuclear cells. Fluorometric DNA assay was used to quantify scaffold seeding. Both porous and solid rings approximated the biomechanics of the native ovine trachea, but the porous rings were most biomimetic. The load-displacement curve of scaffolds fabricated from a ratio of 2:8 PET:PU most closely mimicked that of native trachea in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Solid C-ringed scaffolds had a greater cell seeding efficiency when compared to porous ringed scaffolds (Solid: 19 × 10 4 vs. Porous: 9.6 × 10 4  cells/mm 3 , p = 0.0098). A long segment tracheal graft composed of 2:8 PET:PU with solid C-rings approximates the biomechanics of the native ovine trachea and demonstrates superior cell seeding capacity of the two prototypes tested. Further preclinical studies using this graft design in vivo would inform the rational design of an optimal TETG

  7. Detection of avian metapneumovirus subtypes in turkeys using RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongor, H; Karahan, M; Kalin, R; Bulut, H; Cetinkaya, B

    2010-03-20

    This study investigated the prevalence of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) and the detection of molecular subtypes of field strains of the virus using RT-PCR in clinically healthy turkeys and those showing signs of respiratory disease. In the RT-PCR examination of 624 tracheal tissue samples collected from a local turkey abattoir, 2.9 per cent (18/624) of samples tested positive. In the examination of tracheal swab samples collected from flocks with respiratory problems, 18 of 20 samples tested positive. When the results were assessed at flock level, aMPV infection was detected in only one of the 23 clinically healthy turkey flocks, whereas all four flocks with respiratory problems were infected. Molecular typing using primers specific to the attachment glycoprotein (G) gene showed that all 36 positive samples belonged to subtype B. Partial sequence analysis of DNA samples showed 95 per cent homology between the field types and the reference strain aMPV subtype B. Whereas clinically healthy turkeys had been vaccinated with a subtype A virus vaccine, the flocks with respiratory problems had been vaccinated with a subtype B virus vaccine. Despite four blind passages of RT-PCR-positive samples on Vero and chicken embryo fibroblast cells, no cytopathic effect was detected by microscopic examination.

  8. Airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes Mycoplasma pneumoniae clearance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Jiang

    Full Text Available Respiratory infections including atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp contribute to the pathobiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Mp infection mainly targets airway epithelium and activates various signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. We have shown that short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1 serves as a novel host defense protein and is up-regulated upon Mp infection through NF-κB activation in cultured human and mouse primary airway epithelial cells. However, the in vivo role of airway epithelial NF-κB activation in host defense against Mp infection has not been investigated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation on lung Mp clearance and its association with airway epithelial SPLUNC1 expression.Non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog 9-t-butyl doxycycline (9-TB was initially optimized in mouse primary tracheal epithelial cell culture, and then utilized to induce in vivo airway epithelial specific NF-κB activation in conditional NF-κB transgenic mice (CC10-(CAIKKβ with or without Mp infection. Lung Mp load and inflammation were evaluated, and airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that 9-TB treatment in NF-κB transgene positive (Tg+, but not transgene negative (Tg- mice significantly reduced lung Mp load. Moreover, 9-TB increased airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein expression in NF-κB Tg+ mice.By using the non-antimicrobial 9-TB, our study demonstrates that in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes lung bacterial clearance, which is accompanied by increased epithelial SPLUNC1 expression.

  9. Anesthetic management of a large mediastinal mass for tracheal stent placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The anesthetic management of patients with large mediastinal masses can be complicated due to the pressure effects of the mass on the airway or major vessels. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 64-year-old female with a large mediastinal mass that encroached on the great vessels and compressed the trachea. A tracheal stent was placed to relieve the tracheal compression under general anesthesia. Spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the perioperative period with the use of a classic laryngeal mask airway. We discuss the utility of laryngeal mask airway for anesthetic management of tracheal stenting in patients with mediastinal masses.

  10. Intraoperative Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal During Apneic Oxygenation with an EZ-Blocker in Tracheal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Marco; Nespoli, Moana Rossella; Mattiacci, Dario Maria; Esposito, Marianna; Corcione, Antonio; Buono, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    Tracheal surgery requires continued innovation to manage the anesthetic during an open airway phase. A common approach is apneic oxygenation with continuous oxygen flow, but the lack of effective ventilation causes hypercapnia, with respiratory acidosis. We used extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for intraoperative decapneization during apneic oxygenation in a 64-year-old woman who was scheduled for tracheal surgery because of tracheal stenosis caused by long-term intubation. Our findings demonstrate that even after 40 minutes of total apnea, using an EZ-blocker for oxygenation and external decapneization, hemodynamic and gas exchange variables never demonstrated any dangerous alterations.

  11. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    . In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...

  12. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  13. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis

  14. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-08-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis.

  15. Diagnosis of tracheomalacia using tracheal dynamic respiratory-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Teruo; Watabe, Hideki; Ikeda, Sadao

    1995-01-01

    We performed tracheal-dynamic respiratory scan (T-DRS) in 54 cases which were thought to be tracheomalacia clinically. T-DRS was performed by TOSHIBA TCT-900S at the level of the aortic arch under the condition of 120 kV (140 kV), 100 mA, 5 mm of slice width for 20 seconds when the patient was directed to breath rapidly or slowly. In 19 cases, which underwent both T-DRS and bronchoscopy, could evaluate the results. Only one case was overestimated by T-DRS than bronchoscopic findings, while 9 cases were underestimated and 9 cases were equal. Though T-DRS tended to underestimate the degree of the stenosis of tracheomalacia than bronchoscopic finding. T-DRS can do more objective evaluation than bronchoscopy non-invasively and thought to be useful for the evaluation of tracheomalalcia. (author)

  16. Difficult Tracheal Intubation in Obese Gastric Bypass patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohrn, Niclas; Sommer, Thorbjørn; Bisgaard, J.

    2016-01-01

    index (BMI) 2, ASA scores > 2, and male gender were risk factors of DTI. Males generally had higher CLC, MLP, and ASA scores compared to females, but no difference in BMI. There was no difference in quantities of anesthetics used between the two groups with or without DTI. Intra......Endotracheal intubation is commonly perceived to be more difficult in obese patients than in lean patients. Primarily, we investigated the association between difficult tracheal intubation (DTI) and obesity, and secondarily, the association between DTI and validated scoring systems used to assess...... the airways, the association between DTI and quantities of anesthetics used to induce general anesthesia, and the association between DTI and difficulties with venous and arterial cannulation. This is a monocentric prospective observational clinical study of a consecutive series of 539 obese patients...

  17. Controlled release of carcinogens in heterotopic tracheal grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, B.C.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A major drawback of the conventional approaches to the study of the respiratory tract carcinogenesis by intratracheal injection or instillation is that neither the dose nor the target site can be accurately defined. The tracheal transplant model has been developed in our group to provide a solution to this problem. In this model, rodent tracheas are transplanted under the skin in the scapular region of the isogenic host. The transplants re-establish themselves in the host in 3 to 4 weeks and survive indefinitely. These tracheas can then be exposed to carcinogens in a controlled and quantitative fashion by using monolithic cylindrical pellets. The model has a good potential for establishing a more realistic dose-response relationship in respiratory tract carcinogenesis. However, the success of the model depends on the development of devices for release of carcinogens at a reproducible and predictable rate. This paper describes the various approaches to the solution of this problem.

  18. Failure to predict difficult tracheal intubation for emergency caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Columb, Malachy; Lyons, Gordon

    2010-11-01

    Difficult tracheal intubation following induction of general anaesthesia for caesarean section is a cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate five bedside predictors that might identify women with potential intubation difficulty immediately prior to emergency caesarean section. Women requiring emergency caesarean section with general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation who had been assessed by the same experienced anaesthesiologist preoperatively were included in this study. Mallampati score, sternomental distance, thyromental distance, interincisor gap and atlantooccipital extension were all measured. The same anaesthesiologist performed laryngoscopy and graded the laryngeal view according to Cormack and Lehane. Exact logistic regression was used to identify significant independent predictors for difficult intubation (Cormack and Lehane grades ≥ 3) with two-sided P value less than 0.05 considered as significant. In 3 years, 239 women were recruited. Cormack and Lehane grades of 2 or less (easy) were found in 225 and grade of at least 3 (difficult) in 14 women. Patients' characteristics (age, height, weight, BMI or weight gain) were not significantly associated with difficulty of intubation. The incidence of difficult intubation was 1/17 women [95% confidence interval (CI) from 1/31 to 1/10]. A positive result from any of the five predictors combined had a sensitivity of 0.21 (95%CI 0.05-0.51), a specificity of 0.92 (95%CI 0.88-0.96), a positive predictive value of 0.15 (95%CI 0.032-0.38) and a negative predictive value of 0.95 (95%CI 0.91-0.97) for a Cormack and Lehane grade of at least 3 at laryngoscopy. Airway assessment using these tests cannot be relied upon to predict a difficult intubation at emergency caesarean section as the low sensitivity means that 79% (95%CI 49-95) of difficult intubations will be missed.

  19. A comparison of simple continuous versus simple interrupted suture patterns for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingland, R B; Layton, C I; Kennedy, G A; Galland, J C

    1995-01-01

    Two suture techniques for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection were compared. Eight cartilages were resected from the trachea of each of 12 dogs; anastomoses with 4-0 polydioxanone suture were created using a simple continuous suture technique in six dogs and a simple interrupted suture technique in six dogs. Surgical time was shorter but apposition of tracheal segments at the time of surgery was less precise with the simple continuous suture technique. The dogs were evaluated for 150 days after surgery. Clinical abnormalities after tracheal resection and anastomosis were not observed. Percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was calculated by measuring the tracheal lumen diameter on lateral cervical radiographs. Percent luminal stenosis was calculated planimetrically using a computerized digitizing tablet. Anastomotic stenosis was mild in all dogs; however, the mean percent.luminal stenosis determined planimetrically was significantly greater for dogs that had the simple continuous suture technique. Planimetric measurements of cross-sectional area made before and after formalin fixation were not significantly different. Radiographic determination of percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was a poor predictor of diminution of cross-sectional area determined planimetrically.

  20. Acrolein stimulates eicosanoid release from bovine airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doupnik, C.A.; Leikauf, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Injury to the airway mucosa after exposure to environmental irritants is associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To better understand the relationships between mediator release and airway epithelial cell injury during irritant exposures, we studied the effects of acrolein, a low-molecular-weight aldehyde found in cigarette smoke, on arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Confluent airway epithelial cell monolayers, prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid, released significant levels of 3H activity when exposed (20 min) to 100 microM acrolein. [3H]arachidonic acid products were resolved using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions the released 3H activity coeluted predominantly with the cyclooxygenase product, prostaglandin (PG) E2. After exposure to acrolein, significant peaks in 3H activity coeluted with the lipoxygenase products 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and 15-HETE, as well as with PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Dose-response relationships for acrolein-induced release of immunoreactive PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from unlabeled epithelial monolayers demonstrated 30 microM acrolein as the threshold dose, with 100 microM acrolein inducing nearly a fivefold increase in both PGF2 alpha and PGE2. Cellular viability after exposure to 100 microM acrolein, determined by released lactate dehydrogenase activity, was not affected until exposure periods were greater than or equal to 2 h. These results implicate the airway epithelial cell as a possible source of eicosanoids after exposure to acrolein

  1. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  2. Control strategies against avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  3. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  4. Tracheal left mainstem bronchus and obstructive gastric mucosal intussusception associated with esophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, C. J.; Aronson, D. C.; Ekkelkamp, S.; van de Heide-Jalving, M.; Vos, A.

    1995-01-01

    A tracheal left mainstem bronchus and gastric outlet obstruction owing to gastric mucosal intussusception occurred in a child who had esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. Bronchography and bronchoscopy, indicated because of persisting atelectasis and ventilation dependency, showed a

  5. A grossly abnormal trachea- severe tracheal diverticulosis and Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, O D; Gilmartin, J J

    2014-03-01

    A 53-year-old smoker presented with a history of recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. A diagnosis of Tracheal Diverticulosis due to Tracheobronchomegaly (Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome) was made. The clinical history, diagnosis and treatment options are discussed.

  6. Computed tomographic findings in a Bluetick Coonhound with a longitudinal thoracic tracheal tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Sumari C; Van Der Zee, Johannes; Kirberger, Robert M

    2018-02-11

    A 9-year-old intact male Bluetick Coonhound presented for progressive subcutaneous emphysema of 5 days' duration due to a suspected tracheal tear. Cervical computed tomography (CT) and thoracic CT were performed after failure to identify the tracheal tear with tracheoscopy. A longitudinal tracheal tear was identified starting 4.3 cm cranial to the tracheal bifurcation and extending caudally over a distance of 3.6 cm. Severe pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and retroperitoneal gas were also present. A follow-up CT 7 days postoperatively confirmed the successful repair of the tear with partial resolution of the presurgical secondary pathology and the patient recovered uneventfully. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  7. Association of two respiratory congenital anomalies: tracheal diverticulum and cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, S.; Villamil, M.A.; Rojas, I.C.; Lemos, D.F.; Echeverri, S.; Angarita, M.; Triana, G.

    2004-01-01

    Many associations of congenital anomalies of the respiratory system have been reported, but the combination of tracheal diverticulum and cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is unique. We present a patient with these two anomalies and analyze their embryological correlation. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosis of tracheal instability: inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT and cine CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Hafner, B.; Lill, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: In tracheo- and bronchomalacia, localization and determination of collapse is necessary for planning a surgical procedure. We compared inspiratory and spiral CT, cine CT, and bronchoscopy and evaluated the relevance of each method. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or verified tracheal stonosis or collapse underwent paired inspiratory and exspiratory spiral CT and cine CT during continuous respiration (temporal increment 100 ms). The tracheal cross-sectional area was calculated and compared. Results: In addition to bronchoscopy, further information concerning localization, extent, collapse, stability of the tracheal wall, distal portions of the stenosis, and extraluminal compressions was obtained. A significantly higher degree of tracheal collapse was seen using cine CT compared to paired spiral CT (p [de

  9. Nebulized Lidocaine to Attenuate the Cardiovascular Response to Direct Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bock, Judith

    1996-01-01

    This study described the use of 120 mg nebulized lidocaine to attenuate the cardiovascular response to direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in ASA I and ASA II patients undergoing various surgical procedures...

  10. Use of silicone tracheal stoma stents for temporary tracheostomy in dogs with upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinterud, T; Nelissen, P; White, R A S

    2014-11-01

    To report the use of silicone tracheal stoma stents for temporary tracheostomy in dogs with upper airway obstruction. Retrospective review of medical records for dogs in which silicone tracheal stoma stents were placed. Eighteen dogs had a silicone tracheal stoma stent placed for maintenance of a tracheostomy stoma for periods ranging from three hours to eight months. No intra-operative or immediate postoperative complications were recorded. In 11 dogs the stent was removed by simple traction after a period ranging from 36 hours to 6 weeks, and the tracheal stoma was left to heal by second intention. Five of the 18 dogs were determined as being tracheostomy dependent and underwent conversion to permanent tracheostomy after a period ranging from five days to eight months following stent placement. One dog was euthanased after three months, with the stent still in place, because of poor respiratory function, and one dog died of unrelated reasons. In 6 of 10 dogs (60%) where the stent was in place for five days or more, granulation tissue formation caused dislodgement of the stent. Silicone tracheal stoma stents may be used as an alternative to conventional tracheostomy tubes in selected dogs with upper airway obstruction. Long-term use of the stent beyond five days is not recommended because of granulation tissue formation. The long-term consequences of partial tracheal ring resection are unknown. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  11. [Tracheal intubation with Parker Flex-Tip tubes assisted by tube-guiding devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ju; Morita, Shigeho; Suzuki, Maya; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    In tracheal intubation assisted by tube-guiding devices passing through the tube, such as fiberoptic scopes, bougies, tracheal tube exchange catheters, and light wands, passage of the tube-guiding device, by itself, is often easy. But advancing a tracheal tube with a conventional distal tip over these tube-guiding devices is frequently difficult or impossible, because its rigid, side-beveled tip frequently catches on anatomical features of the airway. A novel tracheal tube, the Parker Flex-Tip tube (Parker Medical, Colorado, USA) has a centered, curved, tapered and flexible distal tip that passes through the airway faster and easier than conventional tracheal tubes. As it is advanced along a tube-guiding device, the tip of the Parker tube travels along the midline of the airway, without the gap that usually exists between the distal edge of a conventional tracheal tube and the tube-guiding device. The gapless, midline travel of the Parker tube leads to a greater incidence of first-attempt intubation success with tube-guiding devices, because there is less risk of tube tip hang-ups on the arytenoids and the vocal cords. Clinically, use of the Parker tube is helpful for oral and nasal intubations, especially in patients with difficult airways.

  12. Disclosing respiratory coinfections: a broad-range panel assay for avian respiratory pathogens on a nanofluidic PCR platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croville, Guillaume; Foret, Charlotte; Heuillard, Pauline; Senet, Alexis; Delpont, Mattias; Mouahid, Mohammed; Ducatez, Mariette F; Kichou, Faouzi; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2018-02-27

    Respiratory syndromes (RS) are among the most significant pathological conditions in edible birds and are caused by complex coactions of pathogens and environmental factors. In poultry, low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses, metapneumoviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Mycoplasma spp. Escherichia coli and/or Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys are considered as key co-infectious agents of RS. Aspergillus sp., Pasteurella multocida, Avibacterium paragallinarum or Chlamydia psittaci may also be involved in respiratory outbreaks. An innovative quantitative PCR method, based on a nanofluidic technology, has the ability to screen up to 96 samples with 96 pathogen-specific PCR primers, at the same time, in one run of real-time quantitative PCR. This platform was used for the screening of avian respiratory pathogens: 15 respiratory agents, including viruses, bacteria and fungi potentially associated with respiratory infections of poultry, were targeted. Primers were designed and validated for SYBR green real-time quantitative PCR and subsequently validated on the Biomark high throughput PCR nanofluidic platform (Fluidigm©, San Francisco, CA, USA). As a clinical assessment, tracheal swabs were sampled from turkeys showing RS and submitted to this panel assay. Beside systematic detection of E. coli, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae were frequently detected, with distinctive coinfection patterns between French and Moroccan flocks. This proof-of-concept study illustrates the potential of such panel assays for unveiling respiratory coinfection profiles in poultry.

  13. Distribution of sialic acid receptors and influenza A viruses of avian and swine origin and in experimentally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, Birgitte M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses in the up......Background: Pigs are considered susceptible to influenza A virus infections from different host origins because earlier studies have shown that they have receptors for both avian (sialic acid-alpha-2,3-terminal saccharides (SAalpha- 2,3)) and swine/human (SA-alpha-2,6) influenza viruses...... acts as a mixing vessel between human and avian influenza viruses. Furthermore, it was shown that AIV prefers to infect alveolar type II epithelial cells in pigs. This corresponds with findings in humans emphasising the resemblance between the two species....

  14. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli MT78 invades chicken fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Barbieri, Nicolle Lima; Nordhoff, Marcel; Ewers, Christa; Horn, Fabiana

    2011-02-24

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are responsible for extraintestinal diseases, called colibacillosis, in avian species. The most severe manifestation of the disease is colisepticemia that usually starts at the respiratory tract and may result in bird death. However, it is not yet clear how APEC cross the respiratory epithelium and get into the bloodstream. In this work, we studied the interaction between 8 APEC strains (UEL31, UEL17, UEL13, UEL29, MT78, IMT5155, IMT2470, A2363) and a chicken non-phagocytic cell, the fibroblast CEC-32 cell line. We investigated the association profile, the invasion capability, the cytotoxicity effect and the induction of caspase-3/7 activation in an attempt to understand the way the pathogen gains access to the host bloodstream. Association to cells was determined after 1 h of infection, while cell invasion was determined after 4 and 24 h of infection. The cytotoxic effect of bacterial infection was measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and the activation of the apoptotic program was verified by caspase-3/7 activation. Also, the presence of genes for adhesins, invasins and other related virulence-associated factors was verified by PCR. All bacterial strains showed similarity in relation to adhesion, LDH release and caspase-3/7 activation. However, one APEC strain, MT78, showed high invasion capability, comparable to the invasive Salmonella typhimurium strain SL1344. Since an APEC strain was capable of invading non-phagocytic cells in vitro, the same may be happening with the epithelial cells of the avian respiratory tract in vivo. CEC-32 monolayers can also provide a useful experimental model to study the molecular mechanisms used by APEC to invade non-phagocytic cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Propagation of avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B using chicken embryo related and other cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coswig, Lia Treptow; dos Santos, Márcia Bianchi; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Ferreira, Helena Lage; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2010-07-01

    Primary isolation of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is carried out using tracheal organ culture (TOC) or chicken embryonated eggs with subsequent adaptation in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) or Vero cultures. This study was conducted to evaluate six different cell lines and two avian culture systems for the propagation of aMPV subtypes A and B. The chicken embryo related (CER) cells were used successfully for primary isolation. In addition to Vero and baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells, CER cells were also shown to be the most appropriate for propagation of aMPV considering high titres. Propagation of A and B subtypes in CEF and TOC remained efficient after the primary isolation and several passages of viruses in the CER cell line. The growth curves were created using CER, Vero and BHK-21 cell lines. Compared with growth, both yielded higher titres in CER cells during the first 30 h after infection, but no significant difference was observed in the results obtained from CER and Vero cells. This data show that CER cells are adequate for aMPV subtypes A and B propagation, giving similar results to Vero cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutations in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that confer binding to human tracheal airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Ayora-Talavera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence in 2009 of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus as the first pandemic of the 21st Century is a timely reminder of the international public health impact of influenza viruses, even those associated with mild disease. The widespread distribution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in the avian population has spawned concern that it may give rise to a human influenza pandemic. The mortality rate associated with occasional human infection by H5N1 virus approximates 60%, suggesting that an H5N1 pandemic would be devastating to global health and economy. To date, the H5N1 virus has not acquired the propensity to transmit efficiently between humans. The reasons behind this are unclear, especially given the high mutation rate associated with influenza virus replication. Here we used a panel of recombinant H5 hemagglutinin (HA variants to demonstrate the potential for H5 HA to bind human airway epithelium, the predominant target tissue for influenza virus infection and spread. While parental H5 HA exhibited limited binding to human tracheal epithelium, introduction of selected mutations converted the binding profile to that of a current human influenza strain HA. Strikingly, these amino-acid changes required multiple simultaneous mutations in the genomes of naturally occurring H5 isolates. Moreover, H5 HAs bearing intermediate sequences failed to bind airway tissues and likely represent mutations that are an evolutionary "dead end." We conclude that, although genetic changes that adapt H5 to human airways can be demonstrated, they may not readily arise during natural virus replication. This genetic barrier limits the likelihood that current H5 viruses will originate a human pandemic.

  17. Traumatic tracheal diverticulum corrected with resection and anastomosis during one-lung ventilation and total intravenous anesthesia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Lepiz, Mauricio; Wall, Corey; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley; Dobbin, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the clinical findings and diagnostic images of a traumatic intrathoracic tracheal avulsion with a tracheal diverticulum in a cat. Furthermore, a complete description of the tracheal resection and anastomosis using one-lung ventilation (OLV) with total and partial intravenous anesthesia is made. A 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat weighing 6.8 kg was presented to the University Teaching Hospital for evaluation of increased respiratory noise 3 months following unknown trauma. Approximately 12 weeks prior to presentation, the cat had been seen by the primary care veterinarian for respiratory distress. At that time, the cat had undergone a tracheal ballooning procedure for a distal tracheal stricture diagnosed by tracheoscopy. The tracheal ballooning had provided only temporary relief. At presentation to our institution, the cat had increased respiratory effort with harsh upper airway noise auscultated during thoracic examination. The remainder of the physical examination was normal. Diagnostics included a tracheoscopy and a thoracic computed tomographic examination. The cat was diagnosed with tracheal avulsion, pseudotrachea with a tracheal diverticulum, and stenosis of the avulsed tracheal ends. Surgical correction of the tracheal stricture via a thoracotomy was performed using OLV with total and partial intravenous anesthesia. The cat recovered uneventfully and at last follow-up was active and doing well. This case report describes OLV using standard anesthesia equipment that is available at most private practices. Furthermore, this case describes the computed tomographic images of the intrathoracic tracheal avulsion and offers a positive outcome for tracheal resection and anastomosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  18. Tracheal ulcer due to Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takeo; Fujisaki, Hideaki; Nishio, Suehiro; Hiroshige, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Eishi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a tracheal stenosis circumscribed with soft tissue density and a left pulmonary nodule. Open biopsy of a right submandibular lymph node revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the malignant cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus gene products. Bronchofiberscopy revealed a tracheal necrotizing ulcer. After chemotherapy, the tracheal ulcer resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly with a tracheal ulcer. © 2013 Published by The Japanese Respiratory Society on behalf of The Japanese Respiratory Society.

  19. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Avian Influenza infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  1. Tracheal intubation in the ICU: Life saving or life threatening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigeeshu V Divatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal intubation (TI is a routine procedure in the intensive care unit (ICU, and is often life saving. However, life-threatening complications occur in a significant proportion of procedures, making TI perhaps one the most common but underappreciated airway emergencies in the ICU. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room (OR, the unstable physiologic state of critically ill patients along with underevaluation of the airways and suboptimal response to pre-oxygenation are the major factors for the high incidence of life-threatening complications like severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse in the ICU. Studies have shown that strategies planned for TI in the OR can be adapted and extrapolated for use in the ICU. Non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation for pre-oxygenation provides adequate oxygen stores during TI for patients with precarious respiratory pathology. The intubation procedure should include not only airway management but also haemodynamic, gas exchange and neurologic care, which are often crucial in critically ill patients. Hence, there is a necessity for the implementation of an Intubation Bundle during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  2. Using EGEE against avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April 2006 avian flu was spreading across the world with the potential of turning into a pandemic, a drug to treat the deadly H5N1 strain was needed. Such a task required the huge processing power provided by EGEE, which analysed 300 000 possible drug components for their suitability. This map shows the network of computer centres and their activity during this time.

  3. Gender determination of avian embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  4. Experimental study of different nickel-titanium memory tracheal stents in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang Xu; He Nengshu; Fan Hailun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Since membrane -covered metal tracheal stent was applied successfully to treat the airway stenosis, it has been widely used and obtained satisfactory result during the past years. The purpose of our study was provide theoretical rational for treatment with membrane-covered tracheal stent by using animal experiment. Methods: The nickel- titanium memory stents of 22 mm in diameter and 6 cm in length were deployed in 18 dogs. The dogs were grouped into full- length membrane-covered group (n=6), partial-length membrane-covered group (membrane was covered for 4 cm in the medial part of the stent, n=6), and naked stent group (n=6). After the stent placement dysphagia or dysphonia was monitored daily. Twenty-four weeks later, the dogs were executed. Speiments were taken from the cephalic, medial, and caudal trachea under the stent. HE stain and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated. Results: After the stent placement, no dyspnea, dysphagia or dysphonia but cough was present in each dog. There was no significant difference in symptom between the three groups. Inflammation reaction, metaplasia from low columnar epithelium to spuamous epithelium, and mild granulation tissue hyperplasia in the underlying mucosa were present in each group. However, fibrosis and tracheal straitness were present only in the non-membrane-covered area, but not in the membrane-covered area. More PCNA expression was observed in the non-membrane -covered area than in the membrane-covered area. Conclusion: Both membrane-covered and non-membrane-covered stents can cause similar symptoms. However, the membrane -covered tracheal stent has good biological compatibility and would not induce tracheal straitness. The non-membrane -covered tracheal stent could induce a severe pathologic reaction and tracheal straitness. (authors)

  5. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  6. The chicken as a natural model for extraintestinal infections caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antão, Esther-Maria; Glodde, Susanne; Li, Ganwu; Sharifi, Reza; Homeier, Timo; Laturnus, Claudia; Diehl, Ines; Bethe, Astrid; Philipp, Hans-C; Preisinger, Rudolf; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa

    2008-01-01

    E. coli infections in avian species have become an economic threat to the poultry industry worldwide. Several factors have been associated with the virulence of E. coli in avian hosts, but no specific virulence gene has been identified as being entirely responsible for the pathogenicity of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Needless to say, the chicken would serve as the best model organism for unravelling the pathogenic mechanisms of APEC, an extraintestinal pathogen. Five-week-old white leghorn SPF chickens were infected intra-tracheally with a well characterized APEC field strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5) using different doses corresponding to the respective models of infection established, that is, the lung colonization model allowing re-isolation of bacteria only from the lung but not from other internal organs, and the systemic infection model. These two models represent the crucial steps in the pathogenesis of APEC infections, including the colonization of the lung epithelium and the spread of bacteria throughout the bloodstream. The read-out system includes a clinical score, pathomorphological changes and bacterial load determination. The lung colonization model has been established and described for the first time in this study, in addition to a comprehensive account of a systemic infection model which enables the study of severe extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections. These in vivo models enable the application of various molecular approaches to study host-pathogen interactions more closely. The most important application of such genetic manipulation techniques is the identification of genes required for extraintestinal virulence, as well as host genes involved in immunity in vivo. The knowledge obtained from these studies serves the dual purpose of shedding light on the nature of virulence itself, as well as providing a route for rational attenuation of the pathogen for vaccine construction, a measure by which extraintestinal infections, including

  7. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuha; Kawashita, Norihito; Daidoji, Tomo; Ibrahim, Madiha S.; El-Gendy, Emad M.; Takagi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shioda, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation. PMID:27097026

  8. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuha Arai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation.

  9. Fracture of an endoluminal nitinol stent used in the treatment of tracheal collapse in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittleman, Elise; Weisse, Chick; Mehler, Stephen J; Lee, Justine A

    2004-10-15

    A 5-year-old castrated male Pomeranian was evaluated because of severe dyspnea and coughing, and a diagnosis of complete, static collapse of the trachea at the thoracic inlet was made. After failure to improve with medical management alone, an endoluminal tracheal stent was placed, which resulted in resolution of signs. Ten weeks after stent placement, the dog underwent tracheal resection and anastomosis because the stent had fractured at the level of the thoracic inlet. One year after surgery, the dog was doing well and required treatment with hydrocodone infrequently. Compared with other surgical treatment options, placement of an endoluminal tracheal stent is a relatively noninvasive intervention that can provide effective relief from the clinical signs associated with tracheal collapse in dogs. Implantation of endoluminal tracheal stents may be associated with complications; therefore, the procedure may best be regarded as a salvage procedure for dogs with end-stage disease that are refractory to appropriate medical management, have extensive collapse of the intrathoracic portion of the trachea, or are poor candidates for surgery.

  10. Evaluation of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2008-02-01

    The Airtraq, a novel single use indirect laryngoscope, has demonstrated promise in the normal and simulated difficult airway. We compared the ease of intubation using the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Forty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, who were deemed to possess at least three characteristics indicating an increased risk for difficulty in tracheal intubation, were randomly assigned to undergo tracheal intubation using a Macintosh (n = 20) or Airtraq (n = 20) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of three anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. Four patients were not successfully intubated with the Macintosh laryngoscope, but were intubated successfully with the Airtraq. The Airtraq reduced the duration of intubation attempts (mean (SD); 13.4 (6.3) vs 47.7 (8.5) s), the need for additional manoeuvres, and the intubation difficulty score (0.4 (0.8) vs 7.7 (3.0)). Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq also reduced the degree of haemodynamic stimulation and minor trauma compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope.

  11. Association between pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm of patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Carneiro Diniz SOUZA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to detect possible associations between respiratory pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm samples in intubated patients in an intensive care unit (ICU, and to identify the most common respiratory pathogens in oral biofilm, particularly in patients that developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Two oral biofilm samples were collected from the tongue of intubated patients (at admission and after 48 hours and analyzed by culture with the Antibiotic Sensitivity Test. The results from the tongue biofilm samples were compared with the tracheal secretions samples. A total of 59.37% of patients exhibited the same species of pathogens in their tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm, of which 8 (42.1% developed VAP, 10 (52.63% did not develop pneumonia and one (5.26% had aspiration pneumonia. There was a statistically significant association between presence of microorganisms in the tracheal and mouth samples for the following pathogens: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter gergoviae, Streptococcus spp and Serratia marcescens (p < 0.05. Pathogens that are present in tracheal aspirates of intubated patients can be detected in their oral cavity, especially in those who developed VAP or aspiration pneumonia. Thus, the results indicate that an improved oral care in these patients could decrease ICU pneumonia rates.

  12. Tracheal Agenesis: A Challenging Prenatal Diagnosis—Contribution of Fetal MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charline Bertholdt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. The prevalence is less than 1 : 50 000 with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. This anomaly may be isolated but, in 93% of cases, it is part of polymalformative syndrome. The most evocative diagnosis situation is the ultrasonographic congenital high airway obstruction syndrome. Dilated airways, enlarged lungs with flattened diaphragm, fetal ascites and severe nonimmune hydrops can be observed. In the absence of a congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, the antenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is difficult. Tracheal agenesis should be suspected in the presence of an unexplained polyhydramnios associated with congenital malformations. The fetal airway exploration should then be systematically performed by fetal thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. A case of Floyd’s type II tracheal agenesis, detected during the postnatal period, is reported here. The retrospective reexamination of fetal magnetic resonance images showed that the antenatal diagnosis would have been easy if a systematical examination of upper airways had been performed. Prenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is possible with fetal MRI but the really challenge is to think about this pathology.

  13. Studies on Nanoparticle Based Avian Influenza Vaccines to Present Immunogenic Epitopes of the Virus with Concentration on Ectodomain of Matrix 2 (M2e) Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babapoor Dighaleh, Sankhiros

    2011-12-01

    Avian influenza is an infectious disease of avian species caused by type A influenza viruses with a significant economic impact on the poultry industry. Vaccination is the main prevention strategy in many countries worldwide. However, available vaccines elicit antibodies against two major surface protein of the virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), where they constantly change by point mutations. Influenza viruses can also easily undergo gene reassortment. Therefore, to protect chickens against new strain of avian influenza virus, as well as control and prevent virus spread among farms, new vaccines needed to be designed which is a tedious, time consuming and expensive. Recently, conserved regions of the influenza genome have been evaluated as possible universal vaccines to eliminate constant vaccine updates based on circulating virus. In this study, peptide nanotechnology was used to generate vaccine nanoparticles that carry the highly conserved external domain of matrix 2 protein (M2e). These nanoparticles presented M2e in monomeric or tetrameric forms, designated as PSC-M2e-CH and BNSC-M2eN-CH. respectively. First, to demonstrate immunogenicity of these nanoparticles, we measured anti-M2e antibody in chickens, particularly when a high dose was applied. Prior to vaccination-challenge study, the challenge dose were determined by oculonasal inoculation of 10 6 EID50 or 107.7 EID50 of low pathogenicity AI virus HSN2 followed by measuring cloacal and tracheal virus shedding. A biphasic virus shedding pattern was observed with two peaks of virus shedding at days 4 and 8 for both tracheal and cloacal swabs. The chickens infected with 107.7 EID50 had significant virus shedding as compared with 106 EID50. Based on results of mentioned studies, a vaccination-challenge study was conducted by using 75mug of each vaccine construct per inoculation (with and without adjuvant) and higher dose of virus for challenge. BN5C-M2e-CH with adjuvant significantly reduced the

  14. Seasonality, distribution and taxonomic status of avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description of a new species is based upon morphology of gametocyte development in the peripheral blood of the avian host. This does not distinguish between morphologically identical gametocytes from different avian host families, nor is species or family level a valid taxonomic character. Thus, Haemoproteus and ...

  15. Mechanisms of avian songs and calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2008-01-01

    The avian vocal organ, the syrinx, is a specialized structure located rather inaccessibly in an air sac close to the heart where the trachea bifurcates into the two primary bronchi. The syrinx of different avian taxa varies so much in position and morphology that it has been used for taxonomy. It...

  16. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  17. Avian Influenza Policy Analysis | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Governments in Southeast Asia have adopted a range of policies aimed at controlling the disease in animals, preventing its spread to humans and strengthening national preparedness for an avian influenza pandemic. The Asia Partnership for Avian Influenza Research (APAIR) brings together national research agencies ...

  18. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  19. Hyperexpression of TNF-Stimulated 6 (TSG-6 of HumanTracheal Aspirate and Bronchial Alveolar Lavage from Heavy-Smoker and Lung TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Trihadi

    2011-06-01

    Design and Methods: Experiments conducted in vitro with purified components revealed that TSG-6 had immunodetection in the Human Tracheal Aspirates (HTA and BAL of heavy smoker and Lung Tuberculosis. Results: Immunoprecipitation revealed that TSG-6 accounts in airways hyperresponsiveness for significant proportion of BAL and HTA, but not in control (p < 0,01. TSG-6 relevant protease inhibitor in airway secretion. In primary cultures of differentiated human airway epithelial, which suggest that TSG-6 may be induced by TNF. Our results suggest that TSG-6 may play an important protective role in bronchial epithellium buy increasing the antiprotese screen on the airway lumen. The present study identifies a novel function of TSG-6 by a distinct mechanism system regulated, enhancement of anti TK activity, and provides a rational for this activity within the context of inflamed airways. These findings correlate with the observed increases in protein expressions in human HTA and BAL. Conclusions: TSG-6 are hyper-expressed in airway epithelial cells in cultures of smoker and lung TB. The interactions of TSG-6 with other molecules are also potentially important to the pathophysiologic aspects of inflammatory airways diseases that remain to be elucidated (Sains Medika, 3(1:31-40.

  20. Tracheal intubation related complications in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Emmanuel; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Cornaglia, Carole; Devaud, Marie-Laure; Pirracchio, Romain

    2015-11-01

    Prehospital tracheal intubation (TI) is associated with morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases of difficult intubation. The goal of the present study was to describe factors associated with TI related complications in the prehospital setting. This was a prospective cohort study including all patients intubated on scene in a prehospital emergency medical service over a 4 year period. TI related complications included oxygen desaturation, aspiration, vomiting, bronchospasm and/or laryngospasm, and mechanical complications (mainstem intubation, oesophageal intubation and airway lesion- that is, dental or laryngeal trauma caused by the laryngoscope). Difficult intubation was defined as >2 failed laryngoscopic attempts, or the need for any alternative TI method. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for TI related complications. 1251 patients were included; 208 complications occurred in 165 patients (13.1%). Among the 208 complications, the most frequent were oesophageal intubation (n=69, 29.7%), desaturation (n=58, 25.0%) and mainstem intubation (n=37, 15.9%). In multivariate analysis, difficult intubation (OR=6.13, 3.93 to 9.54), Cormack and Lehane grades 3 and 4 (OR=2.23, 1.26 to 3.96 for Cormack and Lehane grade 3 and OR=2.61, 1.28 to 5.33 for Cormack and Lehane grade 4 compared with Cormack and Lehane grade 1) and a body mass index >30 kg/m(2) (OR=2.22, 1.38 to 3.56) were significantly associated with TI related complications. Despite specific guidelines, TI related complications are more frequent in the prehospital setting when intubation is deemed difficult, the Cormack and Lehane grade is greater than grade 1 and the patient is overweight. In such situations, particular attention is needed to avoid complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  2. Transcriptional program of ciliated epithelial cells reveals new cilium and centrosome components and links to human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona A Hoh

    Full Text Available Defects in the centrosome and cilium are associated with a set of human diseases having diverse phenotypes. To further characterize the components that define the function of these organelles we determined the transcriptional profile of multiciliated tracheal epithelial cells. Cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells undergoing differentiation in vitro were derived from mice expressing GFP from the ciliated-cell specific FOXJ1 promoter (FOXJ1:GFP. The transcriptional profile of ciliating GFP+ cells from these cultures was defined at an early and a late time point during differentiation and was refined by subtraction of the profile of the non-ciliated GFP- cells. We identified 649 genes upregulated early, when most cells were forming basal bodies, and 73 genes genes upregulated late, when most cells were fully ciliated. Most, but not all, of known centrosome proteins are transcriptionally upregulated early, particularly Plk4, a master regulator of centriole formation. We found that three genes associated with human disease states, Mdm1, Mlf1, and Dyx1c1, are upregulated during ciliogenesis and localize to centrioles and cilia. This transcriptome for mammalian multiciliated epithelial cells identifies new candidate centrosome and cilia proteins, highlights similarities between components of motile and primary cilia, and identifies new links between cilia proteins and human disease.

  3. Development of a 3D bellows tracheal graft: mechanical behavior analysis, fabrication and an in vivo feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Hun; Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Joo, Young Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Artificial tracheal grafts should have not only enough compressive strength to maintain an open tracheal lumen, but also sufficient flexibility for stable mechanical behavior, similar to the native trachea at the implant site. In this study, we developed a new 3D artificial tracheal graft using a bellows design for considering its mechanical behavior. To investigate the mechanical behavior of the bellows structure, finite element method (FEM) analysis in terms of longitudinal tension/compression, bending and radial compression was conducted. The bellows structure was then compared with the cylinder structure generally used for artificial tracheal grafts. The FEM analysis showed that the bellows had outstanding flexibility in longitudinal tension/compression and bending. Moreover, the bellows kept the lumen open without severe luminal deformation in comparison with the cylinder structure. A three-dimensional artificial tracheal graft with a bellows design was fabricated using indirect solid freeform fabrication technology, and the actual mechanical test was conducted to investigate the actual mechanical behavior of the bellows graft. The fabricated bellows graft was then applied to segmental tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model to assess its applicability. The bellows graft was completely incorporated into newly regenerated connective tissue and no obstruction at the implanted site was observed for up to 8 weeks after implantation. The data suggested that the developed bellows tracheal graft could be a promising alternative for tracheal reconstruction. (paper)

  4. Management of a case of left tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy under cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lung tumors with carinal involvement are frequently managed with tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy and tracheobronchial anastomosis without use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Various modes of ventilation have been described during tracheal resection and anastomosis. Use of CPB during this period allows the procedure to be conducted in a more controlled way. We performed tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of left lung involving carina. The surgery was performed in two stages. In the first stage, left pneumonectomy was performed and in the second stage after 48 h, tracheobronchial resection and anastomosis was performed under CPB. Second stage was delayed to avoid excessive bleeding (due to heparinization from the extensive vascular raw area left after pneumonectomy. Meticulous peri-operative planning and optimal post-operative care helped in successful management of a complex case, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  5. Tracheal injury during extraction of an esophageal foreign body: Repair utilizing venovenous ECMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunpei Okochi, MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is a form of life support with an ever-expanding range of indications. Veno-venous (VV ECMO is often utilized to support children with respiratory compromise, and has been employed successfully in the acute setting of traumatic tracheobronchial injury as well as during elective tracheal surgery. We present a successful case of VV ECMO used in the perioperative management of a tracheal repair for a traumatic laceration caused by attempts to retrieve an esophageal foreign body. While this mechanism of injury appears to be rare, we believe that VV-ECMO allowed for the optimal management of this child and should be considered for other extensive tracheal injuries in children.

  6. Tracheal stenosis after treatment with metallic stent: a situation worse than the initial problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Jaime; Mejia, Bibiana; Nino, Federico; Garavito, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Stens are a tubular device for use in trachea, carina or main bronchus to provide a support and maintain the permeability of these structures. There are two groups: Metallic and Silicone stent. Either metallic and silicone stents has a special properties. Metallic stent are very attractive option due to relative easy in their placement. The accumulated experience in this therapy has allowed to recognize several complications to take into consideration mainly in patients with tracheal benign stenosis. FDA has recommended don't use metallic stents, covered and not covered in benign diseases. We report a case of a tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged ortho tracheal intubation that required extensive interventions to control symptoms of central airway obstruction, between April and July of 2005.

  7. Neoglottis reconstruction with sternohyoid muscles on upper-tracheal orifice after laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang Jiang; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Haitao; Tao, Lei; Zhou, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Ideal speech restoration remains a difficult challenge for patients undergoing laryngectomy so far. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of neoglottic reconstruction with sternohyoid muscles on upper-tracheal orifice after total laryngectomy which can obtain relatively ideal voice rehabilitation. Fifteen male patients are laryngectomized, of whom eight with standard total laryngectomy and seven underwent nonstandard total laryngectomy with epiglottis conserved. After laryngectomy, the upper margin of the anterior hypopharyngeal mucosa (postcricoid mucosa) was stitched to the posterior margin of upper-tracheal orifice and a triangle-shaped neoglottis on upper-tracheal orifice was reconstructed using bilateral sternohyoid muscles near the hyoid bone which were sutured to the posterior wall and bilateral of upper-tracheal orifice. Then tracheolingual root anastomosis was done and reconstruction surgery was completed. Finally, a satisfactory voice was achieved in 14 of 15 patients except one whose neoglottis is stenosed and 11 cases had no severe complications including aspiration erroneous deglutition. The stomach catheters were removed successfully from 4 to 6 weeks after surgery in 11 cases, respectively. The neoglottis had to be closed in three patients because of aspiration problem. One neoglottis was closed 3 weeks after surgical reconstruction because of tracheal rings tear which created a bigger neoglottis. One neoglottis was removed 32 moths after total laryngectomy due to big neoglottis. Another one was closed 3 weeks after surgery by reason of the fear of aspiration without psychological preparation. Therefore, it is feasible to use the sternohyoid muscles for creation of a neoglottis on upper-tracheal orifice and provide an alternative surgical method of the voice restoration for the patients after laryngectomy.

  8. Coronaviruses in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J. W.; Bekker, C. P.; Voorhout, W. F.; Horzinek, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Strous, G. J.; Rottier, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. In this paper the interactions of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) with epithelial cells are compared. Porcine (LLC-PK1) and murine (mTAL) epithelial cells were grown on permeable

  9. A retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma with supraglottic and tracheal obstruction: The role of multidisciplinary airway management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkholz Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old man suffered hypoxemic cardiac arrest by supraglottic and tracheal airway obstruction in the emergency department. A previously unknown cervical fracture had caused a traumatic retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma. A lifesaving surgical emergency tracheostomy succeeded. Supraglottic and tracheal obstruction by a retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma with successful resuscitation via emergency tracheostomy after hypoxemic cardiac arrest has never been reported in a context of trauma. This clinically demanding case outlines the need for multidisciplinary airway management systems with continuous training and well-implemented guidelines. Only multidisciplinary staff preparedness and readily available equipments for the unanticipated difficult airway solved the catastrophic clinical situation.

  10. [Tracheal Injury Successfully Treated without Surgery;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Toshihiro; Nakano, Jun; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2018-02-01

    A 73-year-old man was injured after crashing his automobile into a concrete wall, and was admitted to our hospital with breathing difficulties. Chest computed tomography showed extensive mediastinal emphysema, right traumatic pneumothorax, and a suspected tracheal injury at the membranous region. Because of the associated tracheomalacia, the site of the tracheal injury was difficult to find by bronchoscopy. In addition, as the patient's respiratory condition was stable, surgical treatment was not chosen. Due to the continuous air leakage from the right lung, the patient underwent surgery after mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema improved. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  11. Laryngeal mask airway guided tracheal intubation in a neonate with the Pierre Robin syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T G; Joensen, H; Henneberg, S W

    1995-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation in infants with the Pierre Robin syndrome may sometimes be impossible to accomplish by conventional means. To aid difficult tracheal intubation many different techniques have been described. We present a case, in which we successfully intubated a small-for-date newborn boy...... with the Pierre Robin syndrome by using a modified laryngeal mask airway (no. 1) as a guide for the endotracheal tube. The technique is easy to perform, less traumatic and less time-consuming than multiple attempts at laryngoscopy or blind tracheal intubation....

  12. Cricoid pressure in emergency department rapid sequence tracheal intubations: a risk-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Daniel Y; Harris, Tim; Zideman, David

    2007-12-01

    Cricoid pressure is considered an integral part of patient safety in rapid sequence tracheal intubation and emergency airway management. Cricoid pressure is applied to prevent the regurgitation of gastric contents into the pharynx and subsequent aspiration into the pulmonary tree. This review analyzes the published evidence supporting cricoid pressure, along with potential problems, including increased difficulty with tracheal intubation and ventilation. According to the evidence available, the universal and continuous application of cricoid pressure during emergency airway management is questioned. An awareness of the benefits and potential problems with technique allows the practitioner to better judge when cricoid pressure should be used and instances in which it should be removed.

  13. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28 and in females (n=27. Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10 showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second, and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD

  14. Successfully repaired traumatic tracheal disruption and cardiac rupture with cardiopulmonary support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Takehiro; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Tsushima, Takao; Koyama, Masayuki; Takaya, Shunichi

    2002-02-01

    A 19-year-old man suffering from dyspnea associated with tracheal and cardiac rupture from a traffic accident was found by bronchoscopy to have a 7.5 cm longitudinal tear in the membranous portion of the trachea. Right posterolateral thoracotomy was conducted and open ventilation through the left main bronchus initiated with standby cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation of the right femoral artery and vein. When oxygenation was poor, extracorporeal circulation was initiated through the cannulated artery and vein. Under the cardiopulmonary bypass, we safely repaired the tracheal laceration and cardiac rupture.

  15. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  16. On the avian Merkel cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nafstad, P H

    1986-01-01

    Small Merkel cells are described in the hard palate epithelium of the chick. Further, spherical juxtaepithelial Merkel cells and more deeply situated apparently degenerating Merkel corpuscles are also described. The observations are interpreted as a reflection of a sequence of growth and decay of Merkel corpuscles, and seem to support the hypothesis of an epithelial origin of the Merkel cells.

  17. Genetic applications in avian conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  18. Avian Respiratory Coinfection and Impact on Avian Influenza Pathogenicity in Domestic Poultry: Field and Experimental Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Ahmed; Naguib, Mahmoud M

    2018-02-24

    The avian respiratory system hosts a wide range of commensal and potential pathogenic bacteria and/or viruses that interact with each other. Such interactions could be either synergistic or antagonistic, which subsequently determines the severity of the disease complex. The intensive rearing methods of poultry are responsible for the marked increase in avian respiratory diseases worldwide. The interaction between avian influenza with other pathogens can guarantee the continuous existence of other avian pathogens, which represents a global concern. A better understanding of the impact of the interaction between avian influenza virus and other avian respiratory pathogens provides a better insight into the respiratory disease complex in poultry and can lead to improved intervention strategies aimed at controlling virus spread.

  19. Fetal-juvenile origins of point mutations in the adult human tracheal-bronchial epithelium: Absence of detectable effects of age, gender or smoking status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Hiroko; Li-Sucholeiki, Xiao-Cheng; Marcelino, Luisa A.; Gruhl, Amanda N.; Herrero-Jimenez, Pablo; Zarbl, Helmut; Willey, James C.; Furth, Emma E.; Morgenthaler, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Allele-specific mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) of anatomically distinct sectors of the upper bronchial tracts of nine nonsmokers revealed many numerically dispersed clusters of the point mutations C742T, G746T, G747T of the TP53 gene, G35T of the KRAS gene and G508A of the HPRT1 gene. Assays of these five mutations in six smokers have yielded quantitatively similar results. One hundred and eighty four micro-anatomical sectors of 0.5-6 x 10 6 tracheal-bronchial epithelial cells represented en toto the equivalent of approximately 1.7 human smokers' bronchial trees to the fifth bifurcation. Statistically significant mutant copy numbers above the 95% upper confidence limits of historical background controls were found in 198 of 425 sector assays. No significant differences (P = 0.1) for negative sector fractions, mutant fractions, distributions of mutant cluster size or anatomical positions were observed for smoking status, gender or age (38-76 year). Based on the modal cluster size of mitochondrial point mutants, the size of the adult bronchial epithelial maintenance turnover unit was estimated to be about 32 cells. When data from all 15 lungs were combined the log 2 of nuclear mutant cluster size plotted against log 2 of the number of clusters of a given cluster size displayed a slope of ∼1.1 over a range of cluster sizes from ∼2 6 to 2 15 mutant copies. A parsimonious interpretation of these nuclear and previously reported data for lung epithelial mitochondrial point mutant clusters is that they arose from mutations in stem cells at a high but constant rate per stem cell doubling during at least ten stem cell doublings of the later fetal-juvenile period. The upper and lower decile range of summed point mutant fractions among lungs was about 7.5-fold, suggesting an important source of stratification in the population with regard to risk of tumor initiation

  20. Orchitis in roosters with reduced fertility associated with avian infectious bronchitis virus and avian metapneumovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, L Y B; Brandão, P E; Chacón, J L; Assayag, M S; Maiorka, P C; Raffi, P; Saidenberg, A B S; Jones, R C; Ferreira, A J P

    2007-12-01

    The pathogenesis of infection involving both infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes reproductive damage in hens after viral replication in the epithelium of the oviduct, resulting in loss of cilia and degeneration and necrosis of the epithelial and glandular cells. Although IBV has been indicated as a possible cause of the formation of calcium stones in the epididymus of roosters, a definitive association has not been confirmed. This report describes the detection of IBV and aMPV in the testes of roosters from a Brazilian poultry broiler breeder's flock with epididymal stones and low fertility. Samples of testis, trachea, and lungs from breeder males aged 57 wk were positive for IBV by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and virus isolation and testis samples were also positive for aMPV by RT-PCR. The inoculation of testis samples into embryonated chicken eggs via the allantoic cavity resulted in curled, hemorrhagic, and stunted embryos typical of IBV infection. The allantoic fluid was positive by RT-PCR aimed to amplify the region coding for the S1 subunit of the IBV S gene, but it was not positive for aMPV. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragment revealed a close relationship with European IBV genotype D274, previously unreported in Brazil. These results indicate that IBV and perhaps aMPV are likely to have played a role in the pathogenesis of the testicular disease described and should be regarded as factors that can influence male fertility disease in chickens.

  1. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Hall et al. (2012) Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2012.00358.x. Background  Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are l...

  2. Use of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a case of tracheal injury repair in a patient with severe relapsing polychondritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Anne-Sophie; McDonald, Christine; Waddell, Tom; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Tracheobronchial malacia occurs in 50% of patients with relapsing polychondritis (RP), and is often managed with stent insertion. While severe complications have been described after silicone tracheal stent insertion, there are few reports describing tracheal injury in patients with RP. We present a case of tracheal perforation secondary to Dumon ® stent manipulation in a patient with RP. The tracheal injury was successfully repaired with a silicone Y-stent inserted via right thoracotomy using veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) for ventilatory support. It is safe and feasible to introduce a silicone Y-stent through a thoracotomy for a tracheal trauma in combination with VA-ECMO support.

  3. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  4. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction.

  5. Successful airway management in a patient with tracheal stenosis and tracheoesophageal fistula: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Davari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A twenty-year-old girl was referred with tracheal stenosis (TS which was a consequence of prolonged intubation after head injury because of previous car accident. The patient was aphasic and had normal respiration. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed complete tracheal obstruction at second tracheal ring level. Distal trachea was normal through tracheostomy tube. Removal of the tracheostomy tube and blind reinsertion with a new one was complicated with hypoxia and respiratory distress. Fibrotic bronchoscopy revealed large tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF below tracheal obstruction. Reinsertion of the tracheostomy tube by fiber optic bronchoscope was successful. Multidetector CT scan was performed on the same day with confirmation of TS combined with TEF. Surgery was performed on the next day. No clinical evidence of TEF was found in back history. Inadequate evaluation of the whole length of the trachea during the first bronchoscopy was the reasons for missing TEF. TEF should be considered in patients with TS in spite of no typical symptom such as food aspiration or pulmonary infections.

  6. A fully degradable tracheal stent: in vitro and in vivo characterization of material degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Anthony H C; Ng, Nelson S P; Zhu, G H; Lim, Lynne H Y; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2012-04-01

    We report on the testing of materials for a fully degradable tracheal stent. Such a stent has several advantages over currently used permanent stents made of metal or silicone polymers. However, the mode of degradation in the trachea is expected to be different from a fully submerged device, because of the uniqueness of the tracheal environment. A physical model was developed to allow an in-depth study of degradation of bioabsorbable polymers exposed to two differing media; namely 70 wt % water (gel) on one side and humidified air on the other, simulating conditions in a tracheal passage. Longitudinal microtome slices were obtained from both polymer surfaces and degradation kinetics data were derived from size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the data obtained, it is observed that well-studied bulk-degrading polymers might show surface-eroding properties in such an environment. Generally, hydrophobic polymers retard the formation of a water concentration gradient and exhibit bulk-degradation kinetics. However, addition of specific plasticizers can influence the water uptake gradient, and force the polymer towards a pseudo "surface-eroding" behavior. In vivo studies in a rabbit model of degradable stents made from a selected polymer, demonstrate the feasibility of a fully bioabsorbable tracheal stent. This study aims to improve understanding of degradation of polymers under heterogeneous environments. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Using tracheal segments for replacement of cervical oesophagus: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasidezfouli, Azizollah; Sharifi, Davood; Sasani, Farhang; Ansari, Damoon; Abarkar, Mohammad; Rahmanijoo, Nasrin; Abbasidezfouli, Golbahar; Sheikhy, Kambiz

    2012-03-01

    Segmental resection and anastomosis of oesophageal lesions are not performed as a routine clinical practice because of complications and associated problems, whereas tracheal resection and anastomosis are a routine clinical practice. In this experimental study, we resected a segment of cervical oesophagus and replaced it with a tracheal segment. In eight dogs (mixed races), weighing 20-30 kg, ageing 1-2 years, under general anaesthesia, through a cervical incision, 5 cm of cervical trachea was separated while preserving its attachments to surrounding fibroareolar tissues. Afterwards, 5 cm of the oesophagus was resected and replaced with a prepared segment of the trachea. Oral liquids were started at the first post-operative day; the animals were kept for 2 months and then euthanized. Quality of swallowing and voice were evaluated. After an autopsy, anastomoses were examined grossly and histopathologically. No complications occurred during surgery. Swallowing function and voice were normal in all eight dogs after the operation. No sign of aspiration was seen in clinical and radiographic examinations after starting oral diet. In autopsy examination, anastomoses were patent without narrowing or abnormal mucosal changes. Remarkable histopathological findings in replaced tracheal segments were squamous metaplasia, atrophy and degeneration of mucosal glands and degeneration of cartilages. Replacement of a segment of the oesophagus with an autogenous tracheal segment is a practical procedure with low complications and can probably be used for the treatment of cervical oesophageal lesions in human beings.

  8. Tracheal agenesis: Approach towards this severe diagnosis. Case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. De Groot-Van Der Mooren (Maurike); M.C. Haak (Monique); P. Lakeman (Phillis); T.E. Cohen-Overbeek (Titia); J.P. van der Voorn (J. Patrick); J.H. Bretschneider (Jochen); R.M. van Elburg (Ruurd)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTracheal agenesis (TA) is a severe congenital disorder with often an unexpected emergency presentation. There is complete or partial absence of the trachea below the larynx, with presence or absence of a tracheoesophageal fistula (TOF). A neonate with TA is described, and another 48

  9. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...

  10. Flexible bronchoscopic insertion of self-expanding metal stents in malignant tracheal lesions without fluoroscopic guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS are a well-accepted treatment modality for malignant tracheobronchial obstruction or malignant tracheoesophageal fistulae (TEFs. The traditional approach to SEMS insertion in central airway obstruction (CAO has been rigid bronchoscopy performed under general anesthesia. Fluoroscopic guidance is sometimes utilized. Safe and accurate placement of tracheobronchial SEMS has also been described using flexible bronchoscopy. We herein describe our experience with tracheal SEMS insertion using flexible bronchoscopy without fluoroscopic guidance. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the bronchoscopy records was undertaken for the duration June 2012 to June 2014. Patients with malignant CAO or malignant TEF who underwent tracheal SEMS insertion using flexible bronchoscopy were included. Procedures were performed under mild sedation. Fluoroscopic guidance was not utilized. Results: Eleven patients were identified. The mean age was 60.9 (12.8 years. There were 6 males and 5 female patients. Most common indication for tracheal SEMS was CAO (9/11 followed by TEF (2/11. Stent deployment could be accomplished successfully and at the desired location in all the patients. All patients reported immediate symptomatic relief. Two patients experienced peri-procedural respiratory failure that recovered within 24 h. There was no procedure related mortality or other major complications. Conclusion: Insertion of tracheal SEMS in patients with malignant CAO/TEF using flexible bronchoscopy under minimal sedation is a safe and efficacious modality that can be performed without fluoroscopic guidance.

  11. Laryngeal mask airway guided tracheal intubation in a neonate with the Pierre Robin syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Joensen, Henning; Henneberg, Steen Winther

    1995-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation in infants with the Pierre Robin syndrome may sometimes be impossible to accomplish by conventional means. To aid difficult tracheal intubation many different techniques have been described. We present a case, in which we successfully intubated a small-for-date newborn boy...

  12. High frequency components of tracheal sound are emphasized during prolonged flow limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenhunen, M; Huupponen, E; Saastamoinen, A; Kulkas, A; Himanen, S-L; Rauhala, E

    2009-01-01

    A nasal pressure transducer, which is used to study nocturnal airflow, also provides information about the inspiratory flow waveform. A round flow shape is presented during normal breathing. A flattened, non-round shape is found during hypopneas and it can also appear in prolonged episodes. The significance of this prolonged flow limitation is still not established. A tracheal sound spectrum has been analyzed further in order to achieve additional information about breathing during sleep. Increased sound frequencies over 500 Hz have been connected to obstruction of the upper airway. The aim of the present study was to examine the tracheal sound signal content of prolonged flow limitation and to find out whether prolonged flow limitation would consist of abundant high frequency activity. Sleep recordings of 36 consecutive patients were examined. The tracheal sound spectral analysis was performed on 10 min episodes of prolonged flow limitation, normal breathing and periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing. The highest total spectral amplitude, implicating loudest sounds, occurred during flow-limited breathing which also presented loudest sounds in all frequency bands above 100 Hz. In addition, the tracheal sound signal during flow-limited breathing constituted proportionally more high frequency activities compared to normal breathing and even periodic apnea-hypopnea breathing

  13. Association between pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm of patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Luana Carneiro Diniz; Mota, Vanise Barros Rodrigues da; Carvalho, Alícia Valéria Dos Santos Zaranza de; Corrêa, Rita da Graça Carvalhal Frazão; Libério, Silvana Amado; Lopes, Fernanda Ferreira

    2017-06-05

    The aim of this study was to detect possible associations between respiratory pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm samples in intubated patients in an intensive care unit (ICU), and to identify the most common respiratory pathogens in oral biofilm, particularly in patients that developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Two oral biofilm samples were collected from the tongue of intubated patients (at admission and after 48 hours) and analyzed by culture with the Antibiotic Sensitivity Test. The results from the tongue biofilm samples were compared with the tracheal secretions samples. A total of 59.37% of patients exhibited the same species of pathogens in their tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm, of which 8 (42.1%) developed VAP, 10 (52.63%) did not develop pneumonia and one (5.26%) had aspiration pneumonia. There was a statistically significant association between presence of microorganisms in the tracheal and mouth samples for the following pathogens: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter gergoviae, Streptococcus spp and Serratia marcescens (p aspirates of intubated patients can be detected in their oral cavity, especially in those who developed VAP or aspiration pneumonia. Thus, the results indicate that an improved oral care in these patients could decrease ICU pneumonia rates.

  14. Relaxing action of adrenergic β2-agonists on guinea-pig skinned tracheal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Nemoto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Although adrenergic β2-agonist-induced smooth muscle relaxation has been attributed to increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP, a relaxation response has been observed at low β2-agonist concentrations that do not cause increased cAMP To elucidate the mechanism of tracheal muscle relaxation induced by low concentrations of β2-agonists, we used a guinea-pig skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparation to examine the effects on the contractile protein system. The isotonic contraction of β-escin-treated skinned tracheal muscle from guinea-pig was measured. When the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was maintained at 1 μmol/L in the presence of guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP; 100 μmol/L, neither isoproterenol (10nmol/L nor salbutamol (60 nmol/L affected Ca2+ sensitivity, but a significant decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity was observed in the presence of okadaic acid (1 μmol/L. The decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity was a slow response and was blocked by pretreatment with propranolol (1 μmol/L. Forskolin (1 μmol/L did not affect Ca2+ sensitivity. These results suggest that adrenergic b 2-agonists may activate protein phosphatase through an unknown pathway involving the β2-receptor, which enhances dephosphorylation of the myosin light chain and/or thin filament proteins, resulting in relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle.

  15. The effect of transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion on tracheal cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P-H; Lin, V-C; Chen, H-S; Hung, K-C

    2011-09-01

    Increased tracheal cuff pressure during mechanical ventilation is associated with reduced mucosal blood flow and ischaemia, as well as postoperative sore throat. We assessed the potential effects of transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion on the tracheal cuff pressure in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Using a manometer, the cuff pressure of a high-volume, low-pressure tracheal tube (inner diameter 7.0 mm for women and 7.5 mm for men) was adjusted to 25-30 cm H(2)O before blind insertion of a transoesophageal echocardiography probe. The pressure changes were then recorded for 1 min. After probe insertion, the mean (SD) intra-cuff pressure increased from 27.7 (1.5) to 36.2 (6.4) cm H(2)O (p 35 cm H(2)0 in 17/38 patients (45%). Our results suggest that transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion may increase the tracheal cuff pressure more than that is generally recommended and therefore the latter should be routinely monitored under such circumstances. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Thymoma in middle mediastinum that induced tracheal compression—Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teiko Sakurai

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We encountered a thymoma in the middle mediastinum that showed enlargement over a 2-year period, inducing severe tracheal compression. Thymomas can occur widely in pharyngeal pouch-derived locations and should be considered in differential diagnosis of a middle mediastinum tumor.

  17. Management of dogs and cats with endotracheal tube tracheal foreign bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Laura K.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Prosser, Kirsten J.; Defarges, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Two cats and 3 dogs were treated for an endotracheal tube tracheal foreign body (ETFB) during recovery from general anesthesia. Bronchoscopy was used to remove the ETFB. Animals were clinically normal at discharge. While rare, ETFB can occur upon recovery from anesthesia. Bronchoscopy is an effective way to remove ETFB. PMID:24891640

  18. Metallic stent implantation in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuming; Jin Yong; Xie Hong; Cheng Long; Gu Xingshi; Chang Liuhui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the tracheal stent implantation for treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia. Methods: Eighteen patients with malignant tracheal stenosis underwent preoperative 64-slice spiral CT scan and airway reconstruction. The stenotic sites were located in main tracheal trunk (5 patients), in right main bronchus (1 patient), in trachea and left main bronchus (4 patients), in trachea and right main bronchus (3 patients), in main tracheal trunk and bilateral main bronchus (5 patients). The degree of stenosis was rated 51% to 70% in 7 cases, 71% to 90% in 11 cases. All patients, 17 patients of ASA grade Ⅳ and 1 patient of grade Ⅲ, presented with severe dyspnea. Under general anaesthesia, implantation of metallic stent was performed through the sputum aspiration hole of the connecting tubing with DSA guidance. The NBP, ECG, RR, SaO 2 of the patients were recorded and compared with t test during the entire procedure. At the end of the procedure, relief of dyspnea, complications related to anesthesia and operation were recorded. Results: The success rate of stent placement was 18/18, and dyspnea was significantly relived in all patients. Slightly bloody sputum occurred in 7 cases. The stent was obstructed by sputum in 1 case,and the patient was treated with medication. There were no severe complications. The operative course were rated 11 to 9 in 17 cases, and 6 to 8 in 1 case. All 18 patients were cooperative during the procedure. Sixteen patients rated the procedure as very comfortable and 2 rated the procedure as comfortable. Respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) decreased in all patients after the operation [(37.1 ± 2.8)/min and (106.5 ± 14.2) bpm before the operation respectively, (18.6 ± 1.4)/min and (73.2 ± 7.6) bpm after the operation respectively], t=17.81 and 3.80, P<0.01. Pulse oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) during the operation [(91.2 ± 1.8)%]increased [(76.3 ± 8.6 )% before the

  19. An unusual salvage technique for posterior tracheal membranous laceration associated with transhiatal esophagectomy: A transcervical–transsternal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ziaeddin Rasihashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Various surgical approaches may be employed for esophageal resection. Major airway injuries due to transhiatal esophagectomy include vertical tears in the membranous trachea. Tracheal injury is an uncommon but potentially fatal complication. This article describes the technique to repair the posterior membranous tracheal tear, extended just over the carina through a transcervical–transsternal approach, thereby avoiding a second thoracotomy. Six patients with posterior membranous tracheal injury underwent this procedure. The laceration ranged from 3 cm to 5 cm in length. Four patients had received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The management of tracheal laceration added approximately 60 minutes to the total operation time. There was no mortality related to tracheal injury. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery, and both posterior tracheal wall and transverse tracheotomy remained intact without stenosis. The transcervical–transsternal approach decreases the need of thoracotomy and its complications in patients with tracheal laceration in any stage, even in cases of an extended tear down to the carina.

  20. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys...

  1. Resection and anastomosis for benign tracheal stenosis: Single institution experience of 18 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheal stenosis is a complex condition caused by altered inflammatory response to injury and subsequent excessive circumferential scar formation. Surgical resection, wherever possible, offers the best long-term results. Nonsurgical methods provide immediate relief to all can be curative in few but mostly serve as an excellent bridge to surgery in majority. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the outcome following surgery for benign tracheal stenosis at our center. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis was conducted on 18 patients who underwent resection and anastomosis for tracheal stenosis at our center between March 2012 and December 2015. Their records were analyzed for demography, history, clinical presentation, computed tomography, bronchoscopy details, preoperative interventions, indications for and details of surgery, the procedure performed, postoperative complications, and course during 6 months follow-up. Results: The patients had a varied list of pathologies for which they were either intubated or tracheostomized. The length of stenosis ranged between 1 cm and 4 cm. The diameter of stenotic segment ranged between 0 mm and 10 mm. Average length of resected segment was 3 cm, and number of tracheal rings resected ranged from 2 to 9. Postoperative complications occurred in four patients (22.22%. All our patients were in the “excellent outcome” category at discharge as well as at 3 months follow-up. Conclusions: Surgical management of tracheal stenosis is challenging and requires multidisciplinary team approach. Thorough preoperative preparation and multidisciplinary planning regarding need for and timing of surgery, meticulous intraoperative technique, and aggressive postoperative care is key to successful surgery, which can provide long-lasting cure to these patients.

  2. Long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazuke, Yuko; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Uehara, Shuichiro; Ueno, Takehisa; Nara, Keigo; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kubota, Akio; Usui, Noriaki; Soh, Hideki; Nomura, Motonari; Oue, Takaharu; Sasaki, Takashi; Nose, Satoko; Saka, Ryuta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal/alimentary reconstruction. We reviewed the medical records of four long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis and collected the following data: age, sex, type of tracheal agenesis, method of reconstruction, nutritional management, and physical and neurological development. The patients consisted of three boys and one girl, who ranged in age from 77 to 109months. The severity of their condition was classified as Floyd's type I (n=2), II (n=1), or III (n=1). Mechanical respiratory support was not necessary in any of the cases. Esophageal/alimentary reconstruction was performed using the small intestine (n=2), a gastric tube (n=1), and the esophagus (n=1). The age at esophageal reconstruction ranged from 41 to 55months. All of the cases required enteral nutrition via gastrostomy. Three of the patients were able to swallow a small amount of liquid and one was able to take pureed food orally. The physical development of the subjects was moderately delayed-borderline in childhood. Neurological development was normal in two cases and slightly delayed in two cases. None of the long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis required the use of an artificial respirator, and their development was close to normal. Future studies should aim to elucidate the optimal method for performing esophageal reconstruction to allow tracheal agenesis patients to achieve their full oral intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Priming dose of atracurium: measuring orbicularis oculi muscle fade and tracheal intubation conditions.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locks, Giovani de Figueiredo; Almeida, Maria Cristina Simões de

    2003-12-01

    The priming principle consists of administering a low neuromuscular blocker dose, minutes before the total dose for tracheal intubation, to shorten non-depolarizing blockers onset. There is, however, the risk for muscle fade and bronchoaspiration. Laryngeal muscles are of especial interest for tracheal intubation maneuvers and airway protection. Since their direct monitoring imposes technical difficulties, it has been reported that orbicularis oculi correlates with laryngeal muscles in terms of sensitivity to neuromuscular blocks. This study aimed at evaluating the presence of orbicularis oculi muscle fade after priming atracurium dose and at comparing clinical tracheal intubation conditions after two priming dose intervals. Participated in this study 35 adult patients, physical status ASA I or II, without risk factors for bronchoaspiration and submitted to elective surgeries. General anesthesia was induced with alfentanil and propofol and patients were manually ventilated under mask. Surface electrodes were then positioned on the temporal branch of the facial nerve, and the acceleration transducer was placed on the orbicularis oculi. Priming atracurium dose (0.02 mg.kg-1) was administered and T4/T1 ratio was evaluated every minute during 5 minutes in 20 cases (G1) and during 7 minutes in 13 cases (G2). After this interval, complementary atracurium dose (0.5 mg.kg-1) was administered and tracheal intubation was performed one minute later. Fade was defined as T4/T1 ratio below 0.9. There has been no fade in any patient during the monitoring interval. In 80% and 69% of G1 or G2 patients, respectively, tracheal intubation was classified as clinically acceptable (p > 0.05). Priming atracurium dose (0.02 mg.kg-1) does not determine orbicularis oculi fade and there is no difference between 5 or 7 minutes priming intervals.

  4. Central venous catheter tip migration due to tracheal extubation: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Manuel F; Jünemann, Theresa; Reinhart, Konrad; Schummer, Wolfram

    2017-10-01

    Considerable numbers of patients undergo central venous catheterization (CVC) under mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that the return of spontaneous breathing and tracheal extubation could be associated with distal CVC tip migration towards intracardiac positions due to decreasing intrathoracic pressures and subsequent readjustment of mediastinal organs. Patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomized for right or left internal jugular vein (IJV) CVC placement under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. CVC tips were positioned at the cavoatrial junction and measured at the time of placement, postoperatively under mechanical ventilation, and after tracheal extubation until 48 h after surgery. Measurement methods included intravascular electrocardiography (ECG) P-wave amplitude, transesophageal echocardiography, and chest radiography (CXR). Out of 70 patients, 60 were eligible for final statistical analysis (31 right and 29 left IJV CVC). According to ECG interpretation, CVC tip positions remained below the pericardiac reflection point in the distal superior vena cava over the course of the three measurement intervals. The ECG revealed significant proximal migration of CVC tips from the time of placement to the time of tracheal extubation (1.19 ± 0.55 vs. 0.62 ± 0.31 mV; P migrations in the time between postoperative assessment and following tracheal extubation (5.1 ± 1.7 vs. 5.3 ± 1.5 cm; P = 0.196). In patients with CVCs positioned at the cavoatrial junction, tracheal extubation was not associated with significant postoperative CVC tip malposition, but tended to undergo proximal migration. This trend should be considered particularly in left-sided thoracocervical puncture approaches to avoid unfavorable CVC tip positions.

  5. Effect of clenbuterol on tracheal mucociliary transport in horses undergoing simulated long-distance transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, J L; Jackson, K; Chen, J W; Boston, R; Nolen-Walston, R D

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia is observed in horses after long-distance transportation in association with confinement of head position leading to reduction in tracheal mucociliary clearance rate (TMCR). Clenbuterol, a beta-2 agonist shown to increase TMCR in the horse, will ameliorate the effects of a fixed elevated head position on large airway contamination and inflammation in a model of long-distance transportation model. Six adult horses. A cross-over designed prospective study. Horses were maintained with a fixed elevated head position for 48 hours to simulate long-distance transport, and treated with clenbuterol (0.8 μg/kg PO q12h) or a placebo starting 12 hours before simulated transportation. TMCR was measured using a charcoal clearance technique. Data were collected at baseline and 48 hours, and included TMCR, tracheal wash cytology and quantitative culture, rectal temperature, CBC, fibrinogen, and serum TNFα, IL-10, and IL-2 levels. There was a 18-21 day washout between study arms, and data were analyzed using regression analysis and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Tracheal mucociliary clearance rate was significantly decreased after transportation in both treatment (P = .002) and placebo (P = .03) groups. There was a significant effect of treatment on TMCR, with the treatment group showing half the reduction in TMCR compared with the placebo group (P = .002). Other significant differences between before- and after-transportation samples occurred for serum fibrinogen, peripheral eosinophil count, quantitative culture, tracheal bacteria, and degenerate neutrophils, though no treatment effect was found. Treatment with clenbuterol modestly attenuates the deleterious effects of this long-distance transportation model on tracheal mucociliary clearance. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Isolation of avian influenza virus in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S E; Naqi, S A; Grumbles, L C

    1981-01-01

    An avian influenza virus with surface antigens similar to those of fowl plague virus (Hav 1 Nav 2) was isolated in 1979 from 2 commercial turkey flocks in Central Texas. Two flocks in contact with these infected flocks developed clinical signs, gross lesions, and seroconversion but yielded no virus. This was the first recorded incidence of clinical avian influenza in Texas turkeys and only the second time that an agent with these surface antigens was isolated from turkeys in U.S.

  7. Proteomic analysis of chicken embryonic trachea and kidney tissues after infection in ovo by avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian infectious bronchitis (IB is one of the most serious diseases of economic importance in chickens; it is caused by the avian infectious coronavirus (IBV. Information remains limited about the comparative protein expression profiles of chicken embryonic tissues in response to IBV infection in ovo. In this study, we analyzed the changes of protein expression in trachea and kidney tissues from chicken embryos, following IBV infection in ovo, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Results 17 differentially expressed proteins from tracheal tissues and 19 differentially expressed proteins from kidney tissues were identified. These proteins mostly related to the cytoskeleton, binding of calcium ions, the stress response, anti-oxidative, and macromolecular metabolism. Some of these altered proteins were confirmed further at the mRNA level using real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, western blotting analysis further confirmed the changes of annexin A5 and HSPB1 during IBV infection. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, we have performed the first analysis of the proteomic changes in chicken embryonic trachea and kidney tissues during IBV infection in ovo. The data obtained should facilitate a better understanding of the pathogenesis of IBV infection.

  8. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; Khan, Owais Ahmed; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lu, Huaguang

    2010-03-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first diagnosed in a "backyard" flock of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) raised on palace premises in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in December 3, 2007. The flock consisted of 40 peafowl, and their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years old. Affected birds suffered from depression, anorexia, and white diarrhea. Four dead birds were submitted for HPAI diagnosis at the Central Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Riyadh. Brain and liver tissues and tracheal and cloacal swabs were taken from the dead birds and processed for a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR test and virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. The H5N1 subtype of avian influenza virus was isolated from the four dead birds and identified by a real-time RT-PCR before and after egg inoculation. The virus isolates were characterized as HPAI H5N1 virus by sequencing analysis. Phylogenetic comparisons revealed that the H5N1 viruses isolated from peafowl belong to the genetic clade 2.2 according to the World Health Organization nomenclature. The peafowl H5N1 virus falls into 2.2.2 sublineage II and clusters with the H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Saudi Arabia in 2007-08.

  9. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Dennis A.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  10. Field Investigation on the Prevalence of Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Some Localities in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah N. Alkhalaf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find out prevalence and types of avian influenza virus (AIV among broilers, native chickens, ducks and pigeons in Saudi Arabia. Field investigation was carried out in four localities including Al-Qassim, Hail, Al-Jouf and Northern Border regions. Serum sample, tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected from broilers (n=1561, layers (n=988, ducks (n=329 and pigeons (n=450 from these localities and tested for three different avian influenza viruses (H9, H5 and H3 using Enzyme linked immunosorbent (ELISA test, hamagglutination inhibition (HI test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All tested samples were negative for H5 and H3 viruses. In contrast, all positive results were found to be for H9 AI virus using PCR, ELISA and HI test. Chicken sera tested by ELISA for AIV revealed the highest positive samples in Northern Border regions (45.71%, followed by Al-Jouf (29.65%, Al-Qassim (23.98% and Hial (20.94% with non-significant difference (χ2=5.983; P=0.112. HI test carried out on duck sera revealed 35.90% prevalence of antibodies against AIV. PCR amplification resulted in 34.28 and 21.36% positive samples in ducks and chickens, respectively. The highest (45.71% PCR positive chicken samples were from Northern Border regions, followed by Al-Jouf (24.13%, Al-Qassim (19.30% and Hail (16.69% with significant difference (χ2=7.620; P=0.055. All tested pigeons samples were negative for the three virus serotypes included in the study.

  11. Avian metapneumovirus subtype B experimental infection and tissue distribution in chickens, sparrows, and pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, S; Shamoun, M

    2012-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a respiratory virus that infects a range of avian hosts, including chickens and turkeys. Migratory and local wild birds are implicated in aMPV spread among farms, countries, and seasonal outbreaks of the disease. A subtype B aMPV isolate from commercial chicken flocks suffering from respiratory disease was experimentally inoculated oculonasally into 7-week old chickens, young pigeons, and sparrows. Chickens showed minimal tracheal rales, whereas pigeons and sparrows were asymptomatic. Shedding of aMPV was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on homogenates from nasal turbinates. At 5 days postinfection, 5 of 5 chickens, 2 of 5 pigeons, and 1 of 5 sparrows were positive; at 10 or 15 days, none were positive. At 2 and 5 days, aMPV antigens were localized at the ciliated boarder of respiratory epithelium in nasal cavity and trachea of chickens, as well as to the conjunctival epithelium. Pigeons had detectable viral antigens in only the trachea at 2 and 5 days; sparrow tissues did not show any positive staining. At the end of the experiment, at 21 days postinfection, 14 of 15 inoculated chickens seroconverted against aMPV, but none of the inoculated pigeons or sparrows did. The authors believe that pigeons and sparrows have the ability to transmit the virus between chicken farms, although they do not consider pigeons and sparrows as natural hosts for aMPV, given that they failed to seroconvert. In conclusion, pigeons and sparrows are partially susceptible to aMPV infection, probably acting more as mechanical vectors because infection is only temporary and short-lived.

  12. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  13. Using avian radar to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Halstead, Brian J.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Laughlin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar systems designed to detect avian activity at airfields are useful in understanding factors that influence the risk of bird and aircraft collisions (bird strikes). We used an avian radar system to measure avian activity at Beale Air Force Base, California, USA, during 2008 and 2009. We conducted a 2-part analysis to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological and time-dependent factors. We found that avian activity around the airfield was greater at times when bird strikes occurred than on average using a permutation resampling technique. Second, we developed generalized linear mixed models of an avian activity index (AAI). Variation in AAI was first explained by seasons that were based on average migration dates of birds at the study area. We then modeled AAI by those seasons to further explain variation by meteorological factors and daily light levels within a 24-hour period. In general, avian activity increased with decreased temperature, wind, visibility, precipitation, and increased humidity and cloud cover. These effects differed by season. For example, during the spring bird migration period, most avian activity occurred before sunrise at twilight hours on clear days with low winds, whereas during fall migration, substantial activity occurred after sunrise, and birds generally were more active at lower temperatures. We report parameter estimates (i.e., constants and coefficients) averaged across models and a relatively simple calculation for safety officers and wildlife managers to predict AAI and the relative risk of bird strike based on time, date, and meteorological values. We validated model predictability and assessed model fit. These analyses will be useful for general inference of avian activity and risk assessment efforts. Further investigation and ongoing data collection will refine these inference models and improve our understanding of factors that influence avian activity, which is necessary to inform

  14. Cytophotometric analysis of reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver, heart muscle and tracheal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Vogels, I. M.

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in cryostat sections of rat liver, tracheal epithelium and heart muscle were monitored by continuous measurement of formazan formation by cytophotometry at room temperature. Incubation media contained polyvinyl alcohol as tissue

  15. Testing and Evaluation of the IMPACT Instrumentation, Inc. 3O8ME13 Continous Oropharyngeal/Tracheal Suction Apparatus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blake, Butch

    1998-01-01

    The IMPACT Instrumentation, Inc., Continous Oropharyngeal Tracheal Suction, model 308ME13 is a portable self contained, general purpose, medical suction apparatus designed for removing secretions from the upper airway...

  16. Tracheal paraganglioma presenting as stridor in a pediatric patient, case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimachkieh, Amy L; Dobbie, Allison; Olson, Damon R; Lovell, Mark A; Prager, Jeremy D

    2018-04-01

    To review tracheal paragangliomas and describe the clinical presentation, radiologic findings, operative management, and histologic findings of a pediatric patient who presented with stridor refractory to traditional asthma therapy. Chart review of an 8-year-old male who presented to a tertiary care pediatric hospital and literature review of tracheal paragangliomas. We present the case of an 8-year-old male who presented with new-onset of wheezing and dyspnea on exertion. He was given a new diagnosis of asthma and treated with bronchodilators that failed to improve his symptoms, which progressed over 3 months until he presented urgently with biphasic stridor. Bedside flexible laryngoscopy failed to reveal an etiology. Computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated 17 × 12 × 16 mm exophytic mass arising from the posterior membranous trachea with extension of the mass to the border of the thyroid gland and separate from the esophagus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiography confirmed vascular supply from the right thyrocervical trunk and inferior thyroid artery. Rigid microlaryngoscopy revealed a friable vascular polypoid mass 2 cm distal to the vocal folds with 75% obstruction of the airway from which a small biopsy was taken. Pathology confirmed paraganglioma with neuroendocrine cells arranged in "zellballen" architecture and strong immunopositivity for chromogranin and synaptophysin in the neuroendocrine cells and S100 immunopositivity in the sustentacular cells. The patient underwent complete open resection of the tumor including three tracheal rings with primary anastomosis. Final pathology confirmed paraganglioma and negative margins. Genetic screening revealed a succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) germline mutation, confirming hereditary paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma syndrome. He remains well at 3 month follow up without dyspnea or stridor. Tracheal paragangliomas are exceptionally rare, with 12 reported cases. This is the only

  17. Trypsin as enhancement in cyclical tracheal decellularization: Morphological and biophysical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo-Gomez, D.M., E-mail: davidmauro2008@gmail.com [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Unidad de Posgrado Edificio “C” 1er Piso, Circuito de Posgrados, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Leon-Mancilla, B. [Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Edificio “D” Planta Baja, Circuito Interior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Del Prado-Audelo, M.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-02-01

    There are different types of tracheal disorders (e.g. cancer, stenosis and fractures). These can cause respiratory failure and lead to death of patients. Several attempts have been made for trachea replacement in order to restore the airway, including anastomosis and implants made from synthetic or natural materials. Tracheal allotransplantation has shown high rejection rates, and decellularization has emerged as a possible solution. Decellularization involves the removal of antigens from cells in the organ or tissue, leaving a matrix that can be used as 3D cell-scaffold. Although this process has been used for tracheal replacement, it usually takes at least two months and time is critical for patients with tracheal disorders. Therefore, there is necessary to develop a tracheal replacement process, which is not only effective, but also quick to prepare. The aim of this research was to develop a faster trachea decellularization protocol using Trypsin enzyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as decellularization agents. Three protocols of cyclic trachea decellularization (Protocols A, B, and C) were compared. Following Protocol A (previously described in the literature), 15 consecutive cycles were performed over 32 days. Protocol B (a variation of Protocol A) — EDTA being added — with 15 consecutive cycles performed over 60 days. Finally, Protocol C, with the addition of Trypsin as a decellularization agent, 5 consecutive cycles being performed over 10 days. For the three protocols, hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining and DNA residual content quantification were performed to establish the effectiveness of the decellularization process. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the changes in porosity and microarrays. To evaluate the structural matrices integrity, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and biomechanical test were used. None of the protocols showed significant alteration or degradation in the components of the extracellular matrix

  18. Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial cells by lipoxin A4 through AhR-cAMP-dependent pathway. Bi-Huan Cheng, Li-Wei Pan, Sheng-Rong Zhang, Bin-Yu Ying, Ben-Ji Wang, Guo-Liang Lin, Shi-Fang Ding ...

  19. Avian cholera in Nebraska's Rainwater Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurt, J.J.; Trout, A.K.; Cary, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first report of avian cholera in North America occurred in northwestern Texas in winter 1944 (Quortrup et al. 1946). In 1975, mortality from avian cholera occurred for the first time in waterfowl in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska when an estimated 25,000 birds died (Zinkl et al. 1977). Avian cholera has continued to cause mortality in wild birds in specific areas of the Basin each spring since. Losses of waterfowl from avian cholera continue to be much greater in some of the wetlands in the western part of the Basin than in the east. Several wetlands in the west have consistently higher mortality and are most often the wetlands where initial mortality is noticed each spring (Figure 1). The establishment of this disease in Nebraska is of considerable concern because of the importance of the Rainwater Basin as a spring staging area for waterfowl migrating to their breeding grounds. The wetlands in this area are on a major migration route used by an estimated 5 to 9 million ducks and several hundred thousand geese. A large portion of the western mid-continental greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) population stage in the Basin each spring. Occasionally, whooping cranes (Grus americana) use these wetlands during migration, and lesser sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging on the nearby Platte River sometimes use wetlands where avian cholera occurs (Anonymous 1981). Our objectives were to determine whether certain water quality variables in the Rainwater Basin differed between areas of high and low avian cholera incidence. These results would then be used for laboratory studies involving the survivability of Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera. Those studies will be reported elsewhere.

  20. Normal morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and progression of epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chao; Jamal, Leen; Janes, Kevin A

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells organize into various tissue architectures that largely maintain their structure throughout the life of an organism. For decades, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues has fascinated scientists at the interface of cell, developmental, and molecular biology. Systems biology offers ways to combine knowledge from these disciplines by building integrative models that are quantitative and predictive. Can such models be useful for gaining a deeper understanding of epithelial morphogenesis? Here, we take inventory of some recurring themes in epithelial morphogenesis that systems approaches could strive to capture. Predictive understanding of morphogenesis at the systems level would prove especially valuable for diseases such as cancer, where epithelial tissue architecture is profoundly disrupted. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Epithelial cells derived from swine bone marrow express stem cell markers and support influenza virus replication in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Khatri

    Full Text Available The bone marrow contains heterogeneous population of cells that are involved in the regeneration and repair of diseased organs, including the lungs. In this study, we isolated and characterized progenitor epithelial cells from the bone marrow of 4- to 5-week old germ-free pigs. Microscopically, the cultured cells showed epithelial-like morphology. Phenotypically, these cells expressed the stem cell markers octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct4 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1, the alveolar stem cell marker Clara cell secretory protein (Ccsp, and the epithelial cell markers pan-cytokeratin (Pan-K, cytokeratin-18 (K-18, and occludin. When cultured in epithelial cell growth medium, the progenitor epithelial cells expressed type I and type II pneumocyte markers. Next, we examined the susceptibility of these cells to influenza virus. Progenitor epithelial cells expressed sialic acid receptors utilized by avian and mammalian influenza viruses and were targets for influenza virus replication. Additionally, differentiated type II but not type I pneumocytes supported the replication of influenza virus. Our data indicate that we have identified a unique population of progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow that might have airway reconstitution potential and may be a useful model for cell-based therapies for infectious and non-infectious lung diseases.

  2. Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran S. Chaudhry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of only a finite number of tobacco toxins have been studied. Here, we describe exposure of cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells to low concentrations of tobacco carcinogens: nickel sulphate, benzo(bfluoranthene, N-nitrosodiethylamine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK. After a 24-hour exposure, EGFR was expressed in cell membrane and cytoplasm, BCL-2 was expressed only in the irregular nuclei of large atypical cells, MKI67 was expressed in nuclei with no staining in larger cells, cytoplasmic BIRC5 with stronger nuclear staining was seen in large atypical cells, and nuclear TP53 was strongly expressed in all cells. After only a 24-hour exposure, cells exhibited atypical nuclear and cytoplasmic features. After a 48-hour exposure, EGFR staining was localized to the nucleus, BCL-2 was slightly decreased in intensity, BIRC5 was localized to the cytoplasm, and TP53 staining was increased in small and large cells. BCL2L1 was expressed in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells at 24- and 48-hour exposures. We illustrate that short-termexposure of a bronchial epithelial cell line to smoking-equivalent concentrations of tobacco carcinogens alters the expression of key proliferation regulatory genes, EGFR, BCL-2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, TP53, and MKI67, similar to that reported in biopsy specimens of pulmonary epithelium described to be preneoplastic lesions.

  3. The pathogenicity of avian metapneumovirus subtype C wild bird isolates in domestic turkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Ra Mi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian metapneumovirus subtype C (aMPV/C causes severe upper respiratory disease in turkeys. Previous report revealed the presence of aMPV/C in wild birds in the southeast regions of the U.S. Methods In this study, aMPV/C positive oral swabs from American coots (AC and Canada geese (CG were passaged three times in the respiratory tract of specific pathogen free (SPF turkeys and used as aMPV/C P3 virus isolates in subsequent studies. Results Wild bird P3 isolates showed similar growth characteristics when compared to virulent aMPV/C in chicken embryo fibroblast ( CEF cell cultures and their glycoprotein G gene sequence was closely related to the G gene of aMPV/C Colorado reference virus. Three-day-old commercial or SPF turkeys were inoculated oculonasally with wild bird aMPV/C P3 isolates. At 5 and 7 days post-inoculation (DPI, severe clinical signs were observed in both of the AC and CG virus-exposed groups. Viral RNA was detected in tracheal swabs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. In addition, immunohistochemistry showed virus replication in the nasal turbinate and trachea. All virus-exposed turkeys developed positive antibody response by 14 DPI. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that aMPV/C wild bird isolates induced typical aMPV/C disease in the domestic turkeys.

  4. The pathogenicity of avian metapneumovirus subtype C wild bird isolates in domestic turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ra Mi; Yu, Qingzhong; Zsak, Laszlo

    2013-01-30

    Avian metapneumovirus subtype C (aMPV/C) causes severe upper respiratory disease in turkeys. Previous report revealed the presence of aMPV/C in wild birds in the southeast regions of the U.S. In this study, aMPV/C positive oral swabs from American coots (AC) and Canada geese (CG) were passaged three times in the respiratory tract of specific pathogen free (SPF) turkeys and used as aMPV/C P3 virus isolates in subsequent studies. Wild bird P3 isolates showed similar growth characteristics when compared to virulent aMPV/C in chicken embryo fibroblast ( CEF) cell cultures and their glycoprotein G gene sequence was closely related to the G gene of aMPV/C Colorado reference virus. Three-day-old commercial or SPF turkeys were inoculated oculonasally with wild bird aMPV/C P3 isolates. At 5 and 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), severe clinical signs were observed in both of the AC and CG virus-exposed groups. Viral RNA was detected in tracheal swabs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, immunohistochemistry showed virus replication in the nasal turbinate and trachea. All virus-exposed turkeys developed positive antibody response by 14 DPI. Our data demonstrate that aMPV/C wild bird isolates induced typical aMPV/C disease in the domestic turkeys.

  5. Investigations on the protective role of passively transferred antibodies against avian metapneumovirus infection in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2009-12-01

    The avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is the causative agent of an acute respiratory disease in turkeys, which causes considerable economic losses to the poultry industry. Currently attenuated live and inactivated vaccines are widely used to control the disease, but vaccine breaks are frequently observed. For improvement of current vaccination strategies it is necessary to gain enhanced knowledge of the immune mechanisms against aMPV infection. Field observations suggest that vaccine-induced aMPV-specific antibodies are not indicative for protection. In the present study we investigated the role of antibodies in protection of turkeys against aMPV. In two experiments, commercial turkey poults received aMPV-specific antibodies by intravenous injection. The antibody transfer resulted in increased antibody levels in the sera. Virus-specific antibodies were also detected on mucosal surfaces such as the trachea, conjunctivae and gall bladder. Turkeys were subsequently challenged with a virulent aMPV subtype A strain. Development of clinical signs, virus detection by polymerase chain reaction and histopathological changes of tracheal mucosa in challenged turkeys with and without passively transferred antibodies were comparable with each other. Our results suggest that humoral immunity does not provide sufficient protection against aMPV infection. Thus, the measurement of vaccine-induced aMPV antibody response may not be considered as an adequate indicator of vaccine efficacy. Further research on the protective role of cell-mediated immune mechanisms is necessary to improve current vaccine strategies.

  6. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  7. Avian Flu Epidemic 2003: Public health consequences. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman A; Mulder YM; Leeuw JRJ de; Meijer A; Du Ry van Beest Holle M; Kamst RA; Velden PG van der; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Koopmans MPG; Ruijten MWMM; Instituut voor Psychotrauma; CIE; MGO; LIS

    2004-01-01

    Executive summary Avian flu epidemic 2003: public health consequences.Risk factors, health, well-being, health care needs and preventive measures during the H7N7 avian flu outbreak control in the Netherlands.An estimated thousand people, possibly more have been infected with avian flu during the

  8. Proceedings of National Avian-Wind Power Planning Meeting IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Avian Subcommittee

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The purpose of the fourth meeting was to (1) share research and update research conducted on avian wind interactions (2) identify questions and issues related to the research results, (3) develop conclusions about some avian/wind power issues, and (4) identify questions and issues for future avian research.

  9. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C infection in chickens, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  10. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  11. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  12. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  13. [POSTRESUSCITATION CICATRICIAL TRACHEAL STENOSIS. CURRENT STATE OF THE PROBLEM - THE SUCCESSES, THE HOPES AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V D; Vyzhigina, M A; Rusakov, M A; Parshin, V V; Titov, V A; Starostin, A V

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the trend continues to increase the number ofpatients with cicatricial tracheal stenosis (CTS). Therefore, prevention and treatment ofthis disease remains topical. The main cause ofcicatricial tracheal stenosis is damaging the trachea during mechanical ventilation. The scheme ofprevention of this disease in Russia hasn't brought the desired results. to clarify the modern etiology of cicatricial tracheal stenosis, to identify the trend in incidence rates, to determine whether there is an optimal safe alternative to tracheostomy including the use of minimally invasive techniques, to improve diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm at various stages of assistance, and also to study the results of innovative operations and new ways of maintaining gas exchange. 1128 patients with cicatricial tracheal stenosis was treated from 1963 to 2015 in Petrovsky National Research Centre of Surgery and IMSechenov First Moscow State Medical University. Over time methods of di- agnosis, methods of anesthesia and operations have been varied. In this regard all patients were divided into two groups depending on the period of time from 1963 to 2000 (297 patients) andfrom 2001 to 2015 (831 patients). In recent decades there is a steady increase in the number of treated patients. So, if in the first group during the year operational treatment about the CTS 8,0 patients were underwent, in the second - to 55.4. Cicatricial tracheal stenosis appeared after lung mechanical ventilation at 1025 (for 90.9%) patients. They have undergone both radical one-stage treatment and multi-stage and sequential intraluminal procedures. In general there is a clear trend towards more aggressive surgical tactics. So, if in thefirst group, the tracheal resection with anastomosis was performedin 59 patients only, the second-330. Thefrequency ofpostoperative complications and mortality in the second group ofpatients was 12.9 and 0.7 %, respectively. Only a reasonable combination of all treatment methods

  14. Treatment of primary tracheal carcinoma. The role of external and endoluminal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.; Wannenmacher, M.; Becker, H.; Herth, F.; Gagel, B.

    2000-01-01

    Background and Purpose: In a retrospective study the role of radiation therapy for the treatment of primary tracheal carcinoma was investigated. Patients and Methods: Between 1984 and 1997, 25 patients with primary tracheal carcinoma were treated with external beam radiotherapy (17 squamous-cell carcinoma [SCC], 8 adenoid cystic carcinoma [ACC], median dose SCC 60 Gy, ACC 55 Gy). An additional brachytherapy boost was carried out in 10/25 patients (median dose SCC 18 Gy, ACC 15 Gy). Ten patients underwent operative treatment. Results: The median survival (Kaplan-Meier) for patients with SCC was 33 months (ACC 94.2). The 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) for patients with SCC were 64.7% (ACC 85.7%), 64.7% (ACC 85.7%), and 26% (ACC 85.7%). Patients with ACC and patients with a complete remission after treatment had a significantly better survival probability (log rank test, p [de

  15. [Tracheal resection for post-intubation subglottic stenosis in a patient with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Radu; Negru, Irina; Matache, Radu; MirunaTodor

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA or Wegener) is a systemic autoimmune disease with inflammation of small- and medium-size vessels. It can affect practically any organ or system, but renal, respiratory andjoint systems are most frequently damaged. Positive pANCA antibodies can raise the suspicion of diagnosis. Subglottic stenosis is relatively frequent, in a quarter of patients, especially in the third decade women. The case presented is of an 80-year-old woman, recently diagnosed with pulmonary, renal and systemic manifestations of GPA and with a subglottic stenosis rapidly evolving towards endotracheal intubation, tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation and renal failure. Further evolution has been favorable under corticoid therapy. After weaning from the mechanical ventilation and30 days after the suppression of the tracheostomy, the patient developed a tracheal stenosis with mixed etiology, secondary to vasculitis and prolonged intubation with tracheostomy. Tracheal resection with termino-terminal anastomosis was performed in emergency with simple post-operative evolution and without late complications.

  16. Anesthetic and Airways Management of a Dog with Severe Tracheal Collapse during Intraluminal Stent Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Argano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the anesthetic and airways management of a dog affected by 4th degree tracheal collapse and undergoing endoscope-guided intraluminal stent placement. After premedication with acepromazine and butorphanol, general anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with intravenous propofol and butorphanol in constant rate infusion. During intraluminal stent placement, oxygen was supplemented by means of a simple and inexpensive handmade device, namely, a ureteral catheter inserted into the trachea and connected to an oxygen source, which allowed for the maintenance of airways’ patency and adequate patient’s oxygenation, without decreasing visibility in the surgical field or interfering with the procedure. The use of the technique described in the present paper was the main determinant of the successful anesthetic management and may be proposed for similar critical cases in which surgical manipulation of the tracheal lumen, which may potentially result in hypoxia by compromising airways patency, is required.

  17. Saccular lung cannulation in a ball python (Python regius) to treat a tracheal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Debbie A; Wellehan, James F X; Isaza, Ramiro

    2009-03-01

    An adult male ball python (Python regius) presented in a state of severe dyspnea characterized by open-mouth breathing and vertical positioning of the head and neck. The animal had copious discharge in the tracheal lumen acting as an obstruction. A tube was placed through the body wall into the caudal saccular aspect of the lung to allow the animal to breathe while treatment was initiated. The ball python's dyspnea immediately improved. Diagnostics confirmed a bacterial respiratory infection with predominantly Providencia rettgeri. The saccular lung (air sac) tube was removed after 13 days. Pulmonary endoscopy before closure showed minimal damage with a small amount of hemorrhage in the surrounding muscle tissue. Respiratory disease is a common occurrence in captive snakes and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Saccular lung cannulation is a relatively simple procedure that can alleviate tracheal narrowing or obstruction, similar to air sac cannulation in birds.

  18. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells' cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  19. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-01-01

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B -/- mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag + /Cu + transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  20. Changes in Tracheostomy- and Intubation-Related Tracheal Stenosis: Implications for Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel S; Khalpey, Zain; Hsu, Charles; Little, Alex G

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to identify the changing characteristic patterns and locations of stenosis after tracheostomy or intubation and to assess the risk factors associated with perioperative complication and restenosis after primary resection and reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed (January /2012 to March 2015) on patients treated at the University of Arizona Medical Center (Tucson, Arizona) who had symptomatic tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged intubation or tracheostomy. Data on demographics, surgical approach, and outcome were obtained. Analysis was performed using the χ 2 test, Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival, Cox proportional hazards survival analysis, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Forty-eight patients were referred for surgical resection, and 36 patients underwent primary resection and reconstruction; 72% of patients had previous endobronchial treatments for stenosis. Fourteen patients had postintubation tracheal stenosis, and 22 had tracheostomy-related stenosis (16 percutaneous, 6 open tracheostomy). Among all patients, 52.8% had stenosis proximal to or involving the cricoid; 72.7% of patients with tracheostomy-related stenosis had stenosis at or proximal to the cricoid, whereas only 21.4% of the patients with intubation-related stenosis had a similar location. Nineteen patients underwent laryngotracheal resection, and 17 patients had tracheal resection. The mean length of resection was 3.6 cm. A body mass index greater than 35 was associated with increased perioperative complications (p = 0.012). In multivariate analysis, patients younger than 30 years of age at operation had an increased relative risk of recurrence. Recent advances in percutaneous tracheostomy have increased the numbers of patients presenting with proximal tracheal stenosis, thus necessitating more complex subglottic resection and reconstruction. The anastomotic and overall complication rate remains low despite these more complex operations

  1. Prematurity and fetal lung response after tracheal occlusion in fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sananes, Nicolas; Rodo, Carlota; Peiro, Jose Luis; Britto, Ingrid Schwach Werneck; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Favre, Romain; Joal, Arnaud; Gaudineau, Adrien; Silva, Marcos Marques da; Tannuri, Uenis; Zugaib, Marcelo; Carreras, Elena; Ruano, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the independent association of fetal pulmonary response and prematurity to postnatal outcomes after fetal tracheal occlusion for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Fetal pulmonary response, prematurity (prematurity (prematurity was not statistically associated with mortality after controlling for fetal pulmonary response (aOR 0.52, 95% CI 0.12-2.30, p=0.367). Fetal pulmonary response after FETO is the most important factor associated with survival, independently from the gestational age at delivery.

  2. TRACHEAL AND BRONCHIAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT OBSTRUCTIVE SYNDROME: ACCORDING TO BRONCHOSCOPIC

    OpenAIRE

    M. L. Shteiner

    2014-01-01

    The endobronchial pattern of significant bronchial obstructive syndrome of various etiologies was analyzed in 4,000 patients with this condition. At the same time, bronchial malformations were encountered as supplementary bronchi of the left and right basal pyramids, axillary left bronchi, supplementary and displaced tracheal bronchi, and a single case of distal transposition of the right proximal bronchus in 1.58% of cases. According to the bronchoscopic findings, supplementary bronchi and t...

  3. [Study on Tracheal Intubation's Circular Arc Radius Measuring Method Based on Machine Vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong; Li, Genchi; Feng, Yunhao; Yang, Yonghuan; Hao, Xiali

    2015-03-01

    It is difficult to measure the circular arc radius for central angle less than 30 degrees. The existing measuring methods are of low efficiency and big error. Through designing the machine vision system and studying the image detecting method for measurement, It is obtained good results by using the new measurement for tracheal intubation's circular arc radius, Realized a rapid and accurate measurement of the circular arc radius, and expanded the application in the field of machine vision.

  4. Patterns of parasitism by tracheal mites (Locustacarus buchneri) in natural bumble bee populations

    OpenAIRE

    Otterstatter , Michael; Whidden , Troy

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Parasitic mites are among the most destructive enemies of social bees. However, aside from mites of honey bees, virtually nothing is known about the prevalence and effects of parasitic mites in natural bee populations. In this paper, we report on parasitism of bumble bees (Bombus spp.) by the tracheal mite Locustacarus buchneri Stammer in south-western Alberta, Canada. Parasitism of bumble bees by L. buchneri occurred at many sites and in several host species. However,...

  5. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  6. Paclitaxel Drug-eluting Tracheal Stent Could Reduce Granulation Tissue Formation in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Juan; Pei, Ying-Hua; Qiu, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Yu-Ling

    2016-11-20

    Currently available silicone and metallic stents for tracheal stenosis are associated with many problems. Granulation proliferation is one of the main complications. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of paclitaxel drug-eluting tracheal stent in reducing granulation tissue formation in a canine model, as well as the pharmacokinetic features and safety profiles of the coated drug. Eight beagles were randomly divided into a control group (bare-metal stent group, n = 4) and an experimental group (paclitaxel-eluting stent group, n = 4). The observation period was 5 months. One beagle in both groups was sacrificed at the end of the 1st and 3rd months, respectively. The last two beagles in both groups were sacrificed at the end of 5th month. The proliferation of granulation tissue and changes in tracheal mucosa were compared between the two groups. Blood routine and liver and kidney function were monitored to evaluate the safety of the paclitaxel-eluting stent. The elution method and high-performance liquid chromatography were used to characterize the rate of in vivo release of paclitaxel from the stent. Compared with the control group, the proliferation of granulation tissue in the experimental group was significantly reduced. The drug release of paclitaxel-eluting stent was the fastest in the 1st month after implantation (up to 70.9%). Then, the release slowed down gradually. By the 5th month, the release reached up to 98.5%. During the observation period, a high concentration of the drug in the trachea (in the stented and adjacent unstented areas) and lung tissue was not noted, and the blood test showed no side effect. The paclitaxel-eluting stent could safely reduce the granulation tissue formation after stent implantation in vivo, suggesting that the paclitaxel-eluting tracheal stent might be considered for potential use in humans in the future.

  7. Relaxant effects of Ocimum basilicum on guinea pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanism(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Boskabady

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic effects of Ocimum basilicum on respiratory diseases especially dyspnea have been reported in Iranian ancient medical books. In the present study, the relaxant effects of macerated and soxhlet extracts of this plant on tracheal chains of guinea pigs were evaluated. The relaxant effects of 4 cumulative concentrations of macerated and soxhlet extracts (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 W/V in comparison with saline as negative control and 4 cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 mM as positive control were examined on precontracted tracheal chains of two groups of 6 guinea pig by 60 mM KCl (group 1 and 10 µM methacholine (group 2. Decrease in contractile tone of tracheal chains was considered as relaxant effect. In group 1 experiments only the last two higher concentrations of theophylline showed significant relaxant effect compared to that of saline (p<0.001 for both concentrations, which were significantly greater than those of macerated and soxhlet extracts (p<0.001 for all cases and in group 2 experiments both macerated and soxhlet extracts showed concentrationdependent relaxant effects compared to that of saline (p<0.05 to p<0.001 for both extracts. There were significant differences between the relaxant effects of both extracts with those of theophylline in group 2 experiments (p<0.01 to p<0.001. The relaxant effects of macerated and soxhlet extracts in group 1 were significantly lower than those of groups 2. These results showed a potent relaxant effect of Ocimum basilicum on tracheal chains of guinea pigs which were lower than theophylline at concentrations used.

  8. Functional Reconstruction of Tracheal Defects by Protein-Loaded, Cell-Seeded, Fibrous Constructs in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Lindsey M.; Vu, Cindy H.; Farris, Ashley L.; Fox, Katrina D.; Galbraith, Richard A.; Weiss, Mark L.; Weatherly, Robert A.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a life-threatening disease and current treatments include surgical reconstruction with autologous rib cartilage and the highly complex slide tracheoplasty surgical technique. We propose using a sustainable implant, composed of a tunable, fibrous scaffold with encapsulated chondrogenic growth factor (transforming growth factor-beta3 [TGF-β3]) or seeded allogeneic rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs). In vivo functionality of these constructs was determined ...

  9. Arsenic compromises conducting airway epithelial barrier properties in primary mouse and immortalized human cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM and submicromolar (0.8 μM arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-. We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway.

  10. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Utilizing Self-Expanding Nitinol Stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesterhenn, Andreas M.; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Alfke, Heiko; Werner, Jochen A.; Lippert, Burkard M.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the results of self-expanding metallic stent insertion into benign proximal tracheal stenosis in patients not appropriate or unfit for surgical repair. Proximal benign tracheal stenoses had occurred in 11 patients (7 men, 4 women, mean age 68.8 years) after long-time intubation (n = 6), tracheostomy (n = 4), or chondropathia (n = 1). Fourteen self-expanding nitinol stents were placed in the patients under general anesthesia with endoscopical and fluoroscopical guidance. Stent insertion was successful in all cases and led to immediate relief of the morphological and functional airway obstruction. No immediate complications were noted. During the mean follow-up period of 67.5 weeks we observed one recurrent dyspnea 3 months after implantation and granuloma formation at the stent insertion site in another patient. Both complications were successfully treated with additional stent insertion in one case and laser resection of granulomas in the other. Self-expanding nitinol stents should be considered for the treatment of benign proximal tracheal obstruction in selected patients for whom surgical repair is contraindicated

  11. Gastro-tracheal fistula - unusual and life threatening complication after esophagectomy for cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droissart Raphaël

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A gastro-tracheal fistula following esophagectomy for cancer is a rare but potentially lethal complication. We report the successful surgical closure after failed endoscopic treatment, of a gastro-tracheal fistula following esophago-gastrectomy for cancer after induction chemo-radiotherapy. Case presentation A 58 year-old male patient presented with a distal third uT3N1 carcinoma of the esophagus. After induction chemo-radiotherapy, he underwent an esophago-gastrectomy with radical lymphadenectomy and reconstruction by gastric pull-up. Immediate postoperative outcome was uneventful. On the 15th postoperative day however, our patient was readmitted in the Intensive Care Unit with severe bilateral basal pneumonia. Three days later a gastro-tracheal fistula was diagnosed upon gastroscopy and bronchoscopy. His good general condition allowed for an endoscopic primary approach which consisted in the insertion of a covered stent in the trachea along with clipping and glueing of the gastric fistular orifice. Two attempts proved unsuccessful. Conclusion After several weeks of conservative measures, surgical re-intervention through a right thoracotomy with transection of the fistula and closure by primary interrupted sutures of both fistular orifices along with intercostal muscle flap interposition led to excellent patient outcome. Oral feeding was started and our patient was discharged.

  12. Functional relevance of acoustic tracheal design in directional hearing in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arne K D; Römer, Heiner

    2016-10-15

    Internally coupled ears (ICEs) allow small animals to reliably determine the direction of a sound source. ICEs are found in a variety of taxa, but crickets have evolved the most complex arrangement of coupled ears: an acoustic tracheal system composed of a large cross-body trachea that connects two entry points for sound in the thorax with the leg trachea of both ears. The key structure that allows for the tuned directionality of the ear is a tracheal inflation (acoustic vesicle) in the midline of the cross-body trachea holding a thin membrane (septum). Crickets are known to display a wide variety of acoustic tracheal morphologies, most importantly with respect to the presence of a single or double acoustic vesicle. However, the functional relevance of this variation is still not known. In this study, we investigated the peripheral directionality of three co-occurring, closely related cricket species of the subfamily Gryllinae. No support could be found for the hypothesis that a double vesicle should be regarded as an evolutionary innovation to (1) increase interaural directional cues, (2) increase the selectivity of the directional filter or (3) provide a better match between directional and sensitivity tuning. Nonetheless, by manipulating the double acoustic vesicle in the rainforest cricket Paroecanthus podagrosus, selectively eliminating the sound-transmitting pathways, we revealed that these pathways contribute almost equally to the total amount of interaural intensity differences, emphasizing their functional relevance in the system. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Characterization of stem-like cells in mucoepidermoid tracheal paediatric tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ling Lim

    Full Text Available Stem cells contribute to regeneration of tissues and organs. Cells with stem cell-like properties have been identified in tumors from a variety of origins, but to our knowledge there are yet no reports on tumor-related stem cells in the human upper respiratory tract. In the present study, we show that a tracheal mucoepidermoid tumor biopsy obtained from a 6 year-old patient contained a subpopulation of cells with morphology, clonogenicity and surface markers that overlapped with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs. These cells, designated as MEi (mesenchymal stem cell-like mucoepidermoid tumor cells, could be differentiated towards mesenchymal lineages both with and without induction, and formed spheroids in vitro. The MEi cells shared several multipotent characteristics with BM-MSCs. However, they displayed differences to BM-MSCs in growth kinectics and gene expression profiles relating to cancer pathways and tube development. Despite this, the MEi cells did not possess in vivo tumor-initiating capacity, as proven by the absence of growth in situ after localized injection in immunocompromised mice. Our results provide an initial characterization of benign tracheal cancer-derived niche cells. We believe that this report could be of importance to further understand tracheal cancer initiation and progression as well as therapeutic development.

  14. Tidal Volume Estimation Using the Blanket Fractal Dimension of the Tracheal Sounds Acquired by Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa Reljin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose the use of blanket fractal dimension (BFD to estimate the tidal volume from smartphone-acquired tracheal sounds. We collected tracheal sounds with a Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone, from five (N = 5 healthy volunteers. Each volunteer performed the experiment six times; first to obtain linear and exponential fitting models, and then to fit new data onto the existing models. Thus, the total number of recordings was 30. The estimated volumes were compared to the true values, obtained with a Respitrace system, which was considered as a reference. Since Shannon entropy (SE is frequently used as a feature in tracheal sound analyses, we estimated the tidal volume from the same sounds by using SE as well. The evaluation of the performed estimation, using BFD and SE methods, was quantified by the normalized root-mean-squared error (NRMSE. The results show that the BFD outperformed the SE (at least twice smaller NRMSE was obtained. The smallest NRMSE error of 15.877% ± 9.246% (mean ± standard deviation was obtained with the BFD and exponential model. In addition, it was shown that the fitting curves calculated during the first day of experiments could be successfully used for at least the five following days.

  15. Tidal volume estimation using the blanket fractal dimension of the tracheal sounds acquired by smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljin, Natasa; Reyes, Bersain A; Chon, Ki H

    2015-04-27

    In this paper, we propose the use of blanket fractal dimension (BFD) to estimate the tidal volume from smartphone-acquired tracheal sounds. We collected tracheal sounds with a Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone, from five (N = 5) healthy volunteers. Each volunteer performed the experiment six times; first to obtain linear and exponential fitting models, and then to fit new data onto the existing models. Thus, the total number of recordings was 30. The estimated volumes were compared to the true values, obtained with a Respitrace system, which was considered as a reference. Since Shannon entropy (SE) is frequently used as a feature in tracheal sound analyses, we estimated the tidal volume from the same sounds by using SE as well. The evaluation of the performed estimation, using BFD and SE methods, was quantified by the normalized root-mean-squared error (NRMSE). The results show that the BFD outperformed the SE (at least twice smaller NRMSE was obtained). The smallest NRMSE error of 15.877% ± 9.246% (mean ± standard deviation) was obtained with the BFD and exponential model. In addition, it was shown that the fitting curves calculated during the first day of experiments could be successfully used for at least the five following days.

  16. Aspergillus Tracheobronchitis Causing Subtotal Tracheal Stenosis in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Radunz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is recognized as one of the most significant opportunistic infections after liver transplantation. Diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in transplant recipients has been proven to be challenging, and optimal approach to the treatment of invasive aspergillosis is still controversial. We here present an unusual case of Aspergillus tracheobronchitis in the setting of liver transplantation. A 47-year-old female patient with persistent dry cough after liver transplantation developed respiratory insufficiency and was readmitted to the intensive care unit 55 days after liver transplantation. A CT scan revealed subtotal tracheal stenosis; bronchoscopy was performed, and extended white mucus coverings causative of the tracheal stenosis were removed. Microbiological assessment isolated Aspergillus fumigatus. The diagnosis was obstructive Aspergillus tracheobronchitis. The patient was started on a treatment of voriconazole 200 mg orally twice daily, adjusted to a trough level of 1–4 mg/L. For further airway management, a tracheal stent had to be implanted. The patient is alive and well 28 months after liver transplantation. Invasive aspergillosis should be considered a possible etiology in liver transplant patients presenting with unspecific symptoms such as persistent dry cough. Optimal strategies for improved and early diagnosis as well as prophylaxis need to be defined.

  17. Intubation in two patients with difficult airway management and tracheal stenosis after tracheostomy in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell Gil, M; Solís Albamonte, P; Córdova Hernández, C; Cobo, I; Guijarro, R; de Andrés Ibañez, J A

    2018-02-08

    Lung isolation in thoracic surgery is a challenge, this is even more complex in the presence of unknown tracheal stenosis (TS). We report two cases of unknown TS and its airway management. TS appears most frequently after long term intubation close to the endotracheal tube cuff or in the stoma of tracheostomy that appears as a consequence of the granulation tissue after the surgical opening of the trachea. Clinical history, physical examination, difficult intubating predictors and imaging tests (CT scans) are crucial, however most of tracheal stenosis may be unnoticed and symptoms depend on the degree of obstruction. In our cases, the patients presented anatomical changes due to surgery and previous tracheostomy that led to a TS without symptoms. There is scarce literature about the intubation in patients with previous tracheostomy in thoracic surgery. In the first case, a Univent ® tube was used using a flexible fiberscope but an acute tracheal hemorrhage occurred. In the second case, after intubation with VivaSight SL ® in an awake patient, the insertion of a bronchial blocker was performed through an endotracheal tube guided by its integrated camera without using flexible fiberscopy. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller Ann M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. Method In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without the use of nitrous oxide were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. Results In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100 cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 54 patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121 cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O. There was no association between cuff pressure and age, body mass index, type of surgery, or time from induction of anaesthesia to the time the cuff pressure was measured. Conclusion For maintenance of epithelia flow and nerve function and at the same time secure air sealing, this evaluation indicates that the cuff pressure needs to be checked as part of the procedures involved in induction of anaesthesia and eventually checked during surgery.

  19. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121) cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O). There was no association between cuff pressure......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... the use of nitrous oxide) were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. RESULTS: In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100) cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 54...

  20. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... the use of nitrous oxide) were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. RESULTS: In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100) cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 54...... patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121) cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O). There was no association between cuff pressure...

  1. Tracheal intubation by inexperienced medical residents using the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes--a manikin study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2006-11-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope is a novel intubation device that may possess advantages over conventional direct laryngoscopes for use by personnel that are infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation. We conducted a prospective study in 20 medical residents with little prior airway management experience. After brief didactic instruction, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh (Welch Allyn, Welch Allyn, NY) and Airtraq (Prodol Ltd. Vizcaya, Spain) devices, in 3 laryngoscopy scenarios in a Laerdal Intubation Trainer (Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway) and 1 scenario in a Laerdal SimMan manikin (Laerdal, Kent, UK). They then performed tracheal intubation of the normal airway a second time to characterize the learning curve. In all scenarios tested, the Airtraq decreased the duration of intubation attempts, reduced the number of optimization maneuvers required, and reduced the potential for dental trauma. The residents found the Airtraq easier to use in all scenarios compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope. The Airtraq may constitute a superior device for use by personnel infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation.

  2. Removal of the stylet from the tracheal tube: effect of lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A M; Hung, O R; Kwofie, K; Hung, C R; Hung, D R; Guzzo, A

    2012-08-01

    We compared the work needed to retract a non-lubricated and a lubricated stylet from a tracheal tube over 24 h. Stylets were lubricated with sterile water, silicone fluid, lidocaine spray, lidocaine gel, MedPro(®) lubricating gel or Lacri-Lube(®). The mean (SD) work in joules needed to retract the stylet by 5 cm from the tracheal tube was recorded immediately (time 0), at 5 and 30 min and at 1, 3 and 24 h. At time 0 lubrication with sterile water (0.53 (0.09); p = 0.001), silicone fluid (0.43 (0.10); p lubrication (0.94 (0.28)). Where a tracheal tube is pre-loaded with a stylet for use at an indeterminate time, silicone fluid was the best choice of lubricant as it performed consistently well up to 24 h. At 24 h only silicone fluid (0.49 (0.01)) outperformed no lubrication (0.77 (0.24); p = 0.04). Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Splenic epithelial cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, M.; Jalali, U.

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of spleen are rare entities. Congenital splenic cysts are even more uncommon comprising of only 10% of benign non-parasitic cysts. We report a case of 22 years old female who presented with history of 2 years abdominal pain and gradual distension. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) both were suggestive of splenic cyst. Laboratory tests show thrombocytopenia with platelets count of 97000 per cubic millimeter and anemia with hemoglobin 8.7 gram per deciliter. Serological tests were negative for parasitic infection. Splenectomy was done and the weight of the spleen was found to be 1.5 kilogram. Histopathological findings are consistent with splenic epithelial cyst. The aetiology, diagnostic modalities and treatment options are discussed in the case report. (author)

  4. The tracheal system in post-embryonic development of holometabolous insects: a case study using the mealworm beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raś, Marcin; Iwan, Dariusz; Kamiński, Marcin Jan

    2018-03-24

    The tracheal (respiratory) system is regarded as one of the key elements which enabled insects to conquer terrestrial habitats and, as a result, achieve extreme species diversity. Despite this fact, anatomical data concerning this biological system is relatively scarce, especially in an ontogenetic context. The purpose of this study is to provide novel and reliable information on the post-embryonic development of the tracheal system of holometabolous insects using micro-computed tomography methods. Data concerning the structure of the respiratory system acquired from different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of a single insect species (Tenebrio molitor) are co-analysed in detail. Anatomy of the tracheal system is presented. Sample sizes used (29 individuals) enabled statistical analysis of the results obtained. The following aspects have been investigated (among others): the spiracle arrangement, the number of tracheal ramifications originating from particular spiracles, the diameter of longitudinal trunks, tracheal system volumes, tracheae diameter distribution and fractal dimension analysis. Based on the data acquired, the modularity of the tracheal system is postulated. Using anatomical and functional factors, the following respiratory module types have been distinguished: cephalo-prothoracic, metathoracic and abdominal. These modules can be unambiguously identified in all of the studied developmental stages. A cephalo-prothoracic module aerates organs located in the head capsule, prothorax and additionally prolegs. It is characterised by relatively thick longitudinal trunks and originates in the first thoracic spiracle pair. Thoracic modules support the flight muscles, wings, elytra, meso- and metalegs. The unique feature of this module is the presence of additional longitudinal connections between the neighbouring spiracles. These modules are concentrated around the second prothoracic and the first abdominal spiracle pairs. An abdominal module

  5. Origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, D W

    2002-01-01

    The origin of avian microchromosomes has long been the subject of much speculation and debate. Microchromosomes are a universal characteristic of all avian species and many reptilian karyotypes. The typical avian karyotype contains about 40 pairs of chromosomes and usually 30 pairs of small to tiny microchromosomes. This characteristic karyotype probably evolved 100-250 million years ago. Once the microchromosomes were thought to be a non-essential component of the avian genome. Recent work has shown that even though these chromosomes represent only 25% of the genome; they encode 50% of the genes. Contrary to popular belief, microchromosomes are present in a wide range of vertebrate classes, spanning 400-450 million years of evolutionary history. In this paper, comparative gene mapping between the genomes of chicken, human, mouse and zebrafish, has been used to investigate the origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes during this period. This analysis reveals evidence for four ancient syntenies conserved in fish, birds and mammals for over 400 million years. More than half, if not all, microchromosomes may represent ancestral syntenies and at least ten avian microchromosomes are the product of chromosome fission. Birds have one of the smallest genomes of any terrestrial vertebrate. This is likely to be the product of an evolutionary process that minimizes the DNA content (mostly through the number of repeats) and maximizes the recombination rate of microchromosomes. Through this process the properties (GC content, DNA and repeat content, gene density and recombination rate) of microchromosomes and macrochromosomes have diverged to create distinct chromosome types. An ancestral genome for birds likely had a small genome, low in repeats and a karyotype with microchromosomes. A "Fission-Fusion Model" of microchromosome evolution based on chromosome rearrangement and minimization of repeat content is discussed. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Ribosomal RNA gene functioning in avian oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, Elena; Galkina, Svetlana; Saifitdinova, Alsu; Dyomin, Alexandr; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gaginskaya, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Despite long-term exploration into ribosomal RNA gene functioning during the oogenesis of various organisms, many intriguing problems remain unsolved. In this review, we describe nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity in avian oocytes. Whereas oocytes from an adult avian ovary never reveal the formation of the nucleolus in the germinal vesicle (GV), an ovary from juvenile birds possesses both nucleolus-containing and non-nucleolus-containing oocytes. The evolutionary diversity of oocyte NOR functioning and the potential non-rRNA-related functions of the nucleolus in oocytes are also discussed.

  7. [Effect of low dose erythromycin on the proliferation of granulation tissue after tracheal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L H; Xu, M P; Gan, L M; Li, Y; Liang, Y L; Li, W T; Qin, E Y; Gan, J H; Liu, G N

    2017-03-14

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose erythromycin on the proliferation of granulation tissue after tracheal injury. Methods: Forty-two rabbits were randomly divided into 7 groups ( n =6 each), group A (saline control group), group B (penicillin group), group C (low dose erythromycin group), group D (low dose erythromycin and penicillin group), group E (budesonide group), group F (low dose erythromycin and budesonide group), group G (low dose erythromycin, penicillin and budesonide group). All rabbits received tracheotomy, and the tracheal mucosa was scraped with a nylon brush 20 times for tracheal stenosis model. Rabbits were treated with corresponding drugs from a week before operation to 9 days after operation. The serum concentrations of transforming growth factor - beta 1 (TGF-β(1)), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL) -6, IL-8 were determined and the tracheal specimens were harvested for measuring degree of stenosis on the 10th day after operation. Results: Serum concentrations of TGF-β(1) in group A, B, C, D, E, F and G were (17.6±1.3), (18.2±3.1), (13.0±1.1), (14.0±1.0), (21.0±6.1), (13.6± 3.5), (8.2±1.3) ng/L; VEGF were (88.1±4.1), (85.8±4.3), (58.1±6.3), (56.5±2.4), (87.8±2.8), (57.0±3.7), (34.3±6.7) ng/L; IL-6 were (67.8±4.0), (66.1±3.5), (54.1±4.8), (52.1±3.2), (64.6±4.9), (49.4±4.2), (35.9±3.7) ng/L; IL-8 were (112.8±5.2), (116.6±4.1), (88.0±6.2), (85.5±3.5), (114.4±4.6), (82.6±3.8), (55.9±6.0) ng/L, respectively. The serum concentrations of TGF-β(1), VEGF, IL-6 and IL-8 in group C, D, F and G were significantly lower than those in group A, B and E (all P granulation tissue. The degree of tracheal stenosis in Group A, B, C, D, E, F and G were (53.3±4.4)%, (48.2±5.0)%, (24.3±4.4)%, (29.5±3.2)%, (47.8±6.5)%, (27.9±3.1)%, (15.6±2.0)%, respectively. The degree of tracheal stenosis in group C, D, F and G was significantly lower than that in group A, B and E, which had statistical

  8. Pivotal debates and controversies on the structure and function of the avian respiratory system: setting the record straight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, John N

    2017-08-01

    and not by anatomical valves or sphincters, as was previously supposed. The structural strength of the air and blood capillaries is derived from: the interdependence between the air and blood capillaries; a tethering effect between the closely entwined respiratory units; the presence of epithelial-epithelial cell connections (retinacula or cross-bridges) that join the blood capillaries while separating the air capillaries; the abundance and intricate arrangement of the connective tissue elements, i.e. collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle fibres; the presence of type-IV collagen, especially in the basement membranes of the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections; and a putative tensegrity state in the lung. Notwithstanding the paucity of free surface pulmonary macrophages, the respiratory surface of the avian lung is well protected from pathogens and particulates by an assortment of highly efficient phagocytic cells. In commercial poultry production, instead of weak pulmonary cellular defence, stressful husbandry practices such as overcrowding, force-feeding, and intense genetic manipulation for rapid weight gain and egg production may account for the reported susceptibility of birds to aerosol-transmitted diseases. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  9. Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial cells by lipoxin A4 through AhR-cAMP-dependent pathway. Bi-Huan Cheng1,2, Li-Wei Pan2, Sheng-Rong Zhang3, Bin-Yu Ying2, Ben-Ji. Wang2, Guo-Liang Lin2 and Shi-Fang Ding1*. 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong ...

  10. The replication of Bangladeshi H9N2 avian influenza viruses carrying genes from H7N3 in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K; Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Turner, Jasmine; Rabiul Alam, S M; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Seiler, Patrick; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-04-20

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are continuously monitored by the World Health Organization because they are endemic; they continually reassort with H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses; and they periodically cause human infections. We characterized H9N2 influenza viruses carrying internal genes from highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses, which were isolated from chickens or quail from live-bird markets in Bangladesh between 2010 and 2013. All of the H9N2 viruses used in this study carried mammalian host-specific mutations. We studied their replication kinetics in normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine tracheal and lung explants, which exhibit many features of the mammalian airway epithelium and serve as a mammalian host model. All H9N2 viruses replicated to moderate-to-high titers in the normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine lung explants, but replication was limited in the swine tracheal explants. In Balb/c mice, the H9N2 viruses were nonlethal, replicated to moderately high titers and the infection was confined to the lungs. In the ferret model of human influenza infection and transmission, H9N2 viruses possessing the Q226L substitution in hemagglutinin replicated well without clinical signs and spread via direct contact but not by aerosol. None of the H9N2 viruses tested were resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitors. Our study shows that the Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses have the potential to infect humans and highlights the importance of monitoring and characterizing this influenza subtype to better understand the potential risk these viruses pose to humans.

  11. Deletion of the M2-2 gene from avian metapneumovirus subgroup C impairs virus replication and immunogenicity in Turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingzhong; Estevez, Carlos N; Roth, Jason P; Hu, Haixia; Zsak, Laszlo

    2011-06-01

    The second matrix (M2) gene of avian metapneumovirus subgroup C (aMPV-C) contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), encoding two putative proteins, M2-1 and M2-2. Both proteins are believed to be involved in viral RNA transcription or replication. To further characterize the function of the M2-2 protein in virus replication, the non-overlapping region of the M2-2 ORF was deleted from an infectious cDNA clone of the aMPV-C strain, and a viable virus was rescued by using reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus, raMPV-C ΔM2-2, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. In Vero cells, raMPV-C ΔM2-2 replicated slightly less efficiently than the parental virus, 10-fold reduction at 48-h post-infection. The raMPV-C ΔM2-2 virus induced typical cytopathic effects (CPE) that were indistinguishable from those seen with the parental virus infection. In specific-pathogen-free (SPF) turkeys, raMPV-C ΔM2-2 was attenuated and caused no clinical signs of disease. Less than 20% of the inoculated birds shed detectable virus in tracheal tissue during the first 5 days post-infection, and no virus shedding was detected afterward. Forty percent of infected birds produced a weak antibody response at 14 days post-infection. Upon challenge with a virulent aMPV-C strain, more than 80% of the raMPV-C ΔM2-2-inoculated birds showed typical disease signs and virus shedding in tracheal tissue. These results suggest that the M2-2 protein of aMPV-C virus is not essential for virus replication in vitro, but is required for sufficient virus replication to maintain pathogenicity and immunogenicity in the natural host.

  12. Effects of drought on avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Brian D. Wardlow; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Droughts are expected to become more frequent under global climate change. Avifauna depend on precipitation for hydration, cover, and food. While there are indications that avian communities respond negatively to drought, little is known about the response of birds with differing functional and behavioural traits, what time periods and indicators of drought are most...

  13. Serological diagnosis of avian influenza in poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comin, Arianna; Toft, Nils; Stegeman, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Background The serological diagnosis of avian influenza (AI) can be performed using different methods, yet the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is considered the gold standard' for AI antibody subtyping. Although alternative diagnostic assays have been developed, in most cases, their accuracy...

  14. New Avian Hepadnavirus in Palaeognathous Bird, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jo, Wendy K; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Petersen, Henning; Frei, Samuel; Kummrow, Maya; Lorenzen, Stephan; Ludlow, Martin; Metzger, Julia; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert; van der Vries, Erhard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, we identified an avian hepatitis B virus associated with hepatitis in a group of captive elegant-crested tinamous (Eudromia elegans) in Germany. The full-length genome of this virus shares <76% sequence identity with other avihepadnaviruses. The virus may therefore be considered a new

  15. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  16. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  17. the Avian Park Service Learning Centre story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ukwanda Centre for Rural Health (UCRH) opened in 2001, followed 10 years later by the establishment of the Ukwanda Rural Clinical School in one of the rural health districts of the Western Cape. This paper relates the journey of the Faculty with the underserviced community of Avian Park through the provision of ...

  18. Presumptive diagnosis of Avian encephalomyelitis in Japanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A report of Avian encephalomyelitis outbreak in two flocks of adult Japanese quail is presented. High mortalities, tremor, ataxia and lateral recumbency were the prominent clinical signs observed. Absence of gross pathology and microscopic lesions of gliosis, neuronal degeneration, meningitis, congested blood vessel with ...

  19. The genetics and evolution of avian migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulido, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the characteristics of avian migration is its variability within and among species. Variation in migratory behavior, and in physiological and morphological adaptations to migration, is to a large extent due to genetic differences. Comparative studies suggest that migratory behavior has

  20. Solar activity affects avian timing of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.; Sanz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Avian timing of reproduction is strongly affected by ambient temperature. Here we show that there is an additional effect of sunspots on laying date, from five long-term population studies of great and blue tits (Parus major and Cyanistes caeruleus), demonstrating for the first time that solar

  1. Vocal communication in an avian hybrid zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Paula Maria den

    2008-01-01

    Avian vocalizations function in mate attraction and territorial defence. Vocalizations can act as behavioural barriers and play an important role in speciation processes. Hybrid zones illustrate behavioural barriers are not always impermeable and provide a natural laboratory to examine the role of

  2. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Haile, James Seymour; McLay, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful...

  3. Measuring Steroid Hormones in Avian Eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  4. Measuring steroid hormones in avian eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  5. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Extraneuronal monoamine transporter mediates the permissive action of cortisol in the Guinea pig trachea: possible involvement of tracheal chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    Full Text Available Cortisol, a member of glucocorticoids, could potentiate the action of catecholamine by a non-genomic mechanism. Although this permissive effect has been well appreciated in the anti-asthmatic medication, the underlying signaling pathway has remained mysterious. Here, we show that extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT, a membraneous reuptake transporter for circulating catecholamine clearance, is the direct target of cortisol in its permissive effect. We found that BSA-conjugated cortisol, which functions as a cortisol but cannot penetrate cell membrane, enhanced the spasmolytic effect of β-adrenoceptor agonist (isoprenaline in histamine-sensitized tracheal spirals of guinea pigs, and pharmacological inhibition of EMT with famotidine was powerful enough to imitate the permissive action of cortisol. To our surprise, EMT protein expression was high in the chondrocytes of tracheal cartilage, but was undetectable in tracheal smooth muscle cells. The functionality of EMT was further confirmed with measurement of catecholamine uptake by tracheal chondrocytes. Moreover, cortisol-initiated membrane signaling could activate protein kinase C (PKC, which phosphorylates EMT and induces its internalization via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. Both of the mechanisms slow down the reuptake process by chondrocytes, leading to extracellular catecholamine accumulation and results in a more profound adrenergic signaling activation in tracheal smooth muscle cells. Thus, an EMT-centered pathway was proposed to explain the permissive action of cortisol. Collectively, our results highlight the role of EMT in the crosstalk between glucocorticoid and catecholamine. EMT may represent a promising target for adrenergic signaling modulation.

  7. Emergency tracheal intubation without drugs: outcome and one-year survival of medical patients not in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A M; Young, N H; Price, G C

    2012-05-01

    Non-medicine-assisted tracheal intubation in prehospital trauma is associated with a dismal prognosis. We wished to study the outcome of medical patients who underwent non-medicine-assisted tracheal intubation. This retrospective study of patients attending our university hospital emergency department was conducted over seven years. The tracheal intubation database was analysed to identify medical patients not in cardiac arrest undergoing tracheal intubation without medicines. Intensive care unit, hospital, 12-month mortality and patients' residence at 12 months were recorded. Eighty patients were identified who met inclusion criteria. The most common reason for intubation was definite airway compromise due to decreased conscious level (62.5%), then respiratory failure (26.3%) and finally potentially compromised airway due to a decreased conscious level (11.2%). Eighty-eight percent of patients with a definitely compromised airway were successfully intubated at first attempt compared with 66.7% of patients with a potentially compromised airway or respiratory failure (P= 0.03). Of 75 patients with complete data, 30 (40%) were survivors at 12 months, with all but two (6.7%) living at home. Non-medicine-assisted laryngoscopy leads to an increased first time tracheal intubation failure rate in patients with intact airway reflexes and, therefore, cannot be recommended as best practice.

  8. Avian influenza virus wild bird surveillance in the Azov and Black Sea regions of Ukraine (2010-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Spackman, Erica; Stegniy, Borys; Rula, Oleksandr; Shutchenko, Pavlo

    2012-12-01

    The Azov and Black Sea basins are part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from Northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and Southwest Asia. These regions constitute an area of transit, stops during migration, and nesting for many different bird species. From September 2010 to September 2011, a wild bird surveillance study was conducted in these regions to identify avian influenza viruses. Biological samples consisting of cloacal and tracheal swabs and fecal samples were collected from wild birds of different ecological groups, including waterfowl and sea- and land-based birds, in places of mass bird accumulations in Sivash Bay and the Utlyuksky and Molochniy estuaries. The sampling covered the following wild bird biological cycles: autumn migration, wintering, spring migration, nesting, and postnesting seasons. A total of 3634 samples were collected from 66 different species of birds. During the autumn migration, 19 hemagglutinating viruses were isolated, 14 of which were identified as low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus subtypes H1N?, H3N8, H5N2, H7N?, H8N4, H10N7, and H11N8. From the wintering samples, 45 hemagglutinating viruses were isolated, 36 of which were identified as LPAI virus subtypes H1N1, H1N? H1N2, H4N?, H6N1, H7N3, H7N6, H7N7, H8N2, H9N2, H10N7, H10N4, H11N2, H12N2, and H15N7. Only three viruses were isolated during the spring migration, nesting, and postnesting seasons (serotypes H6, H13, and H16). The HA and NA genes were sequenced from the isolated H5 and N1 viruses, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed possible ecological connections between the Azov and Black Sea regions and Europe. The LPAI viruses were isolated mostly from mallard ducks, but also from shellducks, shovelers, teals, and white-fronted geese. The rest of the 14 hemagglutinating viruses isolated were identified as different serotypes of avian paramyxoviruses (APMV-1, APMV-4, APMV-6, and APMV-7). This information furthers our understanding

  9. Mucinous epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, T J

    2016-04-01

    Mucinous tumours involving the ovary may be benign, borderline, or malignant. Malignant tumours may be primary or metastatic. Differentiation between primary and metastatic involvement of the ovary is critical for optimal patient management. Even among skilled pathologists, this distinction can be problematic, as can the distinction between borderline ovarian tumour of intestinal type and well-differentiated invasive primary mucinous ovarian carcinoma. Primary invasive mucinous ovarian carcinoma and mucinous carcinoma metastatic to the ovary do have distinct patterns of macroscopic and microscopic involvement which will reveal the correct diagnosis in many cases. There are also well-recognized patterns of immunohistochemical staining that can further assist in this differentiation. As a result of the application of these histopathological techniques, the incidence of primary invasive mucinous epithelial carcinoma has fallen over recent years from ∼12% to ∼3%. However, even in recent multicentre clinical trials such as GOG 182, expert pathological review suggests that ∼60% of tumours originally classified as primary invasive mucinous carcinomas were in fact metastatic tumours to the ovary. Review of outcome data for patients with mucinous carcinoma entered into multicentre trials suggests that this subtype of disease has a particularly poor prognosis in comparison with other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. Historically, patients with mucinous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (mEOC) have been treated in the same way as other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. While there is undoubtedly a response rate to platinum-based chemotherapy, retrospective reviews of individual centre experience suggest that this is substantially lower than for high-grade papillary serous carcinoma and in the order of only 30%-40%. The mEOC trial was established to investigate the possibility that the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (chemotherapy drugs more commonly used in colorectal

  10. Successful conservative management of a rare complication of tracheostomy; extensive posterior tracheal false pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jennifer F; Ostwani, Waseem; Green, Glenn

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of improved neonatal and pediatric intensive care management, tracheostomy is increasingly performed in children requiring prolonged ventilation. Even though tracheostomy is generally a safe procedure, there remains mortality and morbidity associated with it. We report a rare complication of a tracheostomy tube resulting in extensive erosion and posterior tracheal false pouch secondary to a large tracheostomy tube and high positive end expiratory pressure in a 12-month-old infant. This was managed successfully with conservative treatment. A former 34-week premature infant was transferred to our pediatrics intensive care unit (PICU) with recurrent episodes of cardiopulmonary arrests due to suspected severe tracheobronchomalacia. The patient has bronchopulomonary dysplasia, severe restrictive lung disease and thoracic insufficiency from skeletal dysplasia requiring tracheostomy tube (TT) at two-month-old and mechanical ventilation. The 3.5 NEO TT was gradually upsized to a 5. The PEEP setting at transfer was 18cmH2O. The direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy showed moderate tracheomalacia at the innominate artery with a false pouch in the posterior tracheal wall that was 1.1cm below the tracheostomy stoma. A multi-disciplinary discussion including otolaryngology, PICU, Pulmonary Medicine, and Pediatric Surgery decided on conservative management. The false pouch healed and she was transferred back to referring PICU after a 46-day. Tracheal wall erosion resulting in a pouch formation is a rare complication, but it should be considered in patients with long term tracheostomy with difficulty ventilation and oxygenation with positional change. DLB is a useful tool in its diagnosis and conservative management can be successful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of Chitosan Silk-based Tracheal Scaffold Using Freeze-Casting Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Zeinab; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Zamanian, Ali; Seyedsalehi, Amir; Mohammad-Behgam, Shadmehr; Ghorbani, Fariba; Mirahmadi, Fereshte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Since the treatments of long tracheal lesions are associated with some limitations, tissue engineered trachea is considered as an alternative option. This study aimed at preparing a composite scaffold, based on natural and synthetic materials for tracheal tissue engineering. Methods: Nine chitosan silk-based scaffolds were fabricated using three freezing rates (0.5, 1, and 2°C/min) and glutaraldehyde (GA) concentrations (0, 0.4, and 0.8 wt%). Samples were characterized, and scaffolds having mechanical properties compatible with those of human trachea and proper biodegradability were selected for chondrocyte cell seeding and subsequent biological assessments. Results: The pore sizes were highly influenced by the freezing rate and varied from 135.3×372.1 to 37.8×83.4 µm. Swelling and biodegradability behaviors were more affected by GA rather than freezing rate. Tensile strength raised from 120 kPa to 350 kPa by an increment of freezing rate and GA concentration. In addition, marked stiffening was demonstrated by increasing elastic modulus from 1.5 MPa to 12.2 MPa. Samples having 1 and 2°C/min of freezing rate and 0.8 wt% GA concentration made a non-toxic, porous structure with tensile strength and elastic modulus in the range of human trachea, facilitating the chondrocyte proliferation. The results of 21-day cell culture indicated that glycosaminoglycans content was significantly higher for the rate of 2°C/min (12.04 µg/min) rather than the other (9.6 µg/min). Conclusion: A homogenous porous structure was created by freeze drying. This allows the fabrication of a chitosan silk scaffold cross-linked by GA for cartilage tissue regeneration with application in tracheal regeneration. PMID:28131109

  12. Tracheal aspirate Gram stain has limited sensitivity and specificity for detecting Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetenta, Sodienye; Metersky, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence of respiratory infections due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus has resulted in increased empirical use of antibiotics active against this pathogen. There are limited data available as to whether the Gram stain of respiratory tract secretions accurately predicts growth of S. aureus. We theorized that the distinctive morphology of S. aureus would allow rapid, accurate identification of the organism in respiratory secretions. The authors reviewed all available Gram stains of tracheal aspirates sent to our hospital's microbiology laboratory between 1 April 2008 and 31 October 2008, while blinded to the culture result, and recorded the presence or absence of organisms with a morphology consistent with S. aureus. These results were correlated with the semiquantitative culture result. Among 136 tracheal aspirates studied, 50 (37%) grew S. aureus. The Gram stain was read as positive for organisms consistent with S. aureus in 34 of these. Among 86 samples that did not grow S. aureus, the Gram stain was read as negative in 62. Therefore, the Gram stain had a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 72%, a negative predictive value of 80% and a positive predictive value of 59% for culture of S. aureus. False negative Gram stains were more likely when the culture revealed only rare or small growth of S. aureus (P = 0.01). In this study, the tracheal aspirate Gram stain read by an experienced clinician who was not a microbiologist, was not accurate enough to reliably predict the growth of S. aureus. © 2010 The Authors. Respirology © 2010 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Factors associated with the occurrence of cardiac arrest after emergency tracheal intubation in the emergency department.

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    Won Young Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Emergency tracheal intubation has achieved high success and low complication rates in the emergency department (ED. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of post-intubation CA and determine the clinical factors associated with this complication. METHODS: A matched case-control study with a case to control ratio of 1:3 was conducted at an urban tertiary care center between January 2007 and December 2011. Critically ill adult patients requiring emergency airway management in the ED were included. The primary endpoint was post-intubation CA, defined as CA within 10 minutes after tracheal intubation. Clinical variables were compared between patients with post-intubation CA and patients without CA who were individually matched based on age, sex, and pre-existing comorbidities. RESULTS: Of 2,403 patients who underwent emergency tracheal intubation, 41 patients (1.7% had a post-intubation CA within 10 minutes of the procedure. The most common initial rhythm was pulseless electrical activity (78.1%. Patients experiencing CA had higher in-hospital mortality than patients without CA (61.0% vs. 30.1%; p<0.001. Systolic hypotension prior to intubation, defined as a systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mmHg, was independently associated with post-intubation CA (OR, 3.67 [95% CI, 1.58-8.55], p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: Early post-intubation CA occurred with an approximate 2% frequency in the ED. Systolic hypotension before intubation is associated with this complication, which has potentially significant implications for clinicians at the time of intubation.

  14. Diversity of acoustic tracheal system and its role for directional hearing in crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sound localization in small insects can be a challenging task due to physical constraints in deriving sufficiently large interaural intensity differences (IIDs) between both ears. In crickets, sound source localization is achieved by a complex type of pressure difference receiver consisting of four potential sound inputs. Sound acts on the external side of two tympana but additionally reaches the internal tympanal surface via two external sound entrances. Conduction of internal sound is realized by the anatomical arrangement of connecting trachea. A key structure is a trachea coupling both ears which is characterized by an enlarged part in its midline (i.e., the acoustic vesicle) accompanied with a thin membrane (septum). This facilitates directional sensitivity despite an unfavorable relationship between wavelength of sound and body size. Here we studied the morphological differences of the acoustic tracheal system in 40 cricket species (Gryllidae, Mogoplistidae) and species of outgroup taxa (Gryllotalpidae, Rhaphidophoridae, Gryllacrididae) of the suborder Ensifera comprising hearing and non hearing species. Results We found a surprisingly high variation of acoustic tracheal systems and almost all investigated species using intraspecific acoustic communication were characterized by an acoustic vesicle associated with a medial septum. The relative size of the acoustic vesicle - a structure most crucial for deriving high IIDs - implies an important role for sound localization. Most remarkable in this respect was the size difference of the acoustic vesicle between species; those with a more unfavorable ratio of body size to sound wavelength tend to exhibit a larger acoustic vesicle. On the other hand, secondary loss of acoustic signaling was nearly exclusively associated with the absence of both acoustic vesicle and septum. Conclusion The high diversity of acoustic tracheal morphology observed between species might reflect different steps in the evolution

  15. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Lee, Geewon; Lee, Ho Yun; Oh, Jin Young; Woo, Sook-young; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV 1 ] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV 1 /forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD

  16. Improvement in Cormack and Lehane grading with laparoscopic assistance during tracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anjeleena K; Sharma, Bimla; Kumar, Arvind; Sood, Jayashree

    2011-09-01

    To use laparoscope as an easily available and easy to use alternative option to videolaryngoscope. The aim of the study was to assess the improvement in the glottic view using a conventional direct laryngoscope (DL) assisted by a laparoscope with its endovision system along with the time taken for tracheal intubation. A prospective, double blind, randomized, controlled study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II requiring general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were included in the study. The patients were anaesthetized, paralysed, DL was performed and Cormack and Lehane grade (C and L) noted, followed by the introduction of the laparoscope alongside the flange of the Macintosh laryngoscope and a further C and L grading done as seen on monitor. Demographic data, ASA physical status, airway assessment, mouth opening, modified Mallampatti class, jaw protrusion, thyromental and sternomental distances, optimal external laryngeal manipulation, time taken for intubation, pulse oximetry, blood on; tracheal tube, lip, dentition or mucosal trauma, sore throat, hoarseness of voice, excessive secretions and regurgitation were recorded. Statistical analysis was done using statistics package for social sciences software (17.0 version). A P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Eighty-three percent of the patients showed improvement in glottic view after laparoscopic assistance. Eighty-one and 85% of the patients with C and L grade II and III respectively on DL had an improved glottic view with this technique. The mean time to intubate was 37 seconds. Laparoscopic assistance provided a better glottic view than DL in most patients (83%). It has a potential advantage over standard DL in difficult intubation.

  17. [Usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for tracheal intubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Quintela, P; Oulego Erroz, I; Mora Matilla, M; Rodríguez Blanco, S; Mata Zubillaga, D; Regueras Santos, L

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for endotracheal intubation in children and newborns. Hemodynamically stable children intubated in pedriatric and neonatal intensive care unit were included. Endotracheal tube insertion was checked after every intubation attempt by tracheal ultrasound and capnography simultaneously. The endotracheal tube insertion depth was then checked by assesment of lung sliding by thoracic ultrasound. Thereafter, Chest X-ray was performed and interpreted as usual. Time to perform each technique was recorded. The study included 31 intubations in 26 patients (15 in PICU and 16 in NICU). There were no statistically significant differences between tracheal ultrasound and capnography or between thoracic ultrasound and x-ray in identifying the correct endotracheal intubation and assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, respectively. Sensibility and specificity of ultrasound compared to capnography was 92% and 100%, and 100% and 75% compared to X-ray. Ultrasound was significantly slower compared to capnography [12 (4-16) vs 6 (3-12) seconds; P<.001] and significantly quicker compared to X-ray [0.22 (0.17-0.40) vs. 20 (17-25) minutes, P<.001]. Ultrasound appears to be as effective as capnography, although slower, for identifying endotracheal intubation. Ultrasound may be useful in clinical situations, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation where capnography is less reliable. Ultrasound is as effective and quicker than X-ray for assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, and it may contribute to decrease the routine use of X-ray after tracheal intubation. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of a heat and moisture exchanger on tracheal climate in a cold environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuur, J Karel; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew; Sinaasappel, Michiel; de Jongh, Frans H C; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of pulmonary complaints, severe tracheitis and lung function deterioration is increased during wintertime in laryngectomized individuals. We analyzed how a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) performs in cold and dry ambient circumstances, and how its efficiency in this environmental climate might be improved. Randomized crossover. Intra-tracheal temperature and humidity were measured in 10 laryngectomized patients with and without HME, in a cold (mean, 4.7 degrees C) and dry (mean, 4.5 mgH2O/L) room. Presence of an HME causes the intra-tracheal mean humidity minima and maxima to increase with 4.2 mgH2O/L (95%CI: 3.3-5.0 mgH2O/L; p<0.001) and 2.4 mgH2O/L (95%CI: 1.7-3.1 mgH2O/L; p<0.001), respectively. The intra-tracheal mean temperature minima and maxima increased with 3.9 degrees C (95%CI: 2.7-5.1 degrees C; p<0.001) and 1.2 degrees C (95%CI: 0.8-1.2 degrees C; p<0.001), respectively. In the majority of patients, the calculated relative humidity values appear to reach well above 100% during inspiration. In a cold environment, presence of an HME significantly increases both inspiratory and expiratory temperature and humidity values. Relative humidity calculations suggest the formation of condense droplets during inspiration. To further increase its effectiveness, improvement of the HME's thermal capacity should be aimed for.

  19. Cocaine residue in plasma, cardiac and tracheal tissues of chronic cocaine-treated guinea-pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinee Wongnawa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Supersensitivity of adrenoceptors to catecholamines is one of the mechanisms of cocaine-related cardiac complication. The precise mechanism of cocaine enhancing supersensitivity of adrenoceptors is unconcluded. The aim of this study was todetermine the levels of cocaine in plasma, cardiac and tracheal tissues in order to correlate with the supersensitivity ofadrenoceptors to catecholamines. In this study, two groups of ten guinea-pigs each were injected with 2.5 mg/kg cocaine or normal saline solution intraperitoneally twice daily for 14 days. After 24 hours of cocaine cessation, the cocaine levels in plasma, cardiac and tracheal tissues were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the cocaine levels in plasma and tracheal smooth muscle were 5.08±0.63 ng/ml and 2.8±0.41 ng/mg, respectively, while those in atria and ventricle were lower than 17.5 ng/g and 3.8 ng/g, respectively. These levels were less than the level that had been reported to block norepinephrine uptake (more than 30.34 ng/ml. Moreover, it had been demonstrated that cocainetreatment in the same condition as the present study produced supersensitivity to norepinephrine and epinephrine in isolatedguinea-pig atria as well as in trachea which is almost entirely not innervated by the adrenergic nerves. In addition, supersensitivityto oxymetazoline, isoproterenol and salbutamol which are not the substrates of neuronal reuptake were also demonstrated. All these data support the postsynaptic mechanism of cocaine enhancing supersensitivity which might be correlated with cardiac complication in chronic cocaine use.

  20. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

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    Eom, Jung Seop, E-mail: ejs00@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Geewon, E-mail: rabkingdom@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Yun, E-mail: hoyunlee96@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jin Young, E-mail: indr71@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Medical Center, 814 Siksa-dong, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 410-773 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Sook-young, E-mail: sookyoung12.woo@samsung.com [Biostatistics Team, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Kyeongman, E-mail: kjeon@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Sang-Won, E-mail: sangwonum@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Won-Jung, E-mail: wjkoh@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Gee Young, E-mail: suhgy@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV{sub 1}] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD.

  1. On the Morphological Description of Tracheal and Esophageal Displacement and Its Phylogenetic Distribution in Avialae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy J Klingler

    Full Text Available This research examines the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of a peculiar and often overlooked character seen in birds, herein called tracheal and esophageal displacement. Tracheal and esophageal displacement refers to an asymmetrically situated trachea and/or esophagus along the length of the neck. This contrasts with what would be perceived as the "normal" (midsagittal placement of these organs, wherein the two organs are situated along the ventral midline of the neck with no deviation. A total of forty-two bird species were examined (thirty-six of which came from dissections whereas six came from comments from previous literature or personal observations, as well as turtles, lizards, crocodylians, and mammals. This study found that essentially all birds have a laterally displaced trachea and/or esophagus. Lizards and mammals were seen to have normal, midsagittally placed tracheae and esophagi. Crocodylians were interesting in that alligators were defined by a normally situated trachea and esophagus whereas some crocodiles were characterized by displacement. In birds, the displacement may occur gradually along the neck, or it may happen immediately upon exiting the oropharynx. Displacement of these organs in birds is the result of a heavily modified neck wherein muscles that restrict mobility of the trachea and esophagus in lizards, alligators, and mammals (e.g., m. episternocleidomastoideus, m. omohyoideus, and m. sternohyoideus no longer substantially restrict positions of the trachea and esophagus in birds. Rather, these muscles are modified in ways which may assist with making tracheal movements. The implications of this study may provide interesting insights for future comparisons in extinct taxa.

  2. New Approaches to Airway Management in Tracheal Resections-A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieren, Mark; Böhmer, Andreas; Dusse, Fabian; Koryllos, Aris; Wappler, Frank; Defosse, Jerome

    2017-08-01

    Although endotracheal intubation, surgical crossfield intubation, and jet ventilation are standard techniques for airway management in tracheal resections, there are also reports of new approaches, ranging from regional anesthesia to extracorporeal support. The objective was to outline the entire spectrum of new airway techniques. The literature databases PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched systematically for prospective and retrospective trials as well as case reports on tracheal resections. No restrictions applied to hospital types or settings. Adult patients undergoing surgical resections of noncongenital tracheal stenoses with end-to-end anastomoses. Airway management techniques were divided into conventional and new approaches and analyzed regarding their potential risks and benefits. A total of 59 publications (n = 797 patients) were included. The majority of publications (71.2%) describe conventional airway techniques. Endotracheal tube placement after induction of general anesthesia and surgical crossfield intubation after incision of the trachea were used most frequently without major complications. A total of 7 new approaches were identified, including 4 different regional anesthetic techniques (25 cases), supraglottic airways (4 cases), and new forms of extracorporeal support (25 cases). Overall failure rates of new techniques were low (1.8%). Details on patient selection and procedural specifics are provided. New approaches have several theoretical benefits, yet further research is required to establish criteria for patient selection and evaluate procedural safety. Given the low level of evidence, it currently is impossible to compare methods of airway management regarding outcome-related risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A 46-year-old man with tracheomegaly, tracheal diverticulosis, and bronchiectasis: Mounier-Kuhn syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish K Jaiswal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infection is one of the common causes of morbidity in India which is occasionally undiagnosed. In this regard tracheobronchomegaly is one of those conditions which masquerade as chronic bronchitis and bronchiectasis and are usually undiagnosed. It is a well-defined clinical and radiologic entity characterized by marked dilatation of the trachea and the central bronchi and is frequently associated with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection. Tracheobronchomegaly has been described by a variety of names, including Mounier-Kuhn syndrome, tracheal diverticulosis, tracheobronchiectasis, tracheocele, tracheomalacia, and tracheobronchopathia malacia.

  4. Combination therapy of temporary tracheal stenting and radiofrequency ablation for multinodular thyroid goiter with airway compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Beak, Jung Hwan; Oh, Yeon Mok; Ha, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of multinodular thyroid goiter in an 80-year-old man who successfully underwent tracheal stent placement for respiratory distress caused by the thyroid goiter and following two radiofrequency (RF) ablation sessions performed for thyroid volume reduction. This sequential treatment allowed elective stent removals four weeks after the second RF ablation session because the thyroid volume had been progressively reduced. Combination therapy of temporary airway stenting and RF ablation for the treatment of thyroid goiter has two advantages, i.e., immediate reliefs of dyspnea with airway stenting and reductions of the thyroid volume with RF ablation, and thus, allowing symptom reliefs even after the stent removals.

  5. TRACHEAL AND BRONCHIAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT OBSTRUCTIVE SYNDROME: ACCORDING TO BRONCHOSCOPIC

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    M. L. Shteiner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The endobronchial pattern of significant bronchial obstructive syndrome of various etiologies was analyzed in 4,000 patients with this condition. At the same time, bronchial malformations were encountered as supplementary bronchi of the left and right basal pyramids, axillary left bronchi, supplementary and displaced tracheal bronchi, and a single case of distal transposition of the right proximal bronchus in 1.58% of cases. According to the bronchoscopic findings, supplementary bronchi and transpositions of the left bronchi are the most common anatomic bronchial abnormalities (1.08%.

  6. Cartilage engineering in reconstructive surgery: auricular, nasal and tracheal engineering from a surgical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, Paul Severin; Schantz, Jan Thorsten; Rotter, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    This review provides an update on cartilage tissue engineering with particular focus on the head and neck. It is aimed at scientists and clinicians who are interested in tissue engineering and its clinical applicability. Principal tissue engineering strategies are summarized in the first part of this review. In the second part, current clinical approaches to auricular, nasal and tracheal reconstruction are discussed from a surgical perspective. By this approach, the requirements for clinical applicability are outlined and new insight into relevant aims of research is given to accelerate the transfer from bench to bedside.

  7. Comparative efficacy of Combination of Propofol or Thiopental with Remifentanil on Tracheal Intubation without Muscle Relaxants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k Naseri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In some medical situations administration of muscle relaxants after intravenous anesthetics for tracheal intubation may be unnecessary or sometimes could be hazardous. In such situations, replacing an alternative drug for the facilitation of tracheal intubation is obvious. Remifentanil is a short acting opioid drug which may be useful in solving this problem. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of propofol or thiopental in combination with remifentanil in the absence of muscle relaxants on larengoscopy and intubation conditions in general anesthesia. Materials & Methods: This is a randomized double-blind clinical trial which was performed in 1386 in Be’sat hospital of Sanandaj. Forty two ASA 1 and 2 patients recruited to receive propofol, 2 Mg/Kg, or thiopental, 5Mg/K. All patients received lidocaine, 1.5 Mg/Kg, and remifentanil, 2.5 µg/Kg, 30 seconds before anesthetics administration. larengoscopy and tracheal intubation were done 90 seconds after induction of anesthesia. On the basis of mask ventilation, jaw relaxation, vocal cords position and patient's response to intubations and endotracheal tube cuff inflation the intubation conditions were assessed and recorded as excellent, good ,acceptable or poor. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate were measured before and after anesthetics administration and also 45 seconds and two and five minutes after intubations. Data were analyzed by X2, fisher exact test ant student T-test using SPSS software. Results: Excellent or good larengoscopy and intubation conditions were observed in 9 (%42.9 of thiopental patients and 20 (%95.2 of propofol patients (p<0.05. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate decreased more significantly in propofol group in comparison with the thiopental group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Combination of remifentanil and propofol or thiopental could facilitate ventilation via face mask in all patients. Although combination of propofol and

  8. The tracheal mite Locustacarus buchneri in South American native bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plischuk, Santiago; Pocco, Martina E; Lange, Carlos E

    2013-12-01

    As in other regions of the world, bumble bees (Bombus spp.) are important pollinators in the neotropics. Despite its relevance, knowledge on their health is still limited in the region. While external acari are known to occur in these insects, presence of the internal, tracheal mite Locustacarus buchneri is here reported for first time. After the examination of 2,508 individuals of eight Bombus species from Argentina, two workers of Bombus bellicosus and one of Bombus atratus were found parasitized by L. buchneri in localities within San Luis and Buenos Aires provinces, respectively. The rare occurrence recorded agrees with findings from elsewhere in the world. © 2013.

  9. Combination therapy of temporary tracheal stenting and radiofrequency ablation for multinodular thyroid goiter with airway compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Beak, Jung Hwan; Oh, Yeon Mok; Ha, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    We report a case of multinodular thyroid goiter in an 80-year-old man who successfully underwent tracheal stent placement for respiratory distress caused by the thyroid goiter and following two radiofrequency (RF) ablation sessions performed for thyroid volume reduction. This sequential treatment allowed elective stent removals four weeks after the second RF ablation session because the thyroid volume had been progressively reduced. Combination therapy of temporary airway stenting and RF ablation for the treatment of thyroid goiter has two advantages, i.e., immediate reliefs of dyspnea with airway stenting and reductions of the thyroid volume with RF ablation, and thus, allowing symptom reliefs even after the stent removals.

  10. Death of a 6-month-old due to a tracheal bronchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Welches, Lauren; Slabach, Rachel; Landrum, Jeffry E; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2011-09-01

    The death of an infant younger than 1 year requires a thorough scene investigation and autopsy. Most infant deaths investigated by forensic pathologists can be placed into 2 general categories: sudden infant death syndrome and accidental asphyxial deaths. Despite the fact that most infant deaths occur within these 2 categories, it is important to remember that other entities may be responsible for death. In this report, we present a developmental pulmonary abnormality that was ultimately responsible for the death of an infant. A 6-month-old male infant with a prior history of pneumonia was brought to an emergency department for evaluation of fever. Antibiotics were prescribed, and the child was discharged and sent home with instructions to his mother to follow up with his pediatrician. Later that evening, the infant seemed to be in respiratory distress. His mother again transported him to the emergency department, where, on arrival, he became apneic. Despite vigorous resuscitative efforts, the infant died. Of note at autopsy was the presence of low-set abnormal ears and bilateral inward-turning ankles. Internally, an abnormality of the tracheobronchial tree was evident, with the right upper lobe bronchus arising from the distal trachea, proximal to the carina. In addition, the right upper lobe was discolored and firm. Microscopically, pneumonia was present. The cause of death was pneumonia due to a right tracheal bronchus. Childhood pneumonia is a known cause of childhood hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. Identifying the causes of recurrent pneumonia, be it structural, metabolic, or syndromic, aids in preventing recurrent infections and reducing the incidence of childhood mortality. A tracheal bronchus, also known as bronchus suis or "pig bronchus," is an anatomic variant of the tracheobronchial tree in which a bronchus arises proximal to the carina, most commonly on the right and predominantly in males. The incidence is around 0.2%. Although the tracheal

  11. Relaxant effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) on guinea-pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskabady, M H; Aslani, M R

    2006-10-01

    As indicated in ancient Iranian medical books, Crocus sativus has therapeutic effects on respiratory diseases. The relaxant effect of this plant has been observed also on smooth muscles in previous studies. Therefore, in this study the relaxant effects of aqueous-ethanolic extracts of C. sativus and one of its main constituents, safranal, were examined on guinea-pig tracheal chains. The relaxant effects of four cumulative concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract (0.15, 0.3, 0.45, and 0.60 g %) and safranal (0.15, 0.30, 0.45, and 0.60 mL 0.2 mg mL(-1) solution) in comparison with saline, as negative control, and four cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.15, 0.30, 0.45, and 0.60 mM), as positive control, were examined using guinea-pig precontracted tracheal chains. The tracheal chains had been precontracted by three different methods. Group 1 had been precontracted using 10 microM methacholine. The other two groups had been precontracted using 60 mM KCl at two different conditions: non-incubated tissues (group 2) and tissues incubated with 1 microM propranolol, 1 microM chlorpheniramine and 1 microM atropine (group 3) (for each group, n = 6). In group 1 all concentrations of theophylline, extract and safranal showed significant relaxant effects compared with saline (P effects also compared with saline (P effect (P effects of the last concentration of safranal (0.60 mL 0.2 mg mL(-1) solution) in group 1, and all its concentrations in group 2 were significantly lower than those of theophylline (P effects of safranal 0.45 and 0.60 mL 0.2 mg mL(-1) solution in groups 1 and 2 were significantly lower than that of C. sativus extract. There were significant correlations between the relaxant effects and concentrations for extract, safranal and theophylline in all experimental groups (P effect of C. sativus on tracheal chains of guinea-pigs that was comparable to or even higher than that of theophylline at the concentrations used. The results indicated that

  12. Induction of Programmed Cell Death in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Shahsavandi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avian influenza viruses are considered as a serious threat to human and animal health. An increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFN genes, as well as host cell death responses contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza infection. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the growth dynamics of subacute avian influenza virus in human respiratory alveolar epithelium cells (A549. Methods: The A549 cell cultures were infected at MOIs 0.1 and 2.0 viral doses in the presence and absence of trypsin. The virus growth kinetics were elucidated by the plaque assay and the cell viability was determined by MTT at various times after the infection. The induction quality of programmed cell death as well as the signal transduction pathway of death were assessed by genomic DNA fragmentation and western blotting respectively. Results: The study findings indicated that although the H9N2 virus replication did produce a marked cytopathic effect on the alveolar cells, which led to a reduction in the cell viability, the viral titers were increased in the infected cells. The virus replication of in these cells indicated repression of host defense mechanism as well as activation of cell death. The induction of apoptosis in A549 cells was correlated with the increased virus titers as well as virus replication (p< 0.05. Conclusion: H9N2 avian influenza virus were demonstrated to induce apoptosis in human alveolar epithelial cells via the intrinsic pathway in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Vaccination against H9N2 avian influenza virus reduces bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue formation in cynomolgus macaques after intranasal virus challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Misako; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Itoh, Yasushi; Soda, Kosuke; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Park, Chun-Ho; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Kida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2016-12-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus causes sporadic human infection. Since humans do not possess acquired immunity specific to this virus, we examined the pathogenicity of an H9N2 virus isolated from a human and then analyzed protective effects of a vaccine in cynomolgus macaques. After intranasal challenge with A/Hong Kong/1073/1999 (H9N2) (HK1073) isolated from a human patient, viruses were isolated from nasal and tracheal swabs in unvaccinated macaques with mild fever and body weight loss. A formalin-inactivated H9N2 whole particle vaccine derived from our virus library was subcutaneously inoculated to macaques. Vaccination induced viral antigen-specific IgG and neutralization activity in sera. After intranasal challenge with H9N2, the virus was detected only the day after inoculation in the vaccinated macaques. Without vaccination, many bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues (BALTs) were formed in the lungs after infection, whereas the numbers of BALTs were smaller and the cytokine responses were weaker in the vaccinated macaques than those in the unvaccinated macaques. These findings indicate that the H9N2 avian influenza virus HK1073 is pathogenic in primates but seems to cause milder symptoms than does H7N9 influenza virus as found in our previous studies and that a formalin-inactivated H9N2 whole particle vaccine induces protective immunity against H9N2 virus. © 2016 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Effects of premedication with oral gabapentin on intraocular pressure changes following tracheal intubation in clinically normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbolova, Alexandra; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Capik, Igor

    2017-09-19

    Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug widely approved as an add-on therapy for epilepsy treatment in human and dogs. There is a clinical impression that gabapentin is a suitable drug which attenuates the IOP elevation associated with tracheal intubation in humans. The present study performed to determine the effects of oral gabapentin on intraocular pressure (IOP) changes following tracheal intubation in dogs. Twenty adult healthy dogs were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. Dogs in the treatment group received oral gabapentin (50 mg/kg) 2 h before induction of anesthesia and dogs in the control group received oral gelatin capsule placebo at the same time. The dogs were anesthetized with propofol 6 mg/kg, and anesthesia was maintained with a constant infusion of 0.2 mg/kg/min of propofol for 20 min. IOP were measured immediately before induction and then repeated immediately after induction, as well as 5 min, 10 min and 15 min following tracheal intubation in both groups. IOP was significantly higher immediately after induction, and 5 min after tracheal intubation when compared with IOP reading before induction in the control group. There was no statistically significant change in IOPs immediately after induction, and 5 min after tracheal intubation in comparison to the values before induction in the treatment group. Based on the findings of this study, preanesthetic oral administration of gabapentin significantly prevents an increase in the IOP associated with tracheal intubation in dogs anesthetized with propofol.

  15. A cadaver study comparing three fibreoptic-assisted techniques for converting a supraglottic airway to a cuffed tracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesnicky, B L; Rehak, A; Bestic, W B; Brock, J T; Watterson, L

    2017-02-01

    After rescuing an airway with a supraglottic airway device, a method to convert it to a cuffed tracheal tube is often needed. The best method to do this has never been directly studied. We compared three techniques for conversion of a standard LMA ® Unique airway to a cuffed endotracheal tube using a fibrescope. The primary endpoint was time to intubation, with secondary endpoints of success rate, perceived difficulty and preferred technique. We also investigated the relationship between level of training and prior training and experience with the techniques on the primary outcome. The mean (95% CI) time to intubation using a direct tracheal tube technique of 37 (31-42) s was significantly shorter than either the Aintree intubation catheter technique at 70 (60-80) s, or a guidewire technique at 126 (110-141) s (p < 0.001). Most (13/24) participants rated the tracheal tube as their preferred technique, while 11/24 preferred the Aintree technique. In terms of perceived difficulty, 23/24, 21/24 and 9/24 participants rated the tracheal tube technique, Aintree technique and guidewire technique, respectively, as either very easy or easy. There was no relationship between prior training, prior experience or level of training on time to completion of any of the techniques. We conclude the tracheal tube and Aintree techniques both provide a rapid and easy method for conversion of a supraglottic airway device to a cuffed tracheal tube. The guidewire technique cannot be recommended. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Predictive value of α-amylase in tracheal aspirates for ventilator-associated pneumonia in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge-Ping; Fang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Ya-Ping; Shi, Min; Wang, Yang; Gong, Mei-Liang; Fang, Hao-Ming

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the correlation between α-amylase in tracheal aspirates and risk factors of aspiration, as well as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), in elderly patients undergoing mechanical ventilation and explore the clinical value of α-amylase for predicting VAP. Tracheal aspirates were collected from elderly patients within 2 weeks after tracheal intubation in mechanical ventilation, and α-amylase was detected. Patients were grouped according to the presence of VAP. The correlation between α-amylase and risk factors of aspiration before intubation, as well as VAP, were analyzed. The sample of this study comprised 147 patients. The average age of these patients was 86.9 years. The incidence of VAP was 21% during the study period. Tracheal aspirate α-amylase level increased with the increase in the number of risk factors for aspiration before intubation, α-amylase level was significantly higher in the VAP group than in the non-VAP group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of the diagnostic value of α-amylase for VAP was 0.813 (95% CI: 0.721-0.896), threshold value was 4,681.5 U/L, sensitivity was 0.801 and specificity was 0.793. Logistic multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors for VAP: a number of risk factors before intubation of ≥3, a Glasgow score of aspiration of subglottic secretion and a tracheal aspirate α-amylase level of >4681.5 U/L. Tracheal aspirate α-amylase can serve as a biomarker for predicting VAP in elderly patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Avian brains: Insights from development, behaviors and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    Birds are an extensively specialized animal group with unique anatomical, physiological and ecological characteristics. Sophisticated social behaviors and remarkable cognitive abilities are present in several avian lineages, driven by their enlarged brains and intricate neural networks. These unique traits could be a result of adaptive evolution under the wide range of environmental constraints; however, the intrinsic mechanisms of avian brain development and evolution remain unclear. Here, we introduce recent findings regarding developmental aspects of avian brain organization and neuronal networks for specific avian behaviors, which provide an insight into the link between the evolution of brain development and complex cognitive functions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  18. Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Biology Dept.

    1998-07-01

    This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

  19. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  20. Avian Radar - Is It Worth the Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    DC: The Federal Aviation Administration, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service , Wildlife...Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services. York, D. L., Engeman, R. M., Cummings, J. L., Rossi, C. L., & Sinnett, D. R... Health Inspection Service , Wildlife Services. DOT/FAA/AR-09/61. (2010). Deployments of Avian Radars at Civil Airports. Springfield: National

  1. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D. S.; Salisbury, Steven W.; Horner, John R.; Varricchio, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name ‘Sue’) has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. Conclusions/Significance This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation. PMID:19789646

  2. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan D S Wolff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue' has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  3. Avian influenza in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-07-01

    The disease syndromes caused by avian influenza viruses are highly variable depending on the host species infected, its susceptibility and response to infection and the virulence of the infecting viral strain. Although avian influenza viruses have a broad host range in general, it is rare for an individual strain or subtype to infect more than one species. The H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) lineages of viruses that descended from A/goose/Guandong/96 (H5N1 HPAIV) are unusual in the diversity of species they have infected worldwide. Although the species affected by H5N1 HPAI in the field and those that have been experimentally studied are diverse, their associated disease syndromes are remarkably similar across species. In some species, multi-organ failure and death are rapid and no signs of the disease are observed. Most prominently in this category are chickens and other avian species of the order Galliformes. In other species, neurologic signs develop resulting in the death of the host. This is what has been reported in domestic cats (Carnivora), geese (Anseriformes), ratites (Struthioniformes), pigeons inoculated with high doses (Columbiformes) and ducks infected with H5N1 HPAIV isolated since 2002 (Anseriformes). In some other species, the disease is more prolonged and although multi-organ failure and death are the eventual outcomes, the signs of disease are more extensive. Predominantly, these species include humans (Primates) and the laboratory models of human disease, the ferret (Carnivora), mouse (Rodentia) and cynamologous macaques (Primates). Finally, some species are more resistant to infection with H5N1 HPAIV and show few or no signs of disease. These species include pigeons in some studies (Columbiformes), ducks inoculated with pre-2002 isolates (Anseriformes), and pigs (Artiodactyla).

  4. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D S; Salisbury, Steven W; Horner, John R; Varricchio, David J

    2009-09-30

    Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue') has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  5. The Avian Transcriptome Response to Malaria Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Videvall, Elin; Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valki?nas, Gediminas; Hellgren, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites are highly virulent pathogens which infect a wide range of vertebrates. Despite their importance, the way different hosts control and suppress malaria infections remains poorly understood. With recent developments in next-generation sequencing techniques, however, it is now possible to quantify the response of the entire transcriptome to infections. We experimentally infected Eurasian siskins (Carduelis spinus) with avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium ashfordi), and used hig...

  6. Integration and Validation of Avian Radars (IVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    shape, density, gender ) is problematic; • Not suited to high-clutter environments (e.g., in forests, near buildings); • Health & safety issues...Fuca and the Saratoga Passage and within the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, NAS Whidbey Island offers high quality year round training...was to demonstrate that the digital avian radars being evaluated by the IVAR project can automatically discriminate the echoes of moving targets

  7. Applications of thermal imaging in avian science

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal imaging, or infrared thermography, has been used in avian science since the 1960s. More than 30 species of birds, ranging in size from passerines to ratites, have been studied using this technology. The main strength of this technique is that it is a non-invasive and non-contact method of measuring surface temperature. Its limitations and measurement errors are well understood and suitable protocols have been developed for a variety of experimental settings. Thermal imaging has been u...

  8. Computational modeling of tracheal angioedema due to swelling of the submucous tissue layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Kun; Pence, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Angioedema is a tissue-swelling pathology due to rapid change in soft tissue fluid content. Its occurrence in the trachea is predominantly localized to the soft mucous tissue that forms the innermost tracheal layer. The biomechanical consequences, such as airway constriction, are dependent upon the ensuing mechanical interactions between all of the various tissues that comprise the tracheal tube. We model the stress interactions by treating the trachea organ as a three-tissue system consisting of swellable mucous in conjunction with nonswelling cartilage and nonswelling trachealis musculature. Hyperelastic constitutive modeling is used by generalizing the standard anisotropic, incompressible soft tissue framework to incorporate the swelling effect. Finite element stress analysis then proceeds with swelling of the mucous layer providing the driving factor for the mechanical analysis. The amount of airway constriction is governed by the mechanical interaction between the three predominant tissue types. The detailed stress analysis indicates the presence of stress concentrations near the various tissue junctions. Because of the tissue's nonlinear mechanical behavior, this can lead to material stiffness fluctuations as a function of location on the trachea. Patient specific modeling is presented. The role of the modeling in the interpretation of diagnostic procedures and the assessment of therapies is discussed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide induces CF-like alteration of protein secretion by human tracheal gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammouni, W; Figarella, C; Baeza, N; Marchand, S; Merten, M D

    1997-12-18

    Human tracheal gland (HTG) serous cells are now believed to play a major role in the physiopathology of cystic fibrosis. Because of the persistent inflammation and the specific infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lung, we looked for the action of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of this bacteria on human tracheal gland cells in culture by studying the secretion of the secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) which is a specific serous secretory marker of these cells. Treatment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in the basal production of SLPI (+ 250 +/- 25%) whilst the SLPI transcript mRNA levels remained unchanged. This LPS-induced increase in secretion was inhibited by glucocorticoides. Furthermore, LPS treatment of HTG cells induces a loss of responsiveness to carbachol and isoproterenol but not to adenosine triphosphate. These findings indicate that HTG cells treated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS have the same behavior as those previously observed with CF-HTG cells. Exploration by using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification showed that LPS downregulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA expression in HTG cells indicative of a link between CFTR function and consequent CF-like alteration in protein secretory process.

  10. Retention of tracheal intubation skills by novice personnel: a comparison of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2007-03-01

    Direct laryngoscopic tracheal intubation is a potentially lifesaving manoeuvre, but it is a difficult skill to acquire and to maintain. These difficulties are exacerbated if the opportunities to utilise this skill are infrequent, and by the fact that the consequences of poorly performed intubation attempts may be severe. Novice users find the Airtraq laryngoscope easier to use than the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope. We therefore wished to determine whether novice users would have greater retention of intubation skills with the Airtraq rather than the Macintosh laryngoscope. Twenty medical students who had no prior airway management experience participated in this study. Following brief didactic instruction, each took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh and Airtraq devices in easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. The degree of success with each device, the time taken to perform intubation and the assistance required, and the potential for complications were then assessed. Six months later, the assessment process was repeated. No didactic instruction or practice attempts were provided on this latter occasion. Tracheal intubation skills declined markedly with both devices. However, the Airtraq continued to provide better intubating conditions, resulting in greater success of intubation, with fewer optimisation manoeuvres required, and reduced potential for dental trauma, particularly in the difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. The substantial decline in direct laryngoscopy skills over time emphasise the need for continued reinforcement of this complex skill.

  11. Respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillations during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Alexander-Wigbert; Weiler, Norbert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) allows the measurement of respiratory mechanics in the intensive care setting. The aim of this study was to compare the FOT with a reference method during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube. The respiratory impedance spectra were measured by FOT in nine anaesthetized pigs, and resistance and compliance were estimated on the basis of a linear resistance-compliance inertance model. In comparison, resistance and compliance were quantified by the multiple linear regression analysis (LSF) of conventional ventilator waveforms to the equation of motion. The resistance of the sample was found to range from 6 to 21 cmH(2)O s l(-1) and the compliance from 12 to 32 ml cmH(2)O(-1). A Bland-Altman analysis of the resistance resulted in a sufficient agreement (bias -0.4 cmH(2)O s l(-1); standard deviation of differences 1.4 cmH(2)O s l(-1); correlation coefficient 0.93) and test-retest reliability (coefficient of variation of repeated measurements: FOT 2.1%; LSF 1.9%). The compliance, however, was poor in agreement (bias -8 ml cmH(2)O(-1), standard deviation of differences 7 ml cmH(2)O(-1), correlation coefficient 0.74) and repeatability (coefficient of variation: FOT 23%; LSF 1.7%). In conclusion, FOT provides an alternative for monitoring resistance, but not compliance, in tracheally intubated and ventilated subjects.

  12. Mean tracheal sound energy during sleep is related to daytime blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kenji; Sadamitsu, Yumiko; Shin, Shizue; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2013-09-01

    The pathological role of snoring independent of obstructive sleep apnea remains under debate. The authors hypothesized that snoring sound intensity, as assessed by mean tracheal sound energy (Leq) during sleep, is related to daytime blood pressure. Retrospective analysis of clinical records and polysomnography data. Sleep laboratory at a national hospital in Japan. Consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic polysomnography with suspicion of sleep apnea between January 2005 and December 2009 (n = 1,118). Not applicable. Leq was calculated from tracheal sound spectra recorded every 0.2 sec during polysomnography. Daytime high blood pressure (HBP) was defined as taking antihypertensive drugs or having a systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg at the patient's first clinical visit. Patient age, sex, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, alcohol consumption, and smoking were considered as confounders. Leq during sleep was associated with HBP after adjusting for all confounding factors (n = 1,074, P = 0.00019). This association was demonstrated even in nonapneic nonobese patients (n = 232, P = 0.012). The association between snoring intensity, as assessed by mean sound energy, and blood pressure suggests a pathological role for heavy snoring. Further study in a general population is warranted.

  13. Myocardial effects of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in lambs with CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambaiti, Elisa; Bussani, Rossana; Calcaterra, Valeria; Zandonà, Lorenzo; Silvestri, Furio; Peiró, José Luis; Marotta, Mario; Andreatta, Erika; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) may reduce pulmonary hypertension and ameliorate postnatal cardiac output. The effects of sustained early (ETO) and late (LTO) tracheal occlusion on left ventricular (LV) cells in the lamb model have not been described. CDH was created in lambs at 70 days' gestation (term = 145 days). ETO (85 days) or LTO (105 days) was sustained till term. After cesarean section (140 days) fetuses were euthanized and hearts harvested. LV myocardial cells were studied by histological and immunofluorescence (TGF-beta 1, endothelin-1) assays in CDH, ETO, LTO, and the control group (two subjects per group). Small intramyocardial arteries were evaluated by traditional histology. LV myocardial histology in CDH and LTO was similar. ETO-induced LV myocardial cell enlargement and increased endothelin-1 and TGF-beta 1 staining; a weaker immunofluorescence signal was observed in LTO compared with ETO. Myocardial vascular wall thickness was greater in CDH than in controls. ETO was associated with a vascular wall thickness within the range of controls. With only two fetuses in each group, only an explorative evaluation was possible. The time point at which TO is performed seems to have an effect on cardiac morphology. Functional studies as well as confirmation in clinical samples are mandatory. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Intrinsic Transient Tracheal Occlusion Training and Myogenic Remodeling of Rodent Parasternal Intercostal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara K.; Mathur, Sunita; Ye, Fan; Martin, A. Daniel; Truelson, Sara Attia; Vandenborne, Krista; Davenport, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    It is recognized that diaphragm muscle plasticity occurs with mechanical overloads, yet less is known regarding synergistic parasternal intercostal muscle fiber remodeling. We conducted overload training with intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO) exercises in conscious animals. We hypothesized ITTO would yield significant fiber hypertrophy and myogenic activation that would parallel diaphragm fiber remodeling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of a tracheal cuff and were randomly assigned to receive daily ten-minute sessions of conscious ITTO or observation (SHAM) over two weeks. After training, fiber morphology, myosin heavy chain isoform composition, cross-sectional area, proportion of Pax7-positive nuclei, and presence of embryonic myosin (eMHC) were quantified. Type IIx/b fibers were 20% larger after ITTO training than with SHAM training (ITTO: 4431±676 μm2, SHAM: 3689±400 μm2, p<0.05), and type I fibers were more prevalent after ITTO (p<0.01). Expression of Pax7 was increased in ITTO parasternals and diaphragm (p<0.05). In contrast, the proportion of eMHC-positive fibers was increased only in ITTO parasternals (1.2 (3.4-0.6)%, SHAM: 0 (0.6-0%, p<0.05). Although diaphragm and parasternal type II fibers hypertrophy to a similar degree, myogenic remodeling appears to differ between the two muscles. PMID:25509059

  15. Relaxant effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of Ruta graveolens on isolated rat tracheal rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Águila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ruta graveolens L. (R. graveolens is a medicinal plant employed in non-traditional medicines that has various therapeutic properties, including anthelmintic, and vasodilatory actions, among others. We evaluated the trachea-relaxant effects of hydroalcoholic extract of R. graveolens against potassium chloride (KCl- and carbachol-induced contraction of rat tracheal rings in an isolated organ bath. RESULTS: The results showed that the airway smooth muscle contraction induced by the depolarizing agent (KCl and cholinergic agonist (carbachol was markedly reduced by R. graveolens in a concentration-dependent manner, with maximum values of 109 ± 7.9 % and 118 ± 2.6 %, respectively (changes in tension expressed as positive percentages of change in proportion to maximum contraction, at the concentration of 45 μg/mL (half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50: 35.5 μg/mL and 27.8 μg/mL for KCl- and carbachol-induced contraction, respectively. Additionally, the presence of R. graveolens produced rightward parallel displacement of carbachol dose-response curves and reduced over 35 % of the maximum smooth muscle contraction. CONCLUSIONS: The hydroalcoholic extract of R. graveolens exhibited relaxant activity on rat tracheal rings. The results suggest that the trachea-relaxant effect is mediated by a non-competitive antagonistic mechanism. More detailed studies are needed to identify the target of the inhibition, and to determine more precisely the pharmacological mechanisms involved in the observed biological effects.

  16. Tracheomegaly: a complication of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kieran; Afaq, Asim; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Broderick, Nigel [Nottingham University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gabra, Hany O.; Elliott, Martin J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) is a promising treatment for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. It is hypothesised that balloon occlusion of the fetal trachea leads to an improvement in lung growth and development. The major documented complications of FETO to date are related to preterm delivery. To report a series of five infants who developed tracheomegaly following FETO. Review of all children referred with tracheomegaly to the paediatric intensive care and tracheal service at two referral centres. Five neonates presented with features of respiratory distress shortly after birth and were subsequently found to have marked tracheomegaly. Two neonates had tracheomalacia in addition. There are no previous reports in the literature describing tracheomalacia, or more specifically, tracheomegaly, as a consequence of FETO. We propose that the particularly compliant fetal airway is at risk of mechanical damage from in utero balloon occlusion. This observation of a new problem in this cohort suggests a thorough evaluation of the trachea should be performed in children who have had FETO in utero. It may be that balloon occlusion of the trachea earlier in utero (before 26 weeks' gestation) predisposes to this condition. (orig.)

  17. Distinguishing tracheal and esophageal tissues with hyperspectral imaging and fiber-optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawn, Corinne D.; Souhan, Brian E.; Carter, Robert, III; Kneapler, Caitlin; Fell, Nicholas; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-11-01

    During emergency medical situations, where the patient has an obstructed airway or necessitates respiratory support, endotracheal intubation (ETI) is the medical technique of placing a tube into the trachea in order to facilitate adequate ventilation of the lungs. Complications during ETI, such as repeated attempts, failed intubation, or accidental intubation of the esophagus, can lead to severe consequences or ultimately death. Consequently, a need exists for a feedback mechanism to aid providers in performing successful ETI. Our study examined the spectral reflectance properties of the tracheal and esophageal tissue to determine whether a unique spectral profile exists for either tissue for the purpose of detection. The study began by using a hyperspectral camera to image excised pig tissue samples exposed to white and UV light in order to capture the spectral reflectance properties with high fidelity. After identifying a unique spectral characteristic of the trachea that significantly differed from esophageal tissue, a follow-up investigation used a fiber optic probe to confirm the detectability and consistency of the different reflectance characteristics in a pig model. Our results characterize the unique and consistent spectral reflectance characteristic of tracheal tissue, thereby providing foundational support for exploiting spectral properties to detect the trachea during medical procedures.

  18. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Avian cytokines in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigley P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are proteins secreted by cells that play an important role in the activation and regulation of other cells and tissues during inflammation and immune responses. Although well described in several mammalian species, the role of cytokines and other related proteins is poorly understood in avian species. Recent advances in avian genetics and immunology have begun to allow the exploration of cytokines in health and disease. Cytokines may be classified in a number of ways, but may be conveniently arranged into four broad groups on the basis of their function. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta play a role in mediating inflammation during disease or injury. Th1 cytokines, including interleukin-12 and interferon-gamma, are involved in the induction of cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 are involved in the induction of humoral immunity. The final group Th3 or Tr cytokines play a role in regulation of immunity. The role of various cytokines in infectious and non-infectious diseases of chickens and turkeys is now being investigated. Although there are only a few reliable ELISAs or bioassays developed for avian cytokines, the use of molecular techniques, and in particular quantitative RT-PCR (Taqman has allowed investigation of cytokine responses in a number of diseases including salmonellosis, coccidiosis and autoimmune thyroiditis. In addition the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents or as vaccine adjuvants is now being explored.

  20. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  1. Comparative molecular developmental aspects of the mammalian- and the avian lungs, and the insectan tracheal system by branching morphogenesis: recent advances and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Gas exchangers fundamentally form by branching morphogenesis (BM), a mechanistically profoundly complex process which derives from coherent expression and regulation of multiple genes that direct cell-to-cell interactions, differentiation, and movements by signaling of various molecular morphogenetic cues at specific times and particular places in the developing organ. Coordinated expression of growth-instructing factors determines sizes and sites where bifurcation occurs, by how much a part elongates before it divides, and the angle at which branching occurs. BM is essentially induced by dualities of factors where through feedback- or feed forward loops agonists/antagonists are activated or repressed. The intricate transactions between the development orchestrating molecular factors determine the ultimate phenotype. From the primeval time when the transformation of unicellular organisms to multicellular ones occurred by systematic accretion of cells, BM has been perpetually conserved. Canonical signalling, transcriptional pathways, and other instructive molecular factors are commonly employed within and across species, tissues, and stages of development. While much still remain to be elucidated and some of what has been reported corroborated and reconciled with rest of existing data, notable progress has in recent times been made in understanding the mechanism of BM. By identifying and characterizing the morphogenetic drivers, and markers and their regulatory dynamics, the elemental underpinnings of BM have been more precisely explained. Broadening these insights will allow more effective diagnostic and therapeutic interventions of developmental abnormalities and pathologies in pre- and postnatal lungs. Conservation of the molecular factors which are involved in the development of the lung (and other branched organs) is a classic example of nature’s astuteness in economically utilizing finite resources. Once purposefully formed, well-tested and tried ways and means are adopted, preserved, and widely used to engineer the most optimal phenotypes. The material and time costs of developing utterly new instruments and routines with every drastic biological change (e.g. adaptation and speciation) are circumvented. This should assure the best possible structures and therefore functions, ensuring survival and evolutionary success. PMID:22871018

  2. Characterisation and Identification of Avian Influenza Virus (AI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian Influenza is caused by Influenza A virus which is a member of Orthomyxoviridae family. Influenza A virus is enveloped single stranded RNA with eight-segmented, negative polarity and filament or oval form, 50 – 120 by 200 – 300 nm diameters. Influenza A viruses have been found to infect birds, human, pig, horse and sometimes in the other mammalian such as seal and whale. The viruses are divided into different subtypes based on the antigenic protein which covers the virus surface i.e. Haemaglutinin (HA and Neuraminidase (NA. In addition, the nomenclature of subtype virus is based on HA and NA i.e HxNx, for example H5N1, H9N2 and the others. According to pathogenic, it could be divided into two distinct groups, they are Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI and Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza (LPAI. The Avian Influenza viruses have been continuously occurred and spread out in some continents such us America, Europe, Africa and Asian countries. The outbreak of Avian Influenza caused high mortality on birds and it has been reported that in human case Avian Influenza subtype H5N1 virus has caused several deaths. To anticipate this condition, an effort to prevent the transmission of Avian Influenza is needed. These strategic attempts include biosecurity, depopulation, vaccination, control of virus movement, monitoring and evaluation. Laboratory diagnostic plays an important role for successful prevention, control and eradication programs of Avian Influenza. Recently, there are two diagnostic methods for Avian Influenza. They are conventional (virological diagnosis and molecular methods. The conventional method is usually used for initial diagnostic of Avian Influenza. The conventional method takes more time and more costly, whereas the molecular method is more effective than conventional method. Based on the available diagnostic technique, basically diagnostic of Avian Influenza is done by serology test, isolation and identification as well

  3. Co-circulation of avian influenza viruses in commercial farms, backyards and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Kaoud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloacal and tracheal swab-samples were collected from commercial farms, backyards and live market birds (LBM to identify the potential existence and genetic drifts of avian influenza subtypes (AI H5 and H9 that are circulating among bird species in Egypt. The results revealed that, one sample out of 50 samples of chicken commercial farms was positive for the isolation of subtype H9N2 [KC699549, Influenza A virus: A/chicken/Egypt/VRLCU-R33/2012(H9N2]; from Sharkeia province. Two samples out of 20 samples of Backyard ducks were positive for the isolation of 2 subtypes H5N1; [KC699547, Influenza A virus: A/duck/Egypt/VRLCU-R11/2012(H5N1, “backyard duck”] from El-Fayoum province and the other from Giza province [A/duck/Egypt/VRLCU-R28/2012(H5N1, “backyard duck”]. Analysis of haemagglutinin (HA and the phylogenetic tree of the isolated viruses (H5N1 were fallen within the clade 2.2.1.1. Antigenic cartography for the isolated Egyptian H9N2 AI virus can intuitively be of group-B. The number of mutations in the amino acid sites (33, 47, 65, 90, 92, 143, and 150 and the Long Branch observed in the phylogenetic tree may suggest a rather long evolution period. The sequenced H9N2 Egyptian virus in the study was closely related to the previous Egyptian isolates.

  4. Slide tracheoplasty applied to acquired subglottic and upper tracheal stenosis: an experimental study in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkafy, Wael M; El Atriby, Mohamed N; Iskandar, Nagy M; Mattox, Douglas E; Mansour, Kamal A

    2007-04-01

    To assess the applicability and complications of slide tracheoplasty in the management of subglottic and upper tracheal stenosis in experimental animals. Subglottic stenosis was induced in 10 dogs by cauterizing the subglottic area and the upper 3 to 4 cm of the trachea. After 21 days, the severity of stenosis ranged from 30% to 60%. The subglottic area was reconstruction with slide tracheoplasty, and the results were evaluated at 4, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Ten mongrel dogs (Canis familiaris) were included in the study, each weighing between 12 and 17 kg. Slide tracheoplasty. Patency of the reconstructed segment. Follow-up examination revealed no airway obstruction in any animal. Examination of the reconstructed segment revealed good healing without granulation tissue and a patent endotracheal lumen in all cases. Histopathological examination of sections taken at the suture line confirmed complete healing without granulation tissue. Slide tracheoplasty can be applied successfully to the subglottic area. It offers many advantages in tracheal reconstruction and can be used for the management of acquired subglottic stenosis. The vascularized tracheal cartilage heals without granulation tissue often seen after cartilage interposition grafts. Furthermore, this technique reduces the need for tracheal and laryngeal mobilization for the treatment of longer areas of stenosis.

  5. Tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of the Airwayscope, LMA CTrach, and the Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, and the LMA CTrach, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.

  6. Effect of Fluticasone and Salmeterol on Tracheal Responsiveness to Ovalbumin and Lung Inflammation, Administrated during and after Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Gholamnezhad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of duration of administration of fluticasone propionate and salmeterol on tracheal responsiveness to ovalbumin and total and differential white blood cell in sensitized guinea pig was examined. Six groups of guinea pigs (n=7 were sensitized to ovalbumin. Three groups of them were subjected to inhaled fluticasone propionate and salmeterol, one group during sensitization (A, one group after that (for 18 days, B, and the other one during sensitization but with 18 days delay before measurements (C. Three other groups were treated with placebo in the same manner. The tracheal responsiveness to ovalbumin and total and differential white blood cells of three placebo groups were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.001 for all cases. Tracheal responsiveness to ovalbumin and total and differential white blood cell in treated groups with fluticasone propionate and salmeterol were significantly decreased compared to those of placebo groups (nonsignificant to P<0.001. The improvement in all variables in treatment groups A and C were more pronounced than group B. The results showed that fluticasone propionate and salmeterol had a prevention effect on tracheal hyperresponsiveness to ovalbumin and lung inflammation which was more pronounced when administered during than after sensitization.

  7. The Effects of Intravenously Administrated Methylxanthines on the Proportion of Globlet Cells Containing Fucosylated Glycoconjugates in Rabbit Tracheal Epithelium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vajner, L.; Konrádová, V.; Uhlík, J.; Adášková, Jana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 1 (2004), s. 47-54 ISSN 0065-1281 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : fucosylation * tracheal epithelium * lectin histochemistry * methylxanthines * rabbits Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.895, year: 2004

  8. Lethal infection by a novel reassortant H5N1 avian influenza A virus in a zoo-housed tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shang; Shi, Jianzhong; Qi, Xian; Huang, Guoqing; Chen, Hualan; Lu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) in a zoo died of respiratory distress. All specimens from the tiger were positive for HPAI H5N1, which were detected by real-time PCR, including nose swab, throat swab, tracheal swab, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, aquae pericardii and cerebrospinal fluid. One stain of virus, A/Tiger/JS/1/2013, was isolated from the lung sample. Pathogenicity experiments showed that the isolate was able to replicate and cause death in mice. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that HA and NA of A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 clustered with A/duck/Vietnam/OIE-2202/2012 (H5N1), which belongs to clade 2.3.2.1. Interestingly, the gene segment PB2 shared 98% homology with A/wild duck/Korea/CSM-28/20/2010 (H4N6), which suggested that A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 is a novel reassortant H5N1 subtype virus. Immunohistochemical analysis also confirmed that the tiger was infected by this new reassortant HPAI H5N1 virus. Overall, our results showed that this Bengal tiger was infected by a novel reassortant H5N1, suggesting that the H5N1 virus can successfully cross species barriers from avian to mammal through reassortment. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. 2 original article non-attenuation of highly pathogenic avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    Ularamu, H. G1., Ponman, S1 and Nwagbo, I2., 1 FAO Regional Laboratory for Avian Influenza and Newcastle. Disease (West and Central ... Avian influenza H5N1 represents one of the most researched viruses in laboratories world-wide in recent times with regards ..... Cayouette B. Kinetics of ultra- violet light inactivation of.

  10. High prevalence of avian malaria infection to avifauna at Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation was undertaken during January and February 2004, to determine the epidemiological risk of avian malaria infection to seabirds at the proposed marine animal rehabilitation complex, to be sited at Cape Receife. Despite low numbers of mosquitoes trapped, the incidence of avian malaria infections was ...

  11. Genetic differences between avian and human isolates of Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2009-09-01

    When Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from seabird excrement and from humans in Ireland were compared by using multilocus sequence typing, 13 of 14 avian isolates were genetically distinct from human isolates. The remaining avian isolate was indistinguishable from a human isolate, suggesting that transmission may occur between humans and birds.

  12. Avian fossils from the Early Miocene Moghra Formation of Egypt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian remains from the Early Miocene (~17 Ma) Moghra Formation of Egypt include new records of 'waterbirds' (storks, herons, pelicans and allies) and a ratite. Only a single avian fossil has been previously reported from Wadi Moghra and, thus, additional knowledge of the avifauna complements previously documented ...

  13. Avian influenza, Newcastle and Gumboro disease antibodies and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on avian influenza and Newcastle disease focus on waterfowls, considered natural reservoirs of these viruses. This study surveyed avian influenza (AI), Gumboro and Newcastle disease antibodies and antigens in birds in live wild bird markets (LWBMs), live poultry markets (LPMs) and free flying in Kaduna State ...

  14. Flock-based surveillance for lowpathogenic avian influenza virus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flock-based surveillance for lowpathogenic avian influenza virus in commercial breeders and layers, southwest Nigeria. ... African Journal of Infectious Diseases ... Background: Flock surveillance systems for avian influenza (AI) virus play a critical role in countries where vaccination is not practiced so as to establish the ...

  15. Avian nestling predation by endangered Mount Graham red squirrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire A. Zugmeyer; John L. Koprowski

    2007-01-01

    Studies using artificial nests or remote cameras have documented avian predation by red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Although several direct observations of avian predation events are known in the northern range of the red squirrel distribution, no accounts have been reported in the southern portion. We observed predation upon a hermit thrush...

  16. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  17. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  18. Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  19. Avian research in the U.S. Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrice Van Horne

    2005-01-01

    Avian research in the Federal Government is in a crisis. Yes, there is a strong interest in avian research, as evidenced by the size and level of interest in this conference. But political parties increasingly see wildlife research as expendable. At the same time, the reaction to environment-friendly legislation of the 1970s and 1980s has been strong from both sides....

  20. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin-19

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study describes the cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin (IL)-19, a cytokine that, in mammals, alters the balance of Th1 and Th2 cells in favor of the Th2 phenotype. The full-length avian IL-19 gene, located on chromosome 26, was amplified from LPS-stimulated chi...

  1. Socioeconomic Impacts of Avian Influenza on Small and Backyard ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and compensation schemes are more difficult to enforce than in large commercial poultry farms. Moreover, small and backyard farmers have fewer reserves to cope with the financial impact of avian influenza and, possibly, greater motivation to circumvent government control measures. The Asian Partnership for Avian ...

  2. Ontogeny of avian thermoregulation from a neural point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarendse, P.J.J.; Debonne, M.; Decuypere, M.P.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2007-01-01

    The ontogeny of thermoregulation differs among (avian) species, but in all species both neural and endocrinological processes are involved. In this review the neural processes in ontogeny of thermoregulation during the prenatal and early postnatal phase are discussed. Only in a few avian species

  3. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate. 113.70 Section 113.70 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  4. Detection of avian nephritis virus and chicken astrovirus in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV) and chicken astrovirus (CAstV) are widely distributed in poultry flocks worldwide, causing growth retardation. However, these avian astroviruses have not been previously diagnosed in poultry species in Nigeria. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRTPCR) and reverse ...

  5. Nanostructures for the development of vaccines against avian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... Photo: IDRC / Sven Torfinn. The impact of avian influenza. The livelihoods of smallholder farmers, who most frequently own poultry have been severely impacted by recent outbreaks of avian influenza (AI). The severity of the disease can range from mild to extremely severe cases with up to a 100% mortality ...

  6. Strategies to prevent ventilation-associated pneumonia: the effect of cuff pressure monitoring techniques and tracheal tube type on aspiration of subglottic secretions: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eleanor L; Duguid, Alasdair; Ercole, Ari; Matta, Basil; Burnstein, Rowan M; Veenith, Tonny

    2014-03-01

    Ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the commonest nosocomial infection in intensive care. Implementation of a VAP prevention care bundle is a proven method to reduce its incidence. The UK care bundle recommends maintenance of the tracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 to 30  cmH₂O with 4-hourly pressure checks and use of tracheal tubes with subglottic aspiration ports in patients admitted for more than 72  h. To evaluate the effects of tracheal tube type and cuff pressure monitoring technique on leakage of subglottic secretions past the tracheal tube cuff. Bench-top study. Laboratory. A model adult trachea with simulated subglottic secretions was intubated with a tracheal tube with the cuff inflated to 25  cmH₂O. Experiments were conducted using a Portex Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube with three cuff pressure monitoring strategies and using a Portex SACETT tracheal tube with intermittent cuff pressure checks. Rate of simulated secretion leakage past the tracheal tube cuff. Mean ± SD leakage of fluid past the Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube cuff was 2.25 ± 1.49  ml  min⁻¹ with no monitoring of cuff pressure, 2.98 ± 1.63  ml  min⁻¹ with intermittent cuff pressure monitoring and 3.83 ± 2.17  ml  min⁻¹ with continuous cuff pressure monitoring (P aspiration port and aspirating the simulated secretions prior to intermittent cuff pressure checks reduced the leakage rate to 0.50 ± 0.48  ml  min⁻¹ (P aspiration port. Further evaluation of medical device performance is needed in order to design more effective VAP prevention strategies.

  7. Impact of tracheal cuff shape on microaspiration of gastric contents in intubated critically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillette, Emmanuelle; Brunin, Guillaume; Girault, Christophe; Zerimech, Farid; Chiche, Arnaud; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Fayolle, Cyril; Minacori, Franck; Alves, Isabelle; Barrailler, Stephanie; Robriquet, Laurent; Tamion, Fabienne; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Thellier, Damien; Delcourte, Claire; Duhamel, Alain; Nseir, Saad

    2015-09-25

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common infection in intubated critically ill patients. Microaspiration of the contaminated gastric and oropharyngeal secretions is the main mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of VAP. Tracheal cuff plays an important role in stopping the progression of contaminated secretions into the lower respiratory tract. Previous in vitro studies suggested that conical cuff shape might be helpful in improving tracheal sealing. However, clinical studies found conflicting results. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of conical tracheal cuff shape on the microaspiration of gastric contents in critically ill patients. This prospective cluster randomized controlled crossover open-label trial is currently being conducted in ten French intensive care units (ICUs). Patients are allocated to intubation with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) standard (barrel)-shaped or a PVC conical-shaped tracheal tube. The primary objective is to determine the impact of the conical shaped tracheal cuff on abundant microaspiration of gastric contents. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of microaspiration of oropharyngeal secretions, tracheobronchial colonization, VAP and ventilator-associated events. Abundant microaspiration is defined as the presence of pepsin at significant level (>200 ng/ml) in at least 30 % of the tracheal aspirates. Pepsin and amylase are quantitatively measured in all tracheal aspirates during the 48 h following inclusion. Quantitative tracheal aspirate culture is performed at inclusion and twice weekly. We plan to recruit 312 patients in the participating ICUs. BEST Cuff is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of PVC tracheal-cuff shape on gastric microaspirations in patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. Enrollment began in June 2014 and is expected to end in October 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01948635 (registered 31 August 2013).

  8. Paired inspiratory/expiratory spiral CT and continuous respiration cine CT in the diagnosis of tracheal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussel, C.P.; Schreiber, W.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Hafner, B.; Lill, J.

    2001-01-01

    In tracheo- and bronchomalacia, localisation and determination of collapse is necessary for planning of surgical procedure. We compared inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT, cine CT, bronchoscopy, exemplary cine MR, and evaluated the clinical relevance. Twenty-nine patients (2 follow-ups; mean age 61 years, age range 27-85 years) with suspected or verified tracheal stenosis or collapse (post-tracheotomy: n=17; neoplasm: n=5; other: n=7) underwent paired breath-hold inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT. Forty-five additional cine CT were performed at 1-4 levels (mean 1.5) during continuous respiration (increment 100 ms) to clarify respiratory collapse. The tracheal cross-sectional diameters of both techniques were calculated. Comparison with bronchoscopy, follow-up, and influence upon therapy were evaluated retrospectively. Exemplary comparison with cine MR (8 frames/s) was done in 3 cases. In addition to bronchoscopy, further information concerning localisation, extent, collapse, stability of the tracheal wall, distal portions of the stenosis and extraluminal compressions were obtained. A significantly higher degree and more pathological collapses (>50%) were seen using cine CT (38%) compared with paired spiral CT (13%; degree: p<0.0001; number: p<0.001). The findings changed the further therapeutic procedure in 16 of 29 patients. Further stenoses were excluded and bronchoscopy was verified in another 13 of 29. Temporal resolution of cine CT and cine MR is sufficient; however, spatial resolution of cine MR is inferior. Paired inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT localises tracheal stenoses and demonstrates relevant extraluminal compression. Significantly improved evaluation of respiratory collapse and further information of localised tracheal instability is obtained by cine CT. Cine MR promises more functional information especially due to free choice of imaging plane. (orig.)

  9. Effects of rapamycin on granulation formation in response to centrally doubled coiled stents as a tracheal substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Fujimaki, Shun; Osawa, Mami; Wakai, Toshifumi; Nakaya, Kengo

    2013-12-01

    In experiments involving tracheal wall defects in rabbits, metallic coil stents inevitably induce granulation formation in the defects. We examined the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in granulation formation and examined the effects of rapamycin. The anterior half of the tracheal wall was removed for a longitudinal length of six tracheal rings. Metallic coils were placed into the tracheal lumen through a wall defect. The rabbits were sacrificed two months after undergoing an endoscopic examination, and the granulation tissue in the tracheal defects was removed for a Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analysis. Rapamycin (0.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was administered three times per week intramuscularly. The data were expressed as the relative expression versus the expression of actin. The level of mTOR phosphorylation in the resected trachea was 0.72±0.45, and it significantly increased in the granulation tissue to 11.6±5.2, with concomitant increases in the phosphorylation levels of p70S6K and S6RP in all five rabbits. Although the systemic administration of rapamycin significantly decreased the levels of phosphorylated mTOR to 4.0±2.4 in the five treated rabbits, the clinical outcomes were unsatisfactory. Three of the five treated rabbits exhibited signs of wound complications, and wet granulation tissue that caused respiratory symptoms was found inside and outside of the coils in four rabbits. Although rapamycin effectively reduced the mTOR activity in the granulation tissue, the granulation formation process seemed to be disturbed, most likely owing to the immunosuppressive effects of rapamycin. © 2013.

  10. Endotracheal tubes for critically ill patients: an in vivo analysis of associated tracheal injury, mucociliary clearance, and sealing efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luque, Nestor; Martí, Joan Daniel; Aguilera Xiol, Eli; Di Pasquale, Marta; Giunta, Valeria; Comaru, Talitha; Rigol, Montserrat; Terraneo, Silvia; De Rosa, Francesca; Rinaudo, Mariano; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Peralta Lepe, Rogelio Cesar; Agusti, Carles; Lucena, Carmen; Ferrer, Miguel; Fernández, Laia; Torres, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Improvements in the design of the endotracheal tube (ETT) have been achieved in recent years. We evaluated tracheal injury associated with ETTs with novel high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) cuffs and subglottic secretions aspiration (SSA) and the effects on mucociliary clearance (MCC). Twenty-nine pigs were intubated with ETTs comprising cylindrical or tapered cuffs and made of polyvinylchloride (PVC) or polyurethane. In specific ETTs, SSA was performed every 2 h. Following 76 h of mechanical ventilation, pigs were weaned and extubated. Images of the tracheal wall were recorded before intubation, at extubation, and 24 and 96 h thereafter through a fluorescence bronchoscope. We calculated the red-to-green intensity ratio (R/G), an index of tracheal injury, and the green-plus-blue (G+B) intensity, an index of normalcy, of the most injured tracheal regions. MCC was assessed through fluoroscopic tracking of radiopaque markers. After 96 h from extubation, pigs were killed, and a pathologist scored injury. Cylindrical cuffs presented a smaller increase in R/G vs tapered cuffs (P = .011). Additionally, cuffs made of polyurethane produced a minor increase in R/G (P = .012) and less G+B intensity decline (P = .022) vs PVC cuffs. Particularly, a cuff made of polyurethane and with a smaller outer diameter outperformed all cuffs. SSA-related histologic injury ranged from cilia loss to subepithelial inflammation. MCC was 0.9 ± 1.8 and 0.4 ± 0.9 mm/min for polyurethane and PVC cuffs, respectively (P < .001). HVLP cuffs and SSA produce tracheal injury, and the recovery is incomplete up to 96 h following extubation. Small, cylindrical-shaped cuffs made of polyurethane cause less injury. MCC decline is reduced with polyurethane cuffs.

  11. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  12. Avian mycobacteriosis in companion birds: 20-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarolla, Giovanni; Liandris, Emmanouil; Pisoni, Giuliano; Sassera, Davide; Grilli, Guido; Gallazzi, Daniele; Sironi, Giuseppe; Moroni, Paolo; Piccinini, Renata; Rampin, Tiziana

    2009-02-02

    The causative agents of avian mycobacteriosis in pet birds are rarely identified. The aim of this study is to add information about the etiology of avian mycobacteriosis. The identification of mycobacterium species in 27 cases of avian mycobacteriosis in pet birds was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of a rRNA hypervariable region. Avian mycobacteriosis appeared to be an infrequent diagnosis. Interestingly, a few cases of avian mycobacteriosis were recorded in very young birds. The most commonly affected species were the canary (Serinus canarius), the Eurasian goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and the red siskin (Spinus cucullatus). All but one bird were infected with Mycobacterium genavense. Mycobacterium avium was identified only in one case.

  13. assessment of the economic and social implications of the avian flu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    2006-01-22

    Jan 22, 2006 ... KEYWORDS: Assessment, Economic, Social Implications, Avian Flu, Nigerian Poultry. INTRODUCTION. Avian flu is a highly infectious, contagious and zoonotic disease of man, poultry and other birds caused by the avian influenza type A virus, Emmanuel et.al. (2006). The avian influenza virus belongs to ...

  14. New USDA licensed avian influenza vaccine (rHVT-AI) for protection against H5 avian influenza and usage discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, a new avian influenza vaccine was licensed by USDA for use in the United States for protection of commercial poultry. The vaccine is a recombinant herpes virus of turkeys expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5 subtype avian influenza virus belonging to the 2.2 clade of the H5N1 highly ...

  15. Open Tracheostomy after Aborted Percutaneous Approach due to Tracheoscopy Revealing Occult Tracheal Wall Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Schweiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheostomy is a common procedure for intensive care patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. In this case report, we describe a 78-year-old female patient admitted for an aneurysm of the cerebral anterior communicating artery. Following immediate endovascular coiling, she remained ventilated and was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit. On postoperative day ten, a percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT was requested; however, a large ulcer or possible tracheoesophageal fistula was identified on the posterior tracheal wall following bronchoscopic assessment of the trachea. Therefore, the requested PCT procedure was aborted. An open tracheostomy in the operating room was completed; however, due to the position and depth of the ulcer, a reinforced endotracheal tube (ETT was placed via the tracheostomy. Four days later, the reinforced ETT was replaced with a Shiley distal extended tracheostomy tube to bypass the ulceration. Careful inspection and evaluation of the tracheostomy site before PCT prevented a potentially life-threatening issue in our patient.

  16. Novel use of laryngeal mask airway classic excel™ for bronchoscopy and tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage frequency and scope of supraglottic airway devices in anesthesia has expanded since the original laryngeal mask airway (LMA prototype was invented by Dr Archie Brain in the early 1980s. Today, anesthesiologists are spoilt-for-choice with more than thirty options. The LMA Classic Excel™ was introduced to anesthesia practice in 2009; designed with an epiglottic elevating bar and a removable airway connector to facilitate tracheal intubation using the LMA as a conduit. We present a case report of a women diagnosed with papillary carcinoma of thyroid, who underwent bronchoscopic assessment of the trachea and subsequent intubation for an en-bloc dissection and removal of thyroid gland through the LMA Classic Excel™.

  17. Effect of transoral tracheal wash on respiratory mechanics in dogs with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Meghan E; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; deLaforcade, Armelle M

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a transoral tracheal wash (TOTW) on respiratory mechanics in dogs and to describe the use of a critical care ventilator (CCV) to determine respiratory mechanics. Fourteen client-owned dogs with respiratory diseases were enrolled. Respiratory mechanics, including static compliance (C stat ) and static resistance (R stat ), were determined before and after TOTW. Pre- and post-wash results were compared, with a P -value of mechanics, as observed by a reduction in C stat , presumably due to airway flooding and collapse. While no long-lasting effects were noted in these clinical patients, this effect should be considered when performing TOTW on dogs with respiratory diseases. Respiratory mechanics testing using a CCV was feasible and may be a useful clinical testing approach.

  18. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor.

  19. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Kalai, Umasankar; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop) of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor). PMID:25478275

  20. [Metastatic lung cancer origin from osteosarcoma of mandible invading tracheal lumen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, K; Noriyuki, T; Furonaka, O; Kuroda, Y; Akimoto, E; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Okuda, H; Hashimoto, M; Yonehara, S

    2009-07-01

    A 52-year-old woman underwent the surgical treatment for osteosarcoma of the left mandible in 2003 and was followed up afterward. She suffered from dry cough and bloody sputum, and was admitted to our hospital in April 2007. Computed tomography (CT) revealed several nodules in bilateral lung, and bronchofiberscopy showed the endobronchial tumor obstructing in the right main bronchus. The metastatic tumor progressed in the right main bronchus from the right S6 lung segment. The tumor rapidly progressed in the right bronchus in comparison with the CT findings in about 2 weeks, and the possibility of the tracheal obstruction was considered. She underwent the right middle and lower lobectomy, and the endobronchial tumor was pulled through the right main bronchus. The postoperative course was uneventful, the patient was discharged on 14th postoperative day, and the chemotherapy using cisplatin (CDDP) and adriamycin (ADR) is on-going.